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Sample records for inactivating escherichia coli

  1. Microbial electrolytic disinfection process for highly efficient Escherichia coli inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Xiaohu

    2018-01-01

    extensively studied for recalcitrant organics removal, its application potential towards water disinfection (e.g., inactivation of pathogens) is still unknown. This study investigated the inactivation of Escherichia coli in a microbial electrolysis cell based bio-electro-Fenton system (renamed as microbial...... electrolytic-Fenton cell) with the aim to broad the application of microbial electrochemistry. Results showed that a 4-log reduction of Escherichia coli (107 to hundreds CFU/mL) was achieved with an external applied voltage of 0.2 V, 0.3 mM Fe2+ and cathodic pH of 3.0. However, non-notable inactivation...

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in soil by solarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.; Nishihara, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Matsuura, K.; Koga, T.; Ueno, D.; Inoue, K.; Someya, T.

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of agricultural soil by fecal pathogenic bacteria poses a potential risk of infection to humans. For the biosafety control of field soil, soil solarization in an upland field was examined to determine the efficiency of solarization on the inactivation of Escherichia coli inoculated into soil as a model microorganism for human pathogenic bacteria. Soil solarization, carried out by sprinkling water and covering the soil surface with thin plastic sheets, greatly increased the soil temperature. The daily average temperature of the solarized soil was 4–10°C higher than that of the non-solarized soil and fluctuated between 31 and 38°C. The daily highest temperature reached more than 40°C for 8 days in total in the solarized soil during the second and third weeks of the experiment. Escherichia coli in the solarized soil became undetectable (< 0.08 c.f.u. g −1 dry soil) within 4 weeks as a result, whereas E. coli survived for more than 6 weeks in the non-solarized soil. Soil solarization, however, had little influence on the total direct count and total viable count of bacteria in the soil. These results indicate that soil solarization would be useful for the biosafety control of soil contaminated by human pathogens via immature compost or animal feces. (author)

  3. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  4. Sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli in waste stabilization microcosms in a sahelian region (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïga, Ynoussa; Denyigba, Kokou; Wethe, Joseph; Ouattara, Aboubakar Sidiki

    2009-02-09

    Experiments on sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli were conducted from November 2006 to June 2007 in eight outdoors microcosms with different depths filled with maturation pond wastewater in order to determine pond depth influence on sunlight inactivation of E. coli. The long-term aim was to maximize sunlight inactivation of waterborne pathogens in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) in sahelian regions where number of sunny days enable longer exposure of wastewater to sunlight. The inactivation was followed during daylight from 8.00 h to 17.00 h and during the night. Sunlight inactivation rates (K(S)), as a function of cumulative global solar radiation (insolation), were 16 and 24 times higher than the corresponding dark inactivation (K(D)) rates, respectively in cold and warm season. In warm season, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly. Inactivation of E. coli follows the evolution of radiation during the day. In shallow depth microcosms, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly than in high depth microcosms. The physical chemical parameters [pH, dissolved oxygen (DO)] of microcosms water were higher in shallow depth microcosms than in high depth microcosms suggesting a synergistic effect of sunlight and these parameters to damage E. coli. To increase the efficiency of the elimination of waterborne bacteria, the use of maturation ponds with intermediate depths (0.4m) would be advisable in view of the high temperatures and thus evaporation recorded in sahelian regions.

  5. Thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli in camel milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela, Shlomo; Pinto, Riky; Merin, Uzi; Rosen, Baruch

    2003-09-01

    Camels subsist and produce milk in desert pastures not utilized by other domesticated herbivores. Developing the camel milk industry can improve the economy of desert inhabitants. To comply with sanitary ordinances, camel milk is pasteurized by procedures specified for bovine milk. It is widely accepted that milk composition might affect bacterial thermal death time (TDT). Camel and bovine milks markedly differ in their chemical composition, yet data regarding TDT values of bacteria in camel milk is missing. As a first step toward developing specific heat treatments appropriate for camel milk, TDT curves of Escherichia coli in artificially contaminated camel and cow milks have been compared. Heating the milks to temperatures ranging from 58 to 65 degrees C yields similar thermal death curves and derived D- and z-values. These findings suggest that, in this temperature range, E. coli might behave similarly in bovine and camel milk. Additional TDT studies of various pathogenic species in camel milk are required before establishing pasteurization conditions of camel milk.

  6. Mechanisms of Inactivation of Dry Escherichia coli by High-Pressure Carbon Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan Yao; Temelli, Feral; Gänzle, Michael G

    2017-05-15

    High-pressure carbon dioxide processing is a promising technology for nonthermal food preservation. However, few studies have determined the lethality of high-pressure CO 2 on dry bacterial cells, and the mechanism of inactivation remains unknown. This study explored the mechanisms of inactivation by using Escherichia coli AW1.7 and mutant strains differing in heat and acid resistance, in membrane composition based on disruption of the locus of heat resistance, and in genes coding for glutamate decarboxylases and cyclopropane fatty acid synthase. The levels of lethality of treatments with liquid, gaseous, and supercritical CO 2 were compared. The cell counts of E. coli AW1.7 and mutants with a water activity (a W ) of 1.0 were reduced by more than 3 log 10 (CFU/ml) after supercritical CO 2 treatment at 35°C for 15 min; increasing the pressure generally enhanced inactivation, except for E. coli AW1.7 Δ gadAB E. coli AW1.7 Δ cfa was more susceptible than E. coli AW1.7 after treatment at 10 and 40 MPa; other mutations did not affect survival. Dry cells of E. coli were resistant to treatments with supercritical and liquid CO 2 at any temperature. Treatments with gaseous CO 2 at 65°C were more bactericidal than those with supercritical CO 2 or treatments at 65°C only. Remarkably, E. coli AW1.7 was more susceptible than E. coli AW1.7 Δ cfa when subjected to the gaseous CO 2 treatment. This study identified CO 2 -induced membrane fluidization and permeabilization as causes of supercritical mediated microbial inactivation, and diffusivity was a dominant factor for gaseous CO 2 IMPORTANCE The safety of dry foods is of increasing concern for public health. Desiccated microorganisms, including pathogens, remain viable over long periods of storage and generally tolerate environmental insults that are lethal to the same organisms at high water activity. This study explored the use of high-pressure carbon dioxide to determine its lethality for dried Escherichia coli and to

  7. Polyelectrolyte-Functionalized Nanofiber Mats Control the Collection and Inactivation of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Katrina A.; Porter, Michael; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the effect that nanofiber mat chemistry and hydrophilicity have on microorganism collection and inactivation is critical in biomedical applications. In this study, the collection and inactivation of Escherichia coli K12 was examined using cellulose nanofiber mats that were surface-functionalized using three polyelectrolytes: poly (acrylic acid) (PAA), chitosan (CS), and polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (pDADMAC). The polyelectrolyte functionalized nanofiber mats retained the cylindrical morphology and average fiber diameter (~0.84 µm) of the underlying cellulose nanofibers. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements confirmed the presence of polycations or polyanions on the surface of the nanofiber mats. Both the control cellulose and pDADMAC-functionalized nanofiber mats exhibited a high collection of E. coli K12, which suggests that mat hydrophilicity may play a larger role than surface charge on cell collection. While the minimum concentration of polycations needed to inhibit E. coli K12 was 800 µg/mL for both CS and pDADMAC, once immobilized, pDADMAC-functionalized nanofiber mats exhibited a higher inactivation of E. coli K12, (~97%). Here, we demonstrate that the collection and inactivation of microorganisms by electrospun cellulose nanofiber mats can be tailored through a facile polyelectrolyte functionalization process. PMID:28773422

  8. Cross-protection between controlled acid-adaptation and thermal inactivation for 48 Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberbeck, Leticia Ungaretti; Wang, Xiang; Michiels, Chris; Devlieghere, Frank; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Geeraerd, Annemie H

    2017-01-16

    Given the importance of pH reduction and thermal treatment in food processing and food preservation strategies, the cross-protection between acid adaptation and subsequent thermal inactivation for 48 Escherichia coli strains was investigated. Those strains were selected among 188 E. coli strains according to their odds of growth under low pH conditions as determined by Haberbeck et al. (2015) [Haberbeck, L.U., Oliveira, R.C., Vivijs, B., Wenseleers, T., Aertsen, A., Michiels, C., Geeraerd, A.H., 2015. Variability in growth/no growth boundaries of 188 different Escherichia coli strains reveals that approximately 75% have a higher growth probability under low pH conditions than E. coli O157:H7 strain ATCC 43888. Food Microbiol. 45, 222-230]. E. coli cells were acid and nonacid-adapted during overnight growth in controlled acidic pH (5.5) and neutral pH (7.0), respectively, in buffered Lysogenic Broth (LB). Then, they were heat inactivated at 58°C in non-buffered LB adjusted to pH6.2 and 7.0. Thus, four conditions were tested in total by combining the different pH values during growth/thermal inactivation: 5.5/6.2, 5.5/7.0, 7.0/6.2 and 7.0/7.0. Acid adaptation in buffered LB at pH5.5 increased the heat resistance of E. coli strains in comparison with nonacid-adaptation at pH7.0. For instance, the median D 58 -value of strains inactivated at pH7.0 was approximately 6 and 4min for acid-adapted and nonacid-adapted strains, respectively. For the nonacid-adapted strains, the thermal inactivation at pH6.2 and 7.0 was not significantly (p=0.06) different, while for the acid-adapted strains, the thermal treatment at pH6.2 showed a higher heat resistance than at pH7.0. The correlation between the odds of growth under low pH previously determined and the heat resistance was significant (pcoli O157:H7 (ATCC 43888) showed D 58 -values between 1.2 and 3.1min. In summary, results clearly showed that adaptation of E. coli cells to constant acidic pH results in cross

  9. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Endotoxin by Soft Hydrothermal Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toru; Okano, Shinya; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharides, are a fever-producing by-product of gram-negative bacteria commonly known as pyrogens. It is essential to remove endotoxins from parenteral preparations since they have multiple injurious biological activities. Because of their strong heat resistance (e.g., requiring dry-heat sterilization at 250°C for 30 min) and the formation of various supramolecular aggregates, depyrogenation is more difficult than sterilization. We report here that soft hydrothermal processing, which has many advantages in safety and cost efficiency, is sufficient to assure complete depyrogenation by the inactivation of endotoxins. The endotoxin concentration in a sample was measured by using a chromogenic limulus method with an endotoxin-specific limulus reagent. The endotoxin concentration was calculated from a standard curve obtained using a serial dilution of a standard solution. We show that endotoxins were completely inactivated by soft hydrothermal processing at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system. Moreover, it is easy to remove endotoxins from water by soft hydrothermal processing similarly at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min, without any requirement for ultrafiltration, nonselective adsorption with a hydrophobic adsorbent, or an anion exchanger. These findings indicate that soft hydrothermal processing, applied in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system, can inactivate endotoxins and may be useful for the depyrogenation of parenterals, including end products and medical devices that cannot be exposed to the high temperatures of dry heat treatments. PMID:19502435

  10. Inactivation and injury assessment of Escherichia coli during solar and photocatalytic disinfection in LDPE bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, P S M; Ciavola, M; Rizzo, L; Byrne, J A

    2011-11-01

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) of Escherichia coli suspensions in low-density polyethylene bag reactors was investigated as a low-cost disinfection method suitable for application in developing countries. The efficiency of a range of SODIS reactor configurations was examined (single skin (SS), double skin, black-backed single skin, silver-backed single skin (SBSS) and composite-backed single skin) using E. coli suspended in model and real surface water. Titanium dioxide was added to the reactors to improve the efficiency of the SODIS process. The effect of turbidity was also assessed. In addition to viable counts, E. coli injury was characterised through spread-plate analysis using selective and non-selective media. The optimal reactor configuration was determined to be the SBSS bag (t(50)=9.0min) demonstrating the importance of UVA photons, as opposed to infrared in the SODIS disinfection mechanism. Complete inactivation (6.5-log) was achieved in the presence of turbidity (50NTU) using the SBSS bag within 180min simulated solar exposure. The addition of titanium dioxide (0.025gL(-1)) significantly enhanced E. coli inactivation in the SS reactor, with 6-log inactivation observed within 90min simulated solar exposure. During the early stages of both SODIS and photocatalytic disinfection, injured E. coli were detected; however, irreversible injury was caused and re-growth was not observed. Experiments under solar conditions were undertaken with total inactivation (6.5-log) observed in the SS reactor within 240min, incomplete inactivation (4-log) was observed in SODIS bottles exposed to the same solar conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by essential oil from Cinnamomum zeylanicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafae Senhaji

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a pathogen strain, which causes hemorrhagic colitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in humans. The control of bacterial cells in foods is an important factor to reduce foodborne diseases due to E. coli O157:H7. Assays to inactivate E. coli O157:H7 were carried out by using the cinnamon oil obtained by steam distillation for 6 hours. When E. coli O157:H7 cells were incubated at 37°C for 2 hours in the presence of 0.025% of the essential oil from cinnamon, a dramatic decrease was observed in the viable counts (from 10(7 to 3.10(4 CFU/mL-1. In the presence of 0.05% of the oil, most of cells were killed after 30 min, suggesting that the antimicrobial activity of essential oil is bactericidal against E. coli. The minimal inhibitory concentration of the essential oil from cinnamon was around 625 ppm against E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli ATCC 25921, around 1250 ppm against E. coli ATCC25922 and around 2500 ppm against E. coli ATCC11105.

  12. Effect of incubation temperatures for inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria after gamma-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakauma, Makoto; Ito, Hitoshi; Tada, Mikiro

    2000-01-01

    Irradiated fresh meat or fishery products have been expected to store and distribute under refrigerated temperature below 10degC. From previous reports, growth of coliform bacteria in these products were suppressed by gamma-irradiation below expected doses obtained at 30-37degC. This research was performed to observe the irradiation effect on the inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria at different incubation temperatures of 10-40degC on plate agar after irradiation. From this study, D10 values of all strains decreased 17- 45% at 10degC compared with maximum D10 values at 30- 40degC. Radiation sensitivities were related to the ability to grow at low temperatures in which psychrotrophic type E. coli A4-1 indicated most sensitive to radiation, next of Salmonella enteritidis YK-2, E. coli S2, B4 whereas most resistant at Enterobacter agglomerans K3-1. (author)

  13. Effect of incubation temperatures for inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria after gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakauma, Makoto; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Tada, Mikiro [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    2000-09-01

    Irradiated fresh meat or fishery products have been expected to store and distribute under refrigerated temperature below 10degC. From previous reports, growth of coliform bacteria in these products were suppressed by gamma-irradiation below expected doses obtained at 30-37degC. This research was performed to observe the irradiation effect on the inactivation of Escherichia coli and related bacteria at different incubation temperatures of 10-40degC on plate agar after irradiation. From this study, D10 values of all strains decreased 17- 45% at 10degC compared with maximum D10 values at 30- 40degC. Radiation sensitivities were related to the ability to grow at low temperatures in which psychrotrophic type E. coli A4-1 indicated most sensitive to radiation, next of Salmonella enteritidis YK-2, E. coli S2, B4 whereas most resistant at Enterobacter agglomerans K3-1. (author)

  14. Evaluation of technetium-99m decay on Escherichia coli inactivation: effects of physical or chemical agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, C. R.; Valsa, J. O.; Caniné, M. S.; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1998-01-01

    Technetium-99m (99mTc) has been used in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research to label molecular and cellular structures employed as radiotracers. Here, we have evaluated, on a DNA repair proficient Escherichia coli strain, the 99mTc decay inactivation and the influence of the (i) pre-treatment with metal ion chelators or of the (ii) treatment with a free radical scavenger on the protection of the cells against the lethal effect of the 99mTc. As SnCl2 is frequently used as a reducing ag...

  15. Sunlight mediated inactivation mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli in clear water versus waste stabilization pond water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Khalid; Nelson, Kara L

    2014-03-01

    Escherichia coli and enterococci have been previously reported to differ in the mechanisms and conditions that affect their sunlight-mediated inactivation in waste stabilization ponds. This study was undertaken to further characterize these mechanisms, using simulated sunlight and single strains of laboratory-grown E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis, with a focus on characterizing the contribution of exogenous reactive oxygen species to the inactivation process. We found that direct damage by UVB light (280-320 nm) was not a significant inactivation mechanism for either organism. E. coli inactivation was strongly dependent on dissolved oxygen concentrations and the presence of UVB wavelengths but E. coli were not susceptible to inactivation by exogenous sensitizers present in waste stabilization pond water. In contrast, E. faecalis inactivation in pond water occurred primarily through exogenous mechanisms, with strong evidence that singlet oxygen is an important transient reactive species. The exogenous mechanism could utilize wavelengths into the visible spectrum and sensitizers were mainly colloidal, distributed between 0.2 and ∼1 μm in size. Singlet oxygen is likely an important endogenous species in both E. faecalis and E. coli inactivation due to sunlight. Although the two organisms had similar inactivation rates in buffered, clear water, the inactivation rate of E. faecalis was 7 times greater than that of E. coli in air-saturated pond water at circumneutral pH due to its susceptibility to exogenous sensitizers and longer wavelengths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Solution by Atmospheric-Pressure N2, He, Air, and O2 Microplasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhang, Xianhui; Bi, Zhenhua; Zong, Zichao; Niu, Jinhai; Song, Ying; Liu, Dongping; Yang, Size

    2015-08-01

    Atmospheric-pressure N2, He, air, and O2 microplasma arrays have been used to inactivate Escherichia coli cells suspended in aqueous solution. Measurements show that the efficiency of inactivation of E. coli cells is strongly dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2 and He microplasma arrays, air and O2 microplasma arrays may be utilized to more efficiently kill E. coli cells in aqueous solution. The efficiencies of inactivation of E. coli cells in water can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model, where reactive oxygen species play a crucial role in the inactivation process. Analysis indicates that plasma-generated reactive species can react with E. coli cells in water by direct or indirect interactions. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Reactivation in UV inactivated Escherichia coli by cell-free extracts of propionic acid bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorob'eva, L.I.; Nikitenko, G.V.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    For the first time reactivation of cell extraction of three strains of Propionibacterium shermanii in UV inactivated not filament-forming strain Escherichia colli AB 1157 is shown. Reactivation was demonstrated in prencubated and postincubated test-culture and increased as survival of E.coli decreased in a range 1,8-0,006%. The factor (factores) of defense in dialysable, thermolable and is present as in a fraction of nucleoproteins and nucleic acids so in a fraction of soluble proteins. The extracts were inactivated by incubation with proteinase K and trypsin, partly decreased activity by incubation with alpha-amylase and selected nuclease but not with lipase. Polypeltide nature of reactivative factor is supposed

  18. Reversible inactivation of vectorial phosphorylation by hydroxybutynoate in Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowski, G; Kaback, H R; Walsh, C

    1975-08-26

    The acetylenic hydroxy acid 2-hydroxy-3-butynoate causes irreversible inactivation of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound flavoenzyme D-lactic dehyrogenase, and thus blocks D-lactate dependent active transport in isolated membrane vesicles [Walsh, C. T., Abeles, R. H., and Kaback H. R. (1972), J. Biol. Chem. 247, 7858]. The inactivator is a suicide substrate for the dehydrogenase, undergoing a small number of turnovers before partitioning between oxidation and inactiviation. It is now demonstrated that reactive product molecules of 2-keto-3-butynoate can diffuse in the membranes to a component of the phosphotransferase system and cause time-dependent and covalent inactivation of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent hexose uptake. Membrane vesicles from double mutants with low levels of both D- and L-lactic dehydrogenase lose only 30 percent of their hexose uptake capacity on exposure to hydroxybutynoate under conditions sufficient to fully inactivate hexose transport in wild type vesicles. Transport of 1-[14C]hydroxybutynoate into vesicles is followed by rapid covalent labeling of membrane proteins by the reactive, enzymatically generating keto acid oxidation product. Incubation of hydroxybutynoate-inactivated vesicles (5% residual activity) for 20 min in buffer with 10 mM dithiothreitol results in reactivation of 63% of the hexose transport activity, a 12-fold increase in activity. No reactivation occurs if the vesicular phosphotransferase system is inactivated by keto acid derived from membrane oxidation of the olefinic congener 2-hydroxy-3-butenoate. In contrast to thiol reactivation of acetylenic-blocked glucose transport, blockage of D-lactate-stimulated proline uptake is not alleviated, stressing different modes of inactivation of the phosphotransferase system compared to the membranous lactate dehydrogenases.

  19. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  20. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing.

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 using ultraviolet light-treated bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J A; Billington, C; Premaratne, A; On, S L W

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes serious foodborne infections warranting the development of effective control measures. One control option is to use bacteriophages (phages), which are regarded as safe to humans and an environmentally friendly alternative to chemical antimicrobials. One of the few remaining safety concerns is the potential for phages to facilitate genetic exchange between bacteria so resulting in undesirable mobilisation of genes. UV treatment of phages causes a rapid loss in their ability to replicate, while maintaining their antibacterial activity, and so the use of UV-treated phages could be an alternative to the use of viable phages. Data presented here show the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 by UV-treated phages in milk and on the surface of raw and cooked meat. A minimum concentration of approximately 10(5) PFU cm(-2) (pre-UV treatment titre) of UV-treated phages was required before inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface of meat was measurable, and 1-2 log10 CFU cm(-2) reductions were typically obtained at concentrations of around 10(7) UV-treated phages cm(-2) (pre-UV treatment titre). Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 by UV-treated phages was less than that for untreated phages. The production of UV-treated phages was not optimised and it is possible that better reductions in pathogen concentration could be achieved for the same input UV-treated phages concentrations. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. UV inactivation and photoreactivation of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli; Geri gen sei daichokin no shigaisen ni yoru fukatsuka to hikari kaifuku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, K.; Hirata, T.; Chikuma, D.; Fukuyama, M. [Azabu Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Furuhata, K. [Tokyo Metropolitan Research Lab of Public Health (Japan)

    1997-09-10

    UV inactivation and photoreactivation of 14 strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were investigated. The doses of UV light required for 90% and 99% inactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli ranged from 0.1 to 7.1mW{center_dot}sec{center_dot}cm{sup -2} and from 0.2 to 9.8mWcentre dotsec{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, respectively. Photoreactivation with visible light was observed in O26 (FK10, FK11), enteroinvasive (EIEC) O124 and O152, enteropathogenic (EPEC) O55, and enterotoxicogenic (ETEC) O6, O25 (FK20), and O25 (FK21) Escherichia coli. No photoreactivation was observed in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7, EIEC O167, EPEC O44, O142, O127, and ETEC O6:H16. Entreopathogenic Escherichia coli which has photoreactivation property showed only about 1.5 to 4 log inactivation by UV light even after photo reactivation. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Oxidative stress inactivates cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise R Hondorp

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In nature, Escherichia coli are exposed to harsh and non-ideal growth environments-nutrients may be limiting, and cells are often challenged by oxidative stress. For E. coli cells confronting these realities, there appears to be a link between oxidative stress, methionine availability, and the enzyme that catalyzes the final step of methionine biosynthesis, cobalamin-independent methionine synthase (MetE. We found that E. coli cells subjected to transient oxidative stress during growth in minimal medium develop a methionine auxotrophy, which can be traced to an effect on MetE. Further experiments demonstrated that the purified enzyme is inactivated by oxidized glutathione (GSSG at a rate that correlates with protein oxidation. The unique site of oxidation was identified by selectively cleaving N-terminally to each reduced cysteine and analyzing the results by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Stoichiometric glutathionylation of MetE by GSSG occurs at cysteine 645, which is strategically located at the entrance to the active site. Direct evidence of MetE oxidation in vivo was obtained from thiol-trapping experiments in two different E. coli strains that contain highly oxidizing cytoplasmic environments. Moreover, MetE is completely oxidized in wild-type E. coli treated with the thiol-oxidizing agent diamide; reduced enzyme reappears just prior to the cells resuming normal growth. We argue that for E. coli experiencing oxidizing conditions in minimal medium, MetE is readily inactivated, resulting in cellular methionine limitation. Glutathionylation of the protein provides a strategy to modulate in vivo activity of the enzyme while protecting the active site from further damage, in an easily reversible manner. While glutathionylation of proteins is a fairly common mode of redox regulation in eukaryotes, very few proteins in E. coli are known to be modified in this manner. Our results are complementary to the independent findings of Leichert

  4. Effect of Ozone Treatment on Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria sp. on Spinach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreya Wani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of “gaseous” ozone in reducing numbers and re-growth of food-borne pathogens, (Escherichia coli and Listeria spp., on leafy salads was investigated using spinach. A preliminary in vivo study showed 1-log reduction in six strains of E. coli and two species of Listeria spp. on spinach exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 10 min. A range of ozone treatments were explored to deliver optimal bacterial inactivation while maintaining the visual appearance (color of produce. Exposure to a higher ozone concentration for a shorter duration (10 ppm for 2 min significantly reduced E. coli and Listeria spp. viable counts by 1-log and the pathogens did not re-grow following treatment (over a nine-day storage period. Impacts of 1 and 10 ppm ozone treatments were not significantly different. Approximately 10% of the pathogen population was resistant to ozone treatment. We hypothesized that cell age may be one of several factors responsible for variation in ozone resistance. E. coli cells from older colonies demonstrated higher ozone resistance in subsequent experiments. Overall, we speculate that gaseous ozone treatment constitutes the basis for an alternative customer-friendly method to reduce food pathogen contamination of leafy produce and is worth exploring on a pilot-scale in an industrial setting.

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by ozone under bench-scale plug flow and full-scale hydraulic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, P W M H; van der Helm, A W C; Dullemont, Y J; Rietveld, L C; van Dijk, J C; Medema, G J

    2006-10-01

    To determine the disinfection efficacy of ozonation, water companies can apply several disinfection calculation methods. The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of the T10 and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) method to extrapolate inactivation rates of ozone sensitive microorganisms observed in laboratory tests to full-scale ozonation in drinking water treatment. The inactivation efficacy of the ozonation at the Amsterdam water treatment works was assessed by determining Escherichia coli concentrations in large volume samples before and after ozonation over a period of 1 year. The inactivation of dosed E. coli WR1 was tested in a bench-scale dissolved ozone plug flow reactor (DOPFR) on the same feed water as the full-scale ozonation in which a concentrated ozone solution in Milli-Q water was dosed. Applying the T10 method on the inactivation rates observed in the DOPFR strongly overestimated the inactivation capacity of the full-scale ozonation. The expected inactivation based on the CSTR method (LT2ESWTR) approached the observed inactivation at full-scale. Therefore, the CSTR method should be preferred to calculate inactivation of ozone sensitive organisms such as E. coli, viruses, Giardia and Campylobacter by full-scale ozonation.

  6. Effects of single and combined use of bacteriophages and antibiotics to inactivate Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valério, Nádia; Oliveira, Cristiana; Jesus, Vânia; Branco, Tatiana; Pereira, Carla; Moreirinha, Catarina; Almeida, Adelaide

    2017-08-15

    A major concern of phage therapy is the emergency of phage-resistant mutants. This limitation can be overcome by the combined use of phages and antibiotics. It has been shown that the combination of antibiotics and phages is an alternative that cannot only be effective at reducing bacterial numbers, but also to contribute to the management of resistance levels. However, this view has only been discussed with regard to antibiotic resistance and not to control phage-mutant emergence. In our study we compared not only the resistance of the bacteria to the four antibiotics tested with and without phages addition, but also the resistance to the phages in the presence and absence of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential synergistic effect of phages and antibiotics in the inactivation of Escherichia coli in order to control infections, namely urinary tract infection (UTI), and to reduce the development of bacterial resistance to phages. Phage therapy combined with antibiotics (ampicillin, piperacillin, kamanycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin) was evaluated in the inactivation of E. coli, both in saline solution and urine samples. Phage and antibiotic combinations could result in high synergistic effects in the inactivation of bacteria. The combination of phage and ciprofloxacin at sublethal concentration decreased the bacterial counts in urine samples by 7.8±0.1 log CFU/ml after 8h, but when phages or the antibiotic were tested alone, the decrease was of 3.9±0.3 log CFU/mL and 1.2±0.1 log CFU/mL, respectively, after the same time. The efficacy of the combination of the two therapies depends on the antibiotic resistance status of the targeted bacteria to the employed antibiotic and of the antibiotic type (bactericide or bacteriostatic), causing the same or less bacterial resistance than phages and antibiotics applied alone (1.2±1.0×10 -5 to 2.4±1.5×10 -7 CFU/mL for the combined treatment, 2.7±0.2×10 -4 CFU/mL for the

  7. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by superoxide radicals and their dismutation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Meuling, W.J.A.

    1977-01-01

    E. coli cells are inactivated by the products of the reaction between dialuric acid and oxygen, of which the primary product is superoxide. The rate of inactivation is decreased by superoxide dismutase, by catalase, and by EDTA, whereas it is increased by addition of cupric ions or hydrogen

  8. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in hamburgers by gamma irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Chirinos, Rodolfo R.O.; Vizeu, Dirceu M.; Destro, Maria Teresa; Franco, Bernadette D.G.M.; Landgraf, Mariza

    2002-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening complications like haemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura. Among foods associated with outbreaks caused by this pathogen, hamburger is the most common one. The aim of this research was to determine the radiation dose to reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 in hamburgers to non-detectable levels in order to render a safer product. Hamburgers, inoculated with Escherichia c...

  9. Characteristics of the inactivation of Escherichia coli by infrared irradiative heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, Jun; Isomura, Yasuhiko; Honma, Takayuki; Kenmochi, Hajime

    2006-06-01

    The inactivation of Escherichia coil by infrared (IR) irradiation was quantitatively evaluated and compared to that by thermal conductive heating. After the bulk temperature of the sterile saline irradiated by IR reached a steady given temperature, the E. coil culture was inoculated and IR heating was conducted. A mullite cylinder FIR heater, of which main wavelength is 4-7 microm, was used for IR heating. The killing of the E. coil by IR heating and thermal conductive heating both followed first-order reaction kinetics, and the apparent death rate constants (k) under different conditions were obtained. At the same temperatures, pasteurization by IR heating was more effective than that by thermal conductive heating, and its effectiveness increased with a decrease in liquid layer thickness. The values of k due to IR heating were approximately 2-3 times and one order larger than those due to thermal conductive heating at the liquid layer thickness of 10 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively. The activation energy (Ea) for the killing of E. coli by IR irradiation was slightly lower than that by thermal conductive heating, indicating that there are some differences in the action mechanisms.

  10. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+)-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueca, Beatriz; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    (+)-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+)-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme), or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation), thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers) was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage) was more sensitive to (+)-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+)-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+)-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+)-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+)-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the controversy about

  11. Combination of microsecond and nanosecond pulsed electric field treatments for inactivation of Escherichia coli in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žgalin, Maj Kobe; Hodžić, Duša; Reberšek, Matej; Kandušer, Maša

    2012-10-01

    Inactivation of microorganisms with pulsed electric fields is one of the nonthermal methods most commonly used in biotechnological applications such as liquid food pasteurization and water treatment. In this study, the effects of microsecond and nanosecond pulses on inactivation of Escherichia coli in distilled water were investigated. Bacterial colonies were counted on agar plates, and the count was expressed as colony-forming units per milliliter of bacterial suspension. Inactivation of bacterial cells was shown as the reduction of colony-forming units per milliliter of treated samples compared to untreated control. According to our results, when using microsecond pulses the level of inactivation increases with application of more intense electric field strengths and with number of pulses delivered. Almost 2-log reductions in bacterial counts were achieved at a field strength of 30 kV/cm with eight pulses and a 4.5-log reduction was observed at the same field strength using 48 pulses. Extending the duration of microsecond pulses from 100 to 250 μs showed no improvement in inactivation. Nanosecond pulses alone did not have any detectable effect on inactivation of E. coli regardless of the treatment time, but a significant 3-log reduction was achieved in combination with microsecond pulses.

  12. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Under Fluorescent Lamp using TiO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized Via Sol Gel Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapizah Rahim; Shahidan Radiman; Ainon Hamzah

    2012-01-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were synthesized by using sol gel method and their physico-chemical properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The photo catalytic property of TiO 2 nanoparticles was investigated by inactivation of Escherichia coli under irradiation of fluorescent lamp. The results showed that the size of TiO 2 was in the range of 3 to 7 nm with high crystallinity of anatase phase. The sharp peaks in FTIR spectrum determined the purity of TiO 2 nanoparticles and absorbance peak of UV-Vis spectrum showed the energy band gap of 3.2 eV. Optimum inactivation of E. coli was obtained at 1.0 g/ L TiO 2 nanoparticles, with 80 % of E. coli population was inactivated. The light scattering effect and insufficient concentration are the factors that cause the less effective inactivation reaction for 2.5 g/ L and 0.1 g/ L TiO 2 concentration. (author)

  13. Escherichia Coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodsell, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Diverse biological data may be used to create illustrations of molecules in their cellular context. I describe the scientific results that support a recent textbook illustration of an "Escherichia coli cell". The image magnifies a portion of the bacterium at one million times, showing the location and form of individual macromolecules. Results…

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on stainless steel upon exposure to Paenibacillus polymyxa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonhwa; Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the potential use of biofilm formed by a competitive-exclusion (CE) microorganism to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on a stainless steel surface. Five microorganisms showing inhibitory activities against E. coli O157:H7 were isolated from vegetable seeds and sprouts. The microorganism with the greatest antimicrobial activity was identified as Paenibacillus polymyxa (strain T5). In tryptic soy broth (TSB), strain T5 reached a higher population at 25 °C than at 12 or 37 °C without losing inhibitory activity against E. coli O157:H7. When P. polymyxa (6 log CFU/mL) was co-cultured with E. coli O157:H7 (2, 3, 4, or 5 log CFU/mL) in TSB at 25 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 decreased significantly within 24h. P. polymyxa formed a biofilm on stainless steel coupons (SSCs) in TSB at 25 °C within 24h, and cells in biofilms, compared to attached cells without biofilm formation, showed significantly increased resistance to a dry environment (43% relative humidity [RH]). With the exception of an inoculum of 4 log CFU/coupon at 100% RH, upon exposure to biofilm formed by P. polymyxa on SSCs, populations of E. coli O157:H7 (2, 4, or 6 log CFU/coupon) were significantly reduced within 48 h. Most notably, when E. coli O157:H7 at 2 log CFU/coupon was applied to SSCs on which P. polymyxa biofilm had formed, it was inactivated within 1h, regardless of RH. These results will be useful when developing strategies using biofilms produced by competitive exclusion microorganisms to inactivate foodborne pathogens in food processing environments. © 2013.

  15. Multi-Layered TiO2 Films towards Enhancement of Escherichia coli Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorachon Yoriya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline TiO2 has shown its great photocatalytic properties in bacterial inactivation. This work presents a design fabrication of low-cost, layered TiO2 films assembled reactors and a study of their performance for a better understanding to elucidate the photocatalytic effect on inactivation of E. coli in water. The ability to reduce the number of bacteria in water samples for the layered TiO2 composing reactors has been investigated as a function of time, while varying the parameters of light sources, initial concentration of bacteria, and ratios of TiO2 film area and volume of water. Herein, the layered TiO2 films have been fabricated on the glass plates by thermal spray coating prior to screen printing, allowing a good adhesion of the films. Surface topology and crystallographic phase of TiO2 for the screen-printed active layer have been characterized, resulting in the ratio of anatase:rutile being 80:20. Under exposure to sunlight and a given condition employed in this study, the optimized film area:water volume of 1:2.62 has shown a significant ability to reduce the E. coli cells in water samples. The ratio of surface area of photocatalytic active base to volume of water medium is believed to play a predominant role facilitating the cells inactivation. The kinetic rate of inactivation and its behavior are also described in terms of adsorption of reaction species at different contact times.

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, and Campylobacter jejuni in raw ground beef by gamma irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Clavero, M R; Monk, J D; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P; Brackett, R E

    1994-01-01

    Raw ground beef patties inoculated with stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, or Campylobacter jejuni were subjected to gamma irradiation (60Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 2.52 kGy. The influence of two levels of fat (8 to 14% [low fat] and 27 to 28% [high fat]) and temperature (frozen [-17 to -15 degrees C] and refrigerated [3 to 5 degrees C]) on the inactivation of each pathogen by irradiation was investigated. In ascending order of irradiation resist...

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157 Bacteriophages by Using a Mixture of Ferrous Sulfate and Tea Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Meng, Ruiqiang; Wang, Jiaying; Niu, Yan D; Li, Jinquan; Stanford, Kim; McAllister, Tim A

    2015-12-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been used for biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157 and other pathogenic bacteria in many different matrices and foods, but few studies have included inactivation of residual phages in culture medium before plating and enumeration of surviving host bacteria for the assessment of phage efficacy. This oversight may lead to overestimation of phage efficacy. The ability of virucidal solution containing a mixture of ferrous sulfate [iron(II) sulfate, FeSO4] and tea extract [Fe(II)T] to inactivate residual T5-like, T1-like, T4-like, and rV5-like phages was assessed using E. coli O157 as the host. At concentrations of ≥10 mM FeSO4, all phages were not detected after 20 min in a broth culture model. Compared with the virucidal solution-free samples (1 to 96% recovery), Fe(II)T (10 mM FeSO4 plus 15% tea extract) recovered a greater (P phage-treated broth culture (97 to 100% recovery) and beef samples (52 to 100% recovery). Moreover, with the addition of Fe(II)T, the number of bacteria surviving after exposure to T5-like or T4-like phages was greater (P phages. Consequently, use of a virucide for phage inactivation is recommended to improve the accuracy of evaluations of phage efficacy for biocontrol of E. coli O157.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-[p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl]adenosine (FSO 2 BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25 0 C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of β-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO 2 BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with 3 H-labeled FSO 2 BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO 2 BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg 2+ . The results are consistent with modification by FSO 2 BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium in black pepper and red pepper by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Jae; Sung, Hye-Jung; Kim, Sung-Youn; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-17

    This study evaluated the efficacy of gamma irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in black pepper (Piper nigrum) and red pepper (dried Capsicum annuum). Black pepper and red pepper inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation in the range of 0, 1, 2, 3 and 5 kGy, and color change was evaluated after treatment. Pathogen populations decreased with increasing treatment doses. A gamma irradiation dose of 5 kGy decreased E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium populations >4.4 to >5.2 log CFU/g in black pepper without causing color change. Similarly, 5 kGy of gamma irradiation yielded reduction of 3.8 to >5.2 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium in red pepper. During gamma irradiation treatment, L*, a* and b* values of red pepper were not significantly changed except for 297 μm to 420 μm size red pepper treated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation. Based on the D-value of pathogens in black pepper and red pepper, S. Typhimurium showed more resistant to gamma irradiation than did E. coli O157:H7. These results show that gamma irradiation has potential as a non-thermal process for inactivating foodborne pathogens in spices with minimal color changes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua in apple and carrot juices using high pressure homogenization and nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathanibul, Panchalee; Taylor, T Matthew; Davidson, P Michael; Harte, Federico

    2009-02-28

    High pressure homogenization has been of growing interest as a nonthermal technology for the inactivation of microorganisms in fruit and vegetable juices. Cells of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua, used as surrogates for foodborne pathogens, were inoculated into apple or carrot juice (approximately 7 log(10) CFU/ml) containing 0 or 10 IU/ml nisin and subjected to 350 to 0 MPa high pressure homogenization. At 50 MPa homogenization pressure intervals, juice samples were collected, immediately cooled to 5 log reduction of cells was achieved following exposure to pressures in excess >250 MPa. In contrast, little inactivation was observed for L. innocua with pressure innocua. Results indicate that high pressure homogenization processing is a promising technology to achieve pathogen decontamination in fruit and vegetable juices.

  1. Inactivation of shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in lean ground beef by gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-O157 serovars of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are now responsible for over 60% of STEC induced illnesses. The majority of illnesses caused by non-O157:H7 STEC have been due to serogroups O26, O121, O103, O45, O111, and O145, “the big/top six”, which are now considered adulterant...

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in hamburgers by gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirinos Rodolfo R.O.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening complications like haemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura. Among foods associated with outbreaks caused by this pathogen, hamburger is the most common one. The aim of this research was to determine the radiation dose to reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 in hamburgers to non-detectable levels in order to render a safer product. Hamburgers, inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, were exposed to gamma radiation (60Co treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 0.7 kGy. The average temperature during the process was 5.6ºC. Non-inoculated hamburgers were submitted to sensory evaluation after being exposed to irradiation doses of 0.8 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The D10 for the pathogen varied from 0.17 kGy to O.27 kGy in hamburger. Considering the highest D10 value in hamburger, a dose of 1.08 kGy would be sufficient to reduce E. coli O157:H7 contamination in 4 log cycles, without affecting the sensory attributes of the product.

  3. Study of messenger RNA inactivation and protein degradation in an Escherichia coli cell-free expression system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireaux Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large amount of recombinant proteins can be synthesized in a few hours with Escherichia coli cell-free expression systems based on bacteriophage transcription. These cytoplasmic extracts are used in many applications that require large-scale protein production such as proteomics and high throughput techniques. In recent years, cell-free systems have also been used to engineer complex informational processes. These works, however, have been limited by the current available cell-free systems, which are not well adapted to these types of studies. In particular, no method has been proposed to increase the mRNA inactivation rate and the protein degradation rate in cell-free reactions. The construction of in vitro informational processes with interesting dynamics requires a balance between mRNA and protein synthesis (the source, and mRNA inactivation and protein degradation (the sink. Results Two quantitative studies are presented to characterize and to increase the global mRNA inactivation rate, and to accelerate the degradation of the synthesized proteins in an E. coli cell-free expression system driven by the endogenous RNA polymerase and sigma factor 70. The E. coli mRNA interferase MazF was used to increase and to adjust the mRNA inactivation rate of the Firefly luciferase (Luc and of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP. Peptide tags specific to the endogenous E. coli AAA + proteases were used to induce and to adjust the protein degradation rate of eGFP. Messenger RNA inactivation rate, protein degradation rate, maturation time of Luc and eGFP were measured. Conclusions The global mRNA turnover and the protein degradation rate can be accelerated and tuned in a biologically relevant range in a cell-free reaction with quantitative procedures easy to implement. These features broaden the capabilities of cell-free systems with a better control of gene expression. This cell-free extract could find some applications in

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in broth and sausage by combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun-Jung; Yousef, Ahmed E

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of combined high pressure and Lactobacillus casei cell extract (CE) on Escherichia coli O157 strains with variation in pressure resistance in broth and sausage. Pressure-resistant (O157:H7 and O157:H12) and -sensitive (O157-M1 and O157-M2) E. coli strains were used. Pressure treatment at 350 MPa for 20 min in broth caused 1.1-1.2 logs reduction in O157:H12 and O157:H7 and 4.1-5.5 logs reduction in the O157-M1 and O157-M2. When high pressure was treated in the presence of CE (32 CEAU/mL), the combination treatment caused a significant inactivation in the pressure-resistant O157:H7 strains resulting in the viability loss of 4.3-4.6 logs and the synergistic effect increased with increase in treatment time (p casei CE may cause considerable damage to cellular components of E. coli during the high pressure treatment. The synergy between high pressure processing and Lb. casei OSY-LB6A CE against pressure-resistant E. coli O157 strains suggests the feasibility of using this combination to minimize the risk of transmission of E. coli O157 by food.

  5. Ascaris and Escherichia coli Inactivation in an Ecological Sanitation System in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendes, David; Levy, Karen; Knee, Jackie; Handzel, Thomas; Hill, Vincent R

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the microbial die-off in a latrine waste composting system in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Temperature data and samples were collected from compost aged 0-12+ months. Samples collected from compost bin centers and corners at two depths were assessed for moisture content, E. coli concentration, and Ascaris spp. viability. Center temperatures in compost bins were all above 58 °C, while corner temperatures were 10 - 20 °C lower. Moisture content was 67 ± 10% in all except the oldest compost. A 4-log reduction in E. coli was observed over the first sixteen weeks of composting at both locations and depths, after which E. coli was undetectable (LOD: 142 MPN g(-1) dry weight). In new compost, 10.4% and 8.3% of Ascaris eggs were viable and fully embryonated, respectively. Percent viability dropped to zero in samples older than six weeks. These findings indicate that the Haitian EcoSan composting process was effective in inactivating E. coli and Ascaris spp. in latrine waste within sixteen weeks. This study is one of the first to document efficacy of an ecological sanitation system under field conditions and provides insight into composting methods and monitoring for other international settings.

  6. Ascaris and Escherichia coli Inactivation in an Ecological Sanitation System in Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Berendes

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the microbial die-off in a latrine waste composting system in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Temperature data and samples were collected from compost aged 0-12+ months. Samples collected from compost bin centers and corners at two depths were assessed for moisture content, E. coli concentration, and Ascaris spp. viability. Center temperatures in compost bins were all above 58 °C, while corner temperatures were 10 - 20 °C lower. Moisture content was 67 ± 10% in all except the oldest compost. A 4-log reduction in E. coli was observed over the first sixteen weeks of composting at both locations and depths, after which E. coli was undetectable (LOD: 142 MPN g(-1 dry weight. In new compost, 10.4% and 8.3% of Ascaris eggs were viable and fully embryonated, respectively. Percent viability dropped to zero in samples older than six weeks. These findings indicate that the Haitian EcoSan composting process was effective in inactivating E. coli and Ascaris spp. in latrine waste within sixteen weeks. This study is one of the first to document efficacy of an ecological sanitation system under field conditions and provides insight into composting methods and monitoring for other international settings.

  7. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Cunzhong; Hou, Jiafa

    2017-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate whether Escherichia coli virulence affects the roles of sex hormone receptors in female dogs with simulated pyometra. A total of 33 healthy, nulliparous, crossbred female dogs were divided into four groups, with 10 dogs in each of the three experimental groups and 3 dogs in the control group. Estradiol was administrated to female dogs in group 1 continuously at 0.6-4.8 mg/kg twice daily for 12 days (the dose doubled every three days), followed by intramuscular injection of 0.2-1.8 mg/kg progesterone. The progesterone was administrated with an initial dose of 0.2 µg/kg and increased 0.2 mg/kg every three days, twice daily until the maximum of 1.8 mg/kg for 24 days and maintained at 1.8 mg/kg for 19 days. Progesterone only was administrated at 1.8 mg/kg in group 2 (twice daily) for 55 continuous days and only estradiol was administered with an initial dose of 0.6 µg/kg (dose doubled every 3 days for 12 days) in group 3 twice daily and maintained at 4.8 mg/kg for the following 43 days. A strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, and a weakly virulent strain, nau-i, were screened. On the 12th day of diestrus, 5 female dogs in each of the experimental groups were inoculated with E. coli nau-i strain, while the other five in each group were inoculated with nau-b strain. Histopathological changes of uterine tissues were microscopically observed 50 days after E. coli inoculation and hormone receptor expression levels were detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Simulated pyometra was observed in dogs administrated with progesterone alone or progesterone combined with estradiol. The clinical symptoms and histopathological observation demonstrated that inoculation with strongly virulent E. coli strain, nau-b, caused earlier onset of pyometra symptoms and more severe pyometra symptoms compared with the weakly virulent E. coli strain, nau-i. Furthermore, estrogen and progesterone receptor levels in dogs with pyometra

  8. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in a tropical fruit smoothie by a combination of heat and pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkling-Ribeiro, M; Noci, F; Cronin, D A; Lyng, J G; Morgan, D J

    2008-10-01

    Moderate heat in combination with pulsed electric fields (PEF) was investigated as a potential alternative to thermal pasteurization of a tropical fruit smoothie based on pineapple, banana, and coconut milk, inoculated with Escherichia coli K12. The smoothie was heated from 25 degrees C to either 45 or 55 degrees C over 60 s and subsequently cooled to 10 degrees C. PEF was applied at electric field strengths of 24 and 34 kV/cm with specific energy inputs of 350, 500, and 650 kJ/L. Both processing technologies were combined using heat (45 or 55 degrees C) and the most effective set of PEF conditions. Bacterial inactivation was estimated on standard and NaCl-supplemented tryptone soy agar (TSA) to enumerate sublethally injured cells. By increasing the temperature from 45 to 55 degrees C, a higher reduction in E. coli numbers (1 compared with 1.7 log(10) colony forming units {CFU} per milliliter, P field strength was increased during stand-alone PEF treatment from 24 to 34 kV/cm, a greater number of E. coli cells were inactivated (2.8 compared with 4.2 log(10) CFU/mL, P or = 0.05) achieved by thermal pasteurization (72 degrees C, 15 s). A reversed hurdle processing sequence did not affect bacterial inactivation (P> or = 0.05). No differences were observed (P> or = 0.05) between the bacterial counts estimated on nonselective and selective TSA, suggesting that sublethal cell injury did not occur during single PEF treatments or combined heat/PEF treatments.

