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Sample records for inactivating dihydropyridine-sensitive l-type

  1. Accelerated inactivation of the L-type calcium current due to a mutation in CACNB2b underlies Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Marieb, Mark; Pfeiffer, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    S in which loss of function is caused by accelerated inactivation of I(Ca). The proband, a 32 year old male, displayed a Type I ST segment elevation in two right precordial ECG leads following a procainamide challenge. EP study was positive with induction of polymorphic VT/VF. Interrogation of implanted ICD...... significantly faster in mutant channels between 0 and + 20 mV. Action potential voltage clamp experiments showed that total charge was reduced by almost half compared to WT. We report the first BrS mutation in CaCNB2b resulting in accelerated inactivation of L-type calcium channel current. Our results suggest...

  2. Population Density and Moment-based Approaches to Modeling Domain Calcium-mediated Inactivation of L-type Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Hardcastle, Kiah; Weinberg, Seth H; Smith, Gregory D

    2016-03-01

    We present a population density and moment-based description of the stochastic dynamics of domain [Formula: see text]-mediated inactivation of L-type [Formula: see text] channels. Our approach accounts for the effect of heterogeneity of local [Formula: see text] signals on whole cell [Formula: see text] currents; however, in contrast with prior work, e.g., Sherman et al. (Biophys J 58(4):985-995, 1990), we do not assume that [Formula: see text] domain formation and collapse are fast compared to channel gating. We demonstrate the population density and moment-based modeling approaches using a 12-state Markov chain model of an L-type [Formula: see text] channel introduced by Greenstein and Winslow (Biophys J 83(6):2918-2945, 2002). Simulated whole cell voltage clamp responses yield an inactivation function for the whole cell [Formula: see text] current that agrees with the traditional approach when domain dynamics are fast. We analyze the voltage-dependence of [Formula: see text] inactivation that may occur via slow heterogeneous domain [[Formula: see text

  3. Inactivation of gating currents of L-type calcium channels. Specific role of the alpha 2 delta subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokov, R; Ferreira, G; Yi, J; Ríos, E

    1998-06-01

    In studies of gating currents of rabbit cardiac Ca channels expressed as alpha 1C/beta 2a or alpha 1C/beta 2a/alpha 2 delta subunit combinations in tsA201 cells, we found that long-lasting depolarization shifted the distribution of mobile charge to very negative potentials. The phenomenon has been termed charge interconversion in native skeletal muscle (Brum, G., and E. Ríos. 1987. J. Physiol. (Camb.). 387:489-517) and cardiac Ca channels (Shirokov, R., R. Levis, N. Shirokova, and E. Ríos. 1992. J. Gen. Physiol. 99:863-895). Charge 1 (voltage of half-maximal transfer, V1/2 approximately 0 mV) gates noninactivated channels, while charge 2 (V1/2 approximately -90 mV) is generated in inactivated channels. In alpha 1C/beta 2a cells, the available charge 1 decreased upon inactivating depolarization with a time constant tau approximately 8, while the available charge 2 decreased upon recovery from inactivation (at -200 mV) with tau approximately 0.3 s. These processes therefore are much slower than charge movement, which takes charge movement and that of changes in their availability, which was even wider in the presence of alpha 2 delta, implies that charges 1 and 2 originate from separate channel modes. Because clear modal separation characterizes slow (C-type) inactivation of Na and K channels, this observation establishes the nature of voltage-dependent inactivation of L-type Ca channels as slow or C-type. The presence of the alpha 2 delta subunit did not change the V1/2 of charge 2, but sped up the reduction of charge 1 upon inactivation at 40 mV (to tau approximately 2 s), while slowing the reduction of charge 2 upon recovery (tau approximately 2 s). The observations were well simulated with a model that describes activation as continuous electrodiffusion (Levitt, D. 1989. Biophys. J. 55:489-498) and inactivation as discrete modal change. The effects of alpha 2 delta are reproduced assuming that the subunit lowers the free energy of the inactivated mode.

  4. Odorants suppress T- and L-type Ca2+ currents in olfactory receptor cells by shifting their inactivation curves to a negative voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, F

    1999-12-30

    Mechanisms underlying suppression of T- and L-type Ca2+ currents (I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L)) by odorants were investigated in newt olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) using the whole-cell version of the patch-clamp technique. Under voltage clamp, odorants (amyl acetate, limonene and acetophenone) reversibly suppressed I(Ca,T) and I(Ca, L). These currents disappeared completely within 150 ms following amyl acetate puffs, and recovered in approximately 1 s after the washout. Hyperpolarization of the membrane greatly relieved the odorant block of I(Ca,T) and I(Ca,L). The activation curves of both currents were not changed significantly by odorants, while their inactivation curves were shifted to negative voltages. Half-inactivation voltages of I(Ca,T) were - 66 mV (control), - 102 mV (amyl acetate), - 101 mV (limonene) and - 105 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM); those of I(Ca,L) were -33 mV (control), - 61 mV (amyl acetate), - 59 mV (limonene), and - 63 mV (acetophenone) (all 0.3 mM). These phenomena are similar to the effects of local anesthetics on I(Ca) in various preparations and also similar to the effects of odorants on I(Na) in ORCs, suggesting that these types of suppression are caused by the same mechanism.

  5. Dihydropyridine-sensitive ion currents and charge movement in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, J; Carapia, A; Calvo, J; García, M C; Sánchez, J A

    1999-10-01

    1. Whole-cell voltage clamp experiments were performed in vesicles derived from frog skeletal muscle plasma membranes to characterize the electrophysiological properties of dihydropyridine (DHP) receptors. This preparation allows control of the composition of the internal medium and the recording of currents, without the influence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). 2. In solutions containing Ba2+, Bay K 8644-sensitive, L-type inward currents were recorded. Peak Ba2+ currents (IBa) averaged 3.0 microA microF-1 and inactivated in a voltage-dependent manner. Half-maximal steady-state inactivation occurred at -40 mV. No major facilitation of tail currents was observed. 3. The time course of activation of L-type Ca2+ channels was voltage dependent and 10 times faster than that in muscle fibres; the current density values were also much lower. 4. Lowering [Mg2+]i from 2 to 0.1 mM shifted the time to peak of IBa versus voltage relation by -13 mV. 5. In solutions that contained mostly impermeant ions, non-linear capacitive currents were recorded. Charge movement with properties resembling charge 1 was observed in polarized vesicles. The charge movement depended on voltage with Boltzmann parameters: Qmax (maximum charge), 45.6 nC microF-1; V (potential at which Q = 0.5 Qmax), -58.4 mV; and k (slope factor), 22. 3 mV. There was no indication of the presence of Qgamma (the 'hump' component of charge movement). 6. In depolarized vesicles, non-linear currents were observed during hyperpolarizing pulses. The currents produced an excessive charge during 'on' transients only. Charge during 'off' transients was linear from -180 to +60 mV. There was no evidence of the presence of charge 2.

  6. Evidence for a dihydropyridine-sensitive and conotoxin-insensitive release of noradrenaline and uptake of calcium in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, P. J.; Marriott, D. B.; Boarder, M. R.

    1989-01-01

    1. It has been suggested that neuronal voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCC) may be divided into dihydropyridine (DHP)-sensitive (L) and DHP-insensitive (N and T), and that both the L and the N type channels are attenuated by the peptide blocker omega-conotoxin. Here the effects of omega-conotoxin on release of noradrenaline and uptake of calcium in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells were investigated. 2. Release of noradrenaline in response to 25 mM K+, 65 mM K+, 10 nM bradykinin or 10 microM prostaglandin E1 was not affected by omega-conotoxin in the range 10 nM-1 microM. 3. 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by high K+ and prostaglandin was attenuated by 1 microM nitrendipine and enhanced by 1 microM Bay K 8644; these calcium fluxes were not modified by 20 nM omega-conotoxin. 4. With superfused rat brain striatal slices in the same medium as the above cell studies, release of dopamine in response to 25 mM K+ was attenuated by 20 nM omega-conotoxin. 5. These results show that in these neurone-like cells, release may be effected by calcium influx through DHP-sensitive but omega-conotoxin-insensitive VSCC, a result inconsistent with the suggestion that omega-conotoxin blocks both L-type and N-type neuronal calcium channels. PMID:2470457

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Huiyun; Tang, Xiaohong; Bai, Wenwen; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Sevoflurane might be harmful to the developing brain. Therefore, it is essential to reverse sevoflurane-induced brain injury. This study aimed to determine whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity, which is inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, sevoflurane, and rTMS groups. A Whole-cell patch clamp technique was applied to record L-type Ca(2+) channel currents. The I-V curve, steady-state activation and inactivation curves were studied in rats of each group at different ages (1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks and 5 weeks old). In the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel current density significantly increased from week 2 to week 3. Compared with the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel currents of rats in the sevoflurane group were significantly inhibited from week 1 to week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel shifted significantly towards depolarization at week 1 and week 2. Moreover, steady-state inactivation curves shifted towards hyperpolarization from week 1 to week 3. Compared with the sevoflurane group, rTMS significantly increased L-type Ca(2+) channel currents at week 2 and week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization at week 2. Meanwhile, steady-state inactivation curves significantly shifted towards depolarization at week 2. The period between week 2 and week 3 is critical for the development of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Early sevoflurane exposure inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channel activity and rTMS can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by sevoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Stac gets the skeletal L-type calcium channel unstuck

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2015), s. 101-103 ISSN 0231-5882 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * L-type calcium channel * Ca(v)1.1 channel * Stac adaptor protein * excitation- contraction coupling * trafficking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.892, year: 2015

  9. Perforated patch recording of L-type calcium current with beta-escin in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li-Ying; Wang, Fang; Chen, Xue-Song; Zhou, Hong-Yi; Yao, Wei-Xing; Xia, Guo-Jin; Jiang, Ming-Xing

    2003-11-01

    To establish a perforated patch recording (PPR) mode with beta-escin and compare L-type calcium current (I(Ca,L)) recorded under PPR and normal whole-cell recording (WCR) condition in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes. Single myocytes were dissociated by enzymatic dissociation method. beta-escin was added to the pipette solution to perforate the cell membrane and obtain PPR mode. I(Ca,L) was recorded using PPR and WCR techniques. beta-Escin 20, 25, and 30 micromol/L could permeabilize the cell membrane and obtain PPR mode. With beta-escin 25 micromol/L, the success rate was highest (16/17, 94 %) and the time required for permibilization was 2-15 (8+/-4) min. Run-down of I(Ca,L) was considerably slower in PPR than in WCR condition. The amplitude of I(Ca,L) was decreased by 36 % at 20 min after the formation of WCR, while it was slowly decreased by 8 % at 30 min after the formation of PPR. The current-voltage relation (I-V) curves, activation and inactivation curves of I(Ca,L) were not significantly different between WCR and PPR. The inactivation rate of ICa,L was slower in PPR than in WCR, the faster inactivation time constant (tau(f)) was longer in PPR than in WCR at membrane potentials of -20 mV -- +10 mV (n=6, Pescin 25 micromol/L can easily obtain stable PPR in isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes, and this method is useful in dealing with channels, which show run-down under normal WCR such as L-type Ca channel.

  10. L-Type Calcium Channel Inhibition Contributes to the Proarrhythmic Effects of Aconitine in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Wu

    Full Text Available Aconitine (ACO is well-known for causing lethal ventricular tachyarrhythmias. While cardiac Na+ channel opening during repolarization has long been documented in animal cardiac myocytes, the cellular effects and mechanism of ACO in human remain unexplored. This study aimed to assess the proarrhythmic effects of ACO in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs. ACO concentration-dependently (0.3 ~ 3.0 μM shortened the action potentials (AP durations (APD in ventricular-like hiPSC-CMs by > 40% and induced delayed after-depolarization. Laser-scanning confocal calcium imaging analysis showed that ACO decreased the duration and amplitude of [Ca2+]i transients and increased in the beating frequencies by over 60%. Moreover, ACO was found to markedly reduce the L-type calcium channel (LTCC currents (ICa,L in hiPSC-CMs associated with a positive-shift of activation and a negative shift of inactivation. ACO failed to alter the peak and late Na+ currents (INa in hiPSC-CMs while it drastically increased the late INa in Guinea-pig ventricular myocytes associated with enhanced activation/delayed inactivation of INa at -55 mV~ -85 mV. Further, the effects of ACO on ICa,L, INa and the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (Ikr were validated in heterologous expression systems by automated voltage-clamping assays and a moderate suppression of Ikr was observed in addition to concentration-dependent ICa,L inhibition. Lastly, increased beating frequency, decreased Ca2+ wave and shortened field potential duration were recorded from hiPSC-CMs by microelectrode arrays assay. In summary, our data demonstrated that LTCC inhibition could play a main role in the proarrhythmic action of ACO in human cardiomyocytes.

  11. Inactivation Data.xlsx

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The data set is a spreadsheet that contains results of inactivation experiments that were conducted to to determine the effectiveness of chlorine in inactivating B....

  12. Inactivation of Caliciviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Nims

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Caliciviridae family of viruses contains clinically important human and animal pathogens, as well as vesivirus 2117, a known contaminant of biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes employing Chinese hamster cells. An extensive literature exists for inactivation of various animal caliciviruses, especially feline calicivirus and murine norovirus. The caliciviruses are susceptible to wet heat inactivation at temperatures in excess of 60 °C with contact times of 30 min or greater, to UV-C inactivation at fluence ≥30 mJ/cm2, to high pressure processing >200 MPa for >5 min at 4 °C, and to certain photodynamic inactivation approaches. The enteric caliciviruses (e.g.; noroviruses display resistance to inactivation by low pH, while the non-enteric species (e.g.; feline calicivirus are much more susceptible. The caliciviruses are inactivated by a variety of chemicals, including alcohols, oxidizing agents, aldehydes, and β-propiolactone. As with inactivation of viruses in general, inactivation of caliciviruses by the various approaches may be matrix-, temperature-, and/or contact time-dependent. The susceptibilities of the caliciviruses to the various physical and chemical inactivation approaches are generally similar to those displayed by other small, non-enveloped viruses, with the exception that the parvoviruses and circoviruses may require higher temperatures for inactivation, while these families appear to be more susceptible to UV-C inactivation than are the caliciviruses.

  13. Activation of L-type calcium channel in twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francini, F; Bencini, C; Squecco, R

    1996-07-01

    1. The activation of the L-type calcium current (ICa) was studied in normally polarized (-100 mV) cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog with the double Vaseline-gap voltage-clamp technique. Both external and internal solutions were Ca2+ buffered. Solutions were made in order to minimize all but the Ca2+ current. 2. The voltage-dependent components of the time course of activation were determined by two procedures: fast and slow components were evaluated by multiexponential fitting to current traces elicited by long voltage pulses (5 s) after removing inactivation; fast components were also determined by short voltage pulses having different duration (0.5-70 ms). 3. The components of deactivation were evaluated after removing the charge-movement current from the total tail current by the difference between two short (50 and 70 ms) voltage pulses to 10 mV, moving the same intramembrane charge. Two exponential components, fast and slow (time constants, 6 +/- 0.3 and 90 +/- 7 ms at -100 mV; n = 26), were found. 4. The time onset of ICa was evaluated either by multiexponential fitting to the ICa activation or by pulses of different duration to test the beginning of the 'on' and 'off' inequality. This was at about 2 ms, denoting that it was very early. 5. The time constant vs. voltage plots indicated the presence of four voltage-dependent components in the activation pathway. Various kinetic models are discussed. Models with independent transitions, like a Hodgkin-Huxley scheme, were excluded. Suitable models were a five-state sequential and a four-state cyclic with a branch scheme. The latter gave the best simulation of the data. 6. The steady-state activation curve saturated at high potentials. It had a half-voltage value of 1 +/- 0.2 mV and the opening probability was only 0.82 +/- 0.2 at 20 mV (n = 32). This result implies a larger number of functional calcium channels than was previously supposed and is in agreement with the number of dihydropyridine (DHP

  14. Modulation of L-type calcium current by intracellular magnesium in differentiating cardiomyocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguemo, Filomain; Semmler, Judith; Reppel, Michael; Hescheler, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    Intracellular Mg(2+), which is implicated in arrhythmogenesis and transient cardiac ischemia, inhibits L-type Ca(2+) calcium channel current (ICaL) of adult cardiomyocytes (CMs). We take the advantage of an in vitro model of CMs based on induced pluripotent stem cells to investigate the effects of intracellular Mg(2+) on the phosphorylation or dephosphorylation processes of L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) at early and late stages of cardiac cell differentiation. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we demonstrate that increasing intracellular Mg(2+) concentration [Mg(2+)]i from 0.2 to 5 mM markedly reduced the peak of ICaL density, showing less effect on both the activation and inactivation properties in the late differentiation stage (LDS) of CMs more so than in the early differentiation stage (EDS). Increasing the [Mg(2+)]i from 0.2 to 2 mM in the presence of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A significantly decreased ICaL in LDS (70%) and in EDS (36%) CMs. In addition, the effect of forskolin was greatly attenuated in the presence of 2 mM [Mg(2+)]i in LDS but not in EDS CMs. The effect of forskolin was enhanced in the presence of ATP-γ-S in LDS CMs compared with EDS CMs. The exposure of both EDS and LDS CMs to 2 mM [Mg(2+)]i considerably reduced the effects of isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and okadaic acid on ICaL. Our results provide evidence for differential regulation of LTCCs activities by cytosolic Mg(2+) concentration in developing cardiac cells and confirm that Mg(2+) acts under conditions that favor opening of the LTCCs caused by channel phosphorylation.

  15. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    production. Proc. Soc. Exptl. Biol. Med. 116:174-177. Mayer, V. 1965. Study of the virulence of tick-borne encephalitis virus. IV. Thermosensitivity...inactivation of rabies and other rhabrtoviruses: stabilization of the chelating agent Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid at physiological temperatures. Infec

  16. Alternative Splicing of L-type CaV1.2 Calcium Channels: Implications in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available L-type CaV1.2 calcium channels are the major pathway for Ca2+ influx to initiate the contraction of smooth and cardiac muscles. Alteration of CaV1.2 channel function has been implicated in multiple cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional mechanism that expands CaV1.2 channel structures to modify function, pharmacological and biophysical property such as calcium/voltage-dependent inactivation (C/VDI, or to influence its post-translational modulation by interacting proteins such as Galectin-1. Alternative splicing has generated functionally diverse CaV1.2 isoforms that can be developmentally regulated in the heart, or under pathophysiological conditions such as in heart failure. More importantly, alternative splicing of certain exons of CaV1.2 has been reported to be regulated by splicing factors such as RNA-binding Fox-1 homolog 1/2 (Rbfox 1/2, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTBP1 and RNA-binding motif protein 20 (RBM20. Understanding how CaV1.2 channel function is remodelled in disease will provide better information to guide the development of more targeted approaches to discover therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases.

  17. L-type voltage-operated calcium channels contribute to astrocyte activation in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Cheli, VT; Santiago González, DA; Smith, J; Spreuer, V; Murphy, GG; Paez, PM

    2016-01-01

    We have found a significant upregulation of L-type voltage-operated Ca++ channels (VOCCs) in reactive astrocytes. To test if VOCCs are centrally involved in triggering astrocyte reactivity, we used in vitro models of astrocyte activation in combination with pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs and the Cre/lox system to reduce the activity of L-type VOCCs in primary cortical astrocytes. The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as high extracellular K+, glutamate and ATP promote astrogliosi...

  18. Hallmarks of the channelopathies associated with L-type calcium channels: a focus on the Timothy mutations in Ca(v)1.2 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidaud, Isabelle; Lory, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Within the voltage-gated calcium channels (Cav channels) family, there are four genes coding for the L-type Cav channels (Cav1). The Cav1 channels underly many important physiological functions like excitation-contraction coupling, hormone secretion, neuronal excitability and gene transcription. Mutations found in the genes encoding the Cav channels define a wide variety of diseases called calcium channelopathies and all four genes coding the Cav1 channels are carrying such mutations. L-type calcium channelopathies include muscular, neurological, cardiac and vision syndromes. Among them, the Timothy syndrome (TS) is linked to missense mutations in CACNA1C, the gene that encodes the Ca(v)1.2 subunit. Here we review the important features of the Cav1 channelopathies. We also report on the specific properties of TS-Ca(v)1.2 channels, which display non-inactivating calcium current as well as higher plasma membrane expression. Overall, we conclude that both electrophysiological and surface expression properties must be investigated to better account for the functional consequences of mutations linked to calcium channelopathies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. L-type voltage-operated calcium channels contribute to astrocyte activation In vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, Veronica T; Santiago González, Diara A; Smith, Jessica; Spreuer, Vilma; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Paez, Pablo M

    2016-08-01

    We have found a significant upregulation of L-type voltage-operated Ca(++) channels (VOCCs) in reactive astrocytes. To test if VOCCs are centrally involved in triggering astrocyte reactivity, we used in vitro models of astrocyte activation in combination with pharmacological inhibitors, siRNAs and the Cre/lox system to reduce the activity of L-type VOCCs in primary cortical astrocytes. The endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as well as high extracellular K(+) , glutamate, and ATP promote astrogliosis in vitro. L-type VOCC inhibitors drastically reduce the number of reactive cells, astrocyte hypertrophy, and cell proliferation after these treatments. Astrocytes transfected with siRNAs for the Cav1.2 subunit that conducts L-type Ca(++) currents as well as Cav1.2 knockout astrocytes showed reduce Ca(++) influx by ∼80% after plasma membrane depolarization. Importantly, Cav1.2 knock-down/out prevents astrocyte activation and proliferation induced by LPS. Similar results were found using the scratch wound assay. After injuring the astrocyte monolayer, cells extend processes toward the cell-free scratch region and subsequently migrate and populate the scratch. We found a significant increase in the activity of L-type VOCCs in reactive astrocytes located in the growing line in comparison to quiescent astrocytes situated away from the scratch. Moreover, the migration of astrocytes from the scratching line as well as the number of proliferating astrocytes was reduced in Cav1.2 knock-down/out cultures. In summary, our results suggest that Cav1.2 L-type VOCCs play a fundamental role in the induction and/or proliferation of reactive astrocytes, and indicate that the inhibition of these Ca(++) channels may be an effective way to prevent astrocyte activation. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1396-1415. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Transport of iodothyronines by human l-type amino acid transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Zevenbergen (Chantal); M.E. Meima (Marcel); E.C.L. De Souza; R.P. Peeters (Robin); Kinne, A. (Anita); Krause, G. (Gerd); W. Edward Visser (W.); T.J. Visser (Theo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThyroid hormone (TH) transporters facilitate cellular TH influx and efflux, which is paramount for normal physiology. The L-type amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are known to facilitate TH transport. However, the role of LAT3, LAT4, and LAT5 is still unclear. Therefore, the aim of

  1. L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote Ca2+ accumulation when dopamine receptors are activated in striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Molly E; Macías, Wendy; Youngs, Rachael M; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Dudman, Joshua T; Konradi, Christine

    2004-11-24

    Dopamine (DA) receptor-mediated signal transduction and gene expression play a central role in many brain disorders from schizophrenia to Parkinson's disease to addiction. While trying to evaluate the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), we found that activation of dopamine D1 receptors alters the properties of L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors and turns them into facilitators of Ca2+ influx. In D1 receptor-stimulated neurons, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation. This leads to the activation of a molecular signal transduction pathway and CREB phosphorylation. In the absence of dopamine receptor stimulation, L-type Ca2+ channel blockers inhibit CREB phosphorylation. The effect of dopamine on L-type Ca2+ channel blockers is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA), suggesting that protein phosphorylation plays a role in this phenomenon. Because of the adverse effect of activated dopamine receptors on L-type Ca2+ channel blocker action, the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in the dopamine D1 receptor signal transduction pathway cannot be assessed with pharmacological tools. However, with antisense technology, we demonstrate that L-type Ca2+ channels contribute to D1 receptor-mediated CREB phosphorylation. We conclude that the D1 receptor signal transduction pathway depends on L-type Ca2+ channels to mediate CREB phosphorylation.

  2. Verapamil inhibits L-type calcium channel mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Antoni; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yusheng; Melander, Arne; Jeppsson, Bengt; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2008-11-01

    Treatment with calcium channel blockers have been associated with increased colon cancer mortality in epidemiologic studies. We examined the potential expression and function of calcium channels in two human colon cancer cell lines. Both primary (collected at operation) and commercially-available human colon cancer cell lines were used. The colon cancer cells were incubated with a calcium channel blocker (verapamil) and a calcium channel agonist (BayK 8644) at clinically relevant concentrations. L-type calcium channel mRNA was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Intracellular calcium ion levels were measured with fluorometry and apoptosis with flow cytometry. Both types of cells expressed L-type calcium channel mRNA, comprising an alpha-1D and a beta-3 subunit, whereas the cells were negative for N-type and P-type channels. The selective calcium channel agonist (BayK 8644), dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium ion levels and the level of apoptosis in primary human colon cancer cells. Pretreatment with verapamil completely abolished both calcium channel agonist-induced influx of calcium and apoptosis in these cells. These data demonstrate that human colon cancer cells express L-type calcium channels that mediate calcium influx and apoptosis, which warrants further studies to determine whether calcium channel blockers may promote colon cancer growth.

  3. L-type calcium channels regulate filopodia stability and cancer cell invasion downstream of integrin signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Baghirov, Habib; Georgiadou, Maria; Sihto, Harri; Peuhu, Emilia; Cettour-Janet, Pierre; He, Tao; Perälä, Merja; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Joensuu, Heikki; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Mounting in vitro, in vivo and clinical evidence suggest an important role for filopodia in driving cancer cell invasion. Using a high-throughput microscopic-based drug screen, we identify FDA-approved calcium channel blockers (CCBs) as potent inhibitors of filopodia formation in cancer cells. Unexpectedly, we discover that L-type calcium channels are functional and frequently expressed in cancer cells suggesting a previously unappreciated role for these channels during tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate that, at filopodia, L-type calcium channels are activated by integrin inside-out signalling, integrin activation and Src. Moreover, L-type calcium channels promote filopodia stability and maturation into talin-rich adhesions through the spatially restricted regulation of calcium entry and subsequent activation of the protease calpain-1. Altogether we uncover a novel and clinically relevant signalling pathway that regulates filopodia formation in cancer cells and propose that cycles of filopodia stabilization, followed by maturation into focal adhesions, directs cancer cell migration and invasion. PMID:27910855

  4. 12-lipoxygenase regulates hippocampal long-term potentiation by modulating L-type Ca2+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCostanzo, Anthony J.; Voloshyna, Iryna; Rosen, Zev B.; Feinmark, Steven J.; Siegelbaum, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Although long-term potentiation (LTP) has been intensely studied, there is disagreement as to which molecules mediate and modulate LTP. This is partly due to the presence of mechanistically distinct forms of LTP that are induced by different patterns of stimulation and that depend on distinct Ca2+ sources. Here we report a novel role for the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzyme 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO) in LTP at CA3-CA1 hippocampal synapses that is dependent on the pattern of tetanic stimulation. We find that 12-LO activity is required for the induction of LTP in response to a theta-burst stimulation (TBS) protocol, which depends on Ca2+ influx through both NMDA receptors and L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. In contrast, LTP induced by 100 Hz tetanic stimulation, which requires Ca2+ influx through NMDA receptors but not L-type channels, does not require 12-LO. We find that 12-LO regulates LTP by enhancing postsynaptic somatodendritic Ca2+ influx through L-type channels during theta burst stimulation, an action exerted via 12(S)-HPETE, a downstream metabolite of 12-LO. These results help define the role of a long-disputed signaling enzyme in LTP. PMID:20130191

  5. Tyrosinase inactivation in organic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, J C; Saville, B A

    1999-11-05

    The inactivation of the catecholase activity of mushroom tyrosinase was investigated under nonaqueous conditions. The enzyme was immobilized on glass beads, and assays were conducted in chloroform, toluene, amyl acetate, isopropyl ether, and butanol. The reaction components were pre-equilibrated for 2 weeks with a saturated salt solution at a water activity of 0.90. The initial reaction velocity varied between 1.3 x 10(3) mol product/((mol enzyme)(min)) in toluene and 8.7 x 10(3) mol product/((mol enzyme)(min)) in amyl acetate. The turnover number varied between 8.1 x 10(3) mol product/mol enzyme in toluene and 7.2 x 10(4) mol product/mol enzyme in amyl acetate. In each solvent, the tyrosinase reaction inactivation parameters were represented by a probabilistic model. Changes in the probability of inactivation were followed throughout the course of the reaction using a second model which relates the reaction velocity to the amount of product formed. These models reveal that the inactivation rate of tyrosinase decreases as the reaction progresses, and that the inactivation kinetics are independent of the quinone concentration in toluene, chloroform, butanol, and amyl acetate. Significant effects of quinone concentration were, however, observed in isopropyl ether. The likelihood of inactivation of the enzyme was found to be greatest toward the beginning of the reaction. In the latter phase of the reaction, inactivation probability was less and tended to remain constant until the completion of the reaction. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Effect of epoxy resin on bending momentum in L type corner joins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri Yıldırım

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the furniture industry, the joining points of frame and box construction furniture according to the loads to be affected by the use place is important for the security of the user and service life of the furniture element. In this direction, it is aimed to determine the diagonal compression and diagonal tensile moment values of "L" type corner joints of box framed construction furniture prepared from solid wood materials. The Pinus Nigra, Fagus Orientalis L and Populus Nigra were used as solid wood materials. Wood-based biscuit joining elements were used in corner joints of the test construction and epoxy resin was used as glue for materials. The static loads were applied to construction according to ASTM-D1037. The results show that, the highest tensile and compression values were obtained from Fagus Orientalis L and the lowest values were obtained from Populus Nigra specimens. In the statistical study, the difference between the tensile and compressive bending moment values of the biscuit connection element was found to be statistically significant. This study indicates that, it is suggested to use of L type joints prepared from Fagus Orientalis L by using epoxy resin and wood based biscuit joining element in frame constructions.

  7. Human PIEZO1: removing inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chilman; Gottlieb, Philip A; Sachs, Frederick

    2013-08-20

    PIEZO1 is an inactivating eukaryotic cation-selective mechanosensitive ion channel. Two sites have been located in the channel that when individually mutated lead to xerocytotic anemia by slowing inactivation. By introducing mutations at two sites, one associated with xerocytosis and the other artificial, we were able to remove inactivation. The double mutant (DhPIEZO1) has a substitution of arginine for methionine (M2225R) and lysine for arginine (R2456K). The loss of inactivation was accompanied by ∼30-mmHg shift of the activation curve to lower pressures and slower rates of deactivation. The slope sensitivity of gating was the same for wild-type and mutants, indicating that the dimensional changes between the closed and open state are unaffected by the mutations. The unitary channel conductance was unchanged by mutations, so these sites are not associated with pore. DhPIEZO1 was reversibly inhibited by the peptide GsMTx4 that acted as a gating modifier. The channel kinetics were solved using complex stimulus waveforms and the data fit to a three-state loop in detailed balance. The reaction had two pressure-dependent rates, closed to open and inactivated to closed. Pressure sensitivity of the opening rate with no sensitivity of the closing rate means that the energy barrier between them is located near the open state. Mutant cycle analysis of inactivation showed that the two sites interacted strongly, even though they are postulated to be on opposite sides of the membrane. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal Inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Inactivated influenza virus vaccines are the primary modality used for prevention of influenza. A system of annual identification of new strains causing illnesses, selections for vaccines, chick embryo growth, inactivation, processing, packaging, distribution and usage has been in place for decades. Current vaccines contain 15 µg of the HA of an A/H1N1, A/H3N2 and B strain and are given parenterally to induce serum anti-HA antibody for prevention of subsequent infection and illness from natur...

  9. Influence of the welding process choice on the pitting corrosion resistance of 304 L type stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, L.

    2002-01-01

    This document gives indications and information on process and welding parameters optimization to improve the pitting corrosion resistance of 304 L type stainless steels, used in industrial piping. (A.L.B.)

  10. Polarized distribution of L-type calcium channels in early sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, B; Yazaki, I; Tosti, E

    1997-09-01

    Using the whole cell clamp technique, we have measured calcium-dependent currents and steady-state conductance in early sea urchin blastomeres. The calcium currents in M phase decreased from 8.5 microA/cm2 at the four-cell stage to 5.4 microA/cm2 at the eight-cell stage. In 16-cell stage embryos, calcium currents were 7.4 microA/cm2 in the mesomeres, 2.3 microA/cm2 in the macromeres, and were not detected in the micromeres. In contrast, the micromeres had a two- to threefold higher steady-state conductance than the mesomeres or macromeres, which may be due to potassium ion conductivity. Nifedipine, an L-type channel antagonist, delays cleavage division at a concentration of 0.05-0.1 mM and causes developmental defects, such as poor skeletal differentiation in later sea urchin embryos.

  11. L-type calcium channel blockers enhance 5-HTP-induced antinociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jian-hui; Li, Jun-xu; Wang, Xu-hua; Chen, Bi; Lu, Ying; Zhang, Pan; Han, Rong; Ye, Xiang-feng

    2004-05-01

    To investigate the involvement of L-type Ca(2+) channels in antinociceptive action induced by the 5-HT precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP). Female Kunming mice were treated with either 5-HTP (20-80 mg/kg, ip) alone, or the combination of 5-HTP and fluoxetine (2-8 mg/kg, ip), pargyline (15-60 mg/kg, ip), nimodipine (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), nifedipine (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), verapamil (2.5-10 mg/kg, ip), CaCl(2) (5-20 mmol/L, icv), or EGTA (0.5-3 mmol/L, icv) prior to the hot-plate test (55 degree, hind-paw licking latency). In addition, locomotor activity in mice treated with 5-HTP alone was measured using an ambulometer with five activity boxes. Ip injection of 5-HTP alone had no influence on the spontaneous locomotor activity, whereas dose-dependently increased the latency to licking hind-paw in the hot-plate test in mice. The inhibitory effects of 5-HTP on nociceptive response were significantly enhanced by fluoxetine in the mouse hot-plate test. At a sub-effective dose, pargyline could cause a leftward shift in the dose-response curve of 5-HTP-induced antinociception. Co-administration with 5-HTP and nimodipine, nifedipine, or verapamil obviously potentiated the antinociceptive effects elicited by 5-HTP. Interestingly, 5-HTP-induced antinociception was antagonized by CaCl(2) and enhanced by EGTA injected icv in the mouse hot-plate test. These findings suggest that systemic administration of 5-HTP may yield the antinociceptive effects, which are related to Ca(2+) influx from extracellular fluid through L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  12. Cytoskeleton, L-type Ca2+ and stretch activated channels in injured skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Francini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The extra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton (actin microfilaments and anchoring proteins is involved in maintaining the sarco-membrane stiffness and integrity and in turn the mechanical stability and function of the intra- and sub-sarcoplasmic proteins. Accordingly, it regulates Ca2+ entry through the L-type Ca2+ channels and the mechano-sensitivity of the stretch activated channels (SACs. Moreover, being intra-sarcomeric cytoskeleton bound to costameric proteins and other proteins of the sarcoplasma by intermediate filaments, as desmin, it integrates the properties of the sarcolemma with the skeletal muscle fibres contraction. The aim of this research was to compare the cytoskeleton, SACs and the ECC alterations in two different types of injured skeletal muscle fibres: by muscle denervation and mechanical overload (eccentric contraction. Experiments on denervation were made in isolated Soleus muscle of male Wistar rats; forced eccentric-contraction (EC injury was achieved in Extensor Digitorum Longus muscles of Swiss mice. The method employed conventional intracellular recording with microelectrodes inserted in a single fibre of an isolated skeletal muscle bundle. The state of cytoskeleton was evaluated by recording SAC currents and by evaluating the resting membrane potential (RMP value determined in current-clamp mode. The results demonstrated that in both injured skeletal muscle conditions the functionality of L-type Ca2+ current, ICa, was affected. In parallel, muscle fibres showed an increase of the resting membrane permeability and of the SAC current. These issues, together with a more depolarized RMP are an index of altered cytoskeleton. In conclusion, we found a symilar alteration of ICa, SAC and cytoskeleton in both injured skeletal muscle conditions.

  13. Heterogeneity of L-type calcium channel alpha 1 subunits: stereoselective discrimination of different populations by the novel 1,4-dihydropyridine B 874-67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakitsch, M; Knaus, H G; Topar, G; Romanin, C; Boer, R; Flockerzi, D; Striessnig, J; Schindler, H; Hoeltje, H D; Glossmann, H

    1993-02-01

    The basic (pKa = 8.49) 1,4-dihydropyridine B 874-67 [[3-(C1R,2S)- 2-methylamino-1-phenylpropyl]-5-methyl-1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-(4R)-4-( 3-nitrophenyl)pyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate hydrochloride] has unique properties; it can discriminate two populations of alpha 1 subunits in 1,4-dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels labeled with the neutral 1,4-dihydropyridine (+)-[3H]PN 200-110. The two populations, which occur in proportions of approximately 2:1 in rabbit skeletal muscle membranes and highly purified calcium channel preparations, differ approximately 20-fold in their affinity. The corresponding diastereomer, B 874-66, and other 1,4-dihydropyridines (neutral, basic, or permanently charged) do not share this property. The two populations were observed at 2 degrees, 22 degrees, and 37 degrees in similar proportions. Heterogeneity was also observed for guinea pig heart membrane calcium channels labeled with (+)-[3H]PN 200-110. Heterotropic allosteric regulators, Ca2+, and Mg2+, but not Ba2+ and Ni2+, abolished the discriminatory activity of B 874-67 at 2 degrees and 22 degrees, regardless of whether binding of the neutral 1,4-dihydropyridine was stimulated or inhibited. It is proposed that the two alpha 1 subunit populations differ with respect to their 1,4-dihydropyridine binding domain. The structural basis for the two populations is unclear but may relate to the functional heterogeneity of membrane-bound and highly purified calcium channel preparations previously observed by others.

  14. Inactivation of allergens and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, Piero

    2010-11-30

    Plants are replete with thousands of proteins and small molecules, many of which are species-specific, poisonous or dangerous. Over time humans have learned to avoid dangerous plants or inactivate many toxic components in food plants, but there is still room for ameliorating food crops (and plants in general) in terms of their allergens and toxins content, especially in their edible parts. Inactivation at the genetic rather than physical or chemical level has many advantages and classical genetic approaches have resulted in significant reduction of toxin content. The capacity, offered by genetic engineering, of turning off (inactivating) specific genes has opened up the possibility of altering the plant content in a far more precise manner than previously available. Different levels of intervention (genes coding for toxins/allergens or for enzymes, transporters or regulators involved in their metabolism) are possible and there are several tools for inactivating genes, both direct (using chemical and physical mutagens, insertion of transposons and other genetic elements) and indirect (antisense RNA, RNA interference, microRNA, eventually leading to gene silencing). Each level/strategy has specific advantages and disadvantages (speed, costs, selectivity, stability, reversibility, frequency of desired genotype and regulatory regime). Paradigmatic examples from classical and transgenic approaches are discussed to emphasize the need to revise the present regulatory process. Reducing the content of natural toxins is a trade-off process: the lesser the content of natural toxins, the higher the susceptibility of a plant to pests and therefore the stronger the need to protect plants. As a consequence, more specific pesticides like Bt are needed to substitute for general pesticides. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition by nickel of the L-type Ca channel in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and effect of internal cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, I A; Hancox, J C; Levi, A J

    2000-08-01

    The characteristics of nickel (Ni) block of L-type Ca current (I(Ca, L)) were studied in whole cell patch-clamped guinea pig cardiac myocytes at 37 degrees C in the absence and presence of 100 microM cAMP in the pipette solution. Ni block of peak I(Ca,L) had a dissociation constant (K(d)) of 0.33 +/- 0.03 mM in the absence of cAMP, whereas in the presence of cAMP, the K(d) was 0.53 +/- 0.05 mM (P = 0.006). Ni blocked Ca entry via Ca channels (measured as I(Ca, L) integral over 50 ms) with similar kinetics (K(d) of 0.35 +/- 0.03 mM in cAMP-free solution and 0.30 +/- 0.02 mM in solution with cAMP, P = not significant). Under both conditions, 5 mM Ni produced a maximal block that was complete for the first pulse after application. Ni block of I(Ca,L) was largely use independent. Ni (0. 5 mM) induced a positive shift (4 to 6 mV) in the activation curve of I(Ca,L). The block of I(Ca,L) by 0.5 mM Ni was independent of prepulse membrane potential (over the range of -120 to -40 mV). Ni (0.5 mM) also induced a significant shift in I(Ca,L) inactivation: by 6 mV negative in cAMP-free solution and by 4 mV positive in cells dialyzed with 100 microM cAMP. These data suggest that, in addition to blocking channel conductance by binding to a site in the channel pore, Ni may bind to a second site that influences the voltage-dependent gating of the L-type Ca channel. They also suggest that Ca channel phosphorylation causes a conformational change that alters some effects of Ni. The results may be relevant to excitation-contraction coupling studies, which have employed internal cAMP dialysis, and where Ni has been used to block I(Ca,L) and Ca entry into cardiac cells.

  16. The Role of L-type Calcium Channels in Olfactory Learning and Its Modulation by Norepinephrine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinaba Ghosh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available L type calcium channels (LTCCs are prevalent in different systems and hold immense importance for maintaining/performing selective functions. In the nervous system, CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 are emerging as critical modulators of neuronal functions. Although the general role of these calcium channels in modulating synaptic plasticity and memory has been explored, their role in olfactory learning is not well understood. In this review article we first discuss the role of LTCCs in olfactory learning especially focusing on early odor preference learning in neonate rodents, presenting evidence that while NMDARs initiate stimulus-specific learning, LTCCs promote protein-synthesis dependent long-term memory (LTM. Norepinephrine (NE release from the locus coeruleus (LC is essential for early olfactory learning, thus noradrenergic modulation of LTCC function and its implication in olfactory learning is discussed here. We then address the differential roles of LTCCs in adult learning and learning in aged animals.

  17. Intermolecular failure of L-type Ca2+ channel and ryanodine receptor signaling in hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy is a key step leading to heart failure. The Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR process that governs cardiac contractility is defective in hypertrophy/heart failure, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. To examine the intermolecular aspects of CICR during hypertrophy, we utilized loose-patch confocal imaging to visualize the signaling between a single L-type Ca(2+ channel (LCC and ryanodine receptors (RyRs in aortic stenosis rat models of compensated (CHT and decompensated (DHT hypertrophy. We found that the LCC-RyR intermolecular coupling showed a 49% prolongation in coupling latency, a 47% decrease in chance of hit, and a 72% increase in chance of miss in DHT, demonstrating a state of "intermolecular failure." Unexpectedly, these modifications also occurred robustly in CHT due at least partially to decreased expression of junctophilin, indicating that intermolecular failure occurs prior to cellular manifestations. As a result, cell-wide Ca(2+ release, visualized as "Ca(2+ spikes," became desynchronized, which contrasted sharply with unaltered spike integrals and whole-cell Ca(2+ transients in CHT. These data suggested that, within a certain limit, termed the "stability margin," mild intermolecular failure does not damage the cellular integrity of excitation-contraction coupling. Only when the modification steps beyond the stability margin does global failure occur. The discovery of "hidden" intermolecular failure in CHT has important clinical implications.

  18. The role of solvation in the binding selectivity of the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Dezső; Henderson, Douglas; Gillespie, Dirk

    2013-08-07

    We present grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation results for a reduced model of the L-type calcium channel. While charged residues of the protein amino acids in the selectivity filter are treated explicitly, most of the degrees of freedom (including the rest of the protein and the solvent) are represented by their dielectric response, i.e., dielectric continua. The new aspect of this paper is that the dielectric coefficient in the channel is different from that in the baths. The ions entering the channel, thus, cross a dielectric boundary at the entrance of the channel. Simulating this case has been made possible by our recent methodological development [D. Boda, D. Henderson, B. Eisenberg, and D. Gillespie, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 064105 (2011)]. Our main focus is on the effect of solvation energy (represented by the Born energy) on monovalent vs. divalent ion selectivity in the channel. We find no significant change in selectivity by changing the dielectric coefficient in the channel because the larger solvation penalty is counterbalanced by the enhanced Coulomb attraction inside the channel as soon as we use the Born radii (fitted to experimental hydration energies) to compute the solvation penalty from the Born equation.

  19. L-type calcium channel blockers, morphine and pain: Newer insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier, we had reported that co-administration of opioids and L-type calcium channel blockers (L-CCBs like diltiazem could prove useful in the treatment of cancer pain. Much of this report was based upon earlier published work involving animal models of pain exposed to brief periods of noxious radiant heat without any tissue injury. However, pain in clinical situations usually result from tissue injury. Thus, the aim of the current investigation was to study the analgesic effect of this combination of drugs in the rat formalin test which is associated with actual tissue injury. Wistar rats (n=60 received either L-CCB (nifedipine/nimodipine/verapamil/diltiazem i.p. or morphine (s.c. or both drugs. The formalin test was done 30 min after morphine or placebo injection. The naloxone reversal test was also done. Administration of L-CCBs alone, particularly diltiazem, increased pain in the formalin test. In contrast, co-administration of these L-CCBs with morphine led to decreased pain response, though statistically significant decrease was noted only with nimodipine + morphine. Naloxone reversed this analgesic effect, indicating that it was primarily an opioid-mediated effect. The results show that administration of L-CCBs alone may prove counterproductive in the therapeutic management of pain (anti-analgesic effect. However, co-administration of both drugs (morphine and nimodipine in quick succession could lead to adequate pain relief.

  20. Drotaverine interacts with the L-type Ca(2+) channel in pregnant rat uterine membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tömösközi, Zsuzsanna; Finance, Olivier; Arányi, Péter

    2002-08-02

    The effect of the isoquinoline derivative, drotaverine on the specific binding of [(3)H]nitrendipine and [(3)H]diltiazem to pregnant rat uterine membranes was examined. Drotaverine inhibited the specific [(3)H]nitrendipine and [(3)H]diltiazem bindings with IC(50) values of 5.6 and 2.6 microM, respectively. Saturation studies showed that diltiazem caused a significant increase in the maximum binding density without changing the K(D) of [(3)H]nitrendipine while drotaverine increased both the K(D) and the B(max) of [3H]nitrendipine. The dissociation kinetics of both [3H]nitrendipine and [(3)H]diltiazem were accelerated by drotaverine. These results suggest that drotaverine has a negative allosteric interaction with the binding sites for 1,4-dihydropyridines and 1,5-benzothiazepines on the L-type Ca(2+) channel in pregnant rat uterine membranes, which may have implications as to the potential usefulness of this drug in aiding child delivery.

  1. L-type Ca2+ channel blockers promote Ca2+ accumulation when dopamine receptors are activated in striatal neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Molly E.; Macías, Wendy; Youngs, Rachael M.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali; Dudman, Joshua T.; Konradi, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptor-mediated signal transduction and gene expression play a central role in many brain disorders from schizophrenia to Parkinson’s disease to addiction. While trying to evaluate the role of L-type Ca2+ channels in dopamine D1 receptor-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), we found that activation of dopamine D1 receptors alters the properties of L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitors and turns them into facilitators...

  2. Tx1, from Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom, interacts with dihydropyridine sensitive-calcium channels in GH3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvea dos Santos, R.; Soares, M.A.; Pimenta, A.M.; De Lima, M.E.; ICB, UFMG, Belo Horizonte

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use the binding assay of tritiated-dihydropyridine and radioiodinated Tx1, isolated from the Phoneutria nigriventer venom, in order to show the presence of Ca v 1 calcium channels on pituitary tumour cell (GH3). We showed that GH3 cells have specific sites for 125 I-Tx1, which are sensitive to nifedipine (∼20%). Reverse competition assay with 3 H-PN200-110 (40% inhibition) and electrophysiological data (50% inhibition) suggest that Ca v 1 calcium channels are target sites for this toxin. To summarize, Tx1 binds to specific sites on GH3 cells and this interaction results in Ca v 1 calcium channel blockade. 3 H-PN200-110 and 125 I-Tx1 binding assays proved to be useful tools to show the presence of calcium channels on GH3 cells. (author)

  3. Skeletal muscle dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel (CACNA1S) gene mutations in chinese patients with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hua; Hsu, Yaw-Don; Cheng, Nai-Lin; Kao, Ming-Ching

    2005-02-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP), familial periodic paralysis (FPP), and sporadic periodic paralysis (SPP) are common causes of hypokalemic periodic paralysis and have similar clinical presentations, thus possibly sharing the identical mutations. We analyzed the role of the three known CACNA1S gene mutations (R528H, R1239H, and R1239G) in Chinese patients, including two FPP families, 36 TPP patients, 12 SPP patients, and their relatives. Fifty unrelated healthy subjects were also studied. Genomic DNA was prepared from the peripheral blood of all patients, their family members, and healthy subjects. Mutations of the CACNA1S gene were screened using polymerase chain reaction-based restriction analysis. Two FPP families had the R528H point mutation, but with incomplete penetrance occurring more commonly in men than in women. Only one SPP patient had a de novo mutation (R528H). None of the TPP patients had mutations in the three hot spots. Patients with FPP have R528H mutations in the CACNA1S gene. Only a few patients with SPP may share similar mutations with FPP. TPP patients do not carry any of the three known gene mutations.

  4. Rescuing cardiac automaticity in L-type Cav1.3 channelopathies and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesirca, Pietro; Bidaud, Isabelle; Mangoni, Matteo E

    2016-10-15

    Pacemaker activity of the sino-atrial node generates the heart rate. Disease of the sinus node and impairment of atrioventricular conduction induce an excessively low ventricular rate (bradycardia), which cannot meet the needs of the organism. Bradycardia accounts for about half of the total workload of clinical cardiologists. The 'sick sinus' syndrome (SSS) is characterized by sinus bradycardia and periods of intermittent atrial fibrillation. Several genetic or acquired risk factors or pathologies can lead to SSS. Implantation of an electronic pacemaker constitutes the only available therapy for SSS. The incidence of SSS is forecast to double over the next 50 years, with ageing of the general population thus urging the development of complementary or alternative therapeutic strategies. In recent years an increasing number of mutations affecting ion channels involved in sino-atrial automaticity have been reported to underlie inheritable SSS. L-type Ca v 1.3 channels play a major role in the generation and regulation of sino-atrial pacemaker activity and atrioventricular conduction. Mutation in the CACNA1D gene encoding Ca v 1.3 channels induces loss-of-function in channel activity and underlies the sino-atrial node dysfunction and deafness syndrome (SANDD). Mice lacking Ca v 1.3 channels (Ca v 1.3 -/- ) fairly recapitulate SSS and constitute a precious model to test new therapeutic approaches to handle this disease. Work in our laboratory shows that targeting G protein-gated K + (I KACh ) channels effectively rescues SSS of Ca v 1.3 -/- mice. This new concept of 'compensatory' ion channel targeting shines new light on the principles underlying the pacemaker mechanism and may open the way to new therapies for SSS. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  5. Structural model for dihydropyridine binding to L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B; Zhorov, Boris S

    2009-07-10

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca(2+) binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers.

  6. Structural Model for Dihydropyridine Binding to L-type Calcium Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis B.; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2009-01-01

    1,4-Dihydropyridines (DHPs) constitute a major class of ligands for L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCC). The DHPs have a boat-like, six-membered ring with an NH group at the stern, an aromatic moiety at the bow, and substituents at the port and starboard sides. Various DHPs exhibit antagonistic or agonistic activities, which were previously explained as stabilization or destabilization, respectively, of the closed activation gate by the portside substituents. Here we report a novel structural model in which agonist and antagonist activities are determined by different parts of the DHP molecule and have different mechanisms. In our model, which is based on Monte Carlo minimizations of DHP-LTCC complexes, the DHP moieties at the stern, bow, and starboard form H-bonds with side chains of the key DHP-sensing residues Tyr_IIIS6, Tyr_IVS6, and Gln_IIIS5, respectively. We propose that these H-bonds, which are common for agonists and antagonists, stabilize the LTCC conformation with the open activation gate. This explains why both agonists and antagonists increase probability of the long lasting channel openings and why even partial disruption of the contacts eliminates the agonistic action. In our model, the portside approaches the selectivity filter. Hydrophobic portside of antagonists may induce long lasting channel closings by destabilizing Ca2+ binding to the selectivity filter glutamates. Agonists have either hydrophilic substituents or a hydrogen atom at their portside, and thus lack this destabilizing effect. The predicted orientation of the DHP core allows accommodation of long substituents in the domain interface or in the inner pore. Our model may be useful for developing novel clinically relevant LTCC blockers. PMID:19416978

  7. Potential Biomarker of L type Amino Acid Transporter 1 in Breast Cancer Progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Zhongxing; Cho, Heidi T.; Williams, Larry; Zhu, Aizhi; Liang, Ke; Huang, Ke; Wu, Hui; Jiang, Chunsu; Hong, Samuel; Crowe, Ronald; Goodman, Mark M.; Shim, Hyunsuk

    2011-01-01

    L type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is essential for the transport of large neutral amino acids. However, its role in breast cancer growth remains largely unknown. The purpose of the study is to investigate whether LAT1 is a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. LAT1 mRNA and protein levels in breast cancer cell lines and tissues were analyzed. In addition, the effects of targeting LAT1 for the inhibition of breast cancer cell tumorigenesis were assessed with soft agar assay. The imaging of xenograft with 1 amino 3 [ 18F ]fluorocyclo butane 1 carboxylic acid ([ 18F ]FACBC) PET was assessed for its diagnostic biomarker potential. Normal breast tissue or low malignant cell lines expressed low levels of LAT1 mRNA and protein, while highly malignant cancer cell lines and high grade breast cancer tissue expressed high levels of LAT1. In addition, higher expression levels of LAT1 in breast cancer tissues were consistent with advanced stage breast cancer. Furtermore, the blockade of LAT1 with its inhibitor, 2 amino bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane 2 carboxylic acid (BCH), or the knockdown of LAT1 with siRNA, inhibited proliferation and tumorigenesis of breast cancer cells. A leucine analog, [ 18F ]FACBC, has been demonstrated to be an excellent PET tracer for the non invasive imaging og malignant breast cancer using an orthotopic animal model. The overexpression of LAT1 is required for the progression of breast cancer. LAT1 represents a potential biomarker for therapy and diagnosis of breast cancer. [ 18F ]FACBC that correlates with LAT1 function is a potential PET tracer for malignant breast tumor imaging

  8. Transport of Iodothyronines by Human L-Type Amino Acid Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevenbergen, Chantal; Meima, Marcel E; Lima de Souza, Elaine C; Peeters, Robin P; Kinne, Anita; Krause, Gerd; Visser, W Edward; Visser, Theo J

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) transporters facilitate cellular TH influx and efflux, which is paramount for normal physiology. The L-type amino acid transporters LAT1 and LAT2 are known to facilitate TH transport. However, the role of LAT3, LAT4, and LAT5 is still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to further characterize TH transport by LAT1 and LAT2 and to explore possible TH transport by LAT3, LAT4, and LAT5. FLAG-LAT1-5 constructs were transiently expressed in COS1 cells. LAT1 and LAT2 were cotransfected with the CD98 heavy chain. Cellular transport was measured using 10 nM (125)I-labeled T4, T3, rT3, 3,3'-T2, and 10 μM [(125)I]3'-iodotyrosine (MIT) as substrates. Intracellular metabolism of these substrates was determined in cells cotransfected with either of the LATs with type 1 or type 3 deiodinase. LAT1 facilitated cellular uptake of all substrates and LAT2 showed a net uptake of T3, 3,3'-T2, and MIT. Expression of LAT3 or LAT4 did not affect transport of T4 and T3 but resulted in the decreased cellular accumulation of 3,3'-T2 and MIT. LAT5 did not facilitate the transport of any substrate. Cotransfection with LAT3 or LAT4 strongly diminished the cellular accumulation of 3,3'-T2 and MIT by LAT1 and LAT2. These data were confirmed by metabolism studies. LAT1 and LAT2 show distinct preferences for the uptake of the different iodocompounds, whereas LAT3 and LAT4 specifically facilitate the 3,3'-T2 and MIT efflux. Together our findings suggest that different sets of transporters with specific influx or efflux capacities may cooperate to regulate the cellular thyroid state.

  9. L-type calcium channels refine the neural population code of sound level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Calum Alex; Green, David Brian

    2016-01-01

    The coding of sound level by ensembles of neurons improves the accuracy with which listeners identify how loud a sound is. In the auditory system, the rate at which neurons fire in response to changes in sound level is shaped by local networks. Voltage-gated conductances alter local output by regulating neuronal firing, but their role in modulating responses to sound level is unclear. We tested the effects of L-type calcium channels (CaL: CaV1.1–1.4) on sound-level coding in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICC) in the auditory midbrain. We characterized the contribution of CaL to the total calcium current in brain slices and then examined its effects on rate-level functions (RLFs) in vivo using single-unit recordings in awake mice. CaL is a high-threshold current and comprises ∼50% of the total calcium current in ICC neurons. In vivo, CaL activates at sound levels that evoke high firing rates. In RLFs that increase monotonically with sound level, CaL boosts spike rates at high sound levels and increases the maximum firing rate achieved. In different populations of RLFs that change nonmonotonically with sound level, CaL either suppresses or enhances firing at sound levels that evoke maximum firing. CaL multiplies the gain of monotonic RLFs with dynamic range and divides the gain of nonmonotonic RLFs with the width of the RLF. These results suggest that a single broad class of calcium channels activates enhancing and suppressing local circuits to regulate the sensitivity of neuronal populations to sound level. PMID:27605536

  10. Protein kinase D regulates the human cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel through serine 1884.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Yusuke; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Hirose, Shigehisa; Maturana, Andrés D

    2011-12-15

    Protein kinase D (PKD) regulates the activity of the L-type calcium channel in rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. However, the functional target residues of PKD on the L-type calcium channel remain to be identified. Our aim was to identify the functional phosphorylation sites of PKD on the human L-type calcium channel. The pore subunit of the human CaV1.2 (hCaV1.2) was stably expressed in HEK293 cells. Both the expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKD and the mutation of serine 1884 but not serine 1930, putative targets of PKD, strongly reduced L-type calcium currents and single channel activity without affecting the channel's expression at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest that serine 1884 is essential for the regulation of hCaV1.2 by PKD. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rock Tea extract (Jasonia glutinosa) relaxes rat aortic smooth muscle by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Marta Sofía; Oliván-Viguera, Aida; Garrido, Irene; Langa, Elisa; Berzosa, César; López, Víctor; Gómez-Rincón, Carlota; Murillo, María Divina; Köhler, Ralf

    2015-12-01

    In traditional herbal medicine, Rock Tea (Jasonia glutinosa) is known for its prophylactic and therapeutic value in various disorders including arterial hypertension. However, the mechanism by which Rock Tea exerts blood pressure-lowering actions has not been elucidated yet. Our aim was to demonstrate vasorelaxing effects of Rock Tea extract and to reveal its possible action mechanism. Isometric myography was conducted on high-K+-precontracted rings from rat thoracic aorta and tested extracts at concentrations of 0.5-5 mg/ml. Whole-cell patch-clamp experiments were performed in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (line A7r5) to determine blocking effects on L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extract relaxed the aorta contracted by high [K+] concentration dependently with an EC50 of ≈2.4 mg/ml and produced ≈75 % relaxation at the highest concentration tested. The L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, verapamil (10(-6) M), had similar effects. Rock Tea extract had no effect in nominally Ca(2+)-free high-K(+) buffer but significantly inhibited contractions to re-addition of Ca(2+). Rock Tea extract inhibited the contractions induced by the L-type Ca(2+) channel activator Bay K 8644 (10(-5) M) and by phenylephrine (10(-6) M). Rock Tea extract and Y-27632 (10(-6) M), Rho-kinase inhibitor, had similar effects and the respective effects were not additive. Patch-clamp experiments demonstrated that Rock Tea extract (2.5 mg/ml) virtually abolished L-type Ca(2+) currents in A7r5. We conclude that Rock Tea extract produced vasorelaxation of rat aorta and that this relaxant effect is mediated by inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Rock Tea extracts may be of phytomedicinal value for prevention and adjuvant treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  12. The Contribution of L-Type Cav1.3 Channels to Retinal Light Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liheng Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LTCCs regulate tonic neurotransmitter release from sensory neurons including retinal photoreceptors. There are three types of LTCCs (Cav1.2, Cav1.3, and Cav1.4 expressed in the retina. While Cav1.2 is expressed in all retinal cells including the Müller glia and neurons, Cav1.3 and Cav1.4 are expressed in the retinal neurons with Cav1.4 exclusively expressed in the photoreceptor synaptic terminals. Mutations in the gene encoding Cav1.4 cause incomplete X-linked congenital stationary night blindness in humans. Even though Cav1.3 is present in the photoreceptor inner segments and the synaptic terminals in various vertebrate species, its role in vision is unclear, since genetic alterations in Cav1.3 are not associated with severe vision impairment in humans or in Cav1.3-null (Cav1.3−/− mice. However, a failure to regulate Cav1.3 was found in a mouse model of Usher syndrome, the most common cause of combined deafness and blindness in humans, indicating that Cav1.3 may contribute to retinal function. In this report, we combined physiological and morphological data to demonstrate the role of Cav1.3 in retinal physiology and function that has been undervalued thus far. Through ex vivo and in vivo electroretinogram (ERG recordings and immunohistochemical staining, we found that Cav1.3 plays a role in retinal light responses and synaptic plasticity. Pharmacological inhibition of Cav1.3 decreased ex vivo ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes. In Cav1.3−/− mice, their dark-adapted ERG a-, b-wave, and oscillatory potential amplitudes were significantly dampened, and implicit times were delayed compared to the wild type (WT. Furthermore, the density of ribbon synapses was reduced in the outer plexiform layer of Cav1.3−/− mice retinas. Hence, Cav1.3 plays a more prominent role in retinal physiology and function than previously reported.

  13. Orexin-A potentiates L-type calcium/barium currents in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F; Weng, S-J; Yang, X-L; Zhong, Y-M

    2015-10-01

    Two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B (also called hypocretin-1 and -2), have been implicated in sleep/wake regulation, feeding behaviors via the activation of two subtypes of G-protein-coupled receptors: orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R). While the expression of orexins and orexin receptors is immunohistochemically revealed in retinal neurons, the function of these peptides in the retina is largely unknown. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in rat retinal slices, we demonstrated that orexin-A increased L-type-like barium currents (IBa,L) in ganglion cells (GCs), and the effect was blocked by the selective OX1R antagonist SB334867, but not by the OX2R antagonist TCS OX2 29. The orexin-A effect was abolished by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S/GPAnt-2A, a Gq protein inhibitor, suggesting the mediation of Gq. Additionally, during internal dialysis of the phosphatidylinositol (PI)-phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, orexin-A did not change the IBa,L of GCs, whereas the orexin-A effect persisted in the presence of the phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC inhibitor D609. The orexin-A-induced potentiation was not seen with internal infusion of Ca(2+)-free solution or when inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores was blocked by heparin/xestospongins-C. Moreover, the orexin-A effect was mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, but was eliminated when PKC was inhibited by bisindolylmaleimide IV (Bis-IV)/Gö6976. Neither adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) nor guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-protein kinase G (PKG) signaling pathway was likely involved, as orexin-A persisted to potentiate the IBa,L of GCs no matter these two pathways were activated or inhibited. These results suggest that, by activating OX1R, orexin-A potentiates the IBa,L of rat GCs through a distinct Gq/PI-PLC/IP3/Ca(2+)/PKC signaling pathway. Copyright

  14. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... Abstract. X-chromosome inactivation, which was discovered by Mary Lyon in 1961 results in random silencing of one X chromosome in female mammals. This review is dedicated to Mary Lyon, who passed away last year. She predicted many of the features of X inactivation, for e.g., the existence of an X ...