  9. Factors affecting the efficacy of pressure inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on alfalfa seeds and seed viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neetoo, Hudaa; Ye, Mu; Chen, Haiqiang

    2009-05-31

    The application of high hydrostatic pressure technology as a seed decontamination technology was evaluated. Alfalfa seeds inoculated with approximately 10(5) CFU/g of Escherichia coli O157:H7 were subjected to oscillatory pressure treatments at 600 MPa and 20 degrees C for up to five cycles with a holding time of 2 min/cycle. However, oscillatory pressurization was not able to eliminate E. coli O157:H7. The application of pressure treatment at 600 MPa for 2 min at 20 degrees C in the presence of chemicals such as calcium hypochlorite, calcium hydroxide, lactic acid or sodium acid sulfate was subsequently investigated and it was demonstrated that this "multiple hurdle" approach was unable to decontaminate alfalfa seeds. Soaking seeds prior to pressure treatment was found to play a critical role on enhancing the pressure inactivation of E. coli O157:H7; seeds soaked in water for 60 min followed by treatment at 600 MPa for 2 min at 20 degrees C were decontaminated and had a germination rate of 91% which was 4% lower than that of the untreated seeds (not statistically significant, P>0.05). It was further demonstrated that a process involving soaking seeds in water for > or = 10 min followed by treatment at 600 MPa for 15 min at 20 degrees C was equally effective with respect to E. coli O157:H7 elimination and viability retention of the seeds.

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase by 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl))adenosine: protection by the hydrolyzed reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettigrew, D.W.

    1987-03-24

    Incubation of Escherichia coli glycerol kinase with 5'-(p-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoyl)adenosine (FSO/sub 2/BzAdo) at pH 8.0 and 25/sup 0/C results in the loss of enzyme activity, which is not restored by the addition of ..beta..-mercaptoethanol or dithiothreitol. The FSO/sub 2/BzAdo concentration dependence of the inactivation kinetics is described by a mechanism that includes the equilibrium binding of the reagent to the enzyme prior to a first-order inactivation reaction in addition to effects of reagent hydrolysis. The hydrolysis of the reagent has two effects on the observed kinetics. The first effect is deviation from pseudo-first-order kinetic behavior due to depletion of the reagent. The second effect is the novel protection of the enzyme from inactivation due to binding of the sulfonate hydrolysis product. Determinations of the reaction stoichiometry with /sup 3/H-labeled FSO/sub 2/BzAdo show that the inactivation is associated with the covalent incorporation of 1.08 mol of reagent/mol of enzyme subunit. Ligand protection experiments show that ATP, AMP, dAMP, NADH, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, and the sulfonate hydrolysis product of FSO/sub 2/BzAdo provide protection from inactivation. The protection obtained with ATMP is not dependent on Mg/sup 2 +/. The results are consistent with modification by FSO/sub 2/BzAdo of a single adenine nucleotide binding site per enzyme subunit.

  11. The effect of deep frying or conventional oven cooking on inactivation of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC) in meatballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects deep frying or oven cooking on inactivation of Shiga toxin-producing cells of Escherichia coli (STEC) in meatballs. A finely-ground veal and/or a beef-pork-veal mixture were inoculated (ca. 7.0 log CFU/g) with an eight-strain, genetically-marked cocktail of rifampicin-res...

  12. Inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in Romaine lettuce packaged in a commercial polyethylene terephthalate container using atmospheric cold plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (DACP) treatment on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in Romaine lettuce packaged in a conventional commercial plastic container were evaluated during storage at 4 degrees C for 7 days. Effects ...

  13. The role of reactive oxygen species in near-ultraviolet (320-400 nm) light inactivation of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammartano, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to further elucidate the mechanism of near-UV inactivation in Escherichia coli. Several genetic and biochemical techniques were employed to examine the role of oxygen reactive species in near-UV mediated damage to DNA and membrane components, and to identify endogenous photosensitizers. The results demonstrate that the near-UV inactivation process is initiated when the radiant energy is absorbed by components of the respiratory chain, including cytochromes. The absorption of energy causes the chromophore to be electronically excited into the triplet state which leads to subsequent generation of oxygen reactive species within the membrane. The first line of cellular defense against this oxidative stress is a complex network of antioxidants and scavengers, including catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. E. coli cells also have a second line of defense that incorporates repair systems. In this study evidence is provided for an excision repair pathway that is unique to near-UV mediated damage. Results suggest that a unique, but as yet unidentified, DNA lesion occurs in near-UV irradiated cells. Evidence is also presented that shows near-UV mediated damage also occurs in the membrane

  14. Oxidative modification and electrochemical inactivation of Escherichia coli upon cold atmospheric pressure plasma exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlène Dezest

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPPs are known to have bactericidal effects but the mechanism of their interaction with microorganisms remains poorly understood. In this study the bacteria Escherichia coli were used as a model and were exposed to CAPPs. Different gas compositions, helium with or without adjunctions of nitrogen or oxygen, were used. Our results indicated that CAPP induced bacterial death at decontamination levels depend on the duration, post-treatment storage and the gas mixture composition used for the treatment. The plasma containing O2 in the feeding gas was the most aggressive and showed faster bactericidal effects. Structural modifications of treated bacteria were observed, especially significant was membrane leakage and morphological changes. Oxidative stress caused by plasma treatment led to significant damage of E. coli. Biochemical analyses of bacterial macromolecules indicated massive intracellular protein oxidation. However, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS are not the only actors involved in E. coli's death, electrical field and charged particles could play a significant role especially for He-O2 CAPP.

  15. The growth, survival and thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a traditional South African sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charimba, G; Hugo, C J; Hugo, A

    2010-05-01

    This study investigated the growth and survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into boerewors models with (B+P) and without (B-P) sulphur dioxide preservative at a low (L) and high (H) inoculum followed by storage at 0, 4 and 10 degrees C for 10 days. The pathogen's thermal inactivation at 50, 60, 65 and 70 degrees C was also evaluated in B+P. The B-P at both low and high inocula had significantly higher recoveries at all temperatures compared to B+P. The BL+P and BH+P had significant reductions in recoveries at 0 degrees C, declining to below detectable limits at days 8 and 10, respectively. At 4 degrees C, the BL+P and BH+P recoveries declined significantly at day 10. At 10 degrees C, significant increases were observed from days 0 to day 10 in both models and at low and high inocula. At 0 degrees C, the BL-P and BH-P treatments had significant declines in recoveries. The combination of sulphur dioxide preservative and low temperature demonstrated the best efficacy against E. coli O157:H7 survival. Thermal inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 was 60 min at 60 degrees C, 80 s at 65 degrees C and 60s at 70 degrees C. This study demonstrated that E. coli O157:H7 can survive in boerewors with and without preservative and is more sensitive to heat treatment at 70 degrees C. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy of adding detergents to sanitizer solutions for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Romaine lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskinen, Lindsey A; Annous, Bassam A

    2011-06-30

    Numerous Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks have been linked to consumption of fresh lettuce. The development of effective and easily implemented wash treatment could reduce such incidents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the addition of food-grade detergents to sanitizer solutions for inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 on Romaine lettuce. Freshly-cut leaves of Romaine lettuce were dip-inoculated to achieve a final cell concentration of 7.8±0.2 log CFU/g, air-dried for 2h, and stored overnight at 4 °C. Leaves were then washed for 2 min in an experimental short chain fatty acid formulation (SCFA) or in one of the following solutions with or without 0.2% dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid or 0.2% sodium 2-ethyl hexyl sulfate: 1) deionized water; 2) 100 ppm chlorine dioxide; 3) 100 ppm chlorine; and 4) 200 ppm chlorine. Following wash treatment, samples were blended in neutralizing buffer (1:3) and surface plated on the selective media CT-SMAC. The efficacy of wash treatments, with or without the detergents, in inactivating E. coli O157:H7 cells on lettuce leaves were not significantly different. The most effective wash solution was SCFA, which was capable of reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations by more than 5 log CFU/g. The rest of the wash treatments resulted in a population reduction of less than 1 log CFU/g. The effectiveness of SCFA surpasses that of other sanitizer treatments tested in this study and requires further research to optimize treatments to preserve lettuce quality. Conventional detergents did not enhance the efficacy of any of the wash treatments tested during this study. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, and Campylobacter jejuni in raw ground beef by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavero, M R; Monk, J D; Beuchat, L R; Doyle, M P; Brackett, R E

    1994-06-01

    Raw ground beef patties inoculated with stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, or Campylobacter jejuni were subjected to gamma irradiation (60Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 2.52 kGy. The influence of two levels of fat (8 to 14% [low fat] and 27 to 28% [high fat]) and temperature (frozen [-17 to -15 degrees C] and refrigerated [3 to 5 degrees C]) on the inactivation of each pathogen by irradiation was investigated. In ascending order of irradiation resistance, the D10 values ranged from 0.175 to 0.235 kGy (C. jejuni), from 0.241 to 0.307 kGy (E. coli O157:H7), and from 0.618 to 0.800 kGy (salmonellae). Statistical analysis revealed that E. coli O157:H7 had a significantly (P D10 value when irradiated at -17 to -15 degrees C than when irradiated at 3 to 5 degrees C. Regardless of the temperature during irradiation, the level of fat did not have a significant effect on the D10 value. Salmonellae behaved like E. coli O157:H7 in low-fat beef, but temperature did not have a significant effect when the pathogen was irradiated in high-fat ground beef. Significantly higher D10 values were calculated for C. jejuni irradiated in frozen than in refrigerated low-fat beef. C. jejuni was more resistant to irradiation in low-fat beef than in high-fat beef when treatment was at -17 to -15 degrees C. Regardless of the fat level and temperature during inactivation, these pathogens were highly sensitive to gamma irradiation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Reactivation of Escherichia coli cells, inactivated by ultraviolet rays, with cell extracts of propionic acid bacteria: Fractionation of the extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob`eva, L.I.; Khodzhaev, E.Yu.; Ponomareva, G.M.; Ambrosov, I.V. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1995-01-01

    Separation of Propionibacterium shermanii extract into fractions and testing them for their reactivating effect on UV-inactivated Escherichia coli AB-1157 cells showed that the activity was associated with the fraction of soluble proteins. The activity was not demonstrated in the fractions of RNA, DNA, ribosomes, or cell walls. Fractional salting out and subsequent testing of the fractions showed two active protein fractions: fraction I (20-40% of ammonium sulfate saturating concentration) and fraction II (60-80%). These fractions were separated by HPLC into seven and eight subfractions, respectively. Reactivating activity was showed in subfraction 4 (fraction I) and subfractions 5 and 6 (fraction II). Electrophoresis showed five and four polypeptides in subfractions 4 and 5, respectively. Subfraction 6 (fraction II) contained one protein with a molecular mass of about 30 kDa. This protein, apparently, was responsible for the protective properties of fraction II. 9 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, and Campylobacter jejuni in raw ground beef by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clavero, M.R.S.; Monk, J.D.; Beuchat, L.R.; Doyle, M.P.; Brackett, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Raw ground beef patties inoculated with stationary-phase cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7, salmonellae, or Campylobacter jejuni were subjected to gamma irradiation (60Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 2.52 kGy. The influence of two levels of fat (8 to 14% [low fat] and 27 to 28% [high fat]) and temperature (frozen [-17 to -15 degrees C] and refrigerated [3 to 5 degrees C]) on the inactivation of each pathogen by irradiation was investigated. In ascending order of irradiation resistance, the D10 values ranged from 0.175 to 0.235 kGy (C. jejuni), from 0.241 to 0.307 kGy (E. coli O157:H7), and from 0.618 to 0.800 kGy (salmonellae). Statistical analysis revealed that E. coli O157:H7 had a significantly (P 0.05) higher D10 value when irradiated at -17 to -15 degrees C than when irradiated at 3 to 5 degrees C. Regardless of the temperature during irradiation, the level of fat did not have a significant effect on the D10 value. Salmonellae behaved like E. coli O157:H7 in low-fat beef, but temperature did not have a significant effect when the pathogen was irradiated in high-fat ground beef. Significantly higher D10 values were calculated for C. jejuni irradiated in frozen than in refrigerated low-fat beef. C. jejuni was more resistant to irradiation in low-fat beef than in high-fat beef when treatment was at -17 to -15 degrees C. Regardless of the fat level and temperature during inactivation, these pathogens were highly sensitive to gamma irradiation. An applied dose of 2.5 kGy would be sufficient to kill 10(8.1) E. coli O157:H7, 10(3.1) salmonellae, and 10(10.6) C. jejuni, resulting in a high probability of complete inactivation of populations much higher than those occasionally present in ground beef patties

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms by pulsed ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Nedra L; Banerjee, Pratik

    2015-06-10

    The inactivation of biofilms formed by pathogenic bacteria on ready-to-eat and minimally processed fruits and vegetables by nonthermal processing methods is critical to ensure food safety. Pulsed ultraviolet (PUV) light has shown promise in the surface decontamination of liquid, powdered, and solid foods. In this study, the antimicrobial efficacy of PUV light treatment on nascent biofilms formed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes on the surfaces of food packaging materials, such as low-density polyethylene (LDPE), and fresh produce, such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa) leaves, was investigated. The formation of biofilms on Romaine lettuce leaves and LDPE films was confirmed by crystal violet and Alcian blue staining methods. Inactivation of cells in the biofilm was determined by standard plating procedures, and by a luminescence-based bacterial cell viability assay. Upon PUV treatment of 10 s at two different light source to sample distances (4.5 and 8.8 cm), viable cell counts of L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7 in biofilms on the lettuce surface were reduced by 0.6-2.2 log CFU mL(-1) and 1.1-3.8 log CFU mL(-1), respectively. On the LDPE surface, the efficiency of inactivation of biofilm-encased cells was slightly higher. The maximum values for microbial reduction on LDPE were 2.7 log CFU mL(-1) and 3.9 log CFU mL(-1) for L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. Increasing the duration of PUV light exposure resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) reduction in biofilm formation by both organisms. The results also revealed that PUV treatment was more effective at reducing E. coli biofilms compared with Listeria biofilms. A moderate increase in temperature (~7-15°C) was observed for both test materials. PUV is an effective nonthermal intervention method for surface decontamination of E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes on fresh produce and packaging materials.

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on lettuce, using low-energy X-ray irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sanghyup; Marks, Bradley P; Ryser, Elliot T; Moosekian, Scott R

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy X-ray irradiation was assessed as a means of eliminating Escherichia coli O157:H7 on lettuce. Round-cut iceberg lettuce samples (2.54-cm diameter) were dip or spot inoculated with a three-strain cocktail of E. coli O157:H7, stored for 24 h at 4 degrees C, and then irradiated at four dose levels up to 0.25 kGy using a prototype low-energy (70 kV) X-ray irradiator. E. coli O157:H7 survivors were quantified by plating on sorbitol MacConkey agar containing cefixime and tellurite. Dip inoculation yielded a D(10)-value of 0.040 +/- 0.001 kGy, which is 3.4 times lower than a previously reported value of 0.136 kGy using gamma radiation. The D(10)-value for E. coli O157:H7 on spot-inoculated samples was 0.078 +/- 0.008 kGy, which is about twice that of dip-inoculated samples. When 10 stacked leaves were irradiated from both sides, a dose of 0.2 kGy was achieved at the center of the stack with a surface dose of 1 kGy, corresponding to a approximately 5-log reduction of E. coli O157:H7 at the center of the stack. Based on these findings, low-energy X-ray irradiation appears to be a promising microbial inactivation strategy for leafy greens and potentially for other types of fresh produce.

  2. Inactivation and Gene Expression of a Virulent WastewaterEscherichia coliStrain and the Nonvirulent CommensalEscherichia coliDSM1103 Strain upon Solar Irradiation

    KAUST Repository

    Aljassim, Nada I.

    2017-03-06

    This study examined the decay kinetics and molecular responses of two Escherichia coli strains upon solar irradiation. The first is E. coli PI-7, a virulent and antibiotic-resistant strain that was isolated from wastewater and carries the emerging NDM-1 antibiotic resistance gene. The other strain, E. coli DSM1103, displayed lower virulence and antibiotic resistance than E. coli PI-7. In a buffer solution, E. coli PI-7 displayed a longer lag phase prior to decay and a longer half-life compared with E. coli DSM1103 (6.64 ± 0.63 h and 2.85 ± 0.46 min vs 1.33 ± 0.52 h and 2.04 ± 0.36 min). In wastewater, both E. coli strains decayed slower than they did in buffer. Although solar irradiation remained effective in reducing the numbers of both strains by more than 5-log10 in <24 h, comparative genomics and transcriptomics revealed differences in the genomes and overall regulation of genes between the two E. coli strains. A wider arsenal of genes related to oxidative stress, cellular repair and protective mechanisms were upregulated in E. coli PI-7. Subpopulations of E. coli PI-7 expressed genes related to dormancy and persister cell formation during the late decay phase, which may have accounted for its prolonged persistence. Upon prolonged solar irradiation, both E. coli strains displayed upregulation of genes related to horizontal gene transfer and antibiotic resistance. Virulence functions unique to E. coli PI-7 were also upregulated. Our findings collectively indicated that, whereas solar irradiation is able to reduce total cell numbers, viable E. coli remained and expressed genes that enable survival despite solar treatment. There remains a need for heightened levels of concern regarding risks arising from the dissemination of E. coli that may remain viable in wastewater after solar irradiation.

  3. Pulsed pressure treatment for inactivation of escherichia coli and listeria innocua in whole milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzrul, S; Largeteau, A; Demazeau, G; Alpas, H

    2008-01-01

    E. coli and L. innocua in whole milk were subjected to continuous pressure treatments (300, 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600 MPa) at ambient temperature for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. These treatments underlined that at moderate pressure values (300, 350 and 400 MPa), increasing the pressurization time from 5 to 20 min did not improve cell death to a great extent. Therefore, pulsed pressure treatments (at 300, 350 and 400 MPa) for 5 min (2.5 min x 2 pulses, 1 min x 5 pulses and 0.5 min x 10 pulses), 10 min (5 min x 2 pulses, 2 min x 5 pulses and 1 min x 10 pulses), 15 min (5 min x 3 pulses, 3 min x 5 pulses and 1.5 min x 10 pulses) and 20 min (10 min x 2 pulses, 5 min x 4 pulses, 4 min x 5 pulses and 2 min x 10 pulses) were applied. As already observed in continuous pressure experiments, in pulsed pressure treatments the inactivation level is improved with increasing pressure level and in addition with the number of applied pulses; however, the effect of pulse number is not additive. Results obtained in this study indicated that pulsed pressure treatments could be used to pasteurize the whole milk at lower pressure values than the continuous pressure treatments. Nevertheless, an optimization appears definetely necessary between the number of pulses and pressure levels to reach the desirable number of log-reduction of microorganisms

  4. N-chlorotaurine, a long-lived oxidant produced by human leukocytes, inactivates Shiga toxin of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Eitzinger

    Full Text Available N-chlorotaurine (NCT, the main representative of long-lived oxidants produced by granulocytes and monocytes, is known to exert broad-spectrum microbicidal activity. Here we show that NCT directly inactivates Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2, used as a model toxin secreted by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC. Bacterial growth and Stx2 production were both inhibited by 2 mM NCT. The cytotoxic effect of Stx2 on Vero cells was removed by ≥5.5 mM NCT. Confocal microscopy and FACS analyses showed that the binding of Stx2 to human kidney glomerular endothelial cells was inhibited, and no NCT-treated Stx2 entered the cytosol. Mass spectrometry displayed oxidation of thio groups and aromatic amino acids of Stx2 by NCT. Therefore, long-lived oxidants may act as powerful tools of innate immunity against soluble virulence factors of pathogens. Moreover, inactivation of virulence factors may contribute to therapeutic success of NCT and novel analogs, which are in development as topical antiinfectives.

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia Coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enterica on Blueberries in Water Using Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuhan; Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2015-07-01

    Ultraviolet light (UV) has antimicrobial effects, but the shadowing effect has limited its application. In this study, a novel setup using UV processing in agitated water was developed to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella on blueberries. Blueberries were dip- or spot-inoculated with E. coli or Salmonella. Blueberries inoculated with E. coli were treated for 2 to 10 min with UV directly (dry UV) or immersed in agitated water during UV treatment (wet UV). E. coli was most easily killed on spot-inoculated blueberries with a 5.2-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Dip-inoculated blueberries were the most difficult to be decontaminated with only 1.6-log reduction after 10-min wet UV treatment. Wet UV treatment generally showed higher efficacies than dry UV treatment, achieving an average of 1.4 log more reduction for spot-inoculated blueberries. For dip-inoculated blueberries, chlorine washing and UV treatments were less effective, achieving blueberries were UV-treated while being immersed in agitated water containing 100 ppm SDS, 0.5% levulinic acid or 10 ppm chlorine. The 3 chemicals did not significantly enhance the wet UV treatment. Findings of this study suggest that UV treatment could be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and potentially for other fresh produce. A novel UV light system for decontamination of blueberries in water was developed and evaluated. Results demonstrated that the decontamination efficacy of this system was generally as effective as chlorine washing, indicating that it could potentially be used as an alternative to chlorine washing for blueberries and other fresh produce. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  6. Air-supplied pinhole discharge in aqueous solution for the inactivation of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Ryota; Yasuoka, Koichi

    2018-04-01

    An air-supplied pinhole discharge in aqueous solution has been developed to provide a short-lived and odorless bactericide to replace current conventional disinfectants such as O3, ClO-, HClO, and ClO2. The pinhole discharge that was initiated inside a water bubble generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitrous acid (HNO2) simultaneously. The concentrations of H2O2, HNO2, and HNO3 were 16.3, 13.9, and 17.4 mg/L, respectively when flow rates of NaCl solution and air were 72 and 12.5 mL/min, respectively. The pH value of the solution was 3.87, and HO2 radicals were generated from the reaction of H2O2 with HNO2. The efficacy of sterilization of discharge-treated water was evaluated by changing the acetic solutions. A 4-orders-of-magnitude decrease in Escherichia coli survival rate was observed after treatment with a sodium citrate solution of pH 3.2 for 60 s.

  7. Inactivation and sublethal injury of Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua by high hydrostatic pressure in model suspensions and beetroot juice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Skąpska, Sylwia; Niezgoda, Jolanta; Rutkowska, Małgorzata; Dekowska, Agnieszka; Rzoska, Sylwester J.

    2014-01-01

    Cells exposed to different physical and chemical treatments, including high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), suffer from injuries that could be reversible in food materials when stored. Escherichia coli and Listeria innocua cells suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (model suspensions), and acidified beetroot juice were subjected to a pressure of 400 MPa at a temperature of 20°C for up to 10 min. The difference between the viable and non-injured cells was used to estimate the number of injured survivors. The reduction in E. coli cell number was 3.4-4.1 log after 10 min pressurization in model suspensions and 6.2 log in beetroot juice. Sublethally injured cells in PBS accounted for up to 2.7 log after 10 min HHP treatment and 0.8 log in beetroot juice. The reduction in L. innocua cell number after 10 min pressure treatment reached from 3.8 to 4.8 log, depending on the initial concentration in model suspensions. Among the surviving L. innocua cells, even up to 100% were injured. L. innocua cells were completely inactivated after 1 min HHP treatment in beetroot juice.

  8. Modeling the Inactivation of Intestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Uropathogenic E. coli in Ground Chicken by High Pressure Processing and Thymol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shih-Yung; Sheen, Shiowshuh; Sommers, Christopher H; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compared the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in chicken meat using High Pressure Processing (HPP) in with (the hurdle concept) and without thymol essential oil as a sensitizer. UPEC was found slightly more resistant than E. coli O157:H7 (iPEC O157:H7) at 450 and 500 MPa. A central composite experimental design was used to evaluate the effect of pressure (300-400 MPa), thymol concentration (100-200 ppm), and pressure-holding time (10-20 min) on the inactivation of iPEC O157:H7 and UPEC in ground chicken. The hurdle approach reduced the high pressure levels and thymol doses imposed on the food matrices and potentially decreased food quality damaged after treatment. The quadratic equations were developed to predict the impact (lethality) on iPEC O157:H7 (R (2) = 0.94) and UPEC (R (2) = 0.98), as well as dimensionless non-linear models [Pr > F (UPEC in regard to how they may survive HPP in the presence or absence of thymol. The models may further assist regulatory agencies and food industry to assess the potential risk of iPEC O157:H7 and UPEC in ground chicken.

  9. Inactivation of Escherichia coli phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase by the 2',3'-dialdehyde derivative of ATP. Identification of active site lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilden, Ida; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Harlow, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    The enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase from Escherichia coli was irreversibly inactivated on exposure to the affinity analog 2',3'-dialdehyde ATP (oATP). The reaction displayed complex saturation kinetics with respect to oATP with an apparent KD of approximately 0.8 m...... of enzymatic activity. These results imply a functional role for at least two of the identified amino acid residues....

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli on blueberries using cold plasma with chemical augmentation inside a partial vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justification: The mechanism by which cold plasma inactivates pathogens is through the production of free reactive chemical species. Unfortunately, the most reactive chemical species have the shortest half-life. In a vacuum their half-life is believed to be prolonged. Additionally, these reactive sp...

  11. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma and TiO2 Photocatalysis on Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Li, Jiangwei; Wang, Xingquan; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Size; Chen, Zhong; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma and TiO2 photocatalysis have been widely investigated separately for the management and reduction of microorganisms in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the two methods were combined in order to achieve a more profound understanding of their interactions in disinfection of water contaminated by Escherichia coli. Under water discharges carried out by microplasma jet arrays can result in a rapid inactivation of E. coli cells. The inactivation efficiency is largely dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2, He and air microplasma arrays, O2 microplasma had the highest activity against E. coli cells in aqueous solution, and showed >99.9% bacterial inactivation efficiency within 4 min. Addition of TiO2 photocatalytic film to the plasma discharge reactor significantly enhanced the inactivation efficiency of the O2 microplasma system, decreasing the time required to achieve 99.9% killing of E. coli cells to 1 min. This may be attributed to the enhancement of ROS generation due to high catalytic activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalyst in the combined plasma-TiO2 systems. Present work demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two agents, which can be correlated in order to maximize treatment efficiency. PMID:28004829

  12. Synergistic Effect of Atmospheric-pressure Plasma and TiO2 Photocatalysis on Inactivation of Escherichia coli Cells in Aqueous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Renwu; Zhou, Rusen; Zhang, Xianhui; Li, Jiangwei; Wang, Xingquan; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Size; Chen, Zhong; Bazaka, Kateryna; (Ken) Ostrikov, Kostya

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric-pressure plasma and TiO2 photocatalysis have been widely investigated separately for the management and reduction of microorganisms in aqueous solutions. In this paper, the two methods were combined in order to achieve a more profound understanding of their interactions in disinfection of water contaminated by Escherichia coli. Under water discharges carried out by microplasma jet arrays can result in a rapid inactivation of E. coli cells. The inactivation efficiency is largely dependent on the feed gases used, the plasma treatment time, and the discharge power. Compared to atmospheric-pressure N2, He and air microplasma arrays, O2 microplasma had the highest activity against E. coli cells in aqueous solution, and showed >99.9% bacterial inactivation efficiency within 4 min. Addition of TiO2 photocatalytic film to the plasma discharge reactor significantly enhanced the inactivation efficiency of the O2 microplasma system, decreasing the time required to achieve 99.9% killing of E. coli cells to 1 min. This may be attributed to the enhancement of ROS generation due to high catalytic activity and stability of the TiO2 photocatalyst in the combined plasma-TiO2 systems. Present work demonstrated the synergistic effect of the two agents, which can be correlated in order to maximize treatment efficiency.

  13. Influence of growth temperature on inactivation and injury of Escherichia coli O157:H7 by heat, acid, and freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semanchek, J J; Golden, D A

    1998-04-01

    The influence of growth temperature on heat-, lactic acid-, and freeze-induced inactivation and injury of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in 0.1% peptone water was investigated. Three strains of E. coli O157:H7 isolated respectively from salami, apple cider, and ground beef were evaluated. Growth of strains at 10 degrees C compared with growth at 37 degrees C had a significant impact on reducing (P heating (DH value), acid exposure (DA value), with the exception of the cider strain stored in lactic acid solutions. When strains were cultivated at 10 and 37 degrees C and heated at 54 and 56 degrees C, the salami strain possessed the highest (P heating at 52, 54, and 56 degrees C (11.2, 4.1 and 2.5 min, respectively). The salami strain grown at 10 degrees C had the highest (P storage in 0.1 and 0.25% lactic acid, while DA values for the salami and beef strains did not differ (P > 0.05) when stored in 0.5% lactic acid. Portions of strain populations were sublethally injured by heat and lactic acid treatments, as evidenced by the inability of injured organisms to form colonies on tryptone soy agar containing 2% NaCl. Strains cultured at 10 degrees C were more susceptible to sublethal heat injury than the strains cultured at 37 degrees C. Storage of test strains at -20 degrees C for 7 months resulted in a 4- to 6-log CFU/ml reduction in viable population, but induced only minimal sublethal injury. After 5 months at -20 degrees C, strains cultured at 10 degrees C were more sensitive to freeze inactivation than strains cultured at 37 degrees C. When grown at 10 and cultured at 37 degrees C. When grown at 10 and 37 degrees C and stored at -20 degrees C for 7 months, the cider strain possessed higher (P < 0.01) DF values than the beef and salami strains.

  14. Modeling the inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and uropathogenic E.coli in ground chicken by high pressure processing and thymol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disease causing Escherichia coli commonly found in meat and poultry include intestinal pathogenic E. coli (iPEC) as well as extraintestinal types such as the Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC). In this study we compare the resistance of iPEC (O157:H7) to UPEC in chicken meat using High Pressure Processing...

  15. Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanga, Peter Lokamar; Onyuka, Jackson; Webale, Mark Kilongosi; Were, Tom; Budambula, Valentine

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the prevalence of E. coli pathotypes and Shigella sero-groups and their antimicrobial profiles among diarrheic children in Nairobi city, Kenya. Although diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes and Shigella sero-groups are leading causes of diarrhea in children under five years in developing countries, their distribution and antimicrobial resistance vary from place to place and over time in a given region. In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled diarrheic children (n=354) under five years seeking treatment at Mbagathi Hospital, Nairobi city, Kenya,. Stool samples were collected from all children for bacterial culture. Bacterial isolation and identification was performed by conventional microbiological methods. Polymerase chain amplification was used to detect aspU, aggR, andpcvd432 for EAEC, est and elt for ETEC, eae for EPEC, stx for EHEC, and ipaH for EIEC and Shigella species. Antimicrobial profile was determined by disk diffusion method. The prevalence of EAEC, ETEC, EPEC (eae), EIEC (ipaH) was 21.2%, 10.5%, 4.5%, and 0.6%, respectively, while that of mixed infection was 0.6%for ETEC/EAEC and 0.3%for EAEC/EPEC/ETEC. No EHEC strain was isolated. Pathogenetic analysis for EAEC showed that5.9% carried aspU,8.2% possessed both aspU and aggR and 7.1% had a combination of aspU, aggR andpcvd432 while that of ETEC was 2.3% for elt, 6.5% for both elt and est and 1.7% for est. The combination of aspU with aggR, elt and est, and pcvd432 with aggR, aspU and est was 0.3% for each case of ETEC/EAEC mixed infection. The aspU gene co-existed with aggR, pcvd432, eae and elt in the EAEC/EPEC/ETEC mixed infection. The prevalence of S. boydii , S. dysenteriae , S. flexneriand, S. sonnei was 0.8%, 0.6%, 1.7%, and 0.8%, respectively. No E. coli pathotype and shigella co-infection was detected. In addition, both E. coli pathotypes and Shigella species were resistant to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and

  16. The respiratory chain is the cell's Achilles' heel during UVA inactivation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, Franziska; Bucheli, Margarete; Meur, Yves; Egli, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Solar disinfection (SODIS) is used as an effective and inexpensive tool to improve the microbiological quality of drinking water in developing countries where no other means are available. Solar UVA light is the agent that inactivates bacteria during the treatment. Damage to bacterial membranes plays a crucial role in the inactivation process. This study showed that even slightly irradiated cells (after less than 1 h of simulated sunlight) were strongly affected in their ability to maintain essential parts of their energy metabolism, in particular of the respiratory chain (activities of NADH oxidase, succinate oxidase and lactate oxidase were measured). The cells' potential to generate ATP was also strongly inhibited. Many essential enzymes of carbon metabolism (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase) and defence against oxidative stress (catalases and glutathione-disulfide reductase) were reduced in their activity during SODIS. The work suggests that damage to membrane enzymes is a likely cause of membrane dysfunction (loss of membrane potential and increased membrane permeability) during UVA irradiation. In this study, the first targets on the way to cell death were found to be the respiratory chain and F(1)F(0) ATPase.

  17. Cephem Potentiation by Inactivation of Nonessential Genes Involved in Cell Wall Biogenesis of beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Kristin R.; Sigurdardottir, Helga Høeg; Jana, Bimal

    2017-01-01

    Reversal of antimicrobial resistance is an appealing and largely unexplored strategy in drug discovery. The objective of this study was to identify potential targets for “helper” drugs reversing cephem resistance in Escherichia coli strains producing β-lactamases. A CMY-2-encoding plasmid was tra...

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in vitro and on the surface of spinach leaves by biobased surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of biosurfactants on the populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in suspension and on spinach leaves. Eight surfactants including four soybean oil-based biosurfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80), sopho...

  19. Transpositional inactivation of gadW enhances curli production and biofilm formation in Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 has been shown to produce variants that either express or are repressed in the expression of curli fimbriae promoting bacterial attachment, aggregation, and biofilm formation. The variant expression of curli fimbriae in some instances could result fr...

  20. Escherichia coli pathotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherichia coli strains are important commensals of the intestinal tract of humans and animals; however, pathogenic strains, including diarrhea-inducing E. coli and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. Intestinal E. coli pathotypes may cause a dehydrating watery diarrhea, or more severe diseases su...

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium DT 104 on alfalfa seeds by levulinic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; Doyle, Michael P

    2010-11-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the best concentration and exposure time for treatment of alfalfa seeds with levulinic acid plus sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella without adversely affecting seed germination. Alfalfa seeds inoculated with a five-strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella Typhimurium were dried in a laminar flow hood at 21°C for up to 72 h. Inoculated alfalfa seeds dried for 4 h then treated for 5 min at 21°C with 0.5% levulinic acid and 0.05% SDS reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium by 5.6 and 6.4 log CFU/g, respectively. On seeds dried for 72 h, treatment with 0.5% levulinic acid and 0.05% SDS for 20 min at 21°C reduced E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Typhimurium populations by 4 log CFU/g. Germination rates of alfalfa seeds treated with 0.5% levulinic acid plus 0.05% SDS for up to 1 h at 21°C were compared with a treatment of 20,000 ppm of calcium hypochlorite or tap water only. Treatment of alfalfa seeds with 0.5% levulinic acid plus 0.05% SDS for 5 min at 21°C resulted in a >3.0-log inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella.

  2. Modeling heat transfer and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in precooked meat products in Argentina using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Califano, A

    2008-07-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli is linked with sanitary deficiencies and undercooking of meat products. Recent studies have detected E. coli O157:H7 in black blood sausages. Minimum time-temperature specifications to kill the bacteria were obtained by numerical simulations of the microscopic heat conduction equation using the finite element method, and calculating the temperature profile of the sausage and the population of E. coli at the coldest point during heating. The model was validated by heating sausages in a water-bath. The effects of heat transfer coefficients and water temperatures on the required time to achieve an inactivation value (IV) of 12(log) are reported. Macroscopic heat balances were simultaneously solved to consider the temperature drop in the water batch as a function of the ratio between the mass of thermally treated sausage and the heat capacity of the system.

  3. Thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 (ECOH) and non-0157 Shiga toxin-producing E.coli (STEC)in mechanically tenderized veal

    Science.gov (United States)

    We quantified thermal destruction of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ECOH) and Shiga toxin-producing non-O157 E. coli (STEC) cells within mechanically tenderized veal cutlets following cooking on an electric skillet. For each of five trials, flattened veal cutlets (ca. 71.6 g; ca. 1/...

  4. One-step of tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping to improve the production of L-tryptophan in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background L-tryptophan is an aromatic amino acid widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In Escherichia coli, L-tryptophan is synthesized from phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate by enzymes in the shikimate pathway and L-tryptophan branch pathway, while L-serine and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate are also involved in L-tryptophan synthesis. In order to construct a microbial strain for efficient L-tryptophan production from glucose, we developed a one step tryptophan attenuator inactivation and promoter swapping strategy for metabolic flux optimization after a base strain was obtained by overexpressing the tktA, mutated trpE and aroG genes and inactivating a series of competitive steps. Results The engineered E. coli GPT1002 with tryptophan attenuator inactivation and tryptophan operon promoter substitution exhibited 1.67 ~ 9.29 times higher transcription of tryptophan operon genes than the control GPT1001. In addition, this strain accumulated 1.70 g l-1 L-tryptophan after 36 h batch cultivation in 300-mL shake flask. Bioreactor fermentation experiments showed that GPT1002 could produce 10.15 g l-1 L-tryptophan in 48 h. Conclusions The one step inactivating and promoter swapping is an efficient method for metabolic engineering. This method can also be applied in other bacteria. PMID:22380540

  5. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gun Joon; Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun; Lee, Dong-Un

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 ?s were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The ...

  6. Effects of ultraviolet disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli from wastewater: inactivation, antibiotic resistance profiles and antibiotic resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chong-Miao; Xu, Li-Mei; Wang, Xiaochang C; Zhuang, Kai; Liu, Qiang-Qiang

    2017-04-29

    To evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant and subjected to UV disinfection. The effect of UV disinfection on the antibiotic resistance profiles and the antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) of antibiotic-resistant E. coli was evaluated by a combination of antibiotic susceptibility analysis and molecular methods. Results indicated that multiple-antibiotic-resistant (MAR) E. coli were more resistant at low UV doses and required a higher UV dose (20 mJ cm -2 ) to enter the tailing phase compared with those of antibiotic-sensitive E. coli (8 mJ cm -2 ). UV disinfection caused a selective change in the inhibition zone diameters of surviving antibiotic-resistant E. coli and a slight damage to ARGs. The inhibition zone diameters of the strains resistant to antibiotics were more difficult to alter than those susceptible to antibiotics because of the existence and persistence of corresponding ARGs. The resistance of MAR bacteria to UV disinfection at low UV doses and the changes in inhibition zone diameters could potentially contribute to the selection of ARB in wastewater treatment after UV disinfection. The risk of spread of antibiotic resistance still exists owing to the persistence of ARGs. Our study highlights the acquisition of other methods to control the spread of ARGs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Orange Fruit Surfaces and in Juice Using Photocatalysis and High Hydrostatic Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sungyul; Ghafoor, Kashif; Kim, Jeong Un; Kim, Sanghun; Jung, Bora; Lee, Dong-Un; Park, Jiyong

    2015-06-01

    Nonpasteurized orange juice is manufactured by squeezing juice from fruit without peel removal. Fruit surfaces may carry pathogenic microorganisms that can contaminate squeezed juice. Titanium dioxide-UVC photocatalysis (TUVP), a nonthermal technique capable of microbial inactivation via generation of hydroxyl radicals, was used to decontaminate orange surfaces. Levels of spot-inoculated Escherichia coli O157:H7 (initial level of 7.0 log CFU/cm(2)) on oranges (12 cm(2)) were reduced by 4.3 log CFU/ml when treated with TUVP (17.2 mW/cm(2)). Reductions of 1.5, 3.9, and 3.6 log CFU/ml were achieved using tap water, chlorine (200 ppm), and UVC alone (23.7 mW/cm(2)), respectively. E. coli O157:H7 in juice from TUVP (17.2 mW/cm(2))-treated oranges was reduced by 1.7 log CFU/ml. After orange juice was treated with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) at 400 MPa for 1 min without any prior fruit surface disinfection, the level of E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 2.4 log CFU/ml. However, the E. coli O157:H7 level in juice was reduced by 4.7 log CFU/ml (to lower than the detection limit) when TUVP treatment of oranges was followed by HHP treatment of juice, indicating a synergistic inactivation effect. The inactivation kinetics of E. coli O157:H7 on orange surfaces followed a biphasic model. HHP treatment did not affect the pH, °Brix, or color of juice. However, the ascorbic acid concentration and pectinmethylesterase activity were reduced by 35.1 and 34.7%, respectively.

  8. Inactivation and potential reactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice following ultraviolet light exposure at three monochromatic wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fugui; Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Gong, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation at 254 nm is considered as a novel non-thermal method for decontamination of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. However, lower penetration depth of UV light at 254 nm in apple juice resulted in higher UV dose consumption during apple juice decontamination. In addition, no studies are available on the reactivation of pathogens following exposure to UV light in drinks and beverages. Two novel monochromatic UV light sources (λ = 222 and 282 nm) have been developed for bacterial disinfection. However, the inactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 following exposure to these UV wavelengths is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the inactivation and reactivation potential of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice following exposure to UV light at three monochromatic wavelengths: Far UV (λ = 222 nm), Far UV+ (λ = 282 nm) and UVC light (λ = 254 nm). The results showed that E. coli O157:H7 is acid-resistant, and up to 99.50% of cells survived in apple juice when incubated at 20 °C for 24 h. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to Far UV light (2.81 Log reduction) was higher (P light (1.95 Log reduction) and Far UV+ light (1.83 Log reduction) at the similar levels of UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm(2). No any reactivation potential was observed for E. coli O157:H7 in dark incubation phases after exposure to UV light as determined by the regular plating method. In addition, the exposure to Far UV light at 222 nm followed by incubating at 37 °C significantly decreased (P light. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of cloned carotenoid genes expressed in Escherichia coli in protecting against inactivation by near-UV light and specific phototoxic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuveson, R.W.; Larson, R.A.; Kagan, J.

    1988-01-01

    Genes controlling carotenoid synthesis were cloned from Erwinia herbicola and expressed in an Escherichia coli strain. Carotenoids protect against high fluences of near-UV (NUV; 320 to 400 nm) but not against far-UV (200-300 nm). Protection of E. coli cells was not observed following treatment with either psoralen or 8-methoxypsoralen plus NUV. However, significant protection of cells producing carotenoids was observed with three photosensitizing molecules activated by NUV (alpha-terthienyl, harmine, and phenylheptatriyne) which are thought to have the membrane as an important lethal target. Protection of carotenoid-producing cells against inactivation was not observed with acridine orange plus visible light but was seen with toluidine blue O plus visible light

  10. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (pelectric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk. PMID:26877640

  11. Inactivation of Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Lactobacillus brevis in Low-fat Milk by Pulsed Electric Field Treatment: A Pilot-scale Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Joon; Han, Bok Kung; Choi, Hyuk Joon; Kang, Shin Ho; Baick, Seung Chun; Lee, Dong-Un

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment on microbial inactivation and the physical properties of low-fat milk. Milk inoculated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Lactobacillus brevis was supplied to a pilot-scale PEF treatment system at a flow rate of 30 L/h. Pulses with an electric field strength of 10 kV/cm and a pulse width of 30 μs were applied to the milk with total pulse energies of 50-250 kJ/L achieved by varying the pulse frequency. The inactivation curves of the test microorganisms were biphasic with an initial lag phase (or shoulder) followed by a phase of rapid inactivation. PEF treatments with a total pulse energy of 200 kJ/L resulted in a 4.5-log reduction in E. coli, a 4.4-log reduction in L. brevis, and a 6.0-log reduction in S. cerevisiae. Total pulse energies of 200 and 250 kJ/L resulted in greater than 5-log reductions in microbial counts in stored PEF-treated milk, and the growth of surviving microorganisms was slow during storage for 15 d at 4℃. PEF treatment did not change milk physical properties such as pH, color, or particle-size distribution (pelectric-field strength of 10 kV/cm can be used to pasteurize low-fat milk.

  12. Immunomodulatory effect of non-viable components of probiotic culture stimulated with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus on holoxenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Ditu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Competition of probiotic bacteria with other species from the intestinal microbiota involves different mechanisms that occur regardless of probiotics’ viability. The objective of this paper was to assess the cytokine serum levels in holoxenic mice after oral administration of non-viable components (NVC of Enterococcus faecium probiotic culture stimulated with heat-inactivated Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus in comparison to NVC of unstimulated E. faecium probiotic culture. Methods: Probiotic E. faecium CMGb 16 culture, grown in the presence of heat-inactivated cultures of E. coli and B. cereus CMGB 102, was subsequently separated into supernatant (SN and heat-inactivated cellular sediment (CS fractions by centrifugation. Each NVC was orally administered to holoxenic mice (balb C mouse strain, in three doses, given at 24 hours. Blood samples were collected from the retinal artery, at 7, 14, and 21 days after the first administration of the NVC. The serum concentrations of IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α interleukins were assessed by ELISA method. Results: After the oral administration of SN component obtained from the probiotic culture stimulated with heat-inactivated cultures of B. cereus CMGB 102 and E. coli O28, the serum concentrations of IL-12 were maintained higher in the samples collected at 7 and 14 days post-administration. No specific TNF-α profile could be established, depending on stimulated or non-stimulated probiotic culture, NVC fraction, or harvesting time. Conclusion: The obtained results demonstrate that non-viable fractions of probiotic bacteria, stimulated by other bacterial species, could induce immunostimulatory effects mediated by cytokines and act, therefore, as immunological adjuvants.

  13. A combined treatment of UV-light and radio frequency electric field for the inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12 in apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukuku, Dike O; Geveke, David J

    2010-03-31

    Radio frequency electric fields (RFEF) and UV-light treatments have been reported to inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, information on the efficacy of bacterial inactivation by combined treatments of RFEF and UV-light technologies is limited. In this study, we investigated the relationship between cell injury and inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12 in apple juice treated with a combination of RFEF and UV-light. Apple juice purchased from a wholesale distributor was inoculated with E. coli K-12 at 7.8 log CFU/ml, processed with a laboratory scale RFEF unit at 20 kHz, 15 kV/cm for 170 micros at a flow rate of 540 ml/min followed by UV-light treatment (254 nm) for 12s at 25, 30 and 40 degrees C. Treated samples were analyzed for leakage of UV-substances as a function of membrane damage and were plated (0.1 ml) on Sorbitol MacConkey Agar (SMAC) and Trypticase Soy Agar (TSA) plates to determine the viability loss and percent injury. At 40 degrees C, UV-light treatment alone caused 5.8 log reduction of E. coli in apple juice while RFEF caused only 2.8 log reduction. A combination of the two processing treatments did not increase cell injury or leakage of intracellular bacterial UV-substances more than that from the UV-light treatment. Similarly, the viability loss determined was not significantly (P0.05) different than UV-light treated samples. The results of this study suggest that RFEF treatment causes more injury to the bacterial cells leading to more leakage of intracellular UV-substances than cells treated with UV-light alone. Also, the effect of the two processing treatment combination on bacterial inactivation was not additive. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Taxonomy Icon Data: Escherichia coli [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli Escherichia coli Escherichia_coli_L.png Escherichia_coli_NL.png Escherichia..._coli_S.png Escherichia_coli_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+co...li&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxono...my_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Escherichia+coli&t=NS ...

  15. Plant extracts, spices, and essential oils inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and reduce formation of potentially carcinogenic heterocyclic amines in cooked beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounds, Liliana; Havens, Cody M; Feinstein, Yelena; Friedman, Mendel; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2012-04-11

    Meats need to be heated to inactivate foodborne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7. High-temperature treatment used to prepare well-done meats increases the formation of carcinogenic heterocyclic amines (HCAs). We evaluated the ability of plant extracts, spices, and essential oils to simultaneously inactivate E. coli O157:H7 and suppress HCA formation in heated hamburger patties. Ground beef with added antimicrobials was inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (10(7) CFU/g). Patties were cooked to reach 45 °C at the geometric center, flipped, and cooked for 5 min. Samples were then taken for microbiological and mass spectrometry analysis of HCAs. Some compounds were inhibitory only against E. coli or HCA formation, while some others inhibited both. Addition of 5% olive or apple skin extracts reduced E. coli O157:H7 populations to below the detection limit and by 1.6 log CFU/g, respectively. Similarly, 1% lemongrass oil reduced E. coli O157:H7 to below detection limits, while clove bud oil reduced the pathogen by 1.6 log CFU/g. The major heterocyclic amines 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx) and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were concurrently reduced with the addition of olive extract by 79.5% and 84.3% and with apple extract by 76.1% and 82.1%, respectively. Similar results were observed with clove bud oil: MeIQx and PhIP were reduced by 35% and 52.1%, respectively. Addition of onion powder decreased formation of PhIP by 94.3%. These results suggest that edible natural plant compounds have the potential to prevent foodborne infections as well as carcinogenesis in humans consuming heat-processed meat products.