  15. Photodynamic inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F; Neves, Maria Graça P M S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-07-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  16. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria Amparo F.; Neves, Maria Graça P. M. S.; Cunha, Ângela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i) summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii) discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process. PMID:22852040

  17. Photodynamic Inactivation of Mammalian Viruses and Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic inactivation (PDI has been used to inactivate microorganisms through the use of photosensitizers. The inactivation of mammalian viruses and bacteriophages by photosensitization has been applied with success since the first decades of the last century. Due to the fact that mammalian viruses are known to pose a threat to public health and that bacteriophages are frequently used as models of mammalian viruses, it is important to know and understand the mechanisms and photodynamic procedures involved in their photoinactivation. The aim of this review is to (i summarize the main approaches developed until now for the photodynamic inactivation of bacteriophages and mammalian viruses and, (ii discuss and compare the present state of the art of mammalian viruses PDI with phage photoinactivation, with special focus on the most relevant mechanisms, molecular targets and factors affecting the viral inactivation process.

  18. The Direct l-type Resonance Spectrum of CF3CCH in the Vibrational State v10=2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wötzel, U.; Mäder, H.; Harder, H.; Pracna, Petr; Sarka, K.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 312, 1-3 (2007), s. 159-167 ISSN 0301-0104 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/01/1274 Grant - others:GA SR(SK) 1/0215/03 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : symmetric top * Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy * direct l-type resonance and rotational spectrum Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.805, year: 2007

  19. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvis-Pareja, David; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Hidalgo, Jorge; Ayala, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca 2+ channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca 2+ channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca 2+ channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca 2+ channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca 2+ channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca 2+ channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca 2+ entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca 2+ blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca 2+ blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties

  20. Glutathionylation of the L-type Ca2+ Channel in Oxidative Stress-Induced Pathology of the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria P. A. Johnstone

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence to suggest that protein glutathionylation is a key process contributing to the development of pathology. Glutathionylation occurs as a result of posttranslational modification of a protein and involves the addition of a glutathione moiety at cysteine residues. Such modification can occur on a number of proteins, and exerts a variety of functional consequences. The L-type Ca2+ channel has been identified as a glutathionylation target that participates in the development of cardiac pathology. Ca2+ influx via the L-type Ca2+ channel increases production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS in cardiomyocytes during periods of oxidative stress. This induces a persistent increase in channel open probability, and the resulting constitutive increase in Ca2+ influx amplifies the cross-talk between the mitochondria and the channel. Novel strategies utilising targeted peptide delivery to uncouple mitochondrial ROS and Ca2+ flux via the L-type Ca2+ channel following ischemia-reperfusion have delivered promising results, and have proven capable of restoring appropriate mitochondrial function in myocytes and in vivo.

  1. N'-formylkynurenine-photosensitized inactivation of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walrant, P.; Santus, R.; Redpath, J.L.; Pileni, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the sensitizing properties of N'-formylkynurenine (FK) on bacteriophages, as part of a wider study of FK photosensitization of systems which have both protein and DNA components. Suspensions of bacteriophages T 6 and T 7 were near-U.V. (lambda > 320 nm) irradiated in solutions saturated with either O 2 or He in the presence of 5 x 10 -4 M FK. The survival curves obtained demonstrated that FK can act as a photosensitizer for biological inactivation. The involvement of singlet oxygen as one factor in this FK sensitized inactivation was clearly demonstrated by the increased rate of inactivation when the phage were suspended in O 2 -saturated D 2 O, in place of water, during irradiation. The complex mechanism of phage inactivation must involve direct interaction between excited FK and substrate, as well as singlet oxygen. FK is therefore a new natural photosensitizer of significance in cell photochemistry induced by sunlight. (U.K.)

  2. Physical inactivation and stabilization of sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, D.

    1979-07-01

    High temperature conditioning of sludge is a stabilization process that insures sterilization. Both thermal pasteurization and irradiation are inactivation processes. Viruses and parasites are inactivated at 70-80 0 C. Total bacterial destruction requires higher temperatures and/or detention time. Radio sensitivity of pathogens and pertinent treatment parameters are examined. If sludge is to be land disposed, disinfection requires irradiation doses ranging 500 Krad; if cattle feeding is considered, the required dose is 1 Mrad

  3. Microbial Inactivation by Ultrasound Assisted Supercritical Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedito, Jose; Ortuño, Carmen; Castillo-Zamudio, Rosa Isela; Mulet, Antonio

    A method combining supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) and high power ultrasound (HPU) has been developed and tested for microbial/enzyme inactivation purposes, at different process conditions for both liquid and solid matrices. In culture media, using only SC-CO2, the inactivation rate of E. coli and S. cerevisiae increased with pressure and temperature; and the total inactivation (7-8 log-cycles) was attained after 25 and 140 min of SC-CO2 (350 bar, 36 °C) treatment, respectively. Using SC-CO2+HPU, the time for the total inactivation of both microorganisms was reduced to only 1-2 min, at any condition selected. The SC-CO2+HPU inactivation of both microorganisms was slower in juices (avg. 4.9 min) than in culture media (avg. 1.5 min). In solid samples (chicken, turkey ham and dry-cured pork cured ham) treated with SC-CO2 and SC-CO2+HPU, the inactivation rate of E. coli increased with temperature. The application of HPU to the SC-CO2 treatments accelerated the inactivation rate of E. coli and that effect was more pronounced in treatments with isotonic solution surrounding the solid food samples. The application of HPU enhanced the SC-CO2 inactivation mechanisms of microorganisms, generating a vigorous agitation that facilitated the CO2 solubilization and the mass transfer process. The cavitation generated by HPU could damage the cell walls accelerating the extraction of vital constituents and the microbial death. Thus, using the combined technique, reasonable industrial processing times and mild process conditions could be used which could result into a cost reduction and lead to the minimization in the food nutritional and organoleptic changes.

  4. Methylene blue counteracts H2S toxicity-induced cardiac depression by restoring L-type Ca channel activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Sonobe, Takashi; Song, Jianliang; Rannals, Matthew D.; Wang, JuFang; Tubbs, Nicole; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Haouzi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that methylene blue (MB) can counteract hydrogen sulfide (H2S) intoxication-induced circulatory failure. Because of the multifarious effects of high concentrations of H2S on cardiac function, as well as the numerous properties of MB, the nature of this interaction, if any, remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to clarify 1) the effects of MB on H2S-induced cardiac toxicity and 2) whether L-type Ca2+ channels, one of the targets of H2S, could transduce some of the counteracting effects of MB. In sedated rats, H2S infused at a rate that would be lethal within 5 min (24 μM·kg−1·min−1), produced a rapid fall in left ventricle ejection fraction, determined by echocardiography, leading to a pulseless electrical activity. Blood concentrations of gaseous H2S reached 7.09 ± 3.53 μM when cardiac contractility started to decrease. Two to three injections of MB (4 mg/kg) transiently restored cardiac contractility, blood pressure, and V̇o2, allowing the animals to stay alive until the end of H2S infusion. MB also delayed PEA by several minutes following H2S-induced coma and shock in unsedated rats. Applying a solution containing lethal levels of H2S (100 μM) on isolated mouse cardiomyocytes significantly reduced cell contractility, intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) transient amplitudes, and L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa) within 3 min of exposure. MB (20 mg/l) restored the cardiomyocyte function, ([Ca2+]i) transient, and ICa. The present results offer a new approach for counteracting H2S toxicity and potentially other conditions associated with acute inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:26962024

  5. Targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 for anticancer therapy: clinical impact from diagnostics to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2015-01-01

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is one of the amino acid transporters. It is overexpressed in various types of cancer cells, while it is produced restrictedly in normal tissues. We discuss its characteristics in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also mention the current applications to target LAT1 for anticancer therapy focusing on prognostic biomarkers, radio-labeled tumor imaging reagents, amino acid-stapled prodrugs, LAT1-mediated enhanced transport of anticancer drugs and LAT1 inhibitors. LAT1 can be a versatile target to promisingly develop transporter-based drugs with enhanced drug delivery potential for anticancer therapy.

  6. A novel dihydropyridine with 3-aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution blocks L-type calcium channels in rat cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvis-Pareja, David [Advanced Center for Chronic Diseases (ACCDiS), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas and Facultad Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Centro Estudios Moleculares de la Célula (CEMC), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas and Facultad Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Zapata-Torres, Gerald [Departamento de Química Inorgánica y Analítica, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Hidalgo, Jorge [Centro Estudios Moleculares de la Célula (CEMC), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas and Facultad Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Ayala, Pedro [Centro Estudios Moleculares de la Célula (CEMC), Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas and Facultad Medicina, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); and others

    2014-08-15

    Rationale: Dihydropyridines are widely used for the treatment of several cardiac diseases due to their blocking activity on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channels and their renowned antioxidant properties. Methods: We synthesized six novel dihydropyridine molecules and performed docking studies on the binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel. We used biochemical techniques on isolated adult rat cardiomyocytes to assess the efficacy of these molecules on their Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity and antioxidant properties. The Ca{sup 2+} channel-blocking activity was evaluated by confocal microscopy on fluo-3AM loaded cardiomyocytes, as well as using patch clamp experiments. Antioxidant properties were evaluated by flow cytometry using the ROS sensitive dye 1,2,3 DHR. Results: Our docking studies show that a novel compound with 3-OH substitution inserts into the active binding site of the L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel previously described for nitrendipine. In biochemical assays, the novel meta-OH group in the aryl in C4 showed a high blocking effect on L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel as opposed to para-substituted compounds. In the tests we performed, none of the molecules showed antioxidant properties. Conclusions: Only substitutions in C2, C3 and C5 of the aryl ring render dihydropyridine compounds with the capacity of blocking LTCC. Based on our docking studies, we postulate that the antioxidant activity requires a larger group than the meta-OH substitution in C2, C3 or C5 of the dihydropyridine ring. - Highlights: • Dihydropyridine (DHP) molecules are widely used in cardiovascular disease. • DHPs block Ca{sup 2+} entry through LTCC—some DHPs have antioxidant activity as well. • We synthesized 6 new DHPs and tested their Ca{sup 2+} blocking and antioxidant activities. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution strongly increases their Ca{sup 2+} blocking activity. • 3-Aryl meta-hydroxyl substitution did not affect the antioxidant properties.

  7. Inactivation of pathogenic bacteria in food matrices: high pressure processing, photodynamic inactivation and pressure-assisted photodynamic inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, A.; Couceiro, J.; Bonifácio, D.; Martins, C.; Almeida, A.; Neves, M. G. P. M. S.; Faustino, M. A. F.; Saraiva, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Traditional food processing methods frequently depend on the application of high temperature. However, heat may cause undesirable changes in food properties and often has a negative impact on nutritional value and organoleptic characteristics. Therefore, reducing the microbial load without compromising the desirable properties of food products is still a technological challenge. High-pressure processing (HPP) can be classified as a cold pasteurization technique, since it is a non-thermal food preservation method that uses hydrostatic pressure to inactivate spoilage microorganisms. At the same time, it increases shelf life and retains the original features of food. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is also regarded as promising approach for the decontamination of food matrices. In this case, the inactivation of bacterial cells is achieved by the cytotoxic effects of reactive oxygens species (ROS) produced from the combined interaction of a photosensitizer molecule, light and oxygen. This short review examines some recent developments on the application of HPP and PDI with food-grade photosensitizers for the inactivation of listeriae, taken as a food pathogen model. The results of a proof-of-concept trial of the use of high-pressure as a coadjutant to increase the efficiency of photodynamic inactivation of bacterial endospores is also addressed.

  8. Postsynaptic GABABRs Inhibit L-Type Calcium Channels and Abolish Long-Term Potentiation in Hippocampal Somatostatin Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam A. Booker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Inhibition provided by local GABAergic interneurons (INs activates ionotropic GABAA and metabotropic GABAB receptors (GABABRs. Despite GABABRs representing a major source of inhibition, little is known of their function in distinct IN subtypes. Here, we show that, while the archetypal dendritic-inhibitory somatostatin-expressing INs (SOM-INs possess high levels of GABABR on their somato-dendritic surface, they fail to produce significant postsynaptic inhibitory currents. Instead, GABABRs selectively inhibit dendritic CaV1.2 (L-type Ca2+ channels on SOM-IN dendrites, leading to reduced calcium influx and loss of long-term potentiation at excitatory input synapses onto these INs. These data provide a mechanism by which GABABRs can contribute to disinhibition and control the efficacy of extrinsic inputs to hippocampal networks. : Booker et al. show that GABAB receptors are highly expressed on somatostatin interneuron dendrites. Rather than activating Kir3 channels, they preferentially co-cluster with, and negatively couple to, L-type calcium channels inhibiting long-term potentiation at excitatory inputs. Keywords: GABAergic interneurons, feedback inhibition, GABAB receptors, dendrites, Cav1.2 channels, synaptic plasticity, hippocampus, electron microscopy, whole-cell recording, multi-photon imaging

  9. Gestational hypothyroidism-induced changes in L-type calcium channels of rat aorta smooth muscle and their impact on the responses to vasoconstrictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoun Sedaghat

    2015-02-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that in hypothyroid offspring L-type Ca2+ channels are less functional, while intracellular Ca2+ handling systems are less modified by low levels of maternal thyroid hormones.

  10. The Wood Strengthening and Decorative Automated Production Line ZY-06L-Type Manipulator Motion Analysis and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Hao

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available ZY-06L-type manipulator is the important components of Wood Surface layer Strengthening and Decorative Automated Production Line, designed for a variety of sheet metal or semi-finished components handling, distribution and laying work in the workshop. Through the establishment of the manipulator kinematics equations, combined the position coordinates of the manipulator and object in the actual work environment, and solving this equation to get the relationship between the manipulator end-effectors position and posture with the joint variables. The use of engineering software UG NX8.0 for modeling and simulation of the manipulator, and analysis the reasonableness of structural and workflow design. Provide the basis and reference to the manipulator structure optimization and control systems developments.

  11. siRNA-induced in vivo downregulation of L-type calcium channels in rat small mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Larsen, Per; Kold-Petersen, Henrik Houmann

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ entry via L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2) is a key factor in regulation of excitation-contraction coupling in smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Previous gene deletion studies have provided insight into the critical role of the pore-forming α1C subunit in regulation of blood pressure...... studied using isometric myography. Specific transfection downregulates mRNA of Cav1.2 by 93±2% within 3 days but the mRNA level recovered 10 days after transfection (110±13 % of the control level). Immunohistochemistry identified reduced Cav1.2 expression in the arteries transfected with siRNA directed...

  12. Differential expression of T- and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in renal resistance vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pernille B. Lærkegaard; Jensen, Boye L.; Andreasen, D

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of voltage-dependent calcium channels in kidney pre- and postglomerular resistance vessels was determined at the molecular and functional levels. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of microdissected rat preglomerular vessels and cultured smooth muscle cells...... showed coexpression of mRNAs for T-type subunits (Ca(V)3.1, Ca(V)3.2) and for an L-type subunit (Ca(V)1.2). The same expression pattern was observed in juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and outer medullary vasa recta. No calcium channel messages were detected in cortical efferent arterioles. Ca(V)1.......2 protein was demonstrated by immunochemical labeling of rat preglomerular vasculature and juxtamedullary efferent arterioles and vasa recta. Cortical efferent arterioles were not immunopositive. Recordings of intracellular calcium concentration with digital fluorescence imaging microscopy showed...

  13. Cellular tropism, population dynamics, host range and taxonomic status of an aphid secondary symbiont, SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L type symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L type symbiont is a newly reported aphid secondary symbiont. Phylogenetic evidence from molecular markers indicates that SMLS belongs to the Rickettsiaceae and has a sibling relationship with Orientia tsutsugamushi. A comparative analysis of coxA nucleotide sequences further supports recognition of SMLS as a new genus in the Rickettsiaceae. In situ hybridization reveals that SMLS is housed in both sheath cells and secondary bacteriocytes and it is also detected in aphid hemolymph. The population dynamics of SMLS differ from those of Buchnera aphidicola and titer levels of SMLS increase in older aphids. A survey of 13 other aphids reveals that SMLS only occurs in wheat-associated species.

  14. Effects of Thermocapillary Forces during Welding of 316L-Type Wrought, Cast and Powder Metallurgy Austenitic Stainless Steels

    CERN Document Server

    Sgobba, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is now under construction at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). This 27 km long accelerator requires 1248 superconducting dipole magnets operating at 1.9 K. The cold mass of the dipole magnets is closed by a shrinking cylinder with two longitudinal welds and two end covers at both extremities of the cylinder. The end covers, for which fabrication by welding, casting or Powder Metallurgy (PM) was considered, are dished-heads equipped with a number of protruding nozzles for the passage of the different cryogenic lines. Structural materials and welds must retain high strength and toughness at cryogenic temperature. AISI 316L-type austenitic stainless steel grades have been selected because of their mechanical properties, ductility, weldability and stability of the austenitic phase against low-temperature spontaneous martensitic transformation. 316LN is chosen for the fabrication of the end covers, while the interconnection components to be welded on the protrud...

  15. Cellular Tropism, Population Dynamics, Host Range and Taxonomic Status of an Aphid Secondary Symbiont, SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L Type Symbiont)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Xiao, Jin-Hua; Xu, Zhao-Huan; Murphy, Robert W.; Huang, Da-Wei

    2011-01-01

    SMLS (Sitobion miscanthi L type symbiont) is a newly reported aphid secondary symbiont. Phylogenetic evidence from molecular markers indicates that SMLS belongs to the Rickettsiaceae and has a sibling relationship with Orientia tsutsugamushi. A comparative analysis of coxA nucleotide sequences further supports recognition of SMLS as a new genus in the Rickettsiaceae. In situ hybridization reveals that SMLS is housed in both sheath cells and secondary bacteriocytes and it is also detected in aphid hemolymph. The population dynamics of SMLS differ from those of Buchnera aphidicola and titer levels of SMLS increase in older aphids. A survey of 13 other aphids reveals that SMLS only occurs in wheat-associated species. PMID:21789197

  16. Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein (ox-LDL) Cholesterol Induces the Expression of miRNA-223 and L-type Calcium Channel Protein in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fengping; Xu, Xin; Yuan, Shuguo; Tan, Liangqiu; Gao, Lingjun; Ma, Shaochun; Zhang, Shebin; Ma, Zhanzhong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Fenglian; Chen, Baofeng; Zhang, Beibei; Pang, Jungang; Huang, Xiuyan; Weng, Jiaqiang

    2016-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia causing high morbidity and mortality. While changing of the cellular calcium homeostasis plays a critical role in AF, the L-type calcium channel α1c protein has suggested as an important regulator of reentrant spiral dynamics and is a major component of AF-related electrical remodeling. Our computational modeling predicted that miRNA-223 may regulate the CACNA1C gene which encodes the cardiac L-type calcium channel α1c subunit. We found that oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) cholesterol significantly up-regulates both the expression of miRNA-223 and L-type calcium channel protein. In contrast, knockdown of miRNA-223 reduced L-type calcium channel protein expression, while genetic knockdown of endogenous miRNA-223 dampened AF vulnerability. Transfection of miRNA-223 by adenovirus-mediated expression enhanced L-type calcium currents and promoted AF in mice while co-injection of a CACNA1C-specific miR-mimic counteracted the effect. Taken together, ox-LDL, as a known factor in AF-associated remodeling, positively regulates miRNA-223 transcription and L-type calcium channel protein expression. Our results implicate a new molecular mechanism for AF in which miRNA-223 can be used as an biomarker of AF rheumatic heart disease.

  17. The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF3CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woetzel, Ulf; Maeder, Heinrich; Harder, Hauke; Pracna, Petr; Sarka, Kamil

    2005-01-01

    The direct l-type resonance spectrum of CF 3 CCH in the vibrational state ν 10 = 2 has been measured by means of waveguide microwave Fourier transform spectroscopy in the range 8-26 GHz. Two types of direct l-type resonance transitions induced by the (Δk = ±2, Δl = ±2) interaction could be observed: 262 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 2 selection rule covering values of J = 17-64 and G vertical bar k - l vertical bar from 2 to 15, and 75 transitions following the ΔJ = 0, Δk = Δl = 4 selection rule covering values of J = 44-70 and G up to 3. The strong (2, 2) resonance furthermore allowed the observation of A 1 -A 2 splittings of the k = l = ±2 states from J = 63-70. The transitions with G = 3 showed splittings due to the (4, -2) and (0, 6) interactions. The corresponding energy level systems and part of the Hamiltonian matrix are discussed. Strong perturbations due to Δ(k - l) = 3 interactions coupling the states k = ±1, l = ±2 and k = ±4, l ±2 made possible the observation of perturbation-allowed transitions with selection rule k = ±1, l =± 2 ↔ k = 0, l = ±2. Additionally, the J = 2-1 and 3-2 rotational transitions have been measured. A multiple fitting analysis has been performed in which the experimental data have been fitted using five reduced forms of the effective Hamiltonian as proposed by Sarka and Harder [J. Mol. Spectrosc. 197 (1999) 254]. Parameters up to sixth order have been determined including the axial rotational constant A for both values of vertical bar l vertical bar and the unitary equivalence of the determined parameter sets has been demonstrated

  18. Inactivation of prion infectivity by ionizing rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gominet, M. [Ionisos, ZI les Chatinieres, F01120 Dagneux (France); Vadrot, C.; Austruy, G. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France); Darbord, J.C. [Paris V University, Central Pharmacy of Hospitals, 4 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75006, Paris (France)], E-mail: darbord@pharmacie.univ-paris5.fr

    2007-11-15

    Inactivation of prion deposits on medical devices or prion contamination in pharmaceutical raw materials is considered as impossible by using gamma irradiation. Early, the guideline WHO/CDS/CSR/APH/2000 has described irradiation as an ineffective process. But, in 2003, S. Miekka et al. noted radiation inactivation of prions in a particular application to purify human albumin, shown by the physical denaturation of the infectious protein (PrP). The aim of our study was to determine the inactivation of prions with a scrapie model (strain C506M3) by irradiating standardised preparations. Results: Gamma irradiation was partially effective, showing a 4-5 log reduction on exposure to 50 kGy. A characteristic effect-dose curve was not observed (25, 50 and 100 kGy), only an increase in the incubation period of the murine disease (229 days with 25 kGy to 290 days with 100 kGy) compared with 170 days without irradiation. Since the inactivation was not a total one, the observed effect is significant. It is proposed that further work be undertaken with the model to investigate the application of gamma radiation known levels of prion contamination.

  19. Bioinactivation: Software for modelling dynamic microbial inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garre, Alberto; Fernández, Pablo S; Lindqvist, Roland; Egea, Jose A

    2017-03-01

    This contribution presents the bioinactivation software, which implements functions for the modelling of isothermal and non-isothermal microbial inactivation. This software offers features such as user-friendliness, modelling of dynamic conditions, possibility to choose the fitting algorithm and generation of prediction intervals. The software is offered in two different formats: Bioinactivation core and Bioinactivation SE. Bioinactivation core is a package for the R programming language, which includes features for the generation of predictions and for the fitting of models to inactivation experiments using non-linear regression or a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (MCMC). The calculations are based on inactivation models common in academia and industry (Bigelow, Peleg, Mafart and Geeraerd). Bioinactivation SE supplies a user-friendly interface to selected functions of Bioinactivation core, namely the model fitting of non-isothermal experiments and the generation of prediction intervals. The capabilities of bioinactivation are presented in this paper through a case study, modelling the non-isothermal inactivation of Bacillus sporothermodurans. This study has provided a full characterization of the response of the bacteria to dynamic temperature conditions, including confidence intervals for the model parameters and a prediction interval of the survivor curve. We conclude that the MCMC algorithm produces a better characterization of the biological uncertainty and variability than non-linear regression. The bioinactivation software can be relevant to the food and pharmaceutical industry, as well as to regulatory agencies, as part of a (quantitative) microbial risk assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pulsed electric field inactivation in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is a novel, non-thermal pasteurization method which uses short, high electric field pulses to inactivate microorganisms. The advantage of a pasteurization method like PEF compared to regular heat pasteurization is that the taste, flavour, texture and nutritional value

  1. High Pressure Inactivation of HAV within Mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential of hepatitis A virus (HAV) to be inactivated within Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) by high pressure processing was evaluated. HAV was bioaccumulated within mussels to approximately 6-log10 PFU by exposure of mussels to HAV-contamina...

  2. Inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Ryo; Yonetamari, Kenta; Tokumitsu, Yusuke; Yonemori, Seiya; Yasuda, Hachiro; Mizuno, Akira

    2016-08-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus by OH radicals is measured. This study aims to evaluate the bactericidal effects of OH radicals produced by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma widely used for plasma medicine; however, in this study, OH radicals are produced by vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photolysis of water vapor instead of plasma to allow the production of OH radicals with almost no other reactive species. A 172 nm VUV light from a Xe2 excimer lamp irradiates a He-H2O mixture flowing in a quartz tube to photodissociate H2O to produce OH, H, O, HO2, H2O2, and O3. The produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) flow out of the quartz tube nozzle to the bacteria on an agar plate and cause inactivation. The inactivation by OH radicals among the six ROS is observed by properly setting the experimental conditions with the help of simulations calculating the ROS densities. A 30 s treatment with approximately 0.1 ppm OH radicals causes visible inactivation.

  3. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-06-24

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin-ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, we analyzed the pattern of CHFR expression in a number of human cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We found CpG methylation-dependent silencing of CHFR expression in 45% of cancer cell lines, 40% of primary colorectal cancers, 53% of colorectal adenomas, and 30% of primary head and neck cancers. Expression of CHFR was precisely correlated with both CpG methylation and deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the CpG-rich regulatory region. Moreover, CpG methylation and thus silencing of CHFR depended on the activities of two DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3b, as their genetic inactivation restored CHFR expression. Finally, cells with CHFR methylation had an intrinsically high mitotic index when treated with microtubule inhibitor. This means that cells in which CHFR was epigenetically inactivated constitute loss-of-function alleles for mitotic checkpoint control. Taken together, these findings shed light on a pathway by which mitotic checkpoint is bypassed in cancer cells and suggest that inactivation of checkpoint genes is much more widespread than previously suspected.

  4. Inactivation of Bacillus Anthracis Spores Using Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-30

    effect of SWNTs in combination with antimicrobial chemicals on inactivation of B. anthracis spores; 4) the effect of CNTs coated surfaces on the...2010 31-May-2014 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final Report: (Life Science Division/ Biochemistry ) Inactivation of Bacillus... Biochemistry ) Inactivation of Bacillus Anthracis Spores Using Carbon Nanotubes Report Title The Specific Aims of the project were to investigate: 1) the

  5. Regulation of mouse skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel by activation of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbono, O; Renganathan, M; Messi, M L

    1997-09-15

    We investigated the modulation of the skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel/dihydropyridine receptor in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) activation in single extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers from adult C57BL/6 mice. The L-type Ca2+ channel activity in its dual role as a voltage sensor and a selective Ca2+-conducting pore was recorded in voltage-clamp conditions. Peak Ca2+ current amplitude consistently increased after exposure to 20 ng/ml IGF-1 (EC50 = 5.6 +/- 1.8 nM). Peak IGF-1 effect on current amplitude at -20 mV was 210 +/- 18% of the control. Ca2+ current potentiation resulted from a shift in 13 mV of the Ca2+ current-voltage relationship toward more negative potentials. The IGF-1-induced facilitation of the Ca2+ current was not associated with an effect on charge movement amplitude and/or voltage distribution. These phenomena suggest that the L-type Ca2+ channel structures involved in voltage sensing are not involved in the response to the growth factor. The modulatory effect of IGF-1 on L-type Ca2+ channel was blocked by tyrosine kinase and PKC inhibitors, but not by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor. IGF-1-dependent phosphorylation of the L-type Ca2+ channel alpha1 subunit was demonstrated by incorporation of [gamma-32P]ATP to monolayers of adult fast-twitch skeletal muscles. IGF-1 induced phosphorylation of a protein at the 165 kDa band, corresponding to the L-type Ca2+ channel alpha1 subunit. These results show that the activation of the IGF-1R facilitates skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel activity via a PKC-dependent phosphorylation mechanism.

  6. Cortical inactivation by cooling in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben eCoomber

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversible inactivation of the cortex by surface cooling is a powerful method for studying the function of a particular area. Implanted cooling cryoloops have been used to study the role of individual cortical areas in auditory processing of awake-behaving cats. Cryoloops have also been used in rodents for reversible inactivation of the cortex, but recently there has been a concern that the cryoloop may also cool non-cortical structures either directly or via the perfusion of blood, cooled as it passed close to the cooling loop. In this study we have confirmed that the loop can inactivate most of the auditory cortex without causing a significant reduction in temperature of the auditory thalamus or other sub-cortical structures. We placed a cryoloop on the surface of the guinea pig cortex, cooled it to 2°C and measured thermal gradients across the neocortical surface. We found that the temperature dropped to 20-24°C among cells within a radius of about 2.5mm away from the loop. This temperature drop was sufficient to reduce activity of most cortical cells and led to the inactivation of almost the entire auditory region. When the temperature of thalamus, midbrain, and middle ear were measured directly during cortical cooling, there was a small drop in temperature (about 4°C but this was not sufficient to directly reduce neural activity. In an effort to visualise the extent of neural inactivation we measured the uptake of thallium ions following an intravenous injection. This confirmed that there was a large reduction of activity across much of the ipsilateral cortex and only a small reduction in subcortical structures.

  7. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  8. Characterisation of marrubenol, a diterpene extracted from Marrubium vulgare, as an L-type calcium channel blocker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bardai, Sanae; Wibo, Maurice; Hamaide, Marie-Christine; Lyoussi, Badiaa; Quetin-Leclercq, Joelle; Morel, Nicole

    2003-12-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of the relaxant activity of marrubenol, a diterpenoid extracted from Marrubium vulgare. In rat aorta, marrubenol was a more potent inhibitor of the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl (IC50: 11.8+/-0.3 microM, maximum relaxation: 93+/-0.6%) than of the contraction evoked by noradrenaline (maximum relaxation: 30+/-1.5%). 2. In fura-2-loaded aorta, marrubenol simultaneously inhibited the Ca2+ signal and the contraction evoked by 100 mM KCl, and decreased the quenching rate of fura-2 fluorescence by Mn2+. 3. Patch-clamp data obtained in aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) indicated that marrubenol inhibited Ba2+ inward current in a voltage-dependent manner (KD: 8+/-2 and 40+/-6 microM at holding potentials of -50 and -100 mV, respectively). 4. These results showed that marrubenol inhibits smooth muscle contraction by blocking L-type calcium channels.

  9. Inhibition by external Cd2+ of Na/Ca exchange and L-type Ca channel in rabbit ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, I A; Bates, J A; Howarth, F C; Levi, A J

    1997-05-01

    We investigated the effect of external Cd2+ on the Na/Ca exchange and the L-type Ca channel current (ICa,L) in whole cell patch-clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes at 36 degrees C. After the interfering ion channels and the Na/K pump were blocked, the exchange current was measured as the membrane current that was inhibited by 5 mM nickel. External Cd2+ inhibited Na/Ca exchange with a dissociation constant (KD) of 320.6 +/- 12.4 microM and a Hill coefficient of 1.5 +/- 0.09 (n = 13 cells) and ICa,L with a KD of 2.14 +/- 0.15 microM and a Hill coefficient of 0.74 +/- 0.03 (n = 11 cells). We observed some overlap in the Cd2+ concentration that blocked each mechanism. Cd2+ (100-500 microM) is used commonly to block ICa,L completely. However, 100 microM Cd2+ also inhibits 20% of the Na/Ca exchange activity, whereas 500 microM Cd2+ inhibits 60%.

  10. Potentiation of Opioid-Induced Analgesia by L-Type Calcium Channel Blockers: Need for Clinical Trial in Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Basu Ray

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous reports indicate that the analgesic effect of opioids is due to both closure of specific voltage-gated calcium channels (N- and P/Q-types and opening of G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRKs in neurons concerned with transmission of pain. However, administration of opioids leads to unacceptable levels of side effects, particularly at high doses. Thus, current research is directed towards simultaneously targeting other voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs like the L-type VGCCs or even other cell signaling mechanisms, which would aug-ment opioid-mediated analgesic effect without a concurrent increase in the side effects. Unfortunately, the results of these studies are often conflicting considering the different experimental paradigms (variable drug selection and their doses and also the specific pain test used for studying analgesia adopted by researchers. The present review focuses on some of the interesting findings regarding the analgesic effect of Opioids + L-VGCC blockers and suggests that time has come for a clinical trial of this combination of drugs in the treatment of cancer pain.

  11. Characterisation of L-Type Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT1 Expression in Human Skeletal Muscle by Immunofluorescent Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Hodson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The branch chain amino acid leucine is a potent stimulator of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle. Leucine rapidly enters the cell via the L-Type Amino Acid Transporter 1 (LAT1; however, little is known regarding the localisation and distribution of this transporter in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, we applied immunofluorescence staining approaches to visualise LAT1 in wild type (WT and LAT1 muscle-specific knockout (mKO mice, in addition to basal human skeletal muscle samples. LAT1 positive staining was visually greater in WT muscles compared to mKO muscle. In human skeletal muscle, positive LAT1 staining was noted close to the sarcolemmal membrane (dystrophin positive staining, with a greater staining intensity for LAT1 observed in the sarcoplasmic regions of type II fibres (those not stained positively for myosin heavy-chain 1, Type II—25.07 ± 5.93, Type I—13.71 ± 1.98, p < 0.01, suggesting a greater abundance of this protein in these fibres. Finally, we observed association with LAT1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, suggesting LAT1 association close to the microvasculature. This is the first study to visualise the distribution and localisation of LAT1 in human skeletal muscle. As such, this approach provides a validated experimental platform to study the role and regulation of LAT1 in human skeletal muscle in response to various physiological and pathophysiological models.

  12. Ingestion without inactivation of bacteriophages by Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunyili, Agnes A; Alfatlawi, Miaad; Upadhyaya, Bandana; Rhoads, Laura S; Eichelberger, Henry; Van Bell, Craig T

    2008-01-01

    Tetrahymena has been shown to ingest and inactivate bacteriophages, such as T4, in co-incubation experiments. In this study, Tetrahymena thermophila failed to inactivate phages PhiX174 and MS2 in co-incubations, although PhiX174 were ingested by T. thermophila, as demonstrated by: (1) recovery at defecation in a pulse-chase experiment, (2) recovery from Tetrahymena by detergent lysis, and (3) transmission electron microscopy. We conclude, therefore, that the phages must be digestion-resistant. Internalized PhiX174 were further shown to be partially protected from lethal damage by ultraviolet (UV) C and UVB irradiation. Finally, ingested PhiX174 were shown to be rapidly transported through buffer in a horizontal swimming, race tube-like assay. The transport and protection of phages may confer evolutionary advantages that explain the acquisition of digestion-resistance by some phages.

  13. Immunogenicity of UV-inactivated measles virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorska, R.; Mazur, N.; Korbecki, M.

    1978-01-01

    By means of the antigen extinction limit test it was shown that a triple dose vaccination of guinea pigs with UV-inactivated measles virus gave better results, than a single dose vaccination which was proved by the very low immunogenicity index. For both vaccination schemes (single and triple) the immune response was only sligthly influenced by a change of dose from 10 5 to 10 6 HadU 50 /ml or by the addition of aluminum adjuvant. In the antigen extinction limit test the antibody levels were determined by two methods (HIT and NT) the results of which were statistically equivalent. The UV-inactivated measles virus was also found to induce hemolysis-inhibiting antibodies. (orig.) [de

  14. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  15. Epigenetic inactivation of CHFR in human tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Toyota, Minoru; Sasaki, Yasushi; Satoh, Ayumi; Ogi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Takefumi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Mita, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.; Jair, Kam-Wing; Schuebel, Kornel E.; Imai, Kohzoh; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Cell-cycle checkpoints controlling the orderly progression through mitosis are frequently disrupted in human cancers. One such checkpoint, entry into metaphase, is regulated by the CHFR gene encoding a protein possessing forkhead-associated and RING finger domains as well as ubiquitin–ligase activity. Although defects in this checkpoint have been described, the molecular basis and prevalence of CHFR inactivation in human tumors are still not fully understood. To address this question, w...

  16. Photodynamic inactivation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paronyan, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant strain Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread multiresistant bacteria. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microorganisms by photosensitizers (PS) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option against antibiotic resistant bacteria. The effectiveness of new PS cationic porphyrin Zn-TBut4PyP was tested on two strains of S. aureus (MRSA and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus). It is shown that Zn-TBut4PyP has high photodynamic activity against both strains

  17. Imaging the L-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1 with Zr-89 immunoPET.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwatayo F Ikotun

    Full Text Available The L-type amino acid transporter-1 (LAT1, SLC7A5 is upregulated in a wide range of human cancers, positively correlated with the biological aggressiveness of tumors, and a promising target for both imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled amino acids such as O-(2-[(18F]fluoroethyl-L-tyrosine (FET that are transport substrates for system L amino acid transporters including LAT1 have met limited success for oncologic imaging outside of the brain, and thus new strategies are needed for imaging LAT1 in systemic cancers. Here, we describe the development and biological evaluation of a novel zirconium-89 labeled antibody, [(89Zr]DFO-Ab2, targeting the extracellular domain of LAT1 in a preclinical model of colorectal cancer. This tracer demonstrated specificity for LAT1 in vitro and in vivo with excellent tumor imaging properties in mice with xenograft tumors. PET imaging studies showed high tumor uptake, with optimal tumor-to-non target contrast achieved at 7 days post administration. Biodistribution studies demonstrated tumor uptake of 10.5 ± 1.8 percent injected dose per gram (%ID/g at 7 days with a tumor to muscle ratio of 13 to 1. In contrast, the peak tumor uptake of the radiolabeled amino acid [(18F]FET was 4.4 ± 0.5 %ID/g at 30 min after injection with a tumor to muscle ratio of 1.4 to 1. Blocking studies with unlabeled anti-LAT1 antibody demonstrated a 55% reduction of [(89Zr]DFO-Ab2 accumulation in the tumor at 7 days. These results are the first report of direct PET imaging of LAT1 and demonstrate the potential of immunoPET agents for imaging specific amino acid transporters.

  18. A L-type lectin gene is involved in the response to hormonal treatment and water deficit in Volkamer lemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Dayse Drielly Sousa Santana; Emiliani, Giovanni; Bartolini, Paola; Podda, Alessandra; Centritto, Mauro; Luro, François; Carratore, Renata Del; Morillon, Raphaël; Gesteira, Abelmon; Maserti, Biancaelena

    2017-11-01

    Combination of biotic and abiotic stress is a major challenge for crop and fruit production. Thus, identification of genes involved in cross-response to abiotic and biotic stress is of great importance for breeding superior genotypes. Lectins are glycan-binding proteins with a functions in the developmental processes as well as in the response to biotic and abiotic stress. In this work, a lectin like gene, namely ClLectin1, was characterized in Volkamer lemon and its expression was studied in plants exposed to either water stress, hormonal elicitors (JA, SA, ABA) or wounding to understand whether this gene may have a function in the response to multiple stress combination. Results showed that ClLectin1 has 100% homology with a L-type lectin gene from C. sinensis and the in silico study of the 5'UTR region showed the presence of cis-responsive elements to SA, DRE2 and ABA. ClLectin1 was rapidly induced by hormonal treatments and wounding, at local and systemic levels, suggesting an involvement in defence signalling pathways and a possible role as fast detection biomarker of biotic stress. On the other hand, the induction of ClLectin1 by water stress pointed out a role of the gene in the response to drought. The simultaneous response of ClLectin1 expression to water stress and SA treatment could be further investigated to assess whether a moderate drought stress may be useful to improve citrus performance by stimulating the SA-dependent response to biotic stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The L-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Ca [subscript V] 1.2 Mediates Fear Extinction and Modulates Synaptic Tone in the Lateral Amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J.; Murphy, Geoffrey G.

    2017-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in both the formation and the reduction of fear through Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. Despite the implication of LVGCCs in fear learning and extinction, studies of the individual LVGCC subtypes, Ca[subscript V]1.2 and Ca[subscript V] 1.3, using transgenic mice have…

  20. Cloning, chromosomal localization, and functional expression of the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel from normal human heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, D; Mikala, G; Yatani, A; Engle, D B; Iles, D E; Segers, B; Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Klöckner, U; Wakamori, M

    1993-01-01

    A unique structural variant of the cardiac L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel alpha 1 subunit cDNA was isolated from libraries derived from normal human heart mRNA. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to other calcium channel alpha 1 subunits. However, differences from

  1. Chlorine inactivation of Tubifex tubifex in drinking water and the synergistic effect of sequential inactivation with UV irradiation and chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Xiao-Bao; Li, Zhi-Hong; Long, Yuan-Nan; He, Pan-Pan; Xu, Chao

    2017-06-01

    The inactivation of Tubifex tubifex is important to prevent contamination of drinking water. Chlorine is a widely-used disinfectant and the key factor in the inactivation of T. tubifex. This study investigated the inactivation kinetics of chlorine on T. tubifex and the synergistic effect of the sequential use of chlorine and UV irradiation. The experimental results indicated that the Ct (concentration × time reaction ) concept could be used to evaluate the inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex with chlorine, thus allowing for the use of a simpler Ct approach for the assessment of T. tubifex chlorine inactivation requirements. The inactivation kinetics of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be well-fitted to a delayed pseudo first-order Chick-Watson expression. Sequential experiments revealed that UV irradiation and chlorine worked synergistically to effectively inactivate T. tubifex as a result of the decreased activation energy, E a , induced by primary UV irradiation. Furthermore, the inactivation effectiveness of T. tubifex by chlorine was found to be affected by several drinking water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, and chemical oxygen demand with potassium permanganate (COD Mn ) concentration. High pH exhibited pronounced inactivation effectiveness and the decrease in turbidity and COD Mn concentrations contributed to the inactivation of T. tubifex. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Apamin does not inhibit human cardiac Na+ current, L-type Ca2+ current or other major K+ currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chieh Yu

    Full Text Available Apamin is commonly used as a small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK current inhibitor. However, the specificity of apamin in cardiac tissues remains unclear.To test the hypothesis that apamin does not inhibit any major cardiac ion currents.We studied human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells that expressed human voltage-gated Na+, K+ and Ca2+ currents and isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes. Whole-cell patch clamp techniques were used to determine ionic current densities before and after apamin administration.Ca2+ currents (CACNA1c+CACNB2b were not affected by apamin (500 nM (data are presented as median [25th percentile;75th percentile] (from -16 [-20;-10] to -17 [-19;-13] pA/pF, P = NS, but were reduced by nifedipine to -1.6 [-3.2;-1.3] pA/pF (p = 0.008. Na+ currents (SCN5A were not affected by apamin (from -261 [-282;-145] to -268 [-379;-132] pA/pF, P = NS, but were reduced by flecainide to -57 [-70;-47] pA/pF (p = 0.018. None of the major K+ currents (IKs, IKr, IK1 and Ito were inhibited by 500 nM of apamin (KCNQ1+KCNE1, from 28 [20]; [37] to 23 [18]; [32] pA/pF; KCNH2+KCNE2, from 28 [24]; [30] to 27 [24]; [29] pA/pF; KCNJ2, from -46 [-48;-40] to -46 [-51;-35] pA/pF; KCND3, from 608 [505;748] to 606 [454;684]. Apamin did not inhibit the INa or ICaL in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes (INa, from -67 [-75;-59] to -68 [-71;-59] pA/pF; ICaL, from -16 [-17;-14] to -14 [-15;-13] pA/pF, P = NS for both.Apamin does not inhibit human cardiac Na+ currents, L-type Ca2+ currents or other major K+ currents. These findings indicate that apamin is a specific SK current inhibitor in hearts as well as in other organs.

  3. Modeling Radiation Effectiveness for Inactivation of Bacillus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    MODELING RADIATION EFFECTIVENESS FOR INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS SPORES DISSERTATION Emily A. Knight, Major, USAF AFIT-ENC-DS-15-S-001 DEPARTMENT OF THE...not subject to copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENC-DS-15-S-001 MODELING RADIATION EFFECTIVENESS FOR INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS SPORES...EFFECTIVENESS FOR INACTIVATION OF BACILLUS SPORES Emily A. Knight, B.A., M.S. Major, USAF Committee Membership: Dr. William P. Baker Chair Dr. Larry W

  4. Radiation inactivation analysis of kidney microvillar peptidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulcher, I.S.; Ingram, J.; Kenny, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Five membrane peptidases were studied by radiation inactivation analysis of pig kidney microvillar membranes. One heterodimeric enzyme, γ-glutamyl transferase, presented a target size corresponding to the dimeric M r . The other enzymes are known to be homodimers. Three of these, aminopeptidase A, aminopeptidase N and dipeptidyl peptidase 4, gave results clearly indicating the monomer to be the target and, hence, in this group the association of the subunits was not essential for activity. The target size for endopeptidase-24.11 was intermediate between those for monomer and dimer and its functional state was not resolved by the experiments. (Auth.)

  5. Gamma ray inactivation of some animal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, F C; Davies, A G; Dulac, G C; Willis, N G; Papp-Vid, G; Girard, A

    1981-10-01

    Twenty samples of animal viruses comprising 14 different viruses in 12 families were subjected to varying doses of gamma irradiation from a 60Co source in a Gamma Cell 220 (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) to determine lethal dose levels. The dose responses appeared linear throughout inactivation. The D10 values, that is the dose necessary to reduce infectivity by one log10, ranged from less than 0.20 Megarads to approximately 0.55 Megarads. There was not a complete inverse correlation between the target size (virion core) and the D10 value.

  6. Gamma ray inactivation of some animal viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, F C; Davies, A G; Dulac, G C; Willis, N G; Papp-Vid, G; Girard, A

    1981-01-01

    Twenty samples of animal viruses comprising 14 different viruses in 12 families were subjected to varying doses of gamma irradiation from a 60Co source in a Gamma Cell 220 (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) to determine lethal dose levels. The dose responses appeared linear throughout inactivation. The D10 values, that is the dose necessary to reduce infectivity by one log10, ranged from less than 0.20 Megarads to approximately 0.55 Megarads. There was not a complete inverse correlation betwee...

  7. X Inactivation and Progenitor Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Agrelo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, silencing of one of the two X chromosomes is necessary to achieve dosage compensation. The 17 kb non-coding RNA called Xist triggers X inactivation. Gene silencing by Xist can only be achieved in certain contexts such as in cells of the early embryo and in certain hematopoietic progenitors where silencing factors are present. Moreover, these epigenetic contexts are maintained in cancer progenitors in which SATB1 has been identified as a factor related to Xist-mediated chromosome silencing.

  8. Inactivation of virus in solution by cold atmospheric pressure plasma: identification of chemical inactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; Gangal, Urvashi; Youssef, Mohammed M.; Goyal, Sagar M.; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-05-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) inactivates bacteria and virus through in situ production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). While the bactericidal and virucidal efficiency of plasmas is well established, there is limited knowledge about the chemistry leading to the pathogen inactivation. This article describes a chemical analysis of the CAP reactive chemistry involved in the inactivation of feline calicivirus. We used a remote radio frequency CAP produced in varying gas mixtures leading to different plasma-induced chemistries. A study of the effects of selected scavengers complemented with positive control measurements of relevant RONS reveal two distinctive pathways based on singlet oxygen and peroxynitrous acid. The first mechanism is favored in the presence of oxygen and the second in the presence of air when a significant pH reduction is induced in the solution by the plasma. Additionally, smaller effects of the H2O2, O3 and \\text{NO}2- produced were also found. Identification of singlet oxygen-mediated 2-imidazolone/2-oxo-His (His  +14 Da)—an oxidative modification of His 262 comprising the capsid protein of feline calicivirus links the plasma induced singlet oxygen chemistry to viral inactivation.

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of pathogens causing infectious keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carole; Wolf, G.; Walther, M.; Winkler, K.; Finke, M.; Hüttenberger, D.; Bischoff, Markus; Seitz, B.; Cullum, J.; Foth, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance requires new approaches also for the treatment of infectious keratitis. Photodynamic Inactivation (PDI) using the photosensitizer (PS) Chlorin e6 (Ce6) was investigated as an alternative to antibiotic treatment. An in-vitro cornea model was established using porcine eyes. The uptake of Ce6 by bacteria and the diffusion of the PS in the individual layers of corneal tissue were investigated by fluorescence. After removal of the cornea's epithelium Ce6-concentrations tested in liquid culture against different concentrations of Ce6 (1 - 512 μM) using 10 minutes irradiation (E = 18 J/cm2 ). This demonstrated that a complete inactivation of the pathogen strains were feasible whereby SA was slightly more susceptible than PA. 3909 mutants of the Keio collection of Escherichia coli (E.coli) were screened for potential resistance factors. The sensitive mutants can be grouped into three categories: transport mutants, mutants in lipopolysaccharide synthesis and mutants in the bacterial SOS-response. In conclusion PDI is seen as a promising therapy concept for infectious keratitis.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-1 enhances rat skeletal muscle charge movement and L-type Ca2+ channel gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Laura Messi, María; Renganathan, Muthukrishnan; Delbono, Osvaldo

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), an endogenous potent activator of skeletal muscle proliferation and differentiation, enhances L-type Ca2+ channel gene expression resulting in increased functional voltage sensors in single skeletal muscle cells. Charge movement and inward Ca2+ current were recorded in primary cultured rat myoballs using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. Ca2+ current and maximum charge movement (Qmax) were potentiated in cells treated with IGF-1 without significant changes in their voltage dependence. Peak Ca2+ current in control and IGF-1-treated cells was -7·8 ± 0·44 and -10·5 ± 0·37 pA pF−1, respectively (P charge movement and the level of L-type Ca2+ channel α1-subunits through activation of gene expression in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:10087334

  11. Ebola Virus Inactivation by Detergents Is Annulled in Serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kampen, Jeroen J. A.; Tintu, Andrei; Russcher, Henk; Fraaij, Pieter L. A.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.; Rijken, Mikel; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; van Genderen, Perry J. J.; Koelewijn, Rob; de Jong, Menno D.; Haddock, Elaine; Fischer, Robert J.; Munster, Vincent J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of blood samples from hemorrhagic fever virus (HFV)-infected patients with 0.1% detergents has been recommended for virus inactivation and subsequent safe laboratory testing. However, data on virus inactivation by this procedure are lacking. Here we show the effect of this procedure on

  12. US Naval nuclear powering submarine inactivation, disposal and recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The US NAVY report dealing with the problem of American nuclear submarine inactivation after service life ending is discussed. 31 submarines were inactivated in 1993 accomplishing the treaty on strategic weapons reduction. The technologies of dismantling, weapon, components and equipment removing, submarine hull cutting, transportation of nuclear compartments contaminated with residual radioactivity and their disposal in Hanford are described. 3 figs

  13. Suicide inactivation of horseradish peroxidase by excess hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In reactions carried out in sodium acetate buffer, higher inactivation rates were observed when the buffer ion concentration was increased, an indication that peroxidase might be generating reactive radicals from the buffer molecules. Promethazine exerted a modest protective effect against inactivation; however, higher ...

  14. The pulsed light inactivation of veterinary relevant microbial biofilms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results show that both Cryptosporidium and Giardia attach to biofilms in large numbers (100-1000 oo/cysts) in as little as 72 hours. Pulsed light successfully inactivated all test species (Listeria, Salmonella, Bacillus, Escherichia) in planktonic and biofilm form with an increase in inactivation for every increase in UV dose.

  15. "Studies on the Mechanism of Ultraviolet Inactivation of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiron, Dr. Camillo A. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1968-08-19

    The research proposal accompanying this progress report represents a second renewal. This progress report will be divided into the following parts; (I) Serological properties of enzymes subsequent to inactivation by various methods, (II) Studies on the mechanism of ultraviolet inactivation of enzymes.

  16. Mutual inactivation of Notch receptors and ligands facilitates developmental patterning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sprinzak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Developmental patterning requires juxtacrine signaling in order to tightly coordinate the fates of neighboring cells. Recent work has shown that Notch and Delta, the canonical metazoan juxtacrine signaling receptor and ligand, mutually inactivate each other in the same cell. This cis-interaction generates mutually exclusive sending and receiving states in individual cells. It generally remains unclear, however, how this mutual inactivation and the resulting switching behavior can impact developmental patterning circuits. Here we address this question using mathematical modeling in the context of two canonical pattern formation processes: boundary formation and lateral inhibition. For boundary formation, in a model motivated by Drosophila wing vein patterning, we find that mutual inactivation allows sharp boundary formation across a broader range of parameters than models lacking mutual inactivation. This model with mutual inactivation also exhibits robustness to correlated gene expression perturbations. For lateral inhibition, we find that mutual inactivation speeds up patterning dynamics, relieves the need for cooperative regulatory interactions, and expands the range of parameter values that permit pattern formation, compared to canonical models. Furthermore, mutual inactivation enables a simple lateral inhibition circuit architecture which requires only a single downstream regulatory step. Both model systems show how mutual inactivation can facilitate robust fine-grained patterning processes that would be difficult to implement without it, by encoding a difference-promoting feedback within the signaling system itself. Together, these results provide a framework for analysis of more complex Notch-dependent developmental systems.

  17. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during

  18. [Polyphenolic antioxidants efficiently protect urease from inactivation by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsa, D I; Tarun, E I; Losev, Iu P

    2002-01-01

    Inactivation of urease (25 nM) in aqueous solutions (pH 5.0-6.0) treated with low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS; 27 kHz, 60 Wt/cm2, 36-56 degrees C) or high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS; 2.64 MHz, 1 Wt/cm2, 36 or 56 degrees C) has been characterized quantitatively, using first-order rate constants: kin, aggregate inactivation; kin*, thermal inactivation; and kin* (US), ultrasonic inactivation. Within the range from 1 nM to 10 microM, propyl gallate (PG) decreases approximately threefold the rate of LFUS-induced inactivation of urease (56 degrees C), whereas resorcinol poly-2-disulfide prevents this process at 1 nM or higher concentrations. PG completely inhibits HFUS-induced inactivation of urease at 1 nM (36 degrees C) or 10 nM (56 degrees C). At 0.2-10 microM, human serum albumin (HSA) increases the resistance of urease (at 56 degrees C) treated with HFUS to temperature- and cavitation-induced inactivation. Complexes of gallic acid polydisulfide (GAPDS) with HSA (GAPDS-HSA), formed by conjugation of 1.0 nM PGDS with 0.33 nM HSA, prevent HFUS-induced urease inactivation (56 degrees C).

  19. Quantum chromodynamics as the sequential fragmenting with inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botet, R.

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the modified leading log approximation of the perturbative QCD and the sequential binary fragmentation process. We will show that in the absence of inactivation, this process is equivalent to the QCD gluodynamics. The inactivation term yields a precise prescription of how to include the hadronization in the QCD equations. (authors)

  20. Enigma homolog 1 scaffolds protein kinase D1 to regulate the activity of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Wälchli, Sébastien; Iwata, Miki; Ryser, Stephan; Van Lint, Johannes; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2008-06-01

    In cardiomyocytes, protein kinase D1 (PKD1) plays a central role in the response to stress signals. From a yeast two-hybrid assay, we have identified Enigma Homolog 1 (ENH1) as a new binding partner of PKD1. Since in neurons, ENH1, associated with protein kinase Cepsilon, was shown to modulate the activity of N-type calcium channels, and the pore-forming subunit of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel, alpha1C, possesses a potential phosphorylation site for PKD1, we studied here a possible role of ENH1 and PKD1 in the regulation of the cardiac L-type voltage-gated calcium channel. PKD1-interacting proteins were searched by yeast two-hybrid screening. In vivo protein interactions in cardiomyocytes isolated from heart ventricles of newborn rats were tested by co-immunoprecipitation. Small interfering RNA and a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 were delivered into cardiomyocytes by use of an adenovirus. Calcium currents were measured by the patch-clamp technique. Both ENH1 and PKD1 interact with alpha1C in cardiomyocytes. This interaction is increased upon stimulation. Silencing of ENH1 prevented the binding of PKD1 to alpha1C. Moreover, a dominant negative mutant of PKD1 or the silencing of ENH1 inhibited the alpha-adrenergic-induced increase of L-type calcium currents. We found a new binding partner, ENH1, and a new target, alpha1C, for PKD1 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. We propose a model where ENH1 scaffolds PKD1 to alpha1C in order to form a signalling complex that regulates the activity of cardiac L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

  1. Modelling and application of the inactivation of microorganism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oğuzhan, P.; Yangılar, F.

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of consuming contaminated food with toxic microorganisms causing infections and consideration of food protection and new microbial inactivation methods are obligatory situations. Food microbiology is mainly related with unwanted microorganisms spoiling foods during processing and transporting stages and causing diseases. Determination of pathogen microorganisms is important for human health to define and prevent dangers and elongate shelf life. Inactivation of pathogen microorganisms can provide food security and reduce nutrient losses. Microbial inactivation which is using methods of food protection such as food safety and fresh. With this aim, various methods are used such as classical thermal processes (pasteurisation, sterilisation), pressured electrical field (PEF), ionised radiation, high pressure, ultrasonic waves and plasma sterilisation. Microbial inactivation modelling is a secure and effective method in food production. A new microbiological application can give useful results for risk assessment in food, inactivation of microorganisms and improvement of shelf life. Application and control methods should be developed and supported by scientific research and industrial applications

  2. Chlorophyll mediated photodynamic inactivation of blue laser on Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Suryani Dyah; Zaidan, A.; Setiawati, Ernie Maduratna; Suhariningsih

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic inactivation is an inactivation method in microbial pathogens that utilize light and photosensitizer. This study was conducted to investigate photodynamic inactivation effects of low intensity laser exposure with various dose energy on Streptococcus mutans bacteria. The photodynamic inactivation was achieved with the addition of chlorophyll as photosensitizers. To determine the survival percentage of Streptococcus mutans bacteria after laser exposure, the total plate count method was used. For this study, the wavelength of the laser is 405 nm and variables of energy doses are 1.44, 2.87, 4.31, 5.74, 7.18, and 8.61 in J/cm2. The results show that exposure to laser with energy dose of 7.18 J/cm2 has the best photodynamic inactivation with a decrease of 78% in Streptococcus

  3. 1,25 (OH)2D3 enhances PTH-induced Ca2+ transients in preosteoblasts by activating L-type Ca2+ channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Duncan, R. L.; Karin, N. J.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We previously demonstrated electrophysiologically that 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] shifts the activation threshold of L-type Ca2+ channels in osteoblasts toward the resting potential and prolongs mean open time. Presently, we used single-cell Ca2+ imaging to study the combined effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 and parathyroid hormone (PTH) during generation of Ca2+ transients in fura 2-loaded MC3T3-E1 cells. Pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3 concentrations, which alone did not produce Ca2+ transients, consistently enhanced Ca2+ responses to PTH. Enhancement was dose dependent over the range of 1 to 10 nM and was blocked by pretreatment with 5 microM nitrendipine during pretreatment. A 1,25(OH)2D3 analog that activates L-type channels and shifts their activation threshold also enhanced PTH responses. In contrast, an analog devoid of membrane Ca2+ effects did not enhance PTH-induced Ca2+ transients. The PTH-induced Ca2+ transient involved activation of a dihydropyridine-insensitive cation channel that was inhibited by Gd3+. Together, these data suggest that 1,25(OH)2D3 increases osteoblast responsiveness to PTH through rapid modification of L-type Ca2+ channel gating properties, whose activation enhances Ca2+ entry through other channels such as the PTH-responsive, Gd(3+)-sensitive cation channel.

  4. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation : kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused

  5. Inactivation of mitochondrial ATPase by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, E.; Cuellar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work describes experiments that show that far-ultraviolet irradiation induce the inhibition of ATPase activity in both membrane-bound and soluble F1. It was also found that ultraviolet light promotes the release of tightly bound adenine nucleotides from F1-ATPase. Experiments carried out with submitochondrial particles indicate that succinate partially protects against these effects of ultraviolet light. Titration of sulfhydryl groups in both irradiated submitochondrial particles and soluble F1-ATPase indicates that a conformational change induced by photochemical modifications of amino acid residues appears involved in the inactivation of the enzyme. Finally, experiments are described which show that the tyrosine residue located in the active site of F1-ATPase is modified by ultraviolet irradiation

  6. Prophage induction and inactivation by uv light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnhart, B.J.; Cox, S.H.; Jett, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the induction curves for uv light-irradiated Haemophilus influenzae lysogens and the distribution of pyrimidine dimers in a repair-deficient lysogen suggests that one dimer per prophage-size segment of the host bacterial chromosome is necessary as a preinduction event. The close correlations obtained prompted a renewed consideration of the possibility that direct prophage induction occurs when one dimer is stabilized within the prophage genome. The host excision-repair system apparently functions to reduce the probability of stabilizing within the prophage those dimers that are necessary for induction and inactivation. The presence of the inducible defective prophage in strain Rd depresses the inducibility of prophage HP1c1

  7. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-06-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts.

  8. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetii by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F. (Army Medical Research Inst. of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD (USA)); Williams, J.C. (National Inst. of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79{sup 0}C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0.64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of the micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing 10{sup 11} C. burnetii ml{sup -1} was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes. (author).

  9. Inactivation of Coxiella burnetti by gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, G.H.; McCaul, T.F.; Williams, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    The gamma radiation inactivation kinetics for Coxiella burnetii at - 79 C were exponential. The radiation dose needed to reduce the number of infective C. burnetii by 90% varied from 0-64 to 1.2 kGy depending on the phase of hte micro-organism, purity of the culture and composition of suspending menstruum. The viability of preparations containing C. burnetti was completely abolished by 10 kGy without diminishing antigenicity or ability to elicit a protective immune response in vaccinated mice. Immunocytochemical examinations using monoclonal antibodies and electron microscopy demonstrated that radiation doses of 20 kGy did not alter cell-wall morphology or cell-surface antigenic epitopes.

  10. Esterase resistant to inactivation by heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    El, Dorry Hamza

    2014-09-25

    EstATII is an esterase that a halotolerant, thermophilic and resistant to a spectrum of heavy metals including toxic concentration of metals. It was isolated from the lowest convective layer of the Atlantis II Red Sea brine pool. The Atlantis II brine pool is an extreme environment that possesses multiple harsh conditions such as; high temperature, salinity, pH and high concentration of metals, including toxic heavy metals. A fosmid metagenomic library using DNA isolated from the lowest convective layer this pool was used to identify EstATII. Polynucleotides encoding EstATII and similar esterases are disclosed and can be used to make EstATII. EstATII or compositions or apparatuses that contain it may be used in various processes employing lipases/esterases especially when these processes are performed under harsh conditions that inactivate other kinds of lipases or esterases.

  11. UV inactivation of pathogenic and indicator microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.C.; Ossoff, S.F.; Lobe, D.C.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dumais, C.M.; Qualls, R.G.; Johnson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Survival was measured as a function of the dose of germicidal UV light for the bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella sonnei, Streptococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis spores, the enteric viruses poliovirus type 1 and simian rotavirus SA11, the cysts of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii, as well as for total coliforms and standard plate count microorganisms from secondary effluent. The doses of UV light necessary for a 99.9% inactivation of the cultured vegetative bacteria, total coliforms, and standard plate count microorganisms were comparable. However, the viruses, the bacterial spores, and the amoebic cysts required about 3 to 4 times, 9 times, and 15 times, respectively, the dose required for E. coli. These ratios covered a narrower relative dose range than that previously reported for chlorine disinfection of E. coli, viruses, spores, and cysts

  12. Inactivation of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, L.H.; McCormick, J.B.; Johnson, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    Because of the cumbersome conditions experienced in a maximum containment laboratory, methods for inactivating highly pathogenic viruses were investigated. The infectivity of Lassa, Marburg, and Ebola viruses was inactivated without altering the immunological activity after radiation with 60 CO gamma rays. At 4 degrees C, Lassa virus was the most difficult to inactivate with a rate of 5.3 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad of 60 CO radiation, as compared with 6.8 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Ebola virus and 8.4 X 10(-6) log 50% tissue culture infective dose per rad for Marburg virus. Experimental inactivation curves, as well as curves giving the total radiation needed to inactivate a given concentration of any of the three viruses, are presented. The authors found this method of inactivation to be superior to UV light or beta-propiolactone inactivation and now routinely use it for preparation of material for protein-chemistry studies or for preparation of immunological reagents

  13. Significance of Inactivated Genes in Leukemia: Pathogenesis and Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Nazanin; Abroun, Saeid; Bertacchini, Jessika; Vosoughi, Tina; Rahim, Fakher; Saki, Najmaldin

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic and genetic alterations are two mechanisms participating in leukemia, which can inactivate genes involved in leukemia pathogenesis or progression. The purpose of this review was to introduce various inactivated genes and evaluate their possible role in leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis. By searching the mesh words “Gene, Silencing AND Leukemia” in PubMed website, relevant English articles dealt with human subjects as of 2000 were included in this study. Gene inactivation in leukemia is largely mediated by promoter’s hypermethylation of gene involving in cellular functions such as cell cycle, apoptosis, and gene transcription. Inactivated genes, such as ASPP1, TP53, IKZF1 and P15, may correlate with poor prognosis in acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL), chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), respectively. Gene inactivation may play a considerable role in leukemia pathogenesis and prognosis, which can be considered as complementary diagnostic tests to differentiate different leukemia types, determine leukemia prognosis, and also detect response to therapy. In general, this review showed some genes inactivated only in leukemia (with differences between B-ALL, T-ALL, CLL, AML and CML). These differences could be of interest as an additional tool to better categorize leukemia types. Furthermore; based on inactivated genes, a diverse classification of Leukemias could represent a powerful method to address a targeted therapy of the patients, in order to minimize side effects of conventional therapies and to enhance new drug strategies. PMID:28580304

  14. [Ultrasonic inactivation of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase in aqueous solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaseva, E I; Tarun, E I; Metelitsa, D I

    2009-01-01

    The inactivation of Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase (GO) was studied in 0.02 M phosphate-citrate buffer (PCB) at various pH, temperatures of 37-59 degrees C, and sonication with low frequency (27 kHz, LF-US) and high frequency (2.64 MHz, HF-US) ultrasound. The GO inactivation was characterized by the effective first-order inactivation rate constants k(in), k(in)*, and k(in)(us), reflecting the total, thermal, and ultrasonic inactivation components. The constants strongly depended on the pH and temperature of solution, GO concentration, and the presence of acceptors of the free radicals HO* -DMF, DMSO, ethanol, butanol, octanol, and mannitol, confirming that the active radicals formed in the ultrasonic cavitation field played an important role in the GO inactivation. The activation energy in the loss of GO catalytic activity considerably decreased when the enzyme solution was treated with LF-US or HF-US. The dissociative scheme of GO inactivation is discussed. Mannitol can be used for protection of GO from inactivation with LF-US or HF-US in the food industry and immunobiotechnology.

  15. Cationic Antimicrobial Peptides Inactivate Shiga Toxin-Encoding Bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel E. Del Cogliano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx is the principal virulence factor during Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC infections. We have previously reported the inactivation of bacteriophage encoding Stx after treatment with chitosan, a linear polysaccharide polymer with cationic properties. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (cAMPs are short linear aminoacidic sequences, with a positive net charge, which display bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity against a wide range of bacterial species. They are promising novel antibiotics since they have shown bactericidal effects against multiresistant bacteria. To evaluate whether cationic properties are responsible for bacteriophage inactivation, we tested seven cationic peptides with proven antimicrobial activity as anti-bacteriophage agents, and one random sequence cationic peptide with no antimicrobial activity as a control. We observed bacteriophage inactivation after incubation with five cAMPs, but no inactivating activity was observed with the random sequence cationic peptide or with the non-alpha helical cAMP Omiganan. Finally, to confirm peptide-bacteriophage interaction, zeta potential was analyzed by following changes on bacteriophage surface charges after peptide incubation. According to our results we could propose that: (1 direct interaction of peptides with phage is a necessary step for bacteriophage inactivation, (2 cationic properties are necessary but not sufficient for bacteriophage inactivation, and (3 inactivation by cationic peptides could be sequence (or structure specific. Overall our data suggest that these peptides could be considered a new family of molecules potentially useful to decrease bacteriophage replication and Stx expression.

  16. Inactivation of TRPM2 channels by extracellular divalent copper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyue Yu

    Full Text Available Cu2+ is an essential metal ion that plays a critical role in the regulation of a number of ion channels and receptors in addition to acting as a cofactor in a variety of enzymes. Here, we showed that human melastatin transient receptor potential 2 (hTRPM2 channel is sensitive to inhibition by extracellular Cu2+. Cu2+ at concentrations as low as 3 µM inhibited the hTRPM2 channel completely and irreversibly upon washing or using Cu2+ chelators, suggesting channel inactivation. The Cu2+-induced inactivation was similar when the channels conducted inward or outward currents, indicating the permeating ions had little effect on Cu2+-induced inactivation. Furthermore, Cu2+ had no effect on singe channel conductance. Alanine substitution by site-directed mutagenesis of His995 in the pore-forming region strongly attenuated Cu2+-induced channel inactivation, and mutation of several other pore residues to alanine altered the kinetics of channel inactivation by Cu2+. In addition, while introduction of the P1018L mutation is known to result in channel inactivation, exposure to Cu2+ accelerated the inactivation of this mutant channel. In contrast with the hTRPM2, the mouse TRPM2 (mTRPM2 channel, which contains glutamine at the position equivalent to His995, was insensitive to Cu2+. Replacement of His995 with glutamine in the hTRPM2 conferred loss of Cu2+-induced channel inactivation. Taken together, these results suggest that Cu2+ inactivates the hTRPM2 channel by interacting with the outer pore region. Our results also indicate that the amino acid residue difference in this region gives rise to species-dependent effect by Cu2+ on the human and mouse TRPM2 channels.

  17. Inactivation of Aujeszky's disease virus in slurry at various temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette

    1991-01-01

    Survival of Aujeszky's disease virus in pig slurry was investigated during anaerobic storage at 5, 20, 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55°C using 100-ml laboratory models simulating the conditions in slurry tanks during winter and summer seasons and during anaerobic digestion in batch reactors. The inactivation...... rate was found to increase with increasing temperature. Virus was inactivated at 5 and 20°C in 15 weeks and 2 weeks, respectively. At 35°C (mesophilic conditions) the virus was inactivated in 5 hours and at 55°C (thermophilic conditions) no virus could be detected after 10 minutes....

  18. Microbial electrolytic disinfection process for highly efficient Escherichia coli inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shaofeng; Huang, Shaobin; Li, Xiaohu

    2018-01-01

    extensively studied for recalcitrant organics removal, its application potential towards water disinfection (e.g., inactivation of pathogens) is still unknown. This study investigated the inactivation of Escherichia coli in a microbial electrolysis cell based bio-electro-Fenton system (renamed as microbial...... electrolytic-Fenton cell) with the aim to broad the application of microbial electrochemistry. Results showed that a 4-log reduction of Escherichia coli (107 to hundreds CFU/mL) was achieved with an external applied voltage of 0.2 V, 0.3 mM Fe2+ and cathodic pH of 3.0. However, non-notable inactivation...

  19. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaughn, J.M.; Chen, Y.S.; Lindburg, K.; Morales, D.

    1987-09-01

    The inactivation of simian rotavirus Sa-11 and human rotavirus type 2 (Wa) by ozone was compared at 4/sup 0/C by using single-particle virus stocks. Although the human strain was clearly more sensitive, both virus types were rapidly inactivated by ozone concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater at all pH levels tested. Comparison of the virucidal activity of ozone with that of chlorine in identical experiments indicated little significant difference in rotavirus-inactivating efficiencies when the disinfectants were used at concentrations of 0.25 mg/liter or greater.

  20. [Co-location of ACh-sensitive BK channels and L-type calcium channels in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Kai; Li, Guan-Qiao; Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Song; Wu, Ting-Ting; Li, Jia-Li; Li, Qing-Tian

    2008-03-01

    To explore the mechanisms of the influx of calcium ions during the activation of ACh-sensitive BK channel (big conductance, calcium-dependent potassium channel) in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs. Type II vestibular hair cells were isolated by collagenase type IA. Under the whole-cell patch mode, the sensitivity of ACh-sensitive BK current to the calcium channels blockers was investigated, the pharmacological property of L-type calcium channel activator-sensitive current and ACh-sensitive BK current was compared. Following application of ACh, type II vestibular hair cells displayed a sustained outward potassium current, with a reversal potential of (-70.5 +/- 10.6) mV (x +/- s, n = 10). At the holding potential of -50 mV, the current amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current activated by 100 micromol/L ACh was (267 +/- 106) pA (n = 11). ACh-sensitive potassium current was potently sensitive to the BK current blocker, IBTX (iberiotoxin, 200 nmol/L). Apamin, the well-known small conductance, calcium-dependent potassium current blocker, failed to inhibit the amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current at a dose of 1 micromol/L. ACh-sensitive BK current was sensitive to NiCl2 and potently inhibited by CdCl2. NiCl2 and CdCl2 showed a dose-dependent blocking effect with a half inhibition-maximal response of (135.5 +/- 18.5) micromol/L (n = 7) and (23.4 +/- 2.6) micromol/L (n = 7). The L-type calcium channel activator, (-) -Bay-K 8644 (10 micromol /L), mimicked the role of ACh and activated the IBTX-sensitive outward current. ACh-sensitive BK and L-type calcium channels are co-located in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs.

  1. Influence of dynamical ion mixing of crystalline aluminium and nickel coatings on the fatigue behaviour of a 316L-type stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villechaise, P.; Mendez, J.; Violan, P.; Riviere, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    New techniques of dynamical ion mixing have been applied to the improvement of fatigue resistance of metallic materials. Such techniques involve a deposition method combined with simultaneous ion implantation. In this way, well adherent cyrstalline coatings of pure Al and Ni, 0.5 μm thick, have been deposited on a 316L-type austenitic stainless steel substrate. It has been shown that such coatings lead to a substantial increase in the fatigue lifetime of the stainless steel at room temperature, which is associated with important modifications in surface damage processes. (orig.)

  2. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular...... domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore...

  3. Dry-heat inactivation of "Mycobacterium canettii".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboubaker Osman, Djaltou; Garnotel, Eric; Drancourt, Michel

    2017-06-09

    "Mycobacterium canettii" is responsible for non-transmissible lymph node and pulmonary tuberculosis in persons exposed in the Horn of Africa. In the absence of direct human transmission, contaminated water and foodstuffs could be sources of contamination. We investigated the dry-heat inactivation of "M. canettii" alone and mixed into mock-infected foodstuffs by inoculating agar cylinders and milk with 10 4 colony-forming units of "M. canettii" CIPT140010059 and two "M. canettii" clinical strains with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv as a control. Exposed to 35 °C, M. tuberculosis H37Rv, "M canettii" CIPT140010059 and "M. canettii" 157 exhibited a survival rate of 108, 95 and 81%, which is significantly higher than that of "M. canettii" 173. However, all tested mycobacteria tolerated a 90-min exposure at 45 °C. In the foodstuff models set at 70 °C, no growing mycobacteria were visualized. This study supports the premise that "M. canettii" may survive up to 45 °C; and suggests that contaminated raw drinks and foodstuffs but not cooked ones may be sources of infection for populations.

  4. Operation method for inactivated reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Tasuku.

    1991-01-01

    Inert gases are filled in a container incorporating a reactor pressure vessel and a reactor is operated under the inactivated state. Upon normal operation of the plant, the pressure in the reactor container is controlled so that it is within a range of slightly positive or slightly negative relative to the pressure outside of the container and within an allowable operation range of the container. With such a constitution, a pressure control operation in the reactor container depending on the fluctuation of the atmospheric pressure is no more necessary. In this case, when a high atmospheric pressure approaches rapidly to the district where the power plant is situated, the pressure in the container becomes slightly negative temporarily relative to the surrounding atmospheric pressure. However, the increase of oxygen concentration due to the air flown to the container during the time is within the allowable range. Further, if the pressure control operation is unnecessary, the amount of nitrogen gases consumed and the amount of radioactive materials released from the container to the atmosphere are reduced. As a result, safety and reliability of reactor operation are improved. (I.S.)

  5. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-11-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents.

  6. CHLORINE INACTIVATION OF CATEGORY "A" BIO-TERRORISM AGENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster presents information on the inactivation of select bioterrorist agents. Information will be presented on chlorine disinfection of vegetative cells of Brucella suis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis and endos...

  7. Inactivation Strategies for Clostridium perfringens Spores and Vegetative Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Prabhat K; Udompijitkul, Pathima; Hossain, Ashfaque; Sarker, Mahfuzur R

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is an important pathogen to human and animals and causes a wide array of diseases, including histotoxic and gastrointestinal illnesses. C. perfringens spores are crucial in terms of the pathogenicity of this bacterium because they can survive in a dormant state in the environment and return to being live bacteria when they come in contact with nutrients in food or the human body. Although the strategies to inactivate C. perfringens vegetative cells are effective, the inactivation of C. perfringens spores is still a great challenge. A number of studies have been conducted in the past decade or so toward developing efficient inactivation strategies for C. perfringens spores and vegetative cells, which include physical approaches and the use of chemical preservatives and naturally derived antimicrobial agents. In this review, different inactivation strategies applied to control C. perfringens cells and spores are summarized, and the potential limitations and challenges of these strategies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Biocontrol interventions for inactivation of foodborne pathogens on produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post-harvest interventions for control of foodborne pathogens on minimally processed foods are crucial for food safety. Biocontrol interventions have the primary objective of developing novel antagonists in combinations with physical and chemical interventions to inactivate pathogenic microbes. Ther...

  9. Enterococcus faecalis and pathogenic streptococci inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Elizabeth V K; Pader, Vera; Edwards, Andrew M

    2017-10-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We showed previously that Staphylococcus aureus can survive daptomycin exposure by releasing membrane phospholipids that inactivate the antibiotic. To determine whether other pathogens possess this defence mechanism, phospholipid release and daptomycin activity were measured after incubation of Staphylococcus epidermidis, group A or B streptococci, Streptococcus gordonii or Enterococcus faecalis with the antibiotic. All bacteria released phospholipids in response to daptomycin, which resulted in at least partial inactivation of the antibiotic. However, E. faecalis showed the highest levels of lipid release and daptomycin inactivation. As shown previously for S. aureus, phospholipid release by E. faecalis was inhibited by the lipid biosynthesis inhibitor platensimycin. In conclusion, several pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecalis, inactivate daptomycin by releasing phospholipids, which may contribute to the failure of daptomycin to resolve infections caused by these pathogens.

  10. Inactivation of rabies diagnostic reagents by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamble, W.C.; Chappell, W.A.; George, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment of CVS-11 rabies adsorbing suspensions and street rabies infected mouse brains with gamma radiation resulted in inactivated reagents that are safer to distribute and use. These irradiated reagents were as sensitive and reactive as the nonirradiated control reagents

  11. Use of genetic algorithms for high hydrostatic pressure inactivation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) for high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) inactivation of Bacillus cereus spores, Bacillus subtilis spores and cells, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, all in milk buffer, were used to demonstrate the utility of genetic algorithms ...

  12. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each guinea...

  13. Increased inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protraction of UV irradiation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, R; Haider, T; Cabaj, A; Heidenreich, E; Kundi, M

    1996-01-01

    The principle of equi-effectivity of the product of intensity and exposure time (principle of Bunsen-Roscoe) of UV irradiation has been assumed to be valid for the inactivation of microorganisms in general. Earlier studies claimed higher survival of Escherichia coli B/r with fractionated irradiation compared with single-exposure survival. However, data on the inactivation effect of protraction of UV irradiation are not available. By means of a specially designed UV irradiation apparatus which...

  14. High pressure inactivation of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Sanelle; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-05-01

    Brettanomyces bruxellensis ("Brett") is a major spoilage concern for the wine industry worldwide, leading to undesirable sensory properties. Sulphur dioxide, is currently the preferred method for wine preservation. However, due to its negative effects on consumers, the use of new alternative non-thermal technologies are increasingly being investigated. The aim of this study was to determine and model the effect of high pressure processing (HPP) conditions and yeast strain on the inactivation of "Brett" in Cabernet Sauvignon wine. Processing at 200 MPa for 3 min resulted in 5.8 log reductions. However higher pressure is recommended to achieve high throughput in the wine industry, for example >6.0 log reductions were achieved after 400 MPa for 5 s. The inactivation of B. bruxellensis is pressure and time dependent, with increased treatment time and pressure leading to increased yeast inactivation. It was also found that yeast strain had a significant effect on HPP inactivation, with AWRI 1499 being the most resistant strain. The Weibull model successfully described the HPP "Brett" inactivation. HPP is a viable alternative for the inactivation of B. bruxellensis in wine, with the potential to reduce the industry's reliance on sulphur dioxide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal Inactivation of Feline Calicivirus in Pet Food Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, J; Patel, M; Knight, A I; Corley, D; Gibson, G; Schaaf, J; Moulin, J; Zuber, S

    2015-12-01

    Extrusion is the most common manufacturing process used to produce heat-treated dry dog and cat food (pet food) for domestic use and international trade. Due to reoccurring outbreaks of notifiable terrestrial animal diseases and their impact on international trade, experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness of heat-treated extruded pet food on virus inactivation. The impact of extrusion processing in a pet food matrix on virus inactivation has not been previously reported and very few inactivation studies have examined the thermal inactivation of viruses in complex food matrices. The feline calicivirus vaccine strain FCV F-9 was used as a surrogate model RNA virus pathogen. Small-scale heat inactivation experiments using animal-derived pet food raw materials showed that a > 4 log10 reduction (log10 R) in infectivity occurred at 70 °C prior to reaching the minimum extrusion manufacturing operating temperature of 100 °C. As anticipated, small-scale pressure studies at extrusion pressure (1.6 MPa) showed no apparent effect on FCV F-9 inactivation. Additionally, FCV F-9 was shown not to survive the acidic conditions used to produce pet food palatants of animal origin that are typically used as a coating after the extrusion process.

  16. Oxidation of multiple methionine residues impairs rapid sodium channel inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassmann, Mario; Hansel, Alfred; Leipold, Enrico; Birkenbeil, Jan; Lu, Song-Qing; Hoshi, Toshinori; Heinemann, Stefan H.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) readily oxidize the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine (Met). The impact of Met oxidation on the fast inactivation of the skeletal muscle sodium channel NaV1.4 expressed in human embryonic kidney cells was studied by applying the Met-preferring oxidant chloramine-T (ChT) or by irradiating the ROS-producing dye Lucifer Yellow in the patch pipettes. Both interventions dramatically slowed down inactivation of the sodium channels. Replacement of Met in the Ile-Phe-Met inactivation motif with Leu (M1305L) strongly attenuated the oxidizing effect on inactivation but did not eliminate it completely. Mutagenesis of conserved Met residues in the intracellular linkers connecting the membrane-spanning segments of the channel (M1469L and M1470L) also markedly diminished the oxidation sensitivity of the channel, while that of other conserved Met residues (442, 1139, 1154, 1316) were without any noticeable effect. The results of mutagenesis of results, assays of other NaV channel isoforms (NaV1.2, NaV1.5, NaV1.7) and the kinetics of the oxidation-induced removal of inactivation collectively indicate that multiple Met target residues need to be oxidized to completely impair inactivation. This arrangement using multiple Met residues confers a finely graded oxidative modulation of NaV channels and allows organisms to adapt to a variety of oxidative stress conditions, such as ischemic reperfusion. PMID:18369661

  17. Thermal inactivation kinetics of β-galactosidase during bread baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xiao Dong; Boom, Remko M; Schutyser, Maarten A I

    2017-06-15

    In this study, β-galactosidase was utilized as a model enzyme to investigate the mechanism of enzyme inactivation during bread baking. Thermal inactivation of β-galactosidase was investigated in a wheat flour/water system at varying temperature-moisture content combinations, and in bread during baking at 175 or 205°C. In the wheat flour/water system, the thermostability of β-galactosidase increased with decreased moisture content, and a kinetic model was accurately fitted to the corresponding inactivation data (R 2 =0.99). Interestingly, the residual enzyme activity in the bread crust (about 30%) was hundredfold higher than that in the crumb (about 0.3%) after baking, despite the higher temperature in the crust throughout baking. This result suggested that the reduced moisture content in the crust increased the thermostability of the enzyme. Subsequently, the kinetic model reasonably predicted the enzyme inactivation in the crumb using the same parameters derived from the wheat flour/water system. However, the model predicted a lower residual enzyme activity in the crust compared with the experimental result, which indicated that the structure of the crust may influence the enzyme inactivation mechanism during baking. The results reported can provide a quantitative understanding of the thermal inactivation kinetics of enzyme during baking, which is essential to better retain enzymatic activity in bakery products supplemented with heat-sensitive enzymes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Trans-inactivation: Repression in a wrong place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatskikh, Aleksei S; Abramov, Yuriy A; Lavrov, Sergey A

    2017-04-03

    Trans-inactivation is the repression of genes on a normal chromosome under the influence of a rearranged homologous chromosome demonstrating the position effect variegation (PEV). This phenomenon was studied in detail on the example of brown Dominant allele causing the repression of wild-type brown gene on the opposite chromosome. We have investigated another trans-inactivation-inducing chromosome rearrangement, In(2)A4 inversion. In both cases, brown Dominant and In(2)A4, the repression seems to be the result of dragging of the euchromatic region of the normal chromosome into the heterochromatic environment. It was found that cis-inactivation (classical PEV) and trans-inactivation show different patterns of distribution along the chromosome and respond differently to PEV modifying genes. It appears that the causative mechanism of trans-inactivation is de novo heterochromatin assembly on euchromatic sequences dragged into the heterochromatic nuclear compartment. Trans-inactivation turns out to be the result of a combination of heterochromatin-induced position effect and the somatic interphase chromosome pairing that is widespread in Diptera.

  19. Analysis of stress- strain distribution of dowel and glue line in L-type furniture joint by means of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mossayeb dalvand

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study 3D stress-strain distribution of dowel and glue line on L-type joints made of plywood doweled was investigated. Members of joints made of 11-ply hardwood plywood (Hornbeam, Beech and Alder that were 19 mm in thickness. In this study effect of beech dowels in three levels diameters (6, 8 and 10 mm and penetration of depth (9, 13 and 17 mm on bending moment capacity of L-type joints under compression loading was investigated as experimental test, then stress-strain distribution of wood dowel and glue line in specimens were simulated by means of ANSYS 15 software with finite element method (FEM.Results have shown that bending moment resistance increased with increasing dowel diameter from 6 to 8 mm, but downward trend was observed with increasing 8 to 10 mm in dowel diameter. Bending moment resistance increased with increasing penetration depth. Also, result obtained of simulation by means of ANSYS software have shown that stress-strain in dowel and glue line increased with increasing diameter of dowel and Increasing stress in joints made of diameter dowel 10 mm due to fracture in joints and decrease in resistance once. According to results obtained of model analysis, the ultimate stress of dowel and glue line occurred in the area that joints were contacted.

  20. Effects of L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists on in vitro excystment of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae induced by sodium cholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Teruaki

    2006-09-01

    The inhibitory effects of L-type Ca2+ channel antagonists on Na cholate-induced in vitro excystment (CIIE) of Paragonimus ohirai metacercariae were studied. At concentrations of 10 microM, nicardipine and nimodipine inhibited CIIE completely and by approximately 92%, respectively. Nitrendipine and (+/-)-verapamil inhibited CIIE by about one half and one third, respectively. Nifedipine and diltiazem did not inhibit CIIE significantly. At higher concentrations, nitrendipine at 20 microM completely inhibited CIIE, and (+/-)-verapamil at 40 microM inhibited CIIE by 93%. Nifedipine and diltiazem inhibited CIIE only slightly and little, respectively, even at 40 microM. Complete inhibition by nicardipine at 10 microM required preincubation of metacercariae with the antagonist for 15 min. The inhibitory effects of nicardipine and nimodipine were reversible, and most of the nimodipine-treated metacercariae could excyst within 1 h after being washed, but the nicardipine-treated ones started to excyst 1 h after washing. Nicardipine suppressed the active movement of encysted juveniles evoked by Na cholate, whereas nimodipine did not suppress this significantly. These results suggested that L-type Ca2+ channels appeared to be involved in CIIE of P. ohirai metacercariae and that the inhibitory effect of the channels was due primarily to factors other than the inhibition of muscular activity, probably involving the secretion and release of enzymes lytic against the metacercarial cyst wall.

  1. Vascular L-type Ca²⁺ channel blocking activity of sulfur-containing indole alkaloids from Glycosmis petelotii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Khanh, Pham Ngoc; Huyen, Pham Thu; Duc, Ho Viet; Huong, Tran Thu; Ha, Vu Thi; Durante, Miriam; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Fusi, Fabio

    2014-07-25

    In the search for novel natural compounds endowed with potential antihypertensive activity, a new sulfur-containing indole alkaloid, N-demethylglypetelotine (2), and its known analogue glypetelotine (1), were isolated from the leaves of Glycosmis petelotii. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic evidence. The two alkaloids were assessed for vasorelaxing activity on rat aorta rings and for L-type Ba(2+) current [I(Ba(L))] blocking activity on single myocytes isolated from rat tail artery. Both glypetelotine and N-demethylglypetelotine inhibited phenylephrine-induced contraction with IC50 values of 20 and 50 μM, respectively. The presence of endothelium did not modify their spasmolytic effect. Neither glypetelotine nor N-demethylglypetelotine affected Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum induced by phenylephrine. The spasmolytic effect of glypetelotine increased with membrane depolarization. In the presence of 60 mM K(+), both compounds inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the contraction induced by cumulative addition of Ca(2+), this inhibition being inversely related to Ca(2+) concentration. Glypetelotine and, less efficiently N-demethylglypetelotine, inhibited I(Ba(L)), the former compound also affecting I(Ba(L)) kinetics. In conclusion, glypetelotine is a novel vasorelaxing agent which antagonizes L-type Ca(2+) channels.

  2. Short communication: genetic ablation of L-type Ca2+ channels abolishes depolarization-induced Ca2+ release in arterial smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tenorio, Miguel; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Porras, Cristina; Castellano, Antonio; Moosmang, Sven; Hofmann, Franz; Ureña, Juan; López-Barneo, José

    2010-04-16

    In arterial myocytes, membrane depolarization-induced Ca(2+) release (DICR) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) occurs through a metabotropic pathway that leads to inositol trisphosphate synthesis independently of extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Despite the fundamental functional relevance of DICR, its molecular bases are not well known. Biophysical and pharmacological data have suggested that L-type Ca(2+) channels could be the sensors coupling membrane depolarization to SR Ca(2+) release. This hypothesis was tested using smooth muscle-selective conditional Ca(v)1.2 knockout mice. In aortic myocytes, the decrease of Ca(2+) channel density was paralleled by the disappearance of SR Ca(2+) release induced by either depolarization or Ca(2+) channel agonists. Ca(v)1.2 channel deficiency resulted in almost abolition of arterial ring contraction evoked by DICR. Ca(2+) channel-null cells showed unaltered caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release and contraction. These data suggest that Ca(v)1.2 channels are indeed voltage sensors coupled to the metabolic cascade, leading to SR Ca(2+) release. These findings support a novel, ion-independent, functional role of L-type Ca(2+) channels linked to intracellular signaling pathways in vascular myocytes.

  3. CO, Pb++ and SO2 effects on L-type calcium channel and action potential in human atrial myocytes. In silico study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana C. Pachajoa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to air pollutants like carbon monoxide (CO, lead (Pb++ and sulfur dioxide (SO2 promotes the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have shown that CO, Pb++ and SO2 block L-type calcium channels, reducing the calcium current (ICaL and the action potential duration (APD, which favors the initiation of atrial arrhythmias. The goal is to study the effects of CO, Pb++ and SO2 at different concentrations on ICaL and action potential using computational simulation. For this purpose, models of the effects of the air pollutants on the atrial L-type calcium channel were developed and were incorporated into a mathematical model of a human atrial cell. The results suggest that CO, Pb++ and SO2 block the ICaL current in a fraction that increases along with the concentration, generating an APD shortening. These results are consistent with experimental studies. The combined effect of the three air pollutants produced an APD shortening, which is considered to be a pro-arrhythmic effect.

  4. Leptin increases L-type Ca2+ channel expression and GnRH-stimulated LH release in LβT2 gonadotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Cruz, José E.; Flores, Amira; Cebada, Jorge; Mellon, Pamela L.; Felix, Ricardo; Monjaraz, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Leptin, a mediator of long-term regulation of energy balance, has been implicated in the release of adenohypophyseal gonadotropins by regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion from the hypothalamus. However, a direct effect of leptin on hormone release from gonadotropes remains virtually unexplored. In the current report, we assessed the long-term (48 h) actions of leptin on voltage-gated channel activity and luteinizing hormone (LH) production in mouse pituitary gonadotrope LβT2 cells. Electrophysiological recordings showed that leptin treatment significantly increased whole-cell patch clamp Ba2+ current through L-type Ca2+ channels. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed increased levels of L-type (α1D) Ca2+ channel mRNA. Likewise, radioimmunoassays using specific antibodies provided evidence that leptin alone had no effect on LH release but did enhance GnRH-induced secretion of the hormone. Leptin had no apparent effects on LH gene transcription in absence of GnRH, as measured by transient transfection assays using a LH promoter-reporter gene and real time RT-PCR. These observations suggest that leptin might affect LH release by acting directly on the gonadotropes, favoring hormone production by enhancing responsiveness to GnRH as a result of increased Ca2+ channel expression. PMID:18834922

  5. Viral inactivation in hemotherapy: systematic review on inactivators with action on nucleic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Marial Sobral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review on the photoinactivators used in hemotherapy, with action on viral genomes. The SciELO, Science Direct, PubMed and Lilacs databases were searched for articles. The inclusion criterion was that these should be articles on inactivators with action on genetic material that had been published between 2000 and 2010. The key words used in identifying such articles were "hemovigilance", "viral inactivation", "photodynamics", "chemoprevention" and "transfusion safety". Twenty-four articles on viral photoinactivation were found with the main photoinactivators covered being: methylene blue, amotosalen HCl, S-303 frangible anchor linker effector (FRALE, riboflavin and inactin. The results showed that methylene blue has currently been studied least, because it diminishes coagulation factors and fibrinogen. Riboflavin has been studied most because it is a photoinactivator of endogenous origin and has few collateral effects. Amotosalen HCl is effective for platelets and is also used on plasma, but may cause changes both to plasma and to platelets, although these are not significant for hemostasis. S-303 FRALE may lead to neoantigens in erythrocytes and is less indicated for red-cell treatment; in such cases, PEN 110 is recommended. Thus, none of the methods for pathogen reduction is effective for all classes of agents and for all blood components, but despite the high cost, these photoinactivators may diminish the risk of blood-transmitted diseases.

  6. Laser-induced inactivation of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeBlanc Danielle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haemozoin crystals, produced by Plasmodium during its intra-erythrocytic asexual reproduction cycle, can generate UV light via the laser-induced, non-linear optical process of third harmonic generation (THG. In the current study the feasibility of using haemozoin, constitutively stored in the parasite’s food vacuole, to kill the parasite by irradiation with a near IR laser was evaluated. Methods Cultured Plasmodium parasites at different stages of development were irradiated with a pulsed NIR laser and the viability of parasites at each stage was evaluated from their corresponding growth curves using the continuous culture method. Additional testing for germicidal effects of haemozoin and NIR laser was performed by adding synthetic haemozoin crystals to Escherichia coli in suspension. Cell suspensions were then irradiated with the laser and small aliquots taken and spread on agar plates containing selective agents to determine cell viability (CFU. Results Parasites in the late-trophozoites form as well as trophozoites in early-stage of DNA synthesis were found to be the most sensitive to the treatment with ~4-log reduction in viability after six passes through the laser beam; followed by parasites in ring phase (~2-log reduction. A ~1-log reduction in E. coli viability was obtained following a 60 min irradiation regimen of the bacteria in the presence of 1 μM synthetic haemozoin and a ~2-log reduction in the presence of 10 μM haemozoin. Minimal (≤15% cell kill was observed in the presence of 10 μM haemin. Conclusions Laser-induced third-harmonic generation by haemozoin can be used to inactivate Plasmodium. This result may have clinical implications for treating severe malaria symptoms by irradiating the patient’s blood through the skin or through dialysis tubing with a NIR laser.

  7. Thermal inactivation of Phytophthora capsici oospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etxeberria, Aitzol; Mendarte, Sorkunde; Larregla, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major fungal plant pathogen that causes root and crown rot of pepper crops and its oospores are the most resistant propagules. To evaluate the effect of different temperature regimes and exposure times on the survival of P. capsici oospores. Thermal inactivation treatments simulated field conditions, through the use of different constant and cycling temperature regimes, in moistened sterilized soil (15-53 °C) and sterilized water (45-53 °C). The plasmolysis method evaluated oospore viability. Relationships between oospores viability and exposure time were statistically determined by linear regression. Interpolation was used to calculate the estimated times required to kill a determined percentage of the population. The required time to reduce P. capsici oospores viability decreased with increasing temperatures. Times required to kill 100% of oospores were 199-22-6.6-4.7-1.0 hours at 40-45-47.5-50-53°C respectively in moistened soil and 31-1.0-0.2 hours at 45-50-53 °C in water. Oospores were scarcely affected at temperatures ≤ 35 °C. With 1,680 hours at 15-35 °C, oospores survival in soil ranged from 88 to 36%. The 4 hours-40 °C regime killed 100% of oospores after 28days, while the 5 hours-35°C regime after 70 days killed only 75%. Time required to achieve total oospores death was remarkably shortened in water when compared with moistened soil. The developed models can be used to predict survival values at any exposure time with constant temperatures ranging from 40 to 53 °C in moistened soil and from 45 to 53 °C in water. The weakening of P. capsici oospores under sublethal heating, is a useful observation that can be applied for pathogen control with solarization. Copyright © 2010 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of glycerolisation with cryopreservation methods on HIV-1 inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Baare, J.; Pagnon, J.; Cameron, P.; Vardaxis, N.; Middlekoop, E.; Crowe, S.

    1999-01-01

    Cryopreservation and glycerolisation are two successful long-term preservation methods for human cadaveric donor skin, which is used in the treatment of bum patients. High concentrations of glycerol has been shown to be antibacterial and virucidal. Because fear of possible transmission of HIV-1 following allograft transplantation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether HIV can be effectively eliminated from skin explants. HIV-1 Ba-L, which has been shown to infect monocytes in skin explants and also dendritic cells, was. For the experiments we used cell-free virus, exogenously HIV infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and exogenously HIV infected cadaver split skin. Different concentrations of glycerol at various temperatures and the glycerolisation procedure as used by the Euro Skin Bank were used to determine the effects on HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity. For the cryopreservation technique we used 10% DMSO and a controlled rate freezer. HIV-1 Ba-L transfer was determined by adding uninfected PBMCs to the infected material and reverse transcriptase was measured. Cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by 50% glycerol but was effectively inactivated within 30 minutes by 70% and 85% glycerol at 4 degree C, room temperature and 37 degree C. In contrast, cell-free HIV-1 Ba-L was not inactivated by cryopreservation. Most importantly, we have shown that HIV-1 Ba-L present in split skin is inactivated by incubating skin in 70% glycerol for three hours at 37-C. HIV in exogenously infected skin was not inactivated by cryopreservation. High concentrations of glycerol effectively inactivates free HIV-1 Ba-L and intracellular HIV-1 Ba-L. Also the current glycerolisation procedure carried out by the Euro Skin Bank effectively inactivates infectious virus. However, the cryopreservation technique did not show any reduction in HIV-1 Ba-L infectivity

  9. Molecular Viability Testing of UV-Inactivated Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Kris M; Nguyen, Felicia K; Kearney, Moira R; Meschke, John S; Cangelosi, Gerard A

    2017-05-15

    PCR is effective in detecting bacterial DNA in samples, but it is unable to differentiate viable bacteria from inactivated cells or free DNA fragments. New PCR-based analytical strategies have been developed to address this limitation. Molecular viability testing (MVT) correlates bacterial viability with the ability to rapidly synthesize species-specific rRNA precursors (pre-rRNA) in response to brief nutritional stimulation. Previous studies demonstrated that MVT can assess bacterial inactivation by chlorine, serum, and low-temperature pasteurization. Here, we demonstrate that MVT can detect inactivation of Escherichia coli , Aeromonas hydrophila , and Enterococcus faecalis cells by UV irradiation. Some UV-inactivated E. coli cells transiently retained the ability to synthesize pre-rRNA postirradiation (generating false-positive MVT results), but this activity ceased within 1 h following UV exposure. Viable but transiently undetectable (by culture) E. coli cells were consistently detected by MVT. An alternative viability testing method, viability PCR (vPCR), correlates viability with cell envelope integrity. This method did not distinguish viable bacteria from UV-inactivated bacteria under some conditions, indicating that the inactivated cells retained intact cell envelopes. MVT holds promise as a means to rapidly assess microbial inactivation by UV treatment. IMPORTANCE UV irradiation is increasingly being used to disinfect water, food, and other materials for human use. Confirming the effectiveness of UV disinfection remains a challenging task. In particular, microbiological methods that rely on rapid detection of microbial DNA can yield misleading results, due to the detection of remnant DNA associated with dead microbial cells. This report describes a novel method that rapidly distinguishes living microbial cells from dead microbial cells after UV disinfection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Green Tea Catechin-Inactivated Viral Vaccine Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun H. Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, chemical agents such as formalin (FA and β-propiolactone (BPL have long been used for the preparation of inactivated vaccines or toxoids. It has been shown that FA extensively modifies vaccine antigens and thus affects immunogenicity profiles, sometimes compromising the protective efficacy of the vaccines or even exacerbating the disease upon infection. In this study, we show that natural catechins from green tea extracts (GT can be used as an inactivating agent to prepare inactivated viral vaccines. GT treatment resulted in complete and irreversible inactivation of influenza virus as well as dengue virus. In contrast to FA that reacted extensively with multiple amino acids including lysine, a major anchor residue for epitope binding to MHC molecules, GT catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG crosslinked primarily with cysteine residues and thus preserved the major epitopes of the influenza hemagglutinin. In a mouse model, vaccination with GT-inactivated influenza virus (GTi virus elicited higher levels of viral neutralizing antibodies than FA-inactivated virus (FAi virus. The vaccination completely protected the mice from a lethal challenge and restricted the challenge viral replication in the lungs. Of note, the quality of antibody responses of GTi virus was superior to that with FAi virus, in terms of the magnitude of antibody titer, cross-reactivity to hetero-subtypes of influenza viruses, and the avidity to viral antigens. As the first report of using non-toxic natural compounds for the preparation of inactivated viral vaccines, the present results could be translated into a clinically relevant vaccine platform with improved efficacy, safety, productivity, and public acceptance.

  11. ERADIKASI POLIO DAN IPV (INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE

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    Gendrowahyuhono Gendrowahyuhono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the year 1988, World Health Organization (WHO claims that polio viruses should be eradicated after year 2000. However, until year 2010 the world have not been free from polio viruses circulation. So many effort had been achieved and it is estimated that the world will be free from polio virus after the year 2013. Control of poliomyelitis in Indonesia has been commenced since 1982 with routine immunization of polio program and the National Immunization Days (NID has been commenced since 1995,1996,2005 and 2006. When the world is free from polio virus, WHO suggests several alternative effort to maintain the world free from polio viruses : I stop the OPV (Oral Polio Vaccine and no polio immunization, 2 stop OPV and stock pile mOPV (monovalent OPV, 3 use OPV and IPV (Inactivated Polio Vaccine in a certain times, 4 use IPV only in a certain times. IPV has been used routinely in develop countries but has not been used in the developing countries. Several studies in development countries has been conducted, but had not been done in the developing countries. Indonesia collaboration with WHO has conducted the study of IPV in Yogyakarta Province since year 2002 until year 2010. The overall aim of the study is to compile the necessary data that will inform global and national decision-making regarding future polio immunization policies for the OPV cessation era. The data generated from the study will be particularly important to make decisions regarding optimal IPV use in developing tropical countries. It is unlikely that this data can be assembled through other means than through this study. The tentative result of the study shows that OPV immunization coverage in the year 2004 is 99% in four district and 93 % in the Yogyakarta city. Environment surveillance shows that there are 65.7% polio virus detected from 137 sewage samples pre IPV swich, and 4.8% polio virus detected from 83 sewage samples post IPV swich. Survey polio antibody serologis shows

  12. [Kinetics of catalase inactivation induced by ultrasonic cavitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapovich, M V; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    2003-01-01

    Kinetic patterns of sonication-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase (CAT) were studied in buffer solutions (pH 4-11) within the temperature range from 36 to 55 degrees C. Solutions of CAT were exposed to low-frequency (20.8 kHz) ultrasound (specific power, 48-62 W/cm2). The kinetics of CAT inactivation was characterized by effective first-order rate constants (s-1) of total inactivation (kin), thermal inactivation (*kin), and ultrasonic inactivation (kin(us)). In all cases, the following inequality was valid: kin > *kin. The value of kin(us) increased with the ultrasound power (range, 48-62 W/cm2) and exhibited a strong dependence on pH of the medium. On increasing the initial concentration of CAT (0.4-4.0 nM), kin(us) decreased. The three rate constants were minimum within the range of pH 6.5-8; their values increased considerably at pH 9. At 36-55 degrees C, temperature dependence of kin(us) was characterized by an activation energy (Eact) of 19.7 kcal/mol, whereas the value of Eact for CAT thermoinactivation was equal to 44.2 kcal/mol. Bovine serum and human serum albumins (BSA and HSA, respectively) inhibited sonication-induced CAT inactivation; complete prevention was observed at concentrations above 2.5 micrograms/ml. Dimethyl formamide (DMFA), a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (HO.), prevented sonication-induced CAT inactivation at 10% (kin and *kin increased with the content of DMFA at concentrations in excess of 3%). The results obtained indicate that free radicals generated in the field of ultrasonic cavitation play a decisive role in the inactivation of CAT, which takes place when its solutions are exposed to low-frequency ultrasound. However, the efficiency of CAT inactivation by the radicals is determined by (1) the degree of association between the enzyme molecules in the reaction medium and (2) the composition thereof.

  13. Pulsed dielectric barrier discharge for Bacillus subtilis inactivation in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernández-Arias, A N; López-Callejas, R; De la Piedad Beneitez, A; Rodríguez-Méndez, B G; Valencia-Alvarado, R; Mercado-Cabrera, A; Peña-Eguiluz, R; Barocio, S R; Muñoz-Castro, A E

    2012-01-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus subtilis bacteria in water has been experimentally studied by means of a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (PDBD) in a coaxial reactor endowed with an alumina dielectric. The plasma source is capable of operating at atmospheric pressure with gas, water or hybrid gas-liquid media at adjustable 25 kV pulses, 30 μs long and at a 500 Hz frequency. In order to evaluate the inactivation efficiency of the system, a set of experiments were designed on the basis of oxygen flow control. The initial data have showed a significant bacterial rate reduction of 10 3 -10 7 CFU/mL. Additional results proved that applying an oxygen flow for a few seconds during the PDBD treatment inactivates the Bacillus subtilis population with 99.99% effectiveness. As a reference, without gas flow but with the same exposure times, this percentage is reduced to ∼90%. The analysis of the relationship between inactivation rate and chemical species in the discharge has been carried out using optical emission spectroscopy as to identifying the main reactive species. Reactive oxygen species such as atomic oxygen and ozone tuned out to be the dominant germicidal species. Some proposed inactivation mechanisms of this technique are discussed.

  14. Thermal and high pressure inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terefe, Netsanet Shiferaw; Delon, Antoine; Versteeg, Cornelis

    2017-10-01

    This study for the first time investigated the stability and inactivation kinetics of blueberry peroxidase in model systems (McIlvaine buffer, pH=3.6, the typical pH of blueberry juice) during thermal (40-80°C) and combined high pressure-thermal processing (0.1-690MPa, 30-90°C). At 70-80°C, the thermal inactivation kinetics was best described by a biphasic model with ∼61% labile and ∼39% stable fractions at temperature between 70 and 75°C. High pressure inhibited the inactivation of the enzyme with no inactivation at pressures as high as 690MPa and temperatures less than 50°C. The inactivation kinetics of the enzyme at 60-70°C, and pressures higher than 500MPa was best described by a first order biphasic model with ∼25% labile fraction and 75% stable fraction. The activation energy values at atmospheric pressure were 548.6kJ/mol and 324.5kJ/mol respectively for the stable and the labile fractions. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Removal of detergents from SDS-inactivated dextransucrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husman, D.W.; Mayer, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Dextransucrase, which is rapidly inactivated by SDS, can be reactivated upon the addition of Triton X-100. Purification of the enzyme, in good yield and homogeneity, has been achieved by chromatography in the presence of SDS. The purified enzyme can be reactivated with Triton, but has large amounts of detergents. It was important to develop procedures for their removal. Density gradient centrifugation of SDS-inactivated or Triton-reactivated enzyme, treatment with Extracti-Gel D (Pierce) or chromatography on hydroxyl apatite (HA), have been examined for their effectiveness in providing detergent-free enzyme in good yield. Ultracentrifugation of SDS-inactivated protein provided limited recovery of active enzyme, but suggested that reactivation could be achieved by the simple removal of the detergent. While similar behavior was observed when the enzyme was eluted from Extracti-Gel, it was also shown that the limited recovery was a result of irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. Recovery could be improved if the enzyme was collected in solutions containing Triton, which has been reported to be a stabilizer. Chromatography of SDS-inactivated enzyme on HA also yielded active enzyme. Good recovery was obtained when Triton-reactivated enzyme was employed in these studies. The degree of detergent removal was determined by utilizing radiolabelled SDS and Triton X-100

  16. Structure of suicide-inactivated β-hydroxydecanoyl-thioester dehydrase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwab, J.M.; Ho, C.K.; Li, W.B.; Townsend, C.A.; Salituro, G.M.

    1986-01-01

    β-Hydroxydecanoylthioester dehydrase, the key enzyme in biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids under anaerobic conditions, equilibrates thioesters of (R)-3-hydroxydecanoic acid, E-2-decenoic acid, and Z-3-decenoic acid. Dehydrase is irreversibly inactivated by the N-acetylcysteamine thioester of 3-decynoic acid (3-decynoyl-NAC), via dehydrase-catalyzed isomerization to 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC. To probe the relationship between normal catalysis and suicide inactivation, the structure of the inactivated enzyme has been studied. 3-[2- 13 C]Decynoyl-NAC was synthesized and incubated with dehydrase. 13 C NMR showed that attack of 2,3-decadienoyl-NAC by the active site histidine gives 3-histidinyl-3-decenoyl-NAC, which slowly rearranges to the more stable Δ 2 isomer. Model histidine-allene adducts have been made and characterized. Analysis of NMR data show that the C=C configuration of the decenoyl moiety of enzyme-bound inactivator is E. The suggestion that the mechanism of dehydrase inactivation parallels its normal mechanism of action is supported these findings

  17. Catalysis and inactivation of tyrosinase in its action on hydroxyhydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mar Garcia-Molina, Maria; Muñoz-Muñoz, Jose Luis; Berna, Jose; García-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jose Neptuno; Garcia-Canovas, Francisco

    2014-02-01

    Hydroxyhydroquinone (HHQ) was characterized kinetically as a tyrosinase substrate. A kinetic mechanism is proposed, in which HHQ is considered as a monophenol or as an o-diphenol, depending on the part of the molecule that interacts with the enzyme. The kinetic parameters obtained from an analysis of the measurements of the initial steady state rate of 2-hydroxy p-benzoquinone formation were kcatapp=229.0±7.7 s(-1) and KMapp,HHQ=0.40±0.05 mM. Furthermore, the action of tyrosinase on HHQ led to the enzyme's inactivation through a suicide inactivation mechanism. This suicide inactivation process was characterized kinetically by λmaxapp (the apparent maximum inactivation constant) and r, the number of turnovers made by 1 mol of enzyme before being inactivated. The values of λmaxapp and r were (8.2±0.1)×10(-3) s(-1) and 35,740±2,548, respectively. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as · OH and ONOO - . In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  19. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra, E-mail: olakow@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Serafin, Eligiusz, E-mail: serafin@biol.uni.lodz.p [Laboratory of Computer and Analytical Techniques, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Puchala, Mieczyslaw, E-mail: puchala@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as {sup {center_dot}}OH and ONOO{sup -}. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  20. Inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives. II. Physical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, B.; Wiebe, M.E.; Lippin, A.; Vandersande, J.; Stryker, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal inactivation of viruses in labile blood derivatives was evaluated by addition of marker viruses (VSV, Sindbis, Sendai, EMC) to anti-hemophilic factor (AHF) concentrates. The rate of virus inactivation at 60 degrees C was decreased by at least 100- to 700-fold by inclusion of 2.75 M glycine and 50 percent sucrose, or 3.0 M potassium citrate, additives which contribute to retention of protein biologic activity. Nonetheless, at least 10(4) infectious units of each virus was inactivated within 10 hours. Increasing the temperature from 60 to 70 or 80 degrees C caused a 90 percent or greater loss in AHF activity. An even greater decline in the rate of virus inactivation was observed on heating AHF in the lyophilized state, although no loss in AHF activity was observed after 72 hours of heating at 60 degrees C. Several of the proteins present in lyophilized AHF concentrates displayed an altered electrophoretic mobility as a result of exposure to 60 degrees C for 24 hours. Exposure of lyophilized AHF to irradiation from a cobalt 60 source resulted in an acceptable yield of AHF at 1.0, but not at 2.0, megarads. At 1 megarad, greater than or equal to 6.0 logs of VSV and 3.3 logs of Sindbis virus were inactivated

  1. Molecular and functional identification of cyclic AMP-sensitive BKCa potassium channels (ZERO variant) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in single rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jørgensen, Finn; Andreasen, Ditte

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the type and functional significance of potassium channels and voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(v)) in single rat JG cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Single JG cells displayed outward rectification at positive membrane potentials and limited net currents......, respectively. Double immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of BKCa and renin in the same cell. cAMP increased the outward current by 1.6-fold, and this was inhibited by 74% with iberiotoxin. Expression of the cAMP-sensitive splice variant (ZERO) of BKCa was confirmed in single-sampled JG cells by RT...... no effect. We conclude that JG cells express functional cAMP-sensitive BKCa channels (the ZERO splice variant) and voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels....

  2. L-type calcium channels and MAP kinase contribute to thyrotropin-releasing hormone-induced depolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaj, Miloslav; Zhang, Li; Renaud, Leo P

    2016-06-01

    In rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) neurons, activation of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors enhances neuronal excitability via concurrent decrease in a G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K (GIRK)-like conductance and opening of a cannabinoid receptor-sensitive transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)-like conductance. Here, we investigated the calcium (Ca(2+)) contribution to the components of this TRH-induced response. TRH-induced membrane depolarization was reduced in the presence of intracellular BAPTA, also in media containing nominally zero [Ca(2+)]o, suggesting a critical role for both intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) influx. TRH-induced inward current was unchanged by T-type Ca(2+) channel blockade, but was decreased by blockade of high-voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels (HVACCs). Both the pharmacologically isolated GIRK-like and the TRPC-like components of the TRH-induced response were decreased by nifedipine and increased by BayK8644, implying Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. Only the TRPC-like conductance was reduced by either thapsigargin or dantrolene, suggesting a role for ryanodine receptors and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release in this component of the TRH-induced response. In pituitary and other cell lines, TRH stimulates MAPK. In PVT neurons, only the GIRK-like component of the TRH-induced current was selectively decreased in the presence of PD98059, a MAPK inhibitor. Collectively, the data imply that TRH-induced depolarization and inward current in PVT neurons involve both a dependency on extracellular Ca(2+) influx via opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels, a sensitivity of a TRPC-like component to intracellular Ca(2+) release via ryanodine channels, and a modulation by MAPK of a GIRK-like conductance component. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Localization and functional modification of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in equine spermatozoa from fresh and frozen semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrizio, M; Moramarco, A M; Nicassio, M; Micera, E; Zarrilli, A; Lacalandra, G M

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that insemination of cryopreserved semen always results in lower fertility when compared with fresh semen, but there is an increased interest and demand for frozen equine semen by the major breeder associations because of the utility arising from semen already "on hand" at breeding time. In this article, we report that equine sperm cells express L-type voltage-gated calcium channels; their localization is restricted to sperm neck and to the principal piece of the tail in both fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa. We also studied the causes of cryoinjury at the membrane level focusing on the function of L-type calcium channels. We report that in cryopreserved spermatozoa the mean basal value of [Ca(2+)]i is higher than that of spermatozoa from fresh semen (447.130 vs. 288.3 nM; P antagonist in relation to semen condition (fresh or frozen-thawed). We found that on addition of agonist to the culture medium, the increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) was greater in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 124.59 vs. 16.04 nM; P antagonist the decrease in [Ca(2+)]i was lower in frozen semen than in fresh semen (Δ[Ca(2+)]i = 32.5 vs. 82.5 nM; P < 0.001). In this article, we also discuss the impact of cryopreservation on sperm physiology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The activation ofN-methyl-d-aspartate receptors downregulates transient outward potassium and L-type calcium currents in rat models of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Shi, Shaobo; Yang, Hongjie; Qu, Chuan; Chen, Yuting; Liang, Jinjun; Yang, Bo

    2017-08-01

    Major depression is an important clinical factor in ventricular arrhythmia. Patients diagnosed with major depression overexpress N -methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Previous studies found that chronic NMDAR activation increases susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We aimed to explore the mechanisms by which NMDAR activation may increase susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. Male rats were randomly assigned to either normal environments as control (CTL) group or 4 wk of chronic mild stress (CMS) to produce a major depression disorder (MDD) model group. After 4 wk of CMS, depression-like behaviors were measured in both groups. Varying doses (1-100 μM) of NMDA and 10 μM NMDA antagonist (MK-801) were perfused through ventricular myocytes isolated from MDD rats to measure the L-type calcium current ( I Ca-L ) and transient outward potassium current ( I to ). Structural remodeling was assessed using serial histopathology including Masson's trichrome dye. Electrophysiological characteristics were evaluated using Langendorff perfusion. Depression-like behaviors were observed in MDD rats. MDD rats showed longer action potential durations at 90% repolarization and higher susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias than CTL rats. MDD rats showed lower I Ca-L and I to current densities than CTL rats. Additionally, NMDA reduced both currents in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas there was no significant impact on the currents when perfused with MK-801. MDD rats exhibited significantly more fibrosis areas in heart tissue and reduced expression of Kv4.2, Kv4.3, and Cav1.2. We observed that acute NMDAR activation led to downregulation of potassium and L-type calcium currents in a rat model of depression, which may be the mechanism underlying ventricular arrhythmia promotion by depression. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. SERCA Cys674 sulphonylation and inhibition of L-type Ca2+ influx contribute to cardiac dysfunction in endotoxemic mice, independent of cGMP synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Buys, Emmanuel S; Morse, Justin C; Edgecomb, Jessica; Weiss, Eric H; Armoundas, Antonis A; Hou, Xiuyun; Khandelwal, Alok R; Siwik, Deborah A; Brouckaert, Peter; Cohen, Richard A; Colucci, Wilson S

    2013-10-15

    The goal of this study was to identify the cellular mechanisms responsible for cardiac dysfunction in endotoxemic mice. We aimed to differentiate the roles of cGMP [produced by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)] versus oxidative posttranslational modifications of Ca(2+) transporters. C57BL/6 mice [wild-type (WT) mice] were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 25 μg/g ip) and euthanized 12 h later. Cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening and Ca(2+) transients (ΔCai) were depressed in LPS-challenged mice versus baseline. The time constant of Ca(2+) decay (τCa) was prolonged, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load (CaSR) was depressed in LPS-challenged mice (vs. baseline), indicating decreased activity of sarco(endo)plasmic Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). L-type Ca(2+) channel current (ICa,L) was also decreased after LPS challenge, whereas Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange activity, ryanodine receptors leak flux, or myofilament sensitivity for Ca(2+) were unchanged. All Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities induced by LPS (the decrease in sarcomere shortening, ΔCai, CaSR, ICa,L, and τCa prolongation) were more pronounced in mice deficient in the sGC main isoform (sGCα1(-/-) mice) versus WT mice. LPS did not alter the protein expression of SERCA and phospholamban in either genotype. After LPS, phospholamban phosphorylation at Ser(16) and Thr(17) was unchanged in WT mice and was increased in sGCα1(-/-) mice. LPS caused sulphonylation of SERCA Cys(674) (as measured immunohistochemically and supported by iodoacetamide labeling), which was greater in sGCα1(-/-) versus WT mice. Taken together, these results suggest that cardiac Ca(2+) dysregulation in endotoxemic mice is mediated by a decrease in L-type Ca(2+) channel function and oxidative posttranslational modifications of SERCA Cys(674), with the latter (at least) being opposed by sGC-released cGMP.

  6. L-type calcium channel blockers reverse docetaxel and vincristine-induced multidrug resistance independent of ABCB1 expression in human lung cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ling-Yen; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Lee, Yi-Ju; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Tee, Yi-Torng; Sheu, Gwo-Tarng

    2010-02-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs significantly impedes chemotherapeutic treatment. The purpose of this study is to characterize docetaxel (DOC) or vincristine (VCR) selected A549 and H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) sublines that exhibit MDR phenotypes and followed by re-sensitization study. Although all drug resistant sublines showed cross-resistance to DOC, VCR, and doxorubicin (DXR), the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter B1 (ABCB1) gene was found to be strongly induced in DOC but not in VCR resistant A549 sublines by quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). In DOC and VCR resistant H1299 sublines, moderate expression of ABCB1 was detected. The levels of ABCB1 protein and efflux activities were further examined by immunoblotting and rhodamin-123 staining assay. The results showed that both ABC and non-ABC mediated MDR are existed. Furthermore, verapamil (VER), an inhibitor of ABCB1 and an L-type calcium channel blocker, is capable of reversing the resistance in all drug-resistant sublines independent of ABCB1 expression. Importantly, VER only sensitizes resistant sublines but has no effect on parental cancer cells. Other L-type calcium channel blockers, such as diltiazem (DIL) and nifedipine (NIF), also sensitize MDR sublines without interfering with ABCB1 activity but with lower efficacy than VER. Our data showed that in addition to ABCB1, calcium channel activity may play a crucial role in DOC- and VCR-acquired MDR. Therefore, inhibition of calcium influx may provide a new target to modulate MDR in chemotherapy. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vasoconstriction triggered by hydrogen sulfide: Evidence for Na+,K+,2Cl-cotransport and L-type Ca2+ channel-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergei N; Gusakova, Svetlana V; Smaglii, Liudmila V; Koltsova, Svetlana V; Sidorenko, Svetalana V

    2017-12-01

    This study examined the dose-dependent actions of hydrogen sulfide donor sodium hydrosulphide (NaHS) on isometric contractions and ion transport in rat aorta smooth muscle cells (SMC). Isometric contraction was measured in ring aortas segments from male Wistar rats. Activity of Na + /K + -pump and Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport was measured in cultured endothelial and smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta as ouabain-sensitive and ouabain-resistant, bumetanide-sensitive components of the 86 Rb influx, respectively. NaHS exhibited the bimodal action on contractions triggered by modest depolarization ([K + ] o =30 mM). At 10 -4 M, NaHS augmented contractions of intact and endothelium-denuded strips by ~ 15% and 25%, respectively, whereas at concentration of 10 -3  M it decreased contractile responses by more than two-fold. Contractions evoked by 10 -4  M NaHS were completely abolished by bumetanide, a potent inhibitor of Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport, whereas the inhibition seen at 10 -3  M NaHS was suppressed in the presence of K + channel blocker TEA. In cultured SMC, 5×10 -5  M NaHS increased Na + ,K + ,2Cl - - cotransport without any effect on the activity of this carrier in endothelial cells. In depolarized SMC, 45 Ca influx was enhanced in the presence of 10 -4  M NaHS and suppressed under elevation of [NaHS] up to 10 -3  M. 45 Ca influx triggered by 10 -4  M NaHS was abolished by bumetanide and L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker nicardipine. Our results strongly suggest that contractions of rat aortic rings triggered by low doses of NaHS are mediated by activation of Na + ,K + ,2Cl - cotransport and Ca 2+ influx via L-type channels.

  8. Experimental H-type and L-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle: observation of two clinical syndromes and diagnostic challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konold Timm

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE cases so far identified worldwide have been detected by active surveillance. Consequently the volume and quality of material available for detailed characterisation is very limiting. Here we report on a small transmission study of both atypical forms, H- and L-type BSE, in cattle to provide tissue for test evaluation and research, and to generate clinical, molecular and pathological data in a standardised way to enable more robust comparison of the two variants with particular reference to those aspects most relevant to case ascertainment and confirmatory diagnosis within existing regulated surveillance programmes. Results Two groups of four cattle, intracerebrally inoculated with L-type or H-type BSE, all presented with a nervous disease form with some similarities to classical BSE, which progressed to a more dull form in one animal from each group. Difficulty rising was a consistent feature of both disease forms and not seen in two BSE-free, non-inoculated cattle that served as controls. The pathology and molecular characteristics were distinct from classical BSE, and broadly consistent with published data, but with some variation in the pathological characteristics. Both atypical BSE types were readily detectable as BSE by current confirmatory methods using the medulla brain region at the obex, but making a clear diagnostic distinction between the forms was not consistently straightforward in this brain region. Cerebellum proved a more reliable sample for discrimination when using immunohistochemistry. Conclusions The prominent feature of difficulty rising in atypical BSE cases may explain the detection of naturally occurring cases in emergency slaughter cattle and fallen stock. Current confirmatory diagnostic methods are effective for the detection of such atypical cases, but consistently and correctly identifying the variant forms may require modifications to

  9. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of ω-TRTX-Cc1a, a novel tarantula venom peptide that selectively targets L-type Cav channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klint, Julie K; Berecki, Géza; Durek, Thomas; Mobli, Mehdi; Knapp, Oliver; King, Glenn F; Adams, David J; Alewood, Paul F; Rash, Lachlan D

    2014-05-15

    Spider venoms are replete with peptidic ion channel modulators, often with novel subtype selectivity, making them a rich source of pharmacological tools and drug leads. In a search for subtype-selective blockers of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels, we isolated and characterized a novel 39-residue peptide, ω-TRTX-Cc1a (Cc1a), from the venom of the tarantula Citharischius crawshayi (now Pelinobius muticus). Cc1a is 67% identical to the spider toxin ω-TRTX-Hg1a, an inhibitor of CaV2.3 channels. We assembled Cc1a using a combination of Boc solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. Oxidative folding yielded two stable, slowly interconverting isomers. Cc1a preferentially inhibited Ba(2+) currents (IBa) mediated by L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3) CaV channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes, with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 825nM and 2.24μM, respectively. In rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, Cc1a inhibited IBa mediated by high voltage-activated CaV channels but did not affect low voltage-activated T-type CaV channels. Cc1a exhibited weak activity at NaV1.5 and NaV1.7 voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels stably expressed in mammalian HEK or CHO cells, respectively. Experiments with modified Cc1a peptides, truncated at the N-terminus (ΔG1-E5) or C-terminus (ΔW35-V39), demonstrated that the N- and C-termini are important for voltage-gated ion channel modulation. We conclude that Cc1a represents a novel pharmacological tool for probing the structure and function of L-type CaV channels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Antidepressants Rescue Stress-Induced Disruption of Synaptic Plasticity via Serotonin Transporter-Independent Inhibition of L-Type Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, Claus; Frase, Sibylle; Haug, Verena; von Wolff, Gregor; Clark, Kristin; Münzer, Patrick; Dorner, Alexandra; Scholliers, Jonas; Horn, Max; Vo Van, Tanja; Seifert, Gabriel; Serchov, Tsvetan; Biber, Knut; Nissen, Christoph; Klugbauer, Norbert; Bischofberger, Josef

    2017-10-19

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a basic ability of the brain to dynamically adapt to external stimuli and regulate synaptic strength and ultimately network function. It is dysregulated by behavioral stress in animal models of depression and in humans with major depressive disorder. Antidepressants have been shown to restore disrupted synaptic plasticity in both animal models and humans; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. We examined modulation of synaptic plasticity by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in hippocampal brain slices from wild-type rats and serotonin transporter (SERT) knockout mice. Recombinant voltage-gated calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels in heterologous expression systems were used to determine the modulation of Ca 2+ channels by SSRIs. We tested the behavioral effects of SSRIs in the chronic behavioral despair model of depression both in the presence and in the absence of SERT. SSRIs selectively inhibited hippocampal long-term depression. The inhibition of long-term depression by SSRIs was mediated by a direct block of voltage-activated L-type Ca 2+ channels and was independent of SERT. Furthermore, SSRIs protected both wild-type and SERT knockout mice from behavioral despair induced by chronic stress. Finally, long-term depression was facilitated in animals subjected to the behavioral despair model, which was prevented by SSRI treatment. These results showed that antidepressants protected synaptic plasticity and neuronal circuitry from the effects of stress via a modulation of Ca 2+ channels and synaptic plasticity independent of SERT. Thus, L-type Ca 2+ channels might constitute an important signaling hub for stress response and for pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure inactivation of Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palou, E; López-Malo, A; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Welti-Chanes, J; Swanson, B G

    1998-09-01

    Zygosaccharomyces bailii inactivation was evaluated in oscillatory high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatments at sublethal pressures (207, 241, or 276 MPa) and compared with continuous HHP treatments in laboratory model systems with a water activity (aw) of 0.98 and pH 3.5. The yeast was inoculated into laboratory model systems and subjected to HHP in sterile bags. Two HHP treatments were conducted: continuous (holding times of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, or 90 min) and oscillatory (two, three, or four cycles with holding times of 5 min and two cycles with holding times of 10 min). Oscillatory pressure treatments increased the effectiveness of HHP processing. For equal holding times, Z. bailii counts decreased as the number of cycles increased. Holding times of 20 min in HHP oscillatory treatments at 276 MPa assured inactivation (bailii initial inoculum. Oscillatory pressurization could be useful to decrease Z. bailii inactivation time.