  16. The inactivation of rfaP, rarA or sspA gene improves the viability of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holD mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sinha, Anurag Kumar

    2017-06-01

    The Escherichia coli holD mutant is poorly viable because the stability of holoenzyme polymerase III (Pol III HE) on DNA is compromised. Consequently, the SOS response is induced and the SOS polymerases DinB and Pol II further hinder replication. Mutations that restore the holD mutant viability belong to two classes, those that stabilize Pol III on DNA and those that prevent the deleterious effects of DinB over-production. We identified a dnaX mutation and the inactivation of rfaP and sspA genes as belonging to the first class of holD mutant suppressors. dnaX encodes a Pol III clamp loader subunit that interacts with HolD. rfaP encodes a lipopolysaccharide kinase that acts in outer membrane biogenesis. Its inactivation improves the holD mutant growth in part by affecting potassium import, previously proposed to stabilize Pol III HE on DNA by increasing electrostatic interactions. sspA encodes a global transcriptional regulator and growth of the holD mutant in its absence suggests that SspA controls genes that affect protein-DNA interactions. The inactivation of rarA belongs to the second class of suppressor mutations. rarA inactivation has a weak effect but is additive with other suppressor mutations. Our results suggest that RarA facilitates DinB binding to abandoned forks. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Enhanced Escherichia coli inactivation and oxytetracycline hydrochloride degradation by a Z-scheme silver iodide decorated bismuth vanadate nanocomposite under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dan-Lin; Niu, Cheng-Gang; Wen, Xiao-Ju; Guo, Hai; Deng, Can-Hui; Zeng, Guang-Ming

    2018-02-15

    Novel Z-scheme AgI/BiVO 4 photocatalysts were fabricated by a chemical deposition-precipitation approach. The photocatalytic activities of the obtained catalysts were evaluated by disinfection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and degradation of oxytetracycline hydrochloride (OTC-HCl) under visible-light irradiation. The BA3 (contained 9.09% of AgI) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity and maintained good stability. It could completely inactivate 7.0×10 7 CFU/mL of E. coli in 50 min and degrade 80% of OTC-HCl in 60 min. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of AgI/BiVO 4 composites could be ascribed to the lower recombination rate of electron-hole pairs. Meanwhile, radical trapping experiments revealed that the superoxide radical (O 2 - ) and holes (h + ) were the dominant reactive species in photo-disinfection process. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial initial concentration and inorganic anions were also investigated to optimize the photocatalyst for practical application. This study will give a new insight to construct the effective Z-scheme system for bacterial inactivation and organic pollutants degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ultraviolet action spectra for aerobic and anaerobic inactivation of Escherichia coli strains specifically sensitive and resistant to near ultraviolet radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, J.G.; Peak, M.J.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Action spectra for the lethal effects of ultraviolet light (254-434 nm) irradiation delivered under aerobic or anaerobic conditions to Escherichia coli RT2 (specifically sensitive to near-UV radiation; > 320 nm) and E. coli RT4 (near-UV resistant) were prepared. Negligible oxygen dependence was observed for both strains below about 315 nm. The oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for RT4 increased above this wavelength to the longest wavelength used, whereas for RT2 there was a greater increase in the OER to a large peak at 365 nm, then a progressive decrease at longer wavelengths. The results are consistent with the possibility that the sensitivity of strain RT2 to near-UV radiation may be due to hyperproduction of photosensitizer, operating via photodynamic type reactions involving excited species of oxygen. (author)

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fruit juices by combined treatments of citrus fruit essential oils and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina, Laura; Somolinos, María; Ouazzou, Abdenour Ait; Condón, Santiago; García-Gonzalo, Diego; Pagán, Rafael

    2012-09-17

    This work approaches the possibility of combining mild heat treatments with citrus fruit essential oils (EOs) to improve the effectiveness of heat treatments and thus to reduce treatment intensity. Concentrations between 10 and 200 μL/L of lemon, mandarin, or orange EO were tested at 54 °C for 10 min in laboratory media, determining that 200 μL/L of each EO was necessary to achieve a 5 log(10) reduction of the initial Escherichia coli O157:H7 concentration. A relationship could be established between sublethally injured cells after the heat treatment and inactivated cells after the combined process. In apple juice, the synergism in the inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 when adding 200 μL/L of lemon EO might suppose a reduction in the treatment temperature (of 4.5 °C) or in the treatment time (by 5.7 times) within the range of temperature assayed (54-60 °C). Addition of 75 μL/L of lemon EO was determined to achieve the same synergistic effect of the combined treatment when the initial inoculum was reduced from 3×10(7) to 3×10(4) CFU/mL. Since the addition of lemon EO did not decrease the hedonic acceptability of apple juice, the proposed combined treatment could be further studied and optimized for the production of new minimally processed juices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds by sequential treatments with chlorine dioxide, drying, and dry heat without loss of seed viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2011-09-01

    We developed and validated a treatment to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without decreasing seed viability. Treatments with aqueous ClO(2) followed by drying and dry-heat treatments were evaluated for efficacy to inactivate the pathogen. Conditions to dry radish seeds after treatment with water (control) or ClO(2) were established. When treated seeds with high water activity (a(w)) (>0.99) were stored at 45°C and 23% relative humidity (RH), the a(w) decreased to dry-heat treatment (≥60°C) was essential to preserve seed viability. The germination rate of radish seeds which had been immersed in water for 5 min, dried at 45°C and 23% RH for 24 h, and heated at 70°C for 48 h or at 80°C for 24 h was not significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared to that of untreated radish seeds. Sequential treatments with ClO(2) (500 μg/ml, 5 min), drying (45°C, 23% RH, 24 h), and dry heating (70°C, 23% RH, 48 h) eliminated E. coli O157:H7 (5.9 log CFU/g) on radish seeds and, consequently, sprouts produced from them without decreasing the germination rate. These sequential treatments are recommended for application to radish seeds intended for sprout production.

  1. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 on Radish Seeds by Sequential Treatments with Chlorine Dioxide, Drying, and Dry Heat without Loss of Seed Viability ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Kim, Haeyoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R.; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    We developed and validated a treatment to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 on radish seeds without decreasing seed viability. Treatments with aqueous ClO2 followed by drying and dry-heat treatments were evaluated for efficacy to inactivate the pathogen. Conditions to dry radish seeds after treatment with water (control) or ClO2 were established. When treated seeds with high water activity (aw) (>0.99) were stored at 45°C and 23% relative humidity (RH), the aw decreased to dry-heat treatment (≥60°C) was essential to preserve seed viability. The germination rate of radish seeds which had been immersed in water for 5 min, dried at 45°C and 23% RH for 24 h, and heated at 70°C for 48 h or at 80°C for 24 h was not significantly decreased (P ≤ 0.05) compared to that of untreated radish seeds. Sequential treatments with ClO2 (500 μg/ml, 5 min), drying (45°C, 23% RH, 24 h), and dry heating (70°C, 23% RH, 48 h) eliminated E. coli O157:H7 (5.9 log CFU/g) on radish seeds and, consequently, sprouts produced from them without decreasing the germination rate. These sequential treatments are recommended for application to radish seeds intended for sprout production. PMID:21803896

  2. Inactivation of Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on lettuce and poultry skin by combinations of levulinic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tong; Zhao, Ping; Doyle, Michael P

    2009-05-01

    Four organic acids (lactic acid, acetic acid, caprylic acid, and levulinic acid) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were evaluated individually or in combination for their ability to inactivate Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7. Results from pure culture assays in water with the treatment chemical revealed that 0.5% organic acid and 0.05 to 1% SDS, when used individually, reduced pathogen cell numbers by acids at 0.5% with 0.05% SDS resulted in > 7 log CFU/ml inactivation of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 within 10 s at 21 degrees C. A combination of levulinic acid and SDS was evaluated at different concentrations for pathogen reduction on lettuce at 21 degrees C, on poultry (wings and skin) at 8 degrees C, and in water containing chicken feces or feathers at 21 degrees C. Results revealed that treatment of lettuce with a combination of 3% levulinic acid plus 1% SDS for 6.7 log CFU/g on lettuce. Salmonella and aerobic bacterial populations on chicken wings were reduced by > 5 log CFU/g by treatment with 3% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS for 1 min. Treating water heavily contaminated with chicken feces with 3% levulinic acid plus 2% SDS reduced Salmonella populations by > 7 log CFU/ml within 20 s. The use of levulinic acid plus SDS as a wash solution may have practical application for killing foodborne enteric pathogens on fresh produce and uncooked poultry.

  3. Amino acid residues involved in inactivation of the Escherichia coli multidrug resistance repressor MarR by salicylate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and plumbagin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Laura M.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2013-01-01

    MarR is the dedicated autorepressor of the marRAB operon found in seven genera of the Enterobacteraceae. The MarA transcriptional regulator directly activates numerous genes involved in multidrug resistance and other environmental responses. MarR is inactivated by certain phenolic ligands, such as salicylate, by an unknown mechanism. Our recent work has shown that several amino acid residues of Escherichia coli MarR affecting ligand binding are located between the dimerization and DNA-binding domains. To further characterize the ligand-binding region of MarR, we have now examined seven point mutants generated by random mutagenesis and eleven site-directed alanine replacement mutants for inactivation by three ligands: salicylate, 2,4-dinitrophenol, and plumbagin. Inactivation of MarR was quantitated in intact cells by loss of MarR-mediated repression of a chromosomal mar-lacZ transcriptional fusion. The results showed that most of the residues important for ligand effectiveness lay in the α1 and α2 helices of MarR, between the putative DNA-binding domain and the dimerization domain of MarR, reinforcing our earlier findings. Moreover, the three ligands had different, but overlapping, sets of residues impacting their effects on MarR. PMID:24111786

  4. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella during washing of contaminated gloves in levulinic acid and sodium dodecyl sulfate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Marilyn C; Liao, Jye-Yin; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Cannon, Jennifer L

    2018-08-01

    Field workers often wear gloves harvesting ready-to-eat produce; however, fields are not sterile environments and gloves may become contaminated numerous times during a working shift. This study explored the potential for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella when contaminated gloves were washed in levulinic acid (LV) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions. Washing nitrile gloves with increasing concentrations of LV above 1.0% led to a decreased prevalence of glove contamination by Salmonella (P = 0.0000). A higher level of prevalence occurred for solid agar-cultured pathogens than liquid broth-cultured pathogens after nitrile gloves were washed in LV/SDS (P = 0.0000). Pathogens residing on latex gloves were more likely to be completely inactivated by washing in 0.5% LV/0.1% SDS solutions than nitrile or Canners gloves that exhibited inconsistent responses dependent on the pathogen strain. However, drying after washing nitrile gloves in 0.5% LV/0.1% SDS led to additional pathogen inactivation (P = 0.0394). Pathogen transfer from gloves to produce was implied as the pathogen prevalence on cantaloupe rind handled by LV/SDS-washed gloves was not statistically different from the prevalence on gloves (P = 0.7141). Hence, the risk of produce contamination may still exist but would be reduced by washing gloves in LV/SDS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation inactivation of Salmonella panama and Escherichia coli K 12 present on deep-frozen broiler carcasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, R.W.A.W.

    1976-01-01

    Low doses of ionizing radiation have been used to extend the shelf life of refrigerated poultry carcasses and to reduce the numbers of Salmonellae present. This report gives results of experiments on irradiation of deep-frozen poultry carcasses which were, before freezing, artificially contaminated with Salmonella panama and with a nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli K 12. The D-values (decimal reduction) obtained with the inoculated carcasses were compared with D-values obtained with carcasses which were slaughtered in the normal way. The D-values for S.panama and for E.coli K 12 were 64.9 krad and 55.9 krad in the dripwater. Under commercial conditions approximately 100 krad were required for one decimal reduction of the Enterobacteriaceae present. The D-values estimated on the skin were higher for S.panama than for E.coli K 12 (128.6 krad vs 57.6 krad). If it is assumed that 1 positive carcass in 10,000 is allowed, the deep-frozen carcasses should be irradiated with doses of at least 700 krad to be sure of the absence of the tested S.panama strain. (orig.) [de

  6. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella typhimurium with compounds available in households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Kendall, Patricia A; Medeiros, Lydia; Sofos, John N

    2009-06-01

    Solutions of selected household products were tested for their effectiveness against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella Typhimurium. Hydrogen peroxide (1.5 and 3%), vinegar (2.5 and 5% acetic acid), baking soda (11, 33, and 50% sodium bicarbonate), household bleach (0.0314, 0.0933, and 0.670% sodium hypochlorite), 5% acetic acid (prepared from glacial acetic acid), and 5% citric acid solutions were tested against the three pathogens individually (five-strain composites of each, 10(8) CFU/ml) by using a modified AOAC International suspension test at initial temperatures of 25 and 55degrees C for 1 and 10 min. All bleach solutions (pH 8.36 to 10.14) produced a >5-log reduction of all pathogens tested after 1 min at 25 degrees C, whereas all baking soda solutions (pH 7.32 to 7.55) were ineffective (5-log reduction of both Salmonella Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7, whereas undiluted vinegar (pH 2.58) had a similar effect only against Salmonella Typhimurium. Compared with 1 min at 25 degrees C, greater reductions of L. monocytogenes (P 3% hydrogen peroxide > undiluted vinegar and 5% acetic acid > 5% citric acid > baking soda (50% sodium bicarbonate). The sensitivity of the tested pathogens to all tested household compounds followed the sequence of Salmonella Typhimurium > E. coli O157: H7 > L. monocytogenes.

  7. Determining Thermal Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Fresh Compost by Simulating Early Phases of the Composting Process ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kim, Jinkyung; Shepherd, Marion W.; Luo, Feng; Jiang, Xiuping

    2011-01-01

    A three-strain mixture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated into fresh dairy compost (ca. 107 CFU/g) with 40 or 50% moisture and was placed in an environmental chamber (ca. 70% humidity) that was programmed to ramp from room temperature to selected composting temperatures in 2 and 5 days to simulate the early composting phase. The surviving E. coli O157:H7 population was analyzed by direct plating and enrichment. Optimal and suboptimal compost mixes, with carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of 25:1 and 16:1, respectively, were compared in this study. In the optimal compost mix, E. coli O157:H7 survived for 72, 48, and 24 h in compost with 40% moisture and for 72, 24, and 24 h with 50% moisture at 50, 55, and 60°C, respectively, following 2 days of come-up time (rate of heating up). However, in the suboptimal compost mix, the pathogen survived for 288, 72, and 48 h in compost with 40% moisture and for 240, 72, 24 h in compost with 50% moisture at the same temperatures, respectively. Pathogen survival was longer, with 5 days of come-up time compared with 2 days of come-up. Overall, E. coli O157:H7 was inactivated faster in the compost with 50% moisture than in the compost with 40% at 55 and 60°C. Both moisture and come-up time were significant factors affecting Weibull model parameters. Our results suggest that slow come-up time at the beginning of composting can extend pathogen survival during composting. Additionally, both the C/N ratio and the initial moisture level in the compost mix affect the rate of pathogen inactivation as well. PMID:21498743

  8. Determining thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in fresh compost by simulating early phases of the composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randhir; Kim, Jinkyung; Shepherd, Marion W; Luo, Feng; Jiang, Xiuping

    2011-06-01

    A three-strain mixture of Escherichia coli O157:H7 was inoculated into fresh dairy compost (ca. 10(7) CFU/g) with 40 or 50% moisture and was placed in an environmental chamber (ca. 70% humidity) that was programmed to ramp from room temperature to selected composting temperatures in 2 and 5 days to simulate the early composting phase. The surviving E. coli O157:H7 population was analyzed by direct plating and enrichment. Optimal and suboptimal compost mixes, with carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratios of 25:1 and 16:1, respectively, were compared in this study. In the optimal compost mix, E. coli O157:H7 survived for 72, 48, and 24 h in compost with 40% moisture and for 72, 24, and 24 h with 50% moisture at 50, 55, and 60°C, respectively, following 2 days of come-up time (rate of heating up). However, in the suboptimal compost mix, the pathogen survived for 288, 72, and 48 h in compost with 40% moisture and for 240, 72, 24 h in compost with 50% moisture at the same temperatures, respectively. Pathogen survival was longer, with 5 days of come-up time compared with 2 days of come-up. Overall, E. coli O157:H7 was inactivated faster in the compost with 50% moisture than in the compost with 40% at 55 and 60°C. Both moisture and come-up time were significant factors affecting Weibull model parameters. Our results suggest that slow come-up time at the beginning of composting can extend pathogen survival during composting. Additionally, both the C/N ratio and the initial moisture level in the compost mix affect the rate of pathogen inactivation as well.

  9. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. on alfalfa seeds by caprylic acid and monocaprylin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-sen; Redondo-Solano, Mauricio; Thippareddi, Harshavardhan

    2010-11-15

    Alfalfa and other seed sprouts have been implicated in several Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. human illness outbreaks in the U.S. Continuing food safety issues with alfalfa seeds necessitate the need for discovery and use of novel and effective antimicrobials. The potential use of caprylic acid (CA) and monocaprylin (MC) for reducing E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. populations on alfalfa seeds was evaluated. The effectiveness of three concentrations of CA and MC (25, 50, and 75 mM) to reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. populations in 0.1% peptone water and on alfalfa seeds was evaluated. Surviving populations of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. were enumerated by direct plating on tryptic soy agar (TSA). Non-inoculated alfalfa seeds were soaked for up to 120 min to evaluate the effect of CA and MC solutions on seed germination rate. For planktonic cells, the efficacy of the treatments was: 75 MC > 50 MC > 25 MC > 75 CA > 50 CA > 25 CA. Both E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. were reduced to below the detection limit (0.6 log CFU/ml) within 10 min of exposure to 75 MC from initial populations of 7.65 ± 0.10 log CFU/ml and 7.71 ± 0.11 log CFU/ml, respectively. Maximum reductions of 1.56 ± 0.25 and 2.56 ± 0.17 log CFU/g for E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp., respectively, were achieved on inoculated alfalfa seeds (from initial populations of 4.74 ± 0.62 logCFU/g and 5.27±0.20logCFU/g, respectively) when treated with 75 MC for 90 min. Germination rates of CA or MC treated seeds ranged from 84% to 99%. The germination rates of CA or MC soaked seeds and water soaked seeds (control) were similar (P > 0.05) for soaking times of ≤ 90 min. Monocaprylin (75 mM) can be used to reduce E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. on alfalfa seeds without compromising seed viability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Roles of individual radicals generated by a submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor during Escherichia coli O157:H7 inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Saiful Islam [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun-Jung [Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun-Ji, E-mail: yunji@kfri.re.kr [Department of Food Biotechnology, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Food Safety Research Group, Korea Food Research Institute, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A submerged dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor (underwater DBD) has been used on Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ATCC 35150). Plasma treatment was carried out using clean dry air gas to investigate the individual effects of the radicals produced by underwater DBD on an E. coli O157:H7 suspension (8.0 log CFU/ml). E. coli O157:H7 was reduced by 6.0 log CFU/ml for 2 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment. Optical Emission Spectra (OES) shows that OH and NO (α, β) radicals, generated by underwater DBD along with ozone gas. E. coli O157:H7 were reduced by 2.3 log CFU/ml for 10 min of underwater DBD plasma treatment with the terephthalic acid (TA) OH radical scavenger solution, which is significantly lower (3.7 log CFU/ml) than the result obtained without using the OH radical scavenger. A maximum of 1.5 ppm of ozone gas was produced during the discharge of underwater DBD, and the obtained reduction difference in E.coli O157:H7 in presence and in absence of ozone gas was 1.68 log CFU/ml. The remainder of the 0.62 log CFU/ml reduction might be due to the effect of the NO (α, β) radicals or due to the combined effect of all the radicals produced by underwater DBD. A small amount of hydrogen peroxide was also generated but does not play any role in E. coli O157:H7 inactivation.

  11. Effect of several food ingredients on radiation inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into ground pork

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyejeong [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Lacroix, Monique [Canadian Irradiation Center, Research Laboratory in Science Applied to Food, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Qebec (Canada); Jung, Samooel [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Keehyuk [Department of Culinary Nutrition, Woosong University, Daejeon 300-718 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Woon [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Cheorun, E-mail: cheorun@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Animal Science and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of several food ingredients on the relative radiation sensitivity (RRS) of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto ground pork. Garlic, leek, onion, and ginger were prepared in 3 different forms; pressurized, freeze-dried, and 70% ethanol extracted. The prepared food ingredients were subdivided into 2 groups, non-irradiated and irradiated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation, before addition to ground pork. The prepared food ingredients were added at concentrations of 1% and 5% (w/w) into radiation-sterilized ground pork and inoculated with E. coli and L. monocytogenes (10{sup 6} CFU/mL). For E. coli inoculated pork, the most efficient ingredient was ethanol extracted leek (RRS=3.89), followed by freeze-dried ginger and leek (RRS=3.66 and 3.63, respectively) when used without pasteurization. However, when the food ingredients were irradiation-pasteurized, the freeze-dried ginger showed the highest RRS (4.10). When 5% natural materials were added, RRS was the highest for freeze-dried and ethanol extracted onion (4.44 and 4.65, respectively). For L. monocytogenes, the RRS was relatively lower than E. coli in general. The most efficient material was pressurized and freeze-dried onion (RRS=2.13 and 2.08, respectively) at a concentration of 1%. No increase in RRS was observed at increased concentration of food ingredients. These results suggest that the addition of particular food ingredients increased the efficiency of radiation-sterilization. However, changes in RRS were dependent on the species of microorganism as well as the form of the food ingredients. - Highlights: > Several food ingredients increased the efficiency of irradiation sterilization. > Different forms of food ingredients may affect the efficiency. > The increase of efficiency decreased the required irradiation dose, thereby avoiding sensory impairments of food.

  12. Effect of several food ingredients on radiation inactivation of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated into ground pork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Lacroix, Monique; Jung, Samooel; Kim, Keehyuk; Lee, Ju Woon; Jo, Cheorun

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of several food ingredients on the relative radiation sensitivity (RRS) of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated onto ground pork. Garlic, leek, onion, and ginger were prepared in 3 different forms; pressurized, freeze-dried, and 70% ethanol extracted. The prepared food ingredients were subdivided into 2 groups, non-irradiated and irradiated with 5 kGy of gamma irradiation, before addition to ground pork. The prepared food ingredients were added at concentrations of 1% and 5% (w/w) into radiation-sterilized ground pork and inoculated with E. coli and L. monocytogenes (10 6 CFU/mL). For E. coli inoculated pork, the most efficient ingredient was ethanol extracted leek (RRS=3.89), followed by freeze-dried ginger and leek (RRS=3.66 and 3.63, respectively) when used without pasteurization. However, when the food ingredients were irradiation-pasteurized, the freeze-dried ginger showed the highest RRS (4.10). When 5% natural materials were added, RRS was the highest for freeze-dried and ethanol extracted onion (4.44 and 4.65, respectively). For L. monocytogenes, the RRS was relatively lower than E. coli in general. The most efficient material was pressurized and freeze-dried onion (RRS=2.13 and 2.08, respectively) at a concentration of 1%. No increase in RRS was observed at increased concentration of food ingredients. These results suggest that the addition of particular food ingredients increased the efficiency of radiation-sterilization. However, changes in RRS were dependent on the species of microorganism as well as the form of the food ingredients.

  13. Effect of milk fat content on the performance of ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S-S; Kang, D-H

    2015-08-01

    The effect of milk fat content on ohmic heating compared to conventional heating for inactivation of food-borne pathogens was investigated. Sterile cream was mixed with sterile buffered peptone water and adjusted to 0, 3, 7, 10% (w/v) milk fat content. These samples with varying fat content were subjected to ohmic and conventional heating. The effect of milk fat on temperature increase and electrical conductivity were investigated. Also, the protective effect of milk fat on the inactivation of foodborne pathogens was studied. For conventional heating, temperatures of samples increased with time and were not significantly (P > 0.05) different regardless of fat content. Although the inactivation rate of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and L. monocytogens decreased in samples of 10% fat content, a protective effect was not observed for conventional heating. In contrast with conventional heating, ohmic heating was significantly affected by milk fat content. Temperature increased more rapidly with lower fat content for ohmic heating due to higher electrical conductivity. Nonuniform heat generation of nonhomogeneous fat-containing samples was verified using a thermal infrared camera. Also, the protective effect of milk fat on E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes was observed in samples subjected to ohmic heating. These results indicate that food-borne pathogens can survive in nonhomogeneous fat-containing foods subjected to ohmic heating. Therefore, more attention is needed regarding ohmic heating than conventional heating for pasteurizing fat-containing foods. The importance of adequate pasteurization for high milk fat containing foods was identified. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Effectiveness of sanitizing agents in inactivating Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922 in food cutting board surfaces. Removal E. coli using different sanitizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CEZAR AUGUSTO BELTRAME

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate Escherichia coli adhesion on new and used polyethylene cutting board surface and evaluate it’s removal using different sanitizer (peracetic acid,chlorhexidine, sodium hypochlorite and organic acids. Results indicated that the number of adherent cells increased with time in both surfaces evaluated. Evaluating the sanitizer action, 0.5%peracetic acid was more effective in removal E. coli than chlorhexidine and organic acids at same concentration in both surfaces. Peracetic acid and sodium hypochlorite also showed effectiveness at concentrations of 0.2% and 0.5% on new surfaces, respectively. 0.8% of chlorhexidine and 2.0% of organic acids showed similar effectiveness in the removal E. coli on new and used surfaces, respectively.These results suggest that peracetic acid is considerable promise sanitizer for application in surfaces of the food processing industry.

  15. Radio-frequency heating to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on black and red pepper spice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Youn; Sagong, Hun-Gu; Choi, Sang Ho; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2012-02-01

    The efficacy of radio-frequency (RF) heating to inactivate Salmonella Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on black and red pepper spice was investigated. A 27.12 MHz RF heating system consisted of two parallel-plate electrodes was used, with the sample being placed between them. Black peppers (whole and ground) and red peppers (+ 16 mesh, -16 + 25 mesh, and -25 mesh) inoculated with S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 were treated with RF energy during 50s for black peppers and 40s for red peppers, and color change of samples was evaluated after treatment. RF heating for 50s resulted in 2.80 to 4.29 log CFU/g reductions of S. Typhimurium and E. coli O157:H7 in black peppers and RF heating of red peppers for 40s reduced pathogens by 3.38 log CFU/g to more than 5 log CFU/g (below the detection limit) without affecting the color quality change. The results suggest that RF heating has the potential for novel thermal process to control foodborne pathogens in spice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in hamburgers by gamma irradiation Inativação de Escherichia coli O157:H7 em hambúrgueres submetidos à irradiação gama

    OpenAIRE

    Rodolfo R.O. Chirinos; Dirceu M. Vizeu; Maria Teresa Destro; Bernadette D.G.M. Franco; Mariza Landgraf

    2002-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 causes bloody diarrhoea, haemorrhagic colitis and life-threatening complications like haemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocitopenic purpura. Among foods associated with outbreaks caused by this pathogen, hamburger is the most common one. The aim of this research was to determine the radiation dose to reduce the population of E. coli O157:H7 in hamburgers to non-detectable levels in order to render a safer product. Hamburgers, inoculated with Escherichia c...

  17. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in apple juice at different pH levels by gaseous ozone treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W-J; Shin, J-Y; Ryu, S; Kang, D-H

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the effect of ozone treatment of apple juice at different pH levels for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Apple juice (pH 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) inoculated with the three pathogens were treated with gaseous ozone (3.0 l min(-1) flow rate and 2.0-3.0 g m(-3) ) for up to 4 min. Ozone treatment (4 min) of pH 3.0 apple juice resulted in >5.36 log CFU ml(-1) reduction of E. coli O157:H7. Ozone treatment of pH 4.0 and 5.0 apple juice for 4 min reduced this pathogen by 5.12 log CFU ml(-1) and 1.86 log CFU ml(-1) respectively. The combination of low pH and ozone showed a great antimicrobial effect in apple juice. Salm. Typhimurium and L. monocytogenes showed a reduction trend similar to E. coli O157:H7. There were no significant changes of colour values when apple juice was treated with ozone, except for b values. Among all ozone treated samples, the browning index was lower than that of nontreated samples and there were no significant differences in total phenolic contents. In conclusion, ozone treatment of low pH apple juice was significantly effective in inactivation of foodborne pathogens while maintaining acceptable apple juice quality. The antimicrobial effect of ozone treatment on foodborne pathogens in apple juice can be reinforced by lowering the pH of apple juice. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-bake cookie dough by gamma and electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seul-Gi; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of gamma and electron beam irradiation to inactivate foodborne pathogens in ready-to-bake cookie dough and to determine the effect on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Cookie dough inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, or Listeria monocytogenes was subjected to gamma and electron beam irradiation, with doses ranging from 0 to 3 kGy. As the radiation dose increased, the inactivation effect increased among all tested pathogens. After 3.0 kGy of gamma and electron beam irradiation, numbers of inoculated pathogens were reduced to below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g). The D 10 -values of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes in cookie dough treated with gamma rays were 0.53, 0.51, and 0.71 kGy, respectively, which were similar to those treated by electron beam with the same dose. Based on the D 10 -value of pathogens in cookie dough, L. monocytogenes showed more resistance to both treatments than did E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium. Color values and textural characteristics of irradiated cookie dough were not significantly (P > 0.05) different from the control. These results suggest that irradiation can be applied to control pathogens in ready-to-bake cookie dough products without affecting quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation of acid-adapted and nonadapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 during drying and storage of beef jerky treated with different marinades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calicioglu, Mehmet; Sofos, John N; Samelis, John; Kendall, Patricia A; Smith, Gary C

    2002-09-01

    The inactivation of both acid-adapted and unadapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 during the processing of beef jerky was studied. Following inoculation with the pathogen, beef slices were subjected to different predrying marinade treatments, dried at 60 degrees C for 10 h, and stored at 25 degrees C for 60 d. The predrying treatments evaluated were as follows: (i) no treatment (C), (ii) traditional marinade (TM), (iii) double-strength TM modified with added 1.2% sodium lactate, 9% acetic acid, and 68% soy sauce with 5% ethanol (MM), (iv) dipping into 5% acetic acid for 10 min followed by application of TM (AATM), and (v) dipping into 1% Tween 20 for 15 min and then into 5% acetic acid for 10 min followed by TM (TWTM). Bacterial survivors were determined during drying and storage using tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate, modified eosin methylene blue agar, and sorbitol MacConkey agar. Results indicated that bacterial populations decreased during drying in the order of TWTM (4.9 to 6.7 log) > AATM > MM > C > or = TM (2.8 to 4.9 log) predrying treatments. Populations of acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 decreased faster (P < 0.05) in AATM and TWTM than nonadapted cells during drying, whereas no significant difference was found in inactivation of acid-adapted and nonadapted inocula in C and TM samples. MM was more effective in inactivating the nonadapted than the adapted inoculum. Bacterial populations continued to decline during storage and dropped below the detection limit (-0.4 log10 CFU/cm2) as early as day 0 (after drying) or as late as day 60, depending on acid adaptation, predrying treatment, and agar medium. The results indicated that acid adaptation may not increase resistance to the hurdles involved in jerky processing and that use of additional antimicrobial chemicals or preservatives in jerky marination may improve the effectiveness of drying in inactivating E. coli O157:H7.

  20. 76 FR 20542 - Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic host bacteria... specific to Escherichia coli O157:H7, sequence negative for shiga toxins I and II, and grown on atoxigenic... exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Escherichia coli O157:H7 Specific...

  1. Effect of frequency and waveform on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in salsa by ohmic heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Yeon; Ryu, Sangryeol; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The effect of frequency of alternating current during ohmic heating on electrode corrosion, heating rate, inactivation of food-borne pathogens, and quality of salsa was investigated. The impact of waveform on heating rate was also investigated. Salsa was treated with various frequencies (60 Hz to 20 kHz) and waveforms (sine, square, and sawtooth) at a constant electric field strength of 12.5 V/cm. Electrode corrosion did not occur when the frequency exceeded 1 kHz. The heating rate of the sample was dependent on frequency up to 500 Hz, but there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the heating rate when the frequency was increased above 1 kHz. The electrical conductivity of the sample increased with a rise in the frequency. At a frequency of 60 Hz, the square wave produced a lower heating rate than that of sine and sawtooth waves. The heating rate between waveforms was not significantly (P > 0.05) different when the frequency was >500 Hz. As the frequency increased, the treatment time required to reduce Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to below the detection limit (1 log CFU/g) decreased without affecting product quality. These results suggest that ohmic heating can be effectively used to pasteurize salsa and that the effect of inactivation is dependent on frequency and electrical conductivity rather than waveform.

  2. Effectiveness of the Thermal Treatments Used for Curd Stretching in the Inactivation of Shiga Toxin-Producing O157 and O26 Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Trevisani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The kneading treatment of the fresh curd in hot water is a critical control point in the manufacturing of mozzarella. Factors such as the ratio between hot water and curd mass, the rheological properties, and the mixing and kneading activity affect the processing time and the internal temperature of the curd. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal treatments on the fate of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC. Nine curd samples (weight 160–270 g were artificially contaminated with O157 or O26 STEC and stretched in hot water (90–95°C for 5–10 min. Depending on the heating process and spinning, different nonisothermal profiles were recorded. Observed reductions of O157 and O26 STEC varied between 1.01 and more than 5.38 log⁡MPN (Most Probable Number/g at the end of the temperature treatments. Further, nonisothermal log-linear tail models were developed to compare observed reductions for O157 and O26 VTEC under variable temperature conditions. Results obtained showed that the comparison of predictions provided by the dynamic model with observations described well the linear inactivation pattern since nonsignificant differences were denoted at all profiles tested. The dynamic model developed can be useful to evaluate the effectiveness of the thermal treatments used in the manufacturing of mozzarella in the inactivation of STEC.

  3. Effectiveness of superheated steam for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 30, and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and pistachios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-03-02

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of superheated steam (SHS) on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis phage type (PT) 30 and Listeria monocytogenes on almonds and in-shell pistachios and to determine the effect of superheated steam heating on quality by measuring color and texture changes. Almonds and in-shell pistachios inoculated with four foodborne pathogens were treated with saturated steam (SS) at 100 °C and SHS at 125, 150, 175, and 200 °C for various times. Exposure of almonds and pistachios to SHS for 15 or 30s at 200 °C achieved >5l og reductions among all tested pathogens without causing significant changes in color values or texture parameters (P>0.05). For both almonds and pistachios, acid and peroxide values (PV) following SS and SHS treatment for up to 15s and 30s, respectively, were within the acceptable range (PVnuts industry by improving inactivation of foodborne pathogens on almonds and pistachios while simultaneously reducing processing time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of RAD4 gene required for ultraviolet-induced excision repair of Saccharomyces cerevisiae propagated in Escherichia coli without inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, I.S.; Kim, J.B.; Lee, K.N.; Park, S.D.

    1990-01-01

    The previously isolated RAD4 gene designated as pPC1 from the genomic library of Saccharomyces cerevisiae appeared to propagate in Escherichia coli and yet retained its complementing activity of rad4 mutants without inactivation. The subcloned RAD4 gene was found to be localized within a 2.5 kb DNA fragment flanking Bg/II and BamHI sites in the insert DNA, and was shown to have the same restriction map as a yeast chromosomal DNA, as determined by Southern hybridization. Tetrad analysis and pulse-field chromosome mapping have revealed that the cloned RAD4 gene can be mapped and integrated into the yeast chromosome V, the actual site of this gene. DNA-tRNA hybridization has shown that the isolated RAD4 gene did not contain a suppressor tRNA gene. These results have indicated that the pPC1 is a functional RAD4 gene playing a unique role involved in the nucleotide excision repair of yeast without any genetic change during amplification in E. coli. (author)

  5. Inactivation of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Ground Chicken Meat Using High Pressure Processing and Gamma Radiation, and in Purge and Chicken Meat Surfaces by Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Christopher H; Scullen, O J; Sheen, Shiowshuh

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli, including uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are common contaminants in poultry meat and may cause urinary tract infections after colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and transfer of contaminated feces to the urethra. Three non-thermal processing technologies used to improve the safety and shelf-life of both human and pet foods include high pressure processing (HPP), ionizing (gamma) radiation (GR), and ultraviolet light (UV-C). Multi-isolate cocktails of UPEC were inoculated into ground chicken which was then treated with HPP (4°C, 0-25 min) at 300, 400, or 500 MPa. HPP D10, the processing conditions needed to inactivate 1 log of UPEC, was 30.6, 8.37, and 4.43 min at 300, 400, and 500 MPa, respectively. When the UPEC was inoculated into ground chicken and gamma irradiated (4 and -20°C) the GR D10 were 0.28 and 0.36 kGy, respectively. The UV-C D10 of UPEC in chicken suspended in exudate and placed on stainless steel and plastic food contact surfaces ranged from 11.4 to 12.9 mJ/cm(2). UV-C inactivated ca. 0.6 log of UPEC on chicken breast meat. These results indicate that existing non-thermal processing technologies such as HPP, GR, and UV-C can significantly reduce UPEC levels in poultry meat or exudate and provide safer poultry products for at-risk consumers.

  6. Modeling the Combined Effect of Pressure and Mild Heat on the Inactivation Kinetics of Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Staphylococcus aureus in Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barjinder P. Kaur

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The high-pressure inactivation of Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua, and Staphylococcus aureus was studied in black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon. The processing parameters examined included pressure (300 to 600 MPa and temperature (30 to 50°C. In addition, the pressure-hold period (0 to 15 min was investigated, thus allowing both single-pulse pressure effects (i.e., zero holding time and pressure-hold effects to be explored. E. coli was found to be the most sensitive strain to single-pulse pressure, followed by L. innocua and lastly S. aureus. Higher pressures and temperatures resulted in higher destruction rates, and the value of the shape parameter (β′ accounted for the downward concavity (β′ > 1 of the survival curves. A simplified Weibull model described the non-linearity of the survival curves for the changes in the pressure-hold period well, and it was comparable to the original Weibull model. The regression coefficients (R2, root mean square error (RMSE, accuracy factor (Af, bias factor (Bf, and residual plots suggested that using linear models to represent the data was not as appropriate as using non-linear models. However, linear models produced good fits for some pressure–temperature combinations. Analogous to their use in thermal death kinetics, activation volume (Va and activation energy (Ea can be used to describe the pressure and temperature dependencies of the scale parameter (δ, min, respectively. The Va and Ea values showed that high pressure and temperaturefavored the inactivation process, and S. aureus was the most baro-resistant pathogen.

  7. Inactivation of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli in Ground Chicken Meat Using High Pressure Processing and Gamma Radiation, and in Purge and Chicken Meat Surfaces by Ultraviolet Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher H Sommers

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC, including uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC are common contaminants in poultry meat and may cause urinary tract infections after colonization of the gastrointestinal tract and transfer of contaminated feces to the urethra. Three nonthermal processing technologies used to improve the safety and shelf-life of both human and pet foods include high pressure processing (HPP, ionizing (gamma radiation (GR, and ultraviolet light (UV-C. Multi-isolate cocktails of UPEC were inoculated into ground chicken which was then treated with HPP (4 oC, 0-25 min at 300, 400 or 500 MPa. HPP D10, the processing conditions needed to inactivate 1 log of UPEC, was 30.6, 8.37, and 4.43 min at 300, 400, and 500 MPa, respectively. When the UPEC was inoculated into ground chicken and gamma irradiated (4 and -20 oC the GR D10 were 0.28 and 0.36 kGy, respectively. The UV-C D10 of UPEC in chicken suspended in exudate and placed on stainless steel and plastic food contact surfaces ranged from 11.4 to 12.9 mJ/cm2. UV-C inactivated ca. 0.6 log of UPEC on chicken breast meat. These results indicate that existing nonthermal processing technologies such as HPP, GR, and UV-C can significantly reduce UPEC levels in poultry meat or exudate and provide safer poultry products for at-risk consumers.

  8. Modeling the Combined Effect of Pressure and Mild Heat on the Inactivation Kinetics ofEscherichia coli, Listeria innocua, andStaphylococcus aureusin Black Tiger Shrimp (Penaeus monodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Barjinder P; Rao, P Srinivasa

    2017-01-01

    The high-pressure inactivation of Escherichia coli, Listeria innocua , and Staphylococcus aureus was studied in black tiger shrimp ( Penaeus monodon ). The processing parameters examined included pressure (300 to 600 MPa) and temperature (30 to 50°C). In addition, the pressure-hold period (0 to 15 min) was investigated, thus allowing both single-pulse pressure effects (i.e., zero holding time) and pressure-hold effects to be explored. E. coli was found to be the most sensitive strain to single-pulse pressure, followed by L. innocua and lastly S. aureus . Higher pressures and temperatures resulted in higher destruction rates, and the value of the shape parameter (β') accounted for the downward concavity (β' > 1) of the survival curves. A simplified Weibull model described the non-linearity of the survival curves for the changes in the pressure-hold period well, and it was comparable to the original Weibull model. The regression coefficients ( R 2 ), root mean square error (RMSE), accuracy factor ( A f ), bias factor ( B f ), and residual plots suggested that using linear models to represent the data was not as appropriate as using non-linear models. However, linear models produced good fits for some pressure-temperature combinations. Analogous to their use in thermal death kinetics, activation volume ( V a ) and activation energy ( E a ) can be used to describe the pressure and temperature dependencies of the scale parameter (δ, min), respectively. The V a and E a values showed that high pressure and temperaturefavored the inactivation process, and S. aureus was the most baro-resistant pathogen.

  9. Inibição e inativação de Escherichia coli por extratos de plantas com indicativo etnográfico medicinal ou condimentar Escherichia coli inhibition and inactivation by extracts from plants with medicinal and spice ethnographic indicative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Wiest

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se in vitro a Intensidade de Atividade de Inibição Bacteriana (IINIB e a Intensidade de Atividade de Inativação Bacteriana (IINAB, através de Testes de Diluição e Suspensão em Sistema de Tubos Múltiplos, de diferentes extratos aquosos ou alcoólicos/hidroalcoólicos de 59 plantas com indicativo etnográfico medicinal ou condimentar acessadas na região metropolitana de Porto Alegre/RS/BR, frente à Escherichia sp. (ou E. coli ATCC nº 11229 ou E. coli p.16 CPVDF - SAA/RS, em doses-desafio The in vitro Intensity of Bacterial Inhibition Activity (IINIB and the Intensity of Bacterial Inactivation Activity (IINAB of diverse aqueous alcoholic/hydroalcoholic from extracts of 59 plants with medicinal or spice ethnographic indicative assessed in Porto Alegre/RS/BR, were determinated against Escherichia sp. (or E. coli ATCC nº 11229 or E. coli p.16 CPVDF - SAA/RS in challenge doses < 10(8 CFU.mL-1. Extracts of 30 plants presented some anti-Escherichia coli selective activity while the remaining 29 plants presented no activity. The validity of ethnographical search instruments in the prospection of anti-bacterial protection factors in plants and the influence of inhibition/inactivation results in the prediction of E. coli diagnostic were discussed.