  12. Inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes in milk by pulsed electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, L D; Jin, Z T; Zhang, Q H; Yousef, A E

    1998-09-01

    Pasteurized whole, 2%, and skim milk were inoculated with Listeria monocytogenes Scott A and treated with high-voltage pulsed electric field (PEF). The effects of milk composition (fat content) and PEF parameters (electric field strength, treatment time, and treatment temperature) on the inactivation of the bacterium were studied. No significant differences were observed in the inactivation of L. monocytogenes Scott A in three types of milk by PEF treatment. With treatment at 25 degrees C, 1- to 3-log reductions of L. monocytogenes were observed. PEF lethal effect was a function of field strength and treatment time. Higher field strength or longer treatment time resulted in a greater reduction of viable cells. A 4-log reduction of the bacterium was obtained by increasing the treatment temperature to 50 degrees C. Results indicate that the use of a high-voltage PEF is a promising technology for inactivation of foodborne pathogens.

  13. Lipase inactivation in wheat germ by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Kudachikar, V.B.; Kumar, Sourav

    2013-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve the shelf life of wheat germ by optimizing processing conditions involving γ-irradiation. Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of γ-irradiation (0–30 kGy doses) on the chemical composition of wheat germ with respect to variation in moisture, total ash, crude fat, free fatty acid, protein and lipase activity. The results demonstrate that shelf stability of wheat germ was achieved by inactivation of lipase at doses of γ-irradiation greater than 12 kGy. - Highlights: Ø γ-irradiation was found to inactivate Lipase present in Wheat Germ. Ø The treatment did not result in significant changes in Total Ash, Moisture and Protein Content of Wheat Germ. Ø The irradiation at 30 kGy resulted in 31.2 % inactivation of Lipase in Wheat Germ

  14. Mechanistic studies of the inactivation of tyrosinase by resorcinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratford, Michael R L; Ramsden, Christopher A; Riley, Patrick A

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of tyrosinase by resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) and seventeen simple derivatives has been investigated using combined spectrophotometry and oximetry together with hplc/ms examination of the oxidation products. The results are consistent with a Quintox mechanism, analogous to that proposed for catechol inactivation of tyrosinase, in which the resorcinol substrate is oxidised via the monooxygenase route leading to a hydroxy intermediate that undergoes deprotonation and results in irreversible elimination of Cu(0) from the active site. Hplc/ms evidence for formation of the resorcinol monooxygenase product (3-hydroxy-ortho-quinone) is presented and the relationship between the ring position of simple resorcinol substituents (H, Me, F, Cl) and tyrosinase inactivation is rationalised. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase Is Sensitive to Light Inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Viennet, Thibault; Skjoldager, Nicklas

    2015-01-01

    enzymes belong to the same class of low-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases and display similar kcat values (∼25 s-1) with their cognate thioredoxin. Remarkably, however, the L. lactis enzyme is inactivated by visible light and furthermore reduces molecular oxygen 10 times faster than E. coli Trx......R. The rate of light inactivation under standardized conditions (λmax = 460 nm and 4 °C) was reduced at lowered oxygen concentrations and in the presence of iodide. Inactivation was accompanied by a distinct spectral shift of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) that remained firmly bound. High......-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of heat-extracted FAD from light-damaged TrxR revealed a mass increment of 13.979 Da, relative to that of unmodified FAD, corresponding to the addition of one oxygen atom and the loss of two hydrogen atoms. Tandem mass spectrometry confined the increase in mass...

  16. Thermal inactivation kinetics of partially purified mango pectin methylesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Alonso DÍAZ-CRUZ

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kinetic parameters of thermal inactivation of pectin methylesterase (PME in a partially purified mango enzyme extract were determined. The PME of mango partially purified by salting out showed different patterns of thermal inactivation, indicating the presence of a thermostable fraction at 70 °C and a thermolabile fraction at lower temperatures. The inactivation of the thermostable fraction exhibited a linear behavior that yielded a z-value of 9.44 °C and an activation energy (Ea of 245.6 kJ mol-1 K-1 using the Arrhenius model. The thermostable mango PME fraction represented 17% of total crude enzyme extract, which emphasizes the importance of residual enzyme activity after heat treatment.

  17. Inactivation of Herpes Simplex Viruses by Nonionic Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asculai, Samuel S.; Weis, Margaret T.; Rancourt, Martha W.; Kupferberg, A. B.

    1978-01-01

    Nonionic surface-active agents possessing ether or amide linkages between the hydrophillic and hydrophobic portions of the molecule rapidly inactivated the infectivity of herpes simplex viruses. The activity stemmed from the ability of nonionic surfactants to dissolve lipid-containing membranes. This was confirmed by observing surfactant destruction of mammalian cell plasma membranes and herpes simplex virus envelopes. Proprietary vaginal contraceptive formulations containing nonionic surfactants also inactivated herpes simplex virus infectivity. This observation suggests that nonionic surfactants in appropriate formulation could effectively prevent herpes simplex virus transmission. Images PMID:208460

  18. Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 L-type calcium channels independently control short- and long-term sensitization to pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwani, Houda; Lopez-Gonzalez, Maria José; Cattaert, Daniel; Roca-Lapirot, Olivier; Dobremez, Eric; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Eiríksdóttir, Emelía; Langel, Ülo; Favereaux, Alexandre; Errami, Mohammed; Landry, Marc; Fossat, Pascal

    2016-11-15

    L-type calcium channels in the CNS exist as two subunit forming channels, Cav1.2 and Cav1.3, which are involved in short- and long-term plasticity. We demonstrate that Cav1.3 but not Cav1.2 is essential for wind-up. These results identify Cav1.3 as a key conductance responsible for short-term sensitization in physiological pain transmission. We confirm the role of Cav1.2 in a model of long-term plasticity associated with neuropathic pain. Up-regulation of Cav1.2 and down-regultation of Cav1.3 in neuropathic pain underlies the switch from physiology to pathology. Finally, the results of the present study reveal that therapeutic targeting molecular pathways involved in wind-up may be not relevant in the treatment of neuropathy. Short-term central sensitization to pain temporarily increases the responsiveness of nociceptive pathways after peripheral injury. In dorsal horn neurons (DHNs), short-term sensitization can be monitored through the study of wind-up. Wind-up, a progressive increase in DHNs response following repetitive peripheral stimulations, depends on the post-synaptic L-type calcium channels. In the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, two L-type calcium channels are present, Cav1.2 and Cav1.3, each displaying specific kinetics and spatial distribution. In the present study, we used a mathematical model of DHNs in which we integrated the specific patterns of expression of each Cav subunits. This mathematical approach reveals that Cav1.3 is necessary for the onset of wind-up, whereas Cav1.2 is not and that synaptically triggered wind-up requires NMDA receptor activation. We then switched to a biological preparation in which we knocked down Cav subunits and confirmed the prominent role of Cav1.3 in both naive and spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathy (SNL). Interestingly, although a clear mechanical allodynia dependent on Cav1.2 expression was observed after SNL, the amplitude of wind-up was decreased. These results were confirmed with our model when adapting

  19. Use of In Situ-Generated Dimethyldioxirane for Inactivation of Biological Agents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallace, William H; Bushway, Karen E; Miller, Susan D; Delcomyn, Carrie A; Renard, Jean J; Henley, Michael V

    2005-01-01

    ...) at neutral pH, was investigated for inactivation of biological warfare agent simulants. The DMDO solution inactivated bacterial spores, fungal spores, vegetative bacterial cells, viruses, and protein by 7 orders of magnitude in less than 10 min...

  20. X inactivation in Rett syndrome: A preliminary study showing partial preferential inactivation of paternal X with the M27{beta} probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, P.; Abbadi, N.; Gilgenkrantz, S. [Laboratoire de Genetique, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France)

    1994-04-15

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a severe progressive neurological disorder occurring exclusively in females. Most cases are sporadic. The few familial cases (less than 1%) cannot be explained by a simple mode of inheritance. Several hypotheses have been proposed: X-linked male lethal mutation, maternal uniparental disomy, fresh mutation on the X chromosome, involvement of mitochondrial DNA and differential inactivation with metabolic interference of X-borne alleles. The authors have examined the pattern of X inactivation in 10 affected girls who were selected according to the clinical criteria previously described and accepted by the French Rett Scientific Committee. The X inactivation pattern was studied by analysis of methylation at the hypervariable locus DXS255 with the M27{beta} probe. The results show a more-or-less skewed inactivation of paternal X in 8 Rett females, and 2 cases of symmetrical inactivation. In control girls, inactivation was symmetrical cases and the maternal X has been preferentially inactivated in the other 2 cases. In no case was a total skewed inactivation observed. Though there was clear evidence for a preferential paternal X inactivation that was statistically significant further studies are necessary to establish a relationship between X inactivation pattern and Rett syndrome.

  1. Congenital heart block: identification of autoantibody binding site on the extracellular loop (domain I, S5-S6) of alpha(1D) L-type Ca channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnabi, Eddy; Qu, Yongxia; Wadgaonkar, Raj; Mancarella, Salvatore; Yue, Yuankun; Chahine, Mohamed; Clancy, Robert M; Buyon, Jill P; Boutjdir, Mohamed

    2010-03-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) is an autoimmune disease associated with autoantibodies against intracellular ribonucleoproteins SSB/La and SSA/Ro. The hallmark of CHB is complete atrioventricular block. We have recently established that anti-SSA/Ro -SSB/La autoantibodies inhibit alpha(1D) L-type Ca current, I(Ca-L), and cross-react with the alpha(1D) Ca channel protein. This study aims at identifying the possible binding sites on alpha(1D) protein for autoantibodies from sera of mothers with CHB children. GST fusion proteins of the extracellular regions between the transmembrane segments (S5-S6) of each of the four alpha(1D) Ca channel protein domains I-IV were prepared and tested for reactivity with sera from mothers with CHB children and controls using ELISA. Sera containing anti-Ro/La autoantibodies from 118 mothers with CHB children and from 15 mothers with anti-Ro/La autoantibodies but have healthy children, and from 28 healthy mothers without anti-Ro/La autoantibodies and healthy children were evaluated. Seventeen of 118 (14.4%) sera from mothers with CHB children reacted with the extracellular loop of domain I S5-S6 region (E1). In contrast, only 2 of 28 (7%) of sera from healthy mothers (-anti-Ro/La) and healthy children reacted with E1 loop and none (0 of 15) of sera from healthy mothers (+anti-Ro/La) and healthy children reacted with the E1 loop. Preincubation of E1 loop with the positive sera decreased the O.D reading establishing the specificity of the response. Electrophysiological characterization of the ELISA positive sera and purified IgG showed inhibition (44.1% and 49.8%, respectively) of the alpha(1D) I(Ca-L) expressed in tsA201 cells. The inhibition was abolished when the sera were pre-incubated with E1 fusion protein. The results identified the extracellular loop of domain I S5-S6 of L-type Ca channel alpha(1D) subunit as a target for autoantibodies from a subset of mothers with CHB children. This novel finding provides insights into the

  2. Role of polyols in thermal inactivation of shark ornithine transcarbamoylase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bellocco, E.; Lagana, G.; Barreca, D.; Ficarra, S.; Tellone, E.; Magazu, S.; Branca, C.; Kotyk, Arnošt; Galtieri, A.; Leuzzi, U.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2005), s. 395-402 ISSN 0862-8408 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : ornithine transcarbamoylase * thermal inactivation * shark enzyme Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  3. Application of electrolysis to inactivation of antibacterials in clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Takashi; Hirose, Jun; Kobayashi, Toyohide; Hiro, Naoki; Kondo, Fumitake; Tamai, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Sano, Kouichi

    2013-04-01

    Contamination of surface water by antibacterial pharmaceuticals (antibacterials) from clinical settings may affect aquatic organisms, plants growth, and environmental floral bacteria. One of the methods to decrease the contamination is inactivation of antibacterials before being discharged to the sewage system. Recently, we reported the novel method based on electrolysis for detoxifying wastewater containing antineoplastics. In the present study, to clarify whether the electrolysis method is applicable to the inactivation of antibacterials, we electrolyzed solutions of 10 groups of individual antibacterials including amikacin sulfate (AMK) and a mixture (MIX) of some commercial antibacterials commonly prescribed at hospitals, and measured their antibacterial activities. AMK was inactivated in its antibacterial activities and its concentration decreased by electrolysis in a time-dependent manner. Eighty to ninety-nine percent of almost all antibacterials and MIX were inactivated within 6h of electrolysis. Additionally, cytotoxicity was not detected in any of the electrolyzed solutions of antibacterials and MIX by the Molt-4-based cytotoxicity test. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inactivation of carbenicillin by some radioresistant mutant strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahiera, T.S.; Mahmoud, M.I.; Bashandy, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Sensitivity test of five bacterial species to carbenicillin was performed microbiologically. The bacterial species were previously isolated from high level radiation environment. All the studied species could either highly decrease the antibiotic activity or even inactivate it completely. Detailed study of the inactivation of carbenicillin by the radioresistant mutant strains B. Laterosporus, B. firmus and M. roseus was performed, in the present study. Using high performace liquid chromatography technique. The gram-positive m. roseus mutant strain seemed to be the most active mutant in degrading the antibiotic. The left over of the antibiotic attained a value of 9% of the original amount after 14 day incubation of the antibiotic with this mutant strain, while the value of the left over reached 36% and 32% after the same period of incubation with the mutants B. laterosporus and B. firmus respectively. In the case of bacillus species, the degradation of the antibiotic started at the same moment when it was added to the bacterial cultures. This fact may indicate that the inactivation of the studied antibiotic by these bacillus species was due to extracellular enzymes extracted rapidly in the surrounding medium. In the case of M. roseus the inactivation process started later. after the addition of the antibiotic to the mutant culture

  5. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    2007-12-16

    Dec 16, 2007 ... The cleaved and purified recombinant. BBAP1 exhibited ribosome-inhibiting rRNA N-glycosidase activity, and imparted a high level of resistance against the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). [Choudhary N, Kapoor H C and Lodha M L 2008 Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein from ...

  6. Method of inactivation of viral and bacterial blood contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, R.; Goodrich, R.P.; Van Borssum Waalkes, M.; Wong, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for inactivating viral and/or bacterial contamination in blood cellular matter, such as erythrocytes and platelets, or protein fractions. The cells or protein fractions are mixed with chemical sensitizers and irradiated with, for example, gamma or X-ray radiation

  7. Testing household disinfectants for the inactivation of helminth eggs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-04

    Oct 4, 2016 ... Keywords: Ascaris, carbolic acid, disinfectant, eggs, inactivation, pit latrine, sanitation, sodium hypochlorite. INTRODUCTION. The lack of ... ronment providing temperature (25°C) and humidity (> 55%) are optimal. ...... The pH of the stomach is strongly acidic, but pH of the gas- trointestinal tract is in the ...

  8. Efficiency of inactivation of trypsin inhibitory activity in some selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trypsin inhibitor (TI) levels in the crop seeds varied between 0.0 in Adansonia digitata and 40.8 TIU/mg in Pterocarpus osun. Efficiency of inactivation of TI by autoclaving ranged from 58.1% in Millettia thonningii to 100% in Sesbania pachycarpa and Lonchocarpus. sericeus. It is concluded that the effect of heat treatment on ...

  9. Cold plasma source for bacterial inactivation at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weifeng; Stamate, Eugen; Mejlholm, Ole

    A dielectric-barrier discharge system for cold plasma production was built for bacterial inactivation purpose. The eect of cold plasma treatment on sensory properties of seafood products was studied to establish how the sensory properties (e.g. appearance, texture) of seafood were aected by diere...

  10. Drying of liquid food droplets : enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerdink, G.

    1993-01-01

    In this thesis the drying of liquid food droplets is studied from three different points of view: drying kinetics, enzyme inactivation and multicomponent diffusion. Mathematical models are developed and validated experimentally.

    Drying experiments are performed with suspended

  11. Inactivation of Ascaris suum by short-chain fatty acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascaris suum eggs were inactivated in distilled water and digested sludge by butanoic, pentanoic and hexanoic acids. The fatty acids (FA) were only effective when protonated and at sufficient concentration. The conjugate bases were not effective at the concentrations evaluated. Predictions from an ...

  12. Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Expression of a ribosome inactivating protein (curcin 2) in Jatropha curcas is induced by stress ... Curcin 2; Jatropha curcas; protein induction; stress ... College of Light Industry and Food Engineering Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610 065, PR China; College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610 065 ...

  13. Inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu-Shiaw (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Vaughn, J.M. (Univ. of New England College of Medicine, Biddeford, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The inactivation of single-particle stocks of human (type 2, Wa) and simian (SA-11) rotaviruses by chlorine dioxide was investigated. Experiments were conducted at 4{degree}C in a standard phosphate-carbonate buffer. Both virus types were rapidly inactivated, within 20 s under alkaline conditions, when chlorine dioxide concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/liter were used. Similar reductions of 10{sup 5}-fold in infectivity required additional exposure time of 120 s at 0.2 mg/liter for Wa and at 0.5 mg/liter for SA-11, respectively, at pH 6.0. The inactivation of both virus types was moderate a neutral pH, and the sensitivities to chlorine dioxide were similar. The observed enhancement of virucidal efficiency with increasing pH was contrary to earlier findings with chlorine- and ozone-treated rotavirus particles, where efficiencies decreased with increasing alkalinity. Comparison of 99.9% virus inactivation times revealed ozone to be the most effective virucidal agent among these three disinfectants.

  14. Evaluation of the Efficacy of Inactivated Oil-Emulsion Newcastle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since the first recognition of Newcastle disease (ND) in Nigeria, it has been observed to be enzootic despite the intensive vaccination policy, leading to significant economic losses in the poultry industry. This study evaluated the ability of inactivated oil-emulsion ND Komarov vaccine to protect laying chickens from challenge ...

  15. Inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of insertion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Agrobacterium strains harbour insertion sequences, which are known to transpose into genomes as well as into Ti plasmids. In this study we report the inactivation of a transgene due to transposition of the A. tumefaciens insertion sequence IS136. The transposition was discovered following transformation of plant tissues, ...

  16. Cloning and expression of antiviral/ribosome-inactivating protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    2007-12-16

    Dec 16, 2007 ... Many higher plant species belonging to various taxonomic families are known to produce endogenous, non-stress induced inhibitor proteins called antiviral proteins (AVPs). Many of these AVPs have ribosome-inhibiting rRNA N- glycosidase activity and are known as ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs).

  17. Ribosome-inactivating proteins: potent poisons and molecular tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Matthew J; Dodd, Jennifer E; Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2013-11-15

    Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs) were first isolated over a century ago and have been shown to be catalytic toxins that irreversibly inactivate protein synthesis. Elucidation of atomic structures and molecular mechanism has revealed these proteins to be a diverse group subdivided into two classes. RIPs have been shown to exhibit RNA N-glycosidase activity and depurinate the 28S rRNA of the eukaryotic 60S ribosomal subunit. In this review, we compare archetypal RIP family members with other potent toxins that abolish protein synthesis: the fungal ribotoxins which directly cleave the 28S rRNA and the newly discovered Burkholderia lethal factor 1 (BLF1). BLF1 presents additional challenges to the current classification system since, like the ribotoxins, it does not possess RNA N-glycosidase activity but does irreversibly inactivate ribosomes. We further discuss whether the RIP classification should be broadened to include toxins achieving irreversible ribosome inactivation with similar turnovers to RIPs, but through different enzymatic mechanisms.

  18. The radiation inactivation of glutamate and isocitrate dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Failat, R.R.A.

    1980-12-01

    The reaction of free radicals produced by ionizing radiation with the enzymes glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADP + -specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) have been studied by steady-state and pulse radiolysis techniques. In de-aerated GDH solutions, hydroxyl radicals have been found to be the most efficient of the primary radicals generated from water in causing inactivation. The effect of reaction with the enzyme of selective free radicals (SCN) 2 - , (Br) 2 - and (I) 2 - on its activity has also been studied. In neutral solutions, the order of inactivating effectiveness is (I) 2 - > (Br) 2 - > (SCN) 2 - . In the case of the thiocyanate radical anion (SCN) 2 - , the inactivation efficiency is found to depend on KSCN concentration. The radiation inactivation of GDH at both neutral and alkaline pH is accompanied by the loss of sulphydryl groups. Pulse radiolysis was also used to determine the rate constants and the transient absorption spectra following the reaction of the free radicals with GDH. 60 Co-γ-radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were also used to study the effect of ionizing radiation on the activity of ICDH. The results obtained were similar to those of GDH. (author)

  19. Inactivation and Removal of Free-Living Amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-living amoebae (FLA) are ubiquitous protozoan that are predominantly harmless to humans. There are a few genera that cause disease in humans, Balamuthia, Naegleria, and Acanthamoeba. These organisms are not easily removed by physical means or inactivated by chemic...

  20. Influence of pH, Salt and Temperature on Pressure Inactivation of Hepatitis A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pH (3-7), NaCl (0-6%), and temperature on pressure inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) were determined. The HAV samples were treated at 400 MPa for 1 min at 5, 20, and 50C. Decreasing solution pH enhanced pressure inactivation of HAV. This enhanced inactivation effect was most e...

  1. Inactivation Effect of Antibiotic-Resistant Gene Using Chlorine Disinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Furukawa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to elucidate the inactivation effects on the antibiotic-resistance gene (vanA of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE using chlorination, a disinfection method widely used in various water treatment facilities. Suspensions of VRE were prepared by adding VRE to phosphate-buffered saline, or the sterilized secondary effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. The inactivation experiments were carried out at several chlorine concentrations and stirring time. Enterococci concentration and presence of vanA were determined. The enterococci concentration decreased as chlorine concentrations and stirring times increased, with more than 7.0 log reduction occurring under the following conditions: 40 min stirring at 0.5 mg Cl2/L, 20 min stirring at 1.0 mg Cl2/L, and 3 min stirring at 3.0 mg Cl2/L. In the inactivation experiment using VRE suspended in secondary effluent, the culturable enterococci required much higher chlorine concentration and longer treatment time for complete disinfection than the cases of suspension of VRE. However, vanA was detected in all chlorinated suspensions of VRE, even in samples where no enterococcal colonies were present on the medium agar plate. The chlorine disinfection was not able to destroy antibiotic-resistance genes, though it can inactivate and decrease bacterial counts of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB. Therefore, it was suggested that remaining ARB and/or antibiotic-resistance gene in inactivated bacterial cells after chlorine disinfection tank could be discharged into water environments.

  2. Studies on the inactivation of human parvovirus 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Sally A; Tuke, Philip W; Miyagawa, Eiji; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Human parvovirus 4 (PARV4) is a novel parvovirus, which like parvovirus B19 (B19V) can be a contaminant of plasma pools used to prepare plasma-derived medicinal products. Inactivation studies of B19V have shown that it is more sensitive to virus inactivation strategies than animal parvoviruses. However, inactivation of PARV4 has not yet been specifically addressed. Treatment of parvoviruses by heat or low-pH conditions causes externalization of the virus genome. Using nuclease treatment combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction, the extent of virus DNA externalization was used as an indirect measure of the inactivation of PARV4, B19V, and minute virus of mice (MVM) by pasteurization of albumin and by low-pH treatment. Infectivity studies were performed in parallel for B19V and MVM. PARV4 showed greater resistance to pasteurization and low-pH treatment than B19V, although PARV4 was not as resistant as MVM. There was a 2- to 3-log reduction of encapsidated PARV4 DNA after pasteurization and low-pH treatment. In contrast, B19V was effectively inactivated while MVM was stable under these conditions. Divalent cations were found to have a stabilizing effect on PARV4 capsids. In the absence of divalent cations, even at neutral pH, there was a reduction of PARV4 titer, an effect not observed for B19V or MVM. In the case of heat treatment and incubation at low pH, PARV4 shows intermediate resistance when compared to B19V and MVM. Divalent cations seem important for stabilizing PARV4 virus particles. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  3. Nucleus incertus inactivation impairs spatial learning and memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nategh, Mohsen; Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2015-02-01

    Nucleus incertus (NI) is a pontine nucleus which releases mainly GABA and relaxin-3 in rats. Its suggested functions include response to stress, arousal, and modulation of hippocampal theta rhythm. Since the role of NI in learning and memory has not been well characterized, therefore the involvement of this nucleus in spatial learning and memory and the aftermath hippocampal levels of c-fos and pCREB were evaluated. NI was targeted by implanting cannula in male rats. For reference memory, NI was inactivated by lidocaine (0.4 μl, 4%) at three stages of acquisition, consolidation and retrieval in Morris water maze paradigm. For working memory, NI was inactivated in acquisition and retrieval phases. Injection of lidocaine prior to the first training session of reference memory significantly increased the distance moved, suggesting that inactivation of NI delays acquisition in this spatial task. Inactivation also interfered with the retrieval phase of spatial reference memory, as the time in target quadrant for lidocaine group was less, and the escape latency was higher compared to the control group. However, no difference was observed in the consolidation phase. In the working memory task, with inter-trial intervals of 75 min, the escape latency was higher when NI was inactivated in the retrieval phase. In addition, c-fos and pCREB/CREB levels decreased in NI-inhibited rats. This study suggests that nucleus incertus might participate in acquisition of spatial reference, and retrieval of both spatial reference and working memory. Further studies should investigate possible roles of NI in the hippocampal plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Channelopathies in Cav1.1, Cav1.3, and Cav1.4 voltage-gated L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striessnig, Jörg; Bolz, Hanno Jörn; Koschak, Alexandra

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels couple membrane depolarization to Ca2+-dependent intracellular signaling events. This is achieved by mediating Ca2+ ion influx or by direct conformational coupling to intracellular Ca2+ release channels. The family of Cav1 channels, also termed L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs), is uniquely sensitive to organic Ca2+ channel blockers and expressed in many electrically excitable tissues. In this review, we summarize the role of LTCCs for human diseases caused by genetic Ca2+ channel defects (channelopathies). LTCC dysfunction can result from structural aberrations within their pore-forming alpha1 subunits causing hypokalemic periodic paralysis and malignant hyperthermia sensitivity (Cav1.1 alpha1), incomplete congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB2; Cav1.4 alpha1), and Timothy syndrome (Cav1.2 alpha1; reviewed separately in this issue). Cav1.3 alpha1 mutations have not been reported yet in humans, but channel loss of function would likely affect sinoatrial node function and hearing. Studies in mice revealed that LTCCs indirectly also contribute to neurological symptoms in Ca2+ channelopathies affecting non-LTCCs, such as Cav2.1 alpha1 in tottering mice. Ca2+ channelopathies provide exciting disease-related molecular detail that led to important novel insight not only into disease pathophysiology but also to mechanisms of channel function.

  5. K(ATP) channel gain-of-function leads to increased myocardial L-type Ca(2+) current and contractility in Cantu syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Mark D; Singh, Gautam K; Zhang, Hai Xia; Uchida, Keita; Kozel, Beth A; Stein, Phyllis K; Kovacs, Atilla; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Catterall, William A; Grange, Dorothy Katherine; Nichols, Colin G

    2016-06-14

    Cantu syndrome (CS) is caused by gain-of-function (GOF) mutations in genes encoding pore-forming (Kir6.1, KCNJ8) and accessory (SUR2, ABCC9) KATP channel subunits. We show that patients with CS, as well as mice with constitutive (cGOF) or tamoxifen-induced (icGOF) cardiac-specific Kir6.1 GOF subunit expression, have enlarged hearts, with increased ejection fraction and increased contractility. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from cGOF or icGOF ventricular myocytes (VM) show increased basal L-type Ca(2+) current (LTCC), comparable to that seen in WT VM treated with isoproterenol. Mice with vascular-specific expression (vGOF) show left ventricular dilation as well as less-markedly increased LTCC. Increased LTCC in KATP GOF models is paralleled by changes in phosphorylation of the pore-forming α1 subunit of the cardiac voltage-gated calcium channel Cav1.2 at Ser1928, suggesting enhanced protein kinase activity as a potential link between increased KATP current and CS cardiac pathophysiology.

  6. Tachyphylaxis to the inhibitory effect of L-type channel blockers on ACh-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in porcine tracheal myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Shuo; Farley, Jerry M

    2007-01-01

    Discrepancies about the role of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) in acetylcholine (ACh)-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in tracheal smooth muscle cells (TSMCs) have been seen in recent reports. We demonstrate here that ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in TMCS were reversibly inhibited by three VGCC blockers, nicardipine, nifedipine and verapamil. Prolonged (several minutes) application of VGCC blockers, led to tachyphylaxis; that is, [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations resumed, but at a lower frequency. Brief (15-30 s) removal of VGCC blockers re-sensitized [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations to inhibition by the agents. Calcium oscillations tolerant to VGCC blockers were abolished by KB-R7943, an inhibitor of the reverse mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). KB-R7943 alone also abolished ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations. Enhancement of the reverse mode of NCX via removing extracellular Na(+) reversed inhibition of ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations by VGCC blockers. Inhibition of non-selective cation channels using Gd(3+) slightly reduced the frequency of ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations, but did not prevent the occurrence of tachyphylaxis. Altogether, these results suggest that VGCC and the reverse mode of NCX are two primary Ca(2+) entry pathways for maintaining ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations in TSMCs. The two pathways complement each other, and may account for tachyphylaxis of ACh-induced [Ca(2+)](i) oscillations to VGCC blockers.

  7. Differential rescue of spatial memory deficits in aged rats by L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, S C; D'Angelo, H M; Royer, S E; Kaercher, R M; Adzovic, L; Wenk, G L

    2014-11-07

    Age-associated memory impairments may result as a consequence of neuroinflammatory induction of intracellular calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation. Altered L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC) and ryanodine receptor (RyR) activity may underlie age-associated learning and memory impairments. Various neuroinflammatory markers are associated with increased activity of both L-VDCCs and RyRs, and increased neuroinflammation is associated with normal aging. In vitro, pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs and RyRs has been shown to be anti-inflammatory. Here, we examined whether pharmacological blockade of L-VDCCs or RyRs with the drugs nimodipine and dantrolene, respectively, could improve spatial memory and reduce age-associated increases in microglia activation. Dantrolene and nimodipine differentially attenuated age-associated spatial memory deficits but were not anti-inflammatory in vivo. Furthermore, RyR gene expression was inversely correlated with spatial memory, highlighting the central role of Ca(+2) dysregulation in age-associated memory deficits. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Rotational Spectral Modulations in a Low-mass, L-type Brown Dwarf Companion to a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjavacas, Elena; Apai, Dániel; Zhou, Yifan; Karalidi, Theodora; Lew, Ben W. P.; Schneider, Glenn; Cowan, Nicolas; Metchev, Stan; Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Bedin, Luigi R.; Lowrance, Patrick J.; Marley, Mark S.

    2018-01-01

    Observations of rotational modulations of brown dwarfs and giant exoplanets allow the characterization of condensate cloud properties. As of now, rotational spectral modulations have only been seen in three L-type brown dwarfs. We report here the discovery of rotational spectral modulations in LP261-75B, an L6-type intermediate surface gravity companion to an M4.5 star. As a part of the Cloud Atlas Treasury program, we acquired time-resolved Wide Field Camera 3 grism spectroscopy (1.1–1.69 μm) of LP261-75B. We find gray spectral variations with the relative amplitude displaying only a weak wavelength dependence and no evidence for lower-amplitude modulations in the 1.4 μm water band than in the adjacent continuum. The likely rotational modulation period is 4.78 ± 0.95 hr, although the rotational phase is not well sampled. The minimum relative amplitude in the white light curve measured over the whole wavelength range is 2.41% ± 0.14%. We report an unusual light curve, which seems to have three peaks approximately evenly distributed in rotational phase. The spectral modulations suggests that the upper atmosphere cloud properties in LP261-75B are similar to two other mid-L dwarfs of typical infrared colors, but differ from that of the extremely red L-dwarf WISE0047.

  10. The alpha(1S) subunit of the L-type calcium channel is not a predisposition gene for thyrotoxic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nelson L S; Chow, C C; Ko, Gary T C; Tai, Morris H L; Kwok, Rachel; Yao, X Q; Cockram, Clive S

    2007-02-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TTP) has been associated with genetic variations in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of the L-type calcium channel (CACNA1S). Mutations in CACNA1S are known to account for the majority of cases of familial hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP). In this study we have examined 48 genetic polymorphisms in the CACNA1S gene and genotyped a tagging set of representative polymorphisms to determine the role of this gene in TPP. A genetic association study was carried out with 98 TPP patients and 162 male thyrotoxic controls. Among 47 polymorphisms evaluated for linkage disequilibrium (LD) and the spectrum of haplotypes in the Chinese population, 31 were selected as tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for genotyping the whole sample. A new genotyping protocol was used to analyse an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism. We studied the LD among 47 polymorphisms in the CACNA1S gene, which comprised a set of high-density markers with an average of one SNP every 2 kb. Subsequently, 31 tagSNPs were genotyped for all the samples. The gene is composed of three LD blocks. With this block structure, we were confident that variations of the gene were comprehensively covered by the tagSNPs. No significant association was found between the polymorphisms and TPP. We established the LD structure of this calcium channel subunit gene (CACNA1S) for the first time. However, its genetic variations are not associated with TPP in Chinese patients.

  11. [The expression of genes encoding the voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels in proliferating and differentiating C2C12 myoblasts of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnyi, A M; Ozerniuk, N D

    2011-01-01

    Votage-dependent L-type Ca+ channels of the C2C12 line myoblasts of mice have been studied at the stage of proliferation and 24 h after the beginning of differentiation. The expression of genes Cacna1s, Cacna1S, Cacna1d, and Cacna1f, which encode channel forming subunits alpha1S, alpha1C, alph1D, and alpha1F, respectively, has been assessed. The expression of genes Cacna2d and Cacn1g, which encode the alpha2, delta, and gamma regulatory subunits, has been studied as well. For the first time, the expression of Cacnald, which is typical for nerve cells, units, has been revealed in proliferating myoblasts, whereas in differentiating mononuclear myoblasts the expression of this gene was significantly decreased. On the contrary, the low level of expression of Cacnal IS, which encodes the specific alpha1S channel forming subunit of skeletal muscles, has been observed in proliferating myoblasts, whereas in differentiating mononuclear myoblasts it has been shown to increase multifold. No considerable changes in expression of Cacna2d and Cacn 1g have been revealed in proliferating and differentiating myoblasts. No traces of expression of Cacna1c and Cacna1f have been revealed in myoblasts.

  12. Proteolytic processing of the L-type Ca2+ channel alpha11.2 subunit in neurons [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia R. Buonarati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 is a prominent regulator of neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity, and gene expression. The central element of Cav1.2 is the pore-forming α11.2 subunit. It exists in two major size forms, whose molecular masses have proven difficult to precisely determine. Recent work suggests that α11.2 is proteolytically cleaved between the second and third of its four pore-forming domains (Michailidis et al,. 2014. Methods: To better determine the apparent molecular masses (MRof the α11.2 size forms, extensive systematic immunoblotting of brain tissue as well as full length and C-terminally truncated α11.2 expressed in HEK293 cells was conducted using six different region–specific antibodies against α11.2. Results: The full length form of α11.2 migrated, as expected, with an apparent MR of ~250 kDa. A shorter form of comparable prevalence with an apparent MR of ~210 kDa could only be detected in immunoblots probed with antibodies recognizing α11.2 at an epitope 400 or more residues upstream of the C-terminus. Conclusions: The main two size forms of α11.2 are the full length form and a shorter form, which lacks ~350 distal C-terminal residues. Midchannel cleavage as suggested by Michailidis et al. (2014 is at best minimal in brain tissue.

  13. A novel role of the L-type calcium channel α1D subunit as a gatekeeper for intracellular zinc signaling: zinc wave.

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    Satoru Yamasaki

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that zinc ion (Zn can behave as an intracellular signaling molecule. We previously demonstrated that mast cells stimulated through the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI rapidly release intracellular Zn from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and we named this phenomenon the "Zn wave". However, the molecules responsible for releasing Zn and the roles of the Zn wave were elusive. Here we identified the pore-forming α(1 subunit of the Cav1.3 (α(1D L-type calcium channel (LTCC as the gatekeeper for the Zn wave. LTCC antagonists inhibited the Zn wave, and an agonist was sufficient to induce it. Notably, α(1D was mainly localized to the ER rather than the plasma membrane in mast cells, and the Zn wave was impaired by α(1D knockdown. We further found that the LTCC-mediated Zn wave positively controlled cytokine gene induction by enhancing the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Consistent with this finding, LTCC antagonists inhibited the cytokine-mediated delayed-type allergic reaction in mice without affecting the immediate-type allergic reaction. These findings indicated that the LTCC α(1D subunit located on the ER membrane has a novel function as a gatekeeper for the Zn wave, which is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling and the delayed-type allergic reaction.

  14. Macrophage activation by a vanadyl-aspirin complex is dependent on L-type calcium channel and the generation of nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinuevo, Maria Silvina; Etcheverry, Susana Beatriz; Cortizo, Ana Maria

    2005-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is the result of a tight balance between bone resorption and bone formation where macrophage activation is believed to contribute to bone resorption. We have previously shown that a vanadyl(IV)-aspirin complex (VOAspi) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts in culture. In this study, we assessed VOAspi and VO effects and their possible mechanism of action on a mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. Both vanadium compounds inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Nifedipine completely reversed the VOAspi-induced macrophage cytotoxicity, while it could not block the effect of VO. VOAspi also stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production, the oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR-123) and enhanced the expression of both constitutive and inducible isoforms of nitric oxide syntases (NOS). All these effects were abolished by nifedipine. Althogether our finding give evidence that VOAspi-induced macrophage cytotoxicity is dependent on L-type calcium channel and the generation of NO though the induction of eNOS and iNOS. Contrary, the parent compound VO exerted a cytotoxic effect by mechanisms independent of a calcium entry and the NO/NOS activation

  15. The assessment of efficacy of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus inactivated vaccine based on the viral quantity and inactivation methods

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    Lee Byeongchun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been many efforts to develop efficient vaccines for the control of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV. Although inactivated PRRSV vaccines are preferred for their safety, they are weak at inducing humoral immune responses and controlling field PRRSV infection, especially when heterologous viruses are involved. Results In all groups, the sample to positive (S/P ratio of IDEXX ELISA and the virus neutralization (VN titer remained negative until challenge. While viremia did not reduce in the vaccinated groups, the IDEXX-ELISA-specific immunoglobulin G increased more rapidly and to significantly greater levels 7 days after the challenge in all the vaccinated groups compared to the non-vaccinated groups (p 6 PFU/mL PRRSV vaccine-inoculated and binary ethylenimine (BEI-inactivated groups 22 days after challenge (p Conclusions The inactivated vaccine failed to show the humoral immunity, but it showed different immune response after the challenge compared to mock group. Although the 106 PFU/mL-vaccinated and BEI-inactivated groups showed significantly greater VN titers 22 days after challenge, all the groups were already negative for viremia.

  16. THE ANTIGENIC POTENCY OF EPIDEMIC INFLUENZA VIRUS FOLLOWING INACTIVATION BY ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas E.; Lavin, G. I.; Francis, Thomas

    1940-01-01

    A study of the antigenic potency of influenza virus inactivated by ultraviolet radiation has been made. Virus so inactivated is still capable of functioning as an immunizing agent when given to mice by the intraperitoneal route. In high concentrations inactivated virus appears to be nearly as effective as active virus but when quantitative comparisons of the immunity induced by different dilutions are made, it is seen that a hundredfold loss in immunizing capacity occurs during inactivation. Virus in suspensions prepared from the lungs of infected mice is inactivated more rapidly than virus in tissue culture medium. A standard for the comparison of vaccines of epidemic influenza virus is proposed. PMID:19871057

  17. Modeling of human factor Va inactivation by activated protein C

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    Bravo Maria

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because understanding of the inventory, connectivity and dynamics of the components characterizing the process of coagulation is relatively mature, it has become an attractive target for physiochemical modeling. Such models can potentially improve the design of therapeutics. The prothrombinase complex (composed of the protease factor (FXa and its cofactor FVa plays a central role in this network as the main producer of thrombin, which catalyses both the activation of platelets and the conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin, the main substances of a clot. A key negative feedback loop that prevents clot propagation beyond the site of injury is the thrombin-dependent generation of activated protein C (APC, an enzyme that inactivates FVa, thus neutralizing the prothrombinase complex. APC inactivation of FVa is complex, involving the production of partially active intermediates and “protection” of FVa from APC by both FXa and prothrombin. An empirically validated mathematical model of this process would be useful in advancing the predictive capacity of comprehensive models of coagulation. Results A model of human APC inactivation of prothrombinase was constructed in a stepwise fashion by analyzing time courses of FVa inactivation in empirical reaction systems with increasing number of interacting components and generating corresponding model constructs of each reaction system. Reaction mechanisms, rate constants and equilibrium constants informing these model constructs were initially derived from various research groups reporting on APC inactivation of FVa in isolation, or in the presence of FXa or prothrombin. Model predictions were assessed against empirical data measuring the appearance and disappearance of multiple FVa degradation intermediates as well as prothrombinase activity changes, with plasma proteins derived from multiple preparations. Our work integrates previously published findings and through the cooperative

  18. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu; Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Iwano, Hidetomo; Uchide, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P 3 H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM. These findings suggest that LAT1 could be a new therapeutic target for MM

  19. Effects of induced Na+/Ca2+exchanger overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca2+channels and junctophilin-2 in pressure-overloaded hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Katanosaka, Yuki

    2016-11-25

    The Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) is an essential Ca 2+ efflux system in cardiomyocytes. Although NCX1 is distributed throughout the sarcolemma, a subpopulation of NCX1 is localized to transverse (T)-tubules. There is growing evidence that T-tubule disorganization is a causal event that shifts the transition from hypertrophy to heart failure (HF). However, the detailed molecular mechanisms have not been clarified. Previously, we showed that induced NCX1 expression in pressure-overloaded hearts attenuates defective excitation-contraction coupling and HF progression. Here, we examined the effects of induced NCX1 overexpression on the spatial distribution of L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCCs) and junctophilin-2 (JP2), a structural protein that connects the T-tubule and sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, in pressure-overloaded hearts. Quantitative analysis showed that the regularity of NCX1 localization was significantly decreased at 8 weeks after transverse aortic constriction (TAC)-surgery; however, T-tubule organization and the regularities of LTCC and JP2 immunofluorescent signals were maintained at this time point. These observations demonstrated that release of NCX1 from the T-tubule area occurred before the onset of T-tubule disorganization and LTCC and JP2 mislocalization. Moreover, induced NCX1 overexpression at 8 weeks post-TAC not only recovered NCX1 regularity but also prevented the decrease in LTCC and JP2 regularities at 16 weeks post-TAC. These results suggested that NCX1 may play an important role in the proper spatial distribution of LTCC and JP2 in T-tubules in the context of pressure-overloading. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnostic usefulness of {sup 18}F-FAMT PET and L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

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    Nobusawa, Aiko [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kim, Mai [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kaira, Kyoichi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Gunma University Hospital, Oncology Center, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Miyashita, Go; Negishi, Akihide; Yokoo, Satoshi [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Oriuchi, Noboru; Higuchi, Tetsuya; Tsushima, Yoshito [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan); Kanai, Yoshikatsu [Osaka University, Division of Bio-system Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Oyama, Tetsunari [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Maebashi, Gunma (Japan)

    2013-10-15

    l-[3-{sup 18}F]-{alpha}-Methyltyrosine ({sup 18}F-FAMT) was developed as an amino acid tracer for PET imaging to provide better specificity than 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET for cancer diagnosis. We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of {sup 18}F-FAMT in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The correlation between tumour uptake of {sup 18}F-FAMT and L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) expression was determined. The study group comprised 68 OSCC patients who underwent both {sup 18}F-FAMT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET. Resected tumour sections were stained by immunohistochemistry for LAT1, CD98 and Ki-67, and microvessel density was determined in terms of CD34 and p53 expression. The sensitivity of primary tumour detection by {sup 18}F-FAMT and {sup 18}F-FDG PET was 98 % and 100 %, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of {sup 18}F-FAMT PET for detecting malignant lymph nodes were 68 %, 99 % and 97 %, respectively, and equivalent values for {sup 18}F-FDG PET were 84 %, 94 % and 94 %, respectively. The specificity and accuracy of {sup 18}F-FAMT were significantly higher than those of {sup 18}F-FDG. The uptake of {sup 18}F-FAMT was significantly correlated with LAT1 expression, cell proliferation and advanced stage. The expression of LAT1 in OSCC cells was closely correlated with CD98 levels, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. {sup 18}F-FAMT PET showed higher specificity for detecting malignant lesions than {sup 18}F-FDG PET. The uptake of {sup 18}F-FAMT by OSCC cells can be determined by the presence of LAT1 expression and tumour cell proliferation. (orig.)

  1. Impaired Fear Extinction Due to a Deficit in Ca2+ Influx Through L-Type Voltage-Gated Ca2+ Channels in Mice Deficient for Tenascin-C

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    Fabio Morellini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mice deficient in the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C (TNC−/− express a deficit in specific forms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which involve the L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (L-VGCCs. The mechanisms underlying this deficit and its functional implications for learning and memory have not been investigated. In line with previous findings, we report on impairment in theta-burst stimulation (TBS-induced long-term potentiation (LTP in TNC−/− mice in the CA1 hippocampal region and its rescue by the L-VGCC activator Bay K-8644. We further found that the overall pattern of L-VGCC expression in the hippocampus in TNC−/− mice was normal, but Western blot analysis results uncovered upregulated expression of the Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 α-subunits of L-VGCCs. However, these L-VGCCs were not fully functional in TNC−/− mice, as demonstrated by Ca2+ imaging, which revealed a reduction of nifedipine-sensitive Ca2+ transients in CA1 pyramidal neurons. TNC−/− mice showed normal learning and memory in the contextual fear conditioning paradigm but impaired extinction of conditioned fear responses. Systemic injection of the L-VGCC blockers nifedipine and diltiazem into wild-type mice mimicked the impairment of fear extinction observed in TNC−/− mice. The deficiency in TNC−/− mice substantially occluded the effects of these drugs. Our results suggest that TNC-mediated modulation of L-VGCC activity is essential for fear extinction.

  2. Single-channel L-type Ca2+ currents in chicken embryo semicircular canal type I and type II hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Valeria; Valli, Paolo; Zucca, Giampiero; Masetto, Sergio

    2006-08-01

    Few data are available concerning single Ca channel properties in inner ear hair cells and particularly none in vestibular type I hair cells. By using the cell-attached configuration of the patch-clamp technique in combination with the semicircular canal crista slice preparation, we determined the elementary properties of voltage-dependent Ca channels in chicken embryo type I and type II hair cells. The pipette solutions included Bay K 8644. With 70 mM Ba(2+) in the patch pipette, Ca channel activity appeared as very brief openings at -60 mV. Ca channel properties were found to be similar in type I and type II hair cells; therefore data were pooled. The mean inward current amplitude was -1.3 +/- 0.1 (SD) pA at - 30 mV (n = 16). The average slope conductance was 21 pS (n = 20). With 5 mM Ba(2+) in the patch pipette, very brief openings were already detectable at -80 mV. The mean inward current amplitude was -0.7 +/- 0.2 pA at -40 mV (n = 9). The average slope conductance was 11 pS (n = 9). The mean open time and the open probability increased significantly with depolarization. Ca channel activity was still present and unaffected when omega-agatoxin IVA (2 microM) and omega-conotoxin GVIA (3.2 microM) were added to the pipette solution. Our results show that types I and II hair cells express L-type Ca channels with similar properties. Moreover, they suggest that in vivo Ca(2+) influx might occur at membrane voltages more negative than -60 mV.

  3. Differential neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of L-type voltage dependent calcium channel and ryanodine receptor antagonists in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; Royer, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Heather M; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Fisher, David A; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-01

    Neuroinflammation and degeneration of catecholaminergic brainstem nuclei occur early in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Neuroinflammation increases levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal calcium (Ca(+2)) homoeostasis via L-type voltage dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Alterations in Ca(+2) channel activity in the SN and LC can lead to disruption of normal pacemaking activity in these areas, contributing to behavioral deficits. Here, we utilized an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose (0.25 μg/h) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. Rats were treated with either the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant motor deficits in the accelerating rotarod task as well as abnormal behavioral agitation in the forced swim task and open field. Corresponding with these behavioral deficits, LPS-infused rats also had significant increases in microglia activation and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and locus coeruleus (LC). Treatment with nimodipine or dantrolene normalized LPS-induced abnormalities in the rotarod and forced swim, restored the number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the LC, and significantly reduced microglia activation in the SNpc. Only nimodipine significantly reduced microglia activation in the LC, and neither drug increased TH immunoreactivity in the SNpc. These findings demonstrate that the Ca(+2) dysregulation in the LC and SN brainstem nuclei is differentially altered by chronic neuroinflammation. Overall, targeting Ca + 2 dysregulation may be an important target for ameliorating neurodegeneration in the SNpc and LC.

  4. Calcium dysregulation via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels and ryanodine receptors underlies memory deficits and synaptic dysfunction during chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; D'Angelo, Heather M; Royer, Sarah E; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Crockett, Alexis M; Adzovic, Linda; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-25

    Chronic neuroinflammation and calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation are both components of Alzheimer's disease. Prolonged neuroinflammation produces elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal Ca(+2) homeostasis via L-type voltage-dependent Ca(+2) channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Chronic neuroinflammation also leads to deficits in spatial memory, which may be related to Ca(+2) dysregulation. The studies herein use an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. The rats were treated with the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant memory deficits in the Morris water maze, and this deficit was ameliorated by treatment with nimodipine. Synaptosomes from LPS-infused rats had increased Ca(+2) uptake, which was reduced by a blockade of L-VDCCs either in vivo or ex vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that Ca(+2) dysregulation during chronic neuroinflammation is partially dependent on increases in L-VDCC function. However, blockade of the RyRs also slightly improved spatial memory of the LPS-infused rats, demonstrating that other Ca(+2) channels are dysregulated during chronic neuroinflammation. Ca(+2)-dependent immediate early gene expression was reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with dantrolene or nimodipine, indicating normalized synaptic function that may underlie improvements in spatial memory. Pro-inflammatory markers are also reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with either drug. Overall, these data suggest that Ca(+2) dysregulation via L-VDCCs and RyRs play a crucial role in memory deficits resulting from chronic neuroinflammation.

  5. Effects of L-type calcium channel and human ether-a-go-go related gene blockers on the electrical activity of the human heart: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemzemi, Nejib; Rodriguez, Blanca

    2015-02-01

    Class III and IV drugs affect cardiac human ether-a-go-go related gene (IKr) and L-type calcium (ICaL) channels, resulting in complex alterations in repolarization with both anti- and pro-arrhythmic consequences. Interpretation of their effects on cellular and electrocardiogram (ECG)-based biomarkers for risk stratification is challenging. As pharmaceutical compounds often exhibit multiple ion channel effects, our goal is to investigate the simultaneous effect of ICaL and IKr block on human ventricular electrophysiology from ionic to ECG level. Simulations are conducted using a human body torso bidomain model, which includes realistic representation of human membrane kinetics, anatomy, and fibre orientation. A simple block pore model is incorporated to simulate drug-induced ICaL and IKr blocks, for drug dose = 0, IC50, 2× IC50, 10× IC50, and 30× IC50. Drug effects on human ventricular activity are quantified for different degrees and combinations of ICaL and IKr blocks from the ionic to the body surface ECG level. Electrocardiogram simulations show that ICaL block results in shortening of the QT interval, ST elevation, and reduced T-wave amplitude, caused by reduction in action potential duration and action potential amplitude during the plateau phase, and in repolarization times. In contrast, IKr block results in QT prolongation and reduced T-wave amplitude. When ICaL and IKr blocks are combined, the degree of ICaL block strongly determines QT interval whereas the effect of IKr block is more pronounced on the T-wave amplitude. Our simulation study provides new insights into the combined effect of ICaL and IKr blocks on human ventricular activity using a multiscale computational human torso model. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  6. L-type calcium channels play a critical role in maintaining lens transparency by regulating phosphorylation of aquaporin-0 and myosin light chain and expression of connexins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupalatha Maddala

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of intracellular calcium is crucial for lens cytoarchitecture and transparency, however, the identity of specific channel proteins regulating calcium influx within the lens is not completely understood. Here we examined the expression and distribution profiles of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs and explored their role in morphological integrity and transparency of the mouse lens, using cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunoblot, pharmacological inhibitors and immunofluorescence analyses. The results revealed that Ca (V 1.2 and 1.3 channels are expressed and distributed in both the epithelium and cortical fiber cells in mouse lens. Inhibition of LTCCs with felodipine or nifedipine induces progressive cortical cataract formation with time, in association with decreased lens weight in ex-vivo mouse lenses. Histological analyses of felodipine treated lenses revealed extensive disorganization and swelling of cortical fiber cells resembling the phenotype reported for altered aquaporin-0 activity without detectable cytotoxic effects. Analysis of both soluble and membrane rich fractions from felodipine treated lenses by SDS-PAGE in conjunction with mass spectrometry and immunoblot analyses revealed decreases in β-B1-crystallin, Hsp-90, spectrin and filensin. Significantly, loss of transparency in the felodipine treated lenses was preceded by an increase in aquaporin-0 serine-235 phosphorylation and levels of connexin-50, together with decreases in myosin light chain phosphorylation and the levels of 14-3-3ε, a phosphoprotein-binding regulatory protein. Felodipine treatment led to a significant increase in gene expression of connexin-50 and 46 in the mouse lens. Additionally, felodipine inhibition of LTCCs in primary cultures of mouse lens epithelial cells resulted in decreased intracellular calcium, and decreased actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, without detectable cytotoxic response. Taken together, these observations

  7. Crystal structure of dimeric cardiac L-type calcium channel regulatory domains bridged by Ca[superscript 2+]·calmodulins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallon, Jennifer L.; Baker, Mariah R.; Xiong, Liangwen; Loy, Ryan E.; Yang, Guojun; Dirksen, Robert T.; Hamilton, Susan L.; Quiocho, Florante A.; (Baylor); (Rochester-Med)

    2009-11-10

    Voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(V)) open in response to changes in membrane potential, but their activity is modulated by Ca(2+) binding to calmodulin (CaM). Structural studies of this family of channels have focused on CaM bound to the IQ motif; however, the minimal differences between structures cannot adequately describe CaM's role in the regulation of these channels. We report a unique crystal structure of a 77-residue fragment of the Ca(V)1.2 alpha(1) subunit carboxyl terminus, which includes a tandem of the pre-IQ and IQ domains, in complex with Ca(2+).CaM in 2 distinct binding modes. The structure of the Ca(V)1.2 fragment is an unusual dimer of 2 coiled-coiled pre-IQ regions bridged by 2 Ca(2+).CaMs interacting with the pre-IQ regions and a canonical Ca(V)1-IQ-Ca(2+).CaM complex. Native Ca(V)1.2 channels are shown to be a mixture of monomers/dimers and a point mutation in the pre-IQ region predicted to abolish the coiled-coil structure significantly reduces Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of heterologously expressed Ca(V)1.2 channels.

  8. Inactivation of orange pectinesterase by combined high-pressure and -temperature treatments: a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, I; Ludikhuyze, L R; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-05-01

    Pressure and/or temperature inactivation of orange pectinesterase (PE) was investigated. Thermal inactivation showed a biphasic behavior, indicating the presence of labile and stable fractions of the enzyme. In a first part, the inactivation of the labile fraction was studied in detail. The combined pressure-temperature inactivation of the labile fraction was studied in the pressure range 0.1-900 MPa combined with temperatures from 15 to 65 degrees C. Inactivation in the pressure-temperature domain specified could be accurately described by a first-order fractional conversion model, estimating the inactivation rate constant of the labile fraction and the remaining activity of the stable fraction. Pressure and temperature dependence of the inactivation rate constants of the labile fraction was quantified using the Eyring and Arrhenius relations, respectively. By replacing in the latter equation the pressure-dependent parameters (E(a), k(ref)(T)()) by mathematical expressions, a global model was formulated. This mathematical model could accurately predict the inactivation rate constant of the labile fraction of orange PE as a function of pressure and temperature. In a second part, the stable fraction was studied in more detail. The stable fraction inactivated at temperatures exceeding 75 degrees C. Acidification (pH 3.7) enhanced thermal inactivation of the stable fraction, whereas addition of Ca(2+) ions (1 M) suppressed inactivation. At elevated pressure (up to 900 MPa), an antagonistic effect of pressure and temperature on the inactivation of the stable fraction was observed. The antagonistic effect was more pronounced in the presence of a 1 M CaCl(2) solution as compared to the inactivation in water, whereas it was less pronounced for the inactivation in acid medium.

  9. Inactivation of Clostridium haemolyticum toxic fluids and their antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, E A

    1977-04-01

    One hundred fifty-one isolates of Clostridium haemolyticum were examined for consistent toxin production following repeated serial transfers in laboratory media. Most of these isolates produced only small amounts of toxic materials and serial transfers appeared to reduce toxigenic characteristics. Eleven of the isolates consistenly produced measurable amounts of toxic materials. One of these isolates was used for production of toxic fluids that were concentrated by lyophilization and reconstitution to a smaller volume or by precipitation with ammonium sulphate followed by dialysis against water and glycerol. Known amounts of these substances were inactivated with formalin, heat, beta-propiolactone, ultra-violet irradiation and glutathione. The resulting toxoids were inoculated into guinea pigs and most were judged to be nonimmunogenic because the animals were unable to resist dermal challenge. Toxic materials with added glycine were inactivated with formaldehyde as readily as those without the amino acid but the resulting toxoids were immunogenic while those prepared without the amino acid were not.

  10. Some non-thermal microbial inactivation methods in dairy products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangilar, F.; Kabil, E.

    2013-01-01

    During the production of dairy products, some thermal processes such as pasteurization and sterilization are used commonly to inactive microorganisms. But as a result of thermal processes, loss of nutrient and aroma, non-enzymatic browning and organoleptic differentiation especially in dairy products are seen. Because of this, alternative methods are needed to provide microbial inactivation and as major problems are caused by high temperatures, non-thermal processes are focused on. For this purpose, some methods such as high pressure (HP), pulsed light (PL), ultraviolet radiation (UV), supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) or pulsed electric field (PEF) are used in food. These methods products are processed in ambient temperature and so not only mentioned losses are minimized but also freshness and naturality of products can be preserved. In this work, we will try to be given information about methods of non-thermal microbial inactivation of dairy products. (author) [tr

  11. Inactivation of microorganisms for high pressures in the wine industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montana B, Jaime Nelson; Ortegon T, Sandra Patricia

    2000-01-01

    In order to evaluate experimentally the capacity of N 2 and CO 2 under pressure to inactivate wild yeasts, which remain in the Puntalarga vineyard grape, musts were exposed to hyperbaric treatment with these gases. At the end of the pascalization (after 2 hours), CO 2 at 15 degrades Celsius under pressures from 1 to 5 MPa, reached high inactivation percentages of yeast cells (> 90%). Contrary to CO 2 treatment the use of N 2 at 15 degrades Celsius at 4 and 10 MPa failed to exert microbicide effect in a same treatment time. While CO 2 gas with high solubility in water has the potential to reduce microbial loads in musts, N 2 gas with low solubility in water have not effect on the survival of the pathogenic microorganisms in these juices

  12. [Characteristics of thermal inactivation of lysozyme in solution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    1986-01-01

    In the buffer solution (pH 6,2) at 20-80 degrees, the lysozyme thermoinactivation was studied by monitoring of its activity decrease in the lysis of M. lysodeicticus cells. Protein inactivation was characterized by effective pseudofirst order rate constants which depend on enzyme concentration and are described by equation k = k0 . exp [-alpha 0 (1-gamma/T) [E]0], where k0 is inactivation rate constant at "infinite" enzyme dilution, [E0] is an initial lysozyme concentration, alpha 0 and gamma are the coefficients independent on [E0]. By extrapolation of the "k" dependencies on [E]0 the constants k0 were determined. In the range 40-70 degrees C, the rate constant k0 is equal 4,0 X 10(11) . exp (-24 200/RT) sec-1.

  13. [Thermal inactivation and stabilization of lysozyme substrate-- Micrococcus lysodeicticus cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Eremin, A N; Metelitsa, D I

    1986-01-01

    Heat inactivation of the acetonic powder of Micrococcus lysodeicticus cells suspended in phosphate buffer pH 6.2 was quantitatively characterized in the temperature range from 34 to 52 degrees. The total value of the rate constant for heat inactivation of the cells equals 2.88 X 10(8) exp(-18360/RT) sec-1. The activation parameters of the process at 34 degrees are the following: delta H* = 17.7 kcal/mole; delta S* = 21.8 E. U.; delta F* = 24.4 kcal/mole. The effect of ethylene glycol, mannitol, dextran, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyethylene glycols with different molecular weights on the lysis rate and cell stability was studied. Polyvinyl alcohol was found to be the most effective stabilizer. At concentrations of about 10(-5) it enhances the thermostability of the cells threefold.

  14. Development of methods to measure virus inactivation in fresh waters.

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, R L; Winston, P E

    1985-01-01

    This study concerns the identification and correction of deficiencies in methods used to measure inactivation rates of enteric viruses seeded into environmental waters. It was found that viable microorganisms in an environmental water sample increased greatly after addition of small amounts of nutrients normally present in the unpurified seed virus preparation. This burst of microbial growth was not observed after seeding the water with purified virus. The use of radioactively labeled poliovi...

  15. Inactivation of norovirus on dry copper alloy surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L Warnes

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS determined that Cu(II and especially Cu(I ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked, which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen.