  10. Fabrication of magnetic Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} nanocomposite for visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Ziling [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Wu, Dan [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Wang, Wei, E-mail: weiwang@hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Tan, Fatang [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Ng, Tsz Wai [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); Chen, Jianguo; Qiao, Xueliang [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei (China); Wong, Po Keung, E-mail: pkwong@cuhk.edu.hk [School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, NT, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} was prepared by a facile two-step precipitation method. • Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} exhibited high photocatalytic activity under LED lamp irradiation. • Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} possessed good stability and reusability for bacterial inactivation. • Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} could be easily collected from the reaction solution by a magnet. • The release rate of metal ions from nanocomposite was kept at a very low level. - Abstract: Bacterial inactivation by magnetic photocatalysts has now received growing interests due to the easy separation for recycle and reuse of photocatalysts. In this study, magnetic Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} photocatalyst was prepared by a facile two-step precipitation method. Multiple techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis diffused reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) were employed to characterize the structure, morphology and physicochemical properties of the photocatalyst. The as-obtained Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} possessing magnetic property was easily collected from the reaction system by a magnet. Under white light-emitting-diode (LED) lamp irradiation, Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} nanocomposite could completely inactivate 7-log of Escherichia coli K-12 within 5 h. More importantly, almost no decrease of photocatalytic efficiency in bacterial inactivation was observed even after five consecutive cycles, demonstrating Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} exhibited good stability for reuse. The low released rate of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} and Zn{sup 2+} from Fe@ZnO{sub 0.6}S{sub 0.4} composite further indicated the photocatalyst showed low cytotoxicity to bacterium and high stability under LED lamp irradiation. Facile preparation, high photocatalytic efficiency, good stability and reusability, and magnetic recovery property endow Fe@ZnO{sub 0

  11. Consequences of phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotranferase system and pyruvate kinase isozymes inactivation in central carbon metabolism flux distribution in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meza Eugenio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP is a key central metabolism intermediate that participates in glucose transport, as precursor in several biosynthetic pathways and it is involved in allosteric regulation of glycolytic enzymes. In this work we generated W3110 derivative strains that lack the main PEP consumers PEP:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS- and pyruvate kinase isozymes PykA and PykF (PTS-pykA- and PTS-pykF-. To characterize the effects of these modifications on cell physiology, carbon flux distribution and aromatics production capacity were determined. Results When compared to reference strain W3110, strain VH33 (PTS- displayed lower specific rates for growth, glucose consumption and acetate production as well as a higher biomass yield from glucose. These phenotypic effects were even more pronounced by the additional inactivation of PykA or PykF. Carbon flux analysis revealed that PTS inactivation causes a redirection of metabolic flux towards biomass formation. A cycle involving PEP carboxylase (Ppc and PEP carboxykinase (Pck was detected in all strains. In strains W3110, VH33 (PTS- and VH35 (PTS-, pykF-, the net flux in this cycle was inversely correlated with the specific rate of glucose consumption and inactivation of Pck in these strains caused a reduction in growth rate. In the PTS- background, inactivation of PykA caused a reduction in Ppc and Pck cycling as well as a reduction in flux to TCA, whereas inactivation of PykF caused an increase in anaplerotic flux from PEP to OAA and an increased flux to TCA. The wild-type and mutant strains were modified to overproduce L-phenylalanine. In resting cells experiments, compared to reference strain, a 10, 4 and 7-fold higher aromatics yields from glucose were observed as consequence of PTS, PTS PykA and PTS PykF inactivation. Conclusions Metabolic flux analysis performed on strains lacking the main activities generating pyruvate from PEP revealed the high

  12. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Kilic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is a bacterium that is commonly found in the gut of humans and warm-blooded animals. Most strains of E. coli are harmless for human. E. coli O157:H7 is the most common member of a group of pathogenic E. coli strains known variously as enterohaemorrhagic, verocytotoxin-producing, or Shiga-toxin-producing organisms. EHEC bacterium is the major cause of haemorrhagic colitis and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The reservoir of this pathogen appears to be mainly cattle and other ruminants such as camels. It is transmitted to humans primarily through consumption of contaminated foods. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 387-388

  13. Cold plasma-activated hydrogen peroxide aerosol inactivates Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria innocua and maintains quality of grape tomato, spinach and cantaloupe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunbin; Sokorai, Kimberly; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip; Li, Xihong; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Jin, Tony; Fan, Xuetong

    2017-05-16

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide in inactivating bacteria and maintaining quality of grape tomatoes, baby spinach leaves and cantaloupes. Stem scars and smooth surfaces of tomatoes, spinach leaves, and cantaloupe rinds, inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria innocua, were treated for 45s followed by additional 30min dwell time with hydrogen peroxide (7.8%) aerosols activated by atmospheric cold plasma. Non-inoculated samples were used to study the effects on quality and native microflora populations. Results showed that two ranges of hydrogen peroxide droplets with mean diameters of 40nm and 3.0μm were introduced into the treatment chamber. The aerosolized hydrogen peroxide treatment reduced S. Typhimurium populations by 5.0logCFU/piece, and E. coli O157:H7 and L. innocua populations from initial levels of 2.9 and 6.3logCFU/piece, respectively, to non-detectable levels (detection limit 0.6logCFU/piece) on the smooth surface of tomatoes. However, on the stem scar area of tomatoes, the reductions of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. innocua were only 1.0, 1.3, and 1.3 log, respectively. On the cantaloupe rind, the treatment reduced populations of E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium and L. innocua by 4.9, 1.3, and 3.0logCFU/piece, respectively. Under the same conditions, reductions achieved on spinach leaves were 1.5, 4.2 and 4.0 log for E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium and L. innocua, respectively. The treatments also significantly reduced native aerobic plate count, and yeasts and mold count of tomato fruits and spinach leaves. Furthermore, firmness and color of the samples were not significantly affected by the aerosolized hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our results showed that the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide depended on type of inoculated bacteria, location of bacteria and type of produce items, and aerosolized hydrogen peroxide could potentially be used to

  14. Influence of prior growth conditions, pressure treatment parameters, and recovery conditions on the inactivation and recovery of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella Typhimurium in turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juck, Greg; Neetoo, Hudaa; Beswick, Ethan; Chen, Haiqiang

    2012-02-01

    The relatively high prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in various food products is of great concern to the food industry. The objective of this study was to determine the pressure-inactivation of the pathogens in a representative food model as affected by prior growth temperature, physiological age of the culture, pressure level and treatment temperature. The effect of post-treatment conditions (incubation temperature and gas atmosphere) on the bacterial recovery was also determined. The pathogens being studied were inoculated into sterile turkey breast meat to a final level of ca. 3 logCFU/g and then grown to two stages, the early stage (representative of exponential phase) and late stage (representative of stationary phase), at 15, 25, 35, and 40 °C. Turkey meat samples were pressure-treated at 400 and 600 MPa for 2 min at initial sample temperatures of 4, 20 and 40 °C. Following treatment, bacterial counts in the samples were determined aerobically or anaerobically at incubation temperatures of 15, 25, 35, and 40 °C. Pressure inactivation of the bacterial pathogens increased as a function of the pressure levels and treatment temperatures. Generally speaking, early stage cells were more resistant than late stage cells (P<0.05). The incubation gas atmosphere did not affect bacterial recovery. Bacteria grown at 15-35 °C underwent higher population reductions than those grown at 40 °C. With regard to recovery temperatures, low temperatures promoted greater recovery of injured early and late stage cells than higher temperatures (P<0.05). This study indicates the importance of environmental conditions to which bacteria are exposed prior to pressure treatment and recovery conditions of the bacteria after pressure treatment when considering the adequacy of pressure treatments to enhance the microbiological safety of foods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of water activity on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes in peanut butter by microwave heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a 915 MHz microwave with 3 different electric power levels to inactivate three pathogens in peanut butter with different aw. Peanut butter inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes (0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 aw) were treated with a 915 MHz microwave with 2, 4, and 6 kW for up to 5 min. Six kW 915 MHz microwave treatment for 5 min reduced these three pathogens by 1.97 to >5.17 log CFU/g. Four kW 915 MHz microwave processing for 5 min reduced these pathogens by 0.41-1.98 log CFU/g. Two kW microwave heating did not inactivate pathogens in peanut butter. Weibull and Log-Linear + Shoulder models were used to describe the survival curves of three pathogens because they exhibited shouldering behavior. Td and T5d values were calculated based on the Weibull and Log-Linear + Shoulder models. Td values of the three pathogens were similar to D-values of Salmonella subjected to conventional heating at 90 °C but T5d values were much shorter than those of conventional heating at 90 °C. Generally, increased aw resulted in shorter T5d values of pathogens, but not shorter Td values. The results of this study can be used to optimize microwave heating pasteurization system of peanut butter. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Effect of Pressure-Induced Changes in the Ionization Equilibria of Buffers on Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayán, Elisa; Condón, Santiago; Álvarez, Ignacio; Nabakabaya, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Survival rates of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus after high-pressure treatment in buffers that had large or small reaction volumes (ΔV°), and which therefore underwent large or small changes in pH under pressure, were compared. At a low buffer concentration of 0.005 M, survival was, as expected, better in MOPS (morpholinepropanesulfonic acid), HEPES, and Tris, whose ΔV° values are approximately 5.0 to 7.0 cm3 mol−1, than in phosphate or dimethyl glutarate (DMG), whose ΔV° values are about −25 cm3 mol−1. However, at a concentration of 0.1 M, survival was unexpectedly better in phosphate and DMG than in MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. This was because the baroprotective effect of phosphate and DMG increased much more rapidly with increasing concentration than it did with MOPS, HEPES, or Tris. Further comparisons of survival in solutions of salts expected to cause large electrostriction effects (Na2SO4 and CaCl2) and those causing lower electrostriction (NaCl and KCl) were made. The salts with divalent ions were protective at much lower concentrations than salts with monovalent ions. Buffers and salts both protected against transient membrane disruption in E. coli, but the molar concentrations necessary for membrane protection were much lower for phosphate and Na2SO4 than for HEPES and NaCl. Possible protective mechanisms discussed include effects of electrolytes on water compressibility and kosmotropic and specific ion effects. The results of this systematic study will be of considerable practical significance in studies of pressure inactivation of microbes under defined conditions but also raise important fundamental questions regarding the mechanisms of baroprotection by ionic solutes. PMID:23624471

  17. Thioredoxin from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmgren, A.; Ohlsson, I.; Grankvist, M.L.

    1978-01-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay for Escherichia coli thioredoxin using 125 I-labeled thioredoxin-S 2 and a double antibody technique was developed. The method permits determination of picomole amounts of thioredoxin in crude cell extracts and was used to study the localization of thioredoxin cell fractions. E. coli B was calculated to have approximately 10,000 copies of thioredoxin per cell mainly located in the soluble fraction after separation of the membrane and soluble fractions by gentle lysis and centrifugation. E. coli B tsnC mutants which are defective in the replication of phage T7 DNA in vivo and in vitro were examined for their content of thioredoxin. E. coli B tsnC 7004 contained no detectable level of thioredoxin in cell-free extracts examined under a variety of conditions. The results strongly suggest that tsnC 7004 is a nonsense or deletion mutant. Two other E. coli tsnC mutants, 7007 and 7008, contained detectable levels of thioredoxin in crude extracts as measured by thioredoxin reductase and gave similar immunoprecipitation reactions as the parent strain B/1. By radioimmunoassay incompletely cross-reacting material was present in both strains. These results show that tsnC 7007 and 7008 belong to a type of thioredoxin mutants with missence mutations in the thioredoxin gene affecting the function of thioredoxin as subunit in phage T7 DNA polymerase

  18. Fermentation of table olives by oleuropeinolytic starter culture in reduced salt brines and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataridou, M; Kotzekidou, P

    2015-09-02

    The effect of an autochthonous starter culture developed by oleuropeinolytic strains belonging to the Lactobacillus plantarum group on the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics and the biophenol content of table olives fermented under reduced salt conditions was studied. Black (cv. Kalamata) and green (cv. Chalkidikis) olives were fermented in two different kinds of brine (Brine A containing 2.3% NaCl, 32.3mM Ca-acetate and 33.9mM Ca-lactate and Brine B containing 4% NaCl, pH5.0 in both brines). The sensory attributes of olives fermented by oleuropeinolytic starter culture assessed by a trained panel did not differ significantly compared with industrial processing. It is possible to carry out significant changes in table olive processing applying a completely microbiological procedure using oleuropeinolytic strains of the L. plantarum group as both the debittering and the fermentation agent in order to achieve improved sensorial and nutritional characteristics of the final product. Table olives processed by the suggested methodology may constitute a good source of biophenols in the diet, especially hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. The inactivation potential of Escherichia coli O157 EDL-932 and Listeria monocytogenes Scott A in olives fermented by oleuropeinolytic starter culture was evaluated. The population of each pathogen in olive homogenates of both cultivars is inactivated by more than 6logCFU/ml in less than 24h. When whole fermented olives were submerged in peptone/saline (containing 6.7logCFU/ml of the relevant bacterial pathogen) for 30min followed by rinsing in distilled water, the population of viable foodborne pathogens dropped more than 4 logs in olive pulp. During subsequent storage at 22 or 4°C the population of L. monocytogenes Scott A was further eliminated under the detection limit in both olive cultivars whereas the population of E. coli O157 EDL-932 could be detected in olives stored in peptone/saline at 22°C for 7days. The inhibitory

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in fresh water with advanced oxidation processes based on the combination of O3, H2O2, and TiO2. Kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Chueca, Jorge; Ormad Melero, M Peña; Mosteo Abad, Rosa; Esteban Finol, Javier; Ovelleiro Narvión, José Luis

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to study the efficiency of different treatments, based on the combination of O3, H2O2, and TiO2, on fresh surface water samples fortified with wild strains of Escherichia coli. Moreover, an exhaustive assessment of the influence of the different agents involved in the treatment has been carried out by kinetic modeling of E. coli inactivation results. The treatments studied were (i) ozonation (O3), (ii) the peroxone system (O3/0.04 mM H2O2), (iii) catalytic ozonation (O3/1 g/L TiO2), and (iv) a combined treatment of O3/1 g/L TiO2/0.04 mM H2O2. It was observed that the peroxone system achieved the highest levels of inactivation of E. coli, around 6.80 log after 10 min of contact time. Catalytic ozonation also obtained high levels of inactivation in a short period of time, reaching 6.22 log in 10 min. Both treatments, the peroxone system (O3/H2O2) and catalytic ozonation (O3/TiO2), produced a higher inactivation rate of E. coli than ozonation (4.97 log after 10 min). While the combination of ozone with hydrogen peroxide or titanium dioxide thus produces an increase in the inactivation yield of E. coli regarding ozonation, the O3/TiO2/H2O2 combination did not enhance the inactivation results. The fitting of experimental values to the corresponding equations through non-linear regression techniques was carried out with Microsoft® Excel GInaFiT software. The inactivation results of E. coli did not respond to linear functions, and it was necessary to use mathematical models able to describe certain deviations in the bacterial inactivation processes. In this case, the inactivation results fit with mathematical models based on the hypothesis that the bacteria population is divided into two different subgroups with different degrees of resistance to treatments, for instance biphasic and biphasic with shoulder models. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  20. Depth-dependent inactivation of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis in soil after manure application and simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.coli and Enterococcus serve as important water quality indicator organisms. Rainfall action on manured fields and pastures releases these organisms into soil with infiltrating water. They can then be released back to runoff during subsequent rainfall or irrigation events as soil solution interacts...

  1. Effects of shock waves, ultraviolet light, and electric fields from pulsed discharges in water on inactivation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bing; Xin, Yanbin; Zhu, Xiaomei; Gao, Zhiying; Yan, Zhiyu; Ohshima, Takayuki

    2018-04-01

    In this work, the bacterial inactivation effects of shock waves, ultraviolet (UV) light, and electric field produced by high-voltage pulsed discharge in liquid with needle-plate configurations were studied. The contributions of each effect on the bacterial killing ratio in the discharge process were obtained individually by modifying reactor type and usage of glass, quartz, and black balloons. The results showed that the location from the discharge center axis significantly influenced the effects of shock waves and electric fields, although the effect of UV light was not affected by the location in the reactor. The effects of shock waves and electric fields were improved by decreasing the distance from the discharge center axis. Under this experimental condition, the effects of shock waves, UV light, and electric fields produced by discharges on bacterial inactivation were approximately 36.1%, 30.8%, 12.7%, respectively. Other contributions seemed to be due to activated species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Inactivation bactérienne par photocatalyse hétérogène : application à Escherichia Coli

    OpenAIRE

    Kacem, Majdi

    2015-01-01

    The study presented in this paper is part of the reuse of treated wastewater by advanced oxidation process (AOP), the heterogeneous photocatalysis. This process, coupling the UV radiation and the use of a photocatalyst (TiO2) in a reactor, is envisaged as tertiary treatment process for disinfection of said secondary effluent. Photocatalytic experiments were performed on a target bacterium, E. coli. They were conducted in batch and continuous mode. The experiments in batch mode were performed ...

  3. Inactivation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus on contaminated perilla leaves by Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sang Hye; Ki, Se Hoon; Ahn, Ji Ho; Shin, Jae Ho; Hong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Yun Ji; Choi, Eun Ha

    2018-02-15

    This study focused on sterilization methods for the reduction of microorganisms on perilla leaves by cylinder type Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma with underwater bubbler treatment. S. aureus and E. coli in a suspension were reduced to less than 3.4 and 0.5 log CFU/ml after the plasma treatment for 3 min, respectively. On the perilla leaves, they were also reduced to 4.8 and 1.6 log CFU/ml after the plasma treatment, respectively. The S. aureus and E. coli bacterial cell wall was damaged by the plasma treatment evident by scanning electron microscopic analysis. The observed infrared bands of the FTIR spectra demonstrated changes in protein, lipid, polysaccharide, polyphosphate group and other carbohydrate functionalities of plasma treated bacteria and untreated bacterial cell membranes. The degradation of the constituent bonds of the bacterial cell membrane by RONS generated from plasma destroys the DNA, RNA, and proteins within the cell, and may eventually cause cell death. In this study, H 2 O 2 (13.68 μM) and NO 3 (138 μM), which are the main factors generated by plasma, proved to have a bactericidal effect by inducing lipid peroxidation of bacterial cell membranes. In conclusion, cylinder type DBD plasma with underwater bubbler can be used as an environmentally friendly food disinfection device in cleaning processes of the food industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Effects of overexpression of carboxylation pathway genes and inactivation of malic enzymes on malic acid production in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Fei; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yujiao; Guo, Shiting; Wang, Zhiwen; Chen, Tao

    2016-11-25

    Malic acid is a dicarboxylic acid that is widely used in food, pharmaceutical and chemical industries. We studied the effects of overexpression of carboxylation pathway genes and inactivation of malic enzymes on the aerobic production of malic acid. Over expression of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (ppc) generated strain E21, which increased malic acid production from 0.57 g/L to 3.83 g/L. Then pyc gene from Coryenbacterium glutamicus and pck gene from Actinobacillus succinogenes were overexpressed in E21 separately. The resulting strains E21 (pTrcpyc) and E21 (pTrc-A-pck) produced 6.04 and 5.01 g/L malate with a yield of 0.79 and 0.65 mol/mol glucose, respectively. Deleting two malic enzymes (encoded by maeA and maeB) also led to an increase of 36% in malic acid production with a production of 5.21 g/L. However, the combination of malic enzymes deletion and pyc overexpression could not further increase the yield of malic acid. After optimization of fermentation conditions, strain E21 (pTrcpyc) produced 12.45 g/L malic acid with a yield of 0.84 mol/mol which is 63.2% of the theoretical yield.

  5. Atmospheric cold plasma inactivation of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and aerobic microorganisms in cold-stored romaine lettuce packaged in a commerical polyethylene terephthalate container

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leafy greens continue to be a significant vector for foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7. Dielectric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) treatment is a promising method for microbial decontamination of produce. An important aspect of this technology is the potential f...

  6. ANIMAL ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J. Daniel; Isaacson, Richard E.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is the most common cause of E. coli diarrhea in farm animals. ETEC are characterized by the ability to produce two types of virulence factors; adhesins that promote binding to specific enterocyte receptors for intestinal colonization and enterotoxins responsible for fluid secretion. The best-characterized adhesins are expressed in the context of fimbriae, such as the F4 (also designated K88), F5 (K99), F6 (987P), F17 and F18 fimbriae. Once established in the animal small intestine, ETEC produces enterotoxin(s) that lead to diarrhea. The enterotoxins belong to two major classes; heat-labile toxin that consist of one active and five binding subunits (LT), and heat-stable toxins that are small polypeptides (STa, STb, and EAST1). This chapter describes the disease and pathogenesis of animal ETEC, the corresponding virulence genes and protein products of these bacteria, their regulation and targets in animal hosts, as well as mechanisms of action. Furthermore, vaccines, inhibitors, probiotics and the identification of potential new targets identified by genomics are presented in the context of animal ETEC. PMID:27735786

  7. Inativação dos microrganismos indicadores Escherichia coli, colifagos e Clostridium perfringens empregando ozônioInactivation of the microrganisms indicators Escherichia coli, coliphages and Clostridium perfringens with ozone

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Jeanette Beber de; Daniel, Luiz Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Neste trabalho foram realizados ensaios de desinfecção com ozônio, utilizando água sintética preparada em laboratório inoculada com os microrganismos indicadores Escherichia coli cepa ATCC 11229, colifagos e Clostridium perfringens cepa ATCC 13124. As dosagens aplicadas de ozônio foram: 2,0; 3,0; 4,0 e 5,0 mg/L e os tempos de contato empregados foram: 5, 10, 15 e 20 minutos. O ozônio foi considerado efetivo para a inativação dos três microrganismos indicadores empregados, com destaque para a ...

  8. Escherichia coli Uropathogenesis In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas E; Khandige, Surabhi; Madelung, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are capable of invading bladder epithelial cells (BECs) on the bladder luminal surface. Based primarily on studies in mouse models, invasion is proposed to trigger an intracellular uropathogenic cascade involving intracellular bacterial proliferation...

  9. Enhanced visible-light-driven photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli by Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Huihui [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Gaoke, E-mail: gkzhang@whut.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Hongxia [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} composite was in situ fabrication by hydrothermal methods. ► It showed largely enhanced visible-light photocatalytic destruction of E. coli. ► The heterostructures improved the electron–hole separations during photocatalysis. ► h{sup +}/·OH radicals may be the main oxidative species during photocatalytic destruction. -- Abstract: The Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} (BiCO/BiNbO) composite was successfully fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method and found to be an effective visible-light-driven photocatalyst for inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli). The BiCO/BiNbO composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum (UV–vis DRS), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The BiCO/BiNbO composite exhibited largely enhanced photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli as compared to the pure Bi{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} under visible light irradiation. The enhanced photocatalytic performance can be attributed to the improved separation efficiency of the photogenerated holes and electrons. In addition, the possible bactericidal mechanism of the BiCO/BiNbO composite under visible light irradiation was discussed.

  10. Physiology of inactivation of microbial cells by near-ultraviolet light: mode of action and application for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.

    1976-01-01

    The mode of action of near-ultraviolet (NUV) light was studied in Escherichia coli. NUV light (maximum emission at 365 nm) caused the photodestruction of ribonucleoside diphosphate (RDP) reductase activity in vivo. Evidence was presented for a model suggesting that the loss of RDP-reductase resulted in a metabolic state analogous to that produced during starvation for thymine. Some important properties of cells irradiated by NUV light, cell death, loss of the ability to support the replication of DNA phages and a delay in the onset of cell division in sublethally irradiated cells, were accounted for in terms of photoinactivation of RDP-reductase. Conditions were described under which NUV light was an effective counterselective agent for the enrichment of mutants of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  11. Growing Escherichia coli mutants deficient in riboflavin biosynthesis with non-limiting riboflavin results in sensitization to inactivation by broad-spectrum near-ultraviolet light (320-400 nm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, R.E.; Rinkenberger, J.L.; Hug, B.A.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two mutants of Escherichia coli unable to synthesize riboflavin were grown with limiting (2 μg ml -1 ) and non-limiting (10 μg ml -1 ) concentrations of riboflavin. These riboflavin auxotrophs when grown to exponential phase with non-limiting riboflavin are more sensitive to broad spectrum near-ultraviolet light (NUV, 320-400 nm) inactivation than when they are grown with limiting riboflavin. Exponential phase cells of the riboflavin auxotrophs grown with limiting riboflavin are sensitized when irradiated in saline supplemented with riboflavin. This suggests that extracellular riboflavin is important as a NUV sensitizer when intracellular levels of riboflavin are reduced. The concentration of riboflavin in crude extracts from exponentially growing cells correlates well with the sensitivity of these mutants to NUV inactivation. The level of riboflavin supplementation has little effect on the NUV sensitivity of the parental strain. (author)

  12. nativação dos microrganismos indicadores Escherichia coli, colifagos e Clostridium perfringens empregando ozônio / Inactivation of the microrganisms indicators Escherichia coli, coliphages and Clostridium perfringens with ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Beber de Souza

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram realizados ensaios de desinfecção com ozônio, utilizando água sintética preparada em laboratório inoculada com os microrganismos indicadores Escherichia coli cepa ATCC 11229, colifagos e Clostridium perfringens cepa ATCC 13124. As dosagens aplicadas de ozônio foram: 2,0; 3,0; 4,0 e 5,0 mg/L e os tempos de contato empregados foram: 5, 10, 15 e 20 minutos. O ozônio foi considerado efetivo para a inativação dos três microrganismos indicadores empregados, com destaque para a inativação dos colifagos

  13. Determinação de parâmetros cinéticos da inativação térmica de Escherichia coli em lodo de esgoto Determining kinetic parameters for thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli in sewage sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odinei Fogolari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou determinar parâmetros cinéticos da inativação térmica de Escherichia coli em lodo de esgoto. Os ensaios foram realizados em laboratório pelo método do frasco de três bocas nas temperaturas de 45, 50, 55, 60 e 65ºC. Os resultados indicaram que a cinética de inativação térmica deste microrganismo pode ser descrita por um modelo de primeira ordem. A resistência da bactéria é reduzida consideravelmente em temperaturas acima de 55ºC. A energia de inativação encontrada foi 2,48x10(5 J.mol-1. O tempo de redução decimal D55ºC foi de 3,61 minutos e o coeficiente térmico z foi 8,3ºC.The present study aimed to determine the kinetic parameters of thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli in sewage sludge. The tests were performed in the laboratory using the three-neck flask method at temperatures of 45, 50, 55, 60 and 65ºC. The results indicated that the thermal inactivation kinetic of this microorganism can be described by a first order model. The resistance of bacteria is greatly reduced at temperatures above 55ºC. The inactivation energy was found 2.48x10(5 J.mol-1. The decimal reduction time D55ºC was 3.61 minutes and the thermal coefficient z was 8.3ºC.

  14. Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilm on food-contact surfaces by sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine dioxide and drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Jihyun; Hong, Ayoung; Kim, Hoikyung; Beuchat, Larry R; Rhee, Min Suk; Kim, Younghoon; Ryu, Jee-Hoon

    2014-11-17

    We investigated the efficacy of sequential treatments of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide and drying in killing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in biofilms formed on stainless steel, glass, plastic, and wooden surfaces. Cells attached to and formed a biofilm on wooden surfaces at significantly (P ≤ 0.05) higher levels compared with other surface types. The lethal activities of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and aqueous chlorine dioxide (ClO₂) against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on various food-contact surfaces were compared. Chlorine dioxide generally showed greater lethal activity than NaOCl against E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on the same type of surface. The resistance of E. coli O157:H7 to both sanitizers increased in the order of wood>plastic>glass>stainless steel. The synergistic lethal effects of sequential ClO₂ and drying treatments on E. coli O157:H7 in a biofilm on wooden surfaces were evaluated. When wooden surfaces harboring E. coli O157:H7 biofilm were treated with ClO₂ (200 μg/ml, 10 min), rinsed with water, and subsequently dried at 43% relative humidity and 22 °C, the number of E. coli O157:H7 on the surface decreased by an additional 6.4 CFU/coupon within 6 h of drying. However, when the wooden surface was treated with water or NaOCl and dried under the same conditions, the pathogen decreased by only 0.4 or 1.0 log CFU/coupon, respectively, after 12 h of drying. This indicates that ClO₂ treatment of food-contact surfaces results in residual lethality to E. coli O157:H7 during the drying process. These observations will be useful when selecting an appropriate type of food-contact surfaces, determining a proper sanitizer for decontamination, and designing an effective sanitization program to eliminate E. coli O157:H7 on food-contact surfaces in food processing, distribution, and preparation environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Suppressors of DnaAATP imposed overinitiation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Riber, Leise; Cohen, Malene

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Escherichia coli is limited by the supply of DnaA associated with ATP. Cells deficient in RIDA (Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA) due to a deletion of the hda gene accumulate suppressor mutations (hsm) to counteract the overinitiation caused by an elevated DnaAATP level...

  16. Asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Nielsen, E.M.; Klemm, Per

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) affect millions of people each year. Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) in humans. Persons affected by ABU may carry a particular E. coli strain for extended periods of time without any symptoms. In contrast...... to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) that cause symptomatic UTI, very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the urinary tract. Here, we have investigated the growth characteristics in human urine as well as adhesin repertoire of nine ABU strains; the ability of ABU strains to compete...

  17. Efficacy of vacuum steam pasteurization for inactivation of Salmonella PT 30, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Enterococcus faecium on low moisture foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Manoj K; Asa, Gladys; Sherwood, Julie; Graber, Kari; Bergholz, Teresa M

    2017-03-06

    Low moisture foods such as nuts, spices, and seeds have been implicated in several outbreaks due to Salmonella or E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Such foods may be consumed raw, and can be used as ingredients in other food products. While numerous thermal inactivation studies have been conducted for Salmonella on nuts, studies on other seeds and grains are minimal. Product water activity can influence the thermal resistance of pathogens, where thermal resistance increases as water activity decreases, leading to a requirement for higher temperatures and longer exposure times to achieve significant reduction of pathogen numbers. Vacuum steam pasteurization uses steam under vacuum, which can be operated at temperatures above and below 100°C. The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of vacuum steam pasteurization for inactivation of pathogens on whole flaxseed, quinoa, sunflower kernels, milled flaxseed and whole black peppercorns. The use of E. faecium as a potential surrogate for Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 in vacuum steam pasteurization was also evaluated. Pasteurization for 1min at 75°C yielded average log reductions of 5.48±1.22, 5.71±0.40 and 5.23±0.61 on flaxseed, 4.29±0.92, 5.89±0.26 and 2.39±0.83 on quinoa, and 4.01±0.74, 5.40±0.83 and 2.99±0.92 on sunflower kernels for Salmonella PT 30, E. coli O157:H7 and E. faecium, respectively. Similarly, on milled flaxseed and black peppercorns average log reductions of 3.02±0.79 and 6.10±0.64CFU/g were observed for Salmonella PT 30 after 1min of treatment at 75°C but, on average, >6.0 log reductions were observed after pasteurization at 85°C. Our data demonstrate that vacuum steam pasteurization can be effectively used to reduce pathogens on these low moisture foods at temperature as low as 75 and 85°C, and that E. faecium may be used as a potential surrogate for Salmonella PT 30 and E. coli O157:H7. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Escherichia coli as a probiotic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, GJ; Wildeboer-Veloo, ACM; van der Waaij, D; Degener, JE

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oral treatment with a suspension of non-pathogenic Escherichia coli cells (commercially available as: Symbioflor II(R)) on the morphological composition of the gut microflora and on the systemic humoral immune response (the IgG-, IgA- and IgM-isotype) against the bacterial cells in

  19. ESCHERICHIA COLI AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The bio-effects of the ethanol extracts from the leaf and stem of Momordica charantia were studied with the view to ascertain the medical usefulness ascribed to the plant by the locals. The plant parts, stem and leaf, revealed remarkable activity against Escherichia coli and Staphlococcus aureus. The leaves ...

  20. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 8. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli. Joshua Lederberg. Classics Volume 13 Issue 8 August 2008 pp 793-794. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/08/0793-0794 ...

  1. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 8. Conjugal Pairing in Escherichia Coli. Joshua Lederberg. Classics Volume 13 Issue 8 August 2008 pp 793-794. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/013/08/0793-0794 ...

  2. A Comparison Study of Quality Attributes of Ground Beef and Veal Patties and Thermal Inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 after Double Pan-Broiling Under Dynamic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KaWang Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the quality variation and thermal inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in non-intact beef and veal. Coarse ground beef and veal patties (2.1 cm thick, 12.4 cm diameter, 180 g inoculated with E. coli O157:H7, aerobically stored before double pan-broiling for 0–360 s without rest or to 55, 62.5, 71.1, and 76 °C (internal temperature with 0.5- or 3.5-min rest. Microbial population and qualities including color, cooking losses, pH, water activity, fat, and moisture content, were tested. After cooking the beef and veal patties, the weight losses were 17.83–29%, the pH increased from 5.53–5.60 to 5.74–6.09, the moisture content decreased from 70.53–76.02% to 62.60–67.07%, and the fat content increased (p < 0.05 from 2.19–6.46% to 2.92–9.45%. Cooking beef and veal samples with increasing internal temperatures decreased a* and b* values and increased the L* value. Escherichia coli O157:H7 was more sensitive to heat in veal compared to beef with shorter D-value and “shoulder” time. Cooking to 71.1 and 76 °C reduced E. coli O157:H7 by >6 log CFU/g regardless of rest time. Cooking to 55 °C and 62.5 °C with a 3.5-min rest achieved an additional 1–3 log CFU/g reduction compared to the 0.5-min rest. Results should be useful for developing risk assessment of non-intact beef and veal products.

  3. Photoinactivation of mcr-1 positive Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, C. S. A.; Leal, C. R. B.; Rodrigues, A. C. S.; Lima, A. R.; Silva, C. M.; Ramos, C. A. N.; Chang, M. R.; Arruda, E. J.; Oliveira, S. L.; Nascimento, V. A.; Caires, A. R. L.

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of plasmid-mediated colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae, mostly in Escherichia coli due to the mcr-1 gene, has revealed the need to develop alternative approaches in treating mcr-1 positive bacterial infections. This is because colistin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic and one of the ‘last-resort’ antibiotics for multidrug resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the efficacy of photoinactivation processes to kill a known mcr-1 positive E. coli strain. Eosin methylene-blue (EMB) was investigated as a photoantimicrobial agent for inhibiting the growth of a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain obtained from a patient with a diabetic foot infection. The photoantimicrobial activity of EMB was also tested in a non-multidrug resistant E. coli strain. The photoinactivation process was tested using light doses in the 30-45 J cm-2 range provided by a LED device emitting at 625 nm. Our findings demonstrate that a mcr-1 positive E. coli strain is susceptible to photoinactivation. The results show that the EMB was successfully photoactivated, regardless of the bacterial multidrug resistance; inactivating the bacterial growth by oxidizing the cells in accordance with the generation of the oxygen reactive species. Our results suggest that bacterial photoinactivation is an alternative and effective approach to kill mcr-1 positive bacteria.

  4. [Transformation of phosphotransferase system in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Mengrong; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Shuangping; Shi, Guiyang

    2014-10-01

    We constructed several recombinant Escherichia coli strains to transform phosphoenolpyruvate: carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS system) and compared the characteristics of growth and metabolism of the mutants. We knocked-out the key genes ptsI and ptsG in PTS system by using Red homologous recombination in E. coli and meanwhile we also knocked-in the glucose facilitator gene glf from Zymomonas mobilis in the E. coli chromosome. Recombinant E. coli strains were constructed and the effects of cell growth, glucose consumption and acetic acid accumulation were also evaluated in all recombinant strains. The deletion of gene ptsG and ptsI inactivated some PTS system functions and inhibited the growth ability of the cell. Expressing the gene glf can help recombinant E. coli strains re-absorb the glucose through Glf-Glk (glucose facilitator-glucokinase) pathway as it can use ATP to phosphorylate glucose and transport into cell. This pathway can improve the availability of glucose and also reduce the accumulation of acetic acid; it can also broaden the carbon flux in the metabolism pathway.

  5. Investigation of optimum ohmic heating conditions for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Kyu; Ha, Jae-Won; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2017-05-19

    Control of foodborne pathogens is an important issue for the fruit juice industry and ohmic heating treatment has been considered as one of the promising antimicrobial interventions. However, to date, evaluation of the relationship between inactivation of foodborne pathogens and system performance efficiency based on differing soluble solids content of apple juice during ohmic heating treatment has not been well studied. This study aims to investigate effective voltage gradients of an ohmic heating system and corresponding sugar concentrations (°Brix) of apple juice for inactivating major foodborne pathogens (E. coli O157:H7, S. Typhimurium, and L. monocytogenes) while maintaining higher system performance efficiency. Voltage gradients of 30, 40, 50, and 60 V/cm were applied to 72, 48, 36, 24, and 18 °Brix apple juices. At all voltage levels, the lowest heating rate was observed in 72 °Brix apple juice and a similar pattern of temperature increase was shown in18-48 °Brix juice samples. System performance coefficients (SPC) under two treatment conditions (30 V/cm in 36 °Brix or 60 V/cm in 48 °Brix juice) were relatively greater than for other combinations. Meanwhile, 5-log reductions of the three foodborne pathogens were achieved after treatment for 60 s in 36 °Brix at 30 V/cm, but this same reduction was observed in 48 °Brix juice at 60 V/cm within 20 s without affecting product quality. With respect to both bactericidal efficiency and SPC values, 60 V/cm in 48 °Brix was the most effective ohmic heating treatment combination for decontaminating apple juice concentrates.

  6. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  7. Comparison of the effect of saturated and superheated steam on the inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes on cantaloupe and watermelon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun-Ah; Song, Won-Jae; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was evaluation of the effectiveness of superheated steam (SHS) on inactivation of foodborne pathogens on cantaloupes and watermelons. Saturated steam (SS) treatment was performed at 100 °C and that of SHS at 150 and 200 °C. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes-inoculated cantaloupes and watermelons were exposed for a maximum of 30 s and 10 s, respectively. Populations of the three pathogens on cantaloupes and watermelons were reduced by more than 5 log after 200 °C steam treatment for 30 s and 10 s, respectively. After SHS treatment of cantaloupes and watermelons for each maximum treatment time, color and maximum load values were not significantly different from those of untreated controls. By using a noncontact 3D surface profiler, we found that surface characteristics, especially surface roughness, is the main reason for differences in microbial inactivation between cantaloupes and watermelons. The results of this study suggest that SHS treatment can be used as an antimicrobial intervention for cantaloupes and watermelons without inducing quality deterioration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Additive approach for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella spp. on contaminated fresh fruits and vegetables using bacteriophage cocktail and produce wash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnone, Joshua P; Marek, Patrick J; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Senecal, Andre G

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce is of worldwide concern. Lytic bacteriophage cocktails and a levulinic acid produce wash were investigated for their effectiveness against the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella on broccoli, cantaloupe, and strawberries. Inoculated samples were treated with bacteriophage cocktails (BC) before storage at 10°C for 24 h, a levulinic acid produce wash (PW) after storage at 10°C for 24 h, or a combination of the washes (BCPW) before and after storage. All three treatments were compared against a 200-ppm free available chlorine wash. Wash solutions were prepared using potable water and water with an increased organic content of 2.5 g/liter total dissolved solids and total organic carbon. BCPW was the most effective treatment, producing the highest log reductions in the pathogens. Produce treated with BCPW in potable water with a PW exposure time of 5 min resulted in the highest reduction of each pathogen for all samples tested. The type of produce and wash solution had significant effects on the efficacy of the individual treatments. The chlorine wash in water with higher organic content was the least effective treatment tested. An additive effect of BCPW was seen in water with higher organic content, resulting in greater than 4.0-log reductions in pathogens. Our findings indicate that the combination of antimicrobial BC with a commercial produce wash is a very effective method for treating produce contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, Shigella spp., and Salmonella even in the presence of high loads of organic matter.

  9. Individual and combined application of dry heat with high hydrostatic pressure to inactivate Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on alfalfa seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neetoo, Hudaa; Chen, Haiqiang

    2011-02-01

    Alfalfa sprouts are recurrently implicated in outbreaks of food-borne illnesses as a result of contamination with Salmonella or Escherichia coli O157:H7. In the majority of these outbreaks, the seeds themselves have been shown to be the most likely source of contamination. The aims of this study were to comparatively assess the efficacy of dry heat treatments alone or in conjunction with high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) to eliminate a ∼5 log CFU/g load of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 on alfalfa seeds. Dry heat treatments at mild temperatures of 55 and 60 °C achieved ≤1.6 and 2.2 log CFU/g reduction in the population of Salmonella spp. after a 10-d treatment, respectively. However, subjecting alfalfa seeds to more aggressive temperatures of 65 °C for 10 days or 70 °C for 24 h eliminated a ∼5 log population of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7. We subsequently showed that the sequential application of dry heating followed by HHP could substantially reduce the dry heating exposure time while achieving equivalent decontamination results. Dry heating at 55, 60, 65 and 70 °C for 96, 24, 12 and 6 h, respectively followed by a pressure treatment of 600 MPa for 2 min at 35 °C were able to eliminate a ∼5 log CFU/g initial population of both pathogens. Finally, we evaluated the impact of selected treatments on the seed germination percentages and yield ratios and showed that dry heating at 65 °C for 10 days did not bring about any considerable decrease in the germination percentage. However, the sprout yield of treated alfalfa seeds was reduced by 21%. Dry heating at 60 and 65 °C for 24 and 12 h respectively followed by the pressure treatment of 600 MPa for 2 min at 35 °C did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect the germination percentage of alfalfa seeds although a reduction in the sprouting yield was observed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of moisture content on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in powdered red and black pepper spices by radio-frequency heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seul-Gi; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-04-17

    The influence of moisture content during radio-frequency (RF) heating on heating rate, dielectric properties, and inactivation of foodborne pathogens was investigated. The effect of RF heating on the quality of powdered red and black pepper spices with different moisture ranges was also investigated. Red pepper (12.6%, 15.2%, 19.1%, and 23.3% dry basis, db) and black pepper (10.1%, 17.2%, 23.7%, and 30.5% db) inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were treated in a RF heating system with 27.12 MHz. The heating rate of the sample was dependent on moisture content up to 19.1% (db) of red pepper and 17.2% (db) of black pepper, but there was a significant decrease in the heating rate when the moisture content was increased beyond these levels. The dielectric properties of both samples increased with a rise in moisture content. As the moisture content increased, treatment time required to reduce E. coli O157:H7 and S. Typhimurium by more than 7 log CFU/g (below the detection limit, 1 log CFU/g) decreased and then increased again without affecting product quality when the moisture content exceeded a level corresponding to the peak heating rate. RF treatment significantly (Pheating can be effectively used to not only control pathogens but also reduce moisture levels in spices and that the effect of inactivation is dependent on moisture content. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Drug-resistant Escherichia coli, Rural Idaho

    OpenAIRE

    Hannah, Elizabeth L.; Angulo, Frederick J.; Johnson, James R.; Haddadin, Bassam; Williamson, Jacquelyn; Samore, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    Stool carriage of drug-resistant Escherichia coli in home-living residents of a rural community was examined. Carriage of nalidixic acid–resistant E. coli was associated with recent use of antimicrobial agents in the household. Household clustering of drug-resistant E. coli was observed. Most carriers of drug-resistant E. coli lacked conventional risk factors.

  12. Clinical trial to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of an oral inactivated enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli prototype vaccine containing CFA/I overexpressing bacteria and recombinantly produced LTB/CTB hybrid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, A; Leach, S; Tobias, J; Carlin, N; Gustafsson, B; Jertborn, M; Bourgeois, L; Walker, R; Holmgren, J; Svennerholm, A-M

    2013-02-06

    We have developed a new oral vaccine against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) diarrhea containing killed recombinant E. coli bacteria expressing increased levels of ETEC colonization factors (CFs) and a recombinant protein (LCTBA), i.e. a hybrid between the binding subunits of E. coli heat labile toxin (LTB) and cholera toxin (CTB). We describe a randomized, comparator controlled, double-blind phase I trial in 60 adult Swedish volunteers of a prototype of this vaccine. The safety and immunogenicity of the prototype vaccine, containing LCTBA and an E. coli strain overexpressing the colonization factor CFA/I, was compared to a previously developed oral ETEC vaccine, consisting of CTB and inactivated wild type ETEC bacteria expressing CFA/I (reference vaccine). Groups of volunteers were given two oral doses of either the prototype or the reference vaccine; the prototype vaccine was administered at the same or a fourfold higher dosage than the reference vaccine. The prototype vaccine was found to be safe and equally well-tolerated as the reference vaccine at either dosage tested. The prototype vaccine induced mucosal IgA (fecal secretory IgA and intestine-derived IgA antibody secreting cell) responses to both LTB and CFA/I, as well as serum IgA and IgG antibody responses to LTB. Immunization with LCTBA resulted in about twofold higher mucosal and systemic IgA responses against LTB than a comparable dose of CTB. The higher dose of the prototype vaccine induced significantly higher fecal and systemic IgA responses to LTB and fecal IgA responses to CFA/I than the reference vaccine. These results demonstrate that CF over-expression and inclusion of the LCTBA hybrid protein in an oral inactivated ETEC vaccine does not change the safety profile when compared to a previous generation of such a vaccine and that the prototype vaccine induces significant dose dependent mucosal immune responses against CFA/I and LTB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Salmonella and Escherichia coli O157:H7 Inactivation, Color, and Bioactive Compounds Enhancement on Raspberries during Frozen Storage after Decontamination Using New Formula Sanitizer Washing or Pulsed Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenqing; Chen, Haiqiang; Wu, Changqing

    2016-07-01

    Berries are normally washed before they are frozen. Washing with sanitizer and treatment with pulsed light (PL) were studied for their effectiveness to inactivate foodborne pathogens on raspberries during frozen storage, while maintaining or enhancing major quality parameters. Raspberries were inoculated with Salmonella or Escherichia coli O157:H7 and then underwent a washing treatment with citric acid plus sodium dodecyl sulfate (CA+SDS) or citric acid plus thymol (CA+THY) or treatment with PL (dry PL, water-assisted [wet] PL, and PL-SDS). Pathogen survival was determined immediately after treatments and during frozen storage at -20°C for 3 months. Washing with CA+SDS or CA+THY significantly reduced Salmonella (by 3.6 and 3.2 log CFU/g, respectively) and E. coli O157:H7 (by 4.1 and 3.7 log CFU/g, respectively). At the end of storage, washing with CA+SDS reduced Salmonella to 0.6 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 to 0.5 log CFU/g; washing with CA+THY reduced Salmonella to 0.9 log CFU/g and E. coli O157:H7 to 0.5 log CFU/g. PL-SDS showed decontamination efficacy on raspberries, with 0.7 log CFU/g Salmonella and 0.9 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 surviving at the end of storage; in comparison, in the control, 1.6 log CFU/g Salmonella and 1.5 log CFU/g E. coli O157:H7 survived. Pathogen survival in raspberries that had been washed or treated with PL-SDS was significantly lower than in untreated raspberries. Major quality parameters, including color, total phenolic content, total anthocyanin content, total bacterial count, and total yeast and mold counts, were evaluated on raspberries immediately after treatments and during frozen storage. Redness increased in PL-treated raspberries. At the end of storage, PL-treated raspberries had significantly higher total phenolic content and total anthocyanin content compared with control samples. Washing with sanitizers and treatment with PL decreased the total bacterial count and total yeast and mold counts on raspberries and maintained

  14. Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli in Daycare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebbelstrup Jensen, Betina; Stensvold, Christen R.; Struve, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) has been associated with persistent diarrhea, reduced growth acceleration, and failure to thrive in children living in developing countries and with childhood diarrhea in general in industrialized countries. The clinical implications of an EAEC carrier...... and answered a questionnaire regarding gastrointestinal symptoms and exposures. Exposures included foreign travel, consumption of antibiotics, and contact with a diseased animal. In the capital area of Denmark, a total of 179 children aged 0-6 years were followed in a cohort study, in the period between 2009...

  15. Original Paper Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-12

    Apr 12, 2011 ... Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and ... species by selective cultural procedures and for Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Staphylococcus aureus enriched ... Point System monitoring of critical contamination points used in meat production to ensure food safety in.

  16. PATHOGENIC POTENTIALS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI ISOLATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrolyte and haematological parameters in rabbits infected with pathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli from rural water supplies in Rivers State, Nigeria, where monitored. Rabbits were orally infected with suspension containing 3x107 cfu /ml of Escherichia coli to induce diarrhoea, and the electrolyte (sodium, potassium ...

  17. Escherichia coli in Europe: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Allocati, Nerino; Masulli, Michele; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.; Di Ilio, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli remains one of the most frequent causes of several common bacterial infections in humans and animals. E. coli is the prominent cause of enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicaemia and other clinical infections, such as neonatal meningitis. E. coli is also prominently associated with diarrhoea in pet and farm animals. The therapeutic treatment of E. coli infections is threatened by the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli str...

  18. Validation of a commercial process for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of whole muscle beef jerky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Fett, Anna C S; Call, Jeffrey E; Luchansky, John B

    2008-05-01

    We validated the lethality of three time and temperature regimens for commercial processing of whole muscle beef jerky. A total of ca. 8.9 log CFU per strip of multiple-strain cocktails of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, or Listeria monocytogenes were separately applied onto the surface of beef strips that were treated as follows: (i) inoculated but not marinated or (ii) inoculated and then marinated. A total of three beef strips for each treatment in each of three trials were separately inoculated with a cocktail of one of the three pathogens and placed on the top, middle, and bottom racks of a loading truck. The strips on the rack were loaded into a commercial smokehouse and cooked and dried for 1.5, 2.5, or 3.5 h at a target temperature of 180 degrees F (82.2 degrees C) with constant (natural hickory) smoking, but without the addition of humidity. Regardless of how the strips were treated or where the strips were placed on the loading rack, drying for 1.5, 2.5, or 3.5 h to a target temperature of 180 degrees F (average of 177.2 +/- 5.6 degrees F [80.7 +/- 3.1 degrees C]), with constant smoke at an initial average relative humidity of 63.1% to a final average relative humidity of 20.9% resulted in a decrease of > or = 7.3 log CFU per strip (> or = 6.9 log CFU/g) for each of the three pathogen cocktails. Of note, marinated strips that were cooked and dried for 2.5 and 3.5 h or nonmarinated strips cooked or dried for 3.5 h also satisfied the U.S. Food Safety and Inspection Service standard of identity (moisture-to-protein ratio < or = 0.75:1) and/or shelf-stability (water activity < or = 0.8) requirements for jerky.

  19. [Nature of the heterogeneity of the 30S ribosomal subunits in vitro. II. Two types of inactivation of the 30S subunits of Escherichia coli ribosomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peshin, N N; Kirillov, S V

    1979-01-01

    The influence of concentration of monovalent cations on the binding constant of Phe-tRNAPhe to 30S.poly(U) complex was studied. Two types of inactivation of the 30S subunits by ammonium ions at the low magnesium concentration (1 mM) were found. The first type of inactivation was observed at high concentrations of NH4+ ions (from 0.5 to 1.5 M) and due to the dissociation of ribosomal proteins from 30S subunits. This inactivation only decreased the binding constant of Phe-tRNAPhe to 30S.poly(U) complex up to 50 times but all 30S subunits were equally achieved in Phe-tRNAPhe binding. This type of inactivation was reversible, addition of S-proteins restored the association constant to the original value. At low concentration of NH4+ ions (below 100 mM) about half of the 30S subunits is irreversibly inactivated (the binding constant of Phe-tRNAPhe decreased below detectable level) probably as a result of conformational changes in ribosomal RNA. Both types of inactivation of the 30S subunits can take place during the preparation of isolated subunits of ribosomes.

  20. Effect of electropermeabilization by ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in buffered peptone water and apple juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Il-Kyu; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2013-12-01

    The effect of electric field-induced ohmic heating for inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes in buffered peptone water (BPW) (pH 7.2) and apple juice (pH 3.5; 11.8 °Brix) was investigated in this study. BPW and apple juice were treated at different temperatures (55°C, 58°C, and 60°C) and for different times (0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s) by ohmic heating compared with conventional heating. The electric field strength was fixed at 30 V/cm and 60 V/cm for BPW and apple juice, respectively. Bacterial reduction resulting from ohmic heating was significantly different (Pheating at 58°C and 60°C in BPW and at 55°C, 58°C, and 60°C in apple juice for intervals of 0, 10, 20, 25, and 30 s. These results show that electric field-induced ohmic heating led to additional bacterial inactivation at sublethal temperatures. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations and the propidium iodide (PI) uptake test were conducted after treatment at 60°C for 0, 10, 20, 25 and 30 s in BPW to observe the effects on cell permeability due to electroporation-caused cell damage. PI values when ohmic and conventional heating were compared were significantly different (Pheating can more effectively reduce bacterial populations at reduced temperatures and shorter time intervals, especially in acidic fruit juices such as apple juice. Therefore, loss of quality can be minimized in a pasteurization process incorporating ohmic heating.

  1. Allspice, cinnamon, and clove bud plant essential oils in edible apple films inactivate the foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant essential oils (EOs) are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contaminati...

  2. Allspice, cinnamon and clove bud plant essential oils in edible apple films inactivate the foodbrone pathogens Escherichia coli Ol57:h7, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant essential oils (EOs) are rich sources of volatile terpenoids and phenolic compounds. Such compounds have the potential to inactivate pathogenic bacteria in the vapor phase. Edible films made from fruits or vegetables containing EOs can be used commercially to protect food against contamination...

  3. Cold Plasma-activated hydrogen peroxide aerosol inactivates Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria innocua and maintains quality of grape tomato, spinach and cantaloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide in inactivating bacteria and maintaining quality of grape tomato, baby spinach leaves and cantaloupe. Stem scar and smooth surfaces of tomatoes, spinach leaves, and cantaloupe rinds, inoculated with Escherich...

  4. N-type Cu2O Film for Photocatalytic and Photoelectrocatalytic Processes: Its stability and Inactivation of E. coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Liangbin; Ng, Tsz Wai; Yu, Ying; Xia, Dehua; Yip, Ho Yin; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Zhao, Huijun; Wong, Po Keung

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Photoelectrocatalytic inactivation of E. coli by Cu 2 O film was firstly reported. • 7 log of E. coli could be completely inactivated in 2 h by Cu 2 O with a 0.1 V bias. • Charge transfer between Cu 2 O and E. coli was monitored by electrochemical technique. • Inactivation of E. coli by electric charges of electrodes was in-depth investigated. • Stability of N-type Cu 2 O as a photocatalyst was studied for the first time. - ABSTRACT: Photoelectrocatalytic (PEC) inactivation of Escherichia coli K-12 by cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) film irradiated by visible light is firstly reported. A complete inactivation of about 7 log of E. coli was obtained for Cu 2 O film within 6 h. The bacterial inactivation efficiency was significantly improved in a photoelectrochemical cell, in which 7 log of E. coli could be completely inactivated within 2 h by Cu 2 O film with a 0.1 V bias. Electric charge transfer between electrodes and E. coli, and electric charge inactivation towards E. coli were investigated using membrane-separated reactor combined with short circuit photocurrent technique. H 2 O 2 , hole, and toxicity of Cu 2 O film were found responsible for the inactivation of E. coli. Toxicity of copper ions (including Cu 2+ and Cu + ) leakage from Cu 2 O films was determined and the results showed that the amount of leakage copper ions was not toxic to E. coli. Finally, the Cu 2 O film was proved to be effective and reusable for PC and PEC inactivation of E. coli

  5. Peptidoglycan Hydrolases of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heijenoort, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The review summarizes the abundant information on the 35 identified peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases of Escherichia coli classified into 12 distinct families, including mainly glycosidases, peptidases, and amidases. An attempt is also made to critically assess their functions in PG maturation, turnover, elongation, septation, and recycling as well as in cell autolysis. There is at least one hydrolytic activity for each bond linking PG components, and most hydrolase genes were identified. Few hydrolases appear to be individually essential. The crystal structures and reaction mechanisms of certain hydrolases having defined functions were investigated. However, our knowledge of the biochemical properties of most hydrolases still remains fragmentary, and that of their cellular functions remains elusive. Owing to redundancy, PG hydrolases far outnumber the enzymes of PG biosynthesis. The presence of the two sets of enzymes acting on the PG bonds raises the question of their functional correlations. It is difficult to understand why E. coli keeps such a large set of PG hydrolases. The subtle differences in substrate specificities between the isoenzymes of each family certainly reflect a variety of as-yet-unidentified physiological functions. Their study will be a far more difficult challenge than that of the steps of the PG biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22126997

  6. [Virulence mechanisms of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán-García, Ana Elvira; Ariza-Rojas, Sandra Catherine; Vargas-Cárdenas, Fabiola Andrea; Vargas-Remolina, Lizeth Viviana

    2016-08-01

    Acute diarrheal disease (ADD) is a global public health problem, especially in developing countries and is one of the causes of mortality in children under five. ADD etiologic agents include viruses, bacteria and parasites in that order. Escherichia coli bacteria it is classified as a major diarrheagenic agent and transmitted by consuming contaminated water or undercooked foods. This review compiled updates on information virulence factors and pathogenic mechanisms involved in adhesion and colonization of seven pathotypes of E. coli called enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), shigatoxigenic E. coli (STEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and diffusely-adherent E. coli (DAEC). A final pathotype, adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) associated with Crohn's disease was also reviewed. The diarrheagenic pathotypes of E. coli affect different population groups and knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction with the human is important to guide research towards the development of vaccines and new tools for diagnosis and control.

  7. Characterization of Escherichia coli Phylogenetic Groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Drug resistance, Escherichia coli, Extraintestinal infections, Polymerase chain reaction,. Phylogenetic group, Virulence. Access this .... performed by two methods: A carbapenem–EDTA combined disk method and MBL E-test ..... Enterobacteriaceae: Escherichia, Klebsiella, Proteus and other genera. In: Collee JG ...

  8. Strategies for Protein Overproduction in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Examines heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and the role of regulatory sequences which control gene expression at transcription resulting in abundant production of messenger RNA and regulatory sequences in mRNA which promote efficient translation. Also examines the role of E. coli cells in stabilizing mRNA and protein that is…

  9. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome...

  10. Escherichia Coli Removal from Water Using Electrophotocatalytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this experimental applied study is to evaluate the removal of Escherichia Coli, as the microbial contamination indicator of water, from drinking water using electrophotocatalytic method. The contaminated water in an electrophotocatalytic reactor were prepared by adding 102-103 cell of E. coli bacteria to drinking ...

  11. Fimbrial adhesins from extraintestinal Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Schembri, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) represent an important subclass of E. coli that cause a wide spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. Fimbriae are key virulence factors of ExPEC strains. These long surface located rod-shaped organelles mediate receptor-specific attachment...

  12. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...

  13. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained from 382 samples.

  14. Escherichia coli survival in waters: Temperature dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowing the survival rates of water-borne Escherichia coli is important in evaluating microbial contamination and making appropriate management decisions. E. coli survival rates are dependent on temperature, a dependency that is routinely expressed using an analogue of the Q10 mo...

  15. Characterization of Escherichia coli Phylogenetic Groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli strains mainly fall into four phylogenetic groups (A, B1, B2, and D) and that virulent extra‑intestinal strains mainly belong to groups B2 and D. Aim: The aim was to determine the association between phylogenetic groups of E. coli causing extraintestinal infections (ExPEC) regarding the site of ...

  16. Prevalence of Escherichia coli O157

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdissa, Rosa; Haile, Woynshet; Fite, Akafete Teklu; Beyi, Ashenafi Feyisa; Agga, Getahun E.; Edao, Bedaso Mammo; Tadesse, Fanos; Korsa, Mesula Geloye; Beyene, Takele; Beyene, Tariku Jibat; Zutter, De Lieven; Cox, Eric; Goddeeris, Bruno Maria

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is paucity of information regarding the epidemiology of Escherichia coli O157: H7 in developing countries. In this study, we investigated the occurrence of E. coli O157: H7 associated with beef cattle at processing plants and at retail shops in Ethiopia. Methods: Various samples

  17. Antimicrobial resistance among commensal Escherichia coli from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-07-19

    Jul 19, 2012 ... Commensal bacteria contribute to the distribution and persistence of antimicrobial resistance in the environment. This study monitored antimicrobial resistance in commensal Escherichia coli from the faeces of on-farm and slaughter cattle and beef. A total of 342 (89.5%) E. coli isolates were obtained.

  18. ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli ANALISIS CEMARAN BAKTERI Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    ANGGREINI, RAHAYU

    2015-01-01

    2015 RAHAYU ANGGREINI coli Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan identifikasi cemaran bakteri E. coli O157:H7 pada daging sapi di kota Makassar. Sampel pada penelitian ini sebanyak 72 sampel Kata Kunci : Daging sapi, pasar tradisional, E. coli, E. coli O157:H7, kontaminasi bakteri, identifikasi E. coli O157:H7.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3255 - Escherichia coli serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Escherichia coli serological reagents. 866.3255... coli serological reagents. (a) Identification. Escherichia coli serological reagents are devices that consist of antigens and antisera used in serological tests to identify Escherichia coli from cultured...

  20. Probing bactericidal mechanisms induced by cold atmospheric plasmas with Escherichia coli mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perni, Stefano; Shama, Gilbert; Hobman, J. L.; Lund, P. A.; Kershaw, C. J.; Hidalgo-Arroyo, G. A.; Penn, C. W.; Deng, X. T.; Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-induced microbial inactivation have commonly been studied with physicochemical techniques. In this letter, Escherichia coli K-12 and its ΔrecA, ΔrpoS, and ΔsoxS mutants are employed to discriminate effects of UV photons, OH radicals, and reactive oxygen species produced in atmospheric discharges. This microbiological approach exploits the fact that these E. coli mutants are defective in their resistance against various external stresses. By interplaying bacterial inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, oxygen atoms are identified as a major contributor in plasma inactivation with minor contributions from UV photons, OH radicals, singlet oxygen metastables, and nitric oxide

  1. Probing bactericidal mechanisms induced by cold atmospheric plasmas with Escherichia coli mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perni, Stefano; Shama, Gilbert; Hobman, J. L.; Lund, P. A.; Kershaw, C. J.; Hidalgo-Arroyo, G. A.; Penn, C. W.; Deng, X. T.; Walsh, J. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-02-01

    Mechanisms of plasma-induced microbial inactivation have commonly been studied with physicochemical techniques. In this letter, Escherichia coli K-12 and its ΔrecA, ΔrpoS, and ΔsoxS mutants are employed to discriminate effects of UV photons, OH radicals, and reactive oxygen species produced in atmospheric discharges. This microbiological approach exploits the fact that these E. coli mutants are defective in their resistance against various external stresses. By interplaying bacterial inactivation kinetics with optical emission spectroscopy, oxygen atoms are identified as a major contributor in plasma inactivation with minor contributions from UV photons, OH radicals, singlet oxygen metastables, and nitric oxide.

  2. ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius

    in E.coli is increasing and especially isolates producing Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) have been reported worldwide. Treatment of UTI is usually initiated by the general practitioners and a significant proportion of clinical isolates are now resistant to first line antibiotics. The global...... dissemination of resistant E.coli has in particular been driven by the spread of a few specific E.coli-lineages and it seems that there is a difference between the sequence types found among resistant E.coli, ESBL-producing E.coli and antibiotic susceptible E.coli. The overall objectives of this thesis were...... to investigate (i) antibiotics involved in selection of ESBL-producing E.coli, in an experimental mouse model in vivo, (ii) risk factors for UTI with ESBL-producing E.coli and (iii) to describe the phylogenetic composition of E.coli populations with different resistance patterns. We found that different...

  3. Infection strategies of enteric pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Abigail; Young, Joanna C; Constantinou, Nicholas; Frankel, Gad

    2012-01-01

    Enteric Escherichia coli (E. coli) are both natural flora of humans and important pathogens causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally enteric E. coli have been divided into 6 pathotypes, with further pathotypes often proposed. In this review we suggest expansion of the enteric E. coli into 8 pathotypes to include the emerging pathotypes of adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) and Shiga-toxin producing enteroaggregative E. coli (STEAEC). The molecular mechanisms that allow enteric E. coli to colonize and cause disease in the human host are examined and for two of the pathotypes that express a type 3 secretion system (T3SS) we discuss the complex interplay between translocated effectors and manipulation of host cell signaling pathways that occurs during infection.

  4. EXPRESSION OF BACTERIOOPSIN GENES IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    OpenAIRE

    TSUJIUCHI, Yutaka; IWASA, Tatsuo; TOKUNAGA, Fumio

    1994-01-01

    An inducible expression vector pUBO was constructed with native codons in order to express the gene of Bacteriorhodopsin (BOP) in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Vector pUBO contains lac-promoter followed by the partial structural gene of lacZ and the structural gene of BOP. The expression of this fusion protein was detected by ELISA with anti-BOP antiserum. The fusion protein obtained from E. coli trnsformed with pUBO formed approximately 0.1% of the total protein of the E. coli membrane fraction.

  5. Escherichia coli como causa de diarrea infantil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Fernández Ferrán

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realiza una revisión de la literatura médica reciente sobre Escherichia coli productora de diarrea. Se presentan los diferentes grupos de E. coli y se plantean los mecanismos patogénicos, así como el cuadro clínico asociado y su incidencia en la diarrea infantil, según estudios realizados en diferentes partes del mundo. Se señalan los elementos relacionados con el diagnóstico y se plantean las orientaciones terapéuticas recomendadas.A medical literature review was made about Escherichia coli as a cause of diarrhea. The different groups of E.coli are presented, also the pathogenic mechanisms, the clinical picture associated and its incidence on the infantile diarrhea are stated, according to studies performed in different parts of the world. The elements related to the diagnosis and the recommended therapeutical orientations are pointed out in this paper.

  6. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made i...

  7. Frequency-dependent Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xuejun; Si, Guangwei; Deng, Nianpei; Ouyang, Qi; Wu, Tailin; He, Zhuoran; Jiang, Lili; Luo, Chunxiong; Tu, Yuhai

    2012-01-01

    We study Escherichia coli chemotaxis behaviors in environments with spatially and temporally varying attractant sources by developing a unique microfluidic system. Our measurements reveal a frequency-dependent chemotaxis behavior. At low frequency, the E. coli population oscillate in synchrony with the attractant. In contrast, in fast-changing environments, the population response becomes smaller and out of phase with the attractant waveform. These observations are inconsistent with the well-...

  8. 77 FR 9888 - Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Certain Raw Beef Products AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service... toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145). This new date..., that are contaminated with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26, O45, O103, O111, O121...

  9. Emergence of Plasmid-Mediated Fosfomycin-Resistance Genes among Escherichia coli Isolates, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Yahia; Gallah, Salah; Hommeril, Baptiste; Genel, Nathalie; Decré, Dominique; Rottman, Martin; Arlet, Guillaume

    2017-09-01

    FosA, a glutathione S-transferase that inactivates fosfomycin, has been reported as the cause of enzymatic resistance to fosfomycin. We show that multiple lineages of FosA-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase Escherichia coli have circulated in France since 2012, potentially reducing the efficacy of fosfomycin in treating infections with antimicrobial drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli.

  10. Markerless Escherichia coli rrn Deletion Strains for Genetic Determination of Ribosomal Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Selwyn; Skovgaard, Ole; McLaughlin, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Single-copy rrn strains facilitate genetic ribosomal studies in Escherichia coli. Consecutive markerless deletion of rrn operons resulted in slower growth upon inactivation of the fourth copy, which was reversed by supplying transfer RNA genes encoded in rrn operons in trans. Removal of the sixth...

  11. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad......-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra...

  12. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important component of the biosphere and is an ideal model for studies of processes involved in bacterial genome evolution. Sixty-one publically available E. coli and Shigella spp. sequenced genomes are compared, using basic methods to produce phylogenetic and proteomics......% of the pan-genome and about 80% of a typical genome; some of these variable genes tend to be co-localized on genomic islands. The diversity within the species E. coli, and the overlap in gene content between this and related species, suggests a continuum rather than sharp species borders in this group...

  13. Cellular chain formation in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2009-01-01

    In this study we report on a novel structural phenotype in Escherichia coli biofilms: cellular chain formation. Biofilm chaining in E. coli K-12 was found to occur primarily by clonal expansion, but was not due to filamentous growth. Rather, chain formation was the result of intercellular......; type I fimbriae expression significantly reduced cellular chain formation, presumably by steric hindrance. Cellular chain formation did not appear to be specific to E coli K-12. Although many urinary tract infection (UTI) isolates were found to form rather homogeneous, flat biofilms, three isolates...

  14. Two proline porters in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalmach, M E; Grothe, S; Wood, J M

    1983-11-01

    Escherichia coli mutants defective at putP and putA lack proline transport via proline porter I and proline dehydrogenase activity, respectively. They retain a proline uptake system (proline porter II) that is induced during tryptophan-limited growth and are sensitive to the toxic L-proline analog, 3,4-dehydroproline. 3,4-Dehydroproline-resistant mutants derived from a putP putA mutant lack proline porter II. Auxotrophic derivatives derived from putP+ or putP bacteria can grow if provided with proline at low concentration (25 microM); those derived from the 3,4-dehydroproline-resistant mutants require high proline for growth (2.5 mM). We conclude that E. coli, like Salmonella typhimurium, possesses a second proline porter that is inactivated by mutations at the proP locus.

  15. Coliforms and Escherichia coli in waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavallari, E.; Stefanelli, Gian Piero; Lorenzini, T.

    2005-01-01

    The study shows the evaluation of a defined substrate method, Colilert 18/Quanty Tray, for the simultaneous detection of Coliforms bacteria and Escherichia coli in water. The results obtained indicate that this method represents a valid alternative to the traditional methods considering sensitivity, specificity, repeatability but also rapidity and simplicity of use [it

  16. Leaner and meaner genomes in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David

    2006-01-01

    A 'better' Escherichia coli K-12 genome has recently been engineered in which about 15% of the genome has been removed by planned deletions. Comparison with related bacterial genomes that have undergone a natural reduction in size suggests that there is plenty of scope for yet more deletions....

  17. Inhibition of Escherichia Coli, Salmonella and Staphylococcus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus. aureus are of great concern to the food industry, especially in foods stored under refrigerated conditions where, unlike most food-borne pathogens are able to multiply. This investigation was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of some spice ...

  18. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...

  19. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging antibiotic resistance due to extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production limited the use of β-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. This observational study was conducted at the Microbiology department of the Children's Hospital, Lahore Pakistan, from June, 2009 to ...

  20. Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune Micha; Nielsen, Marc Trunjer Kusk; Möller, Sören

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) causes diarrhoeal disease, bloody diarrhoea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence of STEC and the clinical features of STEC patients from a well-defined Danish population in which all fecal...

  1. Control of Ribosome Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren; Meyenburg, K. von; Måløe, O.

    1977-01-01

    The rate of ribosome synthesis and accumulation in Escherichia coli during the transition after an energy source shift-down was analyzed. The shift was imposed on cultures of stringent and relaxed strains growing in glucose minimal medium by the addition of the glucose analogue {alpha...

  2. Emergence of Quinolone Resistance amongst Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and seventy three isolates of Escherichia coli obtained from 7 hospitals in Lagos were screened for Fluoroquinolone resistance (FQR). Rate of resistance was 22.3% showing an increase in quinolone resistance when compared with resistant rates between 1994 and 1999 which ranged from 0 – 2% then.

  3. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...

  4. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, B.A.; Sharif, Firdaus

    1986-01-01

    The authors report a study of the misincorporation step in excision proficient umuC Escherichia coli as revealed by delayed photoreversal and show that it parallels the loss of photoreversibility of mutations induced in isogenic umu + bacteria; in both cases the end-point was mutation to streptomycin resistance. (author)

  5. Multiplex Genome Editing in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2018-01-01

    Lambda Red recombineering is an easy and efficient method for generating genetic modifications in Escherichia coli. For gene deletions, lambda Red recombineering is combined with the use of selectable markers, which are removed through the action of, e.g., flippase (Flp) recombinase. This PCR...

  6. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antibiotic resistance pattern of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from pregnant women with history of recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTIs) and healthy pregnant women. Methods: A total of 485 high vaginal swab specimens were collected from pregnant women with ...

  7. Antibiotic resistance properties of uropathogenic Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus, ..... and Argentina [28]. CONCLUSION. As far as we know, the present study is the first prevalence report on antibiotic resistance pattern of UPEC strains in ... serogroups profiles of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated ...

  8. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-11-21

    Nov 21, 2011 ... carbapenems (Patricia, 2001; Bush, 2001). The β-lactamases produced by bacteria are ... among clinical isolates of the family Enterobacteriaceae. (Sanders and Sanders, 1992). ESBLs have ..... lactamases among multidrug resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species causing urinary tract infections in ...

  9. Optimization of plasmid electrotransformation into Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve electroporation, optical density of bacteria, recovery time and electrical parameter (field strength and capacitance) were optimized using the Taguchi statistical method. ANOVA of obtained data indicated that the optimal conditions of electrotransformation of pET-28a (+) plasmid into Escherichia coli ...

  10. Prevalence of Arcobacter, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, varying level of resistance of Escherichia coli 66(84.6%), Salmonella 6(100%) and Arcobacter 57(100%) to amoxicillin was observed. The susceptibility pattern indicates that the bacterial isolates exhibited a varying level of resistance to two or more antimicrobial agents with maximum resistance to amoxicillin.

  11. Synergistic effects in mixed Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reisner, A.; Holler, B.M.; Molin, Søren

    2006-01-01

    the pathways governing development of more complex heterogeneous communities. In this study, we established a laboratory model where biofilm-stimulating effects due to interactions between genetically diverse strains of Escherichia coli were monitored. Synergistic induction of biofilm formation resulting from...... the cocultivation of 403 undomesticated E. coli strains with a characterized E. coli K-12 strain was detected at a significant frequency. The survey suggests that different mechanisms underlie the observed stimulation, yet synergistic development of biofilm within the subset of E. coli isolates (n = 56) exhibiting...... the strongest effects was most often linked to conjugative transmission of natural plasmids carried by the E. coli isolates (70%). Thus, the capacity of an isolate to promote the biofilm through cocultivation was (i) transferable to the K-12 strain, (ii) was linked with the acquisition of conjugation genes...

  12. Whole Genome Epidemiological Typing of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) is of huge importance in global health both as a commensal organism living within its host or as a pathogen causing millions of infections each year. Infections occur both sporadic and as outbreaks with sometimes up to thousands of infected people. To limit the number...... of infections it is important to monitor pathogenic E. coli in order to detect outbreaks as quickly as possible and find the source of the outbreak. The effectiveness of monitoring and tracking of pathogens is very dependent on the typing methods that are employed. Classical typing methods employed for E. coli......D thesis attempts to take the first steps toward such a method. In Kaas I all publicly available E. coli genomes sequenced (186) are analyzed. 1,702 core genes were found in all genomes. 3,051 genes were found in 95% of the genomes. The pan genome was found to consist of 16,373 genes. The overall phylogeny...

  13. Defining the Genome Features of Escherichia albertii, an Emerging Enteropathogen Closely Related to Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooka, Tadasuke; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Katsura, Keisuke; Seto, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kawano, Kimiko; Tokuoka, Eisuke; Furukawa, Masato; Harada, Seiya; Yoshino, Shuji; Seto, Junji; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi, Keiji; Murase, Kazunori; Gotoh, Yasuhiro; Imuta, Naoko; Nishi, Junichiro; Gomes, Tânia A; Beutin, Lothar; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-11-03

    Escherichia albertii is a recently recognized close relative of Escherichia coli. This emerging enteropathogen possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by the locus of enterocyte effacement, similar to enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC). Shiga toxin-producing strains have also been identified. The genomic features of E. albertii, particularly differences from other Escherichia species, have not yet been well clarified. Here, we sequenced the genome of 29 E. albertii strains (3 complete and 26 draft sequences) isolated from multiple sources and performed intraspecies and intragenus genomic comparisons. The sizes of the E. albertii genomes range from 4.5 to 5.1 Mb, smaller than those of E. coli strains. Intraspecies genomic comparisons identified five phylogroups of E. albertii. Intragenus genomic comparison revealed that the possible core genome of E. albertii comprises 3,250 genes, whereas that of the genus Escherichia comprises 1,345 genes. Our analysis further revealed several unique or notable genetic features of E. albertii, including those responsible for known biochemical features and virulence factors and a possibly active second T3SS known as ETT2 (E. coli T3SS 2) that is inactivated in E. coli. Although this organism has been observed to be nonmotile in vitro, genes for flagellar biosynthesis are fully conserved; chemotaxis-related genes have been selectively deleted. Based on these results, we have developed a nested polymerase chain reaction system to directly detect E. albertii. Our data define the genomic features of E. albertii and provide a valuable basis for future studies of this important emerging enteropathogen. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  14. A clinical isolate of transposon Tn5 expressing streptomycin resistance in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Genilloud, O; Blázquez, J; Mazodier, P; Moreno, F

    1988-01-01

    The central region of transposon Tn5 carries three antibiotic resistance markers: neo, ble, and str. The str gene codes for a phosphotransferase that inactivates streptomycin. This activity is phenotypically expressed in several gram-negative bacteria but not in Escherichia coli. We identified a Tn5 variant in E. coli clinical isolates that express streptomycin resistance. This transposon carries a 6-base-pair deletion within the str gene, near the 3' end. The same kind of mutation had been p...

  15. Noncomplementing diploidy resulting from spontaneous zygogenesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratia, Jean-Pierre

    2005-09-01

    With the aim of understanding sexual reproduction and phenotypic expression, a novel type of mating recently discovered in Escherichia coli was investigated. Termed spontaneous zygogenesis (or Z-mating), it differs from F-mediated conjugation. Its products proved phenotypically unstable, losing part of the phenotype for which they were selected. Inactivation of a parental chromosome in the zygote is strongly suggested by fluctuation tests, respreading experiments, analysis of reisolates, and segregation of non-viable cells detected by epifluorescence staining. Some phenotypically haploid subclones were interpreted as stable noncomplementing diploids carrying an inactivated co-replicating chromosome. Pedigree analysis indicated that the genetic composition of such cells consisted of parental genomes or one parental plus a recombinant genome. Inactivation of a chromosome carrying a prophage resulted in the disappearance of both the ability to produce phage particles and the immunity to superinfection. Phage production signalled transient reactivation of such a chromosome and constituted a sensitive test for stable noncomplementing diploidy. Chromosome inactivation thus appears to be a spontaneous event in bacteria.

  16. Pathogenomics of uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Subset of faecal E. coli that can enter, colonize urinary tract and cause infection are known as uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC. UPEC strains act as opportunistic intracellular pathogens taking advantage of host susceptibility using a diverse array of virulence factors. Presence of specific virulence associated genes on genomic/pathogenicity islands and involvement of horizontal gene transfer appears to account for evolution and diversity of UPEC. Recent success in large-scale genome sequencing and comparative genomics has helped in unravelling UPEC pathogenomics. Here we review recent findings regarding virulence characteristics of UPEC and mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of urinary tract infection.

  17. Infektionen mit darmpathogenen Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedrich, Alexander; Stein, Jürgen; Dignass, Axel

    2001-01-01

    E. coli ist ein wesentlicher Bestandteil der physiologischen Darmflora des Menschen. Die üblicherweise im Darm vorkommenden Kolibakterien sind apathogen und für den Menschen eher nützlich (Sonnenborn u. Greinwald 1990). Allerdings kennen wir bei dieser Bakterienspezies auch ein breites Spektrum von

  18. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... method enabled us to start the analysis on the distribution of various chromosomal loci inside slowly growing cells. With the actual counting and measuring no longer being any problem we could easily analyze 14 loci distributed on the E.coli chromosome. More than 15.000 cells were analyzed in total...... the new system, which is based on the pMT1 par system from Yersenia pestis, we labeled loci on opposite sides of the E.coli chromosome simultaneously and were able to show that the E.coli chromosome is organized with one chromosomal arm in each cell half. This astounding result is described in Paper III...

  19. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli is among the most common causes of Gram-negative bacteraemia, infectious endocarditis (IE) due to this pathogen is rare. A 67-y-old male without a previous medical history presented with a new mitral regurgitation murmur and persisting E. coli bacteraemia in spite of broad......-spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra......-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) are able to colonize tissue outside the gastrointestinal tract and contain a variety of virulence factors that may enable the pathogens to invade and induce infections in the cardiac endothelia. In these cases echocardiography as the imaging technology is of paramount importance...

  20. FTIR nanobiosensors for Escherichia coli detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Mura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (Escherichia coli have a low incidence but can have severe and sometimes fatal health consequences, and thus represent some of the most serious diseases due to the contamination of water and food. New, fast and simple devices that monitor these pathogens are necessary to improve the safety of our food supply chain. In this work we report on mesoporous titania thin-film substrates as sensors to detect E. coli O157:H7. Titania films treated with APTES ((3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and GA (glutaraldehyde were functionalized with specific antibodies and the absorption properties monitored. The film-based biosensors showed a detection limit for E. coli of 1 × 102 CFU/mL, constituting a simple and selective method for the effective screening of water samples.

  1. Determination of the Thermal Inactivation Kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and non-O157 in Buffer and a Spinach Homogenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monu, Emefa Angelica; Valladares, Malcond; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-08-01

    Produce has been associated with a rising number of foodborne illness outbreaks. While much produce is consumed raw, some is treated with mild heat, such as blanching or cooking. The objectives of this research were to compare the thermal inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS; pH 7.2) and a spinach homogenate and to provide an estimate of the safety of mild heat processes for spinach. Five individual strains of S. enterica, L. monocytogenes, STEC O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC were tested in PBS in 2-ml glass vials, and cocktails of the organisms were tested in blended spinach in vacuum-sealed bags. For Listeria and Salmonella at 56 to 60°C, D-values in PBS ranged from 4.42 ± 0.94 to 0.35 ± 0.03 min and 2.11 ± 0.14 to 0.16 ± 0.03 min, respectively. D-values at 54 to 58°C were 5.18 ± 0.21 to 0.53 ± 0.04 min for STEC O157:H7 and 5.01 ± 0.60 to 0.60 ± 0.13 min for non-O157 STEC. In spinach at 56 to 60°C, Listeria D-values were 11.77 ± 2.18 to 1.22 ± 0.12 min and Salmonella D-values were 3.51 ± 0.06 to 0.47 ± 0.06 min. D-values for STEC O157:H7 and non-O157 STEC were 7.21 ± 0.17 to 1.07 ± 0.11 min and 5.57 ± 0.38 to 0.99 ± 0.07 min, respectively, at 56 to 60°C. In spinach, z-values were 4.07 ± 0.16, 4.59 ± 0.26, 4.80 ± 0.92, and 5.22 ± 0.20°C for Listeria, Salmonella, STEC O157:H7, and non-O157 STEC, respectively. Results indicated that a mild thermal treatment of blended spinach at 70°C for less than 1 min would result in a 6-log reduction of all pathogens tested. These findings may assist the food industry in the design of suitable mild thermal processes to ensure food safety.

  2. Escherichia coli Field Contamination of Pecan Nuts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Karen A.; Amling, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    More pecan samples collected from grazed orchards were contaminated with Escherichia coli than were samples from nongrazed orchards. No differences in frequency of contamination between mechanically and manually harvested nuts occurred. Nutmeats from whole uncracked pecans that were soaked for 24 h in a lactose broth solution containing E. coli did not become contaminated. Twentyfour percent of the whole pecans soaked in water for 48 h to simulate standing in a rain puddle developed openings along shell suture lines which did not completely close when the nuts were redried. PMID:4584575

  3. Vaginal Lactobacillus isolates inhibit uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Atassi , Fabrice; Brassart , Dominique; Grob , Philipp; Graf , Federico; Servin , Alain ,

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activities of Lactobacillus jensenii KS119.1 and KS121.1, and Lactobacillus gasserii KS120.1 and KS124.3 strains isolated from the vaginal microflora of healthy women, against uropathogenic, diffusely adhering Afa/Dr Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains IH11128 and 7372 involved in recurrent cystitis. We observed that some of the Lactobacillus isolates inhibited the growth and decreased the viability of E. coli IH11128 and 7372....

  4. Hydrogen production by recombinant Escherichia coli strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshinari; Sanchez‐Torres, Viviana; Wood, Thomas K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The production of hydrogen via microbial biotechnology is an active field of research. Given its ease of manipulation, the best‐studied bacterium Escherichia coli has become a workhorse for enhanced hydrogen production through metabolic engineering, heterologous gene expression, adaptive evolution, and protein engineering. Herein, the utility of E. coli strains to produce hydrogen, via native hydrogenases or heterologous ones, is reviewed. In addition, potential strategies for increasing hydrogen production are outlined and whole‐cell systems and cell‐free systems are compared. PMID:21895995

  5. Identification and Prevalence of Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancuta Mihaela Rotar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the incidence of Escherichia coli in animal and non-animal foods, and mainly the incidence of the serotype O157: H7 producing verotoxin. The presence of common Escherichia coli and Escherichia coli O157: H7 in various foods (of animal and non animal origin was performed in Transylvania area. We analyzed a total of one hundred forty-one samples of minced meat, one hundred twenty-six samples of meat , twenty six samples of meat products, five samples of alcoholic beverages, three samples of seafood, one hundred samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, seventeen samples of butter, four samples of vegetables and one sample of milk powder, using the standard cultural method and Vidas Eco method for E. coli O157: H7 strains. E. coli was identified in 50 samples of minced meat, 55 samples of meat prepared, 4 samples of meat products, 2 samples of alcoholic beverages, 25 samples of cheese from pasteurized milk, 6 samples of butter and 1 sample of vegetables. In this study were not been identified any foods contaminated with the E. coli O157: H7 serotype. The results of this reasearch have demostrated that E. coli wich represents a hygienic indicator of recent food contamination, can be destroyed with heat treatment and hygienic handling of foods. Our country over the years has been among the few countries where the incidence of the E. coli O157: H7 serotype has been minimal.

  6. Reduction of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli in production of fermented sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holck, Askild L; Axelsson, Lars; Rode, Tone Mari; Høy, Martin; Måge, Ingrid; Alvseike, Ole; L'abée-Lund, Trine M; Omer, Mohamed K; Granum, Per Einar; Heir, Even

    2011-11-01

    After a number of foodborne outbreaks of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli involving fermented sausages, some countries have imposed regulations on sausage production. For example, the US Food Safety and Inspection Service requires a 5 log(10) reduction of E. coli in fermented products. Such regulations have led to a number of studies on the inactivation of E. coli in fermented sausages by changing processing and post-processing conditions. Several factors influence the survival of E. coli such as pre-treatment of the meat, amount of NaCl, nitrite and lactic acid, water activity, pH, choice of starter cultures and addition of antimicrobial compounds. Also process variables like fermentation temperature and storage time play important roles. Though a large variety of different production processes of sausages exist, generally the reduction of E. coli caused by production is in the range 1-2 log(10). In many cases this may not be enough to ensure microbial food safety. By optimising ingredients and process parameters it is possible to increase E. coli reduction to some extent, but in some cases still other post process treatments may be required. Such treatments may be storage at ambient temperatures, specific heat treatments, high pressure processing or irradiation. HACCP analyses have identified the quality of the raw materials, low temperature in the batter when preparing the sausages and a rapid pH drop during fermentation as critical control points in sausage production. This review summarises the literature on the reduction verotoxigenic E. coli in production of fermented sausages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energetics of sodium efflux from Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbolla, M.G.; Rosen, B.P.

    1984-01-01

    When energy-starved cells of Escherichia coli were passively loaded with 22 Na+, efflux of sodium could be initiated by addition of a source of metabolic energy. Conditions were established where the source of energy was phosphate bond energy, an electrochemical proton gradient, or both. Only an electrochemical proton gradient was required for efflux from intact cells. These results are consistent with secondary exchange of Na+ for H+ catalyzed by a sodium/proton antiporter

  8. Escherichia Coli: From Genome Sequences to Consequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Pallen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article summarizes a presentation given by Professor Mark Pallen of the School of Medicine at the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, United Kingdom for the Fourth Stanier Lecture held in Regina, Saskatchewan, on November 9, 2004. Professor Pallen's lecture, entitled 'Escherichia coli: From genome sequences to consequences', provides a summary of the important discoveries of his team of research scientists in the area of genetic sequencing and variations in phenotypic expression.

  9. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of avian Escherichia coli isolates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-06

    Mar 6, 2012 ... this study is to test the antibiotic sensitivity of Escherichia coli strains which were isolated in Tabriz. A total of 100 E. coli ... and K1 capsule, presence of type 1 and P fimbriae, and temperature-sensitive ... Drug resistance patterns of 100 Escherichia coli strains isolated from colibacillosis. S/N Antibiotic type.

  10. Gene encoding virulence markers among Escherichia coli isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    River water sources and diarrhoeic stools of residents in the Venda Region, Limpopo Province of South Africa were analysed for the prevalence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and the presence of virulence genes among the isolates. A control group of 100 nondiarrhoeic stool samples was included. Escherichia coli was ...

  11. Multiplex PCR Assay for Identification of Human Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Toma, Claudia; Lu, Yan; Higa, Naomi; Nakasone, Noboru; Chinen, Isabel; Baschkier, Ariela; Rivas, Marta; Iwanaga, Masaaki

    2003-01-01

    A multiplex PCR assay for the identification of human diarrheagenic Escherichia coli was developed. The targets selected for each category were eae for enteropathogenic E. coli, stx for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, elt and est for enterotoxigenic E. coli, ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli, and aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli. This assay allowed the categorization of a diarrheagenic E. coli strain in a single reaction tube.

  12. Siderophore production by uropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagrali Manjula

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most frequently encountered problems in ambulatory medicine. The present study was designed to determine siderophore production as the urovirulence factor of Escherichia coli isolated from the patients of UTI. A total of 160 strains of E. coli isolated from urine of patients with clinically diagnosed UTI were included in the study and 50 fecal isolates of E. coli, siderophore production was seen in 156 (97.5%. In 50 fecal isolates, siderophore production was seen in 2 (4%. Siderophore production has been shown to be more frequent in E. coli from patients with UTI, than in fecal isolates. The results suggest that siderophore production positive strains can be considered as UPEC. Thus, although a great deal has been learned regarding E. coli virulence mechanisms in UTI, much remains to be learned and the practical application of our growing understanding of E. coli virulence factors to the prevention and treatment of UTI has to be continued.

  13. Systems Metabolic Engineering of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyeong Rok; Shin, Jae Ho; Cho, Jae Sung; Yang, Dongsoo; Lee, Sang Yup

    2016-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering, which recently emerged as metabolic engineering integrated with systems biology, synthetic biology, and evolutionary engineering, allows engineering of microorganisms on a systemic level for the production of valuable chemicals far beyond its native capabilities. Here, we review the strategies for systems metabolic engineering and particularly its applications in Escherichia coli. First, we cover the various tools developed for genetic manipulation in E. coli to increase the production titers of desired chemicals. Next, we detail the strategies for systems metabolic engineering in E. coli, covering the engineering of the native metabolism, the expansion of metabolism with synthetic pathways, and the process engineering aspects undertaken to achieve higher production titers of desired chemicals. Finally, we examine a couple of notable products as case studies produced in E. coli strains developed by systems metabolic engineering. The large portfolio of chemical products successfully produced by engineered E. coli listed here demonstrates the sheer capacity of what can be envisioned and achieved with respect to microbial production of chemicals. Systems metabolic engineering is no longer in its infancy; it is now widely employed and is also positioned to further embrace next-generation interdisciplinary principles and innovation for its upgrade. Systems metabolic engineering will play increasingly important roles in developing industrial strains including E. coli that are capable of efficiently producing natural and nonnatural chemicals and materials from renewable nonfood biomass.

  14. Prodigiosin - A Multifaceted Escherichia coli Antimicrobial Agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjaša Danevčič

    Full Text Available Despite a considerable interest in prodigiosin, the mechanism of its antibacterial activity is still poorly understood. In this work, Escherichia coli cells were treated with prodigiosin to determine its antimicrobial effect on bacterial physiology. The effect of prodigiosin was concentration dependent. In prodigiosin treated cells above MIC value no significant DNA damage or cytoplasmic membrane disintegration was observed. The outer membrane, however, becomes leaky. Cells had severely decreased respiration activity. In prodigiosin treated cells protein and RNA synthesis were inhibited, cells were elongated but could not divide. Pre-treatment with prodigiosin improved E. coli survival rate in media containing ampicillin, kanamycin and erythromycin but not phleomycin. The results suggest that prodigiosin acts as a bacteriostatic agent in E. coli cells. If prodigiosin was diluted, cells resumed growth. The results indicate that prodigiosin has distinct mode of antibacterial action in different bacteria.

  15. Action of sodium deoxycholate on Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Mello, A.; Yotis, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sodium deoxycholate is used in a number of bacteriological media for the isolation and classification of gram-negative bacteria from food and the environment. Initial experiments to study the effect of deoxycholate on the growth parameters of Escherichia coli showed an increase in the lag time constant and generation time and a decrease in the growth rate constant total cell yield of this microorganisms. Cell fractionation studies indicated that sodium deoxycholate at levels used in bacteriological media interferes with the incorporation of [U- 14 C]glucose into the cold-trichloroacetic acid-soluble, ethanol-soluble, and trypsin-soluble cellular fractions of E. coli. Finally, sodium deoxycholate interfered with the flagellation and motility of Proteus mirabilis and E. coli. It would appear then that further improvement of the deoxycholate medium may be in order

  16. Molecular mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxen, Matthew A; Finlay, B Brett

    2010-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a remarkable and diverse organism. This normally harmless commensal needs only to acquire a combination of mobile genetic elements to become a highly adapted pathogen capable of causing a range of diseases, from gastroenteritis to extraintestinal infections of the urinary tract, bloodstream and central nervous system. The worldwide burden of these diseases is staggering, with hundreds of millions of people affected annually. Eight E. coli pathovars have been well characterized, and each uses a large arsenal of virulence factors to subvert host cellular functions to potentiate its virulence. In this Review, we focus on the recent advances in our understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms that are used by various E. coli pathovars and how they cause disease in humans.

  17. Transformation of serum-susceptible Escherichia coli O111 with p16Slux plasmid to allow for real-time monitoring of complement-based inactivation of bacterial growth in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maye, S; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Kelly, P M

    2016-01-01

    Complement activity has only recently been characterized in raw bovine milk. However, the activity of this component of the innate immune system was found to diminish as milk was subjected to heat or partitioning during cream separation. Detection of complement in milk relies on a bactericidal assay. This assay exploits the specific growth susceptibility of Escherichia coli O111 to the presence of complement. Practical application of the assay was demonstrated when a reduction in complement activity was recorded in the case of pasteurized and reduced-fat milks. This presented an opportunity to improve the functionality of the bactericidal assay by incorporating bioluminescence capability into the target organism. Following some adaptation, the strain was transformed by correctly integrating the p16Slux plasmid. Growth properties of the transformed strain of E. coli O111 were unaffected by the modification. The efficacy of the strain adaptation was correlated using the LINEST function analysis [r=0.966; standard error of prediction (SEy)=0.957] bioluminescence with that of bactericidal assay total plate counts within the range of 7.5 to 9.2 log cfu/mL using a combination of raw and processed milk samples. Importantly, the transformed E. coli O111 p16Slux strain could be identified in milk and broth samples using bioluminescence measurement, thus enabling the bactericidal assay-viability test to be monitored in real time throughout incubation. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with airsacculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro S. Machado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Machado L.S., do Nascimento E.R., Pereira V.L.A., Abreu D.L.C., Gouvea R. & Santos L.M.M. 2014. [Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with airsacculitis.] Escherichia coli em frangos de corte com aerossaculite. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(3:261-265, 2014. Departamento de Medicina Veterinária Preventiva e Saúde Pública, Faculdade de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Dr. Vital Brazil Filho 64, Vital Brazil, Niterói, RJ 24230-340, Brazil. E-mail: leandromachadovet@yahoo.com.br The Brazilian poultry industry grows each year and becomes increasingly representative in the production and export of products. The health care with poultry have accompanied and favored this evolution, however, respiratory agents that affect the weight and carcass quality, continue to cause great damage to the poultry industry. Airsacculitis is considered the main cause of total and partial condemnation of carcasses of broilers, and has been attributed to Mycoplasmosis mostly caused by Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG and Mycoplasma synoviae (MS and Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to relate the positivity of MG / MS and E. coli detected by PCR as a risk factor for airsacculitis in condemnation of broilers in Health Inspection Service. We studied 30 broiler poultry slaughtered in a slaughterhouse under Federal Sanitary Inspection, located in the State of Rio de Janeiro. 30 chickens were randomly collected from different lots and tracheas obtained in each PCR. DNA was extracted by phenol-chloroform method and amplified using pairs of “primer”specific for MG, MS and E. coli. Of the 30 chickens analyzed by PCR, 30% (9/30 had lesions in air sacs. None of the birds showed infection with MG and/or MS PCR, however 33.3% (3/9 birds were positive for airsacculitis iss gene from E.coli. E.coli found in broiler chickens that were negative for mycoplasma airsacculitis, implying the presence of such bacteria may be sufficient

  19. Meta-Analysis of Transcriptional Responses to Mastitis-Causing Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Younis

    Full Text Available Bovine mastitis is a widespread disease in dairy cows, and is often caused by bacterial mammary gland infection. Mastitis causes reduced milk production and leads to excessive use of antibiotics. We present meta-analysis of transcriptional profiles of bovine mastitis from 10 studies and 307 microarrays, allowing identification of much larger sets of affected genes than any individual study. Combining multiple studies provides insight into the molecular effects of Escherichia coli infection in vivo and uncovers differences between the consequences of E. coli vs. Staphylococcus aureus infection of primary mammary epithelial cells (PMECs. In udders, live E. coli elicits inflammatory and immune defenses through numerous cytokines and chemokines. Importantly, E. coli infection causes downregulation of genes encoding lipid biosynthesis enzymes that are involved in milk production. Additionally, host metabolism is generally suppressed. Finally, defensins and bacteria-recognition genes are upregulated, while the expression of the extracellular matrix protein transcripts is silenced. In PMECs, heat-inactivated E. coli elicits expression of ribosomal, cytoskeletal and angiogenic signaling genes, and causes suppression of the cell cycle and energy production genes. We hypothesize that heat-inactivated E. coli may have prophylactic effects against mastitis. Heat-inactivated S. aureus promotes stronger inflammatory and immune defenses than E. coli. Lipopolysaccharide by itself induces MHC antigen presentation components, an effect not seen in response to E. coli bacteria. These results provide the basis for strategies to prevent and treat mastitis and may lead to the reduction in the use of antibiotics.

  20. Genetic diversity of Escherichia coli isolated from commercial swine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR) for the analysis of genetic diversity among Escherichia coli strains isolated from commercial swine farms in Sichuan province of China. Thirty four strains of E. coli were selected by selective medium and conventional biochemical test from ...

  1. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    PMQR) genes and the prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) types in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Methods: Sixty-one ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates were studied. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed ...

  2. lactamases genes among0 Escherichia coli from patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -lactamases (ESBLs) that mediate resistance to b-lactam drugs among Escherichia coli and other uropathogens have been reported worldwide. However, there is little information on the detection of ESBLs genes in E. coli from patients with ...

  3. Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yukiko; Niki, Hironori; Kato, Jun-ichi

    2008-01-01

    The Profiling of Escherichia coli Chromosome (PEC) database (http://www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/pec/) is designed to allow E. coli researchers to efficiently access information from functional genomics studies. The database contains two principal types of data: gene essentiality and a large collection of E. coli genetic research resources. The essentiality data are based on data compilation from published single-gene essentiality studies and on cell growth studies of large-deletion mutants. Using the circular and linear viewers for both whole genomes and the minimal genome, users can not only gain an overview of the genome structure but also retrieve information on contigs, gene products, mutants, deletions, and so forth. In particular, genome-wide exhaustive mutants are an essential resource for studying E. coli gene functions. Although the genomic database was constructed independently from the genetic resources database, users may seamlessly access both types of data. In addition to these data, the PEC database also provides a summary of homologous genes of other bacterial genomes and of protein structure information, with a comprehensive interface. The PEC is thus a convenient and useful platform for contemporary E. coli researchers.

  4. Adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase prevents glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bruna, Beatriz; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bastarrica-Berasategui, Ainara; Zandueta-Criado, Aitor; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Lasa, Iñigo; Akazawa, Takashi; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2001-01-01

    An adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase (ASPPase, EC 3.6.1.21) has been characterized by using Escherichia coli. This enzyme, whose activities in the cell are inversely correlated with the intracellular glycogen content and the glucose concentration in the culture medium, hydrolyzes ADP-glucose, the precursor molecule of glycogen biosynthesis. ASPPase was purified to apparent homogeneity (over 3,000-fold), and sequence analyses revealed that it is a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated as “nudix” hydrolases. Insertional mutagenesis experiments leading to the inactivation of the ASPPase encoding gene, aspP, produced cells with marginally low enzymatic activities and higher glycogen content than wild-type bacteria. aspP was cloned into an expression vector and introduced into E. coli. Transformed cells were shown to contain a dramatically reduced amount of glycogen, as compared with the untransformed bacteria. No pleiotropic changes in the bacterial growth occurred in both the aspP-overexpressing and aspP-deficient strains. The overall results pinpoint the reaction catalyzed by ASPPase as a potential step of regulating glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:11416161

  5. ELECTROPHORETIC MOBILITIES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI 0157:H7 AND WILD-TYPE ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of a number of human-virulent and "wild-type" Escherichia coli strains in phosphate buffered water was measured. The impact of pH, ionic strength, cation type (valence) and concentration, and bacterial strain on the EPM was investigated. Resul...

  6. Translational coupling in Escherichia coli of a heterologous Bacillus subtilis-Escherichia coli gene fusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Zaghloul, T I; Doi, R H

    1986-01-01

    The efficient expression in Escherichia coli of the Tn9-derived chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (EC 2.3.1.28) gene fused distal to the promoter and N terminus of the Bacillus subtilis aprA gene was dependent on the initiation of translation from the ribosome-binding site in the aprA gene.

  7. The effects of exogenous catalase on broad-spectrum near-UV (300-400nm) treated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammartano, L.J.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Catalase incorporated into plating medium protects against inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum near-ultraviolet wavelength (300-400nm) (NUV) radiation in strains of Escherichia coli. Plating medium containing catalase does not provide protection against inactivation by wavelengths in the FUV region. Catalase added to the cell suspension during or added immediately after NUV exposure also protects against inactivation. The protection provided by catalase suggests a possible role for hydrogen peroxide in the processes of inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum NUV. (author)

  8. Genetic relationship of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli pathotypes among the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O serogroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Y Bando

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The genetic relationship among the Escherichia coli pathotypes was investigated. We used random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD data for constructing a dendrogram of 73 strains of diarrheagenic E. coli. A phylogenetic tree encompassing 15 serotypes from different pathotypes was constructed using multilocus sequence typing data. Phylogram clusters were used for validating RAPD data on the clonality of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC O serogroup strains. Both analyses showed very similar topologies, characterized by the presence of two major groups: group A includes EPEC H6 and H34 strains and group B contains the other EPEC strains plus all serotypes belonging to atypical EPEC, enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC. These results confirm the existence of two evolutionary divergent groups in EPEC: one is genetically and serologically very homogeneous whereas the other harbors EPEC and non-EPEC serotypes. The same situation was found for EAEC and EHEC.

  9. Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme: purification and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snapka, R.M.; Sutherland, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    Researchers have purified large quantities of Escherichia coli photoreactivating enzyme to apparent homogeneity and have studied its physical and chemical properties. The enzyme has a molecular weight of 36,800 and a S/sub 20,w/ 0 of 3.72 S. Amino acid analysis revealed an apparent absence of tryptophan, a low content of aromatic residues, and the presence of no unusual amino acids. The N terminus is arginine. The purified enzyme contained up to 13% carbohydrate by weight. The carbohydrate was composed of mannose, galactose, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine. The enzyme is also associated with RNA containing uracil, adenine, guanine, and cytosine with no unusual bases detected

  10. Molecular mechanisms of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, James M; Hardwidge, Philip R; Munson, George P; Rasko, David A; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Steinsland, Hans

    2010-02-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are a major cause of diarrheal illness in developing countries, and perennially the most common cause of traveller's diarrhea. ETEC constitute a diverse pathotype that elaborate heat-labile and/or heat-stable enterotoxins. Recent molecular pathogenesis studies reveal sophisticated pathogen-host interactions that might be exploited in efforts to prevent these important infections. While vaccine development for these important pathogens remains a formidable challenge, extensive efforts that attempt to exploit new genomic and proteomic technology platforms in discovery of novel targets are presently ongoing. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  11. Global gene expression in Escherichia coli biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Kjærgaard, K.; Klemm, Per

    2003-01-01

    It is now apparent that microorganisms undergo significant changes during the transition from planktonic to biofilm growth. These changes result in phenotypic adaptations that allow the formation of highly organized and structured sessile communities, which possess enhanced resistance...... to antimicrobial treatments and host immune defence responses. Escherichia coli has been used as a model organism to study the mechanisms of growth within adhered communities. In this study, we use DNA microarray technology to examine the global gene expression profile of E. coli during sessile growth compared...... the transition to biofilm growth, and these included genes expressed under oxygen-limiting conditions, genes encoding (putative) transport proteins, putative oxidoreductases and genes associated with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Of particular interest was the observation that many of the genes altered...