  16. Inactivation of Norovirus on Dry Copper Alloy Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnes, Sarah L.; Keevil, C. William

    2013-01-01

    Noroviruses (family Caliciviridae) are the primary cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide. The virus is highly infectious and touching contaminated surfaces can contribute to infection spread. Although the virus was identified over 40 years ago the lack of methods to assess infectivity has hampered the study of the human pathogen. Recently the murine virus, MNV-1, has successfully been used as a close surrogate. Copper alloys have previously been shown to be effective antimicrobial surfaces against a range of bacteria and fungi. We now report rapid inactivation of murine norovirus on alloys, containing over 60% copper, at room temperature but no reduction of infectivity on stainless steel dry surfaces in simulated wet fomite and dry touch contamination. The rate of inactivation was initially very rapid and proportional to copper content of alloy tested. Viral inactivation was not as rapid on brass as previously observed for bacteria but copper-nickel alloy was very effective. The use of chelators and quenchers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) determined that Cu(II) and especially Cu(I) ions are still the primary effectors of toxicity but quenching superoxide and hydroxyl radicals did not confer protection. This suggests Fenton generation of ROS is not important for the inactivation mechanism. One of the targets of copper toxicity was the viral genome and a reduced copy number of the gene for a viral encoded protein, VPg (viral-protein-genome-linked), which is essential for infectivity, was observed following contact with copper and brass dry surfaces. The use of antimicrobial surfaces containing copper in high risk closed environments such as cruise ships and care facilities could help to reduce the spread of this highly infectious and costly pathogen. PMID:24040380

  17. Nonthermal Plasma Inactivation of Food-Borne Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, N.; Tiwari, B.; Rahavarao, K.; Cullen, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) is electrically energized matter, composed of highly reactive species including gas molecules, charged particles in the form of positive ions, negative ions, free radicals, electrons and quanta of electromagnetic radiation (photons) at near-room temperature. NTP is an emerging nonthermal technology with potential applications for decontamination in the food industries. An upsurge in the research activities for plasma based inactivation of food borne pathogens is evide...

  18. Inactivation of Aerosolized Biological Agents using Filled Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Reviewing Environmental Risk Assessment Reports, CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. Brock , T.D., Madigan, M.T., Markinko, J.M., and Parker, J. (1994). Biology of... microorganisms in combustion environments: development and evaluation 7 - 26 Chapter 2. Thermal inactivation of airborne viable Bacillus subtilis...Hoffmann, V., Trunov M. (2010) Method for Studying Survival of Airborne Viable Microorganisms in Combustion Environments: Development and Evaluation

  19. Thermal Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis Spores Using Rapid Resistive Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    persist in the environment over millennial time spans in a metabolically inactive state (Nicholson et al., 2000)." Once favorable conditions arise...for the prototyping/initial testing, the collection of 1586 data points, and to ensure quality agar plates were used for the thermal inactivation...removal process yielded some broken filament samples and required inspection for cracks of still intact filament samples to ensure quality samples

  20. Capillary isoelectric focusing of native and inactivated microorganisms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horká, Marie; Kubíček, O.; Růžička, F.; Holá, V.; Malinovská, Ivana; Šlais, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 1155, č. 2 (2007), s. 164-171 ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00310701; GA ČR GA203/06/1179 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : capillary isoelectric focusing * isoelectric points * native and inactivated microorganisms Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.641, year: 2007

  1. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  2. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    OpenAIRE

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-01-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h ...

  3. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection. PMID:26343192

  4. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  5. Raman spectroscopy of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology and inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, J. B.; Almeida, J.; Cole, K. D.; Reipa, V.

    2012-12-01

    The ability to detect spore contamination and inactivation is relevant to developing and determining decontamination strategy success for food and water safety. This study was conducted to develop a systematic comparison of nondestructive vibrational spectroscopy techniques (Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, SERS, and normal Raman) to determine indicators of Bacillus thuringiensis physiology (spore, vegetative, outgrown, germinated and inactivated spore forms). SERS was found to provide better resolution of commonly utilized signatures of spore physiology (dipicolinic acid at 1006 cm-1 and 1387 cm-1) compared to normal Raman and native fluorescence indigenous to vegetative and outgrown cell samples was quenched in SERS experiment. New features including carotenoid pigments (Raman features at 1142 cm-1, 1512 cm-1) were identified for spore cell forms. Pronounced changes in the low frequency region (300 cm-1 to 500 cm-1) in spore spectra occurred upon germination and inactivation (with both free chlorine and by autoclaving) which is relevant to guiding decontamination and detection strategies using Raman techniques.

  6. Gamma-irradiation to inactivate thioglucosidase of crucifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessman, K.J.; McCaslin, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    The crucifers contain glucosinolates which through enzymatic hydrolysis give rise to toxicants that limit the use of oil-free meal obtainable from this plant family. Seeds from three crucifers were used to test gamma irradiation to inactivate enzyme systems as a step toward detoxification. Seeds of Crambe abyssinica Hochst (crambe), ground seeds of Sinapis alba L. (mustard), and seeds of Brassica napus L. (rape) were subjected to gamma-irradiation (6.25, 12.5, 25.0 and 50.4 Mrad) to inactivate thioglucosidase and/or destroy glucosinolates. Samples of ground seeds, their oil-free meals, previously irradiated ground seeds and their oil-free meals were assayed for glucose, a product of enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates present in the crucifer seeds. The 50.4 Mrad exposure inactivated thioglucosidase but did not destroy glucosinolates. The fatty acid contents of extracted oils were affected. The amino acid profile of defatted crambe protein meal was affected, while that of white mustard was not

  7. Chemical Addressability of Ultraviolet-Inactivated Viral Nanoparticles (VNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Chris; Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Destito, Giuseppe; Estrada, Mayra N.; Gonzalez, Maria J.; Manchester, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Background Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) is increasingly being used as a nanoparticle platform for multivalent display of molecules via chemical bioconjugation to the capsid surface. A growing variety of applications have employed the CPMV multivalent display technology including nanoblock chemistry, in vivo imaging, and materials science. CPMV nanoparticles can be inexpensively produced from experimentally infected cowpea plants at high yields and are extremely stable. Although CPMV has not been shown to replicate in mammalian cells, uptake in mammalian cells does occur in vitro and in vivo. Thus, inactivation of the virus RNA genome is important for biosafety considerations, however the surface characteristics and chemical reactivity of the particles must be maintained in order to preserve chemical and structural functionality. Methodology/Principal Findings Short wave (254 nm) UV irradiation was used to crosslink the RNA genome within intact particles. Lower doses of UV previously reported to inactivate CPMV infectivity inhibited symptoms on inoculated leaves but did not prohibit systemic virus spread in plants, whereas higher doses caused aggregation of the particles and an increase in chemical reactivity further indicating broken particles. Intermediate doses of 2.0–2.5 J/cm2 were shown to maintain particle structure and chemical reactivity, and cellular binding properties were similar to CPMV-WT. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that it is possible to inactivate CPMV infectivity while maintaining particle structure and function, thus paving the way for further development of CPMV nanoparticles for in vivo applications. PMID:18830402

  8. Enteric virus removal inactivation by coal-based media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A.; Chaudhuri, M. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-02-01

    Four coal-based media, viz. alum-pretreated or ferric hydroxide-impregnated Giridih bituminous coal and lignite (alum-GBC, Fe-GBC; alum-lignite and Fe-Lignite) were laboratory tested to assess their potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses in water. Batch-sorption screening tests, employing a poliovirus-spiked canal water, indicated high poliovirus sorption by Fe-GBC and alum-GBC in a short contact time of 5 min. Based on the results of further batch-sorption tests, using silver incorporated media (alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC-Ag and Fe-GBC-Ag), as well as aesthetic water quality consideration and previous findings on removal of coliforms and turbidity, alum/Ag-GBC, alum-GBC and alum-GBC-AG were included in downflow column studies employing poliovirus-spiked canal water. All three media showed potential in removing/inactivating enteric viruses. In a separate column study employing a joint challenge of poliovirus and rotavirus, alum/Ag-GBC removed 59.3-86.5% of the viruses along with more than 99% reduction in indigenous heterotrophic bacteria. Alum/silver-pretreated bituminous coal medium appears promising for use in household water filters in rural areas of the developing world. However, improved medium preparation to further enhance its efficiency is needed; also, its efficacy in removing/inactivating indigenous enteric bacteria, viruses and protozoa has to be ensured and practicalities or economics of application need to be considered.

  9. Photodynamic inactivation of contaminated blood with Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Thaila Q.; Inada, Natalia M.; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Blanco, Kate C.; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    The presence of bacteria in the bloodstream can trigger a serious systemic inflammation and lead to sepsis that cause septic shock and death. Studies have shown an increase in the incidence of sepsis over the years and it is mainly due to the increased resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics, since these drugs are still sold and used improperly. The bacterial contamination of blood is also a risk to blood transfusions. Thus, bacteria inactivation in blood is being studied in order to increase the security of the blood supply. The purpose of this study was to decontaminate the blood using the photodynamic inactivation (PDI). Human blood samples in the presence of Photogem® were illuminated at an intensity of 30 mW/cm2, and light doses of 10 and 15 J/cm2. Blood counts were carried out for the quantitative evaluation and blood smears were prepared for qualitative and morphological evaluation by microscopy. The results showed normal viability values for the blood cells analyzed. The light doses showed minimal morphological changes in the membrane of red blood cells, but the irradiation in the presence of the photosensitizer caused hemolysis in red blood cells at the higher concentrations of the photosensitizer. Experiments with Staphylococcus aureus, one of the responsible of sepsis, showed 7 logs10 of photodynamic inactivation with 50 μg/mL and 15 J/cm2 and 1 log10 of this microorganism in a co-culture with blood.

  10. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125 I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  11. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Highsmith, R.F.; Gallaher, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive /sup 125/I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface.

  12. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious blood-borne human parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Millard M.; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Matthews, James Lester

    1995-05-01

    Blood-borne viruses and protozoan parasites that are infectious to humans pose risk world-wide of infection transmission through blood and blood product transfusion. Blood-borne infectious viruses include human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-I), which causes AIDS; hepatitis C virus, which can cause chronic hepatitis; and cytomegalovirus, which can be dangerous to immunocompromised patients, e.g., the newborn, transplant recipients, and AIDS patients. Infectious blood-borne protozoan parasites include Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas' disease, endemic throughout Central and South America; the Trypanosoma species causing African sleeping sickness endemic in Central Africa; and Plasmodium falciparum, which causes malignant and increasingly drug- resistant human malaria prevalent throughout the tropics. Some researchers have focused on using photosensitizers to inactivate HIV-I and other viruses in whole blood, packed red cells, and platelet concentrates without compromising blood product function. Our group previously has reported photosensitized in vitro inactivation of P. falciparum and the mouse malaria organism Plasmodium berghei in whole blood using hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and of T. cruzi using benzoporphyrin derivatives BPDMA and BPDDA, dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE), and hydroxyethylvinyldeuteroporphyrin (HEVD). These results suggest that continued investigation is warranted to evaluate the potential for photosensitized inactivation of blood-borne parasites in blood banking.

  13. Ozone inactivation of norovirus surrogates on fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneisen, K A; Markland, S M; Kniel, K E

    2011-05-01

    Preharvest contamination of produce by foodborne viruses can occur through a variety of agents, including animal feces/manures, soil, irrigation water, animals, and human handling. Problems of contamination are magnified by potential countrywide distribution. Postharvest processing of produce can involve spraying, washing, or immersion into water with disinfectants; however, disinfectants, including chlorine, have varying effects on viruses and harmful by-products pose a concern. The use of ozone as a disinfectant in produce washes has shown great promise for bacterial pathogens, but limited research exists on its efficacy on viruses. This study compares ozone inactivation of human norovirus surrogates (feline calicivirus [FCV] and murine norovirus [MNV]) on produce (green onions and lettuce) and in sterile water. Green onions and lettuce inoculated with FCV or MNV were treated with ozone (6.25 ppm) for 0.5- to 10-min time intervals. Infectivity was determined by 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID(50)) and plaque assay for FCV and MNV, respectively. After 5 min of ozone treatment, >6 log TCID(50)/ml of FCV was inactivated in water and ∼2-log TCID(50)/ml on lettuce and green onions. MNV inoculated onto green onions and lettuce showed a >2-log reduction after 1 min of ozone treatment. The food matrix played the largest role in protection against ozone inactivation. These results indicate that ozone is an alternative method to reduce viral contamination on the surface of fresh produce.

  14. Aluminum plasmonic nanoshielding in ultraviolet inactivation of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Jeremy N; Voronine, Dmitri V; Lu, Weigang; Liege, Zachary; Lee, Ho Wai Howard; Zhang, Zhenrong; Scully, Marlan O

    2017-08-22

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is an effective bacterial inactivation technique with broad applications in environmental disinfection. However, biomedical applications are limited due to the low selectivity, undesired inactivation of beneficial bacteria and damage of healthy tissue. New approaches are needed for the protection of biological cells from UV radiation for the development of controlled treatment and improved biosensors. Aluminum plasmonics offers attractive opportunities for the control of light-matter interactions in the UV range, which have not yet been explored in microbiology. Here, we investigate the effects of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) prepared by sonication of aluminum foil on the UVC inactivation of E. coli bacteria and demonstrate a new radiation protection mechanism via plasmonic nanoshielding. We observe direct interaction of the bacterial cells with Al NPs and elucidate the nanoshielding mechanism via UV plasmonic resonance and nanotailing effects. Concentration and wavelength dependence studies reveal the role and range of control parameters for regulating the radiation dosage to achieve effective UVC protection. Our results provide a step towards developing improved radiation-based bacterial treatments.

  15. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  16. Butyroyl-arginine as a potent virus inactivation agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Yukiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Tsujimoto, Kazuko; Koyama, A Hajime; Ejima, Daisuke; Arakawa, Tsutomu

    2008-09-01

    Virus inactivation is a critical step in the manufacturing of recombinant therapeutic proteins, in particular antibodies, using mammalian expression systems. We have shown in the previous paper that arginine is effective in inactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza virus at low temperature under mildly acidic pH, i.e., above pH 4.0; above this pH, conformational changes of most antibodies are negligible. We have here extended virus inactivation study of arginine to other enveloped viruses, such as Sendai virus and Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV), and observed that arginine was ineffective against both viruses under the similar conditions, i.e., on ice and above pH 4.0. However, an arginine derivative, butyroyl-arginine, showed a strong virucidal potency against Sendai virus, leading to a 4log reduction in virus yield at pH 4.0, but not against NDV. In addition, although arginine and butyroyl-arginine were equally effective against influenza virus having a cleaved form of hemagglutinin spike proteins, only butyroyl-arginine was significantly effective against the same virus, but having an uncleaved hemagglutinin spike proteins. Furthermore, butyroyl-arginine was more effective than arginine against HSV-1 at pH 4.5; i.e., it has a broader pH spectrum than does arginine.

  17. Modeling-independent elucidation of inactivation pathways in recombinant and native A-type Kv channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineberg, Jeffrey D.; Ritter, David M.

    2012-01-01

    A-type voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels self-regulate their activity by inactivating directly from the open state (open-state inactivation [OSI]) or by inactivating before they open (closed-state inactivation [CSI]). To determine the inactivation pathways, it is often necessary to apply several pulse protocols, pore blockers, single-channel recording, and kinetic modeling. However, intrinsic hurdles may preclude the standardized application of these methods. Here, we implemented a simple method inspired by earlier studies of Na+ channels to analyze macroscopic inactivation and conclusively deduce the pathways of inactivation of recombinant and native A-type Kv channels. We investigated two distinct A-type Kv channels expressed heterologously (Kv3.4 and Kv4.2 with accessory subunits) and their native counterparts in dorsal root ganglion and cerebellar granule neurons. This approach applies two conventional pulse protocols to examine inactivation induced by (a) a simple step (single-pulse inactivation) and (b) a conditioning step (double-pulse inactivation). Consistent with OSI, the rate of Kv3.4 inactivation (i.e., the negative first derivative of double-pulse inactivation) precisely superimposes on the profile of the Kv3.4 current evoked by a single pulse because the channels must open to inactivate. In contrast, the rate of Kv4.2 inactivation is asynchronous, already changing at earlier times relative to the profile of the Kv4.2 current evoked by a single pulse. Thus, Kv4.2 inactivation occurs uncoupled from channel opening, indicating CSI. Furthermore, the inactivation time constant versus voltage relation of Kv3.4 decreases monotonically with depolarization and levels off, whereas that of Kv4.2 exhibits a J-shape profile. We also manipulated the inactivation phenotype by changing the subunit composition and show how CSI and CSI combined with OSI might affect spiking properties in a full computational model of the hippocampal CA1 neuron. This work unambiguously

  18. Sunlight inactivation of somatic coliphage in the presence of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen-Xi; Kitajima, Masaaki; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2016-01-15

    Long wavelengths of sunlight spectrum (UVA and visible light), as well as natural organic matter (NOM) are important environmental factors affecting survival of viruses in aquatic environment through direct and indirect inactivation. In order to understand the virus inactivation kinetics under such conditions, this study investigated the effects of Suwannee River natural organic matter (NOM) on the inactivation of a somatic coliphage, phiX174, by UVA and visible light. Experiments were carried out to examine the virucidal effects of UVA/visible light, assess the influence of SRNOM at different concentrations, and identify the effective ROS in virus inactivation. The results from this study showed that the presence of NOM could either enhance virus inactivation or reduce virus inactivation depending on the concentration, where the inactivation rate followed a parabolic relationship against NOM concentration. The results indicated that moderate levels of NOM (11 ppm) had the strongest antiviral activity, while very low or very high NOM concentrations prolonged virus survival. The results also showed that OH▪ was the primary ROS in causing phiX174 (ssDNA virus) inactivation, unlike previous findings where (1)O2 was the primary ROS causing MS2 (ssRNA virus) inactivation. The phiX174 inactivation by OH∙ could be described as k=3.7 ✕ 10(13)[OH∙]+1.404 (R(2)=0.8527). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inactivation of pectin methylesterase by immobilized trypsins from cunner fish and bovine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Matos, Madyu; Simpson, Benjamin K

    2013-01-01

    Immobilized cunner fish trypsin was used to inactivate pectin methylesterase (PME). The effects of different reaction conditions (e.g., incubation time, PME concentration, and temperature) on PME inactivation and kinetics of inactivation were investigated. Temperature, incubation time, and PME concentration significantly affected the extent of PME inactivation. Generally, higher temperature, longer incubation time, and low PME concentration caused more PME inactivation. The immobilized fish trypsin had higher capacity to inactivate PME than immobilized bovine trypsin. The inactivation efficiency of the immobilized fish trypsin was about 20% higher than that of its bovine counterpart. However, PME inactivated by both trypsins regained partial activity during storage at 4°C, with immobilized fish trypsin-treated PME regaining more of its original activity than the immobilized bovine trypsin-treated PME. Heat-denatured PME was hydrolyzed more extensively by immobilized fish trypsin than by its bovine counterpart. The rate constants increased, whereas the D-values decreased with temperature for both immobilized fish and bovine trypsins. The inactivation rate constants of immobilized fish trypsin at all the temperatures investigated (i.e., 15-35°C) were higher than those of immobilized bovine trypsin. Furthermore, the activation energy (Ea ) of PME inactivation by immobilized fish trypsin was lower than that of immobilized bovine trypsin. © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Conditional Deletion of the L-Type Calcium Channel Cav1.2 in Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Affects Postnatal Myelination in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheli, Veronica T; Santiago González, Diara A; Namgyal Lama, Tenzing; Spreuer, Vilma; Handley, Vance; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Paez, Pablo M

    2016-10-19

    To determine whether L-type voltage-operated Ca 2+ channels (L-VOCCs) are required for oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) development, we generated an inducible conditional knock-out mouse in which the L-VOCC isoform Cav1.2 was postnatally deleted in NG2-positive OPCs. A significant hypomyelination was found in the brains of the Cav1.2 conditional knock-out (Cav1.2 KO ) mice specifically when the Cav1.2 deletion was induced in OPCs during the first 2 postnatal weeks. A decrease in myelin proteins expression was visible in several brain structures, including the corpus callosum, cortex, and striatum, and the corpus callosum of Cav1.2 KO animals showed an important decrease in the percentage of myelinated axons and a substantial increase in the mean g-ratio of myelinated axons. The reduced myelination was accompanied by an important decline in the number of myelinating oligodendrocytes and in the rate of OPC proliferation. Furthermore, using a triple transgenic mouse in which all of the Cav1.2 KO OPCs were tracked by a Cre reporter, we found that Cav1.2 KO OPCs produce less mature oligodendrocytes than control cells. Finally, live-cell imaging in early postnatal brain slices revealed that the migration and proliferation of subventricular zone OPCs is decreased in the Cav1.2 KO mice. These results indicate that the L-VOCC isoform Cav1.2 modulates oligodendrocyte development and suggest that Ca 2+ influx mediated by L-VOCCs in OPCs is necessary for normal myelination. Overall, it is clear that cells in the oligodendrocyte lineage exhibit remarkable plasticity with regard to the expression of Ca 2+ channels and that perturbation of Ca 2+ homeostasis likely plays an important role in the pathogenesis underlying demyelinating diseases. To determine whether voltage-gated Ca 2+ entry is involved in oligodendrocyte maturation and myelination, we used a conditional knock-out mouse for voltage-operated Ca 2+ channels in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. Our results indicate

  1. A new treatment for human malignant melanoma targeting L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): A pilot study in a canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Shinya; Hanazono, Kiwamu [Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Fu, Dah-Renn; Endo, Yoshifumi; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi [Veterinary Oncology, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Iwano, Hidetomo [Veterinary Biochemistry, Department of Basic Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan); Uchide, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: uchide@rakuno.ac.jp [Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido 069-8501 (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •LAT1 is highly expressed in tumors but at low levels in normal tissues. •We examine LAT1 expression and function in malignant melanoma (MM). •LAT1 expression in MM tissues and cell lines is higher than those in normal tissues. •LAT1 selective inhibitors inhibit amino acid uptake and cell growth in MM cells. •New chemotherapeutic protocols including LAT1 inhibitors are effective for treatment. -- Abstract: L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1), an isoform of amino acid transport system L, transports branched or aromatic amino acids essential for fundamental cellular activities such as cellular growth, proliferation and maintenance. This amino acid transporter recently has received attention because of its preferential and up-regulated expression in a variety of human tumors in contrast to its limited distribution and low-level expression in normal tissues. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using LAT1 inhibitor as a new therapeutic agent for human malignant melanomas (MM) using canine spontaneous MM as a model for human MM. A comparative study of LAT expression was performed in 48 normal tissues, 25 MM tissues and five cell lines established from MM. The study observed LAT1 mRNA levels from MM tissues and cell lines that were significantly (P < 0.01) higher than in normal tissues. Additionally, MM with distant metastasis showed a higher expression than those without distant metastasis. Functional analysis of LAT1 was performed on one of the five cell lines, CMeC-1. [{sup 3}H]L-Leucine uptake and cellular growth activities in CMeC-1 were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by selective LAT1 inhibitors (2-amino-2-norbornane-carboxylic acid, BCH and melphalan, LPM). Inhibitory growth activities of various conventional anti-cancer drugs, including carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, nimustine, vinblastine and vincristine, were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced by combination use with BCH or LPM

  2. Caveolae-specific activation loop between CaMKII and L-type Ca2+channel aggravates cardiac hypertrophy in α1-adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonegawa, Kota; Otsuka, Wataru; Kumagai, Shohei; Matsunami, Sachi; Hayamizu, Nao; Tanaka, Shota; Moriwaki, Kazumasa; Obana, Masanori; Maeda, Makiko; Asahi, Michio; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Fujio, Yasushi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Activation of CaMKII induces a myriad of biological processes and plays dominant roles in cardiac hypertrophy. Caveolar microdomain contains many calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) targets, including L-type Ca 2+ channel (LTCC) complex, and serves as a signaling platform. The location of CaMKII activation is thought to be critical; however, the roles of CaMKII in caveolae are still elusive due to lack of methodology for the assessment of caveolae-specific activation. Our aim was to develop a novel tool for the specific analysis of CaMKII activation in caveolae and to determine the functional role of caveolar CaMKII in cardiac hypertrophy. To assess the caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII, we generated a fusion protein composed of phospholamban and caveolin-3 (cPLN-Cav3) and GFP fusion protein with caveolin-binding domain fused to CaMKII inhibitory peptide (CBD-GFP-AIP), which inhibits CaMKII activation specifically in caveolae. Caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII was detected using phosphospecific antibody for PLN (Thr 17 ). Furthermore, adenoviral overexpression of LTCC β 2a -subunit (β 2a ) in NRCMs showed its constitutive phosphorylation by CaMKII, which induces hypertrophy, and that both phosphorylation and hypertrophy are abolished by CBD-GFP-AIP expression, indicating that β 2a phosphorylation occurs specifically in caveolae. Finally, β 2a phosphorylation was observed after phenylephrine stimulation in β 2a -overexpressing mice, and attenuation of cardiac hypertrophy after chronic phenylephrine stimulation was observed in nonphosphorylated mutant of β 2a -overexpressing mice. We developed novel tools for the evaluation and inhibition of caveolae-specific activation of CaMKII. We demonstrated that phosphorylated β 2a dominantly localizes to caveolae and induces cardiac hypertrophy after α 1 -adrenergic stimulation in mice. NEW & NOTEWORTHY While signaling in caveolae is thought to be important in cardiac hypertrophy, direct evidence

  3. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Li; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huan; Kong, Lingmin; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xin; Ding, Yin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We detect the functional Ca 2+ currents and mRNA expression of VDCC L in rMSCs. ► Blockage of VDCC L exert antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ► Inhibiting VDCC L can suppress the ability of rMSCs to differentiate into osteoblasts. ► α1C of VDCC L may be a primary functional subunit in VDCC L -regulating rMSCs. -- Abstract: L-type voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels (VDCC L ) play an important role in the maintenance of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and influence multiple cellular processes. They have been confirmed to contribute to the functional activities of osteoblasts. Recently, VDCC L expression was reported in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), but the role of VDCC L in MSCs is still undetermined. The aim of this study was to determine whether VDCC L may be regarded as a new regulator in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rat MSC (rMSCs). In this study, we examined functional Ca 2+ currents (I Ca ) and mRNA expression of VDCC L in rMSCs, and then suppressed VDCC L using nifedipine (Nif), a VDCC L blocker, to investigate its role in rMSCs. The proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs were analyzed by MTT, flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin Red S staining, RT-PCR, and real-time PCR assays. We found that Nif exerts antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on rMSCs. ALP activity and mineralized nodules were significantly decreased after Nif treatment. Moreover, the mRNA levels of the osteogenic markers, osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), were also down-regulated. In addition, we transfected α1C-siRNA into the cells to further confirm the role of VDCC L in rMSCs, and a similar effect on osteogenesis was found. These results suggest that VDCC L plays a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs.

  4. Regulation of Ca2+ influx by a protein kinase C activator in chromaffin cells: differential role of P/Q- and L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, C M; Santos, R M; Boarder, M R; Rosário, L M

    1999-02-05

    Phorbol esters reduce depolarization-evoked Ca2+ influx in adrenal chromaffin cells, suggesting that voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs) are inhibited by protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation. We now address the possibility that L- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channel subtypes might be differentially involved in phorbol ester action. In bovine chromaffin cells, short-term (10 min) incubations with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) inhibited early high K+-evoked rises in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the early component of the depolarization-evoked Mn2+ quenching of fura-2 fluorescence in a dose-dependent manner (IC50: 18 and 7 nM; maximal inhibitions: 45 and 48%, respectively). The protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine (100 nM) reverted the inhibitory action of PMA. PMA (0.1-1 microM) inhibited the early and late phases of the ionomycin (2 microM)-evoked [Ca2+]i transients by 14-23%. Omega-agatoxin IVA, a blocker of P/Q-type Ca2+ channels, inhibited high K+-evoked [Ca2+]i rises in a dose-dependent fashion (IC50 = 50 nM). In contrast, 0.1 microM omega-conotoxin GVIA, a blocker of N-type channels, was without effect. A sizeable (< 45%) component of early Ca2+ influx persisted in the combined presence of omega-agatoxin IVA (100 nM) and nitrendipine (1 microM). Simultaneous exposure to omega-agatoxin IVA and PMA inhibited both the early [Ca2+]i transients and Mn2+ quenching to a much greater extent than each drug separately. Inhibition of the [Ca2+]i transients by nitrendipine and PMA did not significantly exceed that produced by PMA alone. It is concluded that phorbol ester-mediated activation of protein kinase C inhibits preferentially L-type VSCCs over P/Q type channels in adrenal chromaffin cells. However, the possibility cannot be ruled out that dihydropyridine-resistant, non-P/Q type channels might also be negatively regulated by protein kinase C. This may represent an important pathway for the specific control of VSCCs by protein kinase C

  5. Inactivation of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by organic solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Grazinoli-Garrido

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of application for enzymes in organic solvents have been developed in chemical processing, food related conversions and analyses. The only unsolved problem related to nonaqueous enzymology is the notion that enzymes in organic solvent are mostly far less active than in water. Therefore, studies concerning the mechanisms by which enzymes are inactivated by organic solvents would reveal a clear understanding of the structure-function relationship of this phenomenon. Here we analyzed the effects of a series of alcohols (methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol and 2-propanol and acetone on the activity of yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase. We observed that solvents inactivated the enzyme in a dose-dependent manner. This inactivation is also dependent on the hydrophobicity of the solvent, where the most hydrophobic solvent is also the most effective one. The I50 for inactivation by n-alcohols are 5.9±4, 2.7±1 and 2.5±1 M for methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol, respectively. Inactivation was less effective at 37C than at 5C, when the I50 for inactivation by methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol are 4.5±2, 2.1±2 and 1.7±1 M, respectively. Our proposal is that solvent binds to the enzyme structure promoting the inactivation by stabilizing an unfolded structure, and that this binding is through the hydrophobic regions of either the protein or the solvent.Várias aplicações para a catálise enzimática em solventes orgânicos têm sido desenvolvidas visando processos químicos, industria alimentícia e métodos analíticos. Entretanto, o único problema ainda não resolvido para estas aplicações é o fato que estes catalisadores são bem menos ativos nestas condições que em meio aquoso. Assim, estudos dos mecanismos pelos quais as enzimas são inativadas em solventes orgânicos podem facilitar a compreensão da interrelação estrutura/função da interação entre os catalisadores e o solvente. Neste trabalho, nós analisamos os efeitos de uma s

  6. Inactivation of bacteria in sewage sludge by ionizing radiation, heat, and thermoradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandon, J.R.; Langley, S.L.

    1976-01-01

    For purposes of animal feeding or fertilizer usage on edible crops, sewage sludge must be free of pathogenic organisms. Bacterial inactivation by a combination of heat and irradiation is shown to be effective. These results must be viewed in conjunction with those from studies of parasite egg inactivation, virus inactivation, and physical-chemical benefits in order to make a fair assessment of the value of the thermoradiation treatment compared to other possible sludge treatment processes

  7. Inactivation of Escherichia coli Endotoxin by Soft Hydrothermal Processing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Toru; Okano, Shinya; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharides, are a fever-producing by-product of gram-negative bacteria commonly known as pyrogens. It is essential to remove endotoxins from parenteral preparations since they have multiple injurious biological activities. Because of their strong heat resistance (e.g., requiring dry-heat sterilization at 250°C for 30 min) and the formation of various supramolecular aggregates, depyrogenation is more difficult than sterilization. We report here that soft hydrothermal processing, which has many advantages in safety and cost efficiency, is sufficient to assure complete depyrogenation by the inactivation of endotoxins. The endotoxin concentration in a sample was measured by using a chromogenic limulus method with an endotoxin-specific limulus reagent. The endotoxin concentration was calculated from a standard curve obtained using a serial dilution of a standard solution. We show that endotoxins were completely inactivated by soft hydrothermal processing at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system. Moreover, it is easy to remove endotoxins from water by soft hydrothermal processing similarly at 130°C for 60 min or at 140°C for 30 min, without any requirement for ultrafiltration, nonselective adsorption with a hydrophobic adsorbent, or an anion exchanger. These findings indicate that soft hydrothermal processing, applied in the presence of a high steam saturation ratio or with a flow system, can inactivate endotoxins and may be useful for the depyrogenation of parenterals, including end products and medical devices that cannot be exposed to the high temperatures of dry heat treatments. PMID:19502435

  8. Inactivation of Salmonella during cocoa roasting and chocolate conching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Maristela da Silva do; Brum, Daniela Merlo; Pena, Pamela Oliveira; Berto, Maria Isabel; Efraim, Priscilla

    2012-10-15

    The high heat resistance of Salmonella in foods with low water activity raises particular issues for food safety, especially chocolate, where outbreak investigations indicate that few colony-forming units are necessary to cause salmonellosis. This study evaluated the efficiency of cocoa roasting and milk chocolate conching in the inactivation of Salmonella 5-strain suspension. Thermal resistance of Salmonella was greater in nibs compared to cocoa beans upon exposure at 110 to 130°C. The D-values in nibs were 1.8, 2.2 and 1.5-fold higher than those calculated for cocoa beans at 110, 120 and 130°C. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the matrices only at 140°C. Since in the conching of milk chocolate the inactivation curves showed rapid death in the first 180 min followed by a lower inactivation rate, and two D-values were calculated. For the first time interval (0-180 min) the D-values were 216.87, 102.27 and 50.99 min at 50, 60 and 70°C, respectively. The other D-values were determined from the second time interval (180-1440 min), 1076.76 min at 50°C, 481.94 min at 60°C and 702.23 min at 70°C. The results demonstrated that the type of matrix, the process temperature and the initial count influenced the Salmonella resistance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Inactivation of Prions and Amyloid Seeds with Hypochlorous Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hughson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypochlorous acid (HOCl is produced naturally by neutrophils and other cells to kill conventional microbes in vivo. Synthetic preparations containing HOCl can also be effective as microbial disinfectants. Here we have tested whether HOCl can also inactivate prions and other self-propagating protein amyloid seeds. Prions are deadly pathogens that are notoriously difficult to inactivate, and standard microbial disinfection protocols are often inadequate. Recommended treatments for prion decontamination include strongly basic (pH ≥~12 sodium hypochlorite bleach, ≥1 N sodium hydroxide, and/or prolonged autoclaving. These treatments are damaging and/or unsuitable for many clinical, agricultural and environmental applications. We have tested the anti-prion activity of a weakly acidic aqueous formulation of HOCl (BrioHOCl that poses no apparent hazard to either users or many surfaces. For example, BrioHOCl can be applied directly to skin and mucous membranes and has been aerosolized to treat entire rooms without apparent deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that immersion in BrioHOCl can inactivate not only a range of target microbes, including spores of Bacillus subtilis, but also prions in tissue suspensions and on stainless steel. Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC assays showed that BrioHOCl treatments eliminated all detectable prion seeding activity of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, cervine chronic wasting disease, sheep scrapie and hamster scrapie; these findings indicated reductions of ≥103- to 106-fold. Transgenic mouse bioassays showed that all detectable hamster-adapted scrapie infectivity in brain homogenates or on steel wires was eliminated, representing reductions of ≥~105.75-fold and >104-fold, respectively. Inactivation of RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated with free chlorine concentration and higher order aggregation or destruction of proteins generally, including prion

  10. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in cows' milk at pasteurization temperatures.

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, I R; Ball, H J; Neill, S D; Rowe, M T

    1996-01-01

    The thermal inactivation of 11 strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis at pasteurization temperatures was investigated. Cows' milk inoculated with M. paratuberculosis at two levels (10(7) and 10(4) CFU/ml) was pasteurized in the laboratory by (i) a standard holder method (63.5 degrees C for 30 min) and (ii) a high-temperature, short-time (HTST) method (71.7 degrees C for 15 s). Additional heating times of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 40 min at 63.5 degrees C were included to enable the construction o...

  11. Thermal inactivation of several Mycobacterium spp. in milk by pasteurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, I R; Ball, H J; Rowe, M T

    1996-03-01

    The thermal inactivation of Mycobacterium avium, Myco. bovis, Myco. fortuitum, Myco. intracellulare and Myco. kansaii in milk at 63.5 degrees C was investigated. Survivors were enumerated after heating for 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min and thermal death curves were constructed for each species. Mycobacterium bovis and Myco. fortuitum were found to exhibit linear thermal death curves and neither species demonstrated any survival after heating at 63.5 degrees C for 30 min (equivalent to holder pasteurization). In contrast, Myco. avium, Myco. intracellulare and Myco. kansasii yielded thermal death curves which exhibited significant 'tailing' and all three strains survived holder pasteurization.

  12. Laser flash photolysis and inactivation of carboxypeptidase A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.Y.; Grossweiner, L.I.

    1978-01-01

    Laser photolysis of CPA at 265 nm photoionizes 3 to 4 Trp residues per molecule inactivated, leading to e - sub(aq) and the disulfide bridge electron adduct. The electron adduct is formed by an internal process and is not involved in the activity loss. Based on this work and published photochemical and pulse radiolysis studies on CPA it is proposed that photolysis of a key Trp residue, possibly Trp 73 adjacent to zinc ligand Glu 72, mediates release of the zinc ion and consequent loss of peptidase activity (author)

  13. Ribosome-inactivating proteins and other lectins from Adenia (Passifloraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosi, Emanuele; Lubelli, Chiara; Polito, Letizia; Barbieri, Luigi; Bolognesi, Andrea; Stirpe, Fiorenzo

    2005-11-01

    The caudices of 10 Adenia species contain galactose-binding lectins that were purified by affinity chromatography. All lectins but three agglutinate human erythrocytes. Six lectins consist of two unequal chains, which can be separated by reduction, and inhibit protein synthesis both by a rabbit reticulocyte lysate and by HeLa and Raji cells. The lectins from A. goetzii, A. lanceolata and A. stenodactyla had the highest cytotoxicity, inhibiting cell protein synthesis with IC50s (concentration inhibiting by 50%) below 0.1 ng/ml, and deadenylate DNA, thus being type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  14. Inactivation of certain insect pathogens by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, A.; Groener, A.; Huber, J.; Zimmermann, G.

    1981-01-01

    The UV-sensitivity of two baculoviruses (granulosis virus, nuclear polyhedrosis virus) and two entomopathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus thuringiensis, Beauveria bassiana) was determined by radiation tests. In the far UV (254 nm) the stability, measured at an inactivation rate of 99%, was in declining order: nuclear polyhedra >= conidia of B. bassiana > granula > spores of B. thuringiensis >= vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. In the near UV (285-380 nm) the following order could be found: conidia of B. bassiana >= nuclear polyhedra > spores of B. thuringiensis >= granula > vegetative cells of B. thuringiensis. Far UV had a much higher germicidal effect for all pathogens tested than near UV. (orig.) [de

  15. Inactivation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus using heated water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M. Zentkovich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV is a very contagious swine pathogen that spreads easily via the fecal-oral route, notably from contaminated fomites. The present study investigated heated water as a method for rapid thermal inactivation of PEDV. Cell-culture adapted PEDV was treated with water at varying temperatures and viral titers were measured at multiple time points post-treatment. Viable PEDV was not recovered after a ten second or longer treatment with water heated to ≥76 °C; however, PEDV nucleic acid was detected in all samples regardless of treatment. Hot water decontamination could be considered in settings where chemical disinfection is impractical.

  16. Comparative Inactivation of Enteroviruses and Adenovirus 2 by UV Light

    OpenAIRE

    Gerba, Charles P.; Gramos, Dawn M.; Nwachuku, Nena

    2002-01-01

    The doses of UV irradiation necessary to inactivate selected enteric viruses on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List were determined. Three-log reductions of echovirus 1, echovirus 11, coxsackievirus B3, coxsackievirus B5, poliovirus 1, and human adenovirus type 2 were effected by doses of 25, 20.5, 24.5, 27, 23, and 119 mW/cm2, respectively. Human adenovirus type 2 is the most UV light-resistant enteric virus reported to date.

  17. Comparative inactivation of enteroviruses and adenovirus 2 by UV light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, Charles P; Gramos, Dawn M; Nwachuku, Nena

    2002-10-01

    The doses of UV irradiation necessary to inactivate selected enteric viruses on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Contaminant Candidate List were determined. Three-log reductions of echovirus 1, echovirus 11, coxsackievirus B3, coxsackievirus B5, poliovirus 1, and human adenovirus type 2 were effected by doses of 25, 20.5, 24.5, 27, 23, and 119 mW/cm(2), respectively. Human adenovirus type 2 is the most UV light-resistant enteric virus reported to date.

  18. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  19. Local androgen inactivation in abdominal visceral adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Karine; Richard, Christian; Bélanger, Chantal; Dupont, Pierre; Daris, Marleen; Laberge, Philippe; Luu-The, Van; Tchernof, André

    2003-12-01

    We examined the expression and activity of two enzymes from the aldoketoreductase (AKR) family 1C, namely type 5 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD-5, AKR1C3) and type 3 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3alpha-HSD-3, AKR1C2) in female sc and omental adipose tissue and in preadipocyte primary cultures. 17beta-HSD-5 preferentially synthesizes testosterone from the inactive adrenal precursor androstenedione, whereas 3alpha-HSD-3 inactivates dihydrotestosterone. mRNAs of both enzymes were detected in adipose tissue from the omental and sc compartments. Real-time PCR quantification indicated a 3-fold higher 3alpha-HSD-3 expression compared with 17beta-HSD-5, and the expression of both enzymes tended to be higher in the sc vs. the omental depot. Accordingly, dose-response and time-course experiments performed in preadipocyte primary cultures indicated that 3alpha-HSD activity was higher than 17beta-HSD activity (13-fold maximum velocity difference). We measured 3alpha-HSD activity in omental and sc adipose tissue samples of 32 women for whom body composition and body fat distribution were evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and CT, respectively. We found that androgen inactivation in omental adipose tissue through 3alpha-HSD activity was significantly higher in women with elevated vs. low visceral adipose tissue accumulation (1.7-fold difference; P < 0.05). Moreover, omental adipose tissue 3alpha-HSD activity was positively and significantly associated with CT-measured visceral adipose tissue (r = 0.43; P < 0.02) and omental adipocyte diameter (r = 0.42; P < 0.02). These results indicate that local androgen inactivation is a predominant reaction in female abdominal adipose tissue, with the greatest conversion rates observed in the presence of abdominal visceral obesity. Increased androgen inactivation in omental adipose tissue of abdominally obese women may impact locally on the regulation of adipocyte metabolism.

  20. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Védy

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  1. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    on two differentially methylated restriction enzyme sites (HpaII) and a polymorphic repeat located within this locus. Although highly informative, this locus is not always sufficient to evaluate the X-inactivation status in X-linked disorders. We have identified three new loci that can be used...... to determine XCI patterns in a methylation-sensitive PCR-based assay. All three loci contain polymorphic repeats and a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (HpaII) site, methylation of which was shown to correlate with XCI. DNA from 60 females was used to estimate the heterozygosity of these new loci...

  2. Evidence for cyanide and mercury inactivation of endogenous plastocyanin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selman, B.R.; Johnson, G.L.; Giaquinta, R.T.; Dilley, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    Cyanide and mercury treatment of chloroplast membranes inactivates plastocyanin as shown by the inability of the extracted plastocyanin to restore electron transport in a bioassay on chloroplasts depleted of their endogenous plastocyanin by digitonin treatment. The extraction procedure did remove the enzyme from cyanide and mercury treated chloroplasts as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamine electrophoresis of the extracts. This procedure normally shows a plastocyanin band at 11,000 dalton molecular weight and the band was present in extracts from control and cyanide or mercury treated membranes. 22 references, 4 figures.

  3. Inactivation of E. Coli in Water Using Photocatalytic, Nanostructured Films Synthesized by Aerosol Routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratim Biswas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TiO2 nanostructured films were synthesized by an aerosol chemical vapor deposition (ACVD method with different controlled morphologies: columnar, granular, and branched structures for the photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli in water. Effects of film morphology and external applied voltage on inactivation rate were investigated. As-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and UV-VIS. Photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical inactivation of E. coli using as-prepared TiO2 films were performed under irradiation of UVA light (note: UVA has a low efficiency to inactivate E. coli. Inactivation rate constants for each case were obtained from their respective inactivation curve through a 2 h incubation period. Photocatalytic inactivation rate constants of E. coli are 0.02/min (using columnar films, and 0.08/min (using branched films. The inactivation rate constant for the columnar film was enhanced by 330% by applied voltage on the film while that for the branched film was increased only by 30%. Photocatalytic microbial inactivation rate of the columnar and the branched films were also compared taking into account their different surface areas. Since the majority of the UV radiation that reaches the Earth’s surface is UVA, this study provides an opportunity to use sunlight to efficiently decontaminate drinking water.

  4. Sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli in waste stabilization microcosms in a sahelian region (Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïga, Ynoussa; Denyigba, Kokou; Wethe, Joseph; Ouattara, Aboubakar Sidiki

    2009-02-09

    Experiments on sunlight inactivation of Escherichia coli were conducted from November 2006 to June 2007 in eight outdoors microcosms with different depths filled with maturation pond wastewater in order to determine pond depth influence on sunlight inactivation of E. coli. The long-term aim was to maximize sunlight inactivation of waterborne pathogens in waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) in sahelian regions where number of sunny days enable longer exposure of wastewater to sunlight. The inactivation was followed during daylight from 8.00 h to 17.00 h and during the night. Sunlight inactivation rates (K(S)), as a function of cumulative global solar radiation (insolation), were 16 and 24 times higher than the corresponding dark inactivation (K(D)) rates, respectively in cold and warm season. In warm season, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly. Inactivation of E. coli follows the evolution of radiation during the day. In shallow depth microcosms, E. coli was inactivated far more rapidly than in high depth microcosms. The physical chemical parameters [pH, dissolved oxygen (DO)] of microcosms water were higher in shallow depth microcosms than in high depth microcosms suggesting a synergistic effect of sunlight and these parameters to damage E. coli. To increase the efficiency of the elimination of waterborne bacteria, the use of maturation ponds with intermediate depths (0.4m) would be advisable in view of the high temperatures and thus evaporation recorded in sahelian regions.

  5. Inactivation of H1N1 viruses exposed to acidic ozone water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Han S.; Lee, Kwang H.; Seong, Baik L.

    2009-10-01

    The inactivation of H1N1 viruses upon exposure to acidic ozone water was investigated using chicken allantoic fluids of different dilutions, pH values, and initial ozone concentrations. The inactivation effect of the acidic ozone water was found to be stronger than the inactivation effect of the ozone water combined with the degree of acidity, indicating a synergic effect of acidity on ozone decay in water. It is also shown that acidic ozone water with a pH value of 4 or less is very effective means of virus inactivation if provided in conjunction with an ozone concentration of 20 mg/l or higher.

  6. A kinetic study of the suicide inactivation of an enzyme measured through coupling reactions. Application to the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano, J; Tudela, J; Garcia-Carmona, F; Garcia-Canovas, F

    1989-01-01

    A systematic procedure for the kinetic study of reaction mechanisms with enzyme inactivation induced by a suicide substrate in the presence or in the absence of an auxiliary substrate, when the enzyme activity is measured through coupling reactions, enzymically catalysed or not, was developed and analysed by using the transient-phase approach. The methodology is established to determine the parameters and kinetic constants corresponding to the enzyme suicide inactivation and the coupling reactions. This approach is illustrated by a study of the suicide inactivation of tyrosinase by catechol in the presence of L-proline. Treatment of the experimental data was carried out by non-linear regression. PMID:2508631

  7. Broad-spectrum antiemetic potential of the L-type calcium channel antagonist nifedipine and evidence for its additive antiemetic interaction with the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist palonosetron in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmani, Nissar A; Zhong, Weixia; Chebolu, Seetha; Vaezi, Mariam; Alkam, Tursun

    2014-01-05

    Cisplatin-like chemotherapeutics cause vomiting via release of multiple neurotransmitters (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT), or substance P (SP)) from the gastrointestinal enterochromaffin cells and/or the brainstem via a calcium dependent process. Diverse channels in the plasma membrane allow extracellular Ca(2+) entry into cells for the transmitter release process. Agonists of 5-HT3 receptors increase calcium influx through both 5-HT3 receptors and L-type Ca(2+) channels. We envisaged that L-type calcium agonists such as FPL 64176 should cause vomiting and corresponding antagonists such as nifedipine would behave as broad-spectrum antiemetics. Administration of FPL 64176 did cause vomiting in the least shrew in a dose-dependent fashion. Nifedipine and the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist palonosetron, potently suppressed FPL 64176-induced vomiting, while a combination of ineffective doses of these antagonists was more efficacious. Subsequently, we investigated the broad-spectrum antiemetic potential of nifedipine against diverse emetogens including agonists of serotonergic 5-HT3- (e.g. 5-HT or 2-Me-5-HT), SP tachykinin NK1- (GR73632), dopamine D2- (apomorphine or quinpirole), and cholinergic M1- (McN-A-343) receptors, as well as the non-specific emetogen, cisplatin. Nifedipine by itself suppressed vomiting in a potent and dose-dependent manner caused by the above emetogens except cisplatin. Moreover, low doses of nifedipine potentiated the antiemetic efficacy of non-effective or semi-effective doses of palonosetron against vomiting caused by either 2-Me-5-HT or cisplatin. Thus, our findings demonstrate that activation of L-type calcium channels causes vomiting, whereas blockade of these ion channels by nifedipine-like antagonists not only provides broad-spectrum antiemetic activity but can also potentiate the antiemetic efficacy of well-established antiemetics such as palonosetron. L-type calcium channel antagonists should also provide antiemetic activity against drug

  8. The Wnt Transcriptional Switch: TLE Removal or Inactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Aravinda-Bharathi; Sinha, Abhishek; Fan, Vinson B; Cadigan, Ken M

    2018-02-01

    Many targets of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway are regulated by TCF transcription factors, which play important roles in animal development, stem cell biology, and oncogenesis. TCFs can regulate Wnt targets through a "transcriptional switch," repressing gene expression in unstimulated cells and promoting transcription upon Wnt signaling. However, it is not clear whether this switch mechanism is a general feature of Wnt gene regulation or limited to a subset of Wnt targets. Co-repressors of the TLE family are known to contribute to the repression of Wnt targets in the absence of signaling, but how they are inactivated or displaced by Wnt signaling is poorly understood. In this mini-review, we discuss several recent reports that address the prevalence and molecular mechanisms of the Wnt transcription switch, including the finding of Wnt-dependent ubiquitination/inactivation of TLEs. Together, these findings highlight the growing complexity of the regulation of gene expression by the Wnt pathway. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Carbodiimide Inactivation of MMPs and Effect on Dentin Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, A.; Apolonio, F.M.; Saboia, V.P.A.; Santi, S.; Angeloni, V.; Checchi, V.; Curci, R.; Di Lenarda, R.; Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.; Breschi, L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. PMID:24334409

  10. Doc toxin is a kinase that inactivates elongation factor Tu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W; Rothenbacher, Francesca P; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S; Dunham, Christine M; Woychik, Nancy A

    2014-03-14

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site.

  11. Doc Toxin Is a Kinase That Inactivates Elongation Factor Tu*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jonathan W.; Rothenbacher, Francesca P.; Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Lane, William S.; Dunham, Christine M.; Woychik, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The Doc toxin from bacteriophage P1 (of the phd-doc toxin-antitoxin system) has served as a model for the family of Doc toxins, many of which are harbored in the genomes of pathogens. We have shown previously that the mode of action of this toxin is distinct from the majority derived from toxin-antitoxin systems: it does not cleave RNA; in fact P1 Doc expression leads to mRNA stabilization. However, the molecular triggers that lead to translation arrest are not understood. The presence of a Fic domain, albeit slightly altered in length and at the catalytic site, provided a clue to the mechanism of P1 Doc action, as most proteins with this conserved domain inactivate GTPases through addition of an adenylyl group (also referred to as AMPylation). We demonstrated that P1 Doc added a single phosphate group to the essential translation elongation factor and GTPase, elongation factor (EF)-Tu. The phosphorylation site was at a highly conserved threonine, Thr-382, which was blocked when EF-Tu was treated with the antibiotic kirromycin. Therefore, we have established that Fic domain proteins can function as kinases. This distinct enzymatic activity exhibited by P1 Doc also solves the mystery of the degenerate Fic motif unique to the Doc family of toxins. Moreover, we have established that all characterized Fic domain proteins, even those that phosphorylate, target pivotal GTPases for inactivation through a post-translational modification at a single functionally critical acceptor site. PMID:24448800

  12. Physicochemical stability and inactivation of human and simian rotaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Z.D.; Birch, C.; Heath, R.; Gust, I.

    1987-04-01

    The effects of various physical and chemical treatments on the stability of a human serotype 1 rotavirus and simian agent 11 (SA11) were compared by using a fluorescence focus assay. The infectivity of both strains was retained after storage at room temperature for 14 days, 4 degree C for 22 days, and -20 degree C for 32 days; lyophilization; and treatment at pH 3 to 11. Both viruses were inactivated at pH 12, as was the human virus at pH 2, although this pH resulted in only partial inactivation of SA11. The human virus also appeared to be more sensitive than SA11 to the action of ether and chloroform. The infectivity of both viruses was lost after UV irradiation for 15 min and after treatment with 8% formaldehyde for 5 min, 70% (vol/vol) ethanol for 30 min, and 2% lysol, 2% phenol, and 1% H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ for 1 h each.

  13. Standardisation of inactivated influenza vaccines-Learning from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John M; Weir, Jerry P

    2018-03-01

    The single radial immunodiffusion assay has been the accepted method for determining the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines since 1978. The worldwide adoption of this assay for vaccine standardisation was facilitated through collaborative studies that demonstrated a high level of reproducibility and its applicability to the different types of influenza vaccine being produced at that time. Clinical evidence indicated the relevance of SRID as a potency assay. Unique features of the SRID assay are likely responsible for its longevity even as newer technologies for vaccine characterisation have been developed and refined. Nevertheless, there are significant limitations to the SRID assay that indicate the need for improvement, and there has been a substantial amount of work undertaken in recent years to develop and evaluate alternative potency assays, including collaborative studies involving research laboratories, regulatory agencies and vaccine manufacturers. Here, we provide an overview of the history of inactivated influenza vaccine potency testing, the current state of alternative assay development and the some of the major challenges to be overcome before implementation of new assays for potency determination. © 2018 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Inactivation of enveloped viruses by anthraquinones extracted from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydiskis, R J; Owen, D G; Lohr, J L; Rosler, K H; Blomster, R N

    1991-01-01

    To determine the extent of antiviral activity present in a number of plant extracts, hot glycerin extracts were prepared from Rheum officinale, Aloe barbadensis, Rhamnus frangula, Rhamnus purshianus, and Cassia angustifolia and their virucidal effects were tested against herpes simplex virus type 1. All the plant extracts inactivated the virus. The active components in these plants were separated by thin-layer chromatography and identified as anthraquinones. A purified sample of aloe emodin was prepared from aloin, and its effects on the infectivity of herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2, varicella-zoster virus, pseudorabies virus, influenza virus, adenovirus, and rhinovirus were tested by mixing virus with dilutions of aloe emodin for 15 min at 37 degrees C, immediately diluting the sample, and assaying the amount of infectious virus remaining in the sample. The results showed that aloe emodin inactivated all of the viruses tested except adenovirus and rhinovirus. Electron microscopic examination of anthraquinone-treated herpes simplex virus demonstrated that the envelopes were partially disrupted. These results show that anthraquinones extracted from a variety of plants are directly virucidal to enveloped viruses. PMID:1810179

  15. Inactivation of VHSV by infiltration and salt under experimental conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Jørgensen, Claus; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by infiltration. To evaluate the inactivation effect of infiltration on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid...... be a valuable method to sanitize VHSV infected water. Changes in temperature, pH, earth types in the area used for infiltration etc. may change the virus reduction, though. As some of the fish cutting plants are also smoking rainbow trout fillets, the question arose whether a brine solution will inactivate VHSV....... In order to answer this question a small trial was set up. VHSV and NaCl was added to cell culture medium with 10% foetal bovine serum, in order to mimic a “dirty” environment, to obtain from 1.9% to 20.9% NaCl and kept in the dark at 4°C. Samples were titrated after 5 min, 1 h and 20 h. No reduction...

  16. Inactivation of VHSV by Percolation and Salt Under Experimental Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Jørgensen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    At the moment the only legal method in Denmark to sanitize wastewater from fish cutting plants is by percolation. To evaluate the inactivation effect of percolation on VHSV an experimental examination was initiated. A column packed with gravel as top- and bottom layer (total of 22 cm) and a mid...... method to sanitize VHSV infected water. Changes in temperature, pH, earth types in the area used for percolation etc. may change the virus reduction, though. As some of the fish cutting plants are also smoking rainbow trout fillets, the question arose whether a brine solution will inactivate VHSV....... In order to answer this question a small trial was set up. VHSV and NaCl was added to cell culture medium with 10% foetal bovine serum, in order to mimic a “dirty” environment, to obtain from 1.9% to 20.9% NaCl and kept in the dark at 4°C. Samples were titrated after 5 min, 1 h and 20 h. No reduction...

  17. [Inactivated poliovirus vaccines: an inevitable choice for eliminating poliomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, J D; Jean-Denis, Shu

    2016-12-06

    The inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) is a very old tool in the fight against poliomyelitis. Though supplanted by oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV) in the 1960s and 1970s, the IPV has now become an inevitable choice because of the increasingly recognized risks associated with continuous use of OPVs. Following the pioneering work of Jonas Salk, who established key principles for the IPV, considerable experience has accumulated over the years. This work has led to modern Salk IPV-containing vaccines, based on the use of inactivated wildtype polioviruses, which have been deployed for routine use in many countries. Very good protection against paralysis is achieved with IPV through the presence of circulating antibodies able to neutralize virus infectivity toward motor neurons. In addition, with IPV, a variable degree of protection against mucosal infection (and therefore transmission) through mucosal antibodies and immune cells is achieved, depending on previous exposure of subjects to wildtype or vaccine polioviruses. The use of an IPV-followed-by-OPV sequential immunization schedule has the potential advantage of eliminating the vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP) risk, while limiting the risks of vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPVs). Sabin strain-derived IPVs are new tools, only recently beginning to be deployed, and data are being generated to document their performance. IPVs will play an irreplaceable role in global eradication of polio.

  18. Randomized Trials Comparing Inactivated Vaccine after Medium- or High-titer Measles Vaccine with Standard Titer Measles Vaccine after Inactivated Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaby, Peter; Ravn, Henrik; Benn, Christine S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Observational studies have suggested that girls have higher mortality if their most recent immunization is an inactivated vaccine rather than a live vaccine. We therefore reanalyzed 5 randomized trials of early measles vaccine (MV) in which it was possible to compare an inactivated......) compared with a standard titer MV (after inactivated vaccine). Girls had a MRR of 1.89 (1.27-2.80), whereas there was no effect for boys, the sex-differential effect being significant (P = 0.02). Excluding measles cases did not alter these conclusions, the MRR after inactivated vaccines (after MTMV or HTMV......) being 1.40 (1.06-1.86) higher overall and 1.92 (1.29-2.86) for girls. Control for variations in national immunization schedules for other vaccines did not modify these results. Conclusions: After 9 months of age, all children had been immunized against measles, and mortality in girls was higher when...

  19. Inactivation of soybean trypsin inhibitors and lipoxygenases by high-pressure processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, van der C.; Matser, A.M.; Berg, van den R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors (TIA), one of the antinutritional factors of soy milk, are usually inactivated by heat treatment. In the current study, high-pressure processing (HPP) was evaluated as an alternative for the inactivation of TIA in soy milk. Moreover, the effect of HPP on lipoxygenase (LOX) in

  20. Effect of rising time of rectangular pulse on inactivation of staphylococcus aureus by pulsed electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Liang, Dapeng; Xiao, Jianfu; Mo, Mengbin; Li, Jing; Zheng, Nanchen

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) is a novel non-thermal food processing technology that involves the electric discharge of high voltage short pulses through the food product. In PEF study, rectangular pulses are most commonly used for inactivating microorganisms. However, little information is available on the inactivation effect of rising time of rectangular pulse. In this paper, inactivation effects, electric field strength, treatment time and conductivity on staphylococcus aureus inactivation were investigated when the pulse rising time is reduced from 2.5 μs to 200 ns. Experimental results showed that inactivation effect of PEF increased with electric field strength, solution conductivity and treatment time. Rising time of the rectangular pulse had a significant effect on the inactivation of staphylococcus aureus. Rectangular pulses with a rising time of 200 ns had a better inactivation effect than that with 2 μs. In addition, temperature increase of the solution treated by pulses with 200 ns rising time was lower than that with 2 μs. In order to obtain a given inactivation effect, treatment time required for the rectangular pulse with 200 ns rise time was shorter than that with 2 μs.

  1. In vivo inactivation of peroxisomal alcohol oxidase in Hansenula polymorpha by KCN is an irreversible process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klei, Ida J. van der; Veenhuis, Marten; Nicolay, Klaas; Harder, Willem

    1988-01-01

    The fate of alcohol oxidase (AO) in chemostat-grown cells of Hansenula polymorpha, after its inactivation by KCN, was studied during subsequent cultivation of the cyanide-treated cells in fresh methanol media. Biochemical experiments showed that the cyanide-induced inactivation of AO was due to the

  2. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by superoxide radicals and their dismutation products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmen, J.J. van; Meuling, W.J.A.

    1977-01-01

    E. coli cells are inactivated by the products of the reaction between dialuric acid and oxygen, of which the primary product is superoxide. The rate of inactivation is decreased by superoxide dismutase, by catalase, and by EDTA, whereas it is increased by addition of cupric ions or hydrogen

  3. Radiation-induced inactivation of bovine liver catalase in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebicka, L.; Metodiewa, D.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-induced inactivation of catalase by . OH/H . radicals was studied. It was found that inactivation yield of catalase depended on the dose. Optical spectrum of irradiated catalase showed that no redox processes in active site of enzyme occurred as a result of . OH/H . interaction. (author) 19 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Impact of Inactivated Extracellular Proteases on the Modified Flagellin Type III Secretion Pathway of Bacillus halodurans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Eldie; du Plessis, Erika; Gerber, Isak; Crampton, Michael; Nxumalo, Nolwandle; Louw, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    The flagellin type III secretion pathway of Bacillus halodurans BhFC01 (Δhag) was modified by the inactivation of fliD. An in-frame flagellin gene fusion polypeptide construct was expressed, and the heterologous peptides were secreted as flagellin fusion monomers. The stability of the secreted monomers was significantly enhanced through gene-targeted inactivation of extracellular proteases.

  5. Effect of rising time of rectangular pulse on inactivation of staphylococcus aureus by pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruobing; Liang, Dapeng; Zheng, Nanchen; Xiao, Jianfu; Mo, Mengbin; Li, Jing

    2013-03-01

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) is a novel non-thermal food processing technology that involves the electric discharge of high voltage short pulses through the food product. In PEF study, rectangular pulses are most commonly used for inactivating microorganisms. However, little information is available on the inactivation effect of rising time of rectangular pulse. In this paper, inactivation effects, electric field strength, treatment time and conductivity on staphylococcus aureus inactivation were investigated when the pulse rising time is reduced from 2.5 μs to 200 ns. Experimental results showed that inactivation effect of PEF increased with electric field strength, solution conductivity and treatment time. Rising time of the rectangular pulse had a significant effect on the inactivation of staphylococcus aureus. Rectangular pulses with a rising time of 200 ns had a better inactivation effect than that with 2 μs. In addition, temperature increase of the solution treated by pulses with 200 ns rising time was lower than that with 2 μs. In order to obtain a given inactivation effect, treatment time required for the rectangular pulse with 200 ns rise time was shorter than that with 2 μs.

  6. Modelling fungal solid-state fermentation: The role of inactivation kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.P.; Sonsbeek, H.M. van; Knol, W.; Tramper, J.; Geelhoed, W.; Peeters, M.; Rinzema, A.