  12. Expression of maize prolamins in Escherichia Coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Szu-zhen; Esen, Asim

    1985-01-01

    We have constructed a cDNA expression library of developing corn (Zea manys L.) endosperm using plasmid pUC8 as vector and Escherichia coli strain DH1 as host. The expression library was screened with non-radioactive immunological probes to detect the expression of gamma-zein and alpha-zein. When anti-gamma-zein antibody was used as the probe, 23 colonies gave positive reactions. The lengths of cDNA inserts of the 23 colonies were found to be 250-900 base pairs. When anti-alpha zein antibody was used, however, fewer colonies gave positive reactions. The library was also screened by colony-hybridization with 32 P-labeled DNA probes. Based on immunological and hybridization screening of the library and other evidence, we conclude that alpha-zein was either toxic to E. coli cells or rapidly degraded whereas gamma-zein and its fragments were readily expressed. (author)

  13. Genes under positive selection in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lise; Bollback, Jonathan P; Dimmic, Matt

    2007-01-01

    We used a comparative genomics approach to identify genes that are under positive selection in six strains of Escherichia coli and Shigella flexneri, including five strains that are human pathogens. We find that positive selection targets a wide range of different functions in the E. coli genome......, including cell surface proteins such as beta barrel porins, presumably because of the involvement of these genes in evolutionary arms races with other bacteria, phages, and/or the host immune system. Structural mapping of positively selected sites on trans-membrane beta barrel porins reveals...... that the residues under positive selection occur almost exclusively in the extracellular region of the proteins that are enriched with sites known to be targets of phages, colicins, or the host immune system. More surprisingly, we also find a number of other categories of genes that show very strong evidence...

  14. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identifying New Small Proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOrsdel, Caitlin E; Kelly, John P; Burke, Brittany N; Lein, Christina D; Oufiero, Christopher E; Sanchez, Joseph F; Wimmers, Larry E; Hearn, David J; Abuikhdair, Fatimeh J; Barnhart, Kathryn R; Duley, Michelle L; Ernst, Sarah E G; Kenerson, Briana A; Serafin, Aubrey J; Hemm, Matthew R

    2018-04-12

    The number of small proteins (SPs) encoded in the Escherichia coli genome is unknown, as current bioinformatics and biochemical techniques make short gene and small protein identification challenging. One method of small protein identification involves adding an epitope tag to the 3' end of a short open reading frame (sORF) on the chromosome, with synthesis confirmed by immunoblot assays. In this study, this strategy was used to identify new E. coli small proteins, tagging 80 sORFs in the E. coli genome, and assayed for protein synthesis. The selected sORFs represent diverse sequence characteristics, including degrees of sORF conservation, predicted transmembrane domains, sORF direction with respect to flanking genes, ribosome binding site (RBS) prediction, and ribosome profiling results. Of 80 sORFs, 36 resulted in encoded synthesized proteins-a 45% success rate. Modeling of detected versus non-detected small proteins analysis showed predictions based on RBS prediction, transcription data, and ribosome profiling had statistically-significant correlation with protein synthesis; however, there was no correlation between current sORF annotation and protein synthesis. These results suggest substantial numbers of small proteins remain undiscovered in E. coli, and existing bioinformatics techniques must continue to improve to facilitate identification. © 2018 The Authors. Proteomics Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim, Towson University.

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. PMID:24747185

  18. Transport proteins promoting Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fengyi; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a genetically diverse species infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide annually. We examined seven well-characterized E. coli pathogens causing urinary tract infections, gastroenteritis, pyelonephritis and haemorrhagic colitis. Their transport proteins were identified and compared with each other and a non-pathogenic E. coli K12 strain to identify transport proteins related to pathogenesis. Each pathogen possesses a unique set of protein secretion systems for export to the cell surface or for injecting effector proteins into host cells. Pathogens have increased numbers of iron siderophore receptors and ABC iron uptake transporters, but the numbers and types of low-affinity secondary iron carriers were uniform in all strains. The presence of outer membrane iron complex receptors and high-affinity ABC iron uptake systems correlated, suggesting co-evolution. Each pathovar encodes a different set of pore-forming toxins and virulence-related outer membrane proteins lacking in K12. Intracellular pathogens proved to have a characteristically distinctive set of nutrient uptake porters, different from those of extracellular pathogens. The results presented in this report provide information about transport systems relevant to various types of E. coli pathogenesis that can be exploited in future basic and applied studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Natural DNA uptake by Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Sinha

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli has homologues of the competence genes other species use for DNA uptake and processing, but natural competence and transformation have never been detected. Although we previously showed that these genes are induced by the competence regulator Sxy as in other gamma-proteobacteria, no conditions are known that naturally induce sxy expression. We have now tested whether the competence gene homologues encode a functional DNA uptake machinery and whether DNA uptake leads to recombination, by investigating the effects of plasmid-borne sxy expression on natural competence in a wide variety of E. coli strains. High- and low-level sxy expression alone did not induce transformation in any of the strains tested, despite varying the transforming DNA, its concentration, and the incubation conditions used. Direct measurements of uptake of radiolabelled DNA were below the limit of detection, however transformants were readily detected when recombination functions were provided by the lambda Red recombinase. This is the first demonstration that E. coli sxy expression can induce natural DNA uptake and that E. coli's competence genes do encode a functional uptake machinery. However, the amount of transformation cells undergo is limited both by low levels of DNA uptake and by inefficient DNA processing/recombination.

  20. The Escherichia coli antiterminator protein BglG stabilizes the 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The β-glucoside utilization (bgl) genes of Escherichia coli are positively regulated by the product of the bglG gene, which functions as an antiterminator by binding to specific sequences present within the bgl mRNA. BglG is inactivated by phosphorylation in the absence of β-glucosides by BglF, the bgl-specific component of ...

  1. Chromatin architecture and gene expression in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willenbrock, Hanni; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli.......Two recent genome-scale analyses underscore the importance of DNA topology and chromatin structure in regulating transcription in Escherichia coli....

  2. Virulence determinants of diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli - A Mini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diarrhoegenic Escherichia coli are of a broad variety. A clear understanding of the virulence/pathogenicity determinants of pathogenic Escherichia coli is important as they affect a large section of the population in the tropical and developing areas of the world. Faecal contamination of food and water is the major route of ...

  3. Prevalence of Escherichia coli some public water sources in Gusau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the presence of Escherichia coli from some public water sources in Gusau municipal, north- western Nigeria. This was done by determining the total coliform counts and the presence of Escherichia coli and its antibiotic susceptibility profile. A total of 180 well 60 tap and 60 packaged water samples ...

  4. (ESBL) Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Asa River

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: Escherichia coli are known pathogenic organism that has caused diseases which has led to severe morbidity and increased death rate. The occurrence of extended spectrum beta Lactamase (bla) producing Escherichia coli has been on the rise. Water samples were investigated as a potential reservoir for the ...

  5. Antibiotic resistant Salmonella and Escherichia coli isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: A hundred and four indigenous chicken rectal swabs were analysed, of which 67.3% were contaminated with Escherichia coli and 12.5% with Salmonella typhimurium. Seventy Escherichia coli isolates showed resistance phenotypes to one, two or more antibiotics. The most common antimicrobial resistance pattern ...

  6. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-01-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This

  7. Escherichia coli clearance after splenic autotransplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, R.G.; Petroianu, A.; Oliveira, M.B.N.; Bernardo-Filho, M.; Portela, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Splenic autotransplantation seems to be the only alternative for preservation of splenic tissue, after total splenectomy. The present study was carried out to analyze Escherichia coli depuration by mononuclear phagocyte system organs after total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation. Methods: We utilized an experimental model including young and adult Wistar rats, of both sexes, submitted to total splenectomy and splenic autotransplantation. The evaluation method was intravenous inoculation of a suspension of Escherichia coli labeled with technetium-99m. We analyzed bacteria uptake by mononuclear phagocyte system organs and bacteria remnant in the bloodstream. Results: There was no difference between young and adult animals in bacteria uptake by mononuclear phagocyte system organs. In the comparison of groups, it was found out that the mean percent uptake by spleen and liver of animals in the control group was higher than that observed for animals with splenic implants. However, bacteria uptake in the lung was higher in the splenic implant group than in the control group. Although spleen bacteria uptake in the control group animals has been higher than that of animals in the splenic implant group, the remnant bacteria in the bloodstream was similar. Animals submitted to isolated total splenectomy showed higher bacteria remnant in the bloodstream than animals of the control group or the group submitted to total splenectomy combined with splenic autotransplantation. Conclusion: Our results indicate that autogenous splenic implant is efficacious in bacteria depuration in rats, by means of their macrophages phagocytosis. In addition, it does not modify bacteria removal function of liver and lung

  8. Antimutagenic effect of isocyanates and related compounds in escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawazoe, Yutaka; Kato, Masanari

    1982-01-01

    Isocyanates and isothiocyanates have been suggested to inactivate enzymes involved in the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens and the repair of DNA damage. These compounds decrease the mutability of a tester strain of Escherichia coli B under UV irradiation. This paper deals with the antimutagenicity of acylating agents, including isocyanates and isothiocyanates, and some anti-oxidants which are suspected to be anticarcinogenic. The results can be summarized as follows. (1) The antimutagenic effect observed in the present study operates on UV-induced mutagenesis but not on X-ray-induced mutagenesis. (2) This effect operates only on the wild-type strain, H/r30R, but not on Hs30R deficient in the excision repair system. (3) This effect may function through giving the irradiated cells a greater chance to carry out excision repair by prolonging the lag-period before entry into the S-phase. (4) The carbamoylating ability of isocyanates and isothiocyanates may be responsible for the antimutagenicity, but other type of reactivities may also be involved. These antimutagens also participate in inactivating enzymes relevant to the metabolic activation of mutagens, resulting in a decrease in the frequency of chemically induced mutagenesis. (author)

  9. Production of glycoprotein vaccines in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihssen Julian

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conjugate vaccines in which polysaccharide antigens are covalently linked to carrier proteins belong to the most effective and safest vaccines against bacterial pathogens. State-of-the art production of conjugate vaccines using chemical methods is a laborious, multi-step process. In vivo enzymatic coupling using the general glycosylation pathway of Campylobacter jejuni in recombinant Escherichia coli has been suggested as a simpler method for producing conjugate vaccines. In this study we describe the in vivo biosynthesis of two novel conjugate vaccine candidates against Shigella dysenteriae type 1, an important bacterial pathogen causing severe gastro-intestinal disease states mainly in developing countries. Results Two different periplasmic carrier proteins, AcrA from C. jejuni and a toxoid form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin were glycosylated with Shigella O antigens in E. coli. Starting from shake flask cultivation in standard complex medium a lab-scale fed-batch process was developed for glycoconjugate production. It was found that efficiency of glycosylation but not carrier protein expression was highly susceptible to the physiological state at induction. After induction glycoconjugates generally appeared later than unglycosylated carrier protein, suggesting that glycosylation was the rate-limiting step for synthesis of conjugate vaccines in E. coli. Glycoconjugate synthesis, in particular expression of oligosaccharyltransferase PglB, strongly inhibited growth of E. coli cells after induction, making it necessary to separate biomass growth and recombinant protein expression phases. With a simple pulse and linear feed strategy and the use of semi-defined glycerol medium, volumetric glycoconjugate yield was increased 30 to 50-fold. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that glycosylated proteins can be produced in recombinant E. coli at a larger scale. The described methodologies constitute an important step

  10. Efficacy of solar disinfection of Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella Typhimurium and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, M; Weilenmann, H-U; Simonetti, A; Egli, T

    2006-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of solar disinfection (SODIS) for enteric pathogens and to test applicability of the reciprocity law. Resistance to sunlight at 37 degrees C based on F99 values was in the following order: Salmonella Typhimurium>Escherichia coli>Shigella flexneri>Vibrio cholerae. While F90 values of Salm. Typhimurium and E. coli were similar, F99 values differed by 60% due to different inactivation curve shapes. Efficacy seemed not to be dependent on fluence rate for E. coli stationary cells. Sensitivity to mild heat was observed above a temperature of 45 degrees C for E. coli, Salm. Typhimurium and Sh. flexneri, while V. cholerae was already susceptible above 40 degrees C. Salmonella Typhimurium was the most resistant and V. cholerae the least resistant enteric strain. The reciprocity law is applicable for stationary E. coli cells irradiated with sunlight or artificial sunlight. Escherichia coli might not be the appropriate indicator bacterium to test the efficacy of SODIS on enteric bacteria and the physiological response to SODIS might be different among enteric bacteria. The applicability of the reciprocity law indicates that fluence rate plays a secondary role in SODIS efficacy. Stating inactivation efficacy with T90 or F90 values without showing original data is inadequate for SODIS studies.

  11. [Population genomic researches of Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y R; Yang, R F; Cui, Y J

    2016-06-01

    Population genomics, an interdiscipline of genomics and population genetics, is booming in recent years with the rapid growth number of deciphered genomes and revolutionizes the understanding of bacterial population diversity and evolution dynamics. It also largely improves the prevention and control of infectious disease through providing more accurate genotyping and source-tracing results and more comprehensive characteristics of emerging pathogens. In this review, taking one of the best characterized bacteria, Escherichia coli, as model, we reviewed the phylogenetic relationship across its five major populations (designated A, B1, B2, D and E); and summarized researches on molecular mutation rate, selection signals, and patterns of adaptive evolution. We also described the application of population genomics in responding against large-scale outbreaks of E. coli O157:H7 and E. coli O104:H4. These results indicated that, although being a novel discipline, population genomics has played an important role in deciphering bacterial population structures, exploring evolutionary patterns and combating emerging infectious diseases.

  12. Multiple loci affecting photoreactivation in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.; Hausrath, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    Sutherland et al. mapped a phr gene in Escherichia coli at 17 min and found that induction of an E. coli stain lysogenic for a lambda phage carrying this gene increased photoreactivating enzyme levels 2,000-fold. Recently, Smith and Youngs and Sancar and Rupert located a phr gene at 15.9 min. We have therefore investigated the properties of photoreactivating enzyme and cellular photoreactivation in cells containing deletions of the gene at 17 min. Cells with this deletion photoreactivated ultraviolet-induced killing at a rate 20% of normal; they also contained approximately 20% of the normal photoreactivating enzyme level. The residual enzyme in these cells was characterized to determine whether the reduced cellular photoreactivation rate and photoreactivating enzyme levels resulted from reduced numbers of normal enzymes or from an altered enzyme. Photoreactivating enzymes from strains carrying a deletion of the region at 17 min has an apparent K/sub m/ about two- to threefold higher than normal enzyme and showed markedly increased heat lability. The gene at 17 min thus contains information determining the function of the E. coli photoreactivating enzyme rather than the quantity of the enzyme. It is proposed that the gene at 17 min be termed phrA and that located at 15.9 min be termed phrB

  13. Microbubble assisted polyhydroxybutyrate production in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Kadriye; Sal, Fulya Ay; Rahman, Asif; Putman, Ryan J; Agblevor, Foster A; Miller, Charles D

    2016-07-09

    One of the potential limitations of large scale aerobic Escherichia coli fermentation is the need for increased dissolved oxygen for culture growth and bioproduct generation. As culture density increases the poor solubility of oxygen in water becomes one of the limiting factors for cell growth and product formation. A potential solution is to use a microbubble dispersion (MBD) generating device to reduce the diameter and increase the surface area of sparged bubbles in the fermentor. In this study, a recombinant E. coli strain was used to produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) under conventional and MBD aerobic fermentation conditions. In conventional fermentation operating at 350 rpm and 0.8 vvm air flow rate, an OD600 of 6.21 and PHB yield of 23 % (dry cell basis) was achieved. MBD fermentation with similar bioreactor operating parameters produced an OD600 of 8.17 and PHB yield of 43 % PHB, which was nearly double that of the conventional fermentation. This study demonstrated that using a MBD generator can increase oxygen mass transfer into the aqueous phase, increasing E. coli growth and bioproduct generation.

  14. Recombinant Protein Expression in Escherichia coli (E.coli): What We Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Seyed Mohammad Gheibi; Farahani, Najmeh; Golichenari, Behrouz; Sahebkar, Amir Hosein

    2018-01-31

    Host, vector, and culture conditions (including cultivation media) are considered among the three main elements contributing to a successful production of recombinant proteins. Accordingly, one of the most common hosts to produce recombinant therapeutic proteins is Escherichia coli. A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify important factors affecting production of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Escherichia coli is taken into account as the easiest, quickest, and cheapest host with a fully known genome. Thus, numerous modifications have been carried out on Escherichia coli to optimize it as a good candidate for protein expression and; as a result, several engineered strains of Escherichia coli have been designed. In general; host strain, vector, and cultivation parameters are recognized as crucial ones determining success of recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli. In this review, the role of host, vector, and culture conditions along with current pros and cons of different types of these factors leading to success of recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli were discussed. Successful protein expression in Escherichia coli necessitates a broad knowledge about physicochemical properties of recombinant proteins, selection among common strains of Escherichia coli and vectors, as well as factors related to media including time, temperature, and inducer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Induction of Streptomycin Uptake in Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höltje, Joachim-Volker

    1979-01-01

    Different streptomycin-resistant strains of Escherichia coli, including an R100 plasmid-carrying strain of E. coli W3110, the ribosomally resistant mutant SM10, and the spontaneous revertant from dependence to independence d1023, exhibited poor accumulation capacity for aminoglycoside antibiotics. This was due to a failure of these mutants to induce the general polyamine transport system that is utilized by streptomycin to enter the cell. It is shown that the aminoglycoside kanamycin, which is effective on these streptomycin-resistant strains, was capable of inducing the uptake of streptomycin, thus giving rise to streptomycin accumulation up to wild-type levels. Plasmid-determined resistance, which has been speculated to be the result of a blockage of the uptake system by modified antibiotic molecules, cannot be overcome by the induction of streptomycin transport. Increase in permeability of the antibiotic does not affect the susceptibility of the bacteria. It is shown that all of the antibiotic taken up was enzymatically modified. R-plasmid-conferred resistance to aminoglycosides is therefore explained by the inactivation of the antibiotic entering the bacterial cell. PMID:371542

  16. neonatal infections caused by escherichia coli at the national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Background: Escherichia coli (E.coli) has been implicated as a common cause of both early and late onset neonatal infections. The emergence of different strains of E.coli that are multiply resistant to commonly used antibiotics has made continuous antibiotics surveillance relevant. Knowledge about common infections ...

  17. Neonatal infections caused by Escherichia coli at the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli (E.coli) has been implicated as a common cause of both early and late onset neonatal infections. The emergence of different strains of E.coli that are multiply resistant to commonly used antibiotics has made continuous antibiotics surveillance relevant. Knowledge about common infections ...

  18. Isolation and genomic characterization of Escherichia coli O157:NM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:NM and E. coli O157:H7 strains have been reported throughout the world. In developed countries, serotype O157:H7 represents the major cause of human diseases; however, there have been increasing reports of non-O157 Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing E. coli strains ...

  19. Increased multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli from hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (MDR E. coli) has become a major public health concern in Sudan and many countries, causing failure in treatment with consequent huge health burden. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and susceptibility of MDR E. coli isolated from patients in hospitals at Khartoum ...

  20. Is Escherichia coli urinary tract infection a zoonosis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, L.; Garneau, P.; Bruant, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that the Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infection (UTI) may come from meat and animals. The purpose was to investigate if a clonal link existed between E. coli from animals, meat and UTI patients. Twenty-two geographically and temporally matched B2 E. coli...

  1. WGS accurately predicts antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objectives: To determine the effectiveness of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in identifying resistance genotypes of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) and whether these correlate with observed phenotypes. Methods: Seventy-six E. coli strains were isolated from farm cattle and measured f...

  2. Gene encoding virulence markers among Escherichia coli isolates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli was isolated and identified by standard cultural and biochemical methods. Pathogenicity of environmental and human isolates was determined by amplification of genes associated with virulence of E. coli, using specific primers. Of a total of 228 water and river sediment samples screened, E. coli was ...

  3. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Markers and Phenotypes among Fecal E. coli Isolates Collected from Nicaraguan Infants ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Daniel; Vilchez, Samuel; Paniagua, Margarita; Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Weintraub, Andrej; Möllby, Roland; Kühn, Inger

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) markers and common phenotypes in 2,164 E. coli isolates from 282 DEC-positive samples. Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) were very diverse and were not correlated with diarrhea. Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) estA and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) belonged to a few phenotypes and were significantly correlated with diarrhea.

  4. Evaluation of data from the literature on the transport and survival of Escherichia coli and thermotolerant coliforms in aquifers under saturated conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J W A; Schijven, J F

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli and thermotolerant coliforms are of major importance as indicators of fecal contamination of water. Due to its negative surface charge and relatively low die-off or inactivation rate coefficient, E. coli is able to travel long distances underground and is therefore also a useful

  5. Behavior of pulsed electric field injured Escherichia coli O157:H7 cells in apple juice amended with pyruvate and catalase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulse Electric Field (PEF) treatment has been used to inactivate bacteria in liquid foods. However, information on the behavior of PEF injured Escherichia coli bacteria in media during storage at 5 and 23C are limited. In this study, we investigated the fate of E. coli O157:H7 cells at 6.8 log CFU/m...

  6. Efficacy of integrated treatment of UV light and low dose gamma irradiation on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on grape tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efficacy of integrated treatment of UVC and low dose Gamma irradiation to inactivate mixed Strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica inoculated on whole Grape tomatoes was evaluated. A mixed bacterial cocktail composed of a three strain mixture of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, E02128 an...

  7. Repair replication in permeabilized Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masker, W.E.; Simon, T.J.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    We have examined the modes of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli strains made permeable to nucleoside triphosphates by treatment with toluene. In this quasi in vitro system, polymerase-I-deficient mutants exhibit a nonconservative mode of synthesis with properties expected for the resynthesis step of excision-repair. This uv-stimulated DNA synthesis can be performed by either DNA polymerase II or III and it also requires the uvrA gene product. It requires the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates; but, in contrast to the semiconservative mode, the ATP requirement can be partially satisfied by other nucleoside triphosphates. The ATP-dependent recBC nuclease is not involved. The observed uv-stimulated mode of DNA synthesis may be part of an alternate excision-repair mechanism which supplements or complements DNA-polymerase-I-dependent repair in vivo

  8. The eclipse period of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Krekling, Martin A.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2000-01-01

    The minimal time between successive initiations on the same origin (the eclipse) in Escherichia coli was determined to be approximately 25-30 min. An inverse relationship was found between the length of the eclipse and the amount of Dam methyltransferase in the cell, indicating that the eclipse...... corresponds to the period of origin hemimethylation. The SeqA protein was absolutely required for the eclipse, and DnaA titration studies suggested that the SeqA protein prevented the binding of multiple DnaA molecules on oriC (initial complex formation). No correlation between the amount of SeqA and eclipse...... length was revealed, but increased SeqA levels affected chromosome partitioning and/or cell division. This was corroborated further by an aberrant nucleoid distribution in SeqA-deficient cells. We suggest that the SeqA protein's role in maintaining the eclipse is tied to a function in chromosome...

  9. Investigation of E. coli bacteria inactivation by photocatalytic activity of TiO2 coated expanded polystyrene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnagiris, S.; Sakalauskaite, S.; Tuckute, S.; Lelis, M.; Daugelavicius, R.; Milcius, D.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic properties of anatase and other TiO2 polymorphs are widely researched and applied in practical application. In current study TiO2 films on the plasma pre-treated expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam were deposited using magnetron sputtering technique. Main properties of the films were characterised using combination of XRD, XPS and SEM techniques. Photocatalytic properties of the observed crystalline anatase phase were tested by investigating bleaching of the methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution and by testing Escherichia coli (E. coli) viability after incubation under UV-B irradiation. E. coli viability experiments indicated that there are two mechanisms of E. coli bacteria inactivation. UV irradiation alone causes rapid damage to the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. The second mechanism of E. coli inactivation is invoked only with synergistic combination of TiO2 and UV. Acting as photocatalyst TiO2 generates active radicals who initiate the chain peroxidation of organic molecules and within 45 min reduce E. coli bacteria viability by nearly 90%.

  10. Cloning and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagellin in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K; Montie, T C

    1989-01-01

    The flagellin gene was isolated from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genomic bank by conjugation into a PA103 Fla- strain. Flagellin DNA was transferred from motile recipient PA103 Fla+ cells by transformation into Escherichia coli. We show that transformed E. coli expresses flagellin protein. Export of flagellin to the E. coli cell surface was suggested by positive colony blots of unlysed cells and by isolation of flagellin protein from E. coli supernatants.

  11. Escherichia coli Pathotypes Occupy Distinct Niches in the Mouse Intestine

    OpenAIRE

    Meador, Jessica P.; Caldwell, Matthew E.; Cohen, Paul S.; Conway, Tyrrell

    2014-01-01

    Since the first step of the infection process is colonization of the host, it is important to understand how Escherichia coli pathogens successfully colonize the intestine. We previously showed that enterohemorrhagic O157:H7 strain E. coli EDL933 colonizes a niche in the streptomycin-treated mouse intestine that is distinct from that of human commensal strains, which explains how E. coli EDL933 overcomes colonization resistance imparted by some, but not all, commensal E. coli strains. Here we...

  12. Independence of replisomes in Escherichia coli chromosomalreplication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breier, Adam M.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Cozzarelli, Nicholas R.

    2005-03-13

    In Escherichia coli DNA replication is carried out by the coordinated action of the proteins within a replisome. After replication initiation, the two bidirectionally oriented replisomes from a single origin are colocalized into higher-order structures termed replication factories. The factory model postulated that the two replisomes are also functionally coupled. We tested this hypothesis by using DNA combing and whole-genome microarrays. Nascent DNA surrounding oriC in single, combed chromosomes showed instead that one replisome, usually the leftward one, was significantly ahead of the other 70% of the time. We next used microarrays to follow replication throughout the genome by measuring DNA copy number. We found in multiple E. coli strains that the replisomes are independent, with the leftward replisome ahead of the rightward one. The size of the bias was strain-specific, varying from 50 to 130 kb in the array results. When we artificially blocked one replisome, the other continued unabated, again demonstrating independence. We suggest an improved version of the factory model that retains the advantages of threading DNA through colocalized replisomes at about equal rates, but allows the cell flexibility to overcome obstacles encountered during elongation.

  13. Comparative study on the high pressure inactivation behavior of the Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104:H4 and O157:H7 outbreak strains and a non-pathogenic surrogate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineke, Kai; Sevenich, Robert; Hertwig, Christian; Janßen, Traute; Fröhling, Antje; Knorr, Dietrich; Wieler, Lothar H; Schlüter, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains cause each year thousands of illnesses, which are sometimes accompanied by the hemolytic uremic syndrome, like in the 2011 outbreak in Germany. For preservation thermal pasteurization is commonly used, which can cause unwanted quality changes. To prevent this high pressure treatment is a potential alternative. Within this study, the 2011 outbreak strain O104:H4, an O157:H7 and a non-pathogenic strain (DSM1116) were tested. The cells were treated in buffer (pH 7 and pH 5) and carrot juice (pH 5.1) in a pressure temperature range of 0.1-500 MPa and 20-70 °C. Flow cytometry was used to investigate the pressure impact on cell structures of the strain DSM1116. Both pathogenic strains had a much higher resistance in buffer and carrot juice than the non-pathogenic surrogate. Further, strains cultivated and treated at a lower pH-value showed higher pressure stability, presumably due to variations in the membrane composition. This was confirmed for the strain DSM1116 by flow cytometry. Cells cultivated and treated at pH 5 had a stronger ability to retain their membrane potential but showed higher rates of membrane permeabilization at pressures <200 MPa compared to cells cultivated and treated at pH 7. These cells had the lowest membrane permeabilization rate at around 125 MPa, possibly denoting that variations in the fatty acid composition and membrane fluidity contribute to this stabilization phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. General considerations regarding the infections with the Escherichia coli pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Necşulescu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is the species of the genus Escherichia with the greatest epidemiological impact. Escherichia coli infections are found mainly in places with poor hygiene; the infants with ages between 1 and 3 years old are included in the category with the highest risk. It is a "fecal-oral" transmission mechanism as a result of consumption of contaminated food or water, or by "dirty hands". The foods most commonly implicated in the transmission of the infection are unpasteurized milk and milk products, beef, especially the one insufficiently cooked, unpasteurized fruit juice, lettuce and insufficiently washed vegetables. The disease has been reported worldwide, being described numerous episodes of infection with Escherichia coli that caused multiple illnesses and deaths. Escherichia coli has three types of antigens: antigen "O" (somatic, antigen "H" (flagella and antigen "K" (capsular. Clinical manifestations are present in the form of non-specific diarrhea, a dysentery form of enteritis, choleriform enteritis, hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. The Escherichia coli infection diagnosis is made by identifying the etiologic agent and/or by highlighting the VTI toxin in the feces. The treatment consists in precautionary antibiotherapy, hydrodynamics and electrolyte rebalancing, blood transfusions and dialysis, if in the case of renal failure. The prevention of infections with Escherichia coli is achieved by personal hygiene, food hygiene and work hygiene.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli Strain WG5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamovic, Lejla; Misiakou, Maria-Anna; van der Helm, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Escherichia coli strain WG5 is a widely used host for phage detection, including somatic coliphages employed as standard ISO method 10705-1 (2000). Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a commercial E. coli WG5 strain.......Escherichia coli strain WG5 is a widely used host for phage detection, including somatic coliphages employed as standard ISO method 10705-1 (2000). Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a commercial E. coli WG5 strain....

  16. Using Limes and Synthetic Psoralens to Enhance Solar Disinfection of Water (SODIS): A Laboratory Evaluation with Norovirus, Escherichia coli, and MS2

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Alexander S.; Schwab, Kellogg J.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the use of psoralens and limes to enhance solar disinfection of water (SODIS) using an UV lamp and natural sunlight experiments. SODIS conditions were replicated using sunlight, 2 L polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles, and tap water with Escherichia coli, MS2 bacteriophage, and murine norovirus (MNV). Psoralens and lime acidity both interact synergistically with UV radiation to accelerate inactivation of microbes. Escherichia coli was ablated > 6.1 logs by SODIS + Lime Sl...

  17. Solar water disinfection (SODIS) of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., and MS2 coliphage: effects of additives and alternative container materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Michael B; Iriarte, Mercedes; Nelson, Kara L

    2012-04-15

    The use of alternative container materials and added oxidants accelerated the inactivation of MS2 coliphage and Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. bacteria during solar water disinfection (SODIS) trials. Specifically, bottles made from polypropylene copolymer (PPCO), a partially UVB-transparent plastic, resulted in three-log inactivation of these organisms in approximately half the time required for disinfection in bottles made from PET, polycarbonate, or Tritan(®), which absorb most UVB light. Furthermore, the addition of 125 mg/L sodium percarbonate in combination with either citric acid or copper plus ascorbate tended to accelerate inactivation by factors of 1.4-19. Finally, it was observed that the inactivation of E. coli and enterococci derived from local wastewater was far slower than the inactivation of laboratory-cultured E. coli and Enterococcus spp., while the inactivation of MS2 was slowest of all. These results highlight the importance of UVB in SODIS under certain conditions, and also the greater sunlight resistance of some viruses and of bacteria of fecal origin, as compared to the laboratory-cultured bacteria commonly used to model their inactivation. Furthermore, this study illustrates promising new avenues for accelerating the inactivation of bacteria and viruses by solar disinfection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effective elimination of water-borne Escherichia coli using archaeal poly-g-glutamate-based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanae Yamaguchi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli is used worldwide as a fecal indicator species to assess the quality of (drinking water. Active carbons are used for the removal of chemical pollutants, but are ineffective in the inactivation of water-borne pathogens such as E. coli. Herein, we developed poly-g-glutamate-ion complex-coated active carbons (PGAIC-AC and examined their ability to eliminate E. coli from a laboratory model of water pollution (~ 2.0 × 104 CFU/mL at room temperature. The results showed that E. coli was virtually eliminated when using PGAIC-AC as a dispersant. In fact, the log reduction values were estimated to be > 1.19. In this study, we further constructed simple but effective bacteria-elimination system with a PGAIC-AC–embedded column. This PGAIC-AC system can be utilized to purify water when no electricity or specialized equipment is available.

  19. Escherichia coli in chronic inflammatory bowel diseases: An update on adherent invasive Escherichia coli pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Garcia-Gil, Librado Jesus

    2014-08-15

    Escherichia coli (E. coli), and particularly the adherent invasive E. coli (AIEC) pathotype, has been increasingly implicated in the ethiopathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). E. coli strains with similar pathogenic features to AIEC have been associated with other intestinal disorders such as ulcerative colitis, colorectal cancer, and coeliac disease, but AIEC prevalence in these diseases remains largely unexplored. Since AIEC was described one decade ago, substantial progress has been made in deciphering its mechanisms of pathogenicity. However, the molecular bases that characterize the phenotypic properties of this pathotype are still not well resolved. A review of studies focused on E. coli populations in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is presented here and we discuss about the putative role of this species on each IBD subtype. Given the relevance of AIEC in CD pathogenesis, we present the latest research findings concerning AIEC host-microbe interactions and pathogenicity. We also review the existing data regarding the prevalence and abundance of AIEC in CD and its association with other intestinal diseases from humans and animals, in order to discuss the AIEC disease- and host-specificity. Finally, we highlight the fact that dietary components frequently found in industrialized countries may enhance AIEC colonization in the gut, which merits further investigation and the implementation of preventative measures.

  20. Role of recBC nuclease in Escherichia coli transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoekstra, W P; Bergmans, J E; Zuidweg, E M

    1980-01-01

    In Escherichia coli transformation with linear donor deoxyribonucleic acid, the recBC pathway is functional, but genetic analysis shows that the recBC nuclease is deleterious to linear deoxyribonucleic acid.

  1. Preliminary studies on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preliminary studies on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from cattle and children in the pastoral community of Nyabushozi, Uganda. J Okwee-Acai, S Majalija, SG Okech, MBS Kisaka, J Acon ...

  2. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  3. TRIMETHOPRIM-SULFAMETHOXAZOLE RESISTANCE IN SEWAGE ISOLATES OF ESCHERICHIA COLI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewage samples from seven locations in the United States were analyzed for Escherichia coli isolates which were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). The prevalence rate of SXT resistant organisms varied between the different geographical locales. The majority of th...

  4. GLYCOSYLATED YGHJ POLYPEPTIDES FROM ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI (ETEC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to glycosylated YghJ polypeptides from or derived from enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) that are immunogenic. In particular, the present invention relates to compositions or vaccines comprising the polypeptides and their application in immunization, vaccination...

  5. The Prevalence of Enterhaemorrhagic Escherichia Coli in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EHEC), the pathogenicity of other strains of Escherichia coli and other organisms in children presenting with and without diarrhoea in the hospital. Subjects and Methods: A total of 247 stool samples collected from children aged 1 month to 7 ...

  6. Annual Surveillance Summary: Escherichia coli (E. coli) Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    with United States (US) trends, most infections were found in the urinary tract (96.2%) and outpatient setting (97.7%). Drug -resistant E. coli...March 2017 EpiData Center Department NMCPHC-EDC-TR-187-2017 Background The genus Escherichia consists of five species, of which Escherichia coli...Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) documented a steady increase from 1999-2014 in drug -resistant E. coli across 39 countries. 17

  7. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  8. Impact of dry chilling on the genetic diversity of Escherichia coli on beef carcasses and on the survival of E. coli and E. coli O157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvalingam, Jeyachchandran; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xianqin

    2017-03-06

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dry chilling on the genetic diversity of naturally occurring Escherichia coli on beef carcasses, and to examine whether two populations of E. coli recovered from carcasses during chilling and E. coli O157 differed in their response to desiccation. Isolates of E. coli were obtained from beef carcasses during a 67h dry chilling process and were genotyped using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA). Ten E. coli genotypes found only at 0h (group A) and found more than once (group B), as well as five strains of E. coli O157 (group C) were inoculated on stainless steel coupons and their survival was examined after exposure to 75 and 100% relative humidity (RH) at 0 or 35°C for 67h. A total of 450 E. coli isolates were obtained, with 254, 49, 49, 51, 23, 20, and 4 from 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24h of chilling, respectively. No E. coli were recovered at 67h. MLVA of the isolates revealed 173 distinct genotypes. Genetic diversity of E. coli isolates, defined as ratio of the number of isolates to the number of genotypes, remained between 2.3 and 1.3 during the 24h of chilling. All strains inoculated on stainless steel coupons and exposed to 75% RH at 35°C were completely inactivated, irrespective of their groups. Inactivation of E. coli of the three groups was not significantly (P>0.05) different by exposure to 75% RH at 0°C. The findings indicate that the genetic diversity of E. coli on beef carcasses was not affected by dry chilling. In addition, inactivation of E. coli genotypes and E. coli O157 by desiccation on stainless steel simulating dry chilling conditions did not differ significantly (P>0.05). Thus, dry chilling may be used as an effective antimicrobial intervention for beef carcasses. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyacioglu, Olcay; Sharma, Manan; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Goktepe, Ipek

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a bacteriophage cocktail (EcoShield™) that is specific against Escherichia coli O157:H7 was evaluated against a nalidixic acid-resistant enterohemorrhagic E. coli O157:H7 RM4407 (EHEC) strain on leafy greens stored under either (1) ambient air or (2) modified atmosphere (MA; 5% O2/35% CO2/60% N2). Pieces (~2 × 2 cm2) of leafy greens (lettuce and spinach) inoculated with 4.5 log CFU/cm2 EHEC were sprayed with EcoShield™ (6.5 log PFU/cm2). Samples were stored at 4 or 10°C for up to 15 d. On spinach, the level of EHEC declined by 2.38 and 2.49 log CFU/cm2 at 4 and 10°C, respectively, 30 min after phage application (p ≤ 0.05). EcoShield™ was also effective in reducing EHEC on the surface of green leaf lettuce stored at 4°C by 2.49 and 3.28 log units in 30 min and 2 h, respectively (p ≤ 0.05). At 4°C under atmospheric air, the phage cocktail significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lowered the EHEC counts in one day by 1.19, 3.21 and 3.25 log CFU/cm2 on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce, respectively compared with control (no bacteriophage) treatments. When stored under MA at 4°C, phages reduced (p ≤ 0.05) EHEC populations by 2.18, 3.50 and 3.13 log CFU/cm2, on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce. At 10°C, EHEC reductions under atmospheric air storage were 1.99, 3.90 and 3.99 log CFU/cm2 (p ≤ 0.05), while population reductions under MA were 3.08, 3.89 and 4.34 logs on spinach, green leaf and romaine lettuce, respectively, compared with controls (p ≤ 0.05). The results of this study showed that bacteriophages were effective in reducing the levels of E. coli O157:H7 on fresh leafy produce, and that the reduction was further improved when produce was stored under the MA conditions. PMID:23819107

  10. Growth modeling of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in ground chicken meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC), including Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), are common contaminants in poultry meat, and are a major pathogen associated with inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, sepsis, and urinary tract infections. The purpose of this study was to determ...

  11. Changes in Escherichia coli resistance to co-trimoxazole in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Thyolo district, Malawi, an operational research study is being conducted on the efficacy and feasibility of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in preventing deaths in HIV-positive patients with tuberculosis (TB). A series of cross-sectional studies were carried out to determine i) whether faecal Escherichia coli (E.coli) resistance to ...

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of avian Escherichia coli isolates in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colibacillosis is a poultry disease of economic importance in Iran and all around the world. The aim of this study is to test the antibiotic sensitivity of Escherichia coli strains which were isolated in Tabriz. A total of 100 E. coli strains isolated from avian colibacillosis of 50 farms from 2008 to 2009 in Tabriz, were investigated for ...

  13. Effect of high pressurized carbon dioxide on Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Carbon dioxide at high pressure can retard microbial growth and sometimes kill microorganisms depending on values of applied pressure, temperature and exposure time. In this study the effect of high pressurised carbon dioxide (HPCD) on Escherichia coli was investigated. Culture of E. coli was subjected to high ...

  14. Antimicrobial activity of peptidomimetics against multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Rasmus D; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Franzyk, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    -lactamase-producing Escherichia coli was assessed by testing an array comprising different types of cationic peptidomimetics obtained by a general monomer-based solid-phase synthesis protocol. Most of the peptidomimetics possessed high to moderate activity toward multidrug-resistant E. coli as opposed to the corresponding...

  15. Prevalence of Aeromonas species and Escherichia coli in stool ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diarrhoea is one of the main causes of mortality and morbidity in childhood. Bacterial diarrhoea is a common disorder. Aeromonas species and Escherichia coli (E. coli) are some of the aetiological agents associated with diarrhoea in children. Objective: To determine the prevalence of Aeromonas species and ...

  16. Adsorption of Escherichia coli Using Bone Char | Rezaee | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of study was providing a novel adsorbent for the removal of Escherichia coli (E.coli) as a microbial model from contaminated air especially in hospital units using bone char (BC). The BC was prepared from cattle animal bone by pyrolysis in a furnace at 450°C for 2 h. The characteristics of BC have been determined ...

  17. Escherichia coli growth modeling using neural network | Shamsudin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    technique that has the ability to predict with efficient and good performance. Using NARX, a highly accurate model was developed to predict the growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) based on pH water parameter. The multiparameter portable sensor and spectrophotometer data were used to build and train the neural network.

  18. in Escherichia coli with native cholesterol oxidase expresse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... of the exogenously expressed forms were 16 ± 0.3 U/mg for non-tagged enzyme from E. coli, 12 ± 0.1. U/mg for the N-terminal ... Key words: Cholesterol oxidase; Brevibacterium sp.; Escherichia coli; structural disruption, His-tags. ... was designed with an EcoR I restriction site (underlined) and Primer.

  19. Expression of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was expressed by transformed cells of Escherichia coli DH5-α grown in LB/amp broth at 37oC, for 8 h and 24 h. To evaluate the effectiveness of different parameters to improve the expression of GFPuv by E. coli, four variable culturing conditions were set up for assays by ...

  20. Antimicrobial resistance of non-clinical Escherichia coli strains from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to determine resistance profiles of Escherichia coli strains isolated from clinically healthy chickens in Nsukka, southeast Nigeria. A total of 324 E. coli strains isolated from cloaca swabs from 390 chickens were tested against 16 antimicrobial agents using the disc diffusion method. The antibiotics ...

  1. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Escherichia coli Strains Isolated from Broiler and Layer Chicken with Colisepticemia in Sudan. ... management of collibacillosis in the farms should be based on the result of susceptibility tests because other than poultry health problems transmission of resistant e coli to human can occur.

  2. A surprising sweetener from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Infections with enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) are remarkably devoid of gut inflammation and necrotic damage compared to infections caused by invasive pathogens such as Salmonella and Shigella. Recently, we observed that EPEC blocks cell death using the type III secretion system (T3SS) effector NleB. NleB mediated post-translational modification of death domain containing adaptor proteins by the covalent attachment of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to a conserved arginine in the death domain.  N-linked glycosylation of arginine has not previously been reported in mammalian cell biology and the precise biochemistry of this modification is not yet defined. Although the addition of a single GlcNAc to arginine is a seemingly slight alteration, the impact of NleB is considerable as arginine in this location is critical for death domain interactions and death receptor induced apoptosis. Hence, by blocking cell death, NleB promotes enterocyte survival and thereby prolongs EPEC attachment to the gut epithelium.

  3. Genotoxicity of Graphene in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ananya

    Rapid advances in nanotechnology necessitate assessment of the safety of nanomaterials in the resulting products and applications. One key nanomaterial attracting much interest in many areas of science and technology is graphene. Graphene is a one atom thick carbon allotrope arranged in a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice. In addition to being extremely thin, graphene has several extraordinary physical properties such as its exceptional mechanical strength, thermal stability, and high electrical conductivity. Graphene itself is relatively chemically inert and therefore pristine graphene must undergo a process called functionalization, which is combination of chemical and physical treatments that change the properties of graphene, to make it chemically active. Functionalization of graphene is of crucial importance as the end application of graphene depends on proper functionalization. In the field of medicine, graphene is currently a nanomaterial of high interest for building biosensors, DNA transistors, and probes for cancer detection. Despite the promising applications of graphene in several areas of biomedicine, there have been only few studies in recent years that focus on evaluating cytotoxicity of graphene on cells, and almost no studies that investigate how graphene exposure affects cellular genetic material. Therefore, in this study we used a novel approach to evaluate the genotoxicity, i.e., the effects of graphene on DNA, using Escherichia coli as a prokaryotic model organism.

  4. Enteropathogenic escherichia coli infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Theresa J; Contreras, Carmen A

    2011-10-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is an important diarrheal pathogen of young children. As the diagnosis of EPEC is now based mainly on molecular criteria, there has been an important change in its prevalence. The purpose of this study is to review the current epidemiology of EPEC infection and the new insights into its physiopathology. Recent epidemiological studies indicate that atypical EPEC (aEPEC) is more prevalent than typical EPEC (tEPEC) in both developed and developing countries, and that aEPEC is important in both pediatric endemic diarrhea and diarrhea outbreaks. Therefore, it is important to further characterize the pathogenicity of these emerging strains. The virulence mechanisms and physiopathology of the attaching and effacing lesion (A/E) and the type three secretion-system (T3SS) are complex but well studied. A/E strains use their pool of locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE)-encoded and non-LEE-encoded effector proteins to subvert and modulate cellular and barrier properties of the host. However, the exact mechanisms of diarrhea in EPEC infection are not completely understood. Remarkable progress has been made to identify virulence determinants required to mediate the pathogenesis of EPEC. However, fast, easy, and inexpensive diagnostic methods are needed in order to define optimal treatment and prevention for children in endemic areas.

  5. Imprecision of adaptation in Escherichia coli chemotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Neumann

    Full Text Available Adaptability is an essential property of many sensory systems, enabling maintenance of a sensitive response over a range of background stimulus levels. In bacterial chemotaxis, adaptation to the preset level of pathway activity is achieved through an integral feedback mechanism based on activity-dependent methylation of chemoreceptors. It has been argued that this architecture ensures precise and robust adaptation regardless of the ambient ligand concentration, making perfect adaptation a celebrated property of the chemotaxis system. However, possible deviations from such ideal adaptive behavior and its consequences for chemotaxis have not been explored in detail. Here we show that the chemotaxis pathway in Escherichia coli shows increasingly imprecise adaptation to higher concentrations of attractants, with a clear correlation between the time of adaptation to a step-like stimulus and the extent of imprecision. Our analysis suggests that this imprecision results from a gradual saturation of receptor methylation sites at high levels of stimulation, which prevents full recovery of the pathway activity by violating the conditions required for precise adaptation. We further use computer simulations to show that limited imprecision of adaptation has little effect on the rate of chemotactic drift of a bacterial population in gradients, but hinders precise accumulation at the peak of the gradient. Finally, we show that for two major chemoeffectors, serine and cysteine, failure of adaptation at concentrations above 1 mM might prevent bacteria from accumulating at toxic concentrations of these amino acids.

  6. Escherichia coli Eyelid Abscess in a Patient with Alcoholic Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Stratton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli (E. coli is a rare cause of ocular infections and has not yet been reported as a cause of an ocular abscess. We describe the case of a 47-year-old woman with a history of alcoholic cirrhosis who presented with painful left lower eyelid swelling that did not improve with oral antibiotics. The abscess was drained and cultures were positive for E. coli. Patients with cirrhosis are at increased risk for developing E. coli bacterial infections, but to our knowledge this is the first case of an E. coli eyelid abscess reported in the literature.

  7. Primjena novih metoda kontrole patogenih oblika bakterije Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Pavankumar, Asalapuram R.; Sankaran, Krishnan

    2008-01-01

    Among foodborne pathogens, diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli is of major concern because of its commensal status, abundance in the natural environment, and ability to acquire virulence determinants by horizontal gene transfer from other microbes. From enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) strains to the more virulent enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), the mechanisms of pathogenicity within this species are intriguing. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics are providing novel tools for improved rapid...

  8. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  9. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; Minh, Van Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an

  10. Colonization of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in chickens and humans in southern Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trung, Nguyen Vinh; Nhung, Hoang Ngoc; Carrique-Mas, Juan J.; Mai, Ho Huynh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Campbell, James; Nhung, Nguyen Thi; van Minh, Pham; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mai, Nguyen Thi Nhu; Hieu, Thai Quoc; Schultsz, Constance; Hoa, Ngo Thi

    2016-01-01

    Enteroaggregative (EAEC) and Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are a major cause of diarrhea worldwide. E. coli carrying both virulence factors characteristic for EAEC and STEC and producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase caused severe and protracted disease during an outbreak of E.

  11. Virulence - associated genes in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli of turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Camarda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 50 Escherichia coli (APEC-Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli strains and 15 E. coli (AFEC-Avian Faecal Escherichia coli from turkeys affected by colibacillosis and from healthy turkeys were tested for the presence of eight different virulence-associated genes. Besides, APEC were serotyped. O78 has been the most detected serotyped. The presence of the tested virulence genes was prevalently related to the APEC isolates. With reference to serogroup, all the tested O78 resulted iss and irp2 positive. Besides, tsh e cva/cvi were respectively present in 88.9 and 83.3% of O78. Nevertheless, the finding of a not typeable strains equipped with all the eight tested virulence genes among the APEC isolates suggest the importance of a careful and complete characterisation of the isolate to evaluate the real potential pathogenic attitude of the bacterium.

  12. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction for identification of Escherichia coli, Escherichia albertii and Escherichia fergusonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Garcia-Toledo, L; Fasulo, D; Gladney, L M; Strockbine, N

    2017-09-01

    Escherichia coli, Escherichia albertii, and Escherichia fergusonii are closely related bacteria that can cause illness in humans, such as bacteremia, urinary tract infections and diarrhea. Current identification strategies for these three species vary in complexity and typically rely on the use of multiple phenotypic and genetic tests. To facilitate their rapid identification, we developed a multiplex PCR assay targeting conserved, species-specific genes. We used the Daydreamer™ (Pattern Genomics, USA) software platform to concurrently analyze whole genome sequence assemblies (WGS) from 150 Enterobacteriaceae genomes (107 E. coli, 5 Shigella spp., 21 E. albertii, 12 E. fergusonii and 5 other species) and design primers for the following species-specific regions: a 212bp region of the cyclic di-GMP regulator gene (cdgR, AW869_22935 from genome K-12 MG1655, CP014225) for E. coli/Shigella; a 393bp region of the DNA-binding transcriptional activator of cysteine biosynthesis gene (EAKF1_ch4033 from genome KF1, CP007025) for E. albertii; and a 575bp region of the palmitoleoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP)-dependent acyltransferase (EFER_0790 from genome ATCC 35469, CU928158) for E. fergusonii. We incorporated the species-specific primers into a conventional multiplex PCR assay and assessed its performance with a collection of 97 Enterobacteriaceae strains. The assay was 100% sensitive and specific for detecting the expected species and offers a quick and accurate strategy for identifying E. coli, E. albertii, and E. fergusonii in either a single reaction or by in silico PCR with sequence assemblies. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Presence and survival of culturable Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli in a temperate urban estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schang, Christelle; Lintern, Anna; Cook, Perran L M; Osborne, Catherine; McKinley, Anand; Schmidt, Jonathon; Coleman, Rhys; Rooney, Graham; Henry, Rebekah; Deletic, Ana; McCarthy, David

    2016-11-01

    Urban estuaries throughout the world typically contain elevated levels of faecal contamination, the extent of which is generally assessed using faecal indicator organisms (FIO) such as Escherichia coli. This study assesses whether the bacterial FIO, E. coli is a suitable surrogate for Campylobacter spp., in estuaries. The presence and survival dynamics of culturable E. coli and Campylobacter spp. are compared in the water column, bank sediments and bed sediments of the Yarra River estuary (located in Melbourne, Australia). The presence of E. coli did not necessarily indicate detectable levels of Campylobacter spp. in the water column, bed and bank sediments, but the inactivation rates of the two bacteria were similar in the water column. A key finding of the study is that E. coli and Campylobacter spp. can survive for up to 14days in the water column and up to 21days in the bed and bank sediments of the estuary. Preliminary data presented in this study also suggests that the inactivation rates of the two bacteria may be similar in bed and bank sediments. This undermines previous hypotheses that Campylobacter spp. cannot survive outside of its host and indicates that public health risks can persist in aquatic systems for up to three weeks after the initial contamination event. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The versatile strategies of Escherichia coli pathotypes: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Sousa

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread species Escherichia coli includes a broad variety of different types, ranging from highly pathogenic strains to avirulent isolates. Few microorganisms are as versatile as E. coli. Pathogenic strains remain a leading cause of severe and persistent infant diarrhea in developing countries. They may be limited to colonization of a mucosal surface or can disseminate throughout the body and have been implicated in urinary tract infection, sepsis/meningitis and gastrointestinal infection. The human gastrointestinal tract is susceptible to diarrheagenic E. coli infections. Escherichia coli have effectively managed to subvert the host cytoskeleton for their own purposes causing substantial diarrheal disease, a major public health problem worldwide. This review deals with the different strategies regarding E. coli as a pathogen and the virulence traits of its pathotypes highlighting the species as a commensal, opportunistic and specialized pathogen.

  15. Bactericidal mechanism of glutaraldehyde-didecyldimethylammonium bromide as a disinfectant against Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W; Guan, X; Cao, J; Niu, B; Chen, Q

    2017-03-01

    This study focuses on the bactericidal mechanism of the new combination of disinfectant glutaraldehyde-didecyldimethylammonium bromide (GA-DDAB) against Escherichia coli. Escherichia coli were exposed to GA-DDAB, and assays for cell morphology, K + and Ca 2+ leakage, H + -ATPase activity and DNA degradation were performed. GA-DDAB damaged the cell wall and disrupted cell-membrane integrity. Leakage of K + and Ca 2+ increased, resulting in significantly lower intracellular concentrations within 60 min of treatment. In addition, H + -ATPase was inactivated and DNA was degraded. Leakage of intracellular components indicated that GA-DDAB damaged the cell membrane of E. coli. This may have caused the observed disruption in equilibria of metal ions, inactivation of H + -ATPase, and DNA damage. Using a low concentration of GA and DDAB, a new combination disinfectant was developed. GA-DDAB displayed higher antimicrobial activity than treatment with GA or DDAB alone. Therefore, GA-DDAB may be a more cost-effective and efficient antimicrobial agent than others in use today. Furthermore, this study provided a paradigm for developing high-efficiency disinfectant to help address the growing problem of bacterial resistance. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Environmental Escherichia coli: Ecology and public health implications - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jeonghwan; Hur, Hor-Gil; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Yan, Tao; Ishii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is classified as a rod-shaped, Gram-negative bacterium in the family Enterobacteriaceae. The bacterium mainly inhabits the lower intestinal tract of warm-blooded animals, including humans, and is often discharged into the environment through feces or wastewater effluent. The presence of E. coli in environmental waters has long been considered as an indicator of recent fecal pollution. However, numerous recent studies have reported that some specific strains of E. coli can survive for long periods of time, and potentially reproduce, in extra-intestinal environments. This indicates that E. coli can be integrated into indigenous microbial communities in the environment. This naturalization phenomenon calls into question the reliability of E. coli as a fecal indicator bacterium (FIB). Recently, many studies reported that E. coli populations in the environment are affected by ambient environmental conditions affecting their long-term survival. Large-scale studies of population genetics provide the diversity and complexity of E. coli strains in various environments, affected by multiple environmental factors. This review examines the current knowledge on the ecology of E. coli strains in various environments in regards to its role as a FIB and as a naturalized member of indigenous microbial communities. Special emphasis is given on the growth of pathogenic E. coli in the environment, and the population genetics of environmental members of the genus Escherichia. The impact of environmental E. coli on water quality and public health is also discussed.

  17. Current pathogenic Escherichia coli foodborne outbreak cases and therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chih-Hung; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Fang, Jia-You

    2017-08-01

    Food contamination by pathogenic microorganisms has been a serious public health problem and a cause of huge economic losses worldwide. Foodborne pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) contamination, such as that with E. coli O157 and O104, is very common, even in developed countries. Bacterial contamination may occur during any of the steps in the farm-to-table continuum from environmental, animal, or human sources and cause foodborne illness. To understand the causes of the foodborne outbreaks by E. coli and food-contamination prevention measures, we collected and investigated the past 10 years' worldwide reports of foodborne E. coli contamination cases. In the first half of this review article, we introduce the infection and symptoms of five major foodborne diarrheagenic E. coli pathotypes: enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shiga toxin-producing E. coli/enterohemorrhagic E. coli (STEC/EHEC), Shigella/enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC). In the second half of this review article, we introduce the foodborne outbreak cases caused by E. coli in natural foods and food products. Finally, we discuss current developments that can be applied to control and prevent bacterial food contamination.

  18. Using Candida oleophila as a biocontriol agens to prevent foodborne Escherichia coli O157 EHEC infections

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yujian; Wei, An; Li, Hongyu

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC O157) is a serious pathogen causing haemorrhagic colitis. In this study, inactivation kinetics of inoculated EHEC O157 and response of EHEC O157 in apple wounds by different concentrations of C. oleophila was investigated. The results presented in this study indicated that EHEC O157 could survive and grow in wounded ?Fuji? apples and extensively proliferate. Water as a decontaminant was ineffective in reducing EHEC O157 in wounded apples. C. oleophila could be a...

  19. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC Is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xuan; Yang, Denghui; Wang, Dong; Han, Xiangan; Shi, Yonghong; Tian, Mingxing; Ding, Chan; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2) is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here, we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  20. Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System 2 ATPase EivC is Involved in the Motility and Virulence of Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type III secretion systems (T3SSs are crucial for bacterial infections because they deliver effector proteins into host cells. The Escherichia coli type III secretion system 2 (ETT2 is present in the majority of E. coli strains, and although it is degenerate, ETT2 regulates bacterial virulence. An ATPase is essential for T3SS secretion, but the function of the ETT2 ATPase has not been demonstrated. Here we show that EivC is homologous to the β subunit of F0F1 ATPases and it possesses ATPase activity. To investigate the effects of ETT2 ATPase EivC on the phenotype and virulence of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC, eivC mutant and complemented strains were constructed and characterized. Inactivation of eivC led to impaired flagella production and augmented fimbriae on the bacterial surface, and, consequently, reduced bacterial motility. In addition, the eivC mutant strain exhibited attenuated virulence in ducks, diminished serum resistance, reduced survival in macrophage cells and in ducks, upregulated fimbrial gene expression, and downregulated flagellar and virulence gene expression. The expression of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL-1β and IL-8 were increased in HD-11 macrophages infected with the eivC mutant strain, compared with the wild-type strain. These virulence-related phenotypes were restored by genetic complementation. These findings demonstrate that ETT2 ATPase EivC is involved in the motility and pathogenicity of APEC.

  1. Human Meningitis-Associated Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIM, KWANG SIK

    2016-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing meningitis and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Our incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis contributes to such mortality and morbidity. Recent reports of E. coli strains producing CTX-M-type or TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases create a challenge. Studies using in vitro and in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier have shown that E. coli meningitis follows a high-degree of bacteremia and invasion of the blood-brain barrier. E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier, the essentials step in the development of E. coli meningitis, requires specific microbial and host factors as well as microbe- and host-specific signaling molecules. Blockade of such microbial and host factors contributing to E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is shown to be efficient in preventing E. coli penetration into the brain. The basis for requiring a high-degree of bacteremia for E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier, however, remains unclear. Continued investigation on the microbial and host factors contributing to a high-degree of bacteremia and E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier is likely to identify new targets for prevention and therapy of E. coli meningitis. PMID:27223820

  2. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili

    2017-01-01

    multiple antimicrobials, however, no (complete) antibiotic resistance genes were present on the chromosome, but a number of genes associated with extra-intestinal disease were identified. Together, the information provided here on E. coli APEC_O2 will assist in future studies of avian pathogenic E. coli......Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy...... and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded...

  3. Escherichia coli O157 infections and unpasteurised milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, F; Wagner, M; Schweiger, P; Rammer, H P; Resch, A; Dierich, M P; Friedrich, A W; Karch, H

    2001-10-01

    We report on two children with Escherichia coli O157 infection, one of whom developed haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS). Both had drunk raw cows or goats milk in the week before their illness. Molecular subtyping identified a sorbitol fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H isolate from a dairy cow. This isolate differed from Shiga toxin producing O157:H strains isolated from the 6 year old boy with HUS. This result underlines the need to search for other causes of infection, despite documented consumption of unpasteurised milk. In the second patient, human sorbitol non-fermenting O157:H isolates and animal isolates from goats were indistinguishable. The isolation of indistinguishable sorbitol non-fermenting Escherichia coli O157:H from contact animals supports the association between HUS and consumption of raw goats milk, and re-emphasises the importance of pasteurising milk.

  4. Radiosensitivity to gamma radiation of Escherichia coli in three different substracts and study of the alterations in the electronic microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, M.E.N.F.

    1984-01-01

    The minimum inactivating dose of radiation (MID) for Escherichia coli IZ-1982 was determinated in three different substrates: cow milk, liquid extract of soybean and nutrient broth (DIFCO). Observations on electronic microscope of the bacterial cells were also made in the three substracts and submitted to different dose of gamma radiation. The Tukey's Test was used to stablish the significance of the difference in the size of the cells grow in the three substrates. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. The Escherichia coli transcriptome linked to growth fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bei-Wen Ying

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of Escherichia coli strains with varied genomic sequences were subjected to high-density microarray analyses to elucidate the fitness-correlated transcriptomes. Fitness, which is commonly evaluated by the growth rate during the exponential phase, is not only determined by the genome but is also linked to growth conditions, e.g., temperature. We previously reported genetic and environmental contributions to E. coli transcriptomes and evolutionary transcriptome changes in thermal adaptation. Here, we describe experimental details on how to prepare microarray samples that truly represent the growth fitness of the E. coli cells. A step-by-step record of sample preparation procedures that correspond to growing cells and transcriptome data sets that are deposited at the GEO database (GSE33212, GSE52770, GSE61739 are also provided for reference. Keywords: Transcriptome, Growth fitness, Escherichia coli, Microarray

  6. Obscured phylogeny and possible recombinational dormancy in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawyer Stanley A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is one of the best studied organisms in all of biology, but its phylogenetic structure has been difficult to resolve with current data and analytical techniques. We analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms in chromosomes of representative strains to reconstruct the topology of its emergence. Results The phylogeny of E. coli varies according to the segment of chromosome analyzed. Recombination between extant E. coli groups is largely limited to only three intergroup pairings. Conclusions Segment-dependent phylogenies most likely are legacies of a complex recombination history. However, E. coli are now in an epoch in which they no longer broadly share DNA. Using the definition of species as organisms that freely exchange genetic material, this recombinational dormancy could reflect either the end of E. coli as a species, or herald the coalescence of E. coli groups into new species.

  7. Human Meningitis-Associated Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    KIM, KWANG SIK

    2016-01-01

    E. coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing meningitis and E. coli meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. Our incomplete knowledge of its pathogenesis contributes to such mortality and morbidity. Recent reports of E. coli strains producing CTX-M-type or TEM-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases create a challenge. Studies using in vitro and in vivo models of the blood-brain barrier have shown that E. coli meningitis...

  8. Expression and cytoprotective activity of the small GTPase RhoB induced by the Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Roggenkamp, Dennis; May, Martin

    2013-01-01

    B expression, based on the inactivation of Rho/Ras proteins. In this study, we report on a long lasting expression of RhoB in cultured cells upon activation of Rho proteins by the cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1) from Escherichia coli. The observations of this study highlight a new pathway involving Rac1...... without any signs of cell death. In conclusion, the cytoprotective RhoB response is not only evoked by bacterial protein toxins inactivating Rho/Ras proteins but also by the Rac1-activating toxin CNF1....

  9. The MinD protein is a membrane ATPase required for the correct placement of the Escherichia coli division site.

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, P A; Crossley, R E; Hand, A R; Rothfield, L I

    1991-01-01

    The proper placement of the cell division site in Escherichia coli requires the site-specific inactivation of potential division sites at the cell poles in a process that is mediated by the MinC, MinD and MinE proteins. During the normal division cycle MinD plays two roles. It activates the MinC-dependent mechanism that is responsible for the inactivation of potential division sites and it also renders the division inhibition system sensitive to the topological specificity factor MinE. MinE s...

  10. Engineering Escherichia coli for autoinducible production of n-butanol

    OpenAIRE

    Qinglong Wang; Yi ding; Li Liu; Jiping Shi; Junsong Sun; Yongchang Xue

    2015-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli does not produce n-butanol naturally, but can be butanologenic when related enzymes were expressed using inducible elements on plasmids. In this study we attempted to confer E. coli strain capability of automatic excretion of the chemical by employing a native anaerobic promoter. Also, a novel DNA kit was designed for PCR preparation of linear DNA fragments to perform strain modification. The kit is primarily composed of two mother vectors, co-transformation of li...

  11. Escherichia coli contamination of pork carcasses in UK slaughterhouses

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Shao-Hung

    2013-01-01

    Despite the HACCP systems which have been introduced to the pork industry, cross-contamination which occurs within pork slaughterlines remains an important concern for food safety of the final carcass. The aim of this work was to understand the dissemination and cross-contamination of enteric bacteria during slaughter processing by investigating Escherichia coli populations. E. coli is widely used as an indicator of faecal or enteric pathogen contamination, and a strong correlation between th...

  12. Differential expression of the Escherichia coli autoaggregation factor antigen 43

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Hjerrild, Louise; Gjermansen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a self-recognizing surface adhesin found in most Escherichia coli strains. Due to its excellent cell-to-cell aggregation characteristics, Ag43 expression confers clumping and fluffing of cells and promotes biofilm formation. Ag43 expression is repressed by the cellular redox......-forming potential of E. coli. Finally, we demonstrated that Ag43-mediated cell aggregation confers significant protection against hydrogen peroxide killing....

  13. Metabolic and Transcriptional Response to Cofactor Perturbations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders Koefoed; Blank, L.M.; Oldiges, M.

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic cofactors such as NADH and ATP play important roles in a large number of cellular reactions, and it is of great interest to dissect the role of these cofactors in different aspects of metabolism. Toward this goal, we overexpressed NADH oxidase and the soluble F1-ATPase in Escherichia coli...... of redox and energy metabolism and should help in developing metabolic engineering strategies in E. coli....

  14. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M

    1998-01-01

    GenProtEC is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins, representing groups of paralogous genes, with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. GenProtEC can be accessed at the URL http://www.mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html

  15. Antibiotic resistance of Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolated from vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mojtaba boniadian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human gastrointestinal disease caused by verotoxigenic Escherichia coli has been diagnosed for recent decades. Escherichia coli O157:H7 is the most important serotype of verotoxigenic Escherichia coli that cause hemolytic uremic syndrome and hemorrhagic colitis in humans. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of verotoxigenic E. coli and antibiotic resistance of the isolates from vegetables. Materials and methods: A total of 500 fresh vegetable samples were collected randomly from retail shops in Shahrekord, Iran. E. coli was isolated and identified using bacteriological and biochemical tests. PCR method was used to identify the rbfE, stx1, stx2 and eae genes. Also, antibiotic resistance of the isolates was determined by disk diffusion method. Results: The results represented that among 25 isolates possess virulence genes, 40, 12 and 4% of the isolates contained eaeA, STx2, and both genes, respectively. But none of them contained H7, STx1, and rfbE genes. The antibiotic resistance pattern demonstrated that the isolates were highly resistant to Gentamycin and cefotoxime. Discussion and conclusion: The results of this study showed that the presence of verotoxigenic E.coli in vegetables; and high resistance of the isolates to antibiotics could be hazardous for public health.

  16. ANTIMICIROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERNS OF Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. A total of 56 and 24 strains of E. coli and Shigella sp. isolated from children less than five years with diarrhoea attending 3 different hospitals in South South Nigeria were screened for their antibiotic resistance patterns. Approximately 80% of E. coli and 70% of Shigella isolates were resistant to tetracycline.

  17. Biochemical and serological characterization of Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to determine the isolation rate, serotypes and biochemical profiles of E. coli from colibacillosis and dead-in-shell embryos in Zaria, Northern-Nigeria. The isolation rate of E. coli from hatcheries studied were 4.67% and 7.50% from farms of Simtu Agricultural Company and National Animal Production ...

  18. Uropathogenic virulence factor FimH facilitates binding of uteropathogenic Escherichia coli to canine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekeler, N; Marenda, M S; Browning, G F; Holden, K M; Charles, J A; Wright, P J

    2012-09-01

    Pyometra is a potentially life-threatening condition in bitches and is often caused by Escherichia coli infection. Both pathogenic and non-pathogenic E. coli strains commonly carry the genes for type 1 fimbriae that mediate bacterial adhesion onto host epithelium. To investigate whether the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, FimH, facilitates the binding of uropathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium, the fimH gene was insertionally inactivated in a pathogenic E. coli strain. The ability of E. coli to bind to canine endometrial epithelial cells was determined in vitro using canine uterine biopsies. Binding of the fimH mutant was only 0.3% of that of the wild type. Complementation of the mutation restored the phenotype to that of the parent. This study has developed an in vitro model that allows quantitative and qualitative assessment of bacterial binding to canine endometrium and has demonstrated that the fimH gene plays a role in adherence of pathogenic E. coli to canine endometrium. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cervical celullitis in broiler chickens for Escherichia coli/ Celulite cervical em frangos de corte causada por Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivens Gomes Guimarães

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper was report the isolation of Escherichia coli in broiler chickens with cellulitis in the cervical region. It was carried through the isolation of E. coli of the lesion of cellulitis from broilers and carried through histopathological examination of skin that had characterized the lesion. Focal ulcerations of epidermis, fibrin in dermis and difuse infiltrated by lymphocytes and heterophils on subcutaneous tissues.Neste trabalho, relata-se o isolamento de Escherichia coli em frangos de corte apresentando lesão de celulite na região cervical. Foi realizado o isolamento de E. coli da lesão de celulite e realizado exames histopatológicos que caracterizaram a lesão. Na epiderme foram verificadas lesões ulcerativas, presença de fibrina na derme e infiltração difusa de linfócitos e heterófilos no tecido subcutâneo.

  20. Effectiveness of different antimicrobial washes combined with freezing against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on blueberries

    Science.gov (United States)

    To ensure the microbial safety of produce including blueberries, sanitization is a critical step. This study evaluated the efficacy of sanitizers when coupled with frozen storage, in inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on wild blueberri...

  1. Moderate prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolates from lettuce, irrigation water, and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holvoet, Kevin; Sampers, Imca; Callens, Benedicte; Dewulf, Jeroen; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2013-11-01

    Fresh produce is known to carry nonpathogenic epiphytic microorganisms. During agricultural production and harvesting, leafy greens can become contaminated with antibiotic-resistant pathogens or commensals from animal and human sources. As lettuce does not undergo any inactivation or preservation treatment during processing, consumers may be exposed directly to all of the (resistant) bacteria present. In this study, we investigated whether lettuce or its production environment (irrigation water, soil) is able to act as a vector or reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli. Over a 1-year period, eight lettuce farms were visited multiple times and 738 samples, including lettuce seedlings (leaves and soil), soil, irrigation water, and lettuce leaves were collected. From these samples, 473 isolates of Escherichia coli were obtained and tested for resistance to 14 antimicrobials. Fifty-four isolates (11.4%) were resistant to one or more antimicrobials. The highest resistance rate was observed for ampicillin (7%), followed by cephalothin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, tetracycline, trimethoprim, and streptomycin, with resistance rates between 4.4 and 3.6%. No resistance to amikacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, or kanamycin was observed. One isolate was resistant to cefotaxime. Among the multiresistant isolates (n = 37), ampicillin and cephalothin showed the highest resistance rates, at 76 and 52%, respectively. E. coli isolates from lettuce showed higher resistance rates than E. coli isolates obtained from soil or irrigation water samples. When the presence of resistance in E. coli isolates from lettuce production sites and their resistance patterns were compared with the profiles of animal-derived E. coli strains, they were found to be the most comparable with what is found in the cattle reservoir. This may suggest that cattle are a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli strains in plant primary production.

  2. Escherichia coli is naturally transformable in a novel transformation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongchang; Zhang, Yanmei; Mei, Yunjun; Jiang, Hui; Xie, Zhixiong; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Xiangdong; Shen, Ping

    2006-12-01

    A novel transformation system, in which neither a nonphysiological concentration of Ca2+ and temperature shifts nor electronic shocks were required, was developed to determine whether Escherichia coli is naturally transformable. In the new protocol, E. coli was cultured normally to the stationary phase and then cultured statically at 37 degrees C in Luria-Bertani broth. After static culture, transformation occurred in bacteria spread on Luria-Bertani plates. The protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol inhibited this transformation process. The need for protein synthesis in plated bacteria suggests that the transformation of E. coli in this new system is regulated physiologically.

  3. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth...... of reducing equivalents. We interpret these data as indicating that E. coli makes use of its ability to respire even if it cannot directly couple this ability to ATP synthesis; by respiring away excess reducing equivalents E. coli enhances substrate level ATP synthesis....

  4. Protein abundance profiling of the Escherichia coli cytosol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishihama, Y.; Schmidt, T.; Rappsilber, J.

    2008-01-01

    sample. Using a combination of LC-MS/MS approaches with protein and peptide fractionation steps we identified 1103 proteins from the cytosolic fraction of the Escherichia coli strain MC4100. A measure of abundance is presented for each of the identified proteins, based on the recently developed em...... protein and mRNA abundance in E. coli cells. Conclusion: Abundance measurements for more than 1000 E. coli proteins presented in this work represent the most complete study of protein abundance in a bacterial cell so far. We show significant associations between the abundance of a protein and its...

  5. [Hemophagocytosis associated with an Escherichia coli sepsis: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, N; Lassoued, K; Pellé, G; Foucher, A; Costa, M-A; Rondeau, E; Sraer, J-D

    2003-10-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis syndrome (HLS) is defined by activated macrophage proliferation. These cells phagocyte the blood elements. This syndrome can be primary as an autosomal recessive disease or secondary to neoplasia, immune diseases or infections-viral, parasitary or bacterian. Our case concerns an association of HLS and Escherichia coli (E. coli) sepsis in a metastatic prostatic cancer. The evolution was rapidly improved by antibiotics alone. The clinical and biological aspects as well as the differential diagnosis are discussed. The HLS is fatal. It can be caused by a severe infection, even an E. coli sepsis. The treatment focused on etiology can be sufficient.

  6. YeeO from Escherichia coli exports flavins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAnulty, Michael J; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) proteins help maintain cellular homeostasis by secreting metabolic wastes. Flavins may occur as cellular waste products, with their production and secretion providing potential benefit for industrial applications related to biofuel cells. Here we find that MATE protein YeeO from Escherichia coli exports both flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Significant amounts of flavins were trapped intracellularly when YeeO was produced indicating transport limits secretion of flavins. Wild-type E. coli secreted 3 flavins (riboflavin, FMN, and FAD), so E. coli likely produces additional flavin transporters.

  7. Spontaneous Escherichia coli Meningitis Associated with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous Escherichia coli meningitis has not been previously reported in association with hemophago-cytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. A previously healthy 72-year-old woman was admitted due to fever, nuchal rigidity, disturbed consciousness and splenomegaly. Anemia, thrombocytopenia and hyperfer-ritinemia developed on the 8th day of hospitalization. Cultures of cerebrospinal fluid and blood grew E. coli. Abundant macrophages overwhelmed erythrocytes in the bone marrow aspirate, confirming the presence of hemophagocytosis. E. coli meningitis was managed with a 40-day course of antibiotic treatment. However, the severity of anemia and thrombocytopenia progressed despite intensive transfusion therapy. The patient died of HLH on the 60th day of hospitalization.

  8. Escherichia coli O26 IN RAW BUFFALO MILK: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O26 is considered to be one of the most important food-borne pathogen. In this study, 120 buffalo milk samples collected in Lazio and in Apulia regions were tested for the presence of E. coli O26. One buffalo milk sample (0,8% tested positive for E. coli O26; the isolate was positive at the verocytotoxicity test and it showed resistance properties to different antimicrobial classes. These preliminary results highlight the need to monitor the foods of animal origin used for production and eaten by a wide range of persons, respect VTEC organism.

  9. Relationship between Phenotypic and Genotypic Florfenicol Resistance in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Singer, Randall S.; Patterson, Sheila K.; Meier, Anne E.; Gibson, Jessica K.; Lee, Hannah L.; Maddox, Carol W.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between florfenicol resistance and flo genotypes in 1,987 Escherichia coli isolates from cattle. The flo gene was detected in 164 isolates, all of which expressed resistance to florfenicol at MICs of ≥256 μg/ml. The florfenicol MICs for all isolates that lacked flo were ≤16 μg/ml.

  10. Relationship between Phenotypic and Genotypic Florfenicol Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Randall S.; Patterson, Sheila K.; Meier, Anne E.; Gibson, Jessica K.; Lee, Hannah L.; Maddox, Carol W.

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between florfenicol resistance and flo genotypes in 1,987 Escherichia coli isolates from cattle. The flo gene was detected in 164 isolates, all of which expressed resistance to florfenicol at MICs of ≥256 μg/ml. The florfenicol MICs for all isolates that lacked flo were ≤16 μg/ml. PMID:15388477

  11. Antibiotic Resistant Salmonella And Escherichia Coli Isolated From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our investigation revealed that Escherichia coli and Salmonella organisms were isolated in the outbreaks. A pattern of antibiotic resistance that seems to be increasing was also found. Considering the role of chickens and its products in the human food chain in Nigeria; and the close interaction between poultry and man, ...

  12. 51 original article antibiotic resistant salmonella and escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    use of antibiotics in the food animals, especially poultry. Keywords: Escherichia coli, Salmonella paratyphi, poultry, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION .... legal classification of veterinary drugs to prevent continued abuse of these various products. More work need to be done to comprehensively assess the national prevalence of ...

  13. Prevalence of Escherichia coli virulence genes in patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of the virulence genes specific for five major pathogroups of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in primary cultures from diarrhoeagenic patients in Burkina Faso. Methodology: From September 2016 to Mars 2017, a total of 211 faecal samples from diarrhoeagenic patients from ...

  14. Antibiotic Resistant Salmonella And Escherichia Coli Isolated From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the cause of death using several virological and bacteriological techniques, isolated the pathogenic agents and carried out sensitivity tests. Our investigation revealed that Escherichia coli and Salmonella organisms were isolated in the outbreaks. A pattern of antibiotic resistance that seems to be increasing ...

  15. Binding of Divalent Magnesium by Escherichia coli Phosphoribosyl Diphosphate Synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of binding of the substrates MgATP and ribose 5-phosphate as well as Mg2+ to the enzyme 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate synthetase from Escherichia coli has been analyzed. By use of the competive inhibitors of ATP and ribose 5-phosphate binding, a,ß-methylene ATP and (+)-1-a,2-a...

  16. Solubilization and purification of Escherichia coli expressed GST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pGEX-4T-1 vector, and GST-VEGF fusion proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli at 37°C. The inclusion bodies of GST-VEGF fusion proteins were solubilized with N-Lauroylsarcosine (sarkosyl). Briefly, the cell suspension with inclusion body was added with sarkosyl at a final concentration of 1.5%. After the disruption ...

  17. Carbon and energy metabolism of atp mutants of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1992-01-01

    The membrane-bound H+-ATPase plays a key role in free-energy transduction of biological systems. We report how the carbon and energy metabolism of Escherichia coli changes in response to deletion of the atp operon that encodes this enzyme. Compared with the isogenic wild-type strain, the growth r...

  18. Sensitivity of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and nine other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sensitivity of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and nine other bacterial species isolated from drinking water in the lower Volta Basin to some commonly used ... It is suggested that close monitoring of quality of water coupled with education in cleaning storage containers, using the traditional heat sterilisation method, ...

  19. Escherichia coli as other Enterobacteriaceae: food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many Escherichia coli strains are harmless, and they are an important commensal in the intestinal microflora; however, pathogenic strains also exist. The pathogenic strains can be divided into diarrhea-inducing strains and strains that reside in the intestines but only cause disease in bodily sites...

  20. Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae: Food poisoning and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The family Enterobactericeae consists of rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, non-spore forming bacteria and also includes the food-borne pathogens, Cronobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella spp., and Yersinia spp. Illness caused by these pathogens is acquired...

  1. Multiple-Resistant Commensal Escherichia Coli from Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence traits of 150 strains of Escherichia coli characterized as commensals recovered from faecal samples from pre-school age children in Ile-Ife,. Nigeria were evaluated in order to determine their potentials for pathogenicity and their contribution to antibiotic resistance in the ...

  2. Effects of recombinant human collagen VI from Escherichia coli on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    irradiated human skin fibroblasts cells. M Wu, Z Xun, G Wang, Y Sun, G Chen. Abstract. In this study, we reported the cloning and over expression of a gene coding for human collagen peptide (CP6) in Escherichia coli and investigated the protective ...

  3. Physiological responses of Escherichia coli to far-ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are reviewed: photochemical damage to DNA; measurement of cell survival; DNA repair processes and genetics of radiation sensitivity; degradation of DNA and RNA; biochemical and physiological consequences; reactivation of bacteriophage in Escherichia coli cells; filament formation; influence of growth phase on survival after uv irradiation; and post-uv-irradiation treatment

  4. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    When wastewater infiltrates into the soil, groundwater may be contaminated. If the distance from source of pollution to point of groundwater abstraction is small, there is a real chance of abstracting pathogenic microorganisms. In this book, the transport of Escherichia coli in aquifers under

  5. Cytokine response to Escherichia coli in gnotobiotic pigs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šplíchal, Igor; Šplíchalová, Alla; Trebichavský, Ilja

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2008), s. 161-164 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA523/05/0249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : germ-free pigs * escherichia coli * cytokine response Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.172, year: 2008

  6. Modelling nitrogen assimilation of Escherichia coli at low ammonium concentration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, H.; Boogerd, F.C.; Goryanin, I.

    2009-01-01

    Modelling is an important methodology in systems biology research. In this paper, we presented a kinetic model for the complex ammonium assimilation regulation system of Escherichia coli. Based on a previously published model, the new model included AmtB mediated ammonium transport and AmtB

  7. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm. R. Jayaraman*. R. H. 35, Palaami Enclave, New Natham Road, Madurai 625 014, India. Abstract. Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to ...

  8. Effect of phytoplankton on Escherichia coli survival in laboratory microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecal contamination of water sources is an important water quality issue for agricultural irrigation ponds. Escherichia coli is a common microbial indicator used to evaluate recreational and irrigation water quality. Nuisance algae commonly grow in low- or no-flow irrigation water source The objecti...

  9. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presence...

  10. Pathology of experimental Escherichia coli infection in mice: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacterial mastitis frequently causes serious depressions of milk production and in certain cases may result in death in the dairy herd. Experimental bacterial mastitis served as a prelude to studying the actual infection in dairy cows. Cultures of nine serotypes of Escherichia coli isolated from various bacterial infections of ...

  11. Characterisation of a haemoglobin protease secreted by pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, B.R.; van Dooren, S.J.M.; Nuijens, J.H.; Luirink, S.; Oudega, B.

    1998-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria can use heme compounds as a source of iron. Pathogenic Escherichia coli strains are capable of using hemoglobin as an iron source. However, the mechanism of heme acquisition from hemoglobin is not understood for this microorganism. We present the first molecular

  12. in Escherichia coli with native cholesterol oxidase expressed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The structure and bio-activity of an endogenous cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sp. was compared to the same enzyme exogenously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) with and without N- or C-terminal his-tags. The different proteins were purified with affinity and subtractive protocols. The specific activity of ...

  13. Sequencing of Escherichia coli that cause persistent and transient Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of two strains of Escherichia coli that cause bovine mastitis were sequenced. These strains are known to be associated with persistent and transient mastitis: strain ECA-B causes a transient infection, and ECC-M leads to a persistent infection....

  14. Escherichia coli. A sanitary methodology for faecal water pollution tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonadonna, L.

    2001-01-01

    Among the traditional indictors of faecal water pollution, Escherichia coli has shown to fit better with the definition of indicator organism. Till now its recovery has been time-consuming and needs confirmation tests. In this report more rapid and direct methods, based on enzymatic reactions, are presented [it

  15. Effect of visible range electromagnetic radiations on Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of ...

  16. Antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolated from five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information on the resistance profiles of clinical and non clinical human bacteria isolates in the developing countries can serve as important means of understanding the human pathogens drug resistance interactions in the zone. Escherichia coli isolated from five geopolitical zones of Nigeria were screened for anti-microbial ...

  17. Modeling base excision repair in Escherichia coli bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the key processes in Escherichia coli bacterial cells during base excision repair is developed. The mechanism is modeled of damaged base elimination involving formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (the Fpg protein), which possesses several types of activities. The modeling of the transitions between DNA states is based on a stochastic approach to the chemical reaction description

  18. Molecular characterization of the Escherichia coli asymptomatic bacteriuria strain 83972

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemm, Per; Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli 83972 is a clinical asymptomatia bacteriuric isolate that is able to colonize the human urinary bladder without inducing an immune response. Here we demonstrate that one of the mechanisms by which this strain has become attenuated is through the mutation of its genes encoding type...

  19. Prevalence and antibiogram of Escherichia coli O157 isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence and antibiogram of Escherichia coli O157 isolated from bovine in Jimma, Ethiopia: abattoir- based survey. Aklilu Feleke Haile1*, Daniel Kebede2, and Ashenafi Kiros Wubshet3. 1College of Veterinary Medicine and Agriculture, Addis Ababa University, Ethiopia. 2School of Veterinary Medicine,Wolaita Sodo ...

  20. Occurrence of Escherichia coli in Brassica rapa L. chinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low quality water has become valuable resource with restricted or unrestricted use in food production depending on its quality. This study has quantified the occurrence of Escherichia coli in Brassica rapa L. chinensis (Chinese cabbage) vegetables and low quality irrigation water. A total of 106 samples including Chinese ...

  1. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  2. Effects of recombinant human collagen VI from Escherichia coli on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-20

    Jul 20, 2011 ... In this study, we reported the cloning and over expression of a gene coding for human collagen peptide. (CP6) in Escherichia coli and investigated the protective effects of CP6 on UVA-irradiated human skin fibroblasts cells. The collagen peptide (CP6) was highly soluble and the expression level was.

  3. Predictive Mathematical Model for Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Dixon, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate has been studied as a potential biodegradable replacement for petrochemical plastics. Polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis is not native to Escherichia coli, but the genes have successfully been inserted through plasmids. However, polyhydroxybutyrate production needs to be more cost-effective before it can be commercially produced. A mathematical model for polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis was developed to identify genes that could be altered to increase polyhydroxybutyrate productio...

  4. Search for Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica are important zoonotic bacteria responsible for enteric infections in humans. The present study investigated the possible role of kittens in the zoonotic transmission of antimicrobial resistant EHEC O157 and Salmonella enterica to human using ...

  5. Production of jet fuel precursor monoterpenoids from engineered Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendez-Perez, Daniel; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Hu, Qijun

    2017-01-01

    ). FPP biosynthesis diverts the carbon flux from monoterpene production to C15 products and quinone biosynthesis. In this study, we tested a chromosomal mutation of Escherichia coli's native FPP synthase (IspA) to improve GPP availability for the production of monoterpenes using a heterologous mevalonate...

  6. DNA supercoiling depends on the phosphorylation potential in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Workum, M.; van Dooren, S.J.M; Oldenburg, N

    1996-01-01

    ATP/ADP ratios were varied in different ways and the degree of negative supercoiling was determined in Escherichia coli. Independent of whether the ATP/ADP ratio was reduced by a shift to anaerobic conditions, by addition of protonophore (dinitrophenol) or by potassium cyanide addition, DNA...

  7. Adsorption of Escherichia coli Using Bone Char 1*ABBAS REZAEE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    15 (1) 57 - 62. Full-text Available Online at www.bioline.org.br/ja. Adsorption of Escherichia coli Using Bone Char. 1*ABBAS REZAEE; 1MARYAM RAMIN; 2GHADER GHANIZADEH; 1AFSHIN. NILI-AHMADABADI. 1Department of Environmental Health , Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran.

  8. Protein export in bacillus subtilis and escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijl, Jan Maarten van

    1990-01-01

    The export of heterologous proteins in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli is often inefficient. Frequently observed problems are: 1) accumulation of the precursor form of the exported protein in the cytoplasm or in the membrane; 2), inefficient or incorrect processing of the precursor; 3),

  9. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presenc...

  10. Antibiotic Sensitivity Profile of Escherichia coli Isolated from Poultry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study involving 300 cloaca swabs from apparently healthy birds from 8 small-medium scale poultry farms in Ibadan Oyo State was carried out. A total of 201 (67%) Escherichia coli isolates were recovered from the birds and they were subjected to in-vitro antibiotic sensitivity test by agar gel diffusion method.

  11. The incidence and antibiotics susceptibility of Escherichia coli O157 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... The incidence of Escherichia coli 0157: H7 was assessed in meat samples from slaughtered cattle in. Ibadan metropolis by culturing on sorbitol MacConkey agar and confirmed using serological agglutination kits. The isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven commonly used antimicrobial agents.

  12. Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157: a survey of dairy cattle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The zoonotic potential of enterohaemorrhagic. Escherichia coli (EHEC) subtype O157 represents a serious food-borne threat to human health. (1Б3). A common animal vector of this pathogen is cattle, and human cases of infection are frequently caused by ingesting food products contaminated with bacteria shed in the ...

  13. Escherichia Coli Removal from Water Using Electrophotocatalytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    photocatalytic process (Chong et al., 2010). Small-scale or at point of use water treatment systems, based on nanoparticles, can be used for inactivation of bacterial microorganisms in areas with low population which are not connected to central drinking water network. Chlorination is the most common method of drinking ...

  14. Inactivation of E.coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella enterica on strawberries by sanitizing solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A recent foodborne outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in Oregon associated with the consumption of fresh strawberries highlights the need for effective sanitizing washes, suitable for the inactivation of pathogens on fresh produce. Sanitizing solutions were screened for decontaminating E. coli O157:H7 (E...

  15. Inactivation of enteropathogenic E. coli by solar disinfection (SODIS) under simulated sunlight conditions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available of maintaining the water temperature at a constant maximum as was done for inactivation studies of other organisms. 2. Methods 2.1. Bacterial Growth EPEC E. coli O157 (ATCC 23631) and E.coli K-12 were obtained from frozen stocks and streaked...

  16. SILAC-based comparative analysis of pathogenic Escherichia coli secretomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Borch, Jonas; Krogh, Thøger Jensen

    2015-01-01

    proteome analysis have the potential to discover both classes of proteins and hence form an important tool for discovering therapeutic targets. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) and Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) are pathogenic variants of E. coli which cause intestinal disease in humans. AIEC......-term protection are still needed. In order to identify proteins with therapeutic potential, we have used mass spectrometry-based Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) quantitative proteomics method which allows us to compare the proteomes of pathogenic strains to commensal E. coli....... In this study, we grew the pathogenic strains ETEC H10407, AIEC LF82 and the non-pathogenic reference strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in parallel and used SILAC to compare protein levels in OMVs and culture supernatant. We have identified well-known virulence factors from both AIEC and ETEC, thus validating our...

  17. Irradiation Sensitivity of Planktonic and Biofilm-Associated Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates Is Influenced by Culture Conditions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Niemira, Brendan A.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation effectively inactivates Escherichia coli O157:H7, but the efficacy of the process against biofilm cells versus that against free-living planktonic cells is not well documented. The radiation sensitivity of planktonic or biofilm cells was determined for three isolates of E. coli O157:H7 (C9490, ATCC 35150, and ATCC 43894). Biofilms were formed on sterile glass slides incubated at 37°C for either 24 h, 48 h, or 72 h. The biofilm and planktonic cultures were gamma irradiated a...

  18. Lytic bacteriophages reduce Escherichia coli O157

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sean; Roberts, Cheryl; Handy, Eric; Sharma, Manan

    2013-01-01

    The role of lytic bacteriophages in preventing cross contamination of produce has not been evaluated. A cocktail of three lytic phages specific for E. coli O157:H7 (EcoShield™) or a control (phosphate buffered saline, PBS) was applied to lettuce by either; (1) immersion of lettuce in 500 ml of EcoShield™ 8.3 log PFU/ml or 9.8 log PFU/ml for up to 2 min before inoculation with E. coli O157:H7; (2) spray-application of EcoShield™ (9.3 log PFU/ml) to lettuce after inoculation with E. coli O157:H7 (4.10 CFU/cm2) following exposure to 50 μg/ml chlorine for 30 sec. After immersion studies, lettuce was spot-inoculated with E. coli O157:H7 (2.38 CFU/cm2). Phage-treated, inoculated lettuce pieces were stored at 4°C for and analyzed for E. coli O157:H7 populations for up to 7 d. Immersion of lettuce in 9.8 log PFU/ml EcoShield™ for 2 min significantly (p bacteriophages on the surface of fresh cut lettuce, potentially contributing to the efficacy of the lytic phages on lettuce. Spraying phages on to inoculated fresh cut lettuce after being washed in hypochlorite solution was significantly more effective in reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations (2.22 log CFU/cm2) on day 0 compared with control treatments (4.10 log CFU/cm2). Both immersion and spray treatments provided protection from E. coli O157:H7 contamination on lettuce, but spray application of lytic bacteriophages to lettuce was more effective in immediately reducing E. coli O157:H7 populations fresh cut lettuce. PMID:23819106

  19. A low-energy intensive electrochemical system for the eradication of Escherichia coli from ballast water: Process development, disinfection chemistry, and kinetics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadeeshani Nanayakkara, K.G.; Khorshed Alam, A.K.M.; Zheng Yuming; Paul Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    The invasion of biological organisms via ballast water has created threats to the environment and human health. In this study, a cost-effective electrochemical disinfection reactor was developed to inactivate Escherichia coli, one of the IMO-regulated indicator microbes, in simulated ballast water. The complete inactivation of E. coli could be achieved within a very short time (150, 120, or 60 s) with an energy consumption as low as 0.0090, 0.0074 or 0.0035 kWh/m 3 for ballast water containing E. coli at concentrations of 10 8 , 10 7 and 10 6 CFU/100 mL, respectively. Electrochemical chlorination was the major disinfection mechanism in chloride-abundant electrolytes, whereas oxidants such as ozone and free radicals contributed to 20% of the disinfection efficiency in chloride-free electrolytes. Moreover, a disinfection kinetics model was successfully developed to describe the inactivation of E. coli.

  20. Cytotoxic Escherichia coli strains encoding colibactin colonize 1 laboratory mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexis; Mannion, Anthony; Feng, Yan; Madden, Carolyn M.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Shen, Zeli; Ge, Zhongming; Fox, James G.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains have not been fully characterized in laboratory mice and are not currently excluded from mouse colonies. Colibactin (Clb), a cytotoxin, has been associated with inflammation and cancer in humans and animals. We performed bacterial cultures utilizing rectal swab, fecal, and extra intestinal samples from clinically unaffected or affected laboratory mice. Fifty-one E. coli were isolated from 45 laboratory mice, identified biochemically, and selected isolates were serotyped. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced for specific isolates, PCR used for clbA and clbQ gene amplification, and phylogenetic group identification was performed on all 51 E. coli strains. Clb genes were sequenced and selected E. coli isolates were characterized using a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. Forty-five of the 51 E. coli isolates (88 %) encoded clbA and clbQ and belonged to phylogenetic group B2. Mouse E. coli serotypes included: O2:H6, O−:H−, OM:H+, and O22:H−. Clb-encoding O2:H6 mouse E. coli isolates were cytotoxic in vitro. A Clb-encoding E. coli was isolated from a clinically affected genetically modified mouse with cystic endometrial hyperplasia. Our findings suggest that Clb-encoding E. coli colonize laboratory mice and may induce clinical and subclinical diseases that may impact experimental mouse models. PMID:27480057

  1. Characterization of diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolates in Jordanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehabi, Asem A; Bulos, Najawa-Kuri; Hajjaj, Kamal G

    2003-01-01

    In a prospective study carried out among Jordanian children in Amman, a total of 73/250 (29.2%) stool specimens were positive for 1 or more diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli strains using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. This study indicated that diarrhoeagenic E. coli isolates were found frequently more in stools of children with diarrhoea (34%) than without diarrhoea (23.1%), but without any significant difference (p > 0.05). The predominant diarrhoeagenic E. coli strains associated with diarrhoea were enteropathogenic E. coli (11.3%), followed by enterotoxigenic E. coli (9.8%) and enteroaggrative E. coli (9%), whereas in the control group these were 4.3%, 11.1% and 6%, respectively. Enteroinvasive E. coli strains (2.9%) were found only in stools of children with diarrhoea. This study revealed the absence of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli in both diarrhoeal and control stools, and found that diarrhoeagenic E. coli isolates were highly resistance to tetracycline (55%), co-trimoxazole (60%) and ampicillin (89%), which are commonly used antibiotics in Jordan.

  2. The attenuation effect of UVc radiation doses in gram-negative bacteria (Brucella, Yersinia, Escherichia coli)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mariri, A.