    1999-01-01

    The theoretical mathematical models described in this paper are used to evaluate the effects of fungal biomass inactivation kinetics on a non- isothermal tray solid-state fermentation (SSF). The inactivation kinetics, derived from previously reported experiments done under isothermal conditions and

  7. Inactivation of factor Xia in vivo: studies in chimpanzees and in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuillemin, W. A.; Hack, C. E.; Bleeker, W. K.; Biemond, B. J.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; ten Cate, H.

    1996-01-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1Inh), antithrombin III (ATIII), alpha 1-antitrypsin (a1AT), and alpha 2-antiplasmin (a2AP) are known inhibitors of factor XIa (FXIa). However, their precise contribution to FXIa inactivation in vivo is not known. We investigated FXIa inactivation in chimpanzees and assessed the

  8. The influence of catechol structure on the suicide-inactivation of tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Christopher A; Stratford, Michael R L; Riley, Patrick A

    2009-09-07

    3,6-Difluorocatechol, which cannot act as a monooxygenase tyrosinase substrate, is an oxidase substrate, and, in contrast to other catechols, oxidation does not lead to suicide-inactivation, providing experimental evidence for an inactivation mechanism involving reductive elimination of Cu(0) from the active site.

  9. Page 1 Effect of Detergents on the Activity and Inactivation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of Detergents on the Activity and Inactivation of Invertase 225. SUMMARY. 1. Detergents are shown to decrease the activity of sucrase. 2. The cationic detergents are found to be more effective than the anionic detergents. 3. The critical pH region of inactivation of sucrase is found to shift to higher pH values in the ...

  10. The impact of atmospheric cold plasma treatment on inactivation of lipase and lipoxygenase of wheat germs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolouie, Haniye; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin; Ghomi, Hamid

    2018-01-01

    to higher inactivation, however, the inactivation of lipase and lipoxygenase was not significant after 25 min treatment time. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic of treated samples did not change significantly compared to controlled samples. However lipase and lipoxygenase recovered some...

  11. The inactivating and mutagenic effect of hydroxylamine on bacteriophage φX174

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, J.H. van de; Arkel, G.A. van

    1965-01-01

    The inactivation of bacteriophage ΦXI74 by the mutagenic agents nitrous acid and ultraviolet irradiation proceeds according to a single-hit kinetics. However, treatment of purified ΦXI74 by hydroxylamine (HA) at pH 6 and 25° results in an inactivation that is not strictly exponential. The

  12. ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT FOR INACTIVATING HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) light from a low-pressure source to determine log inactivation versus applied fluence. Results indicate that H. pylori is readily inactivated at UV fluences typically used in water treatment r...

  13. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen beta-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries-Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  14. The non-enzymatic inactivation of thirteen β-lactam antibiotics in human faeces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, G; Weissing, F; de Vries Hospers, H; Tonk, R; van der Waaij, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain a method that could predict the in vitro inactivation of an antibiotic in the digestive tract, the non-enzymatic inactivation of 13 beta-lactam antibiotics by human faeces was investigated. Benzylpenicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cloxacillin, piperacillin,

  15. Super-oxidized water inactivates major viruses circulating in swine farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianing; Zhang, Chengyu; Liu, Yue; Liu, Guangliang

    2017-04-01

    Disinfectant is commonly employed to eliminate infectious agents and prevent its transmission. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of Medilox ® super-oxidized water on inactivating veterinary viruses mainly circulating in swine farms. The results demonstrated that this super-oxidized water could effectively inactivate porcine viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A CACNA1C variant associated with reduced voltage-dependent inactivation, increased CaV1.2 channel window current, and arrhythmogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A Hennessey

    Full Text Available Mutations in CACNA1C that increase current through the CaV1.2 L-type Ca2+ channel underlie rare forms of long QT syndrome (LQTS, and Timothy syndrome (TS. We identified a variant in CACNA1C in a male child of Filipino descent with arrhythmias and extracardiac features by candidate gene sequencing and performed functional expression studies to electrophysiologically characterize the effects of the variant on CaV1.2 channels. As a baby, the subject developed seizures and displayed developmental delays at 30 months of age. At age 5 years, he displayed a QTc of 520 ms and experienced recurrent VT. Physical exam at 17 years of age was notable for microcephaly, short stature, lower extremity weakness and atrophy with hyperreflexia, spastic diplegia, multiple dental caries and episodes of rhabdomyolysis. Candidate gene sequencing identified a G>C transversion at position 5731 of CACNA1C (rs374528680 predicting a glycine>arginine substitution at residue 1911 (p.G1911R of CaV1.2. The allele frequency of this variant is 0.01 in Malays, but absent in 984 Caucasian alleles and in the 1000 genomes project. In electrophysiological analyses, the variant decreased voltage-dependent inactivation, thus causing a gain of function of CaV1.2. We also observed a negative shift of V1/2 of activation and positive shift of V1/2 of channel inactivation, resulting in an increase of the window current. Together, these suggest a gain-of-function effect on CaV1.2 and suggest increased susceptibility for arrhythmias in certain clinical settings. The p.G1911R variant was also identified in a case of sudden unexplained infant death (SUID, for which an increasing number of clinical observations have demonstrated can be associated with arrhythmogenic mutations in cardiac ion channels. In summary, the combined effects of the CACNA1C variant to diminish voltage-dependent inactivation of CaV1.2 and increase window current expand our appreciation of mechanisms by which a gain of

  17. Growth and inactivation of Salmonella at low refrigerated storage temperatures and thermal inactivation on raw chicken meat and laboratory media: mixed effect meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadi, Hanan; Sargeant, Jan M; Shannon, Harry S; Raina, Parminder

    2012-12-01

    Growth and inactivation regression equations were developed to describe the effects of temperature on Salmonella concentration on chicken meat for refrigerated temperatures (⩽10°C) and for thermal treatment temperatures (55-70°C). The main objectives were: (i) to compare Salmonella growth/inactivation in chicken meat versus laboratory media; (ii) to create regression equations to estimate Salmonella growth in chicken meat that can be used in quantitative risk assessment (QRA) modeling; and (iii) to create regression equations to estimate D-values needed to inactivate Salmonella in chicken meat. A systematic approach was used to identify the articles, critically appraise them, and pool outcomes across studies. Growth represented in density (Log10CFU/g) and D-values (min) as a function of temperature were modeled using hierarchical mixed effects regression models. The current meta-analysis analysis found a significant difference (P⩽0.05) between the two matrices - chicken meat and laboratory media - for both growth at refrigerated temperatures and inactivation by thermal treatment. Growth and inactivation were significantly influenced by temperature after controlling for other variables; however, no consistent pattern in growth was found. Validation of growth and inactivation equations against data not used in their development is needed. Copyright © 2012 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  19. Inactivation disinfection property of Moringa Oleifera seed extract: optimization and kinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, M. A.; Jami, M. S.; Hammed, A. M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the statistical optimization study of disinfection inactivation parameters of defatted Moringa oleifera seed extract on Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial cells. Three level factorial design was used to estimate the optimum range and the kinetics of the inactivation process was also carried. The inactivation process involved comparing different disinfection models of Chicks-Watson, Collins-Selleck and Homs models. The results from analysis of variance (ANOVA) of the statistical optimization process revealed that only contact time was significant. The optimum disinfection range of the seed extract was 125 mg/L, 30 minutes and 120rpm agitation. At the optimum dose, the inactivation kinetics followed the Collin-Selleck model with coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.6320. This study is the first of its kind in determining the inactivation kinetics of pseudomonas aeruginosa using the defatted seed extract.

  20. Rapid Bedside Inactivation of Ebola Virus for Safe Nucleic Acid Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe; Karlberg, Helen; Bragstad, Karoline

    2016-01-01

    Rapid bedside inactivation of Ebola virus would be a solution for the safety of medical and technical staff, risk containment, sample transport, and high-throughput or rapid diagnostic testing during an outbreak. We show that the commercially available Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer used...... for nucleic acid extraction inactivates Ebola virus. A rapid bedside inactivation method for nucleic acid tests is obtained by simply adding Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer directly into vacuum blood collection EDTA tubes using a thin needle and syringe prior to sampling. The ready-to-use inactivation vacuum...... tubes are stable for more than 4 months, and Ebola virus RNA is preserved in the Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer for at least 5 weeks independent of the storage temperature. We also show that Ebola virus RNA can be manually extracted from Magna Pure lysis/binding buffer-inactivated samples using...

  1. Distinct molecular sites of anaesthetic action: pentobarbital block of human brain sodium channels is alleviated by removal of fast inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wartenberg, H. C.; Urban, B. W.; Duch, D. S.

    1999-01-01

    Fast inactivation of sodium channel function is modified by anaesthetics. Its quantitative contribution to the overall anaesthetic effect is assessed by removing the fast inactivation mechanism enzymatically. Sodium channels from human brain cortex were incorporated into planar lipid bilayers. After

  2. Nanoscale Structural and Mechanical Analysis of Bacillus anthracis Spores Inactivated with Rapid Dry Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, Daniel L.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2014-01-01

    Effective killing of Bacillus anthracis spores is of paramount importance to antibioterrorism, food safety, environmental protection, and the medical device industry. Thus, a deeper understanding of the mechanisms of spore resistance and inactivation is highly desired for developing new strategies or improving the known methods for spore destruction. Previous studies have shown that spore inactivation mechanisms differ considerably depending upon the killing agents, such as heat (wet heat, dry heat), UV, ionizing radiation, and chemicals. It is believed that wet heat kills spores by inactivating critical enzymes, while dry heat kills spores by damaging their DNA. Many studies have focused on the biochemical aspects of spore inactivation by dry heat; few have investigated structural damages and changes in spore mechanical properties. In this study, we have inactivated Bacillus anthracis spores with rapid dry heating and performed nanoscale topographical and mechanical analysis of inactivated spores using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in spore morphology and nanomechanical properties after heat inactivation. In addition, we also found that these changes were different under different heating conditions that produced similar inactivation probabilities (high temperature for short exposure time versus low temperature for long exposure time). We attributed the differences to the differential thermal and mechanical stresses in the spore. The buildup of internal thermal and mechanical stresses may become prominent only in ultrafast, high-temperature heat inactivation when the experimental timescale is too short for heat-generated vapor to efficiently escape from the spore. Our results thus provide direct, visual evidences of the importance of thermal stresses and heat and mass transfer to spore inactivation by very rapid dry heating. PMID:24375142

  3. Disulfiram as a novel inactivator of Giardia lamblia triosephosphate isomerase with antigiardial potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Castillo-Villanueva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardiasis, the infestation of the intestinal tract by Giardia lamblia, is one of the most prevalent parasitosis worldwide. Even though effective therapies exist for it, the problems associated with its use indicate that new therapeutic options are needed. It has been shown that disulfiram eradicates trophozoites in vitro and is effective in vivo in a murine model of giardiasis; disulfiram inactivation of carbamate kinase by chemical modification of an active site cysteine has been proposed as the drug mechanism of action. The triosephosphate isomerase from G. lamblia (GlTIM has been proposed as a plausible target for the development of novel antigiardial pharmacotherapies, and chemical modification of its cysteine 222 (C222 by thiol-reactive compounds is evidenced to inactivate the enzyme. Since disulfiram is a cysteine modifying agent and GlTIM can be inactivated by modification of C222, in this work we tested the effect of disulfiram over the recombinant and trophozoite-endogenous GlTIM. The results show that disulfiram inactivates GlTIM by modification of its C222. The inactivation is species-specific since disulfiram does not affect the human homologue enzyme. Disulfiram inactivation induces only minor conformational changes in the enzyme, but substantially decreases its stability. Recombinant and endogenous GlTIM inactivates similarly, indicating that the recombinant protein resembles the natural enzyme. Disulfiram induces loss of trophozoites viability and inactivation of intracellular GlTIM at similar rates, suggesting that both processes may be related. It is plausible that the giardicidal effect of disulfiram involves the inactivation of more than a single enzyme, thus increasing its potential for repurposing it as an antigiardial drug. Keywords: Giardiasis, Drug repurposing, Neglected disease, Recombinant protein, Enzyme inactivation

  4. Inactivation of Ascaris eggs in water using sequential solar driven photo-Fenton and free chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandala, Erick R; González, Liliana; Sanchez-Salas, Jose Luis; Castillo, Jordana H

    2012-03-01

    Sequential helminth egg inactivation using a solar driven advanced oxidation process (AOP) followed by chlorine was achieved. The photo-assisted Fenton process was tested alone under different H(2)O(2) and/or Fe(II) concentrations to assess its ability to inactivate Ascaris suum eggs. The effect of free chlorine alone was also tested. The lowest egg inactivation results were found using Fe(II) or H(2)O(2) separately (5 and 140 mmol L(-1), respectively) in dark conditions, which showed about 28% inactivation of helminth eggs. By combining Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) at the same concentrations described earlier, 55% of helminth egg inactivation was achieved. By increasing the reagent's concentration two-fold, 83% egg inactivation was achieved after 120 min of reaction time. Process efficiency was enhanced by solar excitation. Using solar disinfection only, the A. suum eggs inactivation reached was the lowest observed (58% egg inactivation after 120 min (120 kJ L(-1))), compared with tests using the photo-Fenton process. The use of the photo-Fenton reaction enhanced the process up to over 99% of egg inactivation after 120 kJ L(-1) when the highest Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) concentration was tested. Practically no effect on the helminth eggs was observed with free chlorine alone after 550 mg min L(-1) was used. Egg inactivation in the range of 25-30% was obtained for sequential processes (AOP then chlorine) using about 150 mg min L(-1).

  5. Mechanism-based Enzyme Inactivators of Phytosterol Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. David Nes

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Current progress on the mechanism and substrate recognition by sterol methyl transferase (SMT, the role of mechanism-based inactivators, other inhibitors of SMT action to probe catalysis and phytosterol synthesis is reported. SMT is a membrane-bound enzyme which catalyzes the coupled C-methylation-deprotonation reaction of sterol acceptor molecules generating the 24-alkyl sterol side chains of fungal ergosterol and plant sitosterol. This C-methylation step can be rate-limiting in the post-lanosterol (fungal or post-cycloartenol (plant pathways. A series of sterol analogs designed to impair SMT activity irreversibly have provided deep insight into the C-methylation reaction and topography of the SMT active site and as reviewed provide leads for the development of antifungal agents.

  6. Experience of vaccination with inactivated poliomyelitis vaccines in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnadóttir, M

    1981-01-01

    Iceland, as a few other European countries, has used inactivated vaccine against poliomyelitis from the beginning in 1956. No cases of paralytic polio occurred since 1960. For 17 years neither isolations of poliovirus nor suspected cases of the clinical disease have been recorded. Studies on neutralizing antibodies in sera of vaccinees were not too encouraging after 4 injections. A 5th vaccination of IPV was therefore given to those children who lacked antibodies to any type of poliovirus. One month after the 5th injection 70% had antibodies against all 3 types of poliovirus and only 2% lacked antibodies against both types 1 and 3. In countries where no virus to boost immunity exists any longer during the life of an individual it may be necessary to secure booster effects at regular intervals after primary vaccination and later in life. This will be included in the vaccination schedule against polio in Iceland.

  7. Conformation regulation of the X chromosome inactivation center: a model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scialdone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available X-Chromosome Inactivation (XCI is the process whereby one, randomly chosen X becomes transcriptionally silenced in female cells. XCI is governed by the Xic, a locus on the X encompassing an array of genes which interact with each other and with key molecular factors. The mechanism, though, establishing the fate of the X's, and the corresponding alternative modifications of the Xic architecture, is still mysterious. In this study, by use of computer simulations, we explore the scenario where chromatin conformations emerge from its interaction with diffusing molecular factors. Our aim is to understand the physical mechanisms whereby stable, non-random conformations are established on the Xic's, how complex architectural changes are reliably regulated, and how they lead to opposite structures on the two alleles. In particular, comparison against current experimental data indicates that a few key cis-regulatory regions orchestrate the organization of the Xic, and that two major molecular regulators are involved.

  8. Studies on ultraviolet inactivation of air-borne microorganisms, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Shin-ichi; Doi, Hitoshi; Yamayoshi, Takao; Nunoura, Masako; Tatsumi, Noriyuki.

    1989-01-01

    UV(254nm) inactivation of air-borne bacteria in an air-controlling apparatus was studied. The appratus was composed of a chamber for vaporizing a bacterial suspension and an irradiation duct equipped with an UV lamp(GL-30). The bacterial which passed through the irradiation duct impinged on a petri dish by an air slit sampler. Selected bacteria for the experiment were Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, Sarcina lutea and Bacillus subtilis(spores). The apparatus was useful for the study of the susceptibility of air-borne bacteria to UV radiation. UV dose necessary to inhibit colony formation in 90% of individual bacteria in the controlled air was as low as 27 to 35% of the dose required for the agar plate method. (author)

  9. Inactivation of clay-associated bacteriophage MS-2 by chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, C H; Wallis, C; Ward, C H

    1977-01-01

    The model system consisted of bacteriophage MS-2, bentonite clay, and hypochlorous acid (HOC1). Factors that influenced association of the bacterial virus with bentonite were the titer of unadsorbed viruses, clay concentration, cation concentration, temperature, stirring rate, and the presence of soluble organics. Variation of the kinetic adsorption rate constant with stirring speed indicates that phage attachment is a diffusion-limited process; the attachment reaction has an apparent activation energy of 1 kcal/mol. About 18% of clay-associated bacteriophages was recovered by mixing the suspension with an organic eluent. Inactivation data were obtained from batch reactors operated under those conditions in which loss of HOC1 was minimal during the reaction. Bacteriophages attached to clay were more resistant to HOC1 than were freely suspended phages; for equivalent HOC1 concentrations, clay-associated phages required about twice the time that freely suspended phages required for loss of 99% of the initial virus titer. PMID:192148

  10. Inactivation of poliovirus by gamma irradiation of wastewater sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupert, N; Burgi, E; Scolaro, L

    1999-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on poliovirus infectivity seeded in sludge samples was investigated in order to determine the radiation dose required to inactivate 90% of viral infectivity (D10). Sludges were obtained from anaerobic pretreated sewages produced by San Felipe, a wastewater treatment facility located at the Tucuman province, Argentina. A D10 of 3.34 kGy was determined for poliovirus type III, Sabin strain, suspended in sludge samples. This value dropped to 1.92 kGy when the virus was suspended in water. A virucidal effect associated to sludges was also demonstrated. These results will be of interest when considering the dose of gamma radiation to be applied to wastewater sludges in order to preserve the environment from viral contamination.

  11. Inactivation of chloramphenicol and florfenicol by a novel chloramphenicol hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Weixin; Lee, Myung Hwan; Wu, Jing; Kim, Nam Hee; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Chung, Eunsook; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2012-09-01

    Chloramphenicol and florfenicol are broad-spectrum antibiotics. Although the bacterial resistance mechanisms to these antibiotics have been well documented, hydrolysis of these antibiotics has not been reported in detail. This study reports the hydrolysis of these two antibiotics by a specific hydrolase that is encoded by a gene identified from a soil metagenome. Hydrolysis of chloramphenicol has been recognized in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a chloramphenicol acetate esterase gene, estDL136. A hydrolysate of chloramphenicol was identified as p-nitrophenylserinol by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The hydrolysis of these antibiotics suggested a promiscuous amidase activity of EstDL136. When estDL136 was expressed in E. coli, EstDL136 conferred resistance to both chloramphenicol and florfenicol on E. coli, due to their inactivation. In addition, E. coli carrying estDL136 deactivated florfenicol faster than it deactivated chloramphenicol, suggesting that EstDL136 hydrolyzes florfenicol more efficiently than it hydrolyzes chloramphenicol. The nucleotide sequences flanking estDL136 encode proteins such as amidohydrolase, dehydrogenase/reductase, major facilitator transporter, esterase, and oxidase. The most closely related genes are found in the bacterial family Sphingomonadaceae, which contains many bioremediation-related strains. Whether the gene cluster with estDL136 in E. coli is involved in further chloramphenicol degradation was not clear in this study. While acetyltransferases for chloramphenicol resistance and drug exporters for chloramphenicol or florfenicol resistance are often detected in numerous microbes, this is the first report of enzymatic hydrolysis of florfenicol resulting in inactivation of the antibiotic.

  12. Inactivation of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis in cows' milk at pasteurization temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, I R; Ball, H J; Neill, S D; Rowe, M T

    1996-02-01

    The thermal inactivation of 11 strains of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis at pasteurization temperatures was investigated. Cows' milk inoculated with M. paratuberculosis at two levels (10(7) and 10(4) CFU/ml) was pasteurized in the laboratory by (i) a standard holder method (63.5 degrees C for 30 min) and (ii) a high-temperature, short-time (HTST) method (71.7 degrees C for 15 s). Additional heating times of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 40 min at 63.5 degrees C were included to enable the construction of a thermal death curve for the organism. Viability after pasteurization was assessed by culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium containing mycobactin J (HEYM) and in BACTEC Middlebrook 12B radiometric medium supplemented with mycobactin J and sterile egg yolk emulsion. Confirmation of acid-fast survivors of pasteurization as viable M. paratuberculosis cells was achieved by subculture on HEYM to indicate viability coupled with PCR using M. paratuberculosis-specific 1S900 primers. When milk was initially inoculated with 10(6) to 10(7) CFU of M. paratuberculosis per ml, M. paratuberculosis cells were isolated from 27 of 28 (96%) and 29 of 34 (85%) pasteurized milk samples heat treated by the holder and HTST methods, respectively. Correspondingly, when 10(3) to 10(4) CFU of M. paratuberculosis per ml of milk were present before heat treatment, M. paratuberculosis cells were isolated from 14 of 28 (50%) and 19 of 33 (58%) pasteurized milk samples heat treated by the holder and HTST methods, respectively. The thermal death curve for M. paratuberculosis was concave in shape, exhibiting a rapid initial death rate followed by significant "tailing." Results indicate that when large numbers of M. paratuberculosis cells are present in milk, the organism may not be completely inactivated by heat treatments simulating holder and HTST pasteurization under laboratory conditions.

  13. Porinas as an adyuvant of inactivated Newcastle vaccine in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bustos M.

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Three groups of 25 broilers were vaccinated on two opportunities by aerosol using inactivated NC (Newcastle virus and different helper concentrations of porinas (20 ìg, 50 ìg, 125 ìg. A fourth group was injected with live B1 virus (12 and 28 days of age nasally. The NC inactivated virus (La Sota strain was concentrated 10 times with PEG with a final titer of 1:2.056. Twenty serums for each group were taken in order to evaluate NC antibodies using the HI and double immuno-difusion tests for IgA detection at 1, 12, 28 and 42 days of age. During the study the chickens were on a restricted diet in order to control ascites (2.640 mosl. On day 42, two broilers of the fourth group (live virus presented ascites and 1 broiler of group 1 presented lung edema (20 ìg. The geometric mean for NC antibodies titers at 42 days of age was 2 in the groups 1,2,3 and 5.7 in the group 4 (Log 2. For IgA, 180 mg/dl, 135 mg/dl, 120 mg/dl and 176 mg/dl respectively. Three broilers of each group were challenged with a pathogenic strain of NC, at 42 day of age, without signs of disease after 72 hours when the positive control group was dead. Gross and microscopic lesions were not detected in the bursa of Fabricius or thymo. [thymo sounds like short hand for something that should be properly named.] Very good animal weight, conversion and efficiency results were observed in all the groups. New studies using a fixed dose of porinas, larger numbers of broilers and the establishment of protective levels of IgA against NC challenge are recommended.

  14. Inactivation of Wolbachia Reveals Its Biological Roles in Whitefly Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xia; Li, Shao-Jian; Ahmed, Muhammad Z.; De Barro, Paul J.; Ren, Shun-Xiang; Qiu, Bao-Li

    2012-01-01

    Background The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is cryptic species complex composed of numerous species. Individual species from the complex harbor a diversity of bacterial endosymbionts including Wolbachia. However, while Wolbachia is known to have a number of different roles, its role in B. tabaci is unclear. Here, the antibiotic rifampicin is used to selectively eliminate Wolbachia from B. tabaci so as to enable its roles in whitefly development and reproduction to be explored. The indirect effects of Wolbachia elimination on the biology of Encarsia bimaculata, a dominant parasitoid of B. tabaci in South China, were also investigated. Methodology/Principal Finding qRT-PCR and FISH were used to show that after 48 h exposure to 1.0 mg/ml rifampicin, Wolbachia was completely inactivated from B. tabaci Mediterranean (MED) without any significant impact on either the primary symbiont, Portiera aleyrodidarum or any of the other secondary endosymbionts present. For B. tabaci MED, Wolbachia was shown to be associated with decreased juvenile development time, increased likelihood that nymphs completed development, increased adult life span and increased percentage of female progeny. Inactivation was associated with a significant decrease in the body size of the 4th instar which leads us to speculate as to whether Wolbachia may have a nutrient supplementation role. The reduction in nymph body size has consequences for its parasitoid, E. bimaculata. The elimination of Wolbachia lead to a marked increase in the proportion of parasitoid eggs that completed their development, but the reduced size of the whitefly host was also associated with a significant reduction in the size of the emerging parasitoid adult and this was in turn associated with a marked reduction in adult parasitoid longevity. Conclusions/Significance Wolbachia increases the fitness of the whitefly host and provides some protection against parasitization. These observations add to our understanding of the roles

  15. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; McDevitt, James; Yamauchi, Toshiyuki; Demokritou, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillusatrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of ∼8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 ± 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  16. Role of FAAH-like anandamide transporter in anandamide inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwannok Leung

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system modulates numerous physiological processes including nociception and reproduction. Anandamide (AEA is an endocannabinoid that is inactivated by cellular uptake followed by intracellular hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Recently, FAAH-like anandamide transporter (FLAT, a truncated and catalytically-inactive variant of FAAH, was proposed to function as an intracellular AEA carrier and mediate its delivery to FAAH for hydrolysis. Pharmacological inhibition of FLAT potentiated AEA signaling and produced antinociceptive effects. Given that endocannabinoids produce analgesia through central and peripheral mechanisms, the goal of the current work was to examine the expression of FLAT in the central and peripheral nervous systems. In contrast to the original report characterizing FLAT, expression of FLAT was not observed in any of the tissues examined. To investigate the role of FLAT as a putative AEA binding protein, FLAT was generated from FAAH using polymerase chain reaction and further analyzed. Despite its low cellular expression, FLAT displayed residual catalytic activity that was sensitive to FAAH inhibitors and abolished following mutation of its catalytic serine. Overexpression of FLAT potentiated AEA cellular uptake and this appeared to be dependent upon its catalytic activity. Immunofluorescence revealed that FLAT localizes primarily to intracellular membranes and does not contact the plasma membrane, suggesting that its capability to potentiate AEA uptake may stem from its enzymatic rather than transport activity. Collectively, our data demonstrate that FLAT does not serve as a global intracellular AEA carrier, although a role in mediating localized AEA inactivation in mammalian tissues cannot be ruled out.

  17. A novel method for bacterial inactivation using electrosprayed water nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyrgiotakis, Georgios, E-mail: gpyrgiot@hsph.harvard.edu; McDevitt, James [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States); Yamauchi, Toshiyuki [Panasonic Corporation, Appliances Company (Japan); Demokritou, Philip [Harvard School of Public Health, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This is a study focusing on the potential to deactivate biological agents (bacteria and endospores) using engineered water nanostructures (EWNS). The EWNS were generated using an electrospray device that collects water by condensing atmospheric water vapor on a Peltier-cooled electrode. A high voltage is applied between the collection electrode and a grounded electrode resulting in aerosolization of the condensed water and a constant generation of EWNS. Gram-negative Serratia marcescens, gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillusatrophaeus endospores were placed on stainless steel coupons and exposed to generated EWNS at multiple time intervals. Upon exposures, the bacteria were recovered and placed on nutrient agar to grow, and the colony forming units were counted. Ozone levels as well as air temperature and relative humidity were monitored during the experiments. Qualitative confirmation of bacterial destruction was also obtained by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, important EWNS aerosol properties such as particle number concentration as a function of size as well as the average surface charge of the generated EWNS were measured using real-time instrumentation. It was shown that the novel electrospray method can generate over time a constant flux of EWNS. EWNS have a peak number concentration of {approx}8,000 particles per cubic centimeter with a modal peak size around 20 nm. The average surface charge of the generated EWNS was found to be 10 {+-} 2 electrons per particle. In addition, it was shown that the EWNS have the potential to deactivate both bacteria types from surfaces. At the same administrate dose, however, the endospores were not inactivated. This novel method and the unique properties of the generated EWNS could potentially be used to develop an effective, environmentally friendly, and inexpensive method for bacteria inactivation.

  18. 1,5 iodonaphthyl Azide Inactivated V3526 Protects against Aerosol Challenge with Virulent Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    1 1,5 iodonaphthyl Azide -Inactivated V3526 Protects against Aerosol Challenge with Virulent Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus. Paridhi...immunogenic and does not protect against an aerosol challenge with virulent VEEV. We have previously shown that VEEV inactivated by 1,5 iodonaphthy azide ...of immunization provided maximum amount of protection. Key words: Venezuelan equine encephalitis, vaccine, inactivated, iodonaphthyl azide

  19. No evidence for functional inactivation of wild-type p53 protein by MDM2 overexpression in gastric carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, P.; Craanen, M. E.; Dekker, W.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1998-01-01

    Inactivation of wild-type p53 during gastric carcinogenesis is usually caused by mutations within exons 5-8 of the p53 gene leading to mutated, usually immunohistochemically detectable p53 proteins. However, functional inactivation of wild-type p53, mimicking mutational inactivation, may also result

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of a quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine compared to licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Noss, Michael J; Blatter, Mark M; Biedenbender, Rex; Decker, Michael D

    2013-01-21

    To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a prototype quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (QIV) containing two influenza B strains, one of each lineage, compared with licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVs) containing either a Victoria B-lineage strain (2009-2010 TIV) or a Yamagata B-lineage strain (2008-2009 TIV). Healthy adults ≥18 years of age were eligible to participate in this phase II, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study conducted in the US. Participants received a single dose of 2009-2010 TIV, 2008-2009 TIV, or QIV. Sera were collected before and 21 days after vaccine administration to test for hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibodies to each of the four influenza strains. Immunogenicity endpoints included geometric mean HAI antibody titers (GMTs) and rates of seroprotection (titer ≥1:40) and seroconversion (4-fold rise pre- to post-vaccination). Safety endpoints included frequency of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions occurring within 3 days of vaccination, and unsolicited non-serious adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) within 21 days of vaccination. One hundred and ninety participants were enrolled to each vaccine group. QIV induced GMTs to each A and B strain that were noninferior to those induced by the 2009-2010 and 2008-2009 TIVs (i.e., lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval of the ratio of GMT(QIV)/GMT(TIV)>0.66 for each strain). Rates of seroprotection and seroconversion were similar in all groups. Incidence and severity of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions, AEs, and SAEs were similar among groups. QIV, containing two B strains (one from each B lineage), was as safe and immunogenic as licensed TIV. QIV has the potential to be a useful alternative to TIV and offer protection against both B lineages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  2. Sunlight inactivation of human viruses and bacteriophages in coastal waters containing natural photosensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Andrea I; Peterson, Britt M; Boehm, Alexandria B; McNeill, Kristopher; Nelson, Kara L

    2013-02-19

    Sunlight inactivation of poliovirus type 3 (PV3), adenovirus type 2 (HAdV2), and two bacteriophage (MS2 and PRD1) was investigated in an array of coastal waters to better understand solar inactivation mechanisms and the effect of natural water constituents on observed inactivation rates (k(obs)). Reactor scale inactivation experiments were conducted using a solar simulator, and k(obs) for each virus was measured in a sensitizer-free control and five unfiltered surface water samples collected from different sources. k(obs) values varied between viruses in the same water matrix, and for each virus in different matrices, with PV3 having the fastest and MS2 the slowest k(obs) in all waters. When exposed to full-spectrum sunlight, the presence of photosensitizers increased k(obs) of HAdV2, PRD1 and MS2, but not PV3, which provides evidence that the exogenous sunlight inactivation mechanism, involving damage by exogenously produced reactive intermediates, played a greater role for these viruses. While PV3 inactivation was observed to be dominated by endogenous mechanisms, this may be due to a masking of exogenous k(obs) by significantly faster endogenous k(obs). Results illustrate that differences in water composition can shift absolute and relative inactivation rates of viruses, which has important implications for natural wastewater treatment systems, solar disinfection (SODIS), and the use of indicator organisms for monitoring water quality.

  3. Kinetic analysis and modelling of combined high-pressure-temperature inactivation of the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, K M; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Weemaes, C A; Hendrickx, M E; Michiels, C W

    2000-06-01

    Eight foodborne yeasts were screened for sensitivity to high-pressure (HP) inactivation under a limited number of pressure-temperature combinations. The most resistant strains were Zygoascus hellenicus and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. The latter was taken for a detailed study of inactivation kinetics over a wide range of pressures (120-320 MPa) and temperatures (-5 to 45 degrees C). Isobaric and isothermal inactivation experiments were conducted in Tris-HCl buffer pH 6.5 for 48 different combinations of pressure and temperature. Inactivation was biphasic, with a first phase encompassing four to six decades and being described by first-order kinetics, followed by a tailing phase. Decimal reduction times (D) were calculated for the first-order inactivation phase and their temperature and pressure dependence was described. At constant temperature, D decreased with increasing pressure as expected. At constant pressure, D showed a maximum at around 20 degrees C, and decreased both at lower and at higher temperatures. A mathematical expression was developed to describe accurately the inactivation of Z. bailii as a function of pressure and temperature under the experimental conditions employed. A limited number of experiments in buffer at low pH (3-6) suggest that the model is, in principle, applicable at low pH. In apple and orange juice however, higher inactivation than predicted by the model was achieved.

  4. Identifying possible non-thermal effects of radio frequency energy on inactivating food microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Xiaoxi; Li, Rui; Hou, Lixia; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Shaojin

    2018-03-23

    Radio frequency (RF) heating has been successfully used for inactivating microorganisms in agricultural and food products. Athermal (non-thermal) effects of RF energy on microorganisms have been frequently proposed in the literature, resulting in difficulties for developing effective thermal treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to identify if the athermal inactivation of microorganisms existed during RF treatments. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in apple juice and mashed potato were exposed to both RF and conventional thermal energies to compare their inactivation populations. A thermal death time (TDT) heating block system was used as conventional thermal energy source to simulate the same heating treatment conditions, involving heating temperature, heating rate and uniformity, of a RF treatment at a frequency of 27.12 MHz. Results showed that a similar and uniform temperature distribution in tested samples was achieved in both heating systems, so that the central sample temperature could be used as representative one for evaluating thermal inactivation of microorganisms. The survival patterns of two target microorganisms in two food samples were similar both for RF and heating block treatments since their absolute difference of survival populations was  0.05) in inactivating bacteria between the RF and the heating block treatments at each set of temperatures. The solid temperature and microbial inactivation data demonstrated that only thermal effect of RF energy at 27.12 MHz was observed on inactivating microorganisms in foods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Capsid protein oxidation in feline calicivirus using an electrochemical inactivation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoiri, Nozomi; Nogariya, Osamu; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: tsuyo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • Feline calicivirus was inactivated electrochemically by a factor of >5 log. • The electrochemical treatment was performed at 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 15 min. • Electrochemical treatment caused oxidation of viral proteins. • Oxidation of viral proteins can lead to loss of viral structural integrity. - Abstract: Pathogenic viral infections are an international public health concern, and viral disinfection has received increasing attention. Electrochemical treatment has been used for treatment of water contaminated by bacteria for several decades, and although in recent years several reports have investigated viral inactivation kinetics, the mode of action of viral inactivation by electrochemical treatment remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated the inactivation of feline calicivirus (FCV), a surrogate for human noroviruses, by electrochemical treatment in a developed flow-cell equipped with a screen-printed electrode. The viral infectivity titer was reduced by over 5 orders of magnitude after 15 min of treatment at 0.9 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Proteomic study of electrochemically inactivated virus revealed oxidation of peptides located in the viral particles; oxidation was not observed in the non-treated sample. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy revealed that viral particles in the treated sample had irregular structures. These results suggest that electrochemical treatment inactivates FCV via oxidation of peptides in the structural region, causing structural deformation of virus particles. This first report of viral protein damage through electrochemical treatment will contribute to broadening the understanding of viral inactivation mechanisms.

  6. Inactivation of acetylcholinesterase by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lun-Yi; Misra, Hara P

    2003-12-01

    The neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) has been shown to reversibly inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase. The inactivation of the enzyme was detected by monitoring the accumulation of yellow color produced from the reaction between thiocholine and dithiobisnitrobenzoate ion. The kinetic parameter, Km for the substrate (acetylthiocholine), was found to be 0.216 mM and Ki for MPTP inactivation of acetylcholinesterase was found to be 2.14 mM. The inactivation of enzyme by MPTP was found to be dose-dependent. It was found that MPTP is neither a substrate of AChE nor the time-dependent inactivator. The studies of reaction kinetics indicate the inactivation of AChE to be a linear mixed-type inhibition. The dilution assays indicate that MPTP is a reversible inhibitor for AChE. These data suggest that once MPTP enters the basal ganglia of the brain, it can inactivate the acetylcholinesterase enzyme and thereby increase the acetylcholine level in the basal ganglia of brain, leading to potential cell dysfunction. It appears that the nigrostriatal toxicity by MPTP leading to Parkinson's disease-like syndrome may, in part, be mediated via the acetylcholinesterase inactivation.

  7. Inactivation kinetics and efficiencies of UV-LEDs against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, and surrogate microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanakul, Surapong; Oguma, Kumiko

    2018-03-01

    To demonstrate the effectiveness of UV light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) to disinfect water, UV-LEDs at peak emission wavelengths of 265, 280, and 300 nm were adopted to inactivate pathogenic species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Legionella pneumophila, and surrogate species, including Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis spores, and bacteriophage Qβ in water, compared to conventional low-pressure UV lamp emitting at 254 nm. The inactivation profiles of each species showed either a linear or sigmoidal survival curve, which both fit well with the Geeraerd's model. Based on the inactivation rate constant, the 265-nm UV-LED showed most effective fluence, except for with E. coli which showed similar inactivation rates at 265 and 254 nm. Electrical energy consumption required for 3-log 10 inactivation (E E,3 ) was lowest for the 280-nm UV-LED for all microbial species tested. Taken together, the findings of this study determined the inactivation profiles and kinetics of both pathogenic bacteria and surrogate species under UV-LED exposure at different wavelengths. We also demonstrated that not only inactivation rate constants, but also energy efficiency should be considered when selecting an emission wavelength for UV-LEDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antigenic characterization of a formalin-inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tano, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Martin, Javier; Nishimura, Yorihiro; Simizu, Bunsiti; Miyamura, Tatsuo

    2007-10-10

    A candidate inactivated poliovirus vaccine derived from live-attenuated Sabin strains (sIPV), which are used in the oral poliovirus vaccine (OPV), was prepared in a large-production scale. The modification of viral antigenic epitopes during the formalin inactivation process was investigated by capture ELISA assays using type-specific and antigenic site-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The major antigenic site 1 was modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 1. Antigenic sites 1-3 were slightly modified during the formalin inactivation of Sabin 2 strain. Sites 1 and 3 were altered on inactivated Sabin 3 virus. These alterations were different to those shown by wild-type Saukett strain, used in conventional IPV (cIPV). It has been previously reported that type 1 sIPV showed higher immunogenicity to type 1 cIPV whereas types 2 and 3 sIPV induced lower level of immunogenicity than their cIPV counterparts. Our results suggest that the differences in epitope structure after formalin inactivation may account, at least in part, for the observed differences in immunogenicity between Sabin and wild-type inactivated poliovaccines.

  9. Buffer AVL Alone Does Not Inactivate Ebola Virus in a Representative Clinical Sample Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Weller, Simon A; Phelps, Amanda; Eastaugh, Lin; Ngugi, Sarah; O'Brien, Lyn M; Steward, Jackie; Lonsdale, Steve G; Lever, Mark S

    2015-10-01

    Rapid inactivation of Ebola virus (EBOV) is crucial for high-throughput testing of clinical samples in low-resource, outbreak scenarios. The EBOV inactivation efficacy of Buffer AVL (Qiagen) was tested against marmoset serum (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(8) 50% tissue culture infective dose per milliliter [TCID50 · ml(-1)]) and murine blood (EBOV concentration of 1 × 10(7) TCID50 · ml(-1)) at 4:1 vol/vol buffer/sample ratios. Posttreatment cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis indicated that treatment with Buffer AVL did not inactivate EBOV in 67% of samples, indicating that Buffer AVL, which is designed for RNA extraction and not virus inactivation, cannot be guaranteed to inactivate EBOV in diagnostic samples. Murine blood samples treated with ethanol (4:1 [vol/vol] ethanol/sample) or heat (60°C for 15 min) also showed no viral inactivation in 67% or 100% of samples, respectively. However, combined Buffer AVL and ethanol or Buffer AVL and heat treatments showed total viral inactivation in 100% of samples tested. The Buffer AVL plus ethanol and Buffer AVL plus heat treatments were also shown not to affect the extraction of PCR quality RNA from EBOV-spiked murine blood samples. © Crown copyright 2015.

  10. Effect of Coat Layers in Bacillus Subtilis Spores Resistance to Photo-Catalytic Inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz del Carmen Huesca-Espitia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Different water treatment processes (physical and chemical exist to obtain safe water for human or food industry supply. The advanced oxidation technologies are rising as a new alternative to eliminate undesirable chemicals and waterborne diseases. In this work, we analyze the power of the photo-assisted Fenton process using Fe(II/H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm to inactivate Bacillus subtilis spores, considered among the most resistant biological structures known. Different concentrations of Fe(II, H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm were used to inactivate wt and some coat spore mutants of B. subtilis. Wt spores of B. subtilis were inactivated after 60 min using this process. In general, all defective coat mutants were more sensitive than the wt spores and, particularly, the double mutant was 10 folds more sensitive than others being inactivated during the first 10 minutes using soft reaction conditions. Presence of Fe(II ions was found essential for spore inactivating process and, for those spores inactivated using the Fe(II/H2O2 under UV radiation process, it is suggested that coat structures are important to their resistance to the treatment process. The photo-assisted Fenton process using Fe(II, H2O2 and UV radiation (365 nm can be used to inactivate any water microorganisms with the same or less resistance that B. subtilis spores to produce safe drinking water in relatively short treatment time.

  11. [Flavonoids as effective protectors of urease from ultrasonic inactivation in solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, E I; Kurchenko, V P; Metelitsa, D I

    2006-01-01

    Inactivation of soybean urease in aqueous solution at pH 5.4, 36 degrees C, and high-frequency sonication (2.64 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2) is substantially reduced in the presence of seven structurally different flavonoids. A comparative kinetic study of the effect of these flavonoids on the effective first-order rate constants that characterize the total (thermal and ultrasonic) inactivation k(i), thermal inactivation k(i)*, and ultrasonic inactivation k(i)(US) of 25 nM enzyme solution was carried out. The dependences of the three inactivation rate constants of the urease on the concentrations of flavonoids within the range from 10(-11) to 10(-4) M were obtained. The following order of the efficiency of the flavonoids used in respect of the urease protection from ultrasonic inactivation was found: astragalin > silybin > naringin > hesperidin > quercetin > kaempferol > morin. The results confirm a significant role in the inactivation of the urease of HO* and HO2*, free radicals, which are formed in the ultrasonic cavitation field.

  12. X inactivation in females with X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT1X) is the second most common inherited neuropathy, caused by mutations in gap junction beta-1 (GJB1). Males have a uniformly moderately severe phenotype while females have a variable phenotype, suggested to be due to X inactivation. We aimed to assess X inactivation pattern in females with CMT1X and correlate this with phenotype using the CMT examination score to determine whether the X inactivation pattern accounted for the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X. We determined X inactivation pattern in 67 females with CMT1X and 24 controls using the androgen receptor assay. We were able to determine which X chromosome carried the GJB1 mutation in 30 females. There was no difference in X inactivation pattern between patients and controls. In addition, there was no correlation between X inactivation pattern in blood and phenotype. A possible explanation for these findings is that the X inactivation pattern in Schwann cells rather than in blood may explain the variable phenotype in females with CMT1X.

  13. Bioactive Natural Product and Superacid Chemistry for Lead Compound Identification: A Case Study of Selective hCA III and L-Type Ca2+ Current Inhibitors for Hypotensive Agent Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Carreyre

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dodoneine (Ddn is one of the active compounds identified from Agelanthus dodoneifolius, which is a medicinal plant used in African pharmacopeia and traditional medicine for the treatment of hypertension. In the context of a scientific program aiming at discovering new hypotensive agents through the original combination of natural product discovery and superacid chemistry diversification, and after evidencing dodoneine’s vasorelaxant effect on rat aorta, superacid modifications allowed us to generate original analogues which showed selective human carbonic anhydrase III (hCA III and L-type Ca2+ current inhibition. These derivatives can now be considered as new lead compounds for vasorelaxant therapeutics targeting these two proteins.

  14. Sex-differential selection and the evolution of X inactivation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Connallon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available X inactivation--the transcriptional silencing of one X chromosome copy per female somatic cell--is universal among therian mammals, yet the choice of which X to silence exhibits considerable variation among species. X inactivation strategies can range from strict paternally inherited X inactivation (PXI, which renders females haploid for all maternally inherited alleles, to unbiased random X inactivation (RXI, which equalizes expression of maternally and paternally inherited alleles in each female tissue. However, the underlying evolutionary processes that might account for this observed diversity of X inactivation strategies remain unclear. We present a theoretical population genetic analysis of X inactivation evolution and specifically consider how conditions of dominance, linkage, recombination, and sex-differential selection each influence evolutionary trajectories of X inactivation. The results indicate that a single, critical interaction between allelic dominance and sex-differential selection can select for a broad and continuous range of X inactivation strategies, including unequal rates of inactivation between maternally and paternally inherited X chromosomes. RXI is favored over complete PXI as long as alleles deleterious to female fitness are sufficiently recessive, and the criteria for RXI evolution is considerably more restrictive when fitness variation is sexually antagonistic (i.e., alleles deleterious to females are beneficial to males relative to variation that is deleterious to both sexes. Evolutionary transitions from PXI to RXI also generally increase mean relative female fitness at the expense of decreased male fitness. These results provide a theoretical framework for predicting and interpreting the evolution of chromosome-wide expression of X-linked genes and lead to several useful predictions that could motivate future studies of allele-specific gene expression variation.

  15. Inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by ionizing radiation in body fluids and serological evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigbee, P.D.; Sarin, P.S.; Humphreys, J.C.; Eubanks, W.G.; Sun, D.; Hocken, D.G.; Thornton, A.; Adams, D.E.; Simic, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    A method to use ionizing radiation to inactivate HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) in human body fluids was studied in an effort to reduce the risk of accidental infection to forensic science laboratory workers. Experiments conducted indicate that an X-ray absorbed dose of 25 krad was required to completely inactivate HIV. This does not alter forensically important constituents such as enzymes and proteins in body fluids. This method of inactivation of HIV cannot be used on body fluids which will be subjected to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) typing

  16. Reactive hydroxyl radical-driven oral bacterial inactivation by radio frequency atmospheric plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sung Kil; Lee, Jae Koo; Choi, Myeong Yeol; Koo, Il Gyo; Kim, Paul Y.; Kim, Yoonsun; Kim, Gon Jun; Collins, George J.; Mohamed, Abdel-Aleam H.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated bacterial (Streptococcus mutans) inactivation by a radio frequency power driven atmospheric pressure plasma torch with H 2 O 2 entrained in the feedstock gas. Optical emission spectroscopy identified substantial excited state OH generation inside the plasma and relative OH formation was verified by optical absorption. The bacterial inactivation rate increased with increasing OH generation and reached a maximum 5-log 10 reduction with 0.6%H 2 O 2 vapor. Generation of large amounts of toxic ozone is drawback of plasma bacterial inactivation, thus it is significant that the ozone concentration falls within recommended safe allowable levels with addition of H 2 O 2 vapor to the plasma.

  17. Inactivation of batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels in GH3 cells. Characterization and pharmacological modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX)-modified Na+ currents were characterized in GH3 cells with a reversed Na+ gradient under whole-cell voltage clamp conditions. BTX shifts the threshold of Na+ channel activation by approximately 40 mV in the hyperpolarizing direction and nearly eliminates the declining phase of Na+ currents at all voltages, suggesting that Na+ channel inactivation is removed. Paradoxically, the steady-state inactivation (h infinity) of BTX-modified Na+ channels as determined by a two-pulse protocol shows that inactivation is still present and occurs maximally near -70 mV. About 45% of BTX-modified Na+ channels are inactivated at this voltage. The development of inactivation follows a sum of two exponential functions with tau d(fast) = 10 ms and tau d(slow) = 125 ms at -70 mV. Recovery from inactivation can be achieved after hyperpolarizing the membrane to voltages more negative than -120 mV. The time course of recovery is best described by a sum of two exponentials with tau r(fast) = 6.0 ms and tau r(slow) = 240 ms at -170 mV. After reaching a minimum at -70 mV, the h infinity curve of BTX-modified Na+ channels turns upward to reach a constant plateau value of approximately 0.9 at voltages above 0 mV. Evidently, the inactivated, BTX-modified Na+ channels can be forced open at more positive potentials. The reopening kinetics of the inactivated channels follows a single exponential with a time constant of 160 ms at +50 mV. Both chloramine-T (at 0.5 mM) and alpha-scorpion toxin (at 200 nM) diminish the inactivation of BTX-modified Na+ channels. In contrast, benzocaine at 1 mM drastically enhances the inactivation of BTX-modified Na+ channels. The h infinity curve reaches minimum of less than 0.1 at -70 mV, indicating that benzocaine binds preferentially with inactivated, BTX-modified Na+ channels. Together, these results imply that BTX-modified Na+ channels are governed by an inactivation process. PMID:1311019

  18. Selective inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsen, K T; Tsen, S-W D; Hung, C-F; Wu, T-C; Kiang, Juliann G

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be inactivated by irradiation with subpicosecond near-infrared laser pulses at a moderate laser power density. By comparing the threshold laser power density for the inactivation of HIV with those of human red blood cells and mouse dendritic cells, we conclude that it is plausible to use the ultrashort pulsed laser to selectively inactivate blood-borne pathogens such as HIV while leaving sensitive materials like human red blood cells unharmed. This finding has important implications in the development of a new laser technology for disinfection of viral pathogens in blood products and in the clinic. (fast track communication)

  19. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  20. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  1. UK-18,892: resistance to modification by aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, R J; Brammer, K W; Cheeseman, H E; Jevons, S

    1978-12-01

    UK-18,892, a new semisynthetic aminoglycoside, was active against bacteria possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes, with the exception of some known to possess AAC(6') or AAD(4') enzymes. This activity has been rationalized by using cell-free extracts of bacteria containing known inactivating enzymes, where it was shown that UK-18,892 was not a substrate for the APH(3'), AAD(2''), AAC(3), and AAC(2') enzymes. It was also demonstrated that UK-18,892 protected mice against lethal infections caused by organisms possessing aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes.

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Inactivation of viruses with a very low power visible femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, K. T.; Tsen, Shaw-Wei D.; Chang, Chih-Long; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.; Kiang, Juliann G.

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate for the first time that, by using a visible femtosecond laser, it is effective to inactivate viruses such as bacteriophage M13 through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. By using a very low power visible femtosecond laser having a wavelength of 425 nm and a pulse width of 100 fs, we show that M13 phages were inactivated when the laser power density was greater than or equal to 50 MW cm-2. The inactivation of M13 phages was determined by plaque counts and depended on the pulse width as well as power density of the excitation laser.

  3. Inactivation of viruses with a very low power visible femtosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsen, K T [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Tsen, Shaw-Wei D [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Chang, C.-L. [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Hung, C.-F. [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Wu, T-C [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Kiang, Juliann G [Scientific Research Department, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Uniformed Services University of The Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20889-5603 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    We demonstrate for the first time that, by using a visible femtosecond laser, it is effective to inactivate viruses such as bacteriophage M13 through impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. By using a very low power visible femtosecond laser having a wavelength of 425 nm and a pulse width of 100 fs, we show that M13 phages were inactivated when the laser power density was greater than or equal to 50 MW cm{sup -2}. The inactivation of M13 phages was determined by plaque counts and depended on the pulse width as well as power density of the excitation laser. (fast track communication)

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Fadlyana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV containing antigens of two influenza A strains, A(H1N1 and A(H3N2, and one influenza B strain, are the standard {onnulation for influenza prevention. The vaccines must be updated annually to provide optimal protection against the predicted prevalent strains for the next influenza season. Objective To assess the immunogenidty and safety of the inactivated influenza vaccine (Flubio® in adolescents and adults, 28 days after a single dose. Methods In this experimental, randomized, single-blind, bridging study, we included 60 healthy adolescents and adults. A single, 0.5 mL dose was administered intramuscularly in the deltoid muscle of the left ann. Blood samples were obtained before and 28 days after immunization. Standardized hemagglutination inhibition (HI test was used to assess antibody response to influenza antigens. Results From January to February 2010, a total of 60 adolescents and adults enrolled in the study, but two participants did not provide the required blood samples. One hundred percent of the subjects had an anti-influenza titer ≥ 1:40 HI units to all three strains, A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1, A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2, and B/Brisbane/60/2008 (P=1.000 after immunization. The Geometric Mean Titers (GMT after immunization increased for all strains: A/Brisbane, 76.4 to 992.7, A/Uruguay, 27.6 to 432.1, and B/Brisbane, 19.9 to 312.7. Twenty eight days after immunization, we found a 4 times increase in antibody titers in 75.8% of the subjects for A/Brisbane, 84.5% for A/Uruguay, and 77.6% for B/Brisbane. We also observed that 100% of seronegative subjects converted to seropositive for all 3 strains. All vaccines were well-tolerated. There were no serious adverse events reported during the study. Conclusion In adolescents and adults, the Flubio® vaccine was immunogenic and safe.

  5. An inactivated cell-culture vaccine against yellow fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, Thomas P; Fowler, Elizabeth; Johnson, Casey T; Balser, John; Morin, Merribeth J; Sisti, Maggie; Trent, Dennis W

    2011-04-07

    Yellow fever is a lethal viral hemorrhagic fever occurring in Africa and South America. A highly effective live vaccine (17D) is widely used for travelers to and residents of areas in which yellow fever is endemic, but the vaccine can cause serious adverse events, including viscerotropic disease, which is associated with a high rate of death. A safer, nonreplicating vaccine is needed. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-escalation, phase 1 study of 60 healthy subjects between 18 and 49 years of age, we investigated the safety and immunogenicity of XRX-001 purified whole-virus, β-propiolactone-inactivated yellow fever vaccine produced in Vero cell cultures and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum) adjuvant. On two visits 21 days apart, subjects received intramuscular injections of vaccine that contained 0.48 μg or 4.8 μg of antigen. Levels of neutralizing antibodies were measured at baseline and on days 21, 31, and 42. The vaccine induced the development of neutralizing antibodies in 100% of subjects receiving 4.8 μg of antigen in each injection and in 88% of subjects receiving 0.48 μg of antigen in each injection. Antibody levels increased by day 10 after the second injection, at which time levels were significantly higher with the 4.8-μg formulation than with the 0.48-μg formulation (geometric mean titer, 146 vs. 39; P<0.001). Three adverse events occurred at a higher incidence in the two vaccine groups than in the placebo group: mild pain, tenderness, and (much less frequently) itching at the injection site. One case of urticaria was observed on day 3 after the second dose of 4.8 μg of vaccine. A two-dose regimen of the XRX-001 vaccine, containing inactivated yellow fever antigen with an alum adjuvant, induced neutralizing antibodies in a high percentage of subjects. XRX-001 has the potential to be a safer alternative to live attenuated 17D vaccine. (Funded by Xcellerex; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00995865.).

  6. Bim nuclear translocation and inactivation by viral interferon regulatory factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Bong Choi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Viral replication efficiency is in large part governed by the ability of viruses to counteract pro-apoptotic signals induced by infection of the host cell. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 uses several strategies to block the host's innate antiviral defenses via interference with interferon and apoptotic signaling. Contributors include the four viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs 1-4, which function in dominant negative fashion to block cellular IRF activities in addition to targeting IRF signaling-induced proteins such as p53 and inhibiting other inducers of apoptosis such as TGFbeta receptor-activated Smad transcription factors. Here we identify direct targeting by vIRF-1 of BH3-only pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bim, a key negative regulator of HHV-8 replication, to effect its inactivation via nuclear translocation. vIRF-1-mediated relocalization of Bim was identified in transfected cells, by both immunofluorescence assay and western analysis of fractionated cell extracts. Also, co-localization of vIRF-1 and Bim was detected in nuclei of lytically infected endothelial cells. In vitro co-precipitation assays using purified vIRF-1 and Bim revealed direct interaction between the proteins, and Bim-binding residues of vIRF-1 were mapped by deletion and point mutagenesis. Generation and experimental utilization of Bim-refractory vIRF-1 variants revealed the importance of vIRF-1:Bim interaction, specifically, in pro-replication and anti-apoptotic activity of vIRF-1. Furthermore, blocking of the interaction with cell-permeable peptide corresponding to the Bim-binding region of vIRF-1 confirmed the relevance of vIRF-1:Bim association to vIRF-1 pro-replication activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IRF protein that interacts with a Bcl-2 family member and of nuclear sequestration of Bim or any other member of the family as a means of inactivation. The data presented reveal a novel mechanism utilized by a virus to control

  7. Low pH inactivation for xenotropic gamma retrovirus in recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G and mechanism of inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rong; Cui, Xiaolan

    2014-01-01

    CHO-derived recombinant proteins for human therapeutic are used commonly. There are noninfectious endogenous retroviruses in CHO cells. Validation study for inactivation process is required. Murine xenotropic gamma retrovirus (X-MulV) is a model virus in validation study. In our previous study, optimum conditions for X-MulV inactivation were sifted. In this study, we performed a further research on low pH inactivation for evaluation of X-MulV clearance in manufacturing of recombinant human TNF-α receptor immunoglobulin G fusion proteins (rhTNF-α) for injection. Cell-based infectivity assay was used for the evaluation of X-MulV clearance. RhTNF-α were spiked with X-MulV and were inactivated at pH 3.60 ∼ 3.90, 25 ± 2 °C, and 0 ∼ 240 min, respectively. Samples incubated at the conditions for 15 ∼ 180 min were not inactivated effectively. For 4 h incubation, log10 reductions were achieved 5.0 log10. Biological activity of rhTNF-α incubated at pH 3.60, 25 °C for 4 h, which was assayed on murine L929 fibroblasts cells, was not affected by low pH. Env gene of X-MulV, which was detected by conventional PCR method for the first time, was not detected after incubation at pH 3.60, and it may be the mechanism of low pH inactivation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Development of methods to measure virus inactivation in fresh waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R L; Winston, P E

    1985-11-01

    This study concerns the identification and correction of deficiencies in methods used to measure inactivation rates of enteric viruses seeded into environmental waters. It was found that viable microorganisms in an environmental water sample increased greatly after addition of small amounts of nutrients normally present in the unpurified seed virus preparation. This burst of microbial growth was not observed after seeding the water with purified virus. The use of radioactively labeled poliovirus revealed that high percentages of virus particles, sometimes greater than 99%, were lost through adherence to containers, especially in less turbid waters. This effect was partially overcome by the use of polypropylene containers and by the absence of movement during incubation. Adherence to containers clearly demonstrated the need for labeled viruses to monitor losses in this type of study. Loss of viral infectivity in samples found to occur during freezing was avoided by addition of broth. Finally, microbial contamination of the cell cultures during infectivity assays was overcome by the use of gentamicin and increased concentrations of penicillin, streptomycin, and amphotericin B.

  9. Preformulation study of highly purified inactivated polio vaccine, serotype 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wei; Zeng, Yuhong; Orgel, Scott; Francon, Alain; Kim, Jae Hyun; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F; Middaugh, C Russell

    2014-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of the polio vaccination campaign, improvements in the thermal stability of the vaccine are being investigated. Here, inactivated polio vaccine, serotype 3 (IPV3) was characterized via a number of biophysical techniques. The size was characterized by transmission electronic microscopy and light scattering. The capsid protein conformation was evaluated by intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD), and the D-antigen content by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The pH thermal stability of IPV3 (pH 3.0-8.0; 10°C-87.5°C) was evaluated by fluorescence, CD, and static light scattering. The transition temperatures reflect the responses, respectively, of tertiary structure, secondary structure, and size to applied thermal stress. The data were summarized as empirical phase diagrams, and the most stable conditions were found to be pH 7.0 with temperature lower than 40°C. CD detected a higher transition temperature for capsid protein than that for RNA. The effects of certain excipients on IPV3 thermal stability and antigen content were evaluated. The results of their effects, based on intrinsic fluorescence and ELISA, were in good agreement, suggesting the feasibility of applying intrinsic fluorescence as a high-throughput tool for formulation development. The study improves the understanding of IPV3 thermal stability, and provides a starting point for future formulation development of IPV3 and other serotypes. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashef Nasim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  11. Synergism of UV Radiation and Heat for Cell Inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Su-Hyoun; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2006-01-01

    Organisms including human beings are constantly exposed to UV radiation. The potential hazards of UV radiation have risen due to a depletion of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and the formation of ozone holes. Moreover, the effect of UV radiation may greatly increase due to synergistic interaction of UV radiation with other environmental factors. Fluence rate is known to constitute a very important parameter in photobiology. While it is generally accepted that lowering the UV radiation fluence rate results in a decrease of the cell killing or mutagenesis efficiency per unit dose, the matter is still unclear with regards to the synergistic interaction of UV radiation and another environmental agent. It is of great interest to investigate whether or not the synergistic interaction can take place at low intensities of such environmental factors. Heat is known to be an important modifier of UV radiation sensitivity. Exposure of skin to UV radiation is often encountered at hot ambient temperatures. Therefore, the elucidation of new fundamental aspects of the simultaneous action of UV radiation and heat is an actual task. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to establish whether the UV fluence rate alters the synergistic interaction between heat and UV radiation for cell inactivation

  12. Effect of Activated Plastic Films on Inactivation of Foodborne Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Soriano Cuadrado

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, low density polyethylene films were activated by co-extrusion with zinc oxide, zinc acetate or potassium sorbate. Films were also surface-activated with tyrosol singly or in combination with lactic acid or p-hydroxybenzoic acid. Activated films were tested on Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The combinations showing greatest inhibition zones and broadest inhibitory spectrum were the films activated with tyrosol plus p-hydroxybenzoic acid. A small delay in growth of Listeria innocua was observed on seabream packed in ZnO-activated films during refrigerated storage for 7 days. When films activated with 2.5% tyrosol or with 1.5% tyrosol plus 0.5 p-hydroxybenzoic acid were used for vacuum packaging of smoked salmon and smoked tuna challenged with cocktails of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes strains, the combination of tyrosol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid improved inactivation of both pathogens during chill storage compared to films singly activated with tyrosol. The best results were obtained in smoked salmon, since no viable pathogens were detected after 7 days of chill storage for the activated film. Results from the study highlight the potential of plastic films surface-activated with tyrosol and p-hydroxybenzoic acid in the control of foodborne pathogens in smoked seafood.