    2006-06-01

    The gram-negative bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica sero group O:3 and O:9, and Brucella (Melitensis and abortus) together with Escherichia coli (O:157, DH5α-pEt15b), were investigated to evaluate their susceptibility to UV radiation at 254 nm. If the dose of UVc was 18.7 mW/cm 2 , the time required for inactivation of Y. enterocolitica and E. coli DH5α-pEt15b and O:157 was 240s and 360s in the dark and light respectively; where if the dose was 19.5 mW/cm 2 , the time required was 60s in the dark and 120s in light respectively. The time required for inactivation of Brucella strains (melitensis and abortus) if the dose was 18.7 mW/cm 2 was 240s in both dark and light, whereas it was 120s(dark) and 240s (light) respectively, when the dose was 19.5 mW/cm 2 . Using E. coli O:157 as control, it appears that Y. enterocolitica sero group O:3 and O:9 and vaccinal strains of Brucella (Rev. 1 and S19) are more sensitive to UV than wild Brucella strains. No relation was found between the sensitivity of Y. enterocolitica to UV and the presence or absence of a pYV + virulence plasmid. (author)

  3. Sensitivity of antibiotic resistant and antibiotic susceptible Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains against ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Tolerance of antibiotic susceptible and antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphylococcus strains from clinical and wastewater samples against ozone was tested to investigate if ozone, a strong oxidant applied for advanced wastewater treatment, will affect the release of antibiotic resistant bacteria into the aquatic environment. For this purpose, the resistance pattern against antibiotics of the mentioned isolates and their survival after exposure to 4 mg/L ozone was determined. Antibiotic resistance (AR) of the isolates was not correlating with higher tolerance against ozone. Except for ampicillin resistant E. coli strains, which showed a trend towards increased resistance, E. coli strains that were also resistant against cotrimoxazol, ciprofloxacin or a combination of the three antibiotics were similarly or less resistant against ozone than antibiotic sensitive strains. Pigment-producing Enterococcus casseliflavus and Staphylococcus aureus seemed to be more resistant against ozone than non-pigmented species of these genera. Furthermore, aggregation or biofilm formation apparently protected bacteria in subsurface layers from inactivation by ozone. The relatively large variance of tolerance against ozone may indicate that resistance to ozone inactivation most probably depends on several factors, where AR, if at all, does not play a major role.

  4. The attenuation effect of UVc radiation doses in gram-negative bacteria (Brucella, Yersinia, Escherichia coli)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mariri, A.

    2007-01-01

    The gram-negative bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica sero group O:3 and O:9, and Brucella (Melitensis and abortus) together with Escherichia coli (O:157, DH5alpha-pEt15b), were investigated to evaluate their susceptibility to UV radiation at 254 nm. If the dose of UVc was 18.7 mW/cm2, the time required for inactivation of Y. enterocolitica and E. coli DH5alpha-pEt15b and O:157 was 240s and 360s in the dark and light respectively. Where if the dose was 19.5 mW/cm2, the time required was 60s in the dark and 120s in light respectively. The time required for inactivation of Brucella strains (melitensis and abortus) if the dose was 18.7 mW/cm2 was 240s in both dark and light, whereas it was 120s (dark) and 240s (light) respectively, when the dose was 19.5 mW/cm2. Using E. coli O:157 as control, it appears that Y. enterocolitica sero group O:3 and O:9 and vaccinal strains of Brucella (Rev. 1 and S19) are more sensitive to UV than wild Brucella strains. No relation was found between the sensitivity of Y. enterocolitica to UV and the presence or absence of a pYV+ virulence plasmid. (author)

  5. Adhesive threads of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antão Esther-Maria

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ability to adhere to host surfaces is by far the most vital step in the successful colonization by microbial pathogens. Colonization begins with the attachment of the bacterium to receptors expressed by cells forming the lining of the mucosa. Long hair like extracellular appendages called fimbriae, produced by most Gram-negative pathogens, mediate specific attachment to the epithelial cell surface. Associated with the fimbriae is a protein called an adhesin, which directs high-affinity binding to specific cell surface components. In the last couple of years, an enormous amount of research has been undertaken that deals with understanding how bacterial pathogens adhere to host cells. E. coli in all probability is one of the best studied free-living organisms. A group of E. coli called Extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC including both human and animal pathogens like Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC, Newborn meningitic E. coli (NMEC and Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC, have been found to harbour many fimbriae including Type 1 fimbriae, P fimbriae, curli fibres, S fimbriae, F1C fimbriae, Dr fimbriae, afimbrial adhesins, temperature-sensitive haemagglutinin and many novel adhesin gene clusters that have not yet been characterized. Each of these adhesins is unique due to the recognition of an adhesin-specific receptor, though as a group these adhesins share common genomic organization. A newly identified putative adhesin temporarily termed ExPEC Adhesin I, encoded by gene yqi, has been recently found to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of APEC infection, thus making it an interesting candidate for future research. The aim of this review is to describe the role of ExPEC adhesins during extraintestinal infections known till date, and to suggest the idea of investigating their potential role in the colonization of the host gut which is said to be a reservoir for ExPEC.

  6. Deuterium incorporation into Escherichia-coli proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lederer, H.; May, R. P.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1986-01-01

    Neutron small-angle scattering studies of single protein subunits in a protein-DNA complex require the adjustment of the neutron scattering-length densities of protein and DNA, which is attainable by specific deuteration of the protein. The neutron scattering densities of unlabelled DNA and DNA...... of the degree of deuteration and match point of any E. coli protein from the D2O content of the growth medium, taking the 2H incorporation into RNA polymerase amino acids to be representative for all amino acids in E. coli proteins. The small-angle scattering results, on which the calculation of the degree...

  7. Mechanistic investigation of visible light driven photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli by Ag-AgCl/ZnFe2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upreti, Akhanda Raj; Khadgi, Nirina; Li, Yi

    2018-01-17

    In this study, photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli was investigated over magnetic nanocomposite Ag-AgCl/ZnFe 2 O 4 . The nanocomposite demonstrated efficient photocatalytic activity by complete inactivation of the bacteria within 60 min of visible light irradiation. The anions HPO 4 2- and SO 4 2- were found to play the most important role in the inhibition of photocatalytic inactivation of E. coli. A systematic investigation of mechanism of photocatalytic bacterial inactivation was carried out based on cell membrane injury test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of bacterial morphology changes, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of E. coli cells before and after treatment, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activity assay, and role of various reactive oxygen species (ROS). The activities of SOD and CAT enzymes were found to decrease due to the ROSs attacks during photocatalytic inactivation. The ROS produced in the photocatalytic disinfection severely altered the bacterial permeability and led to protein fragmentation, release of ions, and generation of protein carbonyl derivatives. The leaked cytoplasmic substances and cell debris were further degraded and, ultimately, mineralized with prolonged photocatalytic treatment.

  8. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes.

  9. Genomic Comparative Study of Bovine Mastitis Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Florent; Slugocki, Cindy; Blum, Shlomo E.; Leitner, Gabriel; Germon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli, one of the main causative agents of bovine mastitis, is responsible for significant losses on dairy farms. In order to better understand the pathogenicity of E. coli mastitis, an accurate characterization of E. coli strains isolated from mastitis cases is required. By using phylogenetic analyses and whole genome comparison of 5 currently available mastitis E. coli genome sequences, we searched for genotypic traits specific for mastitis isolates. Our data confirm that there is a bias in the distribution of mastitis isolates in the different phylogenetic groups of the E. coli species, with the majority of strains belonging to phylogenetic groups A and B1. An interesting feature is that clustering of strains based on their accessory genome is very similar to that obtained using the core genome. This finding illustrates the fact that phenotypic properties of strains from different phylogroups are likely to be different. As a consequence, it is possible that different strategies could be used by mastitis isolates of different phylogroups to trigger mastitis. Our results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates analyzed in this study carry very few of the virulence genes described in other pathogenic E. coli strains. A more detailed analysis of the presence/absence of genes involved in LPS synthesis, iron acquisition and type 6 secretion systems did not uncover specific properties of mastitis isolates. Altogether, these results indicate that mastitis E. coli isolates are rather characterized by a lack of bona fide currently described virulence genes. PMID:26809117

  10. Incidence of Escherichia coli  - Glucuronidase Positive on Goat Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Voşgan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Papers on beta- glucuronidase sensitivity and specificity for identifying Escherichia coli in sources of environment, food, water, etc. have been published since 1976. In this study we conducted a review of the incidence of E. coli β- glucuronidase -positive in goat milk, obtained by hand milking throughout the lactation: spring, summer, autumn. The presence of E. coli in milk is considered both as a health indicator and a pathogenic factor capable of causing food poisoning. The determination of the E. coli β-glucuronidase-positive was carried using TBX medium by cultivating colonies typical blue at 440C. The absence of E. coli in milk yielded during the spring, when the animal milking is done three times a day, was found in the performed analyses; the same was observed during fall, when the milk production is lower and the milking is done once a day. The load of E. coli β-glucuronidase-positive was averaging 66.67 CFU/ml of goat milk, during the middle lactation period (July-August, in conditions of higher temperature. During this period, milking is done in the mountain zone, where the transhumance of animals takes place in summer. The presence of the species E. coli was also confirmed by microscopic examination. Attention should be paid to hygiene and milk should be immediately cooled, during hot weather, as E. coli can be a source of food poisoning.

  11. Modelling of tetracycline resistance gene transfer by commensal Escherichia coli food isolates that survived in gastric fluid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Daekeun; Kim, Seung Min; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AR) is a major public health concern and a food safety issue worldwide. Escherichia coli strains, indicators of antibiotic resistance, are a source of horizontal gene transfer to other bacteria in the human intestinal system. A probabilistic exposure model was used to estimate the transfer of the AR gene tet(A). The acid resistance and kinetic behaviour of E. coli was analysed as a function of pH to describe the inactivation of E. coli in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), the major host barrier against exogenous micro-organisms. The kinetic parameters of microbial inactivation in SGF were estimated using GInaFiT, and log-linear + tail and Weibull models were found to be suitable for commensal and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), respectively. A probabilistic exposure model was developed to estimate E. coli survival in gastric pH conditions as well as gene transfer from resistant to susceptible cells in humans. E. coli-contaminated retail foods for consumption without further cooking and gastric pH data in South Korea were considered as an example. The model predicts that 22-33% of commensal E. coli can survive under gastric pH conditions of Koreans. The estimated total mean tet(A) transfer level by commensal E. coli was 1.68 × 10 -4 -8.15 × 10 -4 log CFU/mL/h. The inactivation kinetic parameters of E. coli in SGF and the quantitative exposure model can provide useful information regarding risk management options to control the spread of AR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Infectious endocarditis caused by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Trine Kiilerich; Arpi, Magnus; Fritz-Hansen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    -spectrum intravenous antibiotics. Transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography revealed a severe mitral endocarditis. E. coli DNA was identified from the mitral valve and the vegetation, and no other pathogen was found. The case was further complicated by spondylodiscitis and bilateral endophthalmitis. Extra...

  13. Optimization of plasmid electrotransformation into Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... quantum dots and GFP genes for evaluation. Biomed. Microdevices,. 9: 761-768. Kahrizi D, Salmanian AH (2008) Substitution of Ala183Thr in aro A product of E. coli (k12) and transformation of rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) with altered gene confers tolerance to Roundup. Transgenic Plant J. 2(2): 170175.

  14. Stationary-State Mutagenesis in Escherichia coli

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stationary-phase mutagenesis in nondividing E. coli cells exposed to a nonlethal stress was, a few years ago, claimed to be a likely case of a Lamarckian mechanism capable of producing exclusively useful mutations in a directed manner. After a heated debate over the last decade it now appears to involve a Darwinian ...

  15. Chromosomal features of Escherichia coli serotype O2:K2, an avian pathogenic E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Steffen L; Kudirkiene, Egle; Li, Lili; Christensen, Jens P; Olsen, John E; Nolan, Lisa; Olsen, Rikke H

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli causing infection outside the gastrointestinal system are referred to as extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli. Avian pathogenic E. coli is a subgroup of extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli and infections due to avian pathogenic E. coli have major impact on poultry production economy and welfare worldwide. An almost defining characteristic of avian pathogenic E. coli is the carriage of plasmids, which may encode virulence factors and antibiotic resistance determinates. For the same reason, plasmids of avian pathogenic E. coli have been intensively studied. However, genes encoded by the chromosome may also be important for disease manifestation and antimicrobial resistance. For the E. coli strain APEC_O2 the plasmids have been sequenced and analyzed in several studies, and E. coli APEC_O2 may therefore serve as a reference strain in future studies. Here we describe the chromosomal features of E. coli APEC_O2. E. coli APEC_O2 is a sequence type ST135, has a chromosome of 4,908,820 bp (plasmid removed), comprising 4672 protein-coding genes, 110 RNA genes, and 156 pseudogenes, with an average G + C content of 50.69%. We identified 82 insertion sequences as well as 4672 protein coding sequences, 12 predicated genomic islands, three prophage-related sequences, and two clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats regions on the chromosome, suggesting the possible occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in this strain. The wildtype strain of E. coli APEC_O2 is resistant towards multiple antimicrobials, however, no (complete) antibiotic resistance genes were present on the chromosome, but a number of genes associated with extra-intestinal disease were identified. Together, the information provided here on E. coli APEC_O2 will assist in future studies of avian pathogenic E. coli strains, in particular regarding strain of E. coli APEC_O2, and aid in the general understanding of the pathogenesis of avian pathogenic E. coli .

  16. NMR solution structure of the acylphosphatase from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagano, Katiuscia [University of Udine, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies (Italy); Ramazzotti, Matteo [University of Florence, Department of Biochemical Sciences (Italy); Viglino, Paolo; Esposito, Gennaro [University of Udine, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies (Italy); Degl' Innocenti, Donatella; Taddei, Niccolo [University of Florence, Department of Biochemical Sciences (Italy); Corazza, Alessandra [University of Udine, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies (Italy)], E-mail: acorazza@mail.dstb.uniud.it

    2006-11-15

    The solution structure of Escherichia coli acylphosphatase (E. coli AcP), a small enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of acylphosphates, was determined by {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N NMR and restrained modelling calculation. In analogy with the other members of AcP family, E. coli AcP shows an {alpha}/{beta} sandwich domain composed of four antiparallel and one parallel {beta}-strand, assembled in a five-stranded {beta}-sheet facing two antiparallel {alpha}-helices. The pairwise RMSD values calculated for the backbone atoms of E. coli and Sulfolobus solfataricus AcP, Bovine common type AcP and Horse muscle AcP are 2.18, 5.31 and 5.12 A, respectively. No significant differences are present in the active site region and the catalytic residue side chains are consistently positioned in the structures.

  17. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) antisense effects in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Good, L; Nielsen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA) can be used to control cell growth, gene expression and growth phenotypes in the bacteria Escherichia coli. PNAs targeted to the RNA components of the ribosome can inhibit translation and cell growth, and PNAs targeted to mRNA can limit gene expression with gene...... and sequence specificity. In an E. coli cell extract, efficient inhibition is observed when using PNA concentrations in the nanomolar range, whereas micromolar concentrations are required for inhibition in growing cells. A mutant strain of E. coli that is more permeable to antibiotics also is more susceptible...... to antisense PNAs than the wild type. This chapter details methods for testing the antisense activities of PNA in E. coli. As an example of the specific antisense inhibition possible, we show the effects of an anti-beta-galactosidase PNA in comparison to control PNAs. With improvements in cell uptake...

  18. Alterations induced in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kappke, J.; Schelin, H.R.; Paschuk, S.A.; Denyak, V.; Silva, E.R. da; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T.; Carlin, N.; Toledo, E.S.

    2007-01-01

    Modifications occurred in Escherichia coli cells exposed to gamma radiation ( 60 Co source) were investigated. The irradiations were done at the LIN-COPPE laboratory of the UFRJ and the analysis at the Biology Department of the UTFPR. The E. coli cells were irradiated with 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, 480, 600 e 750 Gy doses. The samples were analyzed with Gram-stain, biochemical tests in EPM, MIO and Lysine Broth, Simmons Cytrate Medium and Rhamnose Broth, antibiogram and isolation of auxotrophic mutants. It was observed that for the received doses the E. coli did not show morphological alterations in the tests. Some E. Coli cells showed to be able to deaminade the L-tryptophan or they changed their sensibility for amoxillin and cephaloonine after the irradiation. The existence of aauxotrophic mutants after irradiation was also verified. (author)

  19. Occurrence of pathogenic and faecal Escherichia coli in layer hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tagliabue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 117 Escherichia coli from colibacillosis affected (APEC and clinically healthy birds (AFEC were serotyped and tested for the presence of virulence genes: iss, tsh, cva. A total of 54.5% E. Coli were typeable and 15 different serogroups were identified. The most common serogroups among APEC strains were O78, O2 and O128, whereas O139 was predominant in faecal strains from healthy birds. Iss, tsh e cva were more frequently detected among the septicaemic E. coli strains. The association of virulence genes was observed. Particularly, the pathotype iss-tsh-cva was present in 46.5% of APEC strains. Referring to serogroups, E. coli O78 and O2 originating from colibacillosis affected birds were always isstsh- cva positive but did not share virulence genes when they came from healthy birds.

  20. EcoCyc: Enyclopedia of Escherichia coli Genes and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, P D; Riley, M; Paley, S M; Pellegrini-Toole, A; Krummenacker, M

    1997-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Genes and Metabolism (EcoCyc) is a database that combines information about the genome and the intermediary metabolism of Escherichia coli. It describes 2970 genes of E.coli, 547 enzymes encoded by these genes, 702 metabolic reactions that occur in E.coli and the organization of these reactions into 107 metabolic pathways. The EcoCyc graphical user interface allows scientists to query and explore the EcoCyc database using visualization tools such as genomic-map browsers and automatic layouts of metabolic pathways. EcoCyc spans the space from sequence to function to allow scientists to investigate an unusually broad range of questions. EcoCyc can be thought of as both an electronic review article because of its copious references to the primary literature, and as an in silicio model of E.coli metabolism that can be probed and analyzed through computational means.

  1. The D-allose operon of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, C; Song, S; Park, C

    1997-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 can utilize D-allose, an all-cis hexose, as a sole carbon source. The operon responsible for D-allose metabolism was localized at 92.8 min of the E. coli linkage map. It consists of six genes, alsRBACEK, which are inducible by D-allose and are under the control of the repressor gene alsR. This operon is also subject to catabolite repression. Three genes, alsB, alsA, and alsC, appear to be necessary for transport of D-allose. D-Allose-binding protein, encoded by alsB, is ...

  2. Recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli: advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosano, Germán L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the organisms of choice for the production of recombinant proteins. Its use as a cell factory is well-established and it has become the most popular expression platform. For this reason, there are many molecular tools and protocols at hand for the high-level production of heterologous proteins, such as a vast catalog of expression plasmids, a great number of engineered strains and many cultivation strategies. We review the different approaches for the synthesis of recombinant proteins in E. coli and discuss recent progress in this ever-growing field. PMID:24860555

  3. UV irradiation alters deoxynucleoside triphosphate pools in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Loeb, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    UV irradiation of exponentially growing Escherichia coli increased intracellular concentration of dATP and dTTP without significantly changing the concentrations of dGTP and dCTP. These selective increases in dATP and dTTP pools are seen in wild-type E. coli K12 and AB1157, as well as in recA and umuC strains, and are proportional to UV dose. The possible significance of these findings with respect to induction of the SOS response and nontargeted mutagenesis are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Novel Aggregative Adherence Fimbria Variant of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boisen, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) organisms belong to a diarrheagenic pathotype known to cause diarrhea and can be characterized by distinct aggregative adherence (AA) in a stacked-brick pattern to cultured epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated 118 EAEC strains isolated from....... Transformation to a nonadherent E. coli HB101 and complementation of the nonadherent C338-14 mutant with the complete gene cluster restored the AA adhesion. Overall, we found the agg5A gene in 12% of the 118 strains isolated from Denmark, suggesting that this novel adhesin represents an important variant....

  5. FimH-mediated autoaggregation of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Christiansen, G.; Klemm, Per

    2001-01-01

    Autoaggregation is a phenomenon thought to contribute to colonization of mammalian hosts by pathogenic bacteria. Type 1 fimbriae are surface organelles of Escherichia coli that mediate D-mannose-sensitive binding to various host surfaces. This binding is conferred by the minor fimbrial component...... FimH. In this study, we have used random mutagenesis to identify variants of the FimH adhesin that confer the ability of E. coli to autoaggregate and settle from liquid cultures. Three separate autoaggregating clones were identified, all of which contained multiple amino acid changes located within...

  6. DNA microarray analysis of fim mutations in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schembri, Mark; Ussery, David; Workman, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion is often mediated by complex polymeric surface structures referred to as fimbriae. Type I fimbriae of Escherichia coli represent the archetypical and best characterised fimbrial system. These adhesive organelles mediate binding to D-mannose and are directly associated...... we have used DNA microarray analysis to examine the molecular events involved in response to fimbrial gene expression in E. coli K-12. Observed differential expression levels of the fim genes were in good agreement with our current knowledge of the stoichiometry of type I fimbriae. Changes in fim...

  7. Genes and proteins of Escherichia coli (GenProtEc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M; Space, D B

    1996-01-01

    GenProtEc is a database of Escherichia coli genes and their gene products, classified by type of function and physiological role and with citations to the literature for each. Also present are data on sequence similarities among E.coli proteins with PAM values, percent identity of amino acids, length of alignment and percent aligned. The database is available as a PKZip file by ftp from mbl.edu/pub/ecoli.exe. The program runs under MS-DOS on IMB-compatible machines. GenProtEc can also be accessed through the World Wide Web at URL http://mbl.edu/html/ecoli.html.

  8. Hybrid-fuel bacterial flagellar motors in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Homma, Michio; Ishijima, Akihiko; Berry, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a rotary nano-machine that is driven by an electrochemical ion gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane, either H+ or Na+ ions. Natural Escherichia coli cells have only H+-driven motors. We demonstrate a genetically engineered hybrid-fuel flagellar motor in E. coli that runs on both types of ion gradient, H+ and Na+. The hybrid motors switch between the two types of ion automatically and dynamically in response to external conditions, by swapping the stator co...

  9. Application of a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Cold Plasma (Dbd-Acp) for Eshcerichia Coli Inactivation in Apple Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xinyu; Li, Jiao; Muhammad, Aliyu Idris; Suo, Yuanjie; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian; Liu, Donghong; Ding, Tian

    2018-02-01

    Atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) is a promising non-thermal technology in food industry. In this study, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD)-ACP exhibited strong bactericidal effect on Escherichia coli in apple juice. Under a 30 to 50 W input power, less than 40 s treatment time was required for DBD-ACP to result in 3.98 to 4.34 log CFU/mL reduction of E. coli in apple juice. The inactivation behavior of ACP on E. coli was well described by the Weibull model. During the treatment, the cell membrane of E. coli was damaged severely by active species produced by plasma, such as hydrogen peroxide, ozone and nitrate. In addition, the ACP exposure had slight effect on the °Brix, pH, titratable acidity (TA), color values, total phenolic content, and antioxidant capacity of apple juice. However, higher level of DBD-ACP treatment, 50 W for more than 10 s in this case, resulted in significant change of the pH, TA, color and total phenolic content of apple juice. The results in this study have provided insight in potential use of DBD-ACP as an alternative to thermal processing for fruit juices in food industry. Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice is a potential risk for public health. This study demonstrated that 30 s cold plasma treatment resulted in more than 4 log CFU/mL reduction under 50 W, while the quality attributes of apple juice were not significantly affected. Therefore, cold plasma technology is a promising alternative substitute of traditional thermal processing for juice pasteurization. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Molecular prophage typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Joon; Seong, Won-Jin; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2013-03-23

    Escherichia coli prophages confer virulence and resistance to physico-chemical, nutritional, and antibiotic stresses on their hosts, and they enhance the evolution of E. coli. Thus, studies on profiles of E. coli prophages are valuable to understand the population structure and evolution of E. coli pathogenicity. Large terminase genes participate in phage genome packaging and are one of the cornerstones for the identification of prophages. Thus, we designed primers to detect 16 types of large terminase genes and analyzed the genomes of 48 E. coli and Shigella reference strains for the prophage markers. We also investigated the distribution of the 16 prophage markers among 92 avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) strains. APEC strains were classified into 61 prophage types (PPTs). Each strain was different from the reference strains as measured by the PPTs and from the frequency of each prophage marker. Investigation of the distribution of prophage-related serum resistance (bor), toxin (stx1 and cdtI), and T3SS effector (lom, espK, sopE, nleB, and ospG) genes revealed the presence of bor (44.1%), lom (95.5%) and cdtI (9.1%) in APEC strains with related prophages. Therefore, the molecular prophage typing method may be useful to understand population structure and evolution of E. coli pathogenicity, and further studies on the mobility of the prophages and the roles of virulence genes in APEC pathogenicity may be valuable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. No evidence for a bovine mastitis Escherichia coli pathotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimbach, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Vollmers, John; Görlich, Dennis; Daniel, Rolf; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2017-05-08

    Escherichia coli bovine mastitis is a disease of significant economic importance in the dairy industry. Molecular characterization of mastitis-associated E. coli (MAEC) did not result in the identification of common traits. Nevertheless, a mammary pathogenic E. coli (MPEC) pathotype has been proposed suggesting virulence traits that differentiate MAEC from commensal E. coli. The present study was designed to investigate the MPEC pathotype hypothesis by comparing the genomes of MAEC and commensal bovine E. coli. We sequenced the genomes of eight E. coli isolated from bovine mastitis cases and six fecal commensal isolates from udder-healthy cows. We analyzed the phylogenetic history of bovine E. coli genomes by supplementing this strain panel with eleven bovine-associated E. coli from public databases. The majority of the isolates originate from phylogroups A and B1, but neither MAEC nor commensal strains could be unambiguously distinguished by phylogenetic lineage. The gene content of both MAEC and commensal strains is highly diverse and dominated by their phylogenetic background. Although individual strains carry some typical E. coli virulence-associated genes, no traits important for pathogenicity could be specifically attributed to MAEC. Instead, both commensal strains and MAEC have very few gene families enriched in either pathotype. Only the aerobactin siderophore gene cluster was enriched in commensal E. coli within our strain panel. This is the first characterization of a phylogenetically diverse strain panel including several MAEC and commensal isolates. With our comparative genomics approach we could not confirm previous studies that argue for a positive selection of specific traits enabling MAEC to elicit bovine mastitis. Instead, MAEC are facultative and opportunistic pathogens recruited from the highly diverse bovine gastrointestinal microbiota. Virulence-associated genes implicated in mastitis are a by-product of commensalism with the primary function

  12. Reproducible gene targeting in recalcitrant Escherichia coli isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Greve Henri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of allele replacement methods can be used to mutate bacterial genes. For instance, the Red recombinase system of phage Lambda has been used very efficiently to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12, through recombination between regions of homology. However, this method does not work reproducibly in some clinical E. coli isolates. Findings The procedure was modified by using longer homologous regions (85 bp and 500-600 bp, to inactivate genes in the uropathogenic E. coli strain UTI89. An lrhA regulator mutant, and deletions of the lac operon as well as the complete type 1 fimbrial gene cluster, were obtained reproducibly. The modified method is also functional in other recalcitrant E. coli, like the avian pathogenic E. coli strain APEC1. The lrhA regulator and lac operon deletion mutants of APEC1 were successfully constructed in the same way as the UTI89 mutants. In other avian pathogenic E. coli strains (APEC3E, APEC11A and APEC16A it was very difficult or impossible to construct these mutants, with the original Red recombinase-based method, with a Red recombinase-based method using longer (85 bp homologous regions or with our modified protocol, using 500 - 600 bp homologous regions. Conclusions The method using 500-600 bp homologous regions can be used reliably in some clinical isolates, to delete single genes or entire operons by homologous recombination. However, it does not invariably show a greater efficiency in obtaining mutants, when compared to the original Red-mediated gene targeting method or to the gene targeting method with 85 bp homologous regions. Therefore the length of the homology regions is not the only limiting factor for the construction of mutants in these recalcitrant strains.

  13. Pathogenic Escherichia coli and food handlers in luxury hotels in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Abel O; Kenya, Eucharia U; Mbithi, John J N; Ng'ayo, Musa O

    2009-11-01

    The epidemiology and virulence properties of pathogenic Escherichia coli among food handlers in tourist destination hotels in Kenya are largely uncharacterized. This cross-sectional study among consenting 885 food handlers working in nine luxurious tourist hotels in Nairobi, Kenya determined the epidemiology, virulence properties, antibiotics susceptibility profiles and conjugation abilities of pathogenic Escherichia coli. Pathogenic Escherichia coli was detected among 39 (4.4%) subjects, including 1.8% enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) harboring aggR genes, 1.2% enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) expressing both LT and STp toxins, 1.1% enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and 0.2% Shiga-like Escherichia coli (EHEC) both harboring eaeA and stx2 genes respectively. All the pathotypes had increased surface hydrophobicity. Using multivariate analyses, food handlers with loose stools were more likely to be infected with pathogenic Escherichia coli. Majority 53.8% of the pathotypes were resistant to tetracycline with 40.2% being multi-drug resistant. About 85.7% pathotypes trans-conjugated with Escherichia coli K12 F(-) NA(r) LA. The carriage of multi-drug resistant, toxin expressing pathogenic Escherichia coli by this population is of public health concern because exposure to low doses can result in infection. Screening food handlers and implementing public awareness programs is recommended as an intervention to control transmission of enteric pathogens.

  14. Tranformasi Fragmen Dna Kromosom Xanthomonas Campestris ke dalam Escherichia Coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibowo Mangunwardoyo

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on DNA transformation of Xanthomonas campestris into Escherichia coli DH5αα using plasmid vector Escherichia coli (pUC19. was carried out. DNA chromosome was isolated using CTAB method, alkali lysis method was used to isolate DNA plasmid. Both of DNA plasmid and chromosome were digested using restriction enzyme EcoRI. Competent cell was prepared with CaCl2 and heat shock method for transformation procedure. The result revealed transformation obtain 5 white colonies, with transformation frequency was 1,22 x 10-8 colony/competent cell. Electrophoresis analysis showed the DNA fragment (insert in range 0.5 – 7,5 kb. Further research should be carried out to prepare the genomic library to obtain better result of transformant.

  15. Some Like It Hot: Heat Resistance of Escherichia coli in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Gänzle, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Heat treatment and cooking are common interventions for reducing the numbers of vegetative cells and eliminating pathogenic microorganisms in food. Current cooking method requires the internal temperature of beef patties to reach 71°C. However, some pathogenic Escherichia coli such as the beef isolate E. coli AW 1.7 are extremely heat resistant, questioning its inactivation by current heat interventions in beef processing. To optimize the conditions of heat treatment for effective decontaminations of pathogenic E. coli strains, sufficient estimations, and explanations are necessary on mechanisms of heat resistance of target strains. The heat resistance of E. coli depends on the variability of strains and properties of food formulations including salt and water activity. Heat induces alterations of E. coli cells including membrane, cytoplasm, ribosome and DNA, particularly on proteins including protein misfolding and aggregations. Resistant systems of E. coli act against these alterations, mainly through gene regulations of heat response including EvgA, heat shock proteins, σE and σS, to re-fold of misfolded proteins, and achieve antagonism to heat stress. Heat resistance can also be increased by expression of key proteins of membrane and stabilization of membrane fluidity. In addition to the contributions of the outer membrane porin NmpC and overcome of osmotic stress from compatible solutes, the new identified genomic island locus of heat resistant performs a critical role to these highly heat resistant strains. This review aims to provide an overview of current knowledge on heat resistance of E. coli, to better understand its related mechanisms and explore more effective applications of heat interventions in food industry. PMID:27857712

  16. GATC sequence and mismatch repair in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Laengle-Rouault, F; Maenhaut-Michel, G; Radman, M

    1986-01-01

    The Escherichia coli mismatch repair system greatly improves DNA replication fidelity by repairing single mispaired and unpaired bases in newly synthesized DNA strands. Transient undermethylation of the GATC sequences makes the newly synthesized strands susceptible to mismatch repair enzymes. The role of unmethylated GATC sequences in mismatch repair was tested in transfection experiments with heteroduplex DNA of phage phi 174 without any GATC sequence or with two GATC sequences, containing i...

  17. Ribosome slowed by mutation to streptomycin resistance. [Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galas, D.J.; Branscomb, E.W.

    1976-08-12

    The effect of mutation to streptomycin resistance on the speed of polypeptide elongation in Escherichia coli was investigated. Translation speed was determined by measuring the time required for the first newly synthesized ..beta..-galactosidase molecules to appear after induction of the lactose operon. The results showed that ribosome speed is not a fixed parameter inherent to the protein synthetic apparatus, but a variable determined by the kinetics of translation and ultimately by the structure of the ribosome. (HLW)

  18. Biochemical and cultural characteristics of invasive Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, R M; Toledo, M R; Trabulsi, L R

    1980-01-01

    The biochemical characteristics of 97 invasive Escherichia coli strains of different O serogroups were studied. Considered as a group, the behavior of the strains was quite variable. However, none of them decarboxylated lysine and all but seven strains, belonging to the O124 serogroup, were nonmotile. The growth of 25 strains obtained on MacConkey, salmonella-shigella, xylose-lysine-desoxycholate, and Hektoen enteric agars was compared. MacConkey and Hektoen enteric agars yielded the highest ...

  19. Removal of Escherichia coli from biological effluents using natural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ability for disinfecting sterile biological effluents inoculated with Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 at concentrations of 105 CFU/m., using a natural mineral aggregate (NMA) and artificial mineral aggregates (AMAfs) consisting of individual oxides as Fe2O3, Cu2O y Ag2O and combined oxides as Fe2O3-Cu2O, Fe2O3-Ag2O, ...

  20. Optimizing the feeding operation of recombinant Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recombinant Escherichia coli BL21 was used to produce human-like collagen in fed-batch culture. After building and analyzing the kinetic models of fed-batch cultures, the maximum specific growth rate, Yx/s and Yp/s were 0.411 h-1 , 0.428 g·g-1 and 0.0716 g/g, respectively. The square error of cell growth models, glucose ...

  1. Two Tales of Prokaryotic Genomic Diversity: Escherichia coli and Halophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Pašić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotes are generally characterized by vast genomic diversity that has been shaped by mutations, horizontal gene transfer, bacteriocins and phage predation. Enormous genetic diversity has developed as a result of stresses imposed in harsh environments and the ability of microorganisms to adapt. Two examples of prokaryotic diversity are presented: on intraspecies level, exemplified by Escherichia coli, and the diversity of the hypersaline environment, with the discussion of food-related health issues and biotechnological potential.

  2. Prevalence of Antibiotic-Resistant Strains of Escherichia coli in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of six bacteria species Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus, Klebsiella pneumonia, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogenes were ... Énumération de nombre de plaque standard a été effectuée par la méthode de la plaque de propagation sur des échantillons d'eau dilués en série.

  3. Aging in Escherichia coli: stochasticity, individual heterogeneity and mortality plateaus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli

    2014-01-01

    are suggested to be involved in aging and senescence, but no mechanism or factor has been unambiguously identified. Here, we report on surprising patterns of aging and senescence from isogenic individual Escherichia coli bacteria grown under identical environmental conditions in a microfluidic device....... Such simple organisms are expected to show senescence because of asymmetric division of accumulated damage among mother and daughter cells, accumulation of late acting deleterious mutations, or antagonistic pleiotropic effects....

  4. Detection and Classification of Live and Dead Escherichia coli by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, P.; Fernández-Bravo, A.; Taleh, L.; Biddle, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A common goal for astrobiology is to detect organic materials that may indicate the presence of life. However, organic materials alone may not be representative of currently living systems. Thus, it would be valuable to have a method with which to determine the health of living materials. Here, we present progress toward this goal by reporting on the application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) to study characteristics of live and dead cells using Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain K12 cells as a model organism since its growth and death in the laboratory are well understood. Our goal is to determine whether LIBS, in its femto- and/or nanosecond forms, could ascertain the state of a living organism. E. coli strain K12 cells were grown, collected, and exposed to one of two types of inactivation treatments: autoclaving and sonication. Cells were also kept alive as a control. We found that LIBS yields key information that allows for the discrimination of live and dead E. coli bacteria based on ionic shifts reflective of cell membrane integrity. Key Words: E. coli—Trace elements—Live and dead cells—Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy—Atomic force microscopy. Astrobiology 15, 144–153. PMID:25683088

  5. PROFILE OF RESISTANCE OF Escherichia coli ISOLATED FROM CANINE PYOMETRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Santana Oliveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial pyometra is a disease that affects more frequently reproductively active adult females. Characterized by inflammation and accumulation of exudate in the uterine cavity, generally associated with bacterial infections. The present study aimed to evaluate the resistance profile of Escherichia coli isolates from 42 female dogs diagnosed with pyometra, seen at the Department of Small Animal Surgery, Hospital of Veterinary Medicine, Federal University of Bahia. To perform the bacteriological analysis, a sample of the contents of the uterus was obtained immediately after surgery of ovariosalpingohisterectomy therapy (OSH and sent to the laboratory. Microbiological analysis showed a predominance of the bacterium Escherichia coli in 40.5% (15/37. Strains of Escherichia coli isolates showed higher rates of resistance to antimicrobial erythromycin (93.3 %, azithromycin (80 %, ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalothin (40% each. This study reinforces the need to perform the microbiological examination for epidemiological purposes and the correct therapeutic application, thereby avoiding the indiscriminate use of antimicrobials and the potential emergence of multidrug-resistant  strains. Keywords: bacteria; multiresistant;  uterus.

  6. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  7. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  8. The asymptomatic bacteriuria Escherichia coli strain 83972 outcompetes uropathogenic E. coli strains in human urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Viktoria; Ulett, G.C.; Schembri, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common organism associated with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU). In contrast to uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), which causes symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTI), very little is known about the mechanisms by which these strains colonize the human urinary tract....... The prototype ABU E. coli strain 83972 was originally isolated from a girl who had carried it asymptomatically for 3 years. Deliberate colonization of UTI-susceptible individuals with E. coli 83972 has been used successfully as an alternative approach for the treatment of patients who are refractory...... to conventional therapy. Colonization with strain 83972 appears to prevent infection with UPEC strains in such patients despite the fact that this strain is unable to express the primary adhesins involved in UTI, viz. P and type 1 fimbriae. Here we investigated the growth characteristics of E. coli 83972 in human...

  9. Single channel atmospheric pressure transporting plasma and plasma stream demultiplexing: physical characterization and application to E. coli bacteria inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valinataj Omran, A; Arefi-Khonsari, F; Sohbatzadeh, F; Siadati, S N; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, A; Akishev, Y

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we developed transporting plasma sources that operate at atmospheric pressure. The effect of electrode configuration on plasma transporting was investigated. In order to increase the transporting plasma cross-section, we converted a plasma stream into four plasma channels by a cylindrical housing. Electron excitation and rotational temperatures were estimated using optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electrical and temporal characteristics of the plasma, discharge power and charge deposition on the target were investigated. The propagation characteristics of single and multi-channel transporting plasma were compared with the same cross-sectional area. Two configurations for multi-channels were designed for this purpose. Escherichia coli bacteria were exposed to the single and multi-channel transporting discharge for different time durations. After exposure, the results indicated that the inactivation zones were significantly increased by a multi-channel transporting plasma. Finally, E. coli inactivation by those plasma apparatuses was compared with that of several standard antimicrobial test discs such as Gentamicin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin and Cefixime. (paper)

  10. Escherichia coli. A sanitary methodology for faecal water pollution tests; Escherichia coli nelle acque. Significato sanitario e metodologie di analisi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonadonna, L. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Rome (Italy)

    2001-02-01

    Among the traditional indictors of faecal water pollution, Escherichia coli has shown to fit better with the definition of indicator organism. Till now its recovery has been time-consuming and needs confirmation tests. In this report more rapid and direct methods, based on enzymatic reactions, are presented. [Italian] Per talune peculiari caratteristiche, Escherichia coli sembra meglio soddisfare i requisiti insiti nella definizione di organismo indicatore, rispetto ai tradizionali indicatori di contaminazione fecale dell'acqua. Finora, i substrati disponibili per il suo rilevamento necessitano tutti di almeno una prova di conferma. Di qui l'esigenza di indicare metodi di rilevamento a riposta piu' rapida, anche in relazione all'inserimento, nelle piu' recenti normative nazionali ed europee, del microrganismo tra i parametri microbiologici da ricercare.

  11. Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHARTONO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Suhartono (2010 Examination of uropathogenic Escherichia coli strains conferring large plasmids. Biodiversitas 11: 59-64. Of major uropathogens, Escherichia coli has been widely known as a main pathogen of UTIs globally and has considerable medical and financial consequences. A strain of UPEC, namely E. coli ST131, confers a large plasmid encoding cephalosporinases (class C β-lactamase or AmpC that may be disseminated through horizontal transfer among bacterial populations. Therefore, it is worth examining such large plasmids by isolating, purifying, and digesting the plasmid with restriction enzymes. The examination of the large plasmids was conducted by isolating plasmid DNA visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis as well as by PFGE. The relationship of plasmids among isolates was carried out by HpaI restriction enzyme digestion. Of 36 isolates of E. coli ST 131, eight isolates possessed large plasmids, namely isolates 3, 9, 10, 12, 17, 18, 26 and 30 with the largest molecular size confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and PFGE was ~42kb and ~118kb respectively. Restriction enzyme analysis revealed that isolates 9, 10, 12, 17 and 18 have the common restriction patterns and those isolates might be closely related.

  12. Incidence of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhumungoon, P.

    2015-01-01

    Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) especially serotype O157:H7 is one of the important food-borne pathogens because it is able to produce crucial toxins Shiga. However, the outbreak of this organism in Thailand has not been reported. Antibody to O157 antigen was detected in some Thai populations and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli were detected in low numbers of clinical specimens. Interestingly, some E. coli that showed positive to O157 fimbriae probe and lack of virulence gene were isolated from certain patients and one isolate of E. coli O157:H7 which possessed stx1, stx2v was detected in a normal child. In addition, the incidence of E. coli O157:H7 strains were monitored by the samples from cattle and retail beef in Thailand although their inability to produce toxins or produce in a low concentration was demonstrated. This review discusses the incidences of E. coli O157 in clinical and environmental samples of Thailand including the transmission possibility of this bacterium across the Thai border through food trade. (author)

  13. Transformation of Escherichia coli and protein expression using lipoplex mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Chul-Ho; Bae, Chun-Sik; Ahn, Taeho

    2016-11-01

    We investigated a "one-step" method for transformation of and protein expression in Escherichia coli (E. coli) using a complex of n-stearylamine, a cationic lipid, and plasmid DNA, which mimics lipoplex-based approaches. When E. coli cells were treated with the cationic lipid-plasmid complex, the transformation efficiencies were in the range of approximately 2-3 × 10(6) colony-forming units. Further increase in the efficiency was obtained by co-treatment with calcium chloride (or rubidium chloride) and the complexes. Moreover, after DNA transfer, E. coli cells successfully expressed plasmid-encoded proteins such as cytochrome P450s and glutathione-S-transferase without overnight incubation of the cells to form colonies, an indispensable step in other bacterial transformation methods. In this study, we provide a simple method for E. coli transformation, which does not require the preparation of competent cells. The present method also shortens the overall procedures for transformation and gene expression in E. coli by omitting the colony-forming step. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of Diverse Escherichia coli between Cattle and Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NandaKafle, Gitanjali; Seale, Tarren; Flint, Toby; Nepal, Madhav; Venter, Stephanus N; Brözel, Volker S

    2017-09-27

    Escherichia coli is widely considered to not survive for extended periods outside the intestines of warm-blooded animals; however, recent studies demonstrated that E. coli strains maintain populations in soil and water without any known fecal contamination. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the niche partitioning of E. coli occurs between cattle and their pasture. We attempted to clarify whether E. coli from bovine feces differs phenotypically and genotypically from isolates maintaining a population in pasture soil over winter. Soil, bovine fecal, and run-off samples were collected before and after the introduction of cattle to the pasture. Isolates (363) were genotyped by uidA and mutS sequences and phylogrouping, and evaluated for curli formation (Rough, Dry, And Red, or RDAR). Three types of clusters emerged, viz. bovine-associated, clusters devoid of cattle isolates and representing isolates endemic to the pasture environment, and clusters with both. All isolates clustered with strains of E. coli sensu stricto, distinct from the cryptic species Clades I, III, IV, and V. Pasture soil endemic and bovine fecal populations had very different phylogroup distributions, indicating niche partitioning. The soil endemic population was largely comprised of phylogroup B1 and had a higher average RDAR score than other isolates. These results indicate the existence of environmental E. coli strains that are phylogenetically distinct from bovine fecal isolates, and that have the ability to maintain populations in the soil environment.

  15. Cooperative Immune Suppression by Escherichia coli and Shigella Effector Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Maarten F; Alto, Neal M

    2018-04-01

    The enteric attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and the invasive pathogens enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC) and Shigella encode type III secretion systems (T3SS) used to inject effector proteins into human host cells during infection. Among these are a group of effectors required for NF-κB-mediated host immune evasion. Recent studies have identified several effector proteins from A/E pathogens and EIEC/ Shigella that are involved in suppression of NF-κB and have uncovered their cellular and molecular functions. A novel mechanism among these effectors from both groups of pathogens is to coordinate effector function during infection. This cooperativity among effector proteins explains how bacterial pathogens are able to effectively suppress innate immune defense mechanisms in response to diverse classes of immune receptor signaling complexes (RSCs) stimulated during infection. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Reassessing Escherichia coli as a cell factory for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chonglong; Pfleger, Brian F; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-06-01

    Via metabolic engineering, industrial microorganisms have the potential to convert renewable substrates into a wide range of biofuels that can address energy security and environmental challenges associated with current fossil fuels. The user-friendly bacterium, Escherichia coli, remains one of the most frequently used hosts for demonstrating production of biofuel candidates including alcohol-, fatty acid- and terpenoid-based biofuels. In this review, we summarize the metabolic pathways for synthesis of these biofuels and assess enabling technologies that assist in regulating biofuel synthesis pathways and rapidly assembling novel E. coli strains. These advances maintain E. coli's position as a prominent host for developing cell factories for biofuel production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel roles for the AIDA adhesin from diarrheagenic Escherichia coli:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherlock, Orla; Schembri, Mark; Reisner, A.

    2004-01-01

    Diarrhea-causing Escherichia coli strains are responsible for numerous cases of gastrointestinal disease and constitute a serious health problem throughout the world. The ability to recognize and attach to host intestinal surfaces is an essential step in the pathogenesis of such strains. AIDA...... is a potent bacterial adhesin associated with some diarrheagenic E. coli strains. AIDA mediates bacterial attachment to a broad variety of human and other mammalian cells. It is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein and belongs to the selected group of bacterial glycoproteins; only the glycosylated form...... binds to mammalian cells. Here, we show that AIDA possesses self-association characteristics and can mediate autoaggregation of E. coli cells. We demonstrate that intercellular AIDA-AIDA interaction is responsible for bacterial autoaggregation. Interestingly, AIDA-expressing cells can interact...

  18. Mechanisms of the radioprotective effect of cysteamine in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korystov, Yu.N.; Vexler, F.B.

    1988-01-01

    The values of the oxygen effect (m) and the maximal protective effect of cysteamine (DMF*) were estimated for four Escherichia coli strains: AB1157 (wild type), AB1886 (uvrA), AB2463 (recA), and p3478 (polA). A correlation made between DMF* and m as well as the kinetics of the increase of DMF with oxygen depletion showed that the protective effect of cysteamine is realized by three mechanisms: (i) anoxia achieved by oxygen reduction, with the DMF varying from 2.2 to 4.2 for different E. coli strains (this protection is the major contribution to the entire mechanism); (ii) lowering of the indirect radiation effect; i.e., for 50 mM cysteamine DMF does not exceed 1.1; and (iii) increase of the efficiency of enzymatic repair. The latter effect of cysteamine is registered only with the wild-type E. coli, the DMF being not less than 1.4

  19. FREQUENCY AND DISTRIBUTION OF DIARRHOEAGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS ISOLATED FROM PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH DIARRHOEA IN BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA

    OpenAIRE

    Dedeić-Ljubović, AmeLa; Hukić, Mirsada; Bekić, DaRia; Zvizdić, AmrA

    2009-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease is a major cause of illness and death among infants and young children worldwide. Among the Escherichia coli (E. coli) causing intestinal diseases, there are six well-described categories: enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), entero-pathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC).

  20. Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica Are Protected against Acetic Acid, but Not Hydrochloric Acid, by Hypertonicity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, B.; Ross, T.

    2009-01-01

    Chapman et al. (B. Chapman, N. Jensen, T Ross, and M. B. Cole, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 72:5165-5172, 2006) demonstrated that an increased NaCl concentration prolongs survival of Escherichia coli O157 SERL 2 in a broth model simulating the aqueous phase of a food dressing or sauce containing acetic acid. We examined the responses of five other E. coli strains and four Salmonella enterica strains to increasing concentrations of NaCl under conditions of lethal acidity and observed that the average “lag” time prior to inactivation decreases in the presence of hydrochloric acid but not in the presence of acetic acid. For E. coli in the presence of acetic acid, the lag time increased with increasing NaCl concentrations up to 2 to 4% at pH 4.0, up to 4 to 6% at pH 3.8, and up to 4 to 7% (wt/wt of water) NaCl at pH 3.6. Salmonella was inactivated more rapidly by combined acetic acid and NaCl stresses than E. coli, but increasing NaCl concentrations still decreased the lag time prior to inactivation in the presence of acetic acid; at pH 4.0 up to 1 to 4% NaCl was protective, and at pH 3.8 up to 1 to 2% NaCl delayed the onset of inactivation. Sublethal injury kinetics suggest that this complex response is a balance between the lethal effects of acetic acid, against which NaCl is apparently protective, and the lethal effects of the NaCl itself. Compared against 3% NaCl, 10% (wt/wt of water) sucrose with 0.5% NaCl (which has similar osmotic potential) was found to be equally protective against adverse acetic acid conditions. We propose that hypertonicity may directly affect the rate of diffusion of acetic acid into cells and hence cell survival. PMID:19346344