  13. Blue light-mediated inactivation of Enterococcus faecalis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pileggi, Giorgio; Wataha, John C; Girard, Myriam; Grad, Iwona; Schrenzel, Jacques; Lange, Norbert; Bouillaguet, Serge

    2013-05-01

    In dentistry, residual infection remains a major cause of failure after endodontic treatment; many of these infections involve Enterococcus faecalis. In the current study, we explored the possibility that blue light activated photosensitizers could be used, in principle, to inactivate this microbe as an adjunct disinfection strategy for endodontic therapy. Three blue light absorbing photosensitizers, eosin-Y, rose bengal, and curcumin, were tested on E. faecalis grown in planktonic suspensions or biofilms. Photosensitizers were incubated for 30 min with bacteria then exposed to blue light (450-500 nm) for 240 s. Sodium hypochlorite (3%) was used as a control. After 48 h, the viability of E. faecalis was estimated by measuring colony-forming units post-exposure vs. untreated controls (CFU/mL). Blue light irradiation alone did not alter E. faecalis viability. For planktonic cultures, blue light activated eosin-Y (5 μM), rose bengal (1 μM), or curcumin (5 μM) significantly (pcurcumin of 100, 10, and 10 μM respectively, completely suppressed E. faecalis viability (p<0.05). Although the current results are limited to an in vitro model, they support further exploration of blue light activated antimicrobials as an adjunct therapy in endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation inactivation analysis of chloroplast CF0-CF1 ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M.Y.; Chien, L.F.; Pan, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation inactivation technique was employed to measure the functional size of adenosine triphosphatase of spinach chloroplasts. The functional size for acid-base-induced ATP synthesis was 450 +/- 24 kilodaltons; for phenazine methosulfate-mediated ATP synthesis, 613 +/- 33 kilodaltons; and for methanol-activated ATP hydrolysis, 280 +/- 14 kilodaltons. The difference (170 +/- 57 kilodaltons) between 450 +/- 24 and 280 +/- 14 kilodaltons is explained to be the molecular mass of proton channel (coupling factor 0) across the thylakoid membrane. Our data suggest that the stoichiometry of subunits I, II, and III of coupling factor 0 is 1:2:15. Ca2+- and Mg2+-ATPase activated by methanol, heat, and trypsin digestion have a similar functional size. However, anions such as SO 3 (2-) and CO 3 (2-) increased the molecular mass for both ATPase's (except trypsin-activated Mg2+-ATPase) by 12-30%. Soluble coupling factor 1 has a larger target size than that of membrane-bound. This is interpreted as the cold effect during irradiation

  15. Size determination of an equilibrium enzymic system by radiation inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, P.; Swillens, S.; Dumont, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation inactivation of complex enzymic systems is currently used to determine the enzyme size and the molecular organization of the components in the system. An equilibrium model was simulated describing the regulation of enzyme activity by association of the enzyme with a regulatory unit. It is assumed that, after irradiation, the system equilibrates before the enzyme activity is assayed. The theoretical results show that the target-size analysis of these numerical data leads to a bad estimate of the enzyme size. Moreover, some implicit assumptions such as the transfer of radiation energy between non-covalently bound molecules should be verified before interpretation of target-size analysis. It is demonstrated that the apparent target size depends on the parameters of the system, namely the size and the concentration of the components, the equilibrium constant, the relative activities of free enzyme and enzymic complex, the existence of energy transfer, and the distribution of the components between free and bound forms during the irradiation. (author)

  16. Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Caused by Inactivating Mutations in SRA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotan, Leman Damla; Cooper, Charlton; Darcan, Şükran; Carr, Ian M; Özen, Samim; Yan, Yi; Hamedani, Mohammad K; Gürbüz, Fatih; Mengen, Eda; Turan, İhsan; Ulubay, Ayça; Akkuş, Gamze; Yüksel, Bilgin; Topaloğlu, A Kemal; Leygue, Etienne

    2016-06-05

    What initiates the pubertal process in humans and other mammals is still unknown. We hypothesized that gene(s) taking roles in triggering human puberty may be identified by studying a cohort of idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). A cohort of IHH cases was studied based on autozygosity mapping coupled with whole exome sequencing. Our studies revealed three independent families in which IHH/delayed puberty is associated with inactivating SRA1 variants. SRA1 was the first gene to be identified to function through its protein as well as noncoding functional ribonucleic acid products. These products act as co-regulators of nuclear receptors including sex steroid receptors as well as SF-1 and LRH-1, the master regulators of steroidogenesis. Functional studies with a mutant SRA1 construct showed a reduced co-activation of ligand-dependent activity of the estrogen receptor alpha, as assessed by luciferase reporter assay in HeLa cells. Our findings strongly suggest that SRA1 gene function is required for initiation of puberty in humans. Furthermore, SRA1 with its alternative products and functionality may provide a potential explanation for the versatility and complexity of the pubertal process.

  17. Inactivation of viral agents in bovine serum by gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, C; House, J A; Yedloutschnig, R J

    1990-10-01

    Cell culture origin or suckling mouse brain origin viruses of Akabane disease, Aino, bovine ephemeral fever, swine vesicular disease, hog cholera, bluetongue, and minute virus of mice were each suspended in bovine serum. Aliquots (1 mL) were exposed to various doses of gamma radiation from a 60Co source while at -68 degrees C. Aliquots (100-mL) of serum from a steer experimentally infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus were similarly irradiated. The samples were assayed for infectivity in cell culture systems before and after irradiation, and the data points were analyzed by linear regression. The irradiation doses (in megarads) necessary to inactivate one log10 of viral infectivity (D10) was calculated for each virus. D10 is otherwise known as the slope of the regression line. The r2 value, a measure of association with 1.0 = perfect fit, was also calculated for each regression line. The values (D10, r2) for each virus were as follows: Akabane, 0.25, 0.998; Aino, 0.35, 0.997; bovine ephemeral fever, 0.29, 0.961; swine vesicular disease, 0.50, 0.969; foot-and-mouth disease, 0.53, 0.978; hog cholera, 0.55, 0.974; bluetongue, 0.83, 0.958; and minute virus of mice, 1.07, 0.935.

  18. Field trials of an inactivated virus vaccine against porcine parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, J M; del Pozo, M; Simarro, I

    1992-07-01

    Serological response and reproductive performance were estimated in field trials of an inactivated virus vaccine against porcine parvovirus. Experiments were carried out in 10 selected pig breeding herds. A total of 277 seronegative gilts were used. Two hundred and twenty animals were vaccinated twice before mating, fourteen days apart and revaccinated after farrowing. Blood samples were obtained from both vaccinated and non-vaccinated (57 animal) control gilts, one week after the 2nd dose of vaccination, at farrowing time and one week after revaccination. Although there were considerable variations among the herds, the number of returns to oestrus in all herds was higher in vaccinated gilts (11.81%) than in the controls (10.52%). This difference, however, was not statistically significant. The reproductive performance results revealed the absence of an increase in the total born, as pooled values, in vaccinated gilts compared to controls. However, when these results are interpreted in relation to serological data, many control gilts were already seropositive before mating, or remained seronegative at farrowing. According to our results, the duration of immunity with this vaccine is apparently short, as there is a clear decrease in the titres between the 1st and the 2nd sampling times (2.35 +/- 0.14 and 1.97 +/- 0.08, respectively).

  19. Inactivation of Escherichia coli in soil by solarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.; Nishihara, M.; Kawasaki, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Matsuura, K.; Koga, T.; Ueno, D.; Inoue, K.; Someya, T.

    2009-01-01

    Contamination of agricultural soil by fecal pathogenic bacteria poses a potential risk of infection to humans. For the biosafety control of field soil, soil solarization in an upland field was examined to determine the efficiency of solarization on the inactivation of Escherichia coli inoculated into soil as a model microorganism for human pathogenic bacteria. Soil solarization, carried out by sprinkling water and covering the soil surface with thin plastic sheets, greatly increased the soil temperature. The daily average temperature of the solarized soil was 4–10°C higher than that of the non-solarized soil and fluctuated between 31 and 38°C. The daily highest temperature reached more than 40°C for 8 days in total in the solarized soil during the second and third weeks of the experiment. Escherichia coli in the solarized soil became undetectable (< 0.08 c.f.u. g −1 dry soil) within 4 weeks as a result, whereas E. coli survived for more than 6 weeks in the non-solarized soil. Soil solarization, however, had little influence on the total direct count and total viable count of bacteria in the soil. These results indicate that soil solarization would be useful for the biosafety control of soil contaminated by human pathogens via immature compost or animal feces. (author)

  20. Probing Mercaptobenzamides as HIV Inactivators via Nucleocapsid Protein 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mrinmoy; Scerba, Michael T; Shank, Nathaniel I; Hartman, Tracy L; Buchholz, Caitlin A; Buckheit, Robert W; Durell, Stewart R; Appella, Daniel H

    2017-05-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nucleocapsid protein 7 (NCp7), a zinc finger protein, plays critical roles in viral replication and maturation and is an attractive target for drug development. However, the development of drug-like molecules that inhibit NCp7 has been a significant challenge. In this study, a series of novel 2-mercaptobenzamide prodrugs were investigated for anti-HIV activity in the context of NCp7 inactivation. The molecules were synthesized from the corresponding thiosalicylic acids, and they are all crystalline solids and stable at room temperature. Derivatives with a range of amide side chains and aromatic substituents were synthesized and screened for anti-HIV activity. Wide ranges of antiviral activity were observed, with IC 50 values ranging from 1 to 100 μm depending on subtle changes to the substituents on the aromatic ring and side chain. Results from these structure-activity relationships were fit to a probable mode of intracellular activation and interaction with NCp7 to explain variations in antiviral activity. Our strategy to make a series of mercaptobenzamide prodrugs represents a general new direction to make libraries that can be screened for anti-HIV activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Inactivation of Salmonella on Eggshells by Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyobi; Yum, Bora; Yoon, Sung-Sik; Song, Kyoung-Ju; Kim, Jong-Rak; Myeong, Donghoon; Chang, Byungjoon; Choe, Nong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Microbiological contamination of eggs should be prevented in the poultry industry, as poultry is one of the major reservoirs of human Salmonella. ClO2 gas has been reported to be an effective disinfectant in various industry fields, particularly the food industry. The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of chlorine dioxide gas on two strains of Salmonella inoculated onto eggshells under various experimental conditions including concentrations, contact time, humidity, and percentage organic matter. As a result, it was shown that chlorine dioxide gas under wet conditions was more effective in inactivating Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum compared to that under dry conditions independently of the presence of organic matter (yeast extract). Under wet conditions, a greater than 4 log reduction in bacterial populations was achieved after 30 min of exposure to ClO2 each at 20 ppm, 40 ppm, and 80 ppm against S. Enteritidis; 40 ppm and 80 ppm against S. Gallinarum. These results suggest that chlorine dioxide gas is an effective agent for controlling Salmonella, the most prevalent contaminant in the egg industry.

  2. Characterization and inactivation of an agmatine deiminase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Justin E.; Causey, Corey P.; Lovelace, Leslie; Knuckley, Bryan; Flick, Heather; Lebioda, Lukasz; Thompson, Paul R. (SC)

    2010-11-12

    Helicobacter pylori encodes a potential virulence factor, agmatine deiminase (HpAgD), which catalyzes the conversion of agmatine to N-carbamoyl putrescine (NCP) and ammonia - agmatine is decarboxylated arginine. Agmatine is an endogenous human cell signaling molecule that triggers the innate immune response in humans. Unlike H. pylori, humans do not encode an AgD; it is hypothesized that inhibition of this enzyme would increase the levels of agmatine, and thereby enhance the innate immune response. Taken together, these facts suggest that HpAgD is a potential drug target. Herein we describe the optimized expression, isolation, and purification of HpAgD (10-30 mg/L media). The initial kinetic characterization of this enzyme has also been performed. Additionally, the crystal structure of wild-type HpAgD has been determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. This structure provides a molecular basis for the preferential deimination of agmatine, and identifies Asp198 as a key residue responsible for agmatine recognition, which has been confirmed experimentally. Information gathered from these studies led to the development and characterization of a novel class of haloacetamidine-based HpAgD inactivators. These compounds are the most potent AgD inhibitors ever described.

  3. The properties of peptidyl diazoethanes and chloroethanes as protease inactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikstrom, P; Kirschke, H; Stone, S; Shaw, E

    1989-04-01

    Earlier work has demonstrated the irreversible inactivation of serine and cysteine proteinases by peptides with a C-terminal chloromethyl ketone group. With a C-terminal diazomethyl ketone, on the other hand, peptides become reagents specific for cysteine proteinases. We have now synthesized and examined the properties of reagents with an additional methyl side chain near the reactive grouping with the goal of diminishing side reactions in a cellular environment. Derivatives of neutral amino acids as well as of lysine and arginine have been prepared. The chloroethyl ketones are about 60% less reactive to chemical nucleophiles than the chloromethyl ketones. However, the susceptibilities of the proteases examined varied remarkably. Cathepsins B and L of the papain family of cysteine proteinases were much less susceptible (about 2 orders of magnitude less) to both peptidyl diazoethyl and chloroethyl ketones. In marked contrast, clostripain, a cysteine proteinase of a separate family was decisively more susceptible to chloroethyl ketones. The serine proteinases showed a drop in susceptibility to the chloroethyl ketones generally, and this was similar to the drop in chemical reactivity in proceeding from the chloromethyl to the chloroethyl ketone.

  4. Reversible brain inactivation induces discontinuous gas exchange in cockroaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2013-06-01

    Many insects at rest breathe discontinuously, alternating between brief bouts of gas exchange and extended periods of breath-holding. The association between discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) and inactivity has long been recognised, leading to speculation that DGCs lie at one end of a continuum of gas exchange patterns, from continuous to discontinuous, linked to metabolic rate (MR). However, the neural hypothesis posits that it is the downregulation of brain activity and a change in the neural control of gas exchange, rather than low MR per se, which is responsible for the emergence of DGCs during inactivity. To test this, Nauphoeta cinerea cockroaches had their brains inactivated by applying a Peltier-chilled cold probe to the head. Once brain temperature fell to 8°C, cockroaches switched from a continuous to a discontinuous breathing pattern. Re-warming the brain abolished the DGC and re-established a continuous breathing pattern. Chilling the brain did not significantly reduce the cockroaches' MR and there was no association between the gas exchange pattern displayed by the insect and its MR. This demonstrates that DGCs can arise due to a decrease in brain activity and a change in the underlying regulation of gas exchange, and are not necessarily a simple consequence of low respiratory demand.

  5. Advances in antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashef, Nasim; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2017-08-01

    The alarming worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance amongst microbial pathogens necessitates a search for new antimicrobial techniques, which will not be affected by, or indeed cause resistance themselves. Light-mediated photoinactivation is one such technique that takes advantage of the whole spectrum of light to destroy a broad spectrum of pathogens. Many of these photoinactivation techniques rely on the participation of a diverse range of nanoparticles and nanostructures that have dimensions very similar to the wavelength of light. Photodynamic inactivation relies on the photochemical production of singlet oxygen from photosensitizing dyes (type II pathway) that can benefit remarkably from formulation in nanoparticle-based drug delivery vehicles. Fullerenes are a closed-cage carbon allotrope nanoparticle with a high absorption coefficient and triplet yield. Their photochemistry is highly dependent on microenvironment, and can be type II in organic solvents and type I (hydroxyl radicals) in a biological milieu. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles act as a large band-gap semiconductor that can carry out photo-induced electron transfer under ultraviolet A light and can also produce reactive oxygen species that kill microbial cells. We discuss some recent studies in which quite remarkable potentiation of microbial killing (up to six logs) can be obtained by the addition of simple inorganic salts such as the non-toxic sodium/potassium iodide, bromide, nitrite, and even the toxic sodium azide. Interesting mechanistic insights were obtained to explain this increased killing.

  6. Enzymatic method for inactivation of aminoglycosides during measurement of postantibiotic effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. den Hollander (Jan); J.W. Mouton (Johan); I.A.J.M. Bakker-Woudenberg (Irma); F.P. Vleggaar (Frank); M.P.J. van Goor (Marie-Louise); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractTo determine the postantibiotic effect of aminoglycosides, two methods are currently being used to remove the test drug: repeated washing and dilution. An enzymatic inactivation method of removing gentamicin and tobramycin was developed and compared with the dilution

  7. Carbohydrates and dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum: The role of moisture distribution and water activity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linders, L.J.M.; Jong, de G.I.W.; Meerdink, G.; Riet, van 't K.

    1997-01-01

    Sucrose, maltose, lactose, trehalose, glucose, fructose and sorbitol were tested for their ability to minimize the dehydration inactivation of Lactobacillus plantarum during fluidized bed drying. Desorption isotherms were measured for starch and L. plantarum, for binary mixtures containing starch

  8. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine Information Statement. Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/ ...

  9. Mary Lyon's X-inactivation studies in the mouse laid the foundation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-20

    washington.edu. mutants, including those in females heterozygous for coat colour mutants translocated to the X chromosome, was due to random embryonic and somatically permanent X chromo- some inactivation. The model ...

  10. Incompatibility of lyophilized inactivated polio vaccine with liquid pentavalent whole-cell-pertussis-containing vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, H.; Have, Ten R.; Maas, van der L.; Kersten, G.F.A.; Amorij, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    A hexavalent vaccine containing diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, whole cell pertussis, Haemophilius influenza type B, hepatitis B and inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) may: (i) increase the efficiency of vaccination campaigns, (ii) reduce the number of injections thereby reducing needlestick

  11. ALTERNATIVE EQUATIONS FOR DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF IONIC CHANNEL ACTIVATION AND INACTIVATION GATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut ÖZER

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, alternative equations for dynamics of ionic channel activation and inactivation gates are proposed based on the path probability method. Dynamic behavior of a voltage-gated ionic channel is modeled by the conventional Hodgkin-Huxley (H-H mathematical formalism. In that model, conductance of the channel is defined in terms of activation and inactivation gates. Dynamics of the activation and inactivation gates is modeled by first-order differential equations dependent on the gate variable and the membrane potential. In the new approach proposed in this study, dynamic behavior of activation and inactivation gates is modeled by a firstorder differential equation dependent on internal energy and membrane potential by using the path probability method which is widely used in statistical physics. The new model doesn't require the time constant and steadystate values which are used explicitly in the H-H model. The numerical results show validity of the proposed method.

  12. Potential and limitation of UVC irradiation for the inactivation of pathogens in platelet concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, Fokke G.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van Engelenburg, Frank A. C.; Dekkers, David W. C.; Verhaar, Robin; de Korte, Dirk; Verhoeven, Arthur J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pathogen contamination, causing transfusion-transmitted diseases, is an ongoing concern in transfusion of cellular blood products. In this explorative study, the pathogen-inactivating capacity of UVC irradiation in platelet (PLT) concentrates was investigated. The dose dependencies of

  13. Studies of inactivation mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral virus by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsen, Shaw-Wei D; Kingsley, David H; Poweleit, Christian; Achilefu, Samuel; Soroka, Douglas S; Wu, T C; Tsen, Kong-Thon

    2014-02-05

    Low-power ultrashort pulsed (USP) lasers operating at wavelengths of 425 nm and near infrared region have been shown to effectively inactivate viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), M13 bacteriophage, and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV). It was shown previously that non-enveloped, helical viruses such as M13 bacteriophage, were inactivated by a USP laser through an impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (ISRS) process. Recently, enveloped virus like MCMV has been shown to be inactivated by a USP laser via protein aggregation induced by an ISRS process. However, the inactivation mechanism for a clinically important class of viruses--non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses remains unknown. We have ruled out the following four possible inactivation mechanisms for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses, namely, (1) inactivation due to ultraviolet C (UVC) photons produced by non-linear optical process of the intense, fundamental laser beam at 425 nm; (2) inactivation caused by thermal heating generated by the direct laser absorption/heating of the virion; (3) inactivation resulting from a one-photon absorption process via chromophores such as porphyrin molecules, or indicator dyes, potentially producing reactive oxygen or other species; (4) inactivation by the USP lasers in which the extremely intense laser pulse produces shock wave-like vibrations upon impact with the viral particle. We present data which support that the inactivation mechanism for non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses is the impulsive stimulated Raman scattering process. Real-time PCR experiments show that, within the amplicon size of 273 bp tested, there is no damage on the genome of MNV-1 caused by the USP laser irradiation. We conclude that our model non-enveloped virus, MNV-1, is inactivated by the ISRS process. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on photon-virus interactions on femtosecond time scales. From the analysis of the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of viral particles

  14. MPLEx: a method for simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of samples for multi-omics profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Gonzalez, Juan F.; Habyarimana, Fabien; Negretti, Nicholas M.; Sims, Amy C.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Thackray, Larissa B.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Kim, Young-Mo; Zink, Erika M.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Weitz, Karl K.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Ahmer, Brian; Konkel, Michael E.; Motin, Vladimir; Baric, Ralph S.; Diamond, Michael S.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Waters, Katrina M.; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2017-01-01

    The continued emergence and spread of infectious agents is of increasing concern due to increased population growth and the associated increased livestock production to meet food demands, increased urbanization and land-use changes, and greater travel. A systems biology approach to infectious disease research can significantly advance our understanding of host-pathogen relationships and facilitate the development of new therapies and vaccines. Molecular characterization of infectious samples outside of appropriate biosafety containment can only take place subsequent to pathogen inactivation. Herein, we describe a modified Folch extraction using chloroform/methanol that facilitates the molecular characterization of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and extraction of proteins, metabolites, and lipids for subsequent mass spectrometry-based multi-omics measurements. This metabolite, protein and lipid extraction (MPLEx) method resulted in complete inactivation of bacterial and viral pathogens with exposed lipid membranes, including Yersinia pestis, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Campylobacter jejuni in pure culture, and Yersinia pestis, Campylobacter jejuni, West Nile, MERS-CoV, Ebola, and influenza H7N9 viruses in infection studies. Partial inactivation was observed for pathogens without exposed lipid membranes including 99.99% inactivation of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 99.6% and >99% inactivation of Clostridium difficile spores and vegetative cells, respectively, and 50% inactivation of adenovirus type 5. To demonstrate that MPLEx yields biomaterial of sufficient quality for subsequent multi-omics analyses, we highlight select proteomics, metabolomics and lipidomics data from human epithelial lung cells infected with wild-type and mutant forms of influenza H7N9. We believe that MPLEx will facilitate systems biology studies of infectious samples by enabling simultaneous pathogen inactivation and multi

  15. Ammonia Inactivation of Ascaris Ova in Ecological Compost by Using Urine and Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parzen, Rebecca E.; Mercado Guzmán, Álvaro

    2012-01-01

    Viable ova of Ascaris lumbricoides, an indicator organism for pathogens, are frequently found in feces-derived compost produced from ecological toilets, demonstrating that threshold levels of time, temperature, pH, and moisture content for pathogen inactivation are not routinely met. Previous studies have determined that NH3 has ovicidal properties for pathogens, including Ascaris ova. This research attempted to achieve Ascaris inactivation via NH3 under environmental conditions commonly found in ecological toilets and using materials universally available in an ecological sanitation setting, including compost (feces and sawdust), urine, and ash. Compost mixed with stored urine and ash produced the most rapid inactivation, with significant inactivation observed after 2 weeks and with a time to 99% ovum inactivation (T99) of 8 weeks. Compost mixed with fresh urine and ash achieved a T99 of 15 weeks, after a 4-week lag phase. Both matrices had relatively high total-ammonia concentrations and pH values of >9.24 (pKa of ammonia). In compost mixed with ash only, and in compost mixed with fresh urine only, inactivation was observed after an 11-week lag phase. These matrices contained NH3 concentrations of 164 to 173 and 102 to 277 mg/liter, respectively, when inactivation occurred, which was below the previously hypothesized threshold for inactivation (280 mg/liter), suggesting that a lower threshold NH3 concentration may be possible with a longer contact time. Other significant results include the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia between pH values of 10.4 and 11.6, above the literature threshold pH of 10. PMID:22582051

  16. Equine abortion (herpes) virus: strain differences in susceptibility to inactivation by dithiothreitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingeborn, B; Dinter, Z

    1972-06-01

    The infectivity of equine abortion (herpes) virus (EAV) was inactivated by treatment with reduced dithiothreitol (DTT). According to their susceptibility to DTT, the EAV strains could be divided into three groups. The vaccine strain RAC-H (419) proved to be more resistant to DTT than all of the other 14 strains tested. The hemagglutinin of EAV was also inactivated by DTT; no strain differences were observed in this respect.

  17. Atmospheric plasma processes for microbial inactivation: food applications and stress response in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Gozzi, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is focused on cold atmospheric plasma treatments (GP) for microbial inactivation in food applications. In fact GP represents a promising emerging technology alternative to the traditional methods for the decontamination of foods. The objectives of this work were to evaluate: - the effects of GP treatments on microbial inactivation in model systems and in real foods; - the stress response in L. monocytogenes following exposure to different GP treatments. As far as t...

  18. Batrachotoxin uncouples gating charge immobilization from fast Na inactivation in squid giant axons

    OpenAIRE

    Tanguy, J.; Yeh, J.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The fast inactivation of sodium currents and the immobolization of sodium gating charge are thought to be closely coupled to each other. This notion was tested in the squid axon in which kinetics and steady-state properties of the gating charge movement were compared before and after removal of the Na inactivation by batrachotoxin (BTX), pronase, or chloramine-T. The immobilization of gating charge was determined by measuring the total charge movement (QON) obtained by integrating the ON gati...

  19. Ammonia inactivation of Ascaris ova in ecological compost by using urine and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, James W; Parzen, Rebecca E; Mercado Guzmán, Álvaro

    2012-08-01

    Viable ova of Ascaris lumbricoides, an indicator organism for pathogens, are frequently found in feces-derived compost produced from ecological toilets, demonstrating that threshold levels of time, temperature, pH, and moisture content for pathogen inactivation are not routinely met. Previous studies have determined that NH(3) has ovicidal properties for pathogens, including Ascaris ova. This research attempted to achieve Ascaris inactivation via NH(3) under environmental conditions commonly found in ecological toilets and using materials universally available in an ecological sanitation setting, including compost (feces and sawdust), urine, and ash. Compost mixed with stored urine and ash produced the most rapid inactivation, with significant inactivation observed after 2 weeks and with a time to 99% ovum inactivation (T(99)) of 8 weeks. Compost mixed with fresh urine and ash achieved a T(99) of 15 weeks, after a 4-week lag phase. Both matrices had relatively high total-ammonia concentrations and pH values of >9.24 (pK(a) of ammonia). In compost mixed with ash only, and in compost mixed with fresh urine only, inactivation was observed after an 11-week lag phase. These matrices contained NH(3) concentrations of 164 to 173 and 102 to 277 mg/liter, respectively, when inactivation occurred, which was below the previously hypothesized threshold for inactivation (280 mg/liter), suggesting that a lower threshold NH(3) concentration may be possible with a longer contact time. Other significant results include the hydrolysis of urea to ammonia between pH values of 10.4 and 11.6, above the literature threshold pH of 10.

  20. Heat inactivation of native plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activators in bovine milk: a revisited study

    OpenAIRE

    Denis, Thierry; Humbert, Gérard; Gaillard, Jean-Luc

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Thermal inactivation, at temperatures between 60 °C and 140 °C, of native plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activators were studied in bovine milk using improved enzymatic assays. While measured heat inactivation kinetic of plasmin and plasminogen were in line with previously reported values, plasminogen activators were, surprisingly, found to be as heat sensitive as plasmin and plasminogen in a milk system containing proteins with free SH groups. Activation energie...

  1. Evaluation of Different Dose-Response Models for High Hydrostatic Pressure Inactivation of Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzrul, Sencer

    2017-09-07

    Modeling of microbial inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) requires a plot of the log microbial count or survival ratio versus time data under a constant pressure and temperature. However, at low pressure and temperature values, very long holding times are needed to obtain measurable inactivation. Since the time has a significant effect on the cost of HHP processing it may be reasonable to fix the time at an appropriate value and quantify the inactivation with respect to pressure. Such a plot is called dose-response curve and it may be more beneficial than the traditional inactivation modeling since short holding times with different pressure values can be selected and used for the modeling of HHP inactivation. For this purpose, 49 dose-response curves (with at least 4 log 10 reduction and ≥5 data points including the atmospheric pressure value ( P = 0.1 MPa), and with holding time ≤10 min) for HHP inactivation of microorganisms obtained from published studies were fitted with four different models, namely the Discrete model, Shoulder model, Fermi equation, and Weibull model, and the pressure value needed for 5 log 10 ( P ₅) inactivation was calculated for all the models above. The Shoulder model and Fermi equation produced exactly the same parameter and P ₅ values, while the Discrete model produced similar or sometimes the exact same parameter values as the Fermi equation. The Weibull model produced the worst fit (had the lowest adjusted determination coefficient (R² adj ) and highest mean square error (MSE) values), while the Fermi equation had the best fit (the highest R² adj and lowest MSE values). Parameters of the models and also P ₅ values of each model can be useful for the further experimental design of HHP processing and also for the comparison of the pressure resistance of different microorganisms. Further experiments can be done to verify the P ₅ values at given conditions. The procedure given in this study can also be extended

  2. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    Vitor Vilar; Caio Silva; Sandra Miranda; Filipe Lopes; Mário Silva; Márcia Dezotti; Adrian M T Silva; Joaquim Luís Faria; Rui Boaventura; Eugenia Pinto

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial ...

  3. Heavy ion effects on mammalian cells: Inactivation measurements with different cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, H.; Kraft-Weyrather, W.; Miltenburger, H.G.; Kraft, G.

    1985-07-01

    In track segment experiments, the inactivation of different mammalian cells by heavy charged particles between helium and uranium in the energy range between 1 and 1000 MeV/u has been measured at the heavy ion accelerator Unilac, Darmstadt, the Tandem Van de Graaf, Heidelberg and the Bevalac, Berkeley. The inactivation cross sections calculated from the final slope of the dose effect curves are given as a function of the particle energy and the LET. (orig.)

  4. Microwave-Irradiation-Assisted HVAC Filtration for Inactivation of Viral Aerosols (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Rengasamy et al. (2010) and Woo et al. (2011) confirmed the inactivation effect of biocidal filters incorporated antimicrobial agents, e.g., silver... Antimicrobial Technologies. Am. J. Infect. Control 38: 9–17. U.S. Army (1998). Filter Medium, Fire-resistant, High Efficiency, Military...Inactivation of Bacteria and Fungus Aerosols Using Microwave Irradiation. J. Aerosol Sci. 41: 682–693. Wu, Y. and Yao, M. (2010b). Effects of Microwave

  5. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase behaviors regarding heat- and pressure-induced inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crelier, S; Robert, M C; Claude, J; Juillerat, M A

    2001-11-01

    The combined high pressure/thermal (HP/T) inactivation of tomato pectin methyl esterase (PME) and polygalacturonase (PG) was investigated as a possible alternative to thermal processing classically used for enzyme inactivation. The temperature and pressure ranges tested were from 60 degrees C to 105 degrees C, and from 0.1 to 800 MPa, respectively. PME, a heat-labile enzyme at ambient pressure, is dramatically stabilized against thermal denaturation at pressures above atmospheric and up to 500-600 MPa. PG, however, is very resistant to thermal denaturation at 0.1 MPa, but quickly and easily inactivated by combinations of moderate temperatures and pressures. Selective inactivation of either PME or PG was achieved by choosing proper combinations of P and T. The inactivation kinetics of these enzymes was measured and described mathematically over the investigated portion of the P/T plane. Whereas medium composition and salinity had little influence on the inactivation rates, PME was found less sensitive to both heat and pressure when pH was raised above its physiological value. PG, on the other hand, became more labile at higher pH values. The results are discussed in terms of isoenzymes and other physicochemical features of PME and PG.

  6. Inactivation of enteropathogenic E. coli by solar disinfection (SODIS) under simulated sunlight conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubomba-Jaswa, E; Boyle, M A R; McGuigan, K G [Department of Physiology and Medical Physics, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: kmcguigan@rcsi.ie

    2008-02-01

    Solar Disinfection (SODIS) is a low cost water treatment method currently used in communities that do not have year round access to safe water. However, there is still reluctance in widespread adoption of this treatment method due to a number of limitations. An important limitation is the lack of SODIS inactivation studies on some waterborne pathogens in the developing world. SODIS inactivation of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), a major cause of infantile diarrhoea is reported for the first time under simulated sunlight conditions and following a natural temperature profile. EPEC was exposed to simulated sunlight (885Wm{sup -2}) for periods up to a cumulative time of 4 hours. Inactivation was determined by a log reduction in growth of the organisms. The temperature (deg. C) of the water was taken at every time point. After 4 hours exposure EPEC was completely inactivated (7 log reduction) by SODIS. Imposing a realistic water temperature profile (min-max) concomitant with irradiation produces a greater kill of EPEC. Maintaining simulated sunlight experiments at a high fixed temperature may result in over-estimation of inactivation. Following a natural water temperature profile will result in more reliable inactivation comparable with those that might be obtained under natural sunlight conditions.

  7. Inactivation of enteropathogenic E. coli by solar disinfection (SODIS) under simulated sunlight conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubomba-Jaswa, E.; Boyle, M. A. R.; McGuigan, K. G.

    2008-02-01

    Solar Disinfection (SODIS) is a low cost water treatment method currently used in communities that do not have year round access to safe water. However, there is still reluctance in widespread adoption of this treatment method due to a number of limitations. An important limitation is the lack of SODIS inactivation studies on some waterborne pathogens in the developing world. SODIS inactivation of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), a major cause of infantile diarrhoea is reported for the first time under simulated sunlight conditions and following a natural temperature profile. EPEC was exposed to simulated sunlight (885Wm-2) for periods up to a cumulative time of 4 hours. Inactivation was determined by a log reduction in growth of the organisms. The temperature (°C) of the water was taken at every time point. After 4 hours exposure EPEC was completely inactivated (7 log reduction) by SODIS. Imposing a realistic water temperature profile (min-max) concomitant with irradiation produces a greater kill of EPEC. Maintaining simulated sunlight experiments at a high fixed temperature may result in over --estimation of inactivation. Following a natural water temperature profile will result in more reliable inactivation comparable with those that might be obtained under natural sunlight conditions.

  8. Membrane Permeabilization in Relation to Inactivation Kinetics of Lactobacillus Species due to Pulsed Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Patrick C.; Bos, Ad P.; Ueckert, Joerg

    2001-01-01

    Membrane permeabilization due to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment of gram-positive Lactobacillus cells was investigated by using propidium iodide uptake and single-cell analysis with flow cytometry. Electric field strength, energy input, treatment time, and growth phase affected membrane permeabilization of Lactobacillus plantarum during PEF treatment. A correlation between PEF inactivation and membrane permeabilization of L. plantarum cells was demonstrated, whereas no relationship was observed between membrane permeabilization and heat inactivation. The same results were obtained with a Lactobacillus fermentum strain, but the latter organism was more PEF resistant and exhibited less membrane permeabilization, indicating that various bacteria have different responses to PEF treatment. While membrane permeabilization was the main factor involved in the mechanism of inactivation, the growth phase and the acidity of the environment also influenced inactivation. By using flow cytometry it was possible to sort cells in the L. plantarum population based on different cell sizes and shapes, and the results were confirmed by image analysis. An apparent effect of morphology on membrane permeabilization was observed, and larger cells were more easily permeabilized than smaller cells. In conclusion, our results indicate that the ability of PEF treatment to cause membrane permeabilization is an important factor in determining inactivation. This finding should have an effect on the final choice of the processing parameters used so that all microorganisms can be inactivated and, consequently, on the use of PEF treatment as an alternative method for preserving food products. PMID:11425727

  9. Inactivation of filter bound aerosolized MS2 bacteriophages using a non-conductive ultrasound transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versoza, Michael; Jung, Wonseok; Barabad, Mona Loraine; Lee, Yongil; Choi, Kyomin; Park, Duckshin

    2018-05-01

    The inactivation of viruses that retain their infectivity when transmitted through the air is challenging. To address this issue, this study used a non-contact ultrasound transducer (NCUT) to generate shock waves in the air at specific distances, input voltages, and exposure durations, targeting bacteriophage virus aerosols captured on to H14 HEPA filters. Initially, a frequency of 27.56 kHz (50V) at 25-mm distance was used, which yielded an inactivation efficiency of up to 32.69 ± 12.10%. Other frequencies at shorter distances were investigated, where 29.10 kHz had the highest inactivation efficiency (up to 81.95 ± 9.79% at 8.5-mm distance and 100 V). Longer exposure times also influenced virus inactivation, but the results were inconclusive because the NCUT overheated with time. Overall, NCUT appears to be a promising method for inactivating virus aerosols that may be safer than other forms of inactivation, which can cause genetic mutations or produce dangerous by-products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterisation of inactivation domains and evolutionary strata in human X chromosome through Markov segmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Kelkar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Markov segmentation is a method of identifying compositionally different subsequences in a given symbolic sequence. We have applied this technique to the DNA sequence of the human X chromosome to analyze its compositional structure. The human X chromosome is known to have acquired DNA through distinct evolutionary events and is believed to be composed of five evolutionary strata. In addition, in female mammals all copies of X chromosome in excess of one are transcriptionally inactivated. The location of a gene is correlated with its ability to undergo inactivation, but correlations between evolutionary strata and inactivation domains are less clear. Our analysis provides an accurate estimate of the location of stratum boundaries and gives a high-resolution map of compositionally different regions on the X chromosome. This leads to the identification of a novel stratum, as well as segments wherein a group of genes either undergo inactivation or escape inactivation in toto. We identify oligomers that appear to be unique to inactivation domains alone.

  11. Inactivation of catalase by free radicals derived from oxygen via gamma radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhaire, J.P.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Sabourault, D.; Ribiere, C.

    1991-01-01

    The inactivation of catalase (10 -5 mol/l) by OH· or OH·/O 2 - · free radicals, at pH 7.4, has been investigated using γ radiolysis with doses up to 9000 Gy. Maxima initial G-values of catalase inactivation have been determined. These values are inferior to those of the free radicals OH· and O 2 - · produced by water radiolysis. Nevertheless, the presence of O 2 /O 2 - · enhances the inactivation due to OH· radicals. The general shape of the inactivation curves as a function of the radiation dose is biphasic: an initial rapid phase (from 0 to ∼ 500 Gy) followed by a slow phase (from ∼ 500 to 9000 Gy). The addition of H 2 O 2 at the beginning of irradiation decreases the inactivation yield by OH· radicals. This phenomenon could be due to the formation of compound-I (catalase-H 2 O 2 ) which would be less sensitive towards OH· radicals than catalase. In the presence of 0.1 mol/l ethanol, catalase (5 x 10 -6 mol/l) is not inactived by O 2 - · and RO 2 · (from ethanol) radicals for an irradiation dose of 2000 Gy, implying a complete protecting effect by ethanol [fr

  12. Inactivation strategy for pseudorabies virus in milk for production of biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jen-Ting; Chou, Yu-Chi; Lin, Meng-Shiue; Wang, Shih-Rong

    2010-11-01

    By selecting pseudorabies virus (PrV) as a model virus, this study assessed the feasibility of applying viral inactivation strategies to manufacturing medicinal products from the milk of transgenic sows. The efficacy of heat, acidic/alkaline and detergent treatments was also evaluated with respect to their ability to inactivate PrV in milk samples. Experimental results indicate that PrV was inactivated obviously at least 7.125 log10 for 30 min at 60 degrees C. At alkaline values of pH 10 and acidic value of pH 4, PrV infectivity was reduced to 3.625 log10 and exceeded 5 log10, respectively. Moreover, PrV virus was inactivated efficiently (> 3.875 log10) by using 0.25-1% of Triton X-100 treatment and without a loss of biological activity of the recombinant human coagulation factor IX (rhFIX). of this study demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed detergent inactivation method for PrV inactivation of rhFIX production from transgenic products, especially in milk materials.

  13. An inactivated yellow fever 17DD vaccine cultivated in Vero cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata C; Silva, Andrea N M R; Souza, Marta Cristina O; Silva, Marlon V; Neves, Patrícia P C C; Silva, Andrea A M V; Matos, Denise D C S; Herrera, Miguel A O; Yamamura, Anna M Y; Freire, Marcos S; Gaspar, Luciane P; Caride, Elena

    2015-08-20

    Yellow fever is an acute infectious disease caused by prototype virus of the genus Flavivirus. It is endemic in Africa and South America where it represents a serious public health problem causing epidemics of hemorrhagic fever with mortality rates ranging from 20% to 50%. There is no available antiviral therapy and vaccination is the primary method of disease control. Although the attenuated vaccines for yellow fever show safety and efficacy it became necessary to develop a new yellow fever vaccine due to the occurrence of rare serious adverse events, which include visceral and neurotropic diseases. The new inactivated vaccine should be safer and effective as the existing attenuated one. In the present study, the immunogenicity of an inactivated 17DD vaccine in C57BL/6 mice was evaluated. The yellow fever virus was produced by cultivation of Vero cells in bioreactors, inactivated with β-propiolactone, and adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide (alum). Mice were inoculated with inactivated 17DD vaccine containing alum adjuvant and followed by intracerebral challenge with 17DD virus. The results showed that animals receiving 3 doses of the inactivated vaccine (2 μg/dose) with alum adjuvant had neutralizing antibody titers above the cut-off of PRNT50 (Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test). In addition, animals immunized with inactivated vaccine showed survival rate of 100% after the challenge as well as animals immunized with commercial attenuated 17DD vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Silva, Mário; Dezotti, Márcia; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial population was not visibly reduced in the bioaerosol by ultraviolet light A (UVA) photolysis. The UVA photocatalytic process for the inactivation of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, ATCC strains and isolates from indoor air samples of a WWTP) using titanium dioxide (TiO 2 P25) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was tested in both liquid-phase and airborne conditions. In the slurry conditions at liquid phase, P25 showed a better performance in inactivation. For this reason, gas-phase assays were performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolithic structures coated with P25. The survival rate of microorganisms under study decreased with the catalyst load and the UVA exposure time. Inactivation of fungi was slower than resistant bacteria, followed by Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Graphical abstract Inactivation of fungi and bacteria in gas phase by photocatalitic process performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolith structures coated with TiO 2 .

  15. Design and Mechanism of Tetrahydrothiophene-Based γ-Aminobutyric Acid Aminotransferase Inactivators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Hoang V. [Departments; Hawker, Dustin D. [Departments; Wu, Rui [Department; Doud, Emma [Departments; Widom, Julia [Departments; Sanishvili, Ruslan [X-ray; Liu, Dali [Department; Kelleher, Neil L. [Departments; Silverman, Richard B. [Departments

    2015-03-25

    Low levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), one of two major neurotransmitters that regulate brain neuronal activity, are associated with many neurological disorders, such as epilepsy, Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease, and cocaine addiction. One of the main methods to raise the GABA level in human brain is to use small molecules that cross the bloodbrain barrier and inhibit the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT), the enzyme that degrades GABA. We have designed a series of conformationally restricted tetrahydrothiophene-based GABA analogues with a properly positioned leaving group that could facilitate a ring-opening mechanism, leading to inactivation of GABA-AT. One compound in the series is 8 times more efficient an inactivator of GABA-AT than vigabatrin, the only FDA-approved inactivator of GABA-AT. Our mechanistic studies show that the compound inactivates GABA-AT by a new mechanism. The metabolite resulting from inactivation does not covalently bind to amino acid residues of GABA-AT but stays in the active site via H-bonding interactions with Arg-192, a pi-pi interaction with Phe-189, and a weak nonbonded (SO)-O-...=C interaction with Glu-270, thereby inactivating the enzyme.

  16. Kinetic parameters for thermal inactivation of soluble peroxidase from needles of Serbian spruce Picea omorika (Pancić) Purkyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laketa, Danijela; Bogdanović, Jelena; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Radotić, Ksenija

    2009-03-01

    Thermal inactivation of peroxidase (POD) in an extract of Picea omorika (Pancić) Purkyne needles initiated by heat treatment was studied. This is the first study of this kind on a conifer species. Non-linear regression analysis was applied on the inactivation rate data, combining Mitscherlich and Arrhenius equations, treating time and temperature simultaneously as explaining variables. We determined the inactivation rate constant k, the Arrhenius energy of inactivation E and the remaining activity C(min) for the crude extract and for separated acidic and basic enzyme fractions, as well as for individual isoenzymes separated electrophoretically. A comparison of inactivation parameters for acidic and basic fractions shows that the thermal inactivation rate of the basic fraction is higher. The obtained value of inactivation energy for crude extract was between the values for acidic and basic isoenzyme fractions. One of the three analysed individual isoenzymes was characterised by a lower inactivation rate constant and higher inactivation energy. Another isoenzyme showed considerably higher level of remaining activity compared to the others, which identified it as the most resistant to high temperatures. The acquired values of Arrhenius energy of inactivation for POD in crude extract were intermediate, considering a range of POD values for various other plant species.

  17. Structural Mechanisms of Inactivation in Scabies Mite Serine Protease Paralogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Katja; Langendorf, Christopher G.; Irving, James A.; Reynolds, Simone; Willis, Charlene; Beckham, Simone; Law, Ruby H.P.; Yang, Sundy; Bashtannyk-Puhalovich, Tanya A.; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C.; Pike, Robert N.; Kemp, David J.; Buckle, Ashley M.; (Monash); (Queensland Inst. of Med. Rsrch.)

    2009-08-07

    The scabies mite (Sarcoptes scabiei) is a parasite responsible for major morbidity in disadvantaged communities and immuno-compromised patients worldwide. In addition to the physical discomfort caused by the disease, scabies infestations facilitate infection by Streptococcal species via skin lesions, resulting in a high prevalence of rheumatic fever/heart disease in affected communities. The scabies mite produces 33 proteins that are closely related to those in the dust mite group 3 allergen and belong to the S1-like protease family (chymotrypsin-like). However, all but one of these molecules contain mutations in the conserved active-site catalytic triad that are predicted to render them catalytically inactive. These molecules are thus termed scabies mite inactivated protease paralogues (SMIPPs). The precise function of SMIPPs is unclear; however, it has been suggested that these proteins might function by binding and protecting target substrates from cleavage by host immune proteases, thus preventing the host from mounting an effective immune challenge. In order to begin to understand the structural basis for SMIPP function, we solved the crystal structures of SMIPP-S-I1 and SMIPP-S-D1 at 1.85 {angstrom} and 2.0 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both structures adopt the characteristic serine protease fold, albeit with large structural variations over much of the molecule. In both structures, mutations in the catalytic triad together with occlusion of the S1 subsite by a conserved Tyr200 residue is predicted to block substrate ingress. Accordingly, we show that both proteases lack catalytic function. Attempts to restore function (via site-directed mutagenesis of catalytic residues as well as Tyr200) were unsuccessful. Taken together, these data suggest that SMIPPs have lost the ability to bind substrates in a classical 'canonical' fashion, and instead have evolved alternative functions in the lifecycle of the scabies mite.

  18. Modelling the Ozone-Based Treatments for Inactivation of Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodowska, Agnieszka Joanna; Nowak, Agnieszka; Kondratiuk-Janyska, Alina; Piątkowski, Marcin; Śmigielski, Krzysztof

    2017-10-09

    The paper presents the development of a model for ozone treatment in a dynamic bed of different microorganisms ( Bacillus subtilis , B. cereus , B. pumilus , Escherichia coli , Pseudomonas fluorescens , Aspergillus niger , Eupenicillium cinnamopurpureum ) on a heterogeneous matrix (juniper berries, cardamom seeds) initially treated with numerous ozone doses during various contact times was studied. Taking into account various microorganism susceptibility to ozone, it was of great importance to develop a sufficiently effective ozone dose to preserve food products using different strains based on the microbial model. For this purpose, we have chosen the Weibull model to describe the survival curves of different microorganisms. Based on the results of microorganism survival modelling after ozone treatment and considering the least susceptible strains to ozone, we selected the critical ones. Among tested strains, those from genus Bacillus were recognized as the most critical strains. In particular, B. subtilis and B. pumilus possessed the highest resistance to ozone treatment because the time needed to achieve the lowest level of its survival was the longest (up to 17.04 min and 16.89 min for B. pumilus reduction on juniper berry and cardamom seed matrix, respectively). Ozone treatment allow inactivate microorganisms to achieving lower survival rates by ozone dose (20.0 g O₃/m³ O₂, with a flow rate of 0.4 L/min) and contact time (up to 20 min). The results demonstrated that a linear correlation between parameters p and k in Weibull distribution, providing an opportunity to calculate a fitted equation of the process.

  19. Inactivation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, U.; Iliakis, G.; Kraft, G.

    1983-01-01

    Exponentially growing and plateau-phase cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were irradiated with heavy ions (Z greater than or equal to 20) and assayed for loss of reproductive capacity either immediately or at delayed times after irradiation. The results indicated no modification of the exponential dose response due to conditions which usually favor the repair of potentially lethal damage at low ionization density. Postirradiation treatment of the cells with a DNA synthesis inhibitor known to act on PLD repair resulted in effects similar to those observed without this drug and confirmed the hypothesis that at such high values of ionization density only lethal, unmodifiable damage can be expressed. The inactivation cross-section values calculated from the slope of the measured survival curves showed no significant correlations with commonly used parameters of radiation quality. Instead, a functional dependence on the primary ion energy was indicated, being smaller by a factor of two at low energies (less than or equal to 2 MeV/amu) compared with values at energies above 4 MeV/amu, where agreement with the morphological nuclear cross section of the culture was found. This suggests that at higher specific ion energies energetic secondary electrons contribute to the induction of lethal damage, and that interaction of damaged sites between the primary track and the track ends of delta electrons may occur. The data are therefore also discussed in terms of the penumbra model which emphasizes the role of delta electrons in cell killing when radiations with very high ionization density are applied

  20. Perfluorooctanesulfonate Mediates Renal Tubular Cell Apoptosis through PPARgamma Inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Wen

    Full Text Available Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs are ubiquitously distributed in the environments including stainless pan-coating, raincoat, fire extinguisher, and semiconductor products. The PPAR family has been shown to contribute to the toxic effects of PFCs in thymus, immune and excretory systems. Herein, we demonstrated that perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS caused cell apoptosis through increasing ratio of Bcl-xS/xL, cytosolic cytochrome C, and caspase 3 activation in renal tubular cells (RTCs. In addition, PFOS increased transcription of inflammatory cytokines (i.e., TNFα, ICAM1, and MCP1 by NFκB activation. Conversely, PFOS reduced the mRNA levels of antioxidative enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, as a result of reduced PPARγ transactivational activity by using reporter and chromatin immuoprecipitation (ChIP assays. PFOS reduced the protein interaction between PPARγ and PPARγ coactivator-1 alpha (PGC1α by PPARγ deacetylation through Sirt1 upregulation, of which the binding of PPARγ and PGC1α to a peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE in the promoter regions of these antioxidative enzymes was alleviated in the ChIP assay. Furthermore, Sirt1 also deacetylated p53 and then increased the binding of p53 to Bax, resulting in increased cytosolic cytochrome C. The effect of PPARγ inactivation by PFOS was validated using the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, whereas the adverse effects of PFOS were prevented by PPARγ overexpression and activators, rosiglitozone and L-carnitine, in RTCs. The in vitro finding of protective effect of L-carnitine was substantiated in vivo using Balb/c mice model subjected to PFOS challenge. Altogether, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for the protective mechanism of L-carnitine in eliminating PFOS-mediated renal injury, at least partially, through PPARγ activation.

  1. Photocatalytic inactivation of biofilms on bioactive dental adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanling; Strømme, Maria; Melhus, Asa; Engqvist, Håkan; Welch, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are the most prevalent mode of microbial life in nature and are 10-1000 times more resistant to antibiotics than planktonic bacteria. Persistent biofilm growth associated at the margin of a dental restoration often leads to secondary caries, which remains a challenge in restorative dentistry. In this work, we present the first in vitro evaluation of on-demand photocatalytic inactivation of biofilm on a novel dental adhesive containing TiO2 nanoparticles. Streptococcus mutans biofilm was cultured on this photocatalytic surface for 16 h before photocatalytic treatment with ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light. UV-A doses ranging from 3 to 43 J/cm(2) were applied to the surface and the resulting viability of biofilms was evaluated with a metabolic activity assay incorporating phenol red that provided a quantitative measure of the reduction in viability due to the photocatalytic treatments. We show that an UV-A irradiation dose of 8.4 J/cm(2) leads to one order of magnitude reduction in the number of biofilm bacteria on the surface of the dental adhesives while as much as 5-6 orders of magnitude reduction in the corresponding number can be achieved with a dose of 43 J/cm(2). This material maintains its functional properties as an adhesive in restorative dentistry while offering the possibility of a novel dental procedure in the treatment or prevention of bacterial infections via on-demand UV-A irradiation. Similar materials could be developed for the treatment of additional indications such as peri-implantits. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Thermal inactivation kinetics of Bacillus coagulans spores in tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing; Mah, Jae-Hyung; Somavat, Romel; Mohamed, Hussein; Sastry, Sudhir; Tang, Juming

    2012-07-01

    The thermal characteristics of the spores and vegetative cells of three strains of Bacillus coagulans (ATCC 8038, ATCC 7050, and 185A) in tomato juice were evaluated. B. coagulans ATCC 8038 was chosen as the target microorganism for thermal processing of tomato products due to its spores having the highest thermal resistance among the three strains. The thermal inactivation kinetics of B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores in tomato juice between 95 and 115°C were determined independently in two different laboratories using two different heating setups. The results obtained from both laboratories were in general agreement, with z-values (z-value is defined as the change in temperature required for a 10-fold reduction of the D-value, which is defined as the time required at a certain temperature for a 1-log reduction of the target microorganisms) of 8.3 and 8.7°C, respectively. The z-value of B. coagulans 185A spores in tomato juice (pH 4.3) was found to be 10.2°C. The influence of environmental factors, including cold storage time, pH, and preconditioning, upon the thermal resistance of these bacterial spores is discussed. The results obtained showed that a storage temperature of 4°C was appropriate for maintaining the viability and thermal resistance of B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores. Acidifying the pH of tomato juice decreased the thermal resistance of these spores. A 1-h exposure at room temperature was considered optimal for preconditioning B. coagulans ATCC 8038 spores in tomato juice.

  3. Activation of inactivation process initiates rapid eye movement sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Birendra Nath; Singh, Abhishek; Khanday, Mudasir Ahmad

    2012-06-01

    Interactions among REM-ON and REM-OFF neurons form the basic scaffold for rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) regulation; however, precise mechanism of their activation and cessation, respectively, was unclear. Locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenalin (NA)-ergic neurons are REM-OFF type and receive GABA-ergic inputs among others. GABA acts postsynaptically on the NA-ergic REM-OFF neurons in the LC and presynaptically on the latter's projection terminals and modulates NA-release on the REM-ON neurons. Normally during wakefulness and non-REMS continuous release of NA from the REM-OFF neurons, which however, is reduced during the latter phase, inhibits the REM-ON neurons and prevents REMS. At this stage GABA from substantia nigra pars reticulate acting presynaptically on NA-ergic terminals on REM-ON neurons withdraws NA-release causing the REM-ON neurons to escape inhibition and being active, may be even momentarily. A working-model showing neurochemical-map explaining activation of inactivation process, showing contribution of GABA-ergic presynaptic inhibition in withdrawing NA-release and dis-inhibition induced activation of REM-ON neurons, which in turn activates other GABA-ergic neurons and shutting-off REM-OFF neurons for the initiation of REMS-generation has been explained. Our model satisfactorily explains yet unexplained puzzles (i) why normally REMS does not appear during waking, rather, appears following non-REMS; (ii) why cessation of LC-NA-ergic-REM-OFF neurons is essential for REMS-generation; (iii) factor(s) which does not allow cessation of REM-OFF neurons causes REMS-loss; (iv) the association of changes in levels of GABA and NA in the brain during REMS and its deprivation and associated symptoms; v) why often dreams are associated with REMS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MECP2 promoter methylation and X chromosome inactivation in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Raman P; Patzel, Katherine A; Martin, Michelle; Yasui, Dag H; Swanberg, Susan E; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hansen, Robin L; Van de Water, Judy; Pessah, Isaac N; Jiang, Ruby; Robinson, Wendy P; LaSalle, Janine M

    2008-06-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the etiology of autism. This hypothesis is supported by the discovery of increased MECP2 promoter methylation associated with decreased MeCP2 protein expression in autism male brain. To further understand the influence of female X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and neighboring methylation patterns on aberrant MECP2 promoter methylation in autism, multiple methylation analyses were peformed on brain and blood samples from individuals with autism. Bisulfite sequencing analyses of a region 0.6 kb upstream of MECP2 in brain DNA samples revealed an abrupt transition from a highly methylated region in both sexes to a region unmethylated in males and subject to XCI in females. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that the CCTC-binding factor (CTCF) bound to this transition region in neuronal cells, consistent with a chromatin boundary at the methylation transition. Male autism brain DNA samples displayed a slight increase in methylation in this transition region, suggesting a possible aberrant spreading of methylation into the MECP2 promoter in autism males across this boundary element. In addition, autistic female brain DNA samples showed evidence for aberrant MECP2 promoter methylation as an increase in the number of bisulfite sequenced clones with undefined XCI status for MECP2 but not androgen receptor (AR). To further investigate the specificity of MECP2 methylation alterations in autism, blood DNA samples from females and mothers of males with autism were also examined for XCI skewing at AR, but no significant increase in XCI skewing was observed compared to controls. These results suggest that the aberrant MECP2 methylation in autism brain DNA samples is due to locus-specific rather than global X chromosome methylation changes.

  5. Atmospheric plasma inactivation of foodborne pathogens on fresh produce surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critzer, Faith J; Kelly-Wintenberg, Kimberly; South, Suzanne L; Golden, David A

    2007-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of one atmosphere uniform glow discharge plasma (OAUGDP) on inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Listeria monocytogenes on apples, cantaloupe, and lettuce, respectively. A five-strain mixture of cultured test organisms was washed, suspended in phosphate buffer, and spot inoculated onto produce (7 log CFU per sample). Samples were exposed inside a chamber affixed to the OAUGDP blower unit operated at a power of 9 kV and frequency of 6 kHz. This configuration allows the sample to be placed outside of the plasma generation unit while allowing airflow to carry the antimicrobial active species, including ozone and nitric oxide, onto the food sample. Cantaloupe and lettuce samples were exposed for 1, 3, and 5 min, while apple samples were exposed for 30 s, 1 min, and 2 min. After exposure, samples were pummeled in 0.1% peptone water-2% Tween 80, diluted, and plated in duplicate onto selective media and tryptic soy agar and incubated as follows: E. coli O157:H7 (modified eosin methylene blue) and Salmonella (xylose lysine tergitol-4) for 48 h at 37 degrees C, and L. monocytogenes (modified Oxford medium) at 48 h for 32 degrees C. E. coli O157:H7 populations were reduced by >1 log after 30-s and 1-min exposures and >2 log after a 2-min exposure. Salmonella populations were reduced by >2 log after 1 min. Three- and 5-min exposure times resulted in >3-log reduction. L. monocytogenes populations were reduced by 1 log after 1 min of exposure. Three- and 5-min exposure times resulted in >3- and >5-log reductions, respectively. This process has the capability of serving as a novel, nonthermal processing technology to be used for reducing microbial populations on produce surfaces.

  6. Inactivation of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsche, U.; Iliakis, G.; Kraft, G.

    1983-01-01

    Exponentially growing and plateau-phase cultures of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were irradiated with heavy ions (Z greater than or equal to 20) and assayed for loss of reproductive capacity either immediately or at delayed times after irradiation. The results indicated no modification of the exponential dose response due to conditions which usually favor the repair of potentially lethal damage at low ionization density. Postirradiation treatment of the cells with beta-arabinofuranosyladenine, a DNA synthesis inhibitor known to act on PLD repair, resulted in effects similar to those observed without this drug and confirmed the hypothesis that at such high values of ionization density only lethal, unmodifiable damage can be expressed. The inactivation cross-section values calculated from the slope of the measured survival curves showed no significant correlations with commonly used parameters of radiation quality such as LET or z 2 /beta 2. Instead, a functional dependence on the primary ion energy was indicated, being smaller by a factor of two at low energies (less than or equal to 2 MeV/amu) compared with values at energies above 4 MeV/amu, where agreement with the morphological nuclear cross section of the culture was found. This suggests that at higher specific ion energies energetic secondary electrons contribute to the induction of lethal damage, and that interaction of damaged sites between the primary track and the track ends of delta electrons may occur. The data are therefore also discussed in terms of the ''penumbra model'' which emphasizes the role of delta electrons in cell killing when radiations with very high ionization density are applied

  7. X-linked gene expression and X-chromosome inactivation: marsupials, mouse, and man compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeBerg, J L; Robinson, E S; Samollow, P B; Johnston, P G

    1987-01-01

    The existence of paternal X inactivation in Australian and American marsupial species suggests that this feature of X-chromosome dosage compensation is not a recent adaptation, but probably predates the evolutionary separation of the Australian and American marsupial lineages. Although it is theoretically possible that the marsupial system is one of random X inactivation with p greater than 0.99 and q less than 0.01 and dependent on parental source, no instance of random X inactivation (p = q or p not equal to q) has ever been verified in any tissue or cell type of any marsupial species. Therefore, we conclude that the most fundamental difference in X inactivation of marsupials and eutherians is whether the inactive X is the paternal one or is determined at random (with p = q in most but not all cases). The only other unequivocal difference between eutherians and marsupials is that both X chromosomes are active in mice and human oocytes, but not in kangaroo oocytes. Apparently, the inactive X is reactivated at a later meiotic stage or during early embryogenesis in kangaroos. X-chromosome inactivation takes place early in embryogenesis of eutherians and marsupials. Extraembryonic membranes of mice exhibit paternal X inactivation, whereas those of humans seem to exhibit random X inactivation with p greater than q (i.e., preferential paternal X inactivation). In general, extraembryonic membranes of marsupial exhibit paternal X inactivation, but the Gpd locus is active on both X chromosomes in at least some cells of kangaroo yolk sac. It is difficult to draw any general conclusion because of major differences in embryogeny of mice, humans, and marsupials, and uncertainties in interpreting the data from humans. Other differences between marsupials and eutherians in patterns of X-linked gene expression and X-chromosome inactivation seem to be quantitative rather than qualitative. Partial expression of some genes on the inactive X is characteristic of marsupials, with

  8. Inactivation of 10(15) chimpanzee-infectious doses of hepatitis B virus during preparation of a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; Niessen, J.; Brotman, B.; Prince, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    The safety of a plasma-derived hepatitis-B vaccine inactivated by two heating steps (90 sec at 103 degrees C followed by 10 hr pasteurization at 65 degrees C) was validated in chimpanzees; 10(3) chimpanzee-infectious doses (CID50) of hepatitis-B virus (HBV), subjected to the purification steps

  9. Establishment of probabilistic model for Salmonella Enteritidis growth and inactivation under acid and osmotic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujiao Shi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The growth and survival characteristic of Salmonella Enteritidis under acidic and osmotic conditions were studied. Meanwhile, a probabilistic model based on the theory of cell division and mortality was established to predict the growth or inactivation of S. Enteritidis. The experimental results demonstrated that the growth curves of planktonic and detached cells showed a significant difference (p < 0.05 under four conditions, including pH5.0 + 0.0%NaCl, pH7.0 + 4.0%NaCl, pH6.0 + 4.0%NaCl, and pH5.0 + 4.0%NaCl. And the established primary and secondary models could describe the growth of S. enteritis well by estimating four mathematics evaluation indexes, including determination coefficient (R2, root mean square error (RMSE, accuracy factor (Af and bias factor (Bf. Moreover, sequential treatment of 15% NaCl stress followed by pH 4.5 stress was the best condition to inactivate S. Enteritidis in 10 h at 25 °C. The probabilistic model with Logistical or Weibullian form could also predict the inactivation of S. Enteritidis well, thus realize the unification of predictive model to some extent or generalization of inactivation model. Furthermore, the primary 4-parameter probabilistic model or generalized inactivation model had slightly higher applicability and reliability to describe the growth or inactivation of S. Enteritidis than Baranyi model or exponential inactivation model within the experimental range in this study. Keywords: Acid, Osmotic pressure, Salmonella Enteritidis, Probabilistic model, Unification, Generalization

  10. High pressure thermal inactivation of Clostridium botulinum type E endospores – kinetic modeling and mechanistic insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Andreas Lenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold-tolerant, neurotoxigenic, endospore forming Clostridium (C. botulinum type E belongs to the non-proteolytic physiological C. botulinum group II, is primarily associated with aquatic environments, and presents a safety risk for seafood. High pressure thermal (HPT processing exploiting the synergistic effect of pressure and temperature can be used to inactivate bacterial endospores.We investigated the inactivation of C. botulinum type E spores by (near isothermal HPT treatments at 300 – 1200 MPa at 30 – 75 °C for 1 s – 10 min. The occurrence of heat and lysozyme susceptible spore fractions after such treatments was determined. The experimental data were modeled to obtain kinetic parameters and represented graphically by isoeffect lines. In contrast to findings for spores of other species and within the range of treatment parameters applied, zones of spore stabilization (lower inactivation than heat treatments alone, large heat susceptible (HPT-induced germinated or lysozyme-dependently germinable (damaged coat layer spore fractions were not detected. Inactivation followed 1st order kinetics. DPA release kinetics allowed for insights into possible inactivation mechanisms suggesting a (poorly effective physiologic-like (similar to nutrient-induced germination at ≤ 450 MPa/≤ 45 °C and non-physiological germination at >500 MPa/>60 – 70 °C.Results of this study support the existence of some commonalities in the HPT inactivation mechanism of C. botulinum type E spores and Bacillus spores although both organisms have significantly different HPT resistance properties. The information presented here contributes to closing the gap in knowledge regarding the HPT inactivation of spore formers relevant to food safety and may help industrial implementation of HPT processing. The markedly lower HPT resistance of C. botulinum type E spores than spores from other C. botulinum types, could allow for the implementation of milder processes without

  11. Post-irradiation inactivation, protection, and repair of the sulfhydryl enzyme malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durchschlag, H.; Zipper, P.

    1985-01-01

    Malate synthase from baker's yeast, a trimeric sulfhydryl enzyme with one essential sulfhydryl group per subunit, was inactivated by 2 kGy X-irradiation in air-saturated aqueous solution (enzyme concentration: 0.5 mg/ml). The radiation induced changes of enzymic activity were registered at about 0,30,60 h after irradiation. To elucidate the role of OH - , O 2 , and H 2 O 2 in the X-ray inactivation of the enzyme, experiments were performed in the absence of presence of different concentrations of specific additives (formate, superoxide dismutase, catalase). These additives were added to malate synthase solutions before or after X-irradiation. Moreover, repairs of inactivated malate synthase were initiated at about 0 or 30 h after irradiation by means of the sulfhydryl agent dithiothreitol. Experiments yielded the following results: 1. Irradiation of malate synthase in the absence of additives inactivated the enzyme immediately to a residual activity Asub(r)=3% (corresponding to a D 37 =0.6 kGy), and led to further slow inactivation in the post-irradiation phase. Repairs, initiated at different times after irradiation, restored enzymic activity considerably. The repair initiated at t=0 led to Asub(r)=21%; repairs started later on resulted in somewhat lower activities. The decay of reparability, however, was found to progress more slowly than post-irradiation inactivation itself. After completion of repair the activities of repaired samples did not decrease significantly. 2. The presence of specific additives during irradiation caused significant protective effects against primary inactivation. The protection by formate was very pronounced (e.g., Asub(r)=72% and D 37 =6 kGy for 100 mM formate). The presence of catalytic amounts of superoxide dismutase and/or catalase exhibited only minor effects, depending on the presence and concentration of formate. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation in bovine spongiform encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Yuichi; Ishikawa, Yukiko; Bo, Xiao; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi [Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan); Somerville, Robert A. [The Roslin Institute and Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, Roslin, Midlothian, EH25 9PS (United Kingdom); Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki [Division of CJD Science and Technology, Department of Prion Research, Center for Translational and Advanced Animal Research on Human Diseases, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo, Aoba, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Mohri, Shirou, E-mail: shirou@affrc.go.jp [Prion Disease Research Center, National Institute of Animal Health, 3-1-5 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0856 (Japan)

    2013-03-01

    Highlights: ► We quantitatively analyzed wet-heat inactivation of the BSE agent. ► Infectivity of the BSE macerate did not survive 155 °C wet-heat treatment. ► Once the sample was dehydrated, infectivity was observed even at 170 °C. ► A quantitative PMCA assay was used to evaluate the degree of BSE inactivation. - Abstract: The bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent is resistant to conventional microbial inactivation procedures and thus threatens the safety of cattle products and by-products. To obtain information necessary to assess BSE inactivation, we performed quantitative analysis of wet-heat inactivation of infectivity in BSE-infected cattle spinal cords. Using a highly sensitive bioassay, we found that infectivity in BSE cattle macerates fell with increase in temperatures from 133 °C to 150 °C and was not detected in the samples subjected to temperatures above 155 °C. In dry cattle tissues, infectivity was detected even at 170 °C. Thus, BSE infectivity reduces with increase in wet-heat temperatures but is less affected when tissues are dehydrated prior to the wet-heat treatment. The results of the quantitative protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay also demonstrated that the level of the protease-resistant prion protein fell below the bioassay detection limit by wet-heat at 155 °C and higher and could help assess BSE inactivation. Our results show that BSE infectivity is strongly resistant to wet-heat inactivation and that it is necessary to pay attention to BSE decontamination in recycled cattle by-products.

  13. Inactivation of internalized and surface contaminated enteric viruses in green onions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-09-02

    With increasing outbreaks of gastroenteritis associated with produce, it is important to assess interventions to reduce the risk of illness. UV, ozone and high pressure are non-thermal processing technologies that have potential to inactivate human pathogens on produce and allow the retention of fresh-like organoleptic properties. The objective of this study was to determine if UV, ozone, and high pressure are effective technologies compared to traditional chlorine spray on green onions to reduce enteric viral pathogens and to determine the effect of location of the virus (surface or internalized) on the efficacy of these processes. Mature green onion plants were inoculated with murine norovirus (MNV), hepatitis A virus (HAV) and human adenovirus type 41 (Ad41) either on the surface through spot inoculation or through inoculating contaminated hydroponic solution allowing for uptake of the virus into the internal tissues. Inoculated green onions were treated with UV (240 mJ s/cm(2)), ozone (6.25 ppm for 10 min), pressure (500 MPa, for 5 min at 20°C), or sprayed with calcium hypochlorite (150 ppm, 4°C). Viral inactivation was determined by comparing treated and untreated inoculated plants using cell culture infectivity assays. Processing treatments were observed to greatly affect viral inactivation. Viral inactivation for all three viruses was greatest after pressure treatment and the lowest inactivation was observed after chlorine and UV treatment. Both surface inoculated viruses and viruses internalized in green onions were inactivated to some extent by these post-harvest processing treatments. These results suggest that ozone and high pressure processes aimed to reduce the level of microbial contamination of produce have the ability to inactivate viruses if they become localized in the interior portions of produce. © 2013.

  14. Detailed analysis of X chromosome inactivation in a 49,XXXXX pentasomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Albert N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentasomy X (49,XXXXX has been associated with a severe clinical condition, presumably resulting from failure or disruption of X chromosome inactivation. Here we report that some human X chromosomes from a patient with 49,XXXXX pentasomy were functionally active following isolation in inter-specific (human-rodent cell hybrids. A comparison with cytogenetic and molecular findings provided evidence that more than one active X chromosome was likely to be present in the cells of this patient, accounting for her abnormal phenotype. Results 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU-pulsed cultures showed different patterns among late replicating X chromosomes suggesting that their replication was asynchronic and likely to result in irregular inactivation. Genotyping of the proband and her mother identified four maternal and one paternal X chromosomes in the proband. It also identified the paternal X chromosome haplotype (P, indicating that origin of this X pentasomy resulted from two maternal, meiotic non-disjunctions. Analysis of the HUMANDREC region of the androgen receptor (AR gene in the patient's mother showed a skewed inactivation pattern, while a similar analysis in the proband showed an active paternal X chromosome and preferentially inactivated X chromosomes carrying the 173 AR allele. Analyses of 33 cell hybrid cell lines selected in medium containing hypoxanthine, aminopterin and thymidine (HAT allowed for the identification of three maternal X haplotypes (M1, M2 and MR and showed that X chromosomes with the M1, M2 and P haplotypes were functionally active. In 27 cell hybrids in which more than one X haplotype were detected, analysis of X inactivation patterns provided evidence of preferential inactivation. Conclusion Our findings indicated that 12% of X chromosomes with the M1 haplotype, 43.5% of X chromosomes with the M2 haplotype, and 100% of the paternal X chromosome (with the P haplotype were likely to be functionally active in the

  15. Reversible inactivation of vectorial phosphorylation by hydroxybutynoate in Escherichia coli membrane vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorowski, G; Kaback, H R; Walsh, C

    1975-08-26

    The acetylenic hydroxy acid 2-hydroxy-3-butynoate causes irreversible inactivation of the Escherichia coli membrane-bound flavoenzyme D-lactic dehyrogenase, and thus blocks D-lactate dependent active transport in isolated membrane vesicles [Walsh, C. T., Abeles, R. H., and Kaback H. R. (1972), J. Biol. Chem. 247, 7858]. The inactivator is a suicide substrate for the dehydrogenase, undergoing a small number of turnovers before partitioning between oxidation and inactiviation. It is now demonstrated that reactive product molecules of 2-keto-3-butynoate can diffuse in the membranes to a component of the phosphotransferase system and cause time-dependent and covalent inactivation of phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent hexose uptake. Membrane vesicles from double mutants with low levels of both D- and L-lactic dehydrogenase lose only 30 percent of their hexose uptake capacity on exposure to hydroxybutynoate under conditions sufficient to fully inactivate hexose transport in wild type vesicles. Transport of 1-[14C]hydroxybutynoate into vesicles is followed by rapid covalent labeling of membrane proteins by the reactive, enzymatically generating keto acid oxidation product. Incubation of hydroxybutynoate-inactivated vesicles (5% residual activity) for 20 min in buffer with 10 mM dithiothreitol results in reactivation of 63% of the hexose transport activity, a 12-fold increase in activity. No reactivation occurs if the vesicular phosphotransferase system is inactivated by keto acid derived from membrane oxidation of the olefinic congener 2-hydroxy-3-butenoate. In contrast to thiol reactivation of acetylenic-blocked glucose transport, blockage of D-lactate-stimulated proline uptake is not alleviated, stressing different modes of inactivation of the phosphotransferase system compared to the membranous lactate dehydrogenases.

  16. Skewed X-chromosome inactivation is common in fetuses or newborns associated with confined placental mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, A W; Brown, C J; Peñaherrera, M; Langlois, S; Kalousek, D K; Robinson, W P

    1997-12-01

    The inactivation of one X chromosome in females is normally random with regard to which X is inactivated. However, exclusive or almost-exclusive inactivation of one X may be observed in association with some X-autosomal rearrangements, mutations of the XIST gene, certain X-linked diseases, and MZ twinning. In the present study, a methylation difference near a polymorphism in the X-linked androgen-receptor gene was used to investigate the possibility that nonrandom X inactivation is increases in fetuses and newborns that are associated with confined placental mosaicism (CPM) involving an autosomal trisomy. Extreme skewing was observed in 7 (58%) of 12 cases with a meiotic origin of the trisomy, but in none of 10 cases examined with a somatic origin of the trisomy, and in only 1 (4%) of 27 control adult females. In addition, an extremely skewed X-inactivation pattern was observed in 3 of 10 informative cases of female uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15. This may reflect the fact that a proportion of UPD cases arise by "rescue" of a chromosomally abnormal conceptus and are therefore associated with CPM. A skewed pattern of X inactivation in CPM cases is hypothesized to result from a reduction in the size of the early-embryonic cell pool, because of either poor early growth or subsequent selection against the trisomic cells. Since approximately 2% of pregnancies detected by chorionic villus sampling are associated with CPM, this is likely a significant contributor to both skewed X inactivation observed in the newborn population and the expression of recessive X-linked diseases in females.

  17. Pathogen inactivation of Dengue virus in red blood cells using amustaline and glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, Maite; Laughhunn, Andrew; Santa Maria, Felicia; Lanteri, Marion C; Stassinopoulos, Adonis; Musso, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arbovirus primarily transmitted through mosquito bite; however, DENV transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) have been reported and asymptomatic DENV RNA-positive blood donors have been identified in endemic countries. DENV is considered a high-risk pathogen for blood safety. One of the mitigation strategies to prevent arbovirus TTIs is pathogen inactivation. In this study we demonstrate that the amustaline and glutathione (S-303/GSH) treatment previously found effective against Zika virus in red blood cells (RBCs) is also effective in inactivating DENV. Red blood cells were spiked with high levels of DENV. Viral RNA loads and infectious titers were measured in the untreated control and before and after pathogen inactivation treatment of RBC samples. DENV infectivity was also assessed over five successive cell culture passages to detect any potential residual replicative virus. The mean ± SD DENV titer in RBCs before inactivation was 6.61 ± 0.19 log 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 )/mL and the mean viral RNA load was 8.42 log genome equivalents/mL. No replicative DENV was detected either immediately after completion of treatment using S-303/GSH or after cell culture passages. Treatment using S-303/GSH inactivated high levels of DENV in RBCs to the limit of detection. In combination with previous studies showing the effective inactivation of DENV in plasma and platelets using the licensed amotosalen/UVA system, this study demonstrates that high levels of DENV can be inactivated in all blood components. © 2017 The Authors Transfusion published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AABB.

  18. Induction of ovarian leiomyosarcomas in mice by conditional inactivation of Brca1 and p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget A Quinn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one out of every ten cases of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC is inherited. The majority of inherited cases of EOC result from mutations in the breast cancer associated gene 1 (BRCA1. In addition to mutation of BRCA1, mutation of the p53 gene is often found in patients with inherited breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.We investigated the role of loss of function of BRCA1 and p53 in ovarian cancer development using mouse models with conditionally expressed alleles of Brca1 and/or p53. Our results show that ovary-specific Cre-recombinase-mediated conditional inactivation of both Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP resulted in ovarian or reproductive tract tumor formation in 54% of mice, whereas conditional inactivation of either allele alone infrequently resulted in tumors (< or =5% of mice. In mice with conditionally inactivated Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP, ovarian tumors arose after long latency with the majority exhibiting histological features consistent with high grade leiomyosarcomas lacking expression of epithelial, follicular or lymphocyte markers. In addition, tumors with conditional inactivation of both Brca1(LoxP/LoxP and p53(LoxP/LoxP exhibited greater genomic instability compared to an ovarian tumor with inactivation of only p53(LoxP/LoxP.Although conditional inactivation of both Brca1 and p53 results in ovarian tumorigenesis, our results suggest that additional genetic alterations or alternative methods for targeting epithelial cells of the ovary or fallopian tube for conditional inactivation of Brca1 and p53 are required for the development of a mouse model of Brca1-associated inherited EOC.

  19. Effect of turbulent gas-liquid contact in a static mixer on Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst inactivation by ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craik, Stephen A; Smith, Daniel W; Chandrakanth, Mysore; Belosevic, Miodrag

    2003-09-01

    Static mixers may be used to dissolve gaseous ozone in water treatment facilities in order to provide protection against the waterborne parasite Cryptosporidium parvum. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a brief exposure to turbulent gas-liquid mixing conditions in a static mixer on inactivation of C. parvum oocysts by ozone. Inactivation measured in an ozone contacting apparatus that employed a static mixer for ozone dissolution was compared to predictions based on a previously published kinetic model of C. parvum inactivation by dissolved ozone in gently stirred batch reactors. Although initial contact in the static mixer had no immediate effect on the oocysts, a 20% increase in the rate of inactivation during subsequent contact with dissolved ozone was observed. Increasing the degree of turbulence within the static mixer did not yield additional inactivation. Use of static mixers for dissolution of ozone in drinking water treatment systems may provide limited enhancement of C. parvum inactivation by dissolved ozone.

  20. Interaction effect of gamma rays and thermal neutrons on the inactivation of odontoglossum ringspot virus isolated from orchid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Itsuhiko; Inouye, Narinobu.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of gamma rays or thermal neutrons and their interaction effects on the inactivation of the infectivity of Odontoglossum ringspot virus (ORSV) in buffered crude sap of the plant tissue were studied. The inactivation effect of gamma ray on ORSV varied in different ionic strength of the phosphate buffer solutions. Borax enhanced this effect. In interaction effect of gamma and neutron irradiation, irradiation orders, that is, n → γ and γ → n, gave different inactivation pattern. (author)

  1. UV light inactivation of hepatitis A virus, Aichi virus, and feline calicivirus on strawberries, green onions, and lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Viviana R; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2008-05-01

    A majority of illnesses caused by foodborne viruses are associated with fresh produce. Fruits and vegetables may be considered high-risk foods, as they are often consumed raw without a specific inactivation step. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate nonthermal treatments for the inactivation of foodborne pathogens. This study investigates the UV inactivation of three viruses: feline calicivirus (a surrogate for norovirus), and two picornaviruses, hepatitis A virus and Aichi virus. Three produce types were selected for their different surface topographies and association with outbreaks. Green onions, lettuce, and strawberries were individually spot inoculated with 10(7) to 10(9) 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of each virus per ml and exposed to UV light at various doses (culture and compared with untreated recovered virus. UV light applied to contaminated lettuce resulted in inactivation of 4.5 to 4.6 log TCID50/ml; for contaminated green onions, inactivation ranged from 2.5 to 5.6 log TCID50/ml; and for contaminated strawberries, inactivation ranged from 1.9 to 2.6 log TCID50/ml for the three viruses tested. UV light inactivation on the surface of lettuce is more effective than inactivation on the other two produce items. Consistently, the lowest results were observed in the inactivation of viruses on strawberries. No significant differences (P > 0.05) for virus inactivation were observed among the three doses applied (40, 120, and 240 mW s/cm2) on the produce, with the exception of hepatitis A virus and Aichi virus inactivation on green onions, where inactivation continued at 120 mW s/cm2 (P < 0.05).

  2. Antibody Responses to Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Health Care Personnel Previously Vaccinated and Vaccinated for The First Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan-Ying A. Huang; Shih-Cheng Chang; Yhu-Chering Huang; Cheng-Hsun Chiu; Tzou-Yien Lin

    2017-01-01

    Inactivated influenza vaccination induces a hemagglutinin-specific antibody response to the strain used for immunization. Annual vaccination is strongly recommended for health care personnel. However, it is debatable if repeated vaccination would affect the antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccine through the time. We enrolled health care personnel who had repeated and first trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in 2005?2008. Serological antibody responses were measured by hem...

  3. Bacteria, mould and yeast spore inactivation studies by scanning electron microscope observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozali, Siti N M; Milani, Elham A; Deed, Rebecca C; Silva, Filipa V M

    2017-12-18

    Spores are the most resistant form of microbial cells, thus difficult to inactivate. The pathogenic or food spoilage effects of certain spore-forming microorganisms have been the primary basis of sterilization and pasteurization processes. Thermal sterilization is the most common method to inactivate spores present on medical equipment and foods. High pressure processing (HPP) is an emerging and commercial non-thermal food pasteurization technique. Although previous studies demonstrated the effectiveness of thermal and non-thermal spore inactivation, the in-depth mechanisms of spore inactivation are as yet unclear. Live and dead forms of two food spoilage bacteria, a mould and a yeast were examined using scanning electron microscopy before and after the inactivation treatment. Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Geobacillus stearothermophilus bacteria are indicators of acidic foods pasteurization and sterilization processes, respectively. Neosartorya fischeri is a phyto-pathogenic mould attacking fruits. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a yeast with various applications for winemaking, brewing, baking and the production of biofuel from crops (e.g. sugar cane). Spores of the four microbial species were thermally inactivated. Spores of S. cerevisiae were observed in the ascus and free form after thermal and HPP treatments. Different forms of damage and cell destruction were observed for each microbial spore. Thermal treatment inactivated bacterial spores of A. acidoterrestris and G. stearothermophilus by attacking the inner core of the spore. The heat first altered the membrane permeability allowing the release of intracellular components. Subsequently, hydration of spores, physicochemical modifications of proteins, flattening and formation of indentations occurred, with subsequent spore death. Regarding N. fischeri, thermal inactivation caused cell destruction and leakage of intracellular components. Both thermal and HPP treatments of S. cerevisiae free spores attacked

  4. Inactivation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by ferryl derivatives of human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Aleksandra; Puchała, Mieczysław; Wesołowska, Katarzyna; Serafin, Eligiusz

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, inactivation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) by products of reactions of H2O2 with metHb has been studied. Inactivation of the enzyme was studied in two systems corresponding to two kinetic stages of the reaction. In the first system H2O2 was added to the mixture of metHb and ADH [the (metHb+ADH)+H2O2] system (ADH was present in the system since the moment of addition of H2O2 i. e. since the very beginning of the reaction of metHb with H2O2). In the second system ADH was added to the system 5 min after the initiation of the reaction of H2O2 with metHb [the (metHb+H2O2)5 min+ADH] system. In the first case all the products of reaction of H2O2 with metHb (non-peroxyl and peroxyl radicals and non-radical products, viz. hydroperoxides and *HbFe(IV)=O) could react with the enzyme causing its inactivation. In the second system, enzyme reacted almost exclusively with non-radical products (though a small contribution of reactions with peroxyl radicals cannot be excluded). ADH inactivation was observed in both system. Hydrogen peroxide alone did not inactivate ADH at the concentrations employed evidencing that enzyme inactivation was due exclusively to products of reaction of H2O2 with metHb. The rate and extent of ADH inactivation were much higher in the first than in the second system. The dependence of ADH activity on the time of incubation with ferryl derivatives of Hb can be described by a sum of three exponentials in the first system and two exponentials in the second system. Reactions of appropriate forms of the ferryl derivatives of hemoglobin have been tentatively ascribed to these exponentials. The extent of the enzyme inactivation in the second system was dependent on the proton concentration, being at the highest at pH 7.4 and negligible at pH 6.0. The reaction of H2O2 with metHb resulted in the formation of cross-links of Hb subunits (dimers and trimers). The amount of the dimers formed was much lower in the first system i. e. when the radical

  5. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  6. Immunogenicity of commercial, formaldehyde and binary ethylenimine inactivated Newcastle disease virus vaccines in specific pathogen free chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmaraii, N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Newcastle disease (ND is one of the most important diseases that affect birds; the epizootic nature of the disease has caused severe economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. In this experiment ND virus (NDV was inactivated by two different chemicals binary ethylenimine (BEI and formaldehyde. Formaldehyde was used at 0.1%, while BEI was used at concentrations of 1 to 4 mM. NDV inactivation with BEI was done in various incubation temperatures and periods and the best result (30 °C, 4 mM BEI and 21 hrs treatment used as an experimental vaccine. Prepared inactivated NDV vaccines and a commercial vaccine were tested for their efficiency in generating humoral immune response in different groups of specific pathogen free (SPF chicks. Test groups received 0.2 ml formaldehyde inactivated NDV (NDVF, BEI inactivated NDV (NDVEI and Razi institute produced NDV vaccine (NDVR subcutaneously respectively. HI Log 2 total mean titer of NDVEI group (8.42 ± 0.12 were significantly higher than NDVF (7.64 ± 0.16 and NDVR (7.86 ± 0.11 groups (p<0.05. BEI-inactivated vaccine gave higher antibody titers than formaldehyde-inactivated vaccine and preserves both structural integrity and antigenicity of the virus. Thus, it might be possible to use these compounds as an inactivator agent for commercial NDV inactivated vaccines in future.

  7. Sunlight mediated inactivation mechanisms of Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli in clear water versus waste stabilization pond water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Khalid; Nelson, Kara L

    2014-03-01

    Escherichia coli and enterococci have been previously reported to differ in the mechanisms and conditions that affect their sunlight-mediated inactivation in waste stabilization ponds. This study was undertaken to further characterize these mechanisms, using simulated sunlight and single strains of laboratory-grown E. coli and Enterococcus faecalis, with a focus on characterizing the contribution of exogenous reactive oxygen species to the inactivation process. We found that direct damage by UVB light (280-320 nm) was not a significant inactivation mechanism for either organism. E. coli inactivation was strongly dependent on dissolved oxygen concentrations and the presence of UVB wavelengths but E. coli were not susceptible to inactivation by exogenous sensitizers present in waste stabilization pond water. In contrast, E. faecalis inactivation in pond water occurred primarily through exogenous mechanisms, with strong evidence that singlet oxygen is an important transient reactive species. The exogenous mechanism could utilize wavelengths into the visible spectrum and sensitizers were mainly colloidal, distributed between 0.2 and ∼1 μm in size. Singlet oxygen is likely an important endogenous species in both E. faecalis and E. coli inactivation due to sunlight. Although the two organisms had similar inactivation rates in buffered, clear water, the inactivation rate of E. faecalis was 7 times greater than that of E. coli in air-saturated pond water at circumneutral pH due to its susceptibility to exogenous sensitizers and longer wavelengths. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Decreased prothrombin conversion and reduced thrombin inactivation explain rebalanced thrombin generation in liver cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy M W Kremers

    Full Text Available Impaired coagulation factor synthesis in cirrhosis causes a reduction of most pro- and anticoagulant factors. Cirrhosis patients show no clear bleeding or thrombotic phenotype, although they are at risk for both types of hemostatic event. Thrombin generation (TG is a global coagulation test and its outcome depends on underlying pro- and anticoagulant processes (prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation. We quantified the prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation during TG in 30 healthy subjects and 52 Child-Pugh (CP- A, 15 CP-B and 6 CP-C cirrhosis patients to test the hypothesis that coagulation is rebalanced in liver cirrhosis patients. Both prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation are reduced in cirrhosis patients. The effect on pro- and anticoagulant processes partially cancel each other out and as a result TG is comparable at 5 pM tissue factor between healthy subjects and patients. This supports the hypothesis of rebalanced hemostasis, as TG in cirrhosis patients remains within the normal range, despite large changes in prothrombin conversion and thrombin inactivation. Nevertheless, in silico analysis shows that normalization of either prothrombin conversion or thrombin inactivation to physiological levels, by for example the administration of prothrombin complex concentrates would cause an elevation of TG, whereas the normalization of both simultaneously maintains a balanced TG. Therefore, cirrhosis patients might require adapted hemostatic treatment.

  9. Solar radiation disinfection of drinking water at temperate latitudes: inactivation rates for an optimised reactor configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C M; Roser, D J; Feitz, A J; Ashbolt, N J

    2009-02-01

    Solar radiation-driven inactivation of bacteria, virus and protozoan pathogen models was quantified in simulated drinking water at a temperate latitude (34 degrees S). The water was seeded with Enterococcus faecalis, Clostridium sporogenes spores, and P22 bacteriophage, each at ca 1x10(5) mL(-1), and exposed to natural sunlight in 30-L reaction vessels. Water temperature ranged from 17 to 39 degrees C during the experiments lasting up to 6h. Dark controls showed little inactivation and so it was concluded that the inactivation observed was primarily driven by non-thermal processes. The optimised reactor design achieved S90 values (cumulative exposure required for 90% reduction) for the test microorganisms in the range 0.63-1.82 MJ m(-2) of Global Solar Exposure (GSX) without the need for TiO2 as a catalyst. High turbidity (840-920 NTU) only reduced the S(90) value by 0.05). However, inactivation was significantly reduced for E. faecalis and P22 when the transmittance of UV wavelengths was attenuated by water with high colour (140 PtCo units) or a suboptimally transparent reactor lid (prob.SODIS type pasteurization were not produced, non-thermal inactivation alone appeared to offer a viable means for reliably disinfecting low colour source waters by greater than 4 orders of magnitude on sunny days at 34 degrees S latitude.

  10. Numerical evaluation of lactoperoxidase inactivation during continuous pulsed electric field processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckow, Roman; Semrau, Julius; Sui, Qian; Wan, Jason; Knoerzer, Kai

    2012-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model describing the flow, electric field and temperature distribution of a laboratory-scale pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment chamber with co-field electrode configuration was developed. The predicted temperature increase was validated by means of integral temperature studies using thermocouples at the outlet of each flow cell for grape juice and salt solutions. Simulations of PEF treatments revealed intensity peaks of the electric field and laminar flow conditions in the treatment chamber causing local temperature hot spots near the chamber walls. Furthermore, thermal inactivation kinetics of lactoperoxidase (LPO) dissolved in simulated milk ultrafiltrate were determined with a glass capillary method at temperatures ranging from 65 to 80 °C. Temperature dependence of first order inactivation rate constants was accurately described by the Arrhenius equation yielding an activation energy of 597.1 kJ mol(-1). The thermal impact of different PEF processes on LPO activity was estimated by coupling the derived Arrhenius model with the CFD model and the predicted enzyme inactivation was compared to experimental measurements. Results indicated that LPO inactivation during combined PEF/thermal treatments was largely due to thermal effects, but 5-12% enzyme inactivation may be related to other electro-chemical effects occurring during PEF treatments. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  11. A molecular switch driving inactivation in the cardiac K+ channel HERG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Köpfer

    Full Text Available K(+ channels control transmembrane action potentials by gating open or closed in response to external stimuli. Inactivation gating, involving a conformational change at the K(+ selectivity filter, has recently been recognized as a major K(+ channel regulatory mechanism. In the K(+ channel hERG, inactivation controls the length of the human cardiac action potential. Mutations impairing hERG inactivation cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia, which also occur as undesired side effects of drugs. In this paper, we report atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, complemented by mutational and electrophysiological studies, which suggest that the selectivity filter adopts a collapsed conformation in the inactivated state of hERG. The selectivity filter is gated by an intricate hydrogen bond network around residues S620 and N629. Mutations of this hydrogen bond network are shown to cause inactivation deficiency in electrophysiological measurements. In addition, drug-related conformational changes around the central cavity and pore helix provide a functional mechanism for newly discovered hERG activators.

  12. Modeling the inactivation of ascaris eggs as a function of ammonia concentration and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidjeland, J; Nordin, A; Pecson, B M; Nelson, K L; Vinnerås, B

    2015-10-15

    Ammonia sanitization is a promising technology for sanitizing human excreta intended for use as a fertilizer in agriculture. Ascaris eggs are the most persistent pathogens regarding ammonia inactivation and are commonly present in fecal sludge in low- and middle-income countries. In this study, a model for predicting ammonia inactivation of ascaris eggs was developed. Data from four previous studies were compiled and analyzed statistically, and a mathematical model for the treatment time required for inactivation was created. The inactivation rate increased with NH3 activity to the power of 0.7. The required treatment time was found to decrease 10-fold for each 16 °C temperature increase. Dry matter (DM) content and pH had no direct effect on inactivation, but had an indirect effect due to their impact on NH3 activity, which was estimated using the Pitzer approach. An additional model giving an approximation of Pitzer NH3 activity but based on the Emerson approach, DM content and total ammonia (NHTot) was also developed. The treatment time required for different log10 reductions of ascaris egg viability can thus easily be estimated by the model as a function of NH3 activity and temperature. The impact on treatment time by different treatment options can then be theoretically evaluated, promoting improvements of the treatment e.g. by adding urea or alkaline agents, or increasing the temperature by solar heating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Study on the inactivation of intracellular enzyme molecules by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    Inactivation of the glutamic acid dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme molecules in the Ehrlich ascites tumor cells of the mouse were studied. The above mentioned intracellular enzyme molecules were irradiated by the X-ray radiation under the condition of 65 kV, 1 Amp under the atmosphere of nitrogen gases and by 4 0 C. Thereby, irradiation doses were 580 KR/min(error: +-3%). After irradiation, the cell homogentes were prepared through liquid air techniques. There after, the activities of the enzymes were measured with photometric method given by O. Warburg and W. Christian. The dose effect curves of the activities of the two enzymes by the X-ray irradiation showed both exponential and the inactivation doses were 6.5x10 6 and 5.0x10 6 R respectively. These results showed one side that the inactivation process of the intracellular enzyme molecules was one hit reaction after target theory, and the other side that this inactivation process could not be the primary causes of the death through X-ray irradiation of the vertebrate animals, because of the high resistance of the intracellular protein molecules against X-ray irradiation. The one hit reaction by the inactivation process of the irradiated intracellular enzyme molecules was discussed. (author)

  14. Acute toxicity and inactivation tests of CO2 on invertebrates in drinking water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Jin-Song; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhao, Jian-Shu; Li, Tuo

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the esthetic problem caused by invertebrates, researchers are recently starting to be more aware of their potential importance in terms of public health. However, the inactivation methods of invertebrates which could proliferate in drinking water treatment systems are not well developed. The objective of this study is to assess the acute toxicity and inactivation effects of CO2 on familiar invertebrates in water treatment processes. The results of this study revealed that CO2 has a definite toxicity to familiar invertebrates. The values of 24-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) were calculated for each test with six groups of invertebrates. The toxicity of CO2 was higher with increasing concentrations in solution but was lower with the increase in size of the invertebrates. Above the concentration of 1,000 mg/L for the CO2 solution, the 100% inactivation time of all the invertebrates was less than 5 s, and in 15 min, the inactivation ratio showed a gradient descent with a decline in concentration. As seen for Mesocyclops thermocyclopoides, by dosing with a sodium bicarbonate solution first and adding a dilute hydrochloric acid solution 5 min later, it is possible to obtain a satisfactory inactivation effect in the GAC (granular activated carbon) filters.

  15. Inactivation of Smad4 leads to impaired ocular development and cataract formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: yingliu@doheny.org [Department of Ophthalmology and Doheny Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Sun Yet-sen University, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Kawai, Kirio; Khashabi, Shabnam [Department of Ophthalmology and Doheny Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Deng, Chuxia [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Metabolism, NIDDK, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Liu, Yi-Hsin; Yiu, Samuel [Department of Ophthalmology and Doheny Eye Institute, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Inactivation of Smad4 caused disruption in the development of the anterior segment. {yields} Inactivation of Smad4 failed to disrupt early lens development. {yields} Smad4 controlled lens cell cycle and cell death processes. {yields} Smad4 may regulate actin stress fiber assembly and eyelid epithelial movement. -- Abstract: Purpose: Signaling by members of the TGF{beta} superfamily of molecules is essential for embryonic development and homeostasis. Smad4, a key intracellular mediator in TGF{beta} signaling, forms transcriptional activator complexes with Activin-, BMP-, and TGF{beta}-restricted Smad proteins. However, the functional role of Smad4 in controlling different visual system compartments has not been fully investigated. Methods: Using the Pax6 promoter-driven Cre transgenic, smad4 was conditionally inactivated in the lens, cornea and ectoderm of the eyelids. Standard histological and molecular analytical approaches were employed to reveal morphological and cellular changes. Results: Inactivation of Smad4 in the lens led to microphthalmia and cataract formation in addition to the persistent adhesion of the retina to the lens and the iris to the cornea. Inactivation of Smad4 from the ectoderm of the eyelid and cornea caused disruption to eyelid fusion and proper development of the corneal epithelium and corneal stroma. Conclusions: Smad4 is required for the development and maintenance of the lens in addition to the proper development of the cornea, eyelids, and retina.

  16. Function of the activated protein C (APC) autolysis loop in activated FVIII inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Thomas J; Gale, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Activated protein C (APC) binds to its substrates activated factor V (FVa) and activated factor VIII (FVIIIa) with a basic exosite that consists of loops 37, 60, 70 and the autolysis loop. These loops have a high density of basic residues, resulting in a positive charge on the surface of APC. Many of these residues are important in the interaction of APC with FVa and FVIIIa. The current study focused on the function of the autolysis loop in the interaction with FVIIIa. This loop was previously shown to interact with FVa, and it inhibits APC inactivation by plasma serpins. Charged residues of the autolysis loop were individually mutated to alanine and the activity of these mutants was assessed in functional FVIIIa inactivation assays. The autolysis loop was functionally important for FVIIIa inactivation. Mutation of R306, K311 and R314 each resulted in significantly reduced FVIIIa inactivation. The inactivating cleavages of FVIIIa at R336 and R562 were affected equally by the mutations. Protein S and FV stimulated cleavage at R562 more than cleavage at R336, independent of mutations in the autolysis loop. Together, these results confirmed that the autolysis loop plays a significant role as part of the basic exosite on APC in the interaction with FVIIIa. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Optimization and Characterization of Candidate Strain for Coxsackievirus A16 Inactivated Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingliang Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16 and enterovirus 71 (EV71, both of which can cause hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD, are responsible for large epidemics in Asian and Pacific areas. Although inactivated EV71 vaccines have completed testing in phase III clinical trials in Mainland China, CA16 vaccines are still under development. A Vero cell-based inactivated CA16 vaccine was developed by our group. Screening identified a CA16 vaccine strain (CC024 isolated from HFMD patients, which had broad cross-protective abilities and satisfied all requirements for vaccine production. Identification of the biological characteristics showed that the CA16CC024 strain had the highest titer (107.5 CCID50/mL in Vero cells, which would benefit the development of an EV71/CA16 divalent vaccine. A potential vaccine manufacturing process was established, including the selection of optimal time for virus harvesting, membrane for diafiltration and concentration, gel-filtration chromatography for the down-stream virus purification and virus inactivation method. Altogether, the analyses suggested that the CC-16, a limiting dilution clone of the CC024 strain, with good genetic stability, high titer and broad-spectrum immunogenicity, would be the best candidate strain for a CA16 inactivated vaccine. Therefore, our study provides valuable information for the development of a Vero cell-based CA16 or EV71-CA16 divalent inactivated vaccine.

  18. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafagh A. Waters

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial. Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding RNA product of XIST, within a cis-acting master control region called the X inactivation center (XIC. Marsupials XCI is XIST independent. Instead, XCI is controlled by the long-noncoding RNA Rsx, which appears to be a functional analog of the eutherian XIST gene, insofar that its transcript coats the inactive X and represses activity of genes in cis. In this review we discuss XCI in eutherians, and contrast imprinted X inactivation in mouse and marsupials. We provide particular focus on the evolution of genomic elements that confer the unique epigenetic features that characterize the inactive X chromosome.

  19. Heat inactivation kinetics of Hypocrea orientalis β-glucosidase with enhanced thermal stability by glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin-Qi; Shi, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Zhan, Xi-Lan; Zhou, Han-Tao; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2015-11-01

    Thermal inactivation kinetics of Hypocrea orientalis β-glucosidase and effect of glucose on thermostability of the enzyme have been determined in this paper. Kinetic studies showed that the thermal inactivation was irreversible and first-order reaction. The microscopic rate constants for inactivation of free enzyme and substrate-enzyme complex were both determined, which suggested that substrates can protect β-glucosidase against thermal deactivation effectively. On the other hand, glucose was found to protect β-glucosidase from heat inactivation to remain almost whole activity below 70°C at 20mM concentration, whereas the apparent inactivation rate of BG decreased to be 0.3×10(-3)s(-1) in the presence of 5mM glucose, smaller than that of sugar-free enzyme (1.91×10(-3)s(-1)). The intrinsic fluorescence spectra results showed that glucose also had stabilizing effect on the conformation of BG against thermal denaturation. Docking simulation depicted the interaction mode between glucose and active residues of the enzyme to produce stabilizing effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dengue virus photo-inactivated in presence of 1,5-iodonaphthylazide (INA) or AMT, a psoralen compound (4′-aminomethyl-trioxsalen) is highly immunogenic in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Sun, Peifang; Raviv, Yossef; Luke, Thomas; Martin, Nicholas; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2013-01-01

    Two novel methods of dengue virus inactivation using iodonaphthyl azide (INA) and aminomethyl trioxsalen (AMT) were compared with traditional virus inactivation by formaldehyde. The AMT inactivated dengue-2 virus retained its binding to a panel of 5 monoclonal antibodies specific for dengue-2 envelope protein, whereas inactivation by formaldehyde and INA led to 30–50% decrease in binding. All three inactivated viruses elicited high level virus neutralizing antibodies in vaccinated mice. However, only mice vaccinated with AMT inactivated virus mounted T cell responses similar to live, uninactivated virus. PMID:23835446

  1. Modeling the high pressure inactivation kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes on RTE cooked meat products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hereu, A.; Dalgaard, Paw; Garriga, M.

    2012-01-01

    provided the best fit to the HP-inactivation kinetics. The relationships between the primary kinetic parameters (log kmax and log Nres) and pressure treatments were described by a polynomial secondary model. To estimate HP-inactivation of L. monocytogenes in log (N/N0) over time, a one-step global fitting......High pressure (HP) inactivation curves of Listeria monocytogenes CTC1034 (ca. 107CFU/g) on sliced RTE cooked meat products (ham and mortadella) were obtained at pressures from 300 to 800MPa. A clear tail shape was observed at pressures above 450MPa and the log-linear with tail primary model...... procedure was applied. The secondary model was integrated into the primary model and the combined equation was fitted to the entire data-set to readjust parameter values. Validation of the developed models both under dynamic conditions and using external independent data supported their suitability...

  2. Thermal contribution to the inactivation of Cryptosporidium in plastic bottles during solar water disinfection procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Couso, Hipólito; Fontán-Sainz, María; Ares-Mazás, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    To determine the thermal contribution, independent of ultraviolet radiation, on the inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum during solar water disinfection procedures (SODIS), oocysts were exposed for 4, 8, and 12 hours to temperatures recorded in polyethylene terephthalate bottles in previous SODIS studies carried out under field conditions. Inclusion/exclusion of the fluorogenic vital dye propidium iodide, spontaneous excystation, and infectivity studies were used to determine the inactivation of oocysts. There was a significant increase in the percentage of oocysts that took up propidium iodide and in the number of oocysts that excysted spontaneously. There was also a significant decrease in the intensity of infection elicited in suckling mice at the end of all exposure times. The results of the study demonstrate the importance of temperature in the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts during application of SODIS under natural conditions.

  3. Inactivation of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, type III by heat, chemicals, and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinnan, G.V. Jr.; Wells, M.A.; Wittek, A.E.; Phelan, M.A.; Mayner, R.E.; Feinstone, S.; Purcell, R.H.; Epstein, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Infectivity of human T-cell lymphotropic virus, Type III (HTLV-III) was inactivated by heat more rapidly if in liquid medium than if lyophilized and more rapidly at 60 than 56 0 C. When HTLV-III was added to factor VIII suspension, then lyophilized and heated at 60 0 C for 2 hours or longer there was elimination of 1 X 10(6) in vitro infectious units (IVIU) of virus. Much of the viral inactivation appeared to result from lyophilization. The application of water-saturated chloroform to the lyophilized material containing virus also resulted in elimination of infectivity. HTLV-III was efficiently inactivated by formalin, beta-propiolactone, ethyl ether, detergent, and ultraviolet light plus psoralen. The results are reassuring regarding the potential safety of various biological products

  4. Rose Bengal-decorated silica nanoparticles as photosensitizers for inactivation of gram-positive bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Yanyan; Zhang Peng [Department of Chemistry, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rogelj, Snezna, E-mail: pzhang@nmt.edu [Department of Biology, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2010-02-10

    A new type of photosensitizer, made from Rose Bengal (RB)-decorated silica (SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}-RB) nanoparticles, was developed to inactivate gram-positive bacteria, including Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), with high efficiency through photodynamic action. The nanoparticles were characterized microscopically and spectroscopically to confirm their structures. The characterization of singlet oxygen generated by RB, both free and immobilized on a nanoparticle surface, was performed in the presence of anthracene-9,10-dipropionic acid. The capability of SiO{sub 2}-NH{sub 2}-RB nanoparticles to inactivate bacteria was tested in vitro on both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The results showed that RB-decorated silica nanoparticles can inactivate MRSA and Staphylococcus epidermidis (both gram-positive) very effectively (up to eight-orders-of-magnitude reduction). Photosensitizers of such design should have good potential as antibacterial agents through a photodynamic mechanism.

  5. Association of Extremely Skewed X-chromosome Inactivation with Taiwanese Women Presenting with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Lin Kuo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is a phenomenon that occurs in female mammals. Typically, maternally- and paternally-derived X chromosomes are inactivated at approximately the same frequency. If preferential inactivation occurs, the person is considered to have skewed XCI. Skewed XCI has been reported to occur more frequently in women who experience recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL. In this study, we sought to investigate if there is an association between skewed XCI and unexplained RPL in Taiwanese women. A total of 194 women who had experienced unexplained RPL were recruited into the study. Human androgen receptor or DXS6673E and DX15-134 loci were used in the XCI assay. The results of our study suggested that a cut-off point 95% XCI is associated with RPL. Extremely skewed XCI occurs in a subset of Taiwanese women with RPL.

  6. Reflex influence of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on respiratory resistance in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klawe JJ

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our previous study demonstrated that selective carotid baroreceptors activation decreases airway resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of carotid baroreceptor inactivation on the reflex change of respiratory resistance. Twenty healthy men aged between 20 and 25 were included in the study. Selective inactivation of carotid baroreceptors was induced by generating a positive pressure of 40 mmHg for 5 s in two capsules placed bilaterally on the neck over the bifurcation of the carotid arteries. The oscillatory method (Siregnost FD5, Siemens was used to measure continuously respiratory resistance. Inactivation of carotid baroreceptors produced a short increase in respiratory resistance by 0.39 ± 0.01(SE mbar/l/s, i.e., 21.7% above the resting level. We conclude that in humans, carotid baroreceptors might have a background contribution to bronchodilator tone. This observation seems to be important for clinical situations of impairment of baroreflex function.

  7. Thermal and Carbon Dioxide Inactivation of Alkaline Phosphatase in Buffer and Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Erkmen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature and CO2 treatment on the inactivation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP were studied. The thermal stability of ALP was found to be significantly (P< 0.05 different in glycine/NaOH buffer, pasteurized milk and raw milk. ALP was completely inactivated in the buffer at 60, 70 and 80 °C but approximately 12 % of activity was present at 50 °C after 55 min of treatment. The time required for complete inactivation of the enzyme in the buffer was reduced from 50 to 4 min as temperature increased from 60 to 80 °C. Complete inactivation of the enzyme in pasteurized milk was achieved at 70 and 80 °C but 28 and 15 % of ALP activity was still present at 50 and 60 °C after 120 min of treatment. Inactivation time for raw milk was reduced nearly 18-fold by increasing temperature from 50 to 70 °C. ALP in the buffer exposed to CO2 (under atmospheric pressure treatment at different temperatures showed a decrease in enzyme activity. Inactivation was found to be higher as the temperature increased from 20 to 50 °C. At the end of a 30-min treatment, residual ALP activity was found to be 84 and 19 % at 20 and 50 °C, respectively. Faster drop in pH and enzyme activity occurred within 5 min. The change in pH and enzyme activity dependant on CO2 treatment was not observed in raw milk mainly due to strong buffering capacity of milk.

  8. Review: Efficiency of physical and chemical treatments on the inactivation of dairy bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Marta Guglielmotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages can cause great economic losses due to fermentation failure in dairy plants. Hence, physical and chemical treatments of raw material and/or equipment are mandatory to maintain phage levels as low as possible. Regarding thermal treatments used to kill pathogenic bacteria or achieve longer shelf-life of dairy products, neither low temperature long time (LTLT nor high temperature short time (HTST pasteurization were able to inactivate most lactic acid bacteria (LAB phages. Even though most phages did not survive 90ºC for 2 min, there were some that resisted 90ºC for more than 15 min (conditions suggested by the International Dairy Federation, IDF, for complete phage destruction. Among biocides tested, ethanol showed variable effectiveness in phage inactivation, since only phages infecting dairy cocci and Lactobacillus helveticus were reasonably inactivated by this alcohol, whereas isopropanol was in all cases highly ineffective. In turn, peracetic acid has consistently proved to be very fast and efficient to inactivate dairy phages, whereas efficiency of sodium hypochlorite was variable, even among different phages infecting the same LAB species. Both alkaline chloride foam and ethoxylated nonylphenol with phosphoric acid were remarkably efficient, trait probably related to their highly alkaline or acidic pH values in solution, respectively. Photocatalysis using UV light and TiO2 has been recently reported as a feasible option to industrially inactivate phages infecting diverse LAB species. Processes involving high pressure were barely used for phage inactivation, but until now most studied phages revealed high resistance to these treatments. To conclude, and given the great phage diversity found on dairies, it is always advisable to combine different anti-phage treatments (biocides, heat, high pressure, photocatalysis, rather than using them separately at extreme conditions.

  9. [Immune response to one booster dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in college students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Z; Feng, X W; Liu, X E; Zhou, Y S; Wen, H R; Peng, S H; Zhang, Y X; Xu, B; Zhuang, H; Chen, H Y

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of one booster dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine in young adults. Methods: The subjects were selected from participants in the clinical trial of immunogenicity of inactivated and attenuated live hepatitis A vaccine in young adults. Eligible subjects were those who had received one dose of inactivated or attenuated hepatitis A vaccine, could be contacted and were sero-negative before primary vaccination. All qualified subjects were immunized with one booster dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine. The blood samples were collected before booster dose vaccination and 28 days after the immunization. Anti-HAV antibody titer ≥20 mIU/ml was considered to be sero-protected against hepatitis A virus. Results: The GMCs in the inactivated HAV vaccine group and attenuated live vaccine group before booster dose vaccination were 70.80 mIU/ml and 50.12 mIU/ml, respectively, and the sero-protection rates were 94.7 % and 65.0 % , respectively. After the vaccination of the booster dose, the sero-protection rates in both groups were 100.0 % , and the GMCs were 2 816.09 mIU/ml and 2 654.55 mIU/ml, respectively. Conclusion: The GMCs and sero-protection rates of anti-HAV antibody in young adults declined after three years of the primary vaccination. However, the higher GMC and sero-protection rate were observed in the inactivated vaccine group than in the attenuated live vaccine group. Significant increases of GMC levels were observed in both groups after one booster dose vaccination.

  10. Reaction of uridine diphosphate galactose 4-epimerase with a suicide inactivator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentke, G.R.; Frey, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    UDPgalactose 4-epimerase from Escherichia coli is rapidly inactivated by the compounds uridine 5'-diphosphate chloroacetol (UDC) and uridine 5'-diphosphate bromoacetol (UCB). Both UDC and UDB inactivate the enzyme in neutral solution concomitant with the appearance of chromophores absorbing maximally at 325 and 328 nm, respectively. The reaction of UDC with the enzyme follows saturation kinetics characterized by a K D of 0.110 mM and k inact of 0.84 min -1 at pH 8.5 and ionic strength 0.2 M. The inactivation by UDC is competitively inhibited by competitive inhibitors of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase, and it is accompanied by the tight but noncovalent binding of UDC to the enzyme in a stoichiometry of 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme dimer, corresponding to 1 mol of UDC/mol of enzyme-bound NAD + . The inactivation of epimerase by uridine 5'-diphosphate [ 2 H 2 ]chloroacetol proceeds with a primary kinetic isotope effect (k H /k D ) of 1.4. The inactivation mechanism is proposed to involve a minimum of three steps: (a) reversible binding of UDC to the active site of UDPgalactose 4-epimerase; (b) enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of enzyme-bound UDC, catalyzed by an enzymic general base at the active site; (c) alkylation of the nicotinamide ring of NAD + at the active site by the chloroacetol enolate. The resulting adduct between UDC and NAD + is proposed to be the chromophore with λ max at 325 nm. The enzymic general base required to facilitate proton transfer in redox catalysis by this enzyme may be the general base that facilitates enolization of the chloroacetol moiety of UDC in the inactivation reaction

  11. Independent Evolution of Transcriptional Inactivation on Sex Chromosomes in Birds and Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livernois, Alexandra M.; Waters, Shafagh A.; Deakin, Janine E.; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A.; Waters, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination). We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH) to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains) on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial) silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes. PMID:23874231

  12. Independent evolution of transcriptional inactivation on sex chromosomes in birds and mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Livernois

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation in eutherian mammals has been thought to be tightly controlled, as expected from a mechanism that compensates for the different dosage of X-borne genes in XX females and XY males. However, many X genes escape inactivation in humans, inactivation of the X in marsupials is partial, and the unrelated sex chromosomes of monotreme mammals have incomplete and gene-specific inactivation of X-linked genes. The bird ZW sex chromosome system represents a third independently evolved amniote sex chromosome system with dosage compensation, albeit partial and gene-specific, via an unknown mechanism (i.e. upregulation of the single Z in females, down regulation of one or both Zs in males, or a combination. We used RNA-fluorescent in situ hybridization (RNA-FISH to demonstrate, on individual fibroblast cells, inactivation of 11 genes on the chicken Z and 28 genes on the X chromosomes of platypus. Each gene displayed a reproducible frequency of 1Z/1X-active and 2Z/2X-active cells in the homogametic sex. Our results indicate that the probability of inactivation is controlled on a gene-by-gene basis (or small domains on the chicken Z and platypus X chromosomes. This regulatory mechanism must have been exapted independently to the non-homologous sex chromosomes in birds and mammals in response to an over-expressed Z or X in the homogametic sex, highlighting the universal importance that (at least partial silencing plays in the evolution on amniote dosage compensation and, therefore, the differentiation of sex chromosomes.

  13. Pulsed-light inactivation of pathogenic and spoilage bacteria on cheese surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, J; Hsu, L C; Miller, B M; Sullivan, G; Paradis, K; Moraru, C I

    2015-09-01

    Cheese products are susceptible to postprocessing cross-contamination by bacterial surface contamination during slicing, handling, or packaging, which can lead to food safety issues and significant losses due to spoilage. This study examined the effectiveness of pulsed-light (PL) treatment on the inactivation of the spoilage microorganism Pseudomonas fluorescens, the nonenterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 (nonpathogenic surrogate of Escherichia coli O157:H7), and Listeria innocua (nonpathogenic surrogate of Listeria monocytogenes) on cheese surface. The effects of inoculum level and cheese surface topography and the presence of clear polyethylene packaging were evaluated in a full factorial experimental design. The challenge microorganisms were grown to early stationary phase and subsequently diluted to reach initial inoculum levels of either 5 or 7 log cfu/slice. White Cheddar and process cheeses were cut into 2.5×5 cm slices, which were spot-inoculated with 100 µL of bacterial suspension. Inoculated cheese samples were exposed to PL doses of 1.02 to 12.29 J/cm(2). Recovered survivors were enumerated by standard plate counting or the most probable number technique, as appropriate. The PL treatments were performed in triplicate and data were analyzed using a general linear model. Listeria innocua was the least sensitive to PL treatment, with a maximum inactivation level of 3.37±0.2 log, followed by P. fluorescens, with a maximum inactivation of 3.74±0.8 log. Escherichia coli was the most sensitive to PL, with a maximum reduction of 5.41±0.1 log. All PL inactivation curves were nonlinear, and inactivation reached a plateau after 3 pulses (3.07 J/cm(2)). The PL treatments through UV-transparent packaging and without packaging consistently resulted in similar inactivation levels. This study demonstrates that PL has strong potential for decontamination of the cheese surface. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  14. X-chromosome inactivation patterns in females with Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; Theodoro, Mariana F; Bittel, Douglas C; Kuipers, Paul J; Driscoll, Daniel J; Talebizadeh, Zohreh

    2007-03-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of paternally expressed genes from the 15q11-q13 region generally due to a paternally-derived deletion of the 15q11-q13 region or maternal disomy 15 (UPD). Maternal disomy 15 is usually caused by maternal meiosis I non-disjunction associated with advanced maternal age and after fertilization with a normal sperm leading to trisomy 15, a lethal condition unless trisomy rescue occurs with loss of the paternal chromosome 15. To further characterize the pathogenesis of maternal disomy 15 process in PWS, the status of X-chromosome inactivation was calculated to determine whether non-random skewing of X-inactivation is present indicating a small pool of early embryonic cells. We studied X-chromosome inactivation in 25 females with PWS-UPD, 35 with PWS-deletion, and 50 controls (with similar means, medians, and age ranges) using the polymorphic androgen receptor (AR) gene assay. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.5, P = 0.01) was seen between X-chromosome inactivation and age for only the UPD group. Furthermore, a significantly increased level (P = 0.02) of extreme X-inactivation skewness (>90%) was detected in our PWS-UPD group (24%) compared to controls (4%). This observation could indicate that trisomy 15 occurred at conceptus with trisomy rescue in early pregnancy leading to extreme skewness in several PWS-UPD subjects. Extreme X-inactivation skewness may also lead to additional risks for X-linked recessive disorders in PWS females with UPD and extreme X-chromosome skewness. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Mirasol PRT system inactivation efficacy evaluated in platelet concentrates by bacteria-contamination model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocić Miodrag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bacterial contamination of blood components, primarily platelet concentrates (PCs, has been identified as one of the most frequent infectious complications in transfusion practice. PC units have a high risk for bacterial growth/multiplication due to their storage at ambient temperature (20 ± 2°C. Consequences of blood contamination could be effectively prevented or reduced by pathogen inactivation systems. The aim of this study was to determine the Mirasol pathogen reduction technology (PRT system efficacy in PCs using an artificial bacteria-contamination model. Methods. According to the ABO blood groups, PC units (n = 216 were pooled into 54 pools (PC-Ps. PC-Ps were divided into three equal groups, with 18 units in each, designed for an artificial bacteria-contamination. Briefly, PC-Ps were contaminated by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli in concentrations 102 to 107 colony forming units (CFU per unit. Afterward, PC-Ps were underwent to inactivation by Mirasol PRT system, using UV (l = 265-370 nm activated riboflavin (RB. All PC-Ps were assayed by BacT/Alert Microbial Detection System for CFU quantification before and after the Mirasol treatment. Samples from non-inactivated PC-P units were tested after preparation and immediately following bacterial contamination. Samples from Mirasol treated units were quantified for CFUs one hour, 3 days and 5 days after inactivation. Results. A complete inactivation of all bacteria species was obtained at CFU concentrations of 102 and 103 per PC-P unit through storage/ investigation period. The most effective inactivation (105 CFU per PC-P unit was obtained in Escherichia coli setting. Contrary, inactivation of all the three tested bacteria species was unworkable in concentrations of ≥ 106 CFU per PC-P unit. Conclusion. Efficient inactivation of investigated bacteria types with a significant CFU depletion in PC-P units was obtained - 3 Log for all

  16. Inactivation of Listeria innocua in skim milk by pulsed electric fields and nisin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Miranda, M L; Barbosa-Cánovas, G V; Swanson, B G

    1999-10-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) is an emerging nonthermal processing technology used to inactivate microorganisms in liquid foods such as milk. PEF results in loss of cell membrane functionality that leads to inactivation of the microorganism. There are many processes that aid in the stability and safety of foods. The combination of different preservation factors, such as nisin and PEF, to control microorganisms should be explored. The objective of this research was to study the inactivation of Listeria innocua suspended in skim milk by PEF as well as the sensitization of PEF treated L. innocua to nisin. The selected electric field intensity was 30, 40 and 50 kV/cm and the number of pulses applied was 10.6, 21.3 and 32. The sensitization exhibited by PEF treated L. innocua to nisin was assessed for 10 or 100 IU nisin/ml. A progressive decrease in the population of L. innocua was observed for the selected field intensities, with the greatest reduction being 2 1/2 log cycles (U). The exposure of L. innocua to nisin after PEF had an additive effect on the inactivation of the microorganism as that exhibited by the PEF alone. As the electric field, number of pulses and nisin concentration increased, synergism was observed in the inactivation of L. innocua as a result of exposure to nisin after PEF. The reduction of L. innocua accomplished by exposure to 10 IU nisin/ml after 32 pulsed electric fields was 2, 2.7, and 3.4 U for an electric field intensity of 30, 40, and 50 kV/cm, respectively. Population of L. innocua subjected to 100 IU nisin/ml after PEF was 2.8-3.8 U for the selected electric field intensities and 32 pulses. The designed model for the inactivation of L. innocua as a result of the PEF followed by exposure to nisin proved to be accurate in the prediction of the inactivation of L. innocua in skim milk containing 1.2 or 37 IU nisin/ml. Inactivation of L. innocua in skim milk containing 37 IU nisin/ml resulted in a decrease in population of 3.7 U.

  17. Intranasal Inactivated Influenza Vaccines: a Reasonable Approach to Improve the Efficacy of Influenza Vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Ainai, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kurata, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious, acute respiratory disease caused by the influenza virus. The mucosal lining in the host respiratory tract is not only the site of virus infection, but also the site of defense; it is at this site that the host immune response targets the virus and protects against reinfection. One of the most effective methods to prevent influenza is to induce specific antibody (Ab) responses in the respiratory tract by vaccination. Two types of influenza vaccines, intranasal live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines and parenteral (injectable) inactivated vaccines, are currently used worldwide. These vaccines are approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration. Live attenuated vaccines induce both secretory IgA (S-IgA) and serum IgG antibodies (Abs), whereas parenteral vaccines induce only serum IgG Abs. However, intranasal administration of inactivated vaccines together with an appropriate adjuvant induces both S-IgA and IgG Abs. Several preclinical studies on adjuvant-combined, nasal-inactivated vaccines revealed that nasal S-IgA Abs, a major immune component in the upper respiratory tract, reacted with homologous virus hemagglutinin (HA) and were highly cross-reactive with viral HA variants, resulting in protection and cross-protection against infection by both homologous and variant viruses, respectively. Serum-derived IgG Abs, which are present mainly in the lower respiratory tract, are less cross-reactive and cross-protective. In addition, our own clinical trials have shown that nasal-inactivated whole virus vaccines, including a built-in adjuvant (single-stranded RNA), induced serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) Ab titers that fulfilled the EMA criteria for vaccine efficacy. The nasal-inactivated whole virus vaccines also induced high levels of nasal HI and neutralizing Ab titers, although we have not yet evaluated the nasal HI titers due to the lack of official criteria to establish efficacy based

  18. Kinetic studies of acid inactivation of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Morten; Nielsen, Jens Bredal; Villadsen, John

    1996-01-01

    The stability of alpha-amylase from Aspergillus oryzae has been studied at different pH. The enzyme is extremely stable at neutral pH (pH 5-8), whereas outside this pH-range a substantial loss of activity is observed. The acid-inactivation of alpha-amylase from A. oryzae was monitored on...... regains part of its activity, and the reactivation process also follows first-order kinetics. The irreversible loss of activity is found not to result from a protease contamination of the protein samples. A proposed model, where irreversibly inactivated a-amylase is formed both directly from the active...

  19. Predicting Bacillus coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under nonisothermal heat treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Morgana; Longhi, Daniel A; Schaffner, Donald W; Aragão, Gláucia M F

    2014-05-01

    The knowledge and understanding of Bacillus coagulans inactivation during a thermal treatment in tomato pulp, as well as the influence of temperature variation during thermal processes are essential for design, calculation, and optimization of the process. The aims of this work were to predict B. coagulans spores inactivation in tomato pulp under varying time-temperature profiles with Gompertz-inspired inactivation model and to validate the model's predictions by comparing the predicted values with experimental data. B. coagulans spores in pH 4.3 tomato pulp at 4 °Brix were sealed in capillary glass tubes and heated in thermostatically controlled circulating oil baths. Seven different nonisothermal profiles in the range from 95 to 105 °C were studied. Predicted inactivation kinetics showed similar behavior to experimentally observed inactivation curves when the samples were exposed to temperatures in the upper range of this study (99 to 105 °C). Profiles that resulted in less accurate predictions were those where the range of temperatures analyzed were comparatively lower (inactivation profiles starting at 95 °C). The link between fail prediction and both lower starting temperature and magnitude of the temperature shift suggests some chemical or biological mechanism at work. Statistical analysis showed that overall model predictions were acceptable, with bias factors from 0.781 to 1.012, and accuracy factors from 1.049 to 1.351, and confirm that the models used were adequate to estimate B. coagulans spores inactivation under fluctuating temperature conditions in the range from 95 to 105 °C. How can we estimate Bacillus coagulans inactivation during sudden temperature shifts in heat processing? This article provides a validated model that can be used to predict B. coagulans under changing temperature conditions. B. coagulans is a spore-forming bacillus that spoils acidified food products. The mathematical model developed here can be used to predict the spoilage

  20. Co-evolution of X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reik, Wolf; Lewis, Annabelle

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have revealed mechanistic parallels between imprinted X-chromosome inactivation and autosomal imprinting. We suggest that neither mechanism was present in ancestral egg-laying mammals, and that both arose when the evolution of the placenta exerted selective pressure to imprint growth-related genes. We also propose that non-coding RNAs and histone modifications were adopted for the imprinting of growth suppressors on the X chromosome and on autosomes. This provides a unified hypothesis for the evolution of X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting.