WorldWideScience

Sample records for in-tank resin removal

  1. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  2. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  3. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  4. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-11-18

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-30

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  6. Removal of radiocesium using cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita-Murase, Yuko; Mizumura, Ryosuke; Tachibana, Yoshitaka; Kanazawa, Hideko

    2013-01-01

    Cation exchange resins (calcium polystyrene sulfonate, Ca-resin and sodium polystyrene sulfonate, Na-resin) have been used as agents to improve hyperkerlemia. For removing 137 Cs from the human body, the adsorption ability of the resin for 137 Cs was examined and evaluated. Resin (0.03 g) and 137 Cs (ca.1 kBq) were introduced into 3 mL of water, the Japanese Pharmacopoeia 1st fluid for a dissolution test (pH 1.2) and 2nd fluid (pH 6.8), respectively, and shaken. After 1-3 hours, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was 99% in water, 60% in a pH 1.2 fluid and, 66% in a pH 6.8 fluid. By adding potassium, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Ca-resin was reduced. However, the 137 Cs adsorption (%) of Na-resin was almost unchanged. These results show that both resins have adsorption ability for 137 Cs in the stomach and the intestines. Therefore, the proposed method will be an effective means in the case of a radiological emergency due to 137 Cs. (author)

  7. Development and application of high performance resins for crud removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deguchi, Tatsuya; Izumi, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Masahiro

    1998-01-01

    The development of crud removal technology has started with the finding of the resin aging effect that an old ion exchange resin, aged by long year of use in the condensate demineralizer, had an enhanced crud removal capability. It was confirmed that some physical properties such as specific surface area and water retention capacity were increased due to degradation caused by long year of contact with active oxygens in the condensate water. So, it was speculated that those degradation in the resin matrix enhanced the adsorption of crud particulate onto the resin surface, hence the crud removal capability. Based on this, crud removal resin with greater surface area was first developed. This resin has shown an excellent crud removal efficiency in an actual power plant, and the crud iron concentration in the condensate effluent was drastically reduced by this application. However, the cross-linkage of the cation resin had to be lowered in a delicate manner for that specific purpose, and this has caused higher organic leachables from the resin, and the sulfate level in the reactor was raised accordingly. Our major goals, therefore, has been to develop a crud resin of as little organic leachables as possible with keeping the original crud removal efficiency. It was revealed through the evaluation of the first generation crud resin and its improved version installed in the actual condensate demineralizers that there was a good correlation between crud removal efficiency and organic leaching rate. The bast one among a number of developmental resins has shown the organic leaching rate of 1/10 of that of the original crud resin (ETR-C), and the crud removal efficiency of 90%. So far as we understand, the resin was considered to have the best overall balance between crud removal and leaching characteristics. The result of six month evaluation of this developmental resin, ETR-C3, in one vessel of condensate demineralizer of a power plant will be presented. (J.P.N.)

  8. Sequestration Resins for Accelerating Removal of Radioactive Contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frattini, Paul-L.; Wells, Daniel-M.; Garcia, Susan-E.; Richard, Kohlmann; Asay, Roger; Yengoyan, Leon

    2012-09-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is developing sequestration resins that can be used in the treatment of nuclear plant water streams for the enhanced removal of ionic cobalt. EPRI is focusing on three key areas of success: 1. Plant safety. The resins that are synthesized must be fully tested to determine that no leachable species or decomposition products (in the event of a resin bed failure) would be introduced to the plant. 2. Acceptable system performance. The resins are currently being synthesized in a powdered form for use in the reactor water clean-up and fuel pool clean-up systems that utilize pre-coatable filter elements. The resins must have effective flocking behavior; uniform application over the underlay resin and efficient removal from the septa elements after use. Bead type resins are also under development. 3. Enhanced cobalt removal. The resins are expected to out-perform the currently used ion exchange resins in the removal of ionic cobalt. During nuclear plant maintenance or refueling outages, current ion exchange resins may require several days to reduce concentrations of cobalt (for example, radio-cobalt 60 Co and 58 Co) and other activated corrosion products to safe levels in reactor coolant streams. This performance limitation often delays key maintenance activities. EPRI's resins are expected to provide at least a three-fold increase in removal capacity in light water reactor coolants. These resins also offer the potential for higher overall removal efficiencies reducing occupational exposures and waste management costs. This paper addresses issues from the range of novel resin development for radio-cobalt removal from synthesis at the bench-top level through scale-up to demonstration of use in an actual operating nuclear power plant. (authors)

  9. Enhanced DOC removal using anion and cation ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Paic, Miguel; Cawley, Kaelin M; Byg, Steve; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Hardness and DOC removal in a single ion exchange unit operation allows for less infrastructure, is advantageous for process operation and depending on the water source, could enhance anion exchange resin removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Simultaneous application of cationic (Plus) and anionic (MIEX) ion exchange resin in a single contact vessel was tested at pilot and bench scales, under multiple regeneration cycles. Hardness removal correlated with theoretical predictions; where measured hardness was between 88 and 98% of the predicted value. Comparing bench scale DOC removal of solely treating water with MIEX compared to Plus and MIEX treated water showed an enhanced DOC removal, where removal was increased from 0.5 to 1.25 mg/L for the simultaneous resin application compared to solely applying MIEX resin. A full scale MIEX treatment plant (14.5 MGD) reduced raw water DOC from 13.7 mg/L to 4.90 mg/L in the treated effluent at a bed volume (BV) treatment rate of 800, where a parallel operation of a simultaneous MIEX and Plus resin pilot (10 gpm) measured effluent DOC concentrations of no greater than 3.4 mg/L, even at bed volumes of treatment 37.5% greater than the full scale plant. MIEX effluent compared to simultaneous Plus and MIEX effluent resulted in differences in fluorescence intensity that correlated to decreases in DOC concentration. The simultaneous treatment of Plus and MIEX resin produced water with predominantly microbial character, indicating the enhanced DOC removal was principally due to increased removal of terrestrially derived organic matter. The addition of Plus resin to a process train with MIEX resin allows for one treatment process to remove both DOC and hardness, where a single brine waste stream can be sent to sewer at a full-scale plant, completely removing lime chemical addition and sludge waste disposal for precipitative softening processes. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Removal of Uranium by Exchanger Resins from Soil Washing Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Han, G. S.; Kim, G. N.; Koo, D. S.; Jeong, J. W.; Moon, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Uranyl ions in the acidic waste solution were sorbed on AM-resin resin with a high sorption efficiency, and desorbed from the resin by a batch-type washing with a 60 .deg. C heated 0.5 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution. However, the uranium dissolved in the sulfuric acid solution was not sorbed onto the strong anion exchanger resins. Our group has developed a decontamination process with washing and electrokinetic methods for uranium-contaminated (U-contaminated) soil. However, this process generates a large amount of waste solution containing various metal ions. If the uranium selectively removed from the waste solution, a very small amount of the 2nd waste would be generated. Thus, selective sorption of uranium by ion exchange resins was examined in this study.

  11. Monoclonal antibody fragment removal mediated by mixed mode resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ellen; Aspelund, Matthew; Bartnik, Frank; Berge, Mark; Coughlin, Kelly; Kambarami, Mutsa; Spencer, David; Yan, Huiming; Wang, William

    2017-05-26

    Efforts to increase monoclonal antibody expression in cell culture can result in the presence of fragmented species requiring removal in downstream processing. Capto adhere, HEA Hypercel, and PPA Hypercel anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction mixed mode resins were evaluated for their fragment removal capabilities and found to separate large hinge IgG1 antibody fragment (LHF) from monomer. Removal of greater than 75% of LHF population occurred at pH 8 and low conductivity. The mechanism of fragment removal was investigated in two series of experiments. The first experimental series consisted of comparison to chromatographic behavior on corresponding single mode resins. Both single mode anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction resins failed to separate LHF. The second experimental series studied the impact of phase modifiers, ethylene glycol, urea, and arginine on the mixed mode mediated removal. The addition of ethylene glycol decreased LHF removal by half. Further decreases in LHF separation were seen upon incubation with urea and arginine. Therefore, it was discovered that the purification is the result of a mixed mode phenomena dominated by hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding effects. The site of interaction between the LHF and mixed mode resin was determined by chemical labeling of lysine residues with sulfo-NHS acetate. The labeling identified the antibody hinge and light chain regions as mediating the fragment separation. Sequence analysis showed that under separation conditions, a hydrophobic proline patch and hydrogen bonding serine and threonine residues mediate the hinge interaction with the Capto adhere ligand. Additionally, a case study is presented detailing the optimization of fragment removal using Capto adhere resin to achieve purity and yield targets in a manufacturing facility. This study demonstrated that mixed mode resins can be readily integrated into commercial antibody platform processes when additional chromatographic abilities

  12. Removal of cadmium from fish sauce using chelate resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tetsuya; Araki, Ryohei; Michihata, Toshihide; Kozawa, Miyuki; Tokuda, Koji; Koyanagi, Takashi; Enomoto, Toshiki

    2015-04-15

    Fish sauce that is prepared from squid organs contains cadmium (Cd), which may be present at hazardous concentrations. Cd molecules are predominantly protein bound in freshly manufactured fish sauce, but are present in a liberated form in air-exposed fish sauce. In the present study, we developed a new method for removing both Cd forms from fish sauce using chelate resin and a previously reported tannin treatment. Sixteen-fold decreases in Cd concentrations were observed (0.78-0.05 mg/100 mL) following the removal of liberated Cd using chelate resin treatment, and the removal of protein-bound Cd using tannin treatment. Major nutritional components of fish sauce were maintained, including free amino acids and peptides, and angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ion Exchange Column Tests Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Morse, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-12-20

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed on site. There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important. Options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste, as well as to examine the volatility of 99Tc during the vitrification process. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. A conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. SuperLig® 639 is an elutable ion exchange resin. In the tank waste, 99Tc is predominantly found in the tank supernate as pertechnetate (TcO4-). Perrhenate (ReO4-) has been shown to be a good non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate in laboratory testing for this ion exchange resin. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient and column resin maturation kinetics testing using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from simulated LAW. This revision includes results from testing to determine effective resin operating temperature range. Loading tests were performed at 45°C, and the computer modeling was updated to include the temperature effects. Equilibrium contact testing indicated that this batch of

  14. SHALLOW SHELL RESIN VERSUS TRADITIONAL RESIN: A CASE STUDY FOR Cu(II REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Arar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study on Cu2+ removal by shallow shell resin (Purolite SST 60 and traditional strongly acidic cation exchange resin (Purolite PFC 100 was performed. Batch experiments were carried out as a function of  resin  dosage and  solution pH and contact time. Ion exchange reaction showed a pH depended feature.  Maximum removal of Cu2+ achieved  pH  from 2 to 5. Sorption isothermal data is well interpreted by the Langmuir equation. Additionally, kinetic experiments showed that the pseudo first-order model was suitable for such resins. The regeneration performance of shallow shell technology (SST resin is better than PFC 100.  A solution of 2M H2SO4 performed well in regenerationof SST 60 resin. On the other han maximum regeneration reached 80% for PFC 100 resin.Özet: Bu çalışmada, klasik iyon değiştirici reçine (Purolite PFC 100 ve  sığ kabuk  reçine (Purolite SST 60  ile Cu2+ giderilmesi incelenmiştir. Yapılan kesikli çalışmalarla Cu2+ giderilmesine, reçine miktarı, çözelti pH`ı ve temas süresinin etkisi incelenmiştir. Çözelti pH`ının 2 ile 5 arasında olduğu durumda Cu2+ iyonları tamamen giderilmiştir. Denge çalışmalarında elde edilen sonuçlar Langmuir izoterm modeline daha uygun olmuştur. Kinetik çalışmalarda elde edilen sonuçlar yalancı birinci mertebe kinetik modeline uygunluk göstermişir. SST 60 reçinesinin rejenerasyon verimi PFC 100 reçinesinden daha yüksektir. 2M H2SO4 ile SST 60 reçinesi tamamen rejenere edilmiştir.

  15. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  16. Use of polymeric resins for removing contaminants from oily waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarisse, M.D.; Queiros, Y.G.C.; Mauro, A.C.; Lucas, E.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Macromoleculas; Barbosa, C.C.R. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Barbosa, L.C.F.; Louvisse, A.M.T. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Polymeric resins are being tried as an alternative material for treating oily waters from the petroleum industry, which have already been treated by conventional methods. The objective of this work has been to evaluate the purification degree of synthetic oily waters when treated in fixed bed columns packed with polymeric resins made up of hydrophilic and lipophilic moieties. The analysis used for characterizing the total grease and oil content (TOG) was fluorimetry. Starting oily waters of average TOG 40 ppm were prepared. Data obtained from eluted waters did not outweigh 1% of the TOG values of starting solutions. The kinetic study showed that the contaminant removal efficiency depends on the system elution flow rate; optimum removal values were reached at a 7.0 mL/min flow rate. High efficiency and speed in the purification process were obtained at this optimum flow rate. The passage of a water volume 1,000 times the volume of the column bed was not sufficient to observe its saturation level. (author)

  17. An evaluation of organic substance fraction removal during ion exchange with Miex-DOC resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Małgorzata

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the usefulness of Miex-DOC resin in eliminating organic substances and their fractions from water sources for drinking water was evaluated. The objects of study were samples from three surface water sources and one infiltration water source taken at water treatment plants before treatment in technical conditions. In particular, the effectiveness of removing biodegradable and non-biodegradable fractions as a function of resin dosages and water-resin contact times was evaluated. The ion exchange process with the Miex-DOC resin achieved a high effectiveness in removing aromatic non-biodegradable organic substances, and therefore a reduction in UV254 absorbance. The biodegradable fraction is much less susceptible to removal yet its removal effectiveness allows for a significant reduction in hazards connected with secondary microorganism development. The results of this study indicate the possibility of using ion exchange with the Miex-DOC resin for effective removal of disinfection by-product precursors.

  18. Preliminary engineering evaluation of heat and digest treatment for in-tank removal of radionuclides from complexed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klem, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    This report uses laboratory data from low temperature-ambient pressure digestion of actual complexed supernatant to evaluate digestion as a pretreatment method for waste in double-shell tanks 241-AN-102, 241-AN-107 and 241-AY-101. Digestion time requirements were developed at 100 degrees celsius to remove organic and meet NRC Class C criterion for TRU elements and NRC Class B criterion for 90Sr. The incidental waste ruling will establish the need for removal of 90Sr. Digestion pretreatment precipitates non radioactive metal ions and produces additional high-level waste solids and canisters of high level glass. This report estimates the amount of additional high-level waste produced and preliminary capital and operating costs for in-tank digestion of waste. An overview of alternative in-tank treatment methods is included

  19. Diclofenac removal in urine using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Kelly A; Boyer, Treavor H

    2013-11-01

    One of the major sources of pharmaceuticals in the environment is wastewater effluent of which human urine contributes the majority of pharmaceuticals. Urine source separation has the potential to isolate pharmaceuticals at a higher concentration for efficient removal as well as produce a nutrient byproduct. This research investigated the efficacy of using strong-base anion exchange polymer resins to remove the widely detected and abundant pharmaceutical, diclofenac, from synthetic human urine under fresh and ureolyzed conditions. The majority of experiments were conducted using a strong-base, macroporous, polystyrene resin (Purolite A520E). Ion-exchange followed a two-step removal rate with rapid removal in 1 h and equilibrium removal in 24 h. Diclofenac removal was >90% at a resin dose of 8 mL/L in both fresh and ureolyzed urine. Sorption of diclofenac onto A520E resin was concurrent with desorption of an equivalent amount of chloride, which indicates the ion-exchange mechanism is occurring. The presence of competing ions such as phosphate and citrate did not significantly impact diclofenac removal. Comparisons of three polystyrene resins (A520E, Dowex 22, Dowex Marathon 11) as well as one polyacrylic resin (IRA958) were conducted to determine the major interactions between anion exchange resin and diclofenac. The results showed that polystyrene resins provide the highest level of diclofenac removal due to electrostatic interactions between quaternary ammonium functional groups of resin and carboxylic acid of diclofenac and non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings of diclofenac. Diclofenac was effectively desorbed from A520E resin using a regeneration solution that contained 4.5% (m/m) NaCl in an equal-volume mixture of methanol and water. The greater regeneration efficiency of the NaCl/methanol-water mixture over the aqueous NaCl solution supports the importance of non-electrostatic interactions between resin matrix and benzene rings

  20. Arsenic Removal from Pinctada martensii Enzymatic Hydrolysate by Using Zr(Ⅳ)-Loaded Chelating Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiaoman; DAI Wenjin; SUN Huili; PAN Jianyu

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the removal of inorganic arsenic from Pinctada martensii enzymatic hydrolysate through unmodified resin (D296) and Zr(Ⅳ)-loaded chelating resin (Zr-D401).By loading Zr to macroporous chelating resin D401,the as exchange adsorption active sites are generated.This transforms D401 from a material that does not have the arsenic adsorption capacity into a material that has excellent arsenic exchange adsorption capacity.The static adsorption experiments were conducted to investigate the optimal removal condition for D296 and Zr-D401.The experimental results show that:the optimum condition for D296 is that T=25℃,pH=5,resin additive amount=1 g(50mL)-1,and contact time=10h,the corresponding arsenic removal rate being 65.7%,and protein loss being 2.33%; the optimum condition for Zr-D401 is that T=25 ℃,pH=8,resin additive amount=1 g (50 mL)-1,and contact time=10 h,the corresponding arsenic removal rate being 70.3%,and protein loss being 4.65%.These results show that both of the two resins are effective in arsenic removal for preserving useful substance.Our research provides scientific evidence and advances in the processing technology for heavy metal removal in shellfish.

  1. Methods for removal of resin remaining after debonding of orthodontic brackets: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Rodrigues Tonetto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of resin debris and/or resin cement from the enamel surface without causing iatrogenic is the main objective when removing the orthodontic brackets. Some factors such as the time required for removal, damage to the tooth structure, are essential factors for the clinician at the time of removal. Various techniques are used for the removal of orthodontic brackets after the treatment; it is known that the use of clinical procedures such as the use of diamond burs and some pliers removers can damage the structure of the enamel, often depending on the bond strength that should be taken into consideration at the time of removal. This literature review aims to gather the most relevant studies that can clarify the clinical technique, which may be more suitable for removal of the brackets.

  2. Selection of magnetic anion exchange resins for the removal of dissolved organic and inorganic matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiongjie; Li, Aimin; Wang, Jinnan; Shuang, Chengdong

    2012-01-01

    Four magnetic anion exchange resins (MAERs) were used as adsorbents to purify drinking water. The effect of water quality (pH, temperature, ionic strength, etc.) on the performance of MAER for the removal of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was also investigated. Among the four studied MAERs, the strong base resin named NDMP-1 with high water content and enhanced exchange capacity exhibited the highest removal rate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (48.9% removal rate) and UV-absorbing substances (82.4% removal rate) with a resin dose of 10 mL/L after 30 min of contact time. The MAERs could also effectively remove inorganic matter such as sulfate, nitrate and fluoride. Because of the higher specific UV absorbance (SUVA) value, the DOM in the raw water was found to be removed more effectively than that in the clarified water by NDMP resin. The temperature showed a weak influence on the removal of DOC from 6 to 26 degrees C, while a relatively strong one at 36 degrees C. The removal of DOM by NDMP was also affected to some extent by the pH value. Moreover, increasing the sulfate concentration in the raw water could decrease the removal rates of DOC and UV-absorbing substances.

  3. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by ion-exchange resin: Column sorption-elution studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koese, T. Ennil; Oztuerk, Nese

    2008-01-01

    A column sorption-elution study was carried out by using a strong base anion-exchange resin (Dowex 2 x 8) for the removal of boron from aqueous solutions. The breakthrough curve was obtained as a function of feed flow rate and the total and breakthrough capacity values of the resin were calculated. The boron on the resin was quantitatively eluted with 0.5 M HCl solution at different flow rates. Three consecutive sorption-elution-washing-regeneration-washing cycles were applied to the resin in order to investigate the reusability of the ion-exchange resin. Total capacity values remained almost the same after three sorption-elution-regeneration cycles. The Thomas and the Yoon-Nelson models were applied to experimental data to predict the breakthrough curves and to determine the characteristic column parameters required for process design. The results proved that the models would describe the breakthrough curves well

  4. Evaluation of new macroporous resins for the removal of uranium and plutonium from waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenst, J.W.; Herald, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    Organic ion exchange resins were evaluated for 238 Pu(IV), 238 Pu(VI), and 233 U(VI) removal from water. The capacity of the resins and equilibrium coefficients (Kd) were compared with each other and to bone char--an inorganic adsorbent consisting of hydroxyapatite (HAP) for which data is available. Bone char gave the best results for the removal of 238 Pu(IV), Amberlite XE279 (one of the new macroporous resins) gave the best results for 238 Pu(VI), and another macroporous resin, Dowex-MSA-1, gave good results for 233 U(VI). Kd values were shown to be a function of pH

  5. Load transfer characteristics of unilateral distal extension removable partial dentures with polyacetal resin supporting components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, T; Chang, T; Caputo, A A

    2009-03-01

    To photoelastically examine load transfer by unilateral distal extension removable partial dentures with supporting and retentive components made of the lower stiffness polyacetal resins. A mandibular photoelastic model, with edentulous space distal to the right second premolar and missing the left first molar, was constructed to determine the load transmission characteristics of a unilateral distal extension base removable partial denture. Individual simulants were used for tooth structure, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Three designs were fabricated: a major connector and clasps made from polyacetal resin, a metal framework as the major connector with polyacetal resin clasp and denture base, and a traditional metal framework I-bar removable partial denture. Simulated posterior bilateral and unilateral occlusal loads were applied to the removable partial dentures. Under bilateral and left side unilateral loading, the highest stress was observed adjacent to the left side posterior teeth with the polyacetal removable partial denture. The lowest stress was seen with the traditional metal framework. Unilateral loads on the right edentulous region produced similar distributed stress under the denture base with all three designs but a somewhat higher intensity with the polyacetal framework. The polyacetal resin removable partial denture concentrated the highest stresses to the abutment and the bone. The traditional metal framework I-bar removable partial denture most equitably distributed force. The hybrid design that combined a metal framework and polyacetal clasp and denture base may be a viable alternative when aesthetics are of primary concern.

  6. Efficiency of lead removal from drinking water using cationic resin Purolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashour Mohammad Merganpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, issues such as water shortage, difficulties and costs related to supplying safe water, and anomalous concentrations of heavy metals in groundwater and surface water resources, doubled the necessity of access to technical methods on removing these pollutants from water resources. Methods: In this lab study, cationic resin Purolite S-930 (with co-polymer styrene di-vinyl benzene structure was used for lead removal from drinking water containing up to 22 μg/L. Using statistical analysis and designing a full factorial experiment are the most important effective parameters on lead removal obtained through ion exchange process. Results: Analysis of response and interaction parameters of ion exchange showed that the resin column height has maximum and pH value has minimum effect on the efficiency of lead removal from aquatic environment. Trinary interaction of “effective size, flow rate, resin column high” has the most important for lead removal efficiency in this system. So the maximum efficiency was obtained at the mesh = 40, bed height =1.6 meter, and pH= 6.5. At the best operation conditions, ability to remove 95.42% of lead concentration can be achieved. Conclusion: Using the resin Purolite S-930 during 21-day service with 91.12% of mean lead removal ratio from drinking water is an economic and technical feasibility.

  7. Mathematical modelling for magnetite (crude removal from primary heat transfer loop by ion-exchange resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeeshan Nawaz

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present research focuses to develop mathematical model for the removal of iron (magnetite by ion-exchange resin from primary heat transfer loop of process industries. This mathematical model is based on operating capacities (that’s provide more effective design as compared to loading capacity from static laboratory tests. Results showed non-steady state distribution of external Fe2+ and limitations imposed on operating conditions, these conditions includes; loading and elution cycle time, flow rate, concentration of both loading and removal, volume of resin required. Number of generalized assumptions was made under shortcut modeling techniques to overcome the gap of theoretical and actual process design.

  8. Synthesis of a magnetic composite resin and its cobalt removal characteristics in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kyun; Lee, Kun Jai

    2001-01-01

    A series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenolsulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. The ion exchange and sorption characteristics of the composite resin prepared by the above method at various conditions were experimentally disclosed. The composite resin prepared shows stably high removal efficiency to Co(II) species in aqueous solution in a wide range of solution pH. The overall isotherm is qualitatively explained by the generalized adsorption isotherm concept proposed by McKinley. The standard enthalpy change derived from van't Hoff equation conforms to the typical range for chemisorption or ion exchange. The selectivity of the PSF-F (phenolsulphonic formaldehyde-iron ferrite) composite resin to Co(II) species and other competing chemicals (i.e. Na 2 EDTA, Ca(II) and Na) was compared. It is anticipated that the composite resin can also be used for column-operation with process-control by applying external magnetic field, since the rigid bead-type composite resin shows magnetic-susceptibility due to its paramagnetic inorganic constituent (i.e. iron ferrite). (author)

  9. Removal of aluminum(III)-based turbidity in water using hydrous titanium oxide dispersed in ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkataramani, B.; Karweer, S.B.; Iyer, R.K.; Phatak, G.M.; Iyer, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    An adsorber consisting of hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO) dispersed in a Dowex-type ion-exchange resin matrix (designated RT resins) has been developed which is capable of removing Al(III)-based colloidal dispersions in the neutral pH condition. The effect of resin crosslinking, particle size, HTiO loading, turbidity level, and flow rate on the turbidity removal efficiency of RT resins has been studied. It is demonstrated that a train of columns comprising RT resin, H + , and OH - form of resins could be used for large-scale purification operations at high flow rates. These columns, apart from removing turbidity and associated radioactivity, can effectively remove dissolved uranium present in ppb levels when used for water purification in nuclear reactors

  10. Assessment of alternate ion exchange resins for improved antimony removal from the primary heat transport system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burany, R.; Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A. [Kinectrics, Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Radiation fields around the CANDU heat transport system are a major contributor to worker dose during inspection, maintenance and refurbishment activities. While Co-60 is typically the dominant contributor to radiation fields in CANDU reactors, Sb-124, an activation product of antimony, is also a significant contributor, accounting for 5-20% of the radiation fields. The goal of this research project was to investigate resins for improved removal of antimony under both oxidizing and reducing conditions.Several candidate resins were tested and short-listed through a sequence of iterative testing. The results of the laboratory testing have identified potential candidates for improved antimony removal. Further testing is required to ensure compatibility with existing station resin specifications. (author)

  11. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  12. ION EXCHANGE MODELING FOR REMOVAL OF CESIUM FROM HANFORD WASTE USING SUPERLIG 644 RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L

    2004-01-01

    The expected performance of a proposed ion exchange column using SuperLig(reg s ign) 644 resin for the removal of cesium from Hanford high level radioactive alkaline waste is discussed. This report represents a final report on the ability and knowledge with regard to modeling the Cesium-SuperLig(reg s ign) 644 resin ion exchange system. Only the loading phase of the cycle process is addressed within this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests and batch equilibrium experiments are addressed. The methodology employed and sensitivity analyses are also included (i.e., existing methodology employed is referenced to prior developmental efforts while updated methodology is discussed). Pilot-scale testing is not assessed since no pilot-scale testing was available at the time of this report. Column performance predictions are made considering three selected feed compositions under nominal operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses provided help to identify key parameters that aid in resin procurement acceptance criteria. The methodology and application presented within this report reflect the expected behavior of SuperLig(reg s ign) 644 resin manufactured at the production-scale (i.e, 250 gallon batch size level). The primary objective of this work was, through modeling and verification based on experimental assessments, to predict the cesium removal performance of SuperLig(reg s ign) 644 resin for application in the RPP pretreatment facility

  13. Removal of Pb2+ from Water by Synthesized Tannin Resins from Invasive South African Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele J. Okoli

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Contamination of water by Pb 2 + and the threat of invasive vegetation affects the quality and quantity of water accessible to all life forms and has become a primary concern to South Africa and the world at large. This paper synthesized, characterized, and evaluated the resins from tannin-rich invasive Acacia species as an environmentally benign Pb 2 + adsorbent. The analysis of the pore volume and surface area of the resins reveals a small pore dimension of 9 × 10−3 cc/g and large surface area (2.31–8.65 m2/g, presenting suitable physical parameters for adsorption of Pb 2 + . Langmuir model offers the best correlation data at pH 6 with maximum monolayer coverage capacity of 189.30, 105.70 and 98.82 mg/g for silver, black and green wattle tannin resins in aqueous solutions, respectively. The kinetic data suitably fits into a pseudo-second-order model, with the Dubinin–Radushkevich adsorption energy (E ≤ 7.07 KJ/mol and intra-particle diffusion model confirming an associated physisorption process within the bio-sorption system. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR data of the resins were informative of the high thermal stability and chelating functionality such as -OH and -NH2 responsible for the removal of Pb 2 + . All the resins showed good adsorption characteristics while silver wattle tannin resin has the best adsorption capacity compared to black and green wattle tannin resins. This study provides a prototype adsorbent from invasive plants for the removal of Pb 2 + in water.

  14. Removal of mixing pump in tank 102-AP -- pump drop onto central pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    The mixing pump, if dropped in the pump pit following its removal from the tank, is incapable of compromising the tank structure either locally or in a structural displacement mode to an extent which might allow dispersion of the contents. A drop from 10 ft above the pit floor (considered the maximum credible height) of a pump which is considered perfectly rigid does not approach the required perforation velocity. The velocity required to perforate requires a drop height which is physically impossible to attain with existing cranes. An analysis of the location of the deposition of the strain energy required to match the pump's impact kinetic energy, the results of which are shown in Table 2, verifies that there is no credible chance for compromise of the tank roof by such a drop

  15. Comparison between two methods for resin removing after bracket debonding

    OpenAIRE

    Marchi, Rodrigo De; Marchi, Luciana Manzotti De; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Terada, Hélio Hissashi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess - using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) - the effectiveness of two abrasive discs, one made from silicon and one from aluminum oxide, in removing adhesive remnants (AR) after debonding orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Ten randomly selected bovine teeth were used, i.e., 2 in the control group, and the other 8 divided into two groups, which had orthodontic brackets bonded to their surface with Concise Orthodontic Adhesive (3M). The following metho...

  16. [Effects of different resin removal methods on shear bond strength of rebonded orthodontic brackets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hai-miao; Zhao, Bin-jiao; Chen, Dong

    2015-06-01

    To compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of rebonded orthodontic metal brackets with different resin removal methods. Forty extracted premolars were chosen as samples and divided into 4 experimental groups. The teeth were bonded with brackets. The brackets from 3 groups were debonded while adhesive remnants were removed from bracket bases by methods of grinding, sandblasting, and direct flaming, respectively and then rebonded. The SBS values of all rebonded brackets were determined after pH cycling experiment for 30 days. Some rebonded bracket bases were selected and observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA test using SPSS 13.0 software package. Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference of SBS values among the 4 experimental groups (Pbrackets after resin removal by grinding and sandblasting have a similar SBS compared to the initial brackets adhesive.

  17. Crud removal by ion exchange resin DIAION HPAN10 and its mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuhara, Ryosuke; Goda, Takashi; Tokumaru, Izuru; Yano, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The metal corrosion products generated in the water systems of nuclear power plants (crud) should be efficiently removed from the water in order to maintain the safety and reliability of the plants' constituent materials and reduce radiation exposure to workers. Recently, we developed a new highly porous type of anion exchange resin product, 'DIAION HPAN10', which has a high crud removal capability. HPAN10 has a highly-developed porous structure, and it is considered that the structure contributes to the efficient capture of curd. Furthermore, HPAN10 was designed specially for the capture of crud, including physical properties such as proper macro pore size, particle size and strength. Therefore, the model crud removal capability of HPAN10 is ten times greater than that of conventional gel types. In regards to the mechanisms of curd removal by resin, it is generally considered that there are three factors which affect the capture of curd: they are filter effect, electric potential and curd penetration into resin particles by partially dissolution. On this report, new experimental data and the consideration about crud removal mechanisms are introduced. (author)

  18. The impact of loading approach and biological activity on NOM removal by ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Joerg; Wray, Heather E; Schulz, Martin; Vortisch, Roman; Barbeau, Benoit; Bérubé, Pierre R

    2018-05-01

    The present study investigated the impact of different loading approaches and microbial activity on the Natural Organic Matter (NOM) removal efficiency and capacity of ion exchange resins. Gaining further knowledge on the impact of loading approaches is of relevance because laboratory-scale multiple loading tests (MLTs) have been introduced as a simpler and faster alternative to column tests for predicting the performance of IEX, but only anecdotal evidence exists to support their ability to forecast contaminant removal and runtime until breakthrough of IEX systems. The overall trends observed for the removal and the time to breakthrough of organic material estimated using MLTs differed from those estimated using column tests. The results nonetheless suggest that MLTs could best be used as an effective tool to screen different ion exchange resins in terms of their ability to remove various contaminants of interest from different raw waters. The microbial activity was also observed to impact the removal and time to breakthrough. In the absence of regeneration, a microbial community rapidly established itself in ion exchange columns and contributed to the removal of organic material. Biological ion exchange (BIEX) removed more organic material and enabled operation beyond the point when the resin capacity would have otherwise been exhausted using conventional (i.e. in the absence of a microbial community) ion exchange. Furthermore, significantly greater removal of organic matter could be achieved with BIEX than biological activated carbon (BAC) (i.e. 56 ± 7% vs. 15 ± 5%, respectively) when operated at similar loading rates. The results suggest that for some raw waters, BIEX could replace BAC as the technology of choice for the removal of organic material. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CAREM 25: Design of resin bed for purification and boron removal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chocron, Mauricio; Iglesias, Alberto M.; Jimenez Rebagliati, Raul; Raffo Calderon, Maria C.; La Gamma, Ana M.

    2000-01-01

    The purification of the water the primary coolant of a water cooled nuclear reactor as well as the water of many auxiliary systems is controlled by the use of ion exchange resins. In the present paper, the resin beds for three different systems are specified: the purification and control volume system, the suppression pool water and the spent fuel pool water for the reactor CAREM-25. In all cases the dimensioning calculations have been done taking in consideration the amount of contaminants and corrosion products generated under normal operation or post-accident. Also, the results have been contrasted with the experience of the nuclear power plants in operation in Argentina, international design criteria and international standards. For the primary coolant, the boron-removal beds have been sized and an estimation of the maximum dose received by the resins have been calculated. It have been found that the result is well below the damaging threshold reported in the literature. (author)

  20. Functionalized dithiocarbamate chelating resin for the removal of Co2+ from simulated wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuewei; Fu, Linwei; Wu, Yanyang; Zhao, Huiling; Zhao, Shuangliang; Xu, Shouhong

    2017-12-01

    Industrial wastewater that contains trace amounts of heavy metal ions is often seen in petrochemical industry. While this wastewater can not be directly discharged, it is difficult to treat due to the low concentration of metal ions. Introducing chelating reagents into this wastewater for selective ion adsorption, followed by a mechanical separation process, provides an appealing solution. Toward the success of this technology, the development of effective chelating resins is of key importance. In the present work, a chelating resin containing amino and dithiocarbamate groups was reported for the removal of Co(II) metal ions in trace concentrations from simulated wastewater. By investigating the adsorption performance of the chelating resin at different solution pH values, adsorbent dosages, contact time, initial ion concentrations, and adsorption temperatures, the maximum adsorption capacity of the resin for Co(II) was identified to be 24.89 mg g-1 for a 2 g L-1 adsorbent dosage and a pH value of 5. After four adsorption-desorption cycles, 97% of the adsorption capacity of the resin was maintained. The adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics were analyzed and discussed as well.

  1. Ion Exchange Modeling Of Cesium Removal From Hanford Waste Using Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2007-06-27

    This report discusses the expected performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) ion exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline Hanford radioactive waste. Predictions of full scale column performance in a carousel mode are made for the Hot Commissioning, Envelope B, and Subsequent Operations waste compositions under nominal operating conditions and for perturbations from the nominal. Only the loading phase of the process cycle is addressed in this report. Pertinent bench-scale column tests, kinetic experiments, and batch equilibrium experiments are used to estimate model parameters and to benchmark the ion-exchange model. The methodology and application presented in this report reflect the expected behavior of spherical RF resin manufactured at the intermediate-scale (i.e., approximately 100 gallon batch size; batch 5E-370/641). It is generally believed that scale-up to production-scale in resin manufacturing will result in similarly behaving resin batches whose chemical selectivity is unaffected while total capacity per gram of resin may vary some. As such, the full-scale facility predictions provided within this report should provide reasonable estimates of production-scale column performance.

  2. Comparison between two methods for resin removing after bracket debonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo De Marchi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess - using scanning electron microscopy (SEM - the effectiveness of two abrasive discs, one made from silicon and one from aluminum oxide, in removing adhesive remnants (AR after debonding orthodontic brackets. METHODS: Ten randomly selected bovine teeth were used, i.e., 2 in the control group, and the other 8 divided into two groups, which had orthodontic brackets bonded to their surface with Concise Orthodontic Adhesive (3M. The following methods were employed - in one single step - to remove AR after debracketing: Group A, Optimize discs (TDV and Group B, Onegloss discs (Shofu, used at low speed. After removing the AR with the aforementioned methods, the teeth were prepared to undergo SEM analysis, and photographs were taken of the enamel surface with 50x magnification. Six examiners evaluated the photographs applying the Zachrisson and Årtun enamel surface index (ESI system (1979. RESULTS: Group A exhibited minor scratches on the enamel surface as well as some AR in some of the photographs, while Group B showed a smoother surface, little or no AR and some abrasion marks in the photographs. No statistically significant differences were found between the two methods and the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The two abrasive discs were effective in removing the AR after bracket debonding in one single step.OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, por microscopia eletrônica de varredura, a eficácia de dois discos abrasivos de silicone e óxido de alumínio para a remoção da resina remanescente após a descolagem de braquetes ortodônticos. MÉTODOS: foram utilizados 10 dentes bovinos selecionados aleatoriamente, sendo 2 para o grupo controle e os demais divididos em dois grupos, os quais receberam colagem de braquetes ortodônticos com resina ortodôntica Concise (3M. Os métodos de remoção da resina após a descolagem dos acessórios ortodônticos em apenas uma etapa foram: Grupo A - disco

  3. Removal of Pb2+ from aqueous solutions by a high-efficiency resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Hao; Ren, Yongzheng; Sun, Xueliang; Xu, Yadi; Li, Xuemei; Zhang, Tiancheng; Kang, Jianxiong; Liu, Dongqi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of Pb 2+ from aqueous solution by 732 cation-exchange resin in sodium type (732-CR) has been studied in batch experiments at varying pH (2.0–8.0), Pb 2+ concentration (50–200 mg/L), contact time (5–300 min), temperature (288–308 K) and resin dose (0.125–0.75 g/L). The experimental data show that the ion-exchange process was dependent on pH and temperature, the optimal exchange capacity was found at pH 4.0, and higher temperature was beneficial to lead sorption. Kinetic data indicate that the ion-exchange process followed a pseudo-first order model. The equilibrium exchange capacity could be reached at approximately 4 h, and the maximum sorption capacity of Pb 2+ at pH 4.0 was 396.8 mg/g resin. The equilibrium data were evaluated with Langmuir and Freundlich model, and were best fitted with Langmuir model. The thermodynamic parameters for removal of Pb 2+ indicate that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. Additionally, column tests were conducted by using both synthetic solution and effluents from lead battery industry. The regeneration of resin was performed for two sorption-regeneration cycles by 1 M NaOH, and the results show that effective regeneration was achieved by this method.

  4. Study of arsenic removal with ionic exchange resins in drinking water from Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Moreno, F.; Prieto-Garcia, F.; Rojas-Hernandez, A.; Marmolejo-Santillan, Y.; Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Patino-Cardona, F.

    2006-01-01

    Anionic exchange resins were research with respect its capacity for removal arsenic content in water. Water of well V from Zimapan Hidalgo Mexico was used to make this research, because this water have a mean concentration of 480±11μg-L''-1 of arsenic and it is available as drinking water. The exchange resins employed were two strong anionic, one macroreticular (IRA-900) and other gel type (IRA-400), as soon as one third anionic weak macroreticular type (IRA-96). The experiments carried with this resins showing that IRA-900 has highest efficient in the process of arsenic removal from drinking water, because, it showed a treatment capacity of 700 V a gua. V r es''-1; while that capacities of IRA-400 e IRA-96 resins were 320 and 52 V a gua .V r es''-1 respectively. The mean concentration of arsenic residue in the treatise water was 24 μg.l''-1 and it is within the maximum level permissible by Mexican official norm for drinking water. (Author) 12 refs

  5. Evaluation of one-step micro polishers for residual resin removal after debonding on fluorosed teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmalatha Challa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim and objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of one step micro polishers for residual resin removal on fluorosed teeth using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Methods and Material: 55 teeth with mild to moderate fluorosis were selected with five teeth as control. Metal brackets were bonded onto 50 teeth which were divided into 5 groups. The finishing and polishing methods which were tested include tungsten carbide burs (TCB, multistep finishing system (Sof-Lex, one step polishers (PoGo and combination of TCB with multistep and one step polishing systems. After resin removal, all the samples were examined under SEM for assessment of the enamel surface. Results: The enamel surface was closest to untouched enamel in samples finished with the PoGo one step polishers followed by Sof-Lex multistep finishing system. However, they took the longest time to finish. TCB required the shortest time for residual resin removal. Conclusions: All polishing systems produce a certain degree of damage to the enamel surface with the smoothest surface being produced by one step polishers on fluorosed teeth.

  6. Treatment of groundwater for nitrate removal by portable ion exchange resin, OSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iriburo, A.; Pessi, M.; Castagnino, G.; Garat, S.; Hackenbruch, R.; Laguardia, J.; Yelpo, L.; Amondarain, A.; Brunetto, C.

    2010-01-01

    The locations of Palmitas in the Province of Soriano is supplied with groundwater from a shallow and high nitrogen content in sedimentary aquifer (Asencio Formation). Due to lack of alternative sources, groundwater or surface water, it was decided to test the water treatment from a perforation whose tenors were of the order of 51-66 mg / L of nitrates. The methodology used for the removal of nitrate is ion exchange resins .The main issue raised in this case was the disposal of effluent from the washing of the resins, because there is no collective sanitation network Palmitas nor a sufficient stream flow for discharge . Several alternatives (installation of a transitional deposit, haulage trucks, dumping at distant points, etc.), which were ruled by their poor viability and / or high costs were studied. Finally it was decided to install a device that will have three cylinders with resins were transportable, for which should have a weight less than 75 kg and those which would be used alternately. Regeneration of the resins is carried out in the city of Mercedes, distant 40 km, where the necessary water for the discharge conditions exist with a high content of sodium chloride, resulting from ion exchange. This pilot project represents a first step in treatment for nitrate removal in groundwater using transportable resins which aims to supply the public . Due to the nature of the above location , the chosen methodology had to be adapted to fulfill their duties satisfactorily. The first results of this project to a year of commissioning implementation, which has been funded by SBI and developed by his staff, in order to be used in other places with similar problems are presented in this report

  7. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milly, Hussam; Andiappan, Manoharan; Thompson, Ian; Banerjee, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  8. Bio-active glass air-abrasion has the potential to remove resin composite restorative material selectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milly, Hussam [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Andiappan, Manoharan [Unit of Dental Public Health, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Thompson, Ian [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Banerjee, Avijit, E-mail: avijit.banerjee@kcl.ac.uk [Biomaterials, Biomimetics and Biophotonics Research Group, Kings College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom); Unit of Conservative Dentistry, King' s College London Dental Institute at Guy' s Hospital, King' s Health Partners, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess: (a) the chemistry, morphology and bioactivity of bio-active glass (BAG) air-abrasive powder, (b) the effect of three air-abrasion operating parameters: air pressure, powder flow rate (PFR) and the abrasive powder itself, on the selective removal of resin composite and (c) the required “time taken”. BAG abrasive particles were characterised using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDX) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Standardised resin composite restorations created within an enamel analogue block (Macor™) in vitro, were removed using air-abrasion undersimulated clinical conditions. 90 standardised cavities were scanned before and after resin composite removal using laser profilometry and the volume of the resulting 3D images calculated. Multilevel linear model was used to identify the significant factors affecting Macor™ removal. BAG powder removed resin composite more selectively than conventional air-abrasion alumina powder using the same operating parameters (p < 0.001) and the effect of altering the unit's operating parameters was significant (p < 0.001). In conclusion, BAG powder is more efficient than alumina in the selective removal of resin composite particularly under specific operating parameters, and therefore may be recommended clinically as a method of preserving sound enamel structure when repairing and removing defective resin composite restorations.

  9. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-01-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO 4 /l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U 3 O 8 ) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  10. Characterization and adsorption mechanism of Zn2+ removal by PVA/EDTA resin in polluted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yun; Li Yanfeng; Yang Liuqing; Ma Xiaojie; Wang Liyuan; Ye Zhengfang

    2010-01-01

    Batch adsorption experiments were conducted using a PVA/EDTA resin as an adsorbent to adsorb Zn(II) ions from single component system in which experimental parameters were studied including solution pH, contact time, adsorbent dose and initial metal ions concentration. The equilibrium isotherms were determined at pH 6 under constant ionic strength and at different temperatures. The results showed that the maximum removal of Zn(II) (99.8%) with 1 g L -1 of sorbent was observed at 40 mg L -1 at an initial pH value of 6. Removals of about 60-70% occurred in 15 min, and equilibrium was attained at around 30 min. The equilibrium data for the adsorption of Zn(II) on PVA/EDTA resin was tested with various adsorption isotherm models among which three models were found to be suitable for the Zn(II) adsorption. In addition, the kinetic adsorption fitted well to the pseudo-second-order model and the corresponding rate constants were obtained. Thermodynamic aspects of the adsorption process were also investigated. Furthermore a higher desorption efficiency of Zn(II) from the PVA/EDTA resin using acid treatment was available by more than 95%.

  11. Comparison of clasp retention on enamel and composite resin-recontoured abutments following repeated removal in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrati, Simindokht; Sadighpour, Leyla; Jahanian, Ghasem

    2010-04-01

    Loss of prosthetic retention over time is a concern with removable prostheses. Use of composite resin to modify an abutment contour receiving a removable partial denture clasp may offer a reasonable, less invasive method of improving removable prosthesis retention. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the removal force of clasps over composite resin-recontoured abutments during a simulated 4 years of service. Twenty first mandibular premolars were selected to form 2 groups of specimens (n=5) resembling a tooth-supported edentulous space. A packable composite resin (Filtek P60) was used to create a 0.25-mm undercut on the buccal abutment surfaces of the composite resin group. Teeth in the natural abutment group were mounted in angulation to produce 0.25-mm undercuts on the buccal surfaces. The chrome-cobalt framework consisted of 2 individually fabricated T-clasps. Both groups were subjected to 4500 cycles of repeated removal using a small shaker. Removal forces were recorded before the repeated removal test (T(0)), after 500 and 1000 cycles, and at 1000-cycle intervals thereafter. The mean values of forces between the 2 groups were compared at each stage using the Mann-Whitney test (alpha=.05). No debonding occurred during the test. At T(0), the highest and lowest force values were observed in the composite resin group (3.75 N and 17.5 N, respectively). There was a significant difference between the removal forces of the 2 groups after 500 cycles and at test completion (P=.008). Retention loss was 3 times greater in the composite resin group than in the natural abutments group (53.65% vs. 15.80%). Within the limitations of the study, removal forces of the composite resin-recontoured abutments were threefold less than those of natural abutments after 4 years of simulated service. Copyright 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The efficiency of macroporous polystyrene ion-exchange resins in natural organic matter removal from surface water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanowska Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural water sources used for water treatment contains various organic and inorganic compounds. Surface waters are commonly contaminated with natural organic matter (NOM. NOM removal from water is important e.g. due to lowering the risk of disinfection by-product formation during chlorination. Ion exchange with the use of synthetic ion-exchange resins is an alternative process to typical NOM removal approach (e.g. coagulation, adsorption or oxidation as most NOM compounds have anionic character. Moreover, neutral fraction could be removed from water due to its adsorption on resin surface. In this study, applicability of two macroporous, polystyrene ion exchange resins (BD400FD and A100 in NOM removal from water was assessed including comparison of treatment efficiency in various process set-ups and conditions. Moreover, resin regeneration effectivity was determined. Obtained results shown that examined resins could be applied in NOM removal and it should be noticed that column set-up yielded better results (contrary to batch set-up. Among the examined resins A100 one possessed better properties. It was determined that increase of solution pH resulted in a slight decrease in treatment efficiency while higher temperature improved it. It was also observed that regeneration efficiency was comparable in both tested methods but batch set-up required less reagents.

  13. Evaluating the Performance of Iron Nano-particle Resin in Removing Fluoride from Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Mahvi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive amounts of fluoride in drinking water pose serious health problems. It is, therefore, essential to remove it from drinking water by appropriate water treatment processes down to standard levels for preventing the health risks associated. The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a kind of hybrid sorbent resin in removing fluoride from water. Batch experiments were performed to investigate adsorption isotherms and the effects of experimental parameters such as contact time (5-120 min and pH (3-9. Results revealed that fluoride adsorption rate was initially rapid but continued at a slower rate before it reached equilibrium in 120 min. Optimum fluoride removal was observed at a pH range of 3-5.5. The data obtained from the experiments were fitted with Langmiur model.

  14. Removal of Chromium by Using of Adsorption onto Strong Base Anion Resin: Study of Equilibrium and Kinetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shirzad Siboni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is one of the heavy metals that is found in industrial effluents and is very toxic for human and environment. In this work the removal of hexavalent chromium by using of adsorption onto strongly basic anion was investigated. Various parameters such as pH, initial hexavalent chromium concentration, contact time and resin dosage were studied. Experimental data were expressed by Langmiur and Freundlich isotherm Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and modified Pseudo-first order kinetic models. The results showed chromium removal was increased by increase of contact time and resin dosage, while decreased by increase of pH and initial hexavalent chromium concentration. At contact time equal 120 min, resin dosage 0.2 g/100 ml and initial hexavalent chromium concentration of 30 mg/l, by increasing pH from 3 to 11, removal efficiency was decreased from 93.56 % to 69.12 %. In addition, by increasing contact time from 5 min to 120 min, removal efficiency was increased from 39.51 % to 94.41 %. The results also showed hexavalent chromium sorption follows Langmiur isotherm model. Pseudo second order models best describe chromium removal by using of adsorption onto strongly basic anion resin. The results revealed that removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution by using of adsorption onto stringly basic onion resins can be done quick and effective.

  15. Removal of both N-nitrosodimethylamine and trihalomethanes precursors in a single treatment using ion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beita-Sandí, Wilson; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-11-01

    Drinking water utilities are relying more than ever on water sources impacted by wastewater effluents. Disinfection/oxidation of these waters during water treatment may lead to the formation of several disinfection by-products, including the probable human carcinogen N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and the regulated trihalomethanes (THMs). In this study, the potential of ion exchange resins to control both NDMA and THMs precursors in a single treatment is presented. Two ion exchange resins were examined, a cation exchange resin (Plus) to target NDMA precursors and an anion exchange resin (MIEX) for THMs precursors control. We applied the resins, individually and combined, in the treatment of surface and wastewater effluent samples. The treatment with both resins removed simultaneously NDMA (43-85%) and THMs (39-65%) precursors. However, no removal of NDMA precursors was observed in the surface water with low initial NDMA FP (14 ng/L). The removals of NDMA FP and THMs FP with Plus and MIEX resins applied alone were (49-90%) and (41-69%), respectively. These results suggest no interaction between the resins, and thus the feasibility of effectively controlling NDMA and THMs precursors concomitantly. Additionally, the effects of the wastewater impact and the natural attenuation of precursors were studied. The results showed that neither the wastewater content nor the attenuation of the precursor affected the removals of NDMA and THMs precursors. Finally, experiments using a wastewater effluent sample showed that an increase in the calcium concentration resulted in a reduction in the removal of NDMA precursors of about 50%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g"−"1 does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  17. Biogenic glutamic acid-based resin: Its synthesis and application in the removal of cobalt(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamiu, Zakariyah A.; Saleh, Tawfik A.; Ali, Shaikh A., E-mail: shaikh@kfupm.edu.sa

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • A novel resin embedded with metal chelating glutamic acid was synthesized. • The biogenic amino acid residues imparted remarkable efficacy to remove Co(II). • The resin showed excellent ability to remove various metals from wastewater. - Abstract: Inexpensive biogenic glutamic acid has been utilized to synthesize a cross-linked dianionic polyelectrolyte (CDAP) containing metal chelating ligands. Cycloterpolymerization, using azoisobutyronitrile as an initiator, of N,N-diallylglutamic acid hydrochloride, sulfur dioxide and a cross-linker afforded a pH-responsive cross-linked polyzwitterionic acid (CPZA) which upon basification with NaOH was converted into CDAP. The new resin, characterized by a multitude of spectroscopic techniques as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses, was evaluated for the removal of Co(II) as a model case under different conditions. The adsorption capacity of 137 mg g{sup −1} does indeed make the resin as one of the most effective sorbents in recent times. The resin leverages its cheap natural source and ease of regeneration in combination with its high and fast uptake capacities to offer a great promise for wastewater treatment. The resin has demonstrated remarkable efficiency in removing toxic metal ions including arsenic from a wastewater sample.

  18. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  19. Synthesis of some Ferromagnetic Composite Resins and their Metal Removal Characteristics in Aqueous Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheha, R.R.; EI-Zahhar, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a procedure for synthesis of new organic-inorganic magnetic composite resins was established. The procedure was based upon immobilization of magnetite as a ferromagnetic material within the polymeric (poly(acrylic acid acrylonitrile) and IRC-120) ion exchange resins. The produced magnetic resins were evaluated as sorbents for CI(VI). The factors influencing the sorption of Cr(Vl), e.g., ph, equilibrium time, initial concentration and temperature were studied. The sorption process was very fast initially and maximum sorption was achieved within 3 h at ph 5.1. Thc kinetics of the system have been evaluated with pseudo first order model, second order model, Elovich equation, intra-particle diffusion model and liquid film diffusion model. Chromium interaction with composite particles followed second-order kinetics with a correlation coefficient extremely high and closer to unity and rate constant (k s ) has the values 1.68 x 10 -4 and 1.9 x 10 -4 g/mg min for IRC-120-P AN-magnetite and P(AA-AN)-magnetite composites, respectively. The values of equilibrium sorption capacity (q e ) are consistent with the modeled data and attain the range 893 - 951 mg/g. Kinetically, both pore diffusion and film diffusion are participating in ruling the diffusion of CI(VI) ions. The sorption data gave good fits with Temkin and Flory-Huggins isotherm models. The isotherm parameters related to the heat of sorption are in the range 8-16 kJ mol -1 which is the range of bonding energy for ion exchange interactions and so suggest an ion exchange mechanism for removal of CI(VI) by the composite sorbents. The adsorption process was exothermic with δH in the range of -73 to -97 kJ/mol. The negative values of Gibbs free energy confirm the feasibility and the spontaneous nature of removal of CI(VI) with these novel composites

  20. Arsenic and fluoride removal from contaminated drinking water with Haix-Fe-Zr and Haix-Zr resin beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Debra H; Sen Gupta, Bhaskar; Mukhopadhyay, Soumyadeep; Sen Gupta, Arup K

    2018-06-01

    The objective of the study was to carry-out batch tests to examine the effectiveness of Haix-Fe-Zr and Haix-Zr resin beads in the removal of As(III), As(V) and F - from groundwater with a similar geochemistry to a site where a community-based drinking water plant has been installed in West Bengal, India. The groundwater was spiked separately with ∼200 μg/L As(III) and As(V) and 5 mg/L F - . Haix-Zr resin beads were more effective than Haix-Fe-Zr resin beads in removing As(III) and As(V). Haix-Zr resin beads showed higher removal of As(V) compared to As(III). Haix-Zr resin beads removed As(V) below the WHO (10 μg/L) drinking water standards at 8.79 μg/L after 4 h of shaking, while As(III) was reduced to 7.72 μg/L after 8 h of shaking. Haix-Fe-Zr resin beads were more effective in removing F - from the spiked groundwater compared to Haix-Zr resin beads. Concentrations of F - decreased from 6.27 mg/L to 1.26 mg/L, which is below the WHO drinking water standards (1.5 mg/L) for F - , after 15 min of shaking with Haix-Fe-Zr resin beads. After 20 min of shaking in groundwater treated with Haix-Zr resin beads, F - concentrations decreased from 6.27 mg/L to 1.43 mg/L. In the removal of As(III), As(V), and F - from the groundwater, Haix-Fe-Zr and Haix-Zr resin beads fit the parabolic diffusion equation (PDE) suggesting that adsorption of these contaminants was consistent with inter-particle diffusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion exchange removal of cesium from Hanford tank waste supernates with SuperLigR 644 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.; McCabe, D.J.; King, W.D.; Hamm, L.L.

    2002-01-01

    SuperLig R 644 ion exchange resin is currently being evaluated for cesium ( 137 Cs) removal from radioactive Hanford tank waste supernates as part of the River Protection Project. Testing was performed with actual Hanford tank wastes of widely different compositions using two identical ion exchange columns connected in series each containing approximately 5.5-6.5 ml of SuperLig R 644 resin. The ion exchange columns utilized the same resin material that was eluted between the column tests. This was done to demonstrate the performance of the SuperLig R 644 resin for cesium removal from waste samples of different compositions, determine the loading and elution profiles, and to validate design assumptions for full-scale column performances. Decontaminated product solutions generated at the same operating temperature and constant residence times (bed volumes per hour) exhibited the same chemical compositions as their feed samples. The compositions of eluate solutions were generally as expected with the exception of uranium and total organic carbon, which where concentrated by the resin. Development of a pretreatment method for the SuperLig R 644 resin has been critical to successful column operation with different waste solutions. (author)

  2. In-office bleaching efficacy on stain removal from CAD/CAM and direct resin composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of in-office bleaching on stain removal from stained resin composite and ceramic computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks and direct resin composites. Forty disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials: six CAD/CAM (VITABLOCS Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Exp Vita Hybrid Ceramic, VITA ENAMIC, Exp Kerr, and LAVA Ultimate) and three direct resin composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond, and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8), each stained with a particular staining solution. Using a calibrated spectrophotometer and a black background, L*a*b* values were assessed before and after 120 days of staining. Samples were subjected to in-office bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide gel for one hour. At subsequent assessment, color change (ΔE) was calculated as the difference between L*a*b* values. Both ANOVA and the Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Bleaching resulted in significant differences in ΔE values for all materials (P Bleaching efficacy was highly influenced by material composition and staining solution. Residual color values after bleaching for ceramic and hybrid ceramics ranged from -0.49 to 2.35, within the clinically acceptable maximum of 3.3. Values after bleaching for resin-based CAD/CAM ranged from -0.7 to 7.08 while direct resin composites values ranged from -1.47 to 25.13. Coffee left the greatest residual color on all materials. Based on material nature, 40% hydrogen peroxide bleaching can remove staining. The new resin-based CAD/CAM blocks showed promising results in terms of color stability. Bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide can be an effective method to remove stains from dental restorations. In this way, restoration replacement as a result of discoloration may no longer be necessary. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Selective Removal of Toxic Metals like Copper and Arsenic from Drinking Water Using Phenol-Formaldehyde Type Chelating Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Mohanty

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of different toxic metals has increased beyond environmentally and ecologically permissible levels due to the increase in industrial activity. More than 100 million people of Bangladesh and West Bengal in India are affected by drinking ground water contaminated with arsenic and some parts of India is also affected by poisoning effect of copper, cadmium and fluoride. Different methods have been evolved to reduce the arsenic concentration in drinking water to a maximum permissible level of 10 μg/L where as various methods are also available to separate copper from drinking water. Of the proven methods available today, removal of arsenic by polymeric ion exchangers has been most effective. While chelating ion exchange resins having specific chelating groups attached to a polymer have found extensive use in sorption and pre concentration of Cu2+ ions. Both the methods are coupled here to separate and preconcentrate toxic metal cation Cu2+ and metal anion arsenate(AsO4– at the same time. We have prepared a series of low-cost polymeric resins, which are very efficient in removing copper ion from drinking water and after coordinating with copper ion they act as polymeric ligand exchanger, which are efficiently removing arsenate from drinking water. For this purpose Schiff bases were prepared by condensing o-phenylenediamine with o-, m-, and p-hydroxybenzaldehydes. Condensing these phenolic Schiff bases with formaldehyde afforded the chelating resins in high yields. These resins are loaded with Cu2+, Ni2+ 2+, and Fe3+ ions. The resins and the polychelates are highly insoluble in water. In powdered form the metal ion-loaded resins are found to very efficiently remove arsenate ion from water at neutral pH. Resins loaded with optimum amount of Cu2+ ion is more effective in removing arsenate ions compared to those with Fe3+ ion, apparently because Cu2+ is a stronger Lewis acid than Fe3+. Various parameters influencing the removal of the

  4. Evaluation of methods for stain removal in acrylic resin denture teeth: in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Flávia Balestrero CASSIANO

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The staining of artificial teeth can be related to the acrylic resin abrasion caused by brushing, resulting in higher deposition of dyes from the beverage, and consequently higher aesthetic damage. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate methods for removal of stains from acrylic denture teeth using spectrophotometric analysis. Material and method Artificial teeth were divided into twelve groups (n=10 according to the type of treatment (re-polishing - Re or immersion in Corega Tabs - Sp, staining solutions, coffee (Cf and Coca-Cola® (Cc or water (W and with/without toothbrushing (B. The Sp specimens were submitted to seven immersion cycles (5 min each. The Re specimens were polished with pumice stone followed by Spain white paste. Color differences (ΔE were captured by a spectrophotometer: T0 (baseline, T1 (after brushing/immersion in solutions and T2 (after Re or Sp. Result Statistically significant color change between T1 and T2 (paired T-test; α =.05 was observed for the group CfSp (p=.032; and for the groups BWRe (p=.000, BCfRe (p=.049 and CcRe (p=.042. Higher color changes were observed for the specimens submitted to toothbrushing (ANOVA two way; p<.001. Conclusion It could be concluded that the immersion in sodium perborate (Corega Tabs can be used for removal of coffee stains from denture teeth, and re-polishing for removal of Coca-Cola® stains. Still, toothbrushing produced greater color changes on denture teeth, regardless of the immersion solution.

  5. A thermodynamic and kinetic study of trace iron removal from aqueous cobalt sulfate solutions using Monophos resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangxin; Zhao, Yunchao; Yang, Bin; Song, Yongfa

    2018-01-01

    High purity cobalt has many important applications, such as magnetic recording media, magnetic recording heads, optoelectronic devices, magnetic sensors, and integrated circuits, etc. To produce 5N or higher purity cobalt in an electro-refining process, one of the challenges is to effectively reduce the Fe content of aqueous cobalt salt solution before electrolysis. This paper describes thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of the Fe adsorption process of a new sulfonated monophosphonic resin with the trade mark Monophos. Five cobalt sulfate solutions of different Co concentrations were prepared. Fe ions were removed from the solutions by ion exchange method using Monophos resin. Chemical analysis was carried out using a Perkin Elmer ICP-OES. The initial Fe concentrations of about 0.9-2.0 mg/L can be reduced to about 0.3-0.8 mg/L, which is equivalent to an Fe removal rate of 60-67%. The Langmuir isothermal adsorption model applies well to the Fe removal process. A second-order type based on McKay equation fits better with experimental data than other kinetic models. The kinetic curve can be divided into two sections. For t 30 min. Monophos resin is effective for the removal of trace Fe from cobalt sulfate solution. This ion exchange process obeys the Langmuir isothermal adsorption model and the McKay equation of second-order kinetics.

  6. Application of Some Synthesized Polymeric Composite Resins for Removal of Some Metal Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zahhhar, A.A.; Abdel-Aziz, H.M.; Siyam, T.

    2005-01-01

    The ion-exchange and sorption characteristic of new polymeric composite resins, prepared by gamma radiation were experimentally studied. The composite resins shows high uptake for Co(II) and Eu(III) ions in aqueous solutions in wide range of ph. The selectivity of the resins to Co (II) or Eu (III) species in the presence of some competing ions and complexing agents (as Na + , Fe 3+ , EDTA Na 2 , etc.) was compared. Various factors that could affect the sorption behaviors of metal ions (Co (II) and Eu (III)) on the prepared polymeric composite resins were studied such as ionic strength, Contact time, volume mass ratio

  7. Dissolved organic matter removal using magnetic anion exchange resin treatment on biological effluent of textile dyeing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jun; Li, Haibo; Shuang, Chendong; Li, Wentao; Li, Aimin

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the removal of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from real dyeing bio-treatment effluents (DBEs) with the use of a novel magnetic anion exchange resin (NDMP). DOMs in two typical DBEs were fractionized using DAX-8/XAD-4 resin and ultrafiltration membranes. The hydrophilic fractions and the low molecular weight (MW) (50%) of DOMs for the two effluents. The hydrophilic and low MW fractions of both effluents were the greatest contributors of specific UV254 absorbance (SUVA254), and the SUVA254 of DOM fractions decreased with hydrophobicity and MW. Two DBEs exhibited acute and chronic biotoxicities. Both acute and chronic toxicities of DOM fractions increased linearly with the increase of SUVA254 value. Kinetics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal via NDMP treatment was performed by comparing it with that of particle active carbon (PAC). Results indicated that the removal of DOC from DBEs via NDMP was 60%, whereas DOC removals by PAC were lower than 15%. Acidic organics could be significantly removed with the use of NDMP. DOM with large MW in DBE could be removed significantly by using the same means. Removal efficiency of NDMP for DOM decreased with the decrease of MW. Compared with PAC, NDMP could significantly reduce the acute and chronic bio-toxicities of DBEs. NaCl/NaOH mixture regenerants, with selected concentrations of 10% NaCl (m/m)/1% NaOH (m/m), could improve desorption efficiency. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Adsorptive removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions using collagen-tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xia; Huang Xin [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Liao Xuepin, E-mail: xpliao@scu.edu.cn [Department of Biomass Chemistry and Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Shi Bi, E-mail: shibi@scu.edu.cn [National Engineering Laboratory for Clean Technology of Leather Manufacture, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China)

    2011-02-28

    The collagen-tannin resin (CTR), as a novel adsorbent, was prepared via a reaction of collagen with black wattle tannin and aldehyde, and its adsorption properties to Cu(II) were systematically investigated, including pH effect, adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetics, and column adsorption. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) on CTR was pH-dependent, and it increased with the increase of solution pH. The adsorption isotherms were well described by Langmuir isotherm model with correlating constant (R{sup 2}) higher than 0.99. The adsorption capacity determined at 303 K was high up to 0.26 mmol/g, which was close to the value (0.266 mmol/g) estimated from Langmuir equation. The adsorption capacity was increased with the increase of temperature, and thermodynamic calculations suggested that the adsorption of Cu(II) on CTR is an endothermic process. The adsorption kinetics were well fitted by the pseudo-second-order rate model. Further column studies suggested that CTR was effective for the removal of Cu(II) from solutions, and more than 99% of Cu(II) was desorbed from column using 0.1 mol/L HNO{sub 3} solution. The CTR column can be reused to adsorb Cu(II) without any loss of adsorption capacity.

  9. One pot synthesis of chitosan grafted quaternized resin for the removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banu, H Thagira; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2017-11-01

    The present study deals with the synthesis of chitosan quaternized resin for efficient removal of nitrate and phosphate from aqueous solution. The resin was characterized with FTIR, SEM with EDX and XRD. Batch method was carried out to optimize various parameters such as contact time, initial concentration of nitrate and phosphate, dosage, pH, co-anions and temperature on the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. The adsorption process illustrated that the Freundlich isotherm and the pseudo-second order are the best fitted models for the sorption of both anions. The respective negative values of ΔH° and ΔG° revealed that the adsorption of both the anions were exothermic and spontaneous. The removal efficiency of nitrate and phosphate on chitosan quaternized resin were 78% and 90% respectively with 0.1g of adsorbent and the initial concentration as 100mg/L. Nitrate and phosphate anions adsorbed effectively on chitosan quaternized resin by replacing Cl - ions from quaternary site through electrostatic attraction as well as ion-exchange mechanism. Hydrogen bonding also played important role in adsorption process. Even after 7th regeneration cycle the adsorbent retained its adsorption capacity as 23.7mg/g and 30.4mg/g for both nitrate and phosphate respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adsorption and removal of clofibric acid and diclofenac from water with MIEX resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xian; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Chen, Juxiang; Zhang, Yansen; Wang, Qiongfang; Lu, Yuqi

    2016-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of MIEX resin as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of clofibric acid (CA) and diclofenac (DCF). The adsorption performance of CA and DCF are investigated by a batch mode in single-component or bi-component adsorption system. Various factors influencing the adsorption of CA and DCF, including initial concentration, contact time, adsorbent dosage, initial solution pH, agitation speed, natural organic matter and coexistent anions are studied. The Langmuir model can well describe CA adsorption in single-component system, while the Freundlich model gives better fitting in bi-component system. The DCF adsorption can be well fitted by the Freundlich model in both systems. Thermodynamic analyses show that the adsorption of CA and DCF is an endothermic (ΔH(o) > 0), entropy driven (ΔS(o) > 0) process and more randomness exists in the DCF adsorption process. The values of Gibbs free energy (ΔG(o)  0) for CA adsorption. The kinetic data suggest the adsorption of CA and DCF follow the pseudo-first-order model in both systems and the intra-particle is not the unique rate-limiting step. The adsorption process is controlled simultaneously by external mass transfer and surface diffusion according to the surface diffusion modified Biot number (Bis) ranging from 1.06 to 26.15. Moreover, the possible removal mechanism for CA and DCF is respectively proposed based on the ion exchange stoichiometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The efficiency of Amberjet 4200 resin in removing nitrate in the presence of competitive anions from Shiraz drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, M; Haghighi, A Binaee; Zamanian, Z

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this research is to study the feasibility of removing nitrates from water by means of anion exchange. In the purposed work an attempt was made to utilize strong basic anion resin to remove nitrate in the presence of competitive anion. Amberjet Cl- 4200 ion exchange resin was used in a batch scale. The fixation rate of nitrate without the presences of any competitive anion was almost constant (94.60-96.43) when the nitrate concentrations are in the range of 100-150 mg L(-1). The fixation rate of nitrate in the presences of two competitive anions (sulphate and chloride) was reduced to 82% when the concentration of nitrate was 100 mg L(-1).

  12. The Effects of Fabrication Techniques and Storage Methods on the Dimensional Stability of Removable Acrylic Resin Orthoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    Bruxism : a report and a case report. J. Dent. Med., 9:189-199, 1954. 138. Super, S: A modified occlusal splint for segmental osteotomy fixation. J. Oral...minimize linear dimensional change prior to the clinical use of a removable acrylic resin orthosis. . .. . . . . TABLE OF CONTENTS Title...distortion and clinical use of an orthosis having a precise and accurate fit. V % N II. LITERATURE REVIEW A. Terminology The therapeutic use of interocclusal

  13. Utilization of m-Phenylenediamine-Furfural Resin for Removal of Cu(II) from Aqueous Solution-A Thermodynamic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Najim, Tariq S.; Zainal, Israa G.; Ali, Dina A.

    2010-01-01

    m-Phenylenediamine was condensed with furfural in absence of catalyst at room temperature. The produced m-phenylenediamine-furfural resin was used for the removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solution. The pH for the optimum removal of Cu(II) was 6. The negative values of Gibbs free energy at low concentration of Cu(II) (20, 30 ppm) indicative of the spontaneous adsorption process, while, at higher Cu(II) concentration (40,50 ppm) the positive and weak values of ∆G° indicate that the process is fea...

  14. Effect of pore structure on the removal of clofibric acid by magnetic anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang; Shuang, Chendong; Wang, Yunshu; Wang, Jun; Su, Yihong; Li, Aimin

    2018-01-01

    The effect of pore structure of resin on clofibric acid (CA) adsorption behavior was investigated by using magnetic anion exchange resins (ND-1, ND-2, ND-3) with increasing pore diameter by 11.68, 15.37, 24.94 nm. Resin with larger pores showed faster adsorption rates and a higher adsorption capacity because the more opened tunnels provided by larger pores benefit the CA diffusion into the resin matrix. The ion exchange by the electrostatic interactions between Cl-type resin and CA resulted in chloride releasing to the solution, and the ratio of released chloride to CA adsorption amount decreased from 0.90 to 0.65 for ND-1, ND-2 and ND-3, indicating that non-electrostatic interactions obtain a larger proportional part of the adsorption into the pores. Co-existing inorganic anions and organic acids reduced the CA adsorption amounts by the competition effect of electrostatic interaction, whereas resins with more opened pore structures weakened the negative influence on CA adsorption because of the existence of non-electrostatic interactions. 85.2% and 65.1% adsorption amounts decrease are calculated for resin ND-1 and ND-3 by the negative influence of 1 mmol L -1 NaCl. This weaken effect of organic acid is generally depends on its hydrophobicity (Log Kow) for carboxylic acid and its ionization degree (pKb) for sulfonic acid. The resins could be reused with the slightly decreases by 1.9%, 3.2% and 5.4% after 7 cycles of regeneration, respectively for ND-1, ND-2 and ND-3, suggesting the ion exchange resin with larger pores are against its reuse by the brine solution regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part V: Nickel(II/H+/Dowex C400

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Alguacil

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The cationic exchange resin Dowex C400 was used to remove nickel(II from aqueous solutions of different pH values and under various experimental conditions: stirring speed of the aqueous solution/resin system, temperature, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the resin was investigated against the presence of various metals in the aqueous solution, and the removal of nickel(II from aqueous solutions was also compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes or functionalized (carboxylic groups multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. According to batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Freundlich model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-first order model. Experimental data fit well to the moving boundary controlled model. Elution of the nickel(II loaded onto Dowex C400 resin is fully possible using acidic solutions.

  16. Study on removing chlorin by conversion-aborption of chlorin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yunbai; Zhao Jinfang; Tang Zhijuan; Huang Qijin; Deng Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Theon version of chlorin resin and the reclamation of acid and uranium in converting solution were investigated. The results indicated the residual chlorin can meet the requirement after converting, acid and uranium in converting solution can be reclaimed. (authors)

  17. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher

  18. Study on Selective Removal of Impurity Iron from Leached Copper-Bearing Solution Using a Chelating Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to selectively remove iron from copper laden solution after leaching but prior to electrowinning, equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies have been conducted on an a chelating resin of Rexp-501 at pH 1.0 and at various temperatures. Both Langmuir and Freundlich models were investigated, with the Langmuir model proving to be more suitable for fitting iron removal performance, with little influence from copper concentration. Compared with the pseudo first order kinetic model, the pseudo second order kinetic model fitted the dynamic adsorption process better, indicating a chemisorption mechanism. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR results indicated that C=O from carbonyl group played a key role in combining with iron and can be regenerated and reused. However, the C=O of the acylamino group combining with iron was not able to be released after oxalic acid was applied.

  19. Method of removing alkyl iodides or mixtures of iodine and alkyl iodides from a gas phase and an aqueous solution phase by utilizing ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi; Mizuuchi, Noboru; Yokoyama, Fumio.

    1967-01-01

    Alkyl iodides and mixtures of iodine and alkyl iodides are removed from a gas phase and an aquous solution phase by using solely an anion exchange resin containing a tertiary amine or together with an anion exchange resin containing quarternary ammonium compound. The resin containing the quarternary ammonium compound is employed mainly to remove iodine, and the resin containing the tertiary amine serves mainly to remove alkyl iodides. The method can be applied to collecting a majority of the methyl iodide as well as the radioactive iodine produced in the atmosphere of a reactor in case of a fuel accident. In embodiments, it is desirable to maintain the sufficient moisture content of the anion exchange resins at a sufficient moisture level so as not to reduce the migration speed of the iodine and alkyl iodides. The iodine and alkyl iodide can be produced with high efficiency and stability independently of the relative humidity of the gas phase. In examples, a solution which consists of 20.5 mg/l of iodine and 42.2mg/l of methyl iodide flew through a column of Amberite IRA-93 alone or blended with IRA-900 at a speed of 15 /hr. respectively. The resins were able to treat 400 times their equivalent in water. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin for the Removal of Cesium from Hanford Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, William

    2006-01-01

    This power-point presentation highlights that spherical RF continues to out-perform baseline technology (SuperLig(registered trademark)644) due to several factors: increased radiation stability from Cs Capacity perspective, outstanding hydraulic performance, and flammable gas generation being the same as the baseline technology. Actual waste testing at Pacific Northwest National Lab. is going well, and isotherm modeling is continuing at Savannah River National Lab. Regulatory analysis of spent resin is planned for early summer 2006

  1. Removal of cesium from aluminum decladding wastes generated in irradiated target processing using a fixed-bed column of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunson, R.R.; Williams, D.F.; Bond, W.D.; Benker, D.E.; Chattin, F.R.; Collins, E.D.

    1994-09-01

    The removal of cesium (Cs) from a low-level liquid waste (LLLW) with a cation-exchange column was demonstrated using a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin. The RF resin was developed at the Westinghouse Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and is highly specific for the removal of Cs from an alkaline waste of high sodium content. It was determined that the RF resin would be suitable for removing Cs, the largest gamma radiation contributor, from the LLLW generated at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Presently, the disposal of the LLLW is limited due to the amount of Cs contained in the waste. Cesium removal from the waste solution offers immediate benefits by conserving valuable tank space and would allow cask shipments of the treated waste should the present Laboratory pipelines become unavailable in the future. Preliminary laboratory tests of the RF resins, supplied from two different sources, were used to design a full-scale cation-exchange column for the removal of Cs from a Mark 42 SRL fuel element dejacketing waste solution. The in-cell tests reproduced the preliminary bench-scale test results. The initial Cs breakthrough range was 85--92 column volumes (CV). The resin capacity for Cs was found to be ∼0.35 meq per gram of resin. A 1.5-liter resin bed loaded a combined ∼1,300 Ci of 134 Cs and 137 Cs. A distribution coefficient of ∼110 CV was determined, based on a 50% Cs breakthrough point. The kinetics of the system was studied by examining the rate parameters; however, it was decided that several more tests would be necessary to define the mass transfer characteristics of the system

  2. Multiwall carbon nanotube embedded phenolic resin-based carbon foam for the removal of As (V) from contaminated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani Agrawal, Pinki; Singh, Nahar; Kumari, Saroj; Dhakate, Sanjay R.

    2018-03-01

    It is well proposed that micron or nano size filters requires to separate adsorbent from water after removal of adsorbate. However, even after filtration trace quantity of adsorbent remains in purified water, which deteriorates the quality of water for potability. To overcome these problems, multi walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) loaded Carbon Foam (CF) was fabricated by a sacrificial template process. In this process, multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and phenolic resin mixture was used for the impregnation of the polyurethane (PU) template. Impregnated PU Foam stabilized and carbonized to get MWCNTs embedded Carbon Foam (CF). The MWCNT loaded CF (MWCNTs-CF) was used for the removal of As (V) species from water. The proposed foam efficiently removes arsenic (As (V)) from water and it can be easily separated from water after purification without any sophisticated tools. The adsorption capacity of the proposed material was found to be 90.5 μg*g-1 at optimized condition of pH, time and concentration, which is excellent in comparison to several other materials utilized for removal of As (V). Kinetic and isotherm studies reveal that the multilayer adsorption over heterogeneous surface follows pseudo second order kinetics. The adsorption phenomena were further confirmed by several characterization techniques like scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  3. Method for removing cesium from aqueous liquid, method for purifying the reactor coolant in boiling water and pressurized water reactors and a mixed ion exchanged resin bed, useful in said purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otte, J.N.A.; Liebmann, D.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for removing cesium from an aqueous liquid, and to a resin bed containing a mixture of an anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin useful in said purification. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention is a method for purifying the reactor coolant of a presurized water or boiling water reactor. Said method, which is particularly advantageously employed in purifying the reactor coolant in the primary circuit of a pressurized reactor, comprises contacting at least a portion of the reactor coolant with a strong base anion exchange resin and the strong acid cation exchange resin derived from a highly cross-linked, macroporous copolymer of a monovinylidene aromatic and a cross-linking monomer copolymerizable therewith. Although the reactor coolant can sequentially be contacted with one resin type and thereafter with the second resin type, the contact is preferably conducted using a resin bed comprising a mixture of the cation and anion exchange resins. 1 fig., refs

  4. Evaluating Residence Time for Cesium Removal from Simulated Hanford Tank Wastes Using SuperLig(R) 644 Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, N.M.

    2003-01-01

    Batch contact and column experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of residence time on cesium (Cs) removal from two simulated Hanford tank wastes using SuperLig(R) 644 resin. The two waste simulants mimic the compositions of tanks 241-AZ-102 and 241-AN-107 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. A single column made of glass tube (2.7-cm i.d.), which contained approximately 100 mL of H-form SuperLig(R) 644 resin was used in the column experiments. The experiments each consisted of loading, elution, and regeneration steps were performed at flow rates ranging from 0.64 to 8.2 BV/h for AZ-102 and from 1.5 to 18 BV/h for AN-107 simulant. The lowest flow rates of 0.64 and 1.5 BV/h were selected to evaluate less than optimal flow conditions in the plant. The range of the flow rates is consistent with the River Protection Project design for the waste treatment plant (WTP) columns, which will operate at a flow rate between 1.5 to 3 BV/h. Batch contact experiments were also performed for two batches of SuperLig(R) 644 to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients (Kds) as a function of Cs concentration

  5. Preliminary Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Cesium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig 644 Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, L.L.

    2000-01-01

    A proposed facility is being designed for the immobilization of Hanford high-level radioactive waste. One unit process in the facility is designed to remove radioactive cesium by ion-exchange from the strongly alkaline aqueous phase. A resin specifically designed with high selectivity of cesium under alkaline conditions is being investigated. The resin also is elutable under more acidic conditions. The proposed design of the facility consists of two sets of two packed columns placed in series (i.e., a lead column followed by a lag (guard) column configuration). During operation, upon reaching a specified cesium concentration criterion at the exit of the lag column, operation is switched to the second set of lead and lag columns. The cesium-loaded lead column is processed (i.e., washed and eluted) and switched to the lag position. the previous lag column is then placed in the lead position (without eluting) and the system is ready for use in the next cycle. For a well designed process, the loading and elution processes result in significant volume reductions in aqueous high-level waste

  6. Processing and removal of the Three Mile Island makeup and purification system resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; McIntosh, T.W.; Northey, L.M.; GaTanto, J.J.; Osterhoudt, T.R.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 in March 1979 left the makeup and purification demineralizers inaccessible to workers. These demineralizers contained the highest concentrations of radioactive isotopes outside the Reactor Building. Additionally, unknown quantities of fuel were in the demineralizers. Other concerns centered on the unknown condition of the demineralizer resins, the possible loss of system integrity, and the presence of hydrogen due to the radiolytic breakdown of water contained in the demineralizers. GPU Nuclear, with the US Department of Energy and its contractors EG and G Idaho, Inc., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Westinghouse Hanford Company, remotely measured the fuel and fission product inventory of the demineralizers and demonstrated a practical chemical processing method using samples acquired from the demineralizers. Equipment was developed and installed to elute the radioactive cesium from the demineralizers. And elution, which began in September 1984 now nears completion

  7. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, Charles A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hamm, L. Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, Frank G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, Daniel J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  8. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [es

  9. Removing uranium from drinking water by metal hydroxides and anion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Bondietti, E.A.

    1983-01-01

    Results of bench-scale testing on uranium removal from a natural water that was chosen as a good representative of uranium-bearing waters indicated that conventional coagulant and lime softening treatment removes more than 85 percent of dissolved uranium (83 μg U/L) when an optimum pH and dosage were provided. A strong base anion-exchange column is a recommended option for the treatment of private well waters containing uranium at higher than desirable levels

  10. Evaluation of adsorbent and ion exchange resins for removal of organic matter from petroleum refinery wastewaters aiming to increase water reuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Domingos, Rodrigo; da Fonseca, Fabiana Valéria

    2018-05-15

    The oil refinery industry seeks solutions to reduce its water uptake and consumption by encouraging the reuse of internal streams and wastewater from treatment systems. After conventional treatment the petroleum refinery wastewater still contains a considerable quantity of recalcitrant organics and the adsorption on activated carbon is currently used in Brazilian refineries, although it is still expensive due to the difficulty of its regeneration. This study evaluated the use of adsorbent and ion exchange resins for the removal of organic matter from refinery wastewater after conventional treatment in order to verify its feasibility, applying successive resin regenerations and comparing the results with those obtained for activated carbon process. Adsorption isotherms experiments were used to evaluate commercial resins, and the most efficient was subjected to column experiments, where absorbance (ABS) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal were measured. The adsorption isotherm of the best resin showed an adsorptive capacity that was 55% lower than that of activated carbon. On the other hand, the column experiments indicated good removal efficiency, and the amount of TOC in the treated wastewater was as good as has been reported in the literature for activated carbon. The regeneration efficiency of the retained organics ranged from 57 to 94%, while regenerant consumption ranged from 12 to 79% above the amount recommended by the resin supplier for the removal of organic material from natural sources, showing the great resistance of these recalcitrant compounds to desorption. Finally, an estimate of the service life of the resin using intermediate regeneration conditions found it to be seven times higher than that of activated carbon when the latter is not regenerated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Process for removing a mixture containing iodine and alkyl iodine compounds from a gas phase or aqueous solution with ion-exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, H; Mizuuchi, A; Yokoyama, F

    1968-10-04

    Iodine and alkyl iodine compounds are removed from a gas phase or aqueous solution containing salts, iodine and iodine compounds, such as the ambient gas in a reactor, if an accident should occur. The process comprises contacting the phase or solution: (a) with a hydrogen type strongly acidic cationic exchange resin, (b) with an anionic exchange resin containing quarternary ammonium and (c) with an anionic exchange resin containing free basic type tertiary amine, in this order or by reversing the order of the two anionic exchange resins. Although no problems arise in the liquid phase reaction, the ion-exchange resins in the gas phase reaction are desired in the moist state in order to stable maintain the migration speed of the materials to be removed regardless of the relative humidity of the amibent gas. In example I, Amberlite IRA-900 of 200 mm thickness as the lowermost bed, Amberlite IRA93 of 200 mm thickness as the middle bed and Amberlite 200 of 200 mm thickness as the uppermost bed were filled respectively, in a methacrylate resin cylinder with an inner diameter of 25 mm. A solution containing 15.9 mg/1 of iodine, 41.2 mg/1 of methyl iodide and 550 mg/1 of sodium carbonate flows at a rate of 15 liter/hr downward through the beds. As a result of testing, no iodine, iodine ions, iodic acid ions and methyl iodine were detected. The amount of water the beds could treat was 60 times the total quantity of the filled resins.

  12. Preparation of wheat straw based superabsorbent resins and their applications as adsorbents for ammonium and phosphate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Su, Yuan; Li, Qian; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2013-09-01

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) superabsorbent resin (SAR) was prepared by graft copolymerization. The structure and performance of the WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs SAR was studied and compared with those of wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate) (WSC-g-PKA) SAR. The effects of various experimental parameters such as solution pH, concentration, contact time and ion strength on NH4(+) and PO4(3-) removal from solutions were investigated. Equilibrium isotherm data of adsorption of both NH4(+) and PO4(3-) were well fitted to the Freundlich model. Kinetic analysis showed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was more suitable for describing the whole adsorption process of NH4(+) and PO4(3-) on SARs. Overall, WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs SAR showed better properties in comparison with WSC-g-PKA SAR and it could be considered as one efficient material for the removal and recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus with the agronomic reuse as a fertilizer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Utilization of m-Phenylenediamine-Furfural Resin for Removal of Cu(II from Aqueous Solution-A Thermodynamic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq S. Najim

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available m-Phenylenediamine was condensed with furfural in absence of catalyst at room temperature. The produced m-phenylenediamine-furfural resin was used for the removal of Cu(II from aqueous solution. The pH for the optimum removal of Cu(II was 6. The negative values of Gibbs free energy at low concentration of Cu(II (20, 30 ppm indicative of the spontaneous adsorption process, while, at higher Cu(II concentration (40,50 ppm the positive and weak values of ∆G° indicate that the process is feasible but non spontaneous. The values of ∆H° were positive indicating that the sorption process is endothermic. On the other hand, the values of activation energy (Ea were inconsistent with the values of ∆H° both are positive and lie in the range of physisorption. The entropy ∆S° of the process was positive indicative of the randomness of the Cu(II ions at the solid / liquid interface. The values of sticking probability S* were less than one which indicate a preferable adsorption process and the mechanism is physisorption.

  14. Sorptive Removal of Cesium and Cobalt Ions in a Fixed bed Column Using Lewatit S100 Cation Exchange Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Naggar, M.R.; Ibrahim, H.A.; El-Kamash, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    The sorptive removal of cesium and cobalt ions from aqueous solutions in a fixed bed column packed with Lewatit S100® cation exchange resin has been investigated. A preliminary batch studies were performed to estimate the effect of pH and contact time on the sorption process. Results indicated that Cs + and Co 2+ could be efficiently removed using Lewatit S100® at a ph range of 4-7 with more affinity towards Cs than Co 2+ . Kinetic models have been applied to the sorption rate data and the relevant parameters were determined. The obtained results indicated that the sorption of both Cs + and Co 2+ on Lewatit S100 followed pseudo second-order rather than pseudo first-order or Morris-Webber model. Fixed bed experiments were conducted at a constant initial concentration of 100 mg/l whereas the effect of bed depth (3, 4.5 and 6 cm) and volumetric flow rate (3 and 5 ml/min.) on the breakthrough characteristics of the fixed bed sorption systems were determined. The experimental sorption data were fitted to the well-established column models namely; Thomas and BDST models to compute the different model parameters. The higher column sorption capacities were obtained at bed depth of 3 cm with a flow rate of 3 ml/min., for both Cs + and Co 2+ . The BDST model appeared to describe experimental results better than Thomas model. Results indicate that Lewatit S100® is an efficient material for the removal of cesium and cobalt ions from aqueous solutions.

  15. Removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions by strongly basic polystyrene anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz, Monika; Hubicki, Zbigniew

    2009-05-30

    The removal of tartrazine from aqueous solutions onto the strongly basic polystyrene anion exchangers of type 1 (Amberlite IRA-900) and type 2 (Amberlite IRA-910) was investigated. The experimental data obtained at 100, 200, 300 and 500 mg/dm(3) initial concentrations at 20 degrees C were applied to the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and Weber-Morris kinetic models. The calculated sorption capacities (q(e,cal)) and the rate constant of the first order adsorption (k(1)) were determined. The pseudo-second order kinetic constants (k(2)) and capacities were calculated from the plots of t/q(t) vs. t, 1/q(t) vs. 1/t, 1/t vs. 1/q(t) and q(t)/t vs. q(t) for type 1, type 2, type 3 and type 4 of the pseudo-second order expression, respectively. The influence of phase contact time, solution pH and temperature on tartrazine removal was also discussed. The FTIR spectra of pure anion exchangers and those loaded with tartrazine were recorded, too.

  16. Improved crud iron removal efficiency for powder resin type condensate filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Hiroshi; Ino, Takao

    1989-01-01

    In 1984, a precoat type condensate filtration system was delivered to The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. by Ebara and stable operation of the system is reported ever since. Originally, condensate filtration systems are used to remove crud iron in condensate water. However, it has become desirable to freely control the crud iron in the outlet flow of such filtration system. The main source of radioactivity in a BWR plant, is Cobalt 60, and it is necessary to optimally control the amount of crud iron released into the reactor to match the nickel and cobalt amounts in the reactor feed water for achieving an overall reduction of the concentration of radioactivity within the BWR plant. The method of such control, developed by the authors, is outlined in the following. By this method, the radioactive level within the overall plant is significantly decreased. Consequently, the risk of radioactive exposure of personnel at time of periodical checkup is greatly reduced. (author)

  17. Ion exchange removal of chromium (iii) from tannery wastes by using a strong acid cation exchange resin amberlite ir-120 h+ and its hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, T.

    2014-01-01

    A strong acid cation exchange resin Amberlite IR-120 H+ and its hybrids with Mn(OH)/sub 2/, Cu(OH)/sub 2/ and Fe(OH)/sub 3/ are used for the removal of chromium (III) from spent tannery bath. The experimental data give good fits with the Langmuir sorption model. The thermodynamic parameters entropy (delta S), enthalpy (delta H) and free energy (delta G) changes are computed, which reveal that the chromium removal from tannery wastes by ion exchangers is an endothermic, physical sorption and entropically driven process. The rate of sorption is found to increase with the increase of resin dosage, stirring speed and temperature. Different kinetic models such as film diffusion, particle diffusion and Lagergren pseudo first order are used to evaluate the mechanism of the process. It is found that the hybrid ion exchange resins have better removal capacity as compared to the parent ion exchanger. The increase in the removal capacity is found to be in the order of the corresponding PZC values of the hybrid ion exchangers. Further, it is suggested that the higher exchange capacity is the result of Donnan effect and specific adsorption of chromium by the oxides / hydroxides present inside the matrix of the organic cation exchanger. (author)

  18. Use of strong anion exchange resins for the removal of perfluoroalkylated substances from contaminated drinking water in batch and continuous pilot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaggia, Alessandro; Conte, Lino; Falletti, Luigi; Fant, Massimo; Chiorboli, Andrea

    2016-03-15

    In recent years abnormally high levels of perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) have been detected both in surface and underground water sampled in an area covering approximately 150 square kilometers in the Veneto region (Italy) indicating the presence of a pollution point source (fluorochemicals production plant). Adsorption on granular activated carbon is an emergency measure which is poorly effective requiring frequent replacement. This work focuses on the application of three strong anion exchange resins (Purolite® A520E, A600E and A532E) for the removal of traces of PFOA, PFOS, PFBA and PFBS (concentration of hundreds of ng L(-1)) from drinking water. This technology is attractive for the possibility of reusing resins after an in-situ regeneration step. A strong relationship between the hydrophobicity of the exchange functional group of the resin and its capacity in removing PFAS exists. A600E (non hydrophobic) and A520E (fairly hydrophobic) show a reduced sorption capacity compared to A532E (highly hydrophobic). While A600E and A520E can be regenerated with solvent-less dilute solutions of non-toxic NH4Cl and NH4OH, A532E requires concentrated solutions of methanol or ethanol and 1% NH4Cl and for the sake of this work it was regarded as non-regenerable. The volume of regeneration effluents requiring incineration can be efficiently reduced by more than 96.5% by using reverse osmosis coupled with under-vacuum evaporation. Transmission electron analysis on saturated resins showed that large molecular macro-aggregates of PFAS can form in the intraparticle pores of resin indicating that ion exchange is not the only mechanism involved in PFAS removal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of SuperLig 639 Ion Exchange Resin for the Removal of Rhenium from Hanford Envelope A Simulant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, W.D.

    2000-01-01

    Hanford Radioactive Waste materials have been categorized into four envelopes labeled A through D as specified in the Tank Waste Remediation Contract between BNFL and DOE. 1 Envelopes A, B and C contain only solubilized species and are specified as Low-Activity Waste (LAW). Each envelope is defined based on compositional maximums of chemical and radioactive constituents. Envelopes A and B contain low concentrations of organic species and the primary form of technetium is pertechnetate (TcO4-). Envelope C contains higher levels of organic species and technetium which is primarily in the nonpertechnetate form (presumably complexed TcO2). Envelope D is sludge which has been separated from the supernate and is referred to as High Activity Waste. The current plant design utilizes SuperLig ion exchange resins to remove cesium and technetium (the primary radioactive constituents) from the Hanford LAW. The process is designed to produce a decontaminated waste stream and a concentrated eluate waste stream for vitrification into low and high activity glasses, respectively

  20. Enhanced biocatalytic production of L-cysteine by Pseudomonas sp. B-3 with in situ product removal using ion-exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pu; He, Jun-Yao; Yin, Jiang-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Bioconversion of DL-2-amino-Δ(2)-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (DL-ATC) catalyzed by whole cells of Pseudomonas sp. was successfully applied for the production of L-cysteine. It was found, however, like most whole-cell biocatalytic processes, the accumulated L-cysteine produced obvious inhibition to the activity of biocatalyst and reduced the yield. To improve L-cysteine productivity, an anion exchange-based in situ product removal (ISPR) approach was developed. Several anion-exchange resins were tested to select a suitable adsorbent used in the bioconversion of DL-ATC for the in situ removal of L-cysteine. The strong basic anion-exchange resin 201 × 7 exhibited the highest adsorption capacity for L-cysteine and low adsorption for DL-ATC, which is a favorable option. With in situ addition of 60 g L(-1) resin 201 × 7, the product inhibition can be reduced significantly and 200 mmol L(-1) of DL-ATC was converted to L-cysteine with 90.4 % of yield and 28.6 mmol L(-1 )h(-1) of volumetric productivity. Compared to the bioconversion without the addition of resin, the volumetric productivity of L-cysteine was improved by 2.27-fold using ISPR method.

  1. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part VI: Manganese(II/H+/Lewatit K2621

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Alguacil

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this sixth part of the series, Manganese(II was removed from aqueous solutions by the cationic exchange resin Lewatit K2621. The investigation was performed under various experimental conditions such as the stirring speed associated with the system, aqueous pH, temperature, resin dosage and the ionic strength of the solution. The performance of the resin against the loading of metals from metal-binary solutions as well as the removal of Manganese(II from the solutions using multiwalled carbon nanotubes and functionalized (carboxylic groups multiwalled carbon nanotubes, were also investigated. Experimental results fit well with the pseudo-first kinetic order model, whereas fit of the data show that at 20 °C the process responded well to the diffusion controlled model, and that at 60 °C, the system is controlled by the moving boundary model. Adsorption data is better related to the Freundlich isotherm. Elution of the Manganese(II loaded onto the resin was investigated using acidic (H2SO4 or HCl solutions.

  2. HIGH ASPECT RATIO ION EXCHANGE RESIN BED - HYDRAULIC RESULTS FOR SPERICAL RESIN BEADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duignan, M; Charles Nash, C; Timothy Punch, T

    2007-01-01

    A principal role of the DOE Savannah River Site is to safely dispose of a large volume of liquid nuclear waste held in many storage tanks. An in-tank ion exchange unit is being considered for cesium removal to accelerate waste processing. This unit is planned to have a relatively high bed height to diameter ratio (10:1). Complicating the design is the need to cool the ion exchange media; therefore, the ion exchange column will have a central cooling core making the flow path annular. To separate cesium from waste the media being considered is made of resorcinol formaldehyde resin deposited on spherical plastic beads and is a substitute for a previously tested resin made of crystalline silicotitanate. This spherical media not only has an advantage of being mechanically robust, but, unlike its predecessor, it is also reusable, that is, loaded cesium can be removed through elution and regeneration. Resin regeneration leads to more efficient operation and less spent resin waste, but its hydraulic performance in the planned ion exchange column was unknown. Moreover, the recycling process of this spherical resorcinol formaldehyde causes its volume to significantly shrink and swell. To determine the spherical media's hydraulic demand a linearly scaled column was designed and tested. The waste simulant used was prototypic of the wastes' viscosity and density. This paper discusses the hydraulic performance of the media that will be used to assist in the design of a full-scale unit

  3. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin-part I: definition and indication of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-Ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    This position paper proposes a definition and naming standard for removable partial dentures (RPDs) using thermoplastic resin, and presents a guideline for clinical application. A panel of 14 experts having broad experience with clinical application of RPDs using thermoplastic resin was selected from members of the Japan Prosthodontic Society. At a meeting of the panel, "non-metal clasp denture" was referred as the generic name of RPDs with retentive elements (resin clasps) made of thermoplastic resin. The panel classified non-metal clasp dentures into two types: one with a flexible structure that lacks a metal framework and the other having a rigid structure that includes a metal framework. According to current prosthetic principles, flexible non-metal clasp dentures are not recommended as definitive dentures, except for limited cases such as patients with a metal allergy. Rigid non-metal clasp dentures are recommended in cases where patients will not accept metal clasps for esthetic reasons. Non-metal clasp dentures should follow the same design principles as conventional RPDs using metal clasps. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel chelating resin with cyanoguanidine group: Useful recyclable materials for Hg(II) removal in aqueous environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaojie; Li Yanfeng; Ye Zhengfang; Yang Liuqing; Zhou Lincheng; Wang Liyuan

    2011-01-01

    A novel chelating resin containing cyanoguanidine moiety has been successfully prepared by the functionalizing reaction of a macroporous bead based on chloromethylated copolymer of styrene-divinylbenzene (CMPS) with dicyandiamide (DCDA) in the presence of phase transfer catalyst. The Fourier transform-infrared spectra (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed in the characterization of the resulting chelating resin, meanwhile, the adsorption properties of the resin for Hg(II) were investigated by batch and column methods. The results indicated that the resin displayed a marked advantage in Hg(II) binding capacity, and the saturated adsorption capacity estimated from the Langmuir model was dramatically up to 1077 mg g -1 at 45 deg. C. Furthermore, it was found that the resin was able to selectively separate Hg(II) from multicomponent solutions with Zn(II), Cu(II), Pb(II) and Mg(II). The desorption process of Hg(II) was tested with different eluents and the ratio of the highest recovery reached to 96% under eluting condition of 1 M HCl + 10% thiourea. Consequently, the resulting chelating resin would provide a potential application for treatment process of Hg(II) containing wastewater.

  5. USE OF STRONG ACID RESIN PUROLITE C100E FOR REMOVING PERMANENT HARDNESS OF WATER – FACTORS AFFECTING CATIONIC EXCHANGE CAPACITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN BANDRABUR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper experimentally investigates the performance and capacity of Purolite C100E commercial resin recommended for water softening applications in the food industry. The practical ion exchange capacity and the softening process efficiency are studied in batch mode as a function of the sorption specific process factors. Optimum operation conditions were determined as initial pH 7.1, resin dose 8 g dry resin•L-1, temperature 25 oC, contact time of 360 min, and in those conditions the retention capacity for the Ca2+ ions is 17.18 mg•g-1 that corresponds to a removal efficiency equal to 85.7%.

  6. Thermodynamic modeling of Cl(-), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) removal by an anion exchange resin and comparison with Dubinin-Astakhov isotherms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-03-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions from wastewaters by a macroporous ion-exchange resin is studied through the experimental results obtained for six ion exchange systems, OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO3(-), OH(-)/SO4(2-), and HCO3(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO3(-), Cl(-)/SO4(2-). The results are described through thermodynamic modeling, considering either an ideal or a nonideal behavior of the ionic species in the liquid and solid phases. The nonidealities are determined by the Davies equation and Wilson equations in the liquid and solid phases, respectively. The results show that the resin has a strong affinity for all the target ions, and the order of affinity obtained is OH(-) < HCO3(-) < Cl(-) < NO3(-) < SO4(2-). The calculation of the changes in standard Gibbs free energies (ΔG(0)) shows that even though HCO3(-) has a lower affinity to the resin, it may affect the removal of Cl(-), and in the same way that Cl(-) may affect the removal of NO3(-) and SO4(2-). The application of nonidealities in the thermodynamic model leads to an improved fit of the model to the experimental data with average relative deviations below 1.5% except for the OH(-)/SO4(2-) system. On the other hand, considering ideal or nonideal behaviors has no significant impact on the determination of the selectivity coefficients. The thermodynamic modeling is also compared with the Dubinin-Astakhov adsorption isotherms obtained for the same ion exchange systems. Surprisingly, the latter performs significantly better than the ideal thermodynamic model and nearly as well as the nonideal thermodynamic model.

  7. Uranium recovery and uranium remove from acid mine waters by ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina com resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos R.L. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao do Laborarorio; Fatibello Filho, Orlando [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-11-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of few processes capable of reducing contaminants in effluents to very low levels according to environmental legislation. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The presence of pyrite in the waste rock piles, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants. Including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by an anionic exchanger. Studies of uranium sorption without treatment, and with lime pretreatment of water to precipitate the iron and recovery uranium as commercial product, are presented. Uranium elution was done with NaCl solutions. Saline concentration and retention time were the parameters studied. the uranium decontaminations level in the effluents from acid mine water was 94%. (author) 10 refs., 6 tabs., 3 figs.

  8. Preliminary extraction of tannins by 1-butyl-3-methylimidazole bromide and its subsequent removal from Galla chinensis extract using macroporous resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chunxia; Luo, Xiaoling; Lu, Liliang; Li, Hongmin; Chen, Xia; Ji, Yong

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, ionic liquids have become increasingly attractive as 'green solvents' used in the extraction of bioactive compounds from natural plant. However, the separation of ionic liquid from the target compounds was difficult, due to their low vapour pressure and high stabilities. In our study, ionic liquid-based ultrasonic and microwave-assisted extraction was used to obtain the crude tannins, then the macroporous resin adsorption technology was further employed to purify the tannins and remove the ionic liquid from crude extract. The results showed that XDA-6 had higher separation efficiency than other tested resins, and the equilibrium experimental data were well fitted to Langmuir isotherms. Dynamic adsorption and desorption were performed on XDA-6 packed in glass columns to optimise the separation process. The optimum conditions as follows: the ratio of column height to diameter bed was 1:8, flow rate 1 BV/h (bed volume per hour), 85% ethanol was used as eluant while the elution volume was 2 BV. Under the optimised conditions, the adsorption and desoption rate of tannins in XDA-6 were 94.81 and 91.63%, respectively. The content of tannins was increased from 70.24% in Galla chinensis extract to 85.12% with a recovery of 99.06%. The result of ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-MS/MS analysis showed that [bmim]Br could be removed from extract. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Removal of malathion from aqueous solution using De-Acidite FF-IP resin and determination by UPLC-MS/MS: equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naushad, Mu; Alothman, Z A; Khan, M R

    2013-10-15

    In the present study, De-Acidite FF-IP resin was used to remove a highly toxic and persistent organophosphorus pesticide (malathion) from the aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed as a function of various experimental parameters such as effect of pH (2-10), contact time (10-120 min), resin dose (0.05-0.5 g), initial malathion concentration (0.5-2.5 µg mL(-1)) and temperature (25-65°C). The concentration of malathion was determined using a sensitive, selective and rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method. The uptake rate of malathion on De-Acidite FF-IP resin was rapid and equilibrium established within 40 min. Kinetics studies showed better applicability for pseudo-second-order model. The equilibrium data was fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models and the isotherm constants were calculated for malathion. The values of thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) were computed from the Van't Hoff plot of lnKC vs. 1/T which showed that the adsorption of malathion was feasible, endothermic and spontaneous. The regeneration studies were carried out which demonstrated a decrease in the recovery of malathion from 95% to 68% after five consecutive cycles. Breakthrough and exhaustive capacities of malathion were found to be 1.25 mg g(-1) and 3.5 mg g(-1), respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Upgrade to Ion Exchange Modeling for Removal of Technetium from Hanford Waste Using SuperLig® 639 Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Aleman, S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2013-05-16

    This report documents the development and application of computer models to describe the sorption of pertechnetate [TcO₄⁻], and its surrogate perrhenate [ReO₄⁻], on SuperLig® 639 resin. Two models have been developed: 1) A thermodynamic isotherm model, based on experimental data, that predicts [TcO₄⁻] and [ReO₄⁻] sorption as a function of solution composition and temperature and 2) A column model that uses the isotherm calculated by the first model to simulate the performance of a full-scale sorption process. The isotherm model provides a synthesis of experimental data collected from many different sources to give a best estimate prediction of the behavior of the pertechnetate-SuperLig® 639 system and an estimate of the uncertainty in this prediction. The column model provides a prediction of the expected performance of the plant process by determining the volume of waste solution that can be processed based on process design parameters such as column size, flow rate and resin physical properties.

  11. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part lll:Copper(ll/Sulphate/Amberlite 200

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Copper(II adsorption from aqueous sulphate media on Amberlite 200 was investigated. The influence of operating variables such as aqueous pH, temperature and copper concentration on the metal adsorption kinetics was measured. The copper{II uptake is best fitted to the film-diffusion controlled process. The resin has been used in minicolumns to investigate its performance under dynamics conditions. Copper(II desorption from the resin is accomplished using sulphuric acid solutions.

    Se estudia la adsorción de cobre(II, de disoluciones en medio sulfato, en la resina Amberlite 200. La cinética de adsorción del metal se ha estudiado en función de una serie de variables experimentales: pH de la fase acuosa, temperatura y concentración del metal en el medio acuoso. La adsorción de cobre(II se puede correlacionar como controlada por un proceso de difusión en capa límite. Se ha utilizado la resina en minicolumnas para estudiar su comportamiento bajo condiciones dinámicas. La desorción del cobre(II se lleva a cabo con disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico.

  12. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng, E-mail: zhangteng@mail.iee.ac.cn; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste.

  13. Small Column Ion Exchange Analysis for Removal of Cesium from SRS Low Curie Salt Solutions Using Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ALEMAN, SEBASTIAN

    2004-01-01

    Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) researchers modeled ion exchange removal of cesium from dissolved salt waste solutions. The results assist in evaluating proposed configurations for an ion exchange process to remove residual cesium from low curie waste streams. A process for polishing (i.e., removing small amounts) of cesium may prove useful should supernate draining fail to meet the Low Curie Salt (LCS) target limit of 0.1 Ci of Cs-137 per gallon of salt solution. Cesium loading isotherms and column breakthrough curves for Low Curie dissolved salt solutions were computed to provide performance predictions for various column designs

  14. Ion Exchange Studies for Removal of Sulfate from Hanford Tank Waste Envelope C (241-AN-107) Using SuperLig 655 Resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurath, D.E.; Bontha, J.R.; Blanchard, D.L.; Fiskum, S.K.; Rapko, B.M.

    2000-01-01

    BNFL Inc. is evaluating various pretreatment technologies to mitigate the impacts of sulfate on the LAW vitrification system. One pretreatment technology for separating sulfate from LAW solutions involves the use of SuperLig(reg. sign) 655 (SL-655), a proprietary ion exchange material developed and supplied by IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc., American Fork, UT. This report describes testing of SL-655 with diluted ([Na] approximately 5 M) waste from Hanford Tank 241-AN-107 at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Division. Batch contact studies were conducted from 4 to 96 hours to determine the sulfate distribution coefficient and reaction kinetics. A small-scale ion exchange column test was conducted to evaluate sulfate removal, loading, breakthrough, and elution from the SL-655. In all of these tests, an archived 241-AN-107 tank waste sample (pretreated to remove Cs, Sr, and transuranics elements) was used. The experimental details and results are described in this report. Under the test conditions, SL-655 was found to have no significant ion exchange affinity for sulfate in this matrix. The batch contact study resulted in no measurable difference in the aqueous sulfate concentration following resin contact (K d ∼ 0). The column test also demonstrated SL-655 had no practical affinity for sulfate in the tested matrix. Within experimental error, the sulfate concentration in the column effluent was equal to the concentration in the feed after passing 3 bed volumes of sample through the columns. Furthermore, some, if not all, of the decreased sulfate concentration in these first three column volumes of effluent can be ascribed to mixing and dilution of the 241-AN-107 feed with the interstitial liquid present in the column at the start of the loading cycle. Finally, ICP-AES measurements on the eluate solutions showed the presence of barium as soon as contact with the feed solution is completed. Barium is a metal not detected in the feed solution. Should the loss of barium be

  15. Bench scale evaluation and economic assessment of ion exchange resins for the removal of radionuclides from uranium mill tailings effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmanan, V.I.; Itzkovitch, I.J.

    1981-07-01

    The removal of <0.45 m radium 226 (soluble) from acid and alkaline mill tailings effluents to meet the Canadian provincial (Ontario and Saskatchewan) objective of <3 pCi/L using ion exchange has been studied. Stirred tank tests were used to screen potential solid ion exchangers for detailed testing in columns. Column tests on selected exchangers were carried out to determine breakthrough curves as a function of column throughput. An economic assessment of the process was carried out. Results obtained indicate that removal of soluble radium 226 to <3 pCi/L by ion exchange is technically feasible. However, if the solid exchangers are to be used on a once through basis the process is prohibitively expensive

  16. The use of ionizing radiation and ion exchange resins in the removal of heavy metals from waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Arnaouty, M.B.; Taher, N.H.; El-Toony, M.M.; Dessouki, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    The removal of heavy metal ions from waste water using gamma-radiation and a polymeric membrane prepared by radiation graft copolymerization of vinyl acetate (VAc) onto low density polyethylene films was investigated for the cases of zinc and iron ions. These metal ions were reduced by the hydrated electrons and hydrogen atoms to lower or zero valence state and eventually precipitate out of solution. parameter analysis includes the effect metal ion concentration, Ph, degree of grafting and irradiation dose. The maximum precipitation of the unirradiated metal ions was achieved at Ph 10, while the least precipitation occurred at Ph 3. Irradiation at Ph 5.5 resulted in more precipitation of iron than zinc. Both elements were adsorbed by different adsorbents granular activated carbon (GAC), powdered activated carbon (PAC), amberlite IR-120 plus, dowex-1- exchangers and grafted membranes). The combined treatment by irradiation plus adsorption showed more removal percent, especially for powdered activated carbon (PAC). Also, the grafted membranes showed a removal percent of 98% at high degree of grafting

  17. Scoping Tests of Technetium and Iodine Removal from Tank Waste Using SuperLig® 639 Resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); McCabe, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-26

    The primary chemical form of 99Tc found in Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) is pertechnetate anion (TcO4 -), which is highly soluble in water, and is mobile if released to the environment. Pertechnetate will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford waste treatment plant, and the primary disposition path is immobilization in the LAW glass waste form, which will be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Due to the soluble properties of pertechnetate, and the potential for impact to the Performance Assessment (PA), effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the River Protection Project mission. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow-sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. While 99Tc is the primary radionuclide of interest, 129I also contributes to the calculated future dose of disposed LAW, and it would be of interest to examine if removal is possible.

  18. In-Tank Peroxide Oxidation Process for the Decomposition of Tetraphenylborate in Tank 48H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DANIEL, LAMBERT

    2005-01-01

    Tank 48H return to service is critical to the processing of high level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Tank 48H currently holds legacy material containing organic tetraphenylborate (TPB) compounds from the operation of the In-Tank Precipitation process. The TPB was added during an in-tank precipitation process to removed soluble cesium, but excessive benzene generation curtailed this treatment method. This material is not compatible with the waste treatment facilities at SRS and must be removed or undergo treatment to destroy the organic compounds before the tank can be returned to routine Tank Farm service. Tank 48H currently contains approximately 240,000 gallons of alkaline slurry with approximately 19,000 kg (42,000 lb) of potassium and cesium tetraphenylborate (KTPB and CsTPB). Out of Tank processing of the Tank 48H has some distinct advantages as aggressive processing conditions (e.g., high temperature, low pH) are required for fast destruction of the tetraphenylborate. Also, a new facility can be designed with the optimum materials of construction and other design features to allow the safe processing of the Tank 48H waste. However, it is very expensive to build a new facility. As a result, an in-tank process primarily using existing equipment and facilities is desirable. Development of an in-tank process would be economically attractive. Based on success with Fentons Chemistry (i.e., hydrogen peroxide with an iron or copper catalyst to produce hydroxyl radicals, strong oxidation agents), testing was initiated to develop a higher pH oxidation process that could be completed in-tank

  19. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of antimony by electrochemical hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry in samples with high iron content using chelating resins as on-line removal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolea, E.; Arroyo, D.; Laborda, F.; Castillo, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    A method for the removal of the interference caused by iron on electrochemical generation of stibine is proposed. It consists of a chelating resin Chelex 100 column integrated into a flow injection system and coupled to the electrochemical hydride generator quartz tube atomic absorption spectrometer (EcHG-QT-AAS). Iron, as Fe(II), is retained in the column with high efficiency, close to 99.9% under optimal conditions. No significant retention was observed for Sb(III) under same conditions and a 97 ± 5% signal recovery was achieved. An electrochemical hydride generator with a concentric configuration and a reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was employed. The system is able to determine antimony concentrations in the range of ng ml -1 in presence of iron concentrations up to 400 mg l -1 . The procedure was validated by analyzing PACS-2 marine sediments reference material with a 4% (w/w) iron content and a [Fe]:[Sb] ratio of 4000:1, which caused total antimony signal suppression on the electrochemical hydride generation system. A compost sample with high iron content (0.7%, w/w), was also analyzed. A good agreement was found on both samples with the certified value and the antimony concentration determined by ICP-MS, respectively

  1. Study of arsenic removal with ionic exchange resins in drinking water from Zimapan, Hidalgo State, Mexico; Estudio de eliminacion de arsenico con resinas de entercambio ionico en agua potable de Zimapan, Estado de Hidalgo, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Moreno, F.; Prieto-Garcia, F.; Rojas-Hernandez, A.; Marmolejo-Santillan, Y.; Salinas-Rodriguez, E.; Patino-Cardona, F.

    2006-07-01

    Anionic exchange resins were research with respect its capacity for removal arsenic content in water. Water of well V from Zimapan Hidalgo Mexico was used to make this research, because this water have a mean concentration of 480{+-}11{mu}g-L''-1 of arsenic and it is available as drinking water. The exchange resins employed were two strong anionic, one macroreticular (IRA-900) and other gel type (IRA-400), as soon as one third anionic weak macroreticular type (IRA-96). The experiments carried with this resins showing that IRA-900 has highest efficient in the process of arsenic removal from drinking water, because, it showed a treatment capacity of 700 V{sub a}gua. V{sub r}es''-1; while that capacities of IRA-400 e IRA-96 resins were 320 and 52 V{sub a}gua .V{sub r}es''-1 respectively. The mean concentration of arsenic residue in the treatise water was 24 {mu}g.l''-1 and it is within the maximum level permissible by Mexican official norm for drinking water. (Author) 12 refs.

  2. Uptake of actinides by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin from acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaya Mohandas; Srinivasa Rao, V.; Vijayakumar, N.; Kumar, T.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    The removal of uranium and americium from nitric acid solutions by sulphonated phosphinic acid resin has been investigated. The capacity of the sulphonated resin exceeds the capacities of phosphinic acid resin and commercial cation exchange resin. Other advantages of the sulphonated resin for uranium and americium removal include reduced sensitivity to acidity and inert salt concentration. (author)

  3. Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means

  4. Batch adsorptive removal of Fe(III), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions in aqueous and aqueous organic–HCl media by Dowex HYRW2-Na Polisher resin as adsorbents

    OpenAIRE

    Aboul-Magd, Abdul-Aleem Soliman; Al-Husain, Salwa Al-Rashed; Al-Zahrani, Salma Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Of the metal ions in tap, Nile, waste and sea water samples and some ores were carried out. Removal of heavy metal ions such as Fe(III), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cu(II), Mn(II), Mg(II), and Pb(II) from water and wastewater is obligatory in order to avoid water pollution. Batch shaking adsorption experiments to evaluate the performance of nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions in the removal of metal ions by cation exchange resin at the same conditions for both, such as the effect of initial metal ion ...

  5. Comparison of adsorption equilibrium models for the study of CL-, NO3- and SO4(2-) removal from aqueous solutions by an anion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dron, Julien; Dodi, Alain

    2011-06-15

    The removal of chloride, nitrate and sulfate ions from aqueous solutions by a macroporous resin is studied through the ion exchange systems OH(-)/Cl(-), OH(-)/NO(3)(-), OH(-)/SO(4)(2-), and HCO(3)(-)/Cl(-), Cl(-)/NO(3)(-), Cl(-)/SO(4)(2-). They are investigated by means of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevitch (D-R) and Dubinin-Astakhov (D-A) single-component adsorption isotherms. The sorption parameters and the fitting of the models are determined by nonlinear regression and discussed. The Langmuir model provides a fair estimation of the sorption capacity whatever the system under study, on the contrary to Freundlich and D-R models. The adsorption energies deduced from Dubinin and Langmuir isotherms are in good agreement, and the surface parameter of the D-A isotherm appears consistent. All models agree on the order of affinity OH(-)

  6. Removing and recovering of uranium from the acid mine waters by using ion exchange resin; Remocao e recuperacao de uranio de aguas acidas de mina por resina de troca ionica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Marcos Roberto Lopes do

    1998-07-01

    Ion exchange using resins is one of the few processes capable of reducing ionic contaminants in effluents to very low levels. In this study the process was used to remove and recovery uranium from acid mine waters at Pocos de Caldas-MG Uranium Mining and Milling Plant. The local mineralogical features, allied to the biogeochemical phenomena, owing to presence of pyrite in the rock piles, moreover another factors, resulting acid drainage with several pollutants, including uranium ranging from 6 to 14 mg/l, as sulfate complex, that can be removed by anionic exchanger. The iron interference is eliminated by lime pretreatment of water, increasing pH from 2.6 to 3.3-3.8 to precipitate this cation, without changing the uranium amount. Eight anionic resins were tested, based on the uranium loading, in sorption studies. Retention time, and pH influence was verified for the exchanger chose. With breakthrough of 1 mg U/L and 10 mg U/l in the feed solution, the uranium decontamination level was 94%. Typical values of loading resin were 20-30 g U/l and 70-90 g SO{sub 4}/l. Uranium elution was done with Na Cl solution. Retention time, saline, and acid concentration were the parameters studied. The concentrate, obtained from the eluate by ammonia precipitation, presented uranium (86,8% as U{sub 3} O{sub 8}) and impurities within commercial specifications. (author)

  7. Evaluation of oil and grease removal by adsorptive polymeric resins in semi-industrial scale: influence of temperature; Avaliacao da remocao de oleos e graxas por resinas polimericas adsorventes em escala semi-industrial: influencia da temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Luis F.S. de; Silva, Carla M.F. da; Queiros, Yure G.C.; Lucas, Elizabete F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Macromoleculas, Laboratorio de Macromoleculas e Coloides na Industria de Petroleo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: elucas@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of polymeric resins packed in a fixed bed eluted in semi-industrial scale for oil and greases removal disposed in synthetic oily water in different temperature conditions. For this work, columns packed with vinyl and acryl polymer-base were tested and their efficiency of oil removal was evaluated by fluorimetry technique in two different temperatures: 25 and 60 deg C, in a flow rate condition of 200 mL/min. The experimental results were very good: the removal efficiencies were above 98% in both cases. At 60 deg C, the system keep the efficiency for a longer time: no significant loss in the efficiency was observed after eluting 1,000 times of the column bed volume at 25 deg C and 2,000, at 60 deg C. This result characterizes a great potential of application in the industry. (author)

  8. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A

    2002-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, ion exchange resins are used for purification of aqueous streams. The major contaminants of the resins are usually the radioactive materials that are removed from the aqueous streams. The use of the ion exchange resins creates a waste stream that can be very high in both organic and radioactive constituents. Therefore, disposal of the spent resin often becomes an economic problem because of the large volumes of resin produced and the relatively few technologies that are capable of economically stabilizing this waste. Vitrification of this waste stream presents a reasonable disposal alternative because of its inherent destruction capabilities, the volume reductions obtainable, and the durable product that it produces

  9. Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-07-29

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  10. In-tank photo analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorvick, C.A.; Baird, D.B.; Heasler, P.G.

    1995-09-01

    This report documents an analysis performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) of photographs showing the interior of a single shell tank (SST) at the Hanford site. This report shows that in-tank photos can be used to create a plan-view map of the waste surface inside a tank, and that measuring the elevation of the waste surface from the photos is possible, but not accurate enough to be useful at this time. In-tank photos were acquired for Tanks BX111 and T111. The BX111 photos were used to create the waste surface map and to measure the waste surface elevation. T111 photos were used to measure the waste surface elevation. Uncertainty analyses of the mapping and surface elevation are included to show the accuracy of the calculations for both methods

  11. Two years survival rate of class II composite resin restorations prepared by ART with and without a chemomechanical caries removal gel in primary molars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topaloglu-Ak, A.; Eden, E.; Frencken, J.E.F.M.; Oncag, O.

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to test the null hypotheses that there is no difference: (1) in carious lesion development at the restoration margin between class II composite resin restorations in primary molars produced through the atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) with and without a chemomechanical caries

  12. [The influence of the chemo-mechanical removal of the smear-layer and the use of a dentin adhesive on microleakage of composite resin restorations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Macorra García, J C; Gómez Martínez, A; Gutiérrez Argumosa, B

    1989-02-01

    We present an "in vitro" study of microfiltration in composite resin restorations with a perimetral seal placed totally in cement. We compare the sealing capability of a dentin adhesive (ScotchBond I) used in two ways: habitual, without conditioning dentin and conditioning it by means of the Caridex system. This produced no increasing of sealing capability under the study conditions.

  13. Development of a treatment process for the removal of heavy metals from raw water for drinking water supply using chelating ion exchange resins. Subproject 1. Final report; Entwicklung der Verfahrenstechnik zur Eliminierung von Schwermetallen aus Rohwaessern zur Trinkwassergewinnung mit chelatbildenden Kationenaustauscherharzen zur technischen Reife. Teilprojekt 1. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overath, H.; Stetter, D.; Doerdelmann, O.

    2002-07-01

    Chelating cation exchange resins with iminodiacetic acid group (Lewatit TP 207 and Amberlite IRC 748) were tested for the removal of heavy metals in a drinking water treatment plant. The pilot scale filtration experiments were conducted by varying the operating conditions, such as flow rate and feed concentrations. Heavy metal concentrations (nickel, lead, cadmium, zinc) in the feed were adjusted between 20 and 200 {mu}g/L. Different methods for regeneration and conditioning of the resins were developed and investigated. Finally the ion exchange resins were tested according to German health regulations for ion exchangers in drinking water treatment. (orig.)

  14. Resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how the modulus of elasticity of resin composites influences marginal quality in restorations submitted to thermocyclic and mechanical loading. METHODS: Charisma, Filtek Supreme XTE and Grandio were selected as they were found to possess different moduli of elasticity...... of resin composite (p=0.81) on the quality of dentine margins was observed, before or after loading. Deterioration of all margins was evident after loading (p....008). CONCLUSIONS: The resin composite with the highest modulus of elasticity resulted in the highest number of gap-free enamel margins but with an increased incidence of paramarginal enamel fractures. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The results from this study suggest that the marginal quality of restorations can...

  15. Batch adsorptive removal of Fe(III, Cu(II and Zn(II ions in aqueous and aqueous organic–HCl media by Dowex HYRW2-Na Polisher resin as adsorbents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Aleem Soliman Aboul-Magd

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Of the metal ions in tap, Nile, waste and sea water samples and some ores were carried out. Removal of heavy metal ions such as Fe(III, Cd(II, Zn(II, Cu(II, Mn(II, Mg(II, and Pb(II from water and wastewater is obligatory in order to avoid water pollution. Batch shaking adsorption experiments to evaluate the performance of nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions in the removal of metal ions by cation exchange resin at the same conditions for both, such as the effect of initial metal ion concentration, different proportions of some organic solvents, H+-ion concentrations and reaction temperature on the partition coefficients. The metal adsorption for the cation exchanger was found to be significant in different media for both nitric and hydrochloric acids, i.e., the adsorption up take of metal ions presented in this work is very significant depending on the characteristics of ions and on the external concentrations of solute. The presence of low ionic strength or low concentration of acids does have a significant adsorption of metal ions on ion-exchange resin. The results show that the ion exchanger could be employed for the preconcentration, separation and the determination.

  16. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part II: cadmium(II/ sulphate/Lewatit TP260

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alguacil, F. J.

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cadmium (II, from aqueous sulphate solutions, on Lewatit TP260 resin has been investigated in batch equilibrium experiments. The influence of pH and temperature on metal adsorption capacity have also been examined. The kinetic performance of the resin has been assesed and the results have been correlated by the pore diffusion model. The resin has been used in mini-columns to study its performance under dynamics conditions. The desorption of metal ion is achieved using sulphuric acid (0.25M and 0.5M.

    Se estudia la adsorción de cadmio(II, de disoluciones en medio sulfato, sobre la resina Lewatit TP260. La adsorción del metal se ha investigado en función del pH, la temperatura y el tiempo de contacto con la resina. Los estudios cinéticos permiten correlacionar el proceso de intercambio iónico con el modelo de difusión en poro. Se ha empleado el sistema en mini columnas para evaluar el comportamiento de la resina bajo condiciones dinámicas. La desorción del metal se lleva a cabo con disoluciones de ácido sulfúrico (0,25M y 0,5M.

  17. Modified resins for solid-phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, James S.; Sun, Jeffrey J.

    1991-12-10

    A process of treating aqueous solutions to remove organic solute contaminants by contacting an aqueous solution containing polar organic solute contaminants with a functionalized polystyrene-divinyl benzene adsorbent resin, with the functionalization of said resin being accomplished by organic hydrophilic groups such as hydroxymethyl, acetyl and cyanomethyl.

  18. Hot dewatering and resin encapsulation of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rickman, J.; Birch, D.

    1985-01-01

    The chemistry of the processes involved in the hot dewatering and encapsulation of alumino-ferric hydroxide floc in epoxide resin have been studied. Pretreatment of the floc to reduce resin attack and hydrolysis and to increase the dimensional stability of the solidified wasteform has been evaluated. It has been demonstrated that removal of ammonium nitrate from the floc and control of the residual water in the resin are important factors in ensuring dimensional stability of the solidified resin. Resin systems have been identified which, together with the appropriate waste pretreatment have successfully encapsulated a simulated magnox sludge producing a stable wasteform having mechanical and physical properties comparable with the basic resin. (author)

  19. Removal of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution on Amberlite IRC 748 synthetic resin by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhihui; Qi Tao; Qu Jingkui; Wang Lina; Chu Jinglong

    2009-01-01

    Experimental measurements have been made on the batch ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution using cation exchanger of Amberlite IRC 748 as K + form. The ion exchange behavior of two alkaline-earth metals on the resin, depending on contact time, pH, temperature and resin dosage was studied. The adsorption isotherms were described by means of the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. For Ca(II) ion, the Langmuir model represented the adsorption process better than the Freundlich model. The maximum ion exchange capacity was found to be 47.21 mg g -1 for Ca(II) and 27.70 mg g -1 for Mg(II). The kinetic data were tested using Lagergren-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. Kinetic data correlated well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating that the chemical adsorption was the rate-limiting step. Various thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (ΔG o ), enthalpy (ΔH o ) and entropy (ΔS o ) were also calculated. These parameters showed that the ion exchange of Ca(II) and Mg(II) from potassium chromate solution was feasible, spontaneous and endothermic process in nature. The activation energy of ion-exchange (E a ) was determined as 12.34 kJ mol -1 for Ca(II) and 9.865 kJ mol -1 for Mg(II) according to the Arrhenius equation.

  20. Electrodialytic decontamination of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    Development of a novel electrodialytic decontamination process for the selective removal of radioactive Cs from spent ion exchange resins containing large amounts of Li is described. The process involves passage of a dc electric current through a bed of the spent ion exchange resin in a specially designed electrodialytic cell. The radiocesium so removed from a volume of the spent resin is concentrated onto a much smaller volume of a Cs selective sorbent to achieve a significant radioactive waste volume reduction. Technical feasibility of the electrodialytic resin decontamination process has been demonstrated on a bench scale with a batch of simulated spent ion exchange resin and using potassium cobalt ferrocyanide as the Cs selective sorbent. A volume reduction factor between 10 and 17 has been estimated. The process appears to be economically attractive. Improvements in process economics can be expected from optimization of the process. Other possible applications of the EDRD process have been identified

  1. Management of white spots: resin infiltration technique and microabrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hye Son

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report compared the effectiveness of resin infiltration technique (Icon, DMG with microabrasion (Opalustre, Ultradent Products, Inc. in management of white spot lesions. It demonstrates that although neither microabrasion nor resin infiltration technique can remove white spot lesions completely, resin infiltration technique seems to be more effective than microabrasion. Therefore resin infiltration technique can be chosen preferentially for management of white spot lesions and caution should be taken for case selection.

  2. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-02-12

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  3. HOUDINI: RECONFIGURABEL IN-TANK ROBOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce Thompson; Adam Slifko

    1997-01-01

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup systems called Houdini(trademark). Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini(trademark) represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini(trademark) is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini(trademark) utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobile waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini(trademark) system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini(trademark) system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks

  4. Removal of Gutta-Percha/Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol Sealer or Gutta-Percha/Epoxy Resin Sealer from Severely Curved Canals: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhoshini Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the cleanliness of root canal walls after retreatment using two rotary retreatment files to hand instruments in severely curved canals obturated with gutta-percha and two different sealers. Single rooted mandibular premolars (n=90 with root curvatures were instrumented and obturated with gutta-percha and an epoxy resin (Group 1, n=45 or zinc oxide eugenol sealer (Group 2, n=45. Following retreatment of the specimens (n=15 ProTaper Universal Retreatment Files (Subgroup B or R-Endo retreatment files (Subgroup C after 1 month, split specimens were examined under a stereomicroscope and the percentage of remaining root filling material was statistically compared using one way ANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons (P=0.05. The R-Endo system performed significantly better than the other two file systems (P<0.05. None of the systems used in this study cleaned root canals thoroughly. The R-Endo system did provide cleaner walls when compared to the other instruments used. The type of root filling materials had an impact on the outcomes with all techniques.

  5. Effect of pH and complementary ion concentration on nitrate removal using puroliteA400 Resin impregnated Cu in batch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmuzi, M.; Tarigan, Z. N.; Nadapdap, L.; Batubara, F.

    2018-02-01

    The total nitrogen content in water bodies should be below 50 mg NO3 -/L (11.3 mgN/l) World Health Organization (WHO) 2006. The content of nitrogen exceeding the quality standard threshold will cause damage to the aquatic ecosystem and be carcinogenic to humans. The Purolite A-400 resin will be modified with Cu metal by batch method to see the adsorption allowance of nitrate in synthetic liquid waste with nitrate concentration of 50 mg/l. This study will evaluate the effect of pH and complementary ions on the adsorption process. From the result of the research, the second order pseudo model is the most suitable adsorption kinetics model. For the adsorption isotherms the most suitable model is the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The optimum pH conditions were at the range of 8.5. The addition of complementary ions sulfate and phosphate did not show any significant change, but sulfate is the most effective complementary ion with a content of 20 mg/l.

  6. Novel silica-based ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    Eichrom`s highly successful Diphonixo resin resembles a conventional ion exchange resin in its use of sulfonic acid ligands on a styrene- divinylbenzene matrix. Diphonix resin exhibits rapid exchange kinetics that allow economical operation of ion exchange systems. Unlike conventional resins, Diphonix resin contains chelating ligands that are diphosphonic acid groups that recognize and remove the targeted metals and reject the more common elements such as sodium, calcium and magnesium. This latter property makes Diphonix ideal for many industrial scale applications, including those involving waste treatment. For treatment of low-level, transuranic (TRU) and high- level radioactive wastes, Diphonix`s polystyrene backbone hinders its application due to radiolytic stability of the carbon-hydrogen bonds and lack of compatibility with expected vitrification schemes. Polystyrene-based Diphonix is approximately 60% carbon- hydrogen. In response to an identified need within the Department of Energy for a resin with the positive attributes of Diphonix that also exhibits greater radiolytic stability and final waste form compatibility, Eichrom has successfully developed a new, silica-based resin version of Diphonix. Target application for this new resin is for use in environmental restoration and waste management situations involving the processing of low-level, transuranic and high-level radioactive wastes. The resin can also be used for processing liquid mixed waste (waste that contains low level radioactivity and hazardous constituents) including mixed wastes contaminated with organic compounds. Silica-based Diphonix is only 10% carbon-hydrogen, with the bulk of the matrix silica.

  7. Immobilization of spent resin with epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gultom, O.; Suryanto; Sayogo; Ramdan

    1997-01-01

    immobilization of spent resin using epoxy resin has been conducted. The spent resin was mixtured with epoxy resin in variation of concentration, i.e., 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 weight percent of spent resin. The mixture were pour into the plastic tube, with a diameter of 40 mm and height of 40 mm. The density, compressive strength and leaching rate were respectively measured by quanta chrome, paul weber apparatus and gamma spectrometer. The results showed that the increasing of waste concentration would be decreased the compressive strength, and increased density by immobilized waste. The leaching rate of 137 Cs from waste product was not detected in experiment (author)

  8. The use of new modified poly(acrylamide chelating resin with pendent benzothiazole groups containing donor atoms in the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semmedu Selvaraj Kalaivani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption studies of poly(6-(ethoxybenzothiazole acrylamide (PEBTA, for Cu(II and Zn(II metal ions removal from an aqueous solution have been investigated, as a function of solution pH, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The chemical and structural characteristics of the adsorbent were determined by the FT-IR, 1H-NMR, TGA, SEM, and EDAX analysis. The maximum adsorption capacities of the adsorbent for Cu(II and Zn(II ions, as calculated from the Langmuir isotherm model, were 273.5 and 216.4 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption kinetic studies show that the adsorption of Cu(II and Zn(II ions onto PEBTA follows the pseudo second order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also evaluated, and it has been found that the adsorption process is feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Desorption studies were carried out using 0.3 N HCl, and it revealed that the adsorbed Cu(II and Zn(II ions can be easily removed. The adsorption–desorption process is reversible, and this indicates that PEBTA is an effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from an aqueous medium.

  9. Amine chemistry. Update on impact on resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, Gregory; Kellogg, Douglas; Wilkes, Marty

    2012-01-01

    Impurity removal in the steam cycle and the associated prevention of corrosion and/or fouling of system components are the goals of ion exchange resins. However, in many instances (such as a switch to amine chemistry or a change in product specifications), resins do not remove, and, in fact, contribute impurities to the steam cycle. This paper reviews recent data compiled to determine the direct and indirect effects of amines on ion exchange resins used in the power industry. Water chemistries have improved in recent years, in large part due to changes in chemistry and resins, but it is necessary to continue to develop products, processes and techniques to reduce impurities and improve overall water chemistry in power plant systems. (orig.)

  10. Amine chemistry. Update on impact on resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachman, Gregory; Kellogg, Douglas [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Technology and Lab Services; Wilkes, Marty [Siemens Industry, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States). Water Technologies Div.

    2012-03-15

    Impurity removal in the steam cycle and the associated prevention of corrosion and/or fouling of system components are the goals of ion exchange resins. However, in many instances (such as a switch to amine chemistry or a change in product specifications), resins do not remove, and, in fact, contribute impurities to the steam cycle. This paper reviews recent data compiled to determine the direct and indirect effects of amines on ion exchange resins used in the power industry. Water chemistries have improved in recent years, in large part due to changes in chemistry and resins, but it is necessary to continue to develop products, processes and techniques to reduce impurities and improve overall water chemistry in power plant systems. (orig.)

  11. Large-scale treatment of high-salt, high-pH wastewater for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr removal, using crystalline silicotitanate resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P.A.; Walker, J.F.; Lee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    A full-scale demonstration of cesium removal technology has been conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration utilized a modular, mobile ion-exchange system and existing facilities for the off-gas system, secondary containment, and utilities. The ion-exchange material, crystalline silicotitanate (CST), was selected on the basis of its effectiveness in laboratory tests. The CST, which was developed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between DOE and private industry, is highly selective for removing cesium from solutions containing high concentrations of other contaminants, such as sodium and potassium. Approximately 116,000 liters of supernate was processed during the demonstration with {approximately} 1,142 Ci of {sup 137}Cs removed from the supernate and loaded onto 266 liters of the CST sorbent. The supernate processed had a high salt content, about 4 M NaNO{sub 3} and a pH of 12 to 13. The CST also loaded Ba, Pb, Sr, U and Zn. Analysis of the spent sorbent has shown that it is not hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The cesium breakthrough curves for the lab and full-scale columns agreed very well, suggesting that lab-scale tests can be used to predict the performance of larger systems. The cesium breakthrough curves for runs at different flowrates show that film diffusion is significant in controlling the mass transfer process. Operational factors that increase the effect of film diffusion include the small size and high porosity of the CST sorbent, and the relatively low liquid velocity through the sorbent.

  12. Large-scale treatment of high-salt, high-pH wastewater for 137Cs and 90Sr removal, using crystalline silicotitanate resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.A.; Walker, J.F.; Lee, D.D.

    1998-04-01

    A full-scale demonstration of cesium removal technology has been conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This demonstration utilized a modular, mobile ion-exchange system and existing facilities for the off-gas system, secondary containment, and utilities. The ion-exchange material, crystalline silicotitanate (CST), was selected on the basis of its effectiveness in laboratory tests. The CST, which was developed through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between DOE and private industry, is highly selective for removing cesium from solutions containing high concentrations of other contaminants, such as sodium and potassium. Approximately 116,000 liters of supernate was processed during the demonstration with ∼ 1,142 Ci of 137 Cs removed from the supernate and loaded onto 266 liters of the CST sorbent. The supernate processed had a high salt content, about 4 M NaNO 3 and a pH of 12 to 13. The CST also loaded Ba, Pb, Sr, U and Zn. Analysis of the spent sorbent has shown that it is not hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The cesium breakthrough curves for the lab and full-scale columns agreed very well, suggesting that lab-scale tests can be used to predict the performance of larger systems. The cesium breakthrough curves for runs at different flowrates show that film diffusion is significant in controlling the mass transfer process. Operational factors that increase the effect of film diffusion include the small size and high porosity of the CST sorbent, and the relatively low liquid velocity through the sorbent

  13. EPICOR-II resin degradation results from first resin samples of PF-8 and PF-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1985-12-01

    The 28 March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 released approximately 560,000 gallons of contaminated water to the Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Buildings. The water was decontaminated using a demineralization system called EPICOR-II developed by Epicor, Inc. The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Project is studying the chemical and physical conditions of the synthetic ion exchange resins found in several EPICOR-II prefilters. This report summarizes results and analyses of the first sampling of ion exchange resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PE-8 and -20. Results are compared with baseline data from tests performed on unirradiated Epicor, Inc. resins to determine if degradation has occurred due to the high internal radiation dose received by the EPICOR-II resins. Results also are compared with recent findings on resin degradation by Battelle Columbus Laboratories and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analyses comparing test results of resins from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 with unirradiated resins obtained from Epicor, Inc. show resin degradation has occurred in some of the EPICOR-II resins examined. The mechanism of degradation is compared with work of other researchers and is consistent with their findings. The strong acid cation resins (divinylbenzene, styrene base structure) are losing effective cross-linking along with scission of functional groups and are experiencing first an increase and eventually a decrease in total exchange capacity as the absorbed radiation dose increases. The phenolic cation resins (phenol-formaldehyde base structure) show a loss of effective cross-linking and oxidation of the polymer chain. Analyses of resins removed from EPICOR-II prefilters PF-8 and -20 over the next several years should show a further increase in degradation

  14. Suspending Zeolite Particles In Tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is in the process of removing waste (sludge and salt cake) from million gallon waste tanks. The current practice for removing waste from the tanks is adding water, agitating the tanks with long shaft vertical centrifugal pumps, and pumping the sludge/salt solution from the tank to downstream treatment processes. This practice has left sludge heels (tilde 30,000 gallons) in the bottom of the tanks. SRS is evaluating shrouded axial impeller mixers for removing the sludge heels in the waste tanks. The authors conducted a test program to determine mixer requirements for suspending sludge heels using the shrouded axial impeller mixers. The tests were performed with zeolite in scaled tanks which have diameters of 1.5, 6.0, and 18.75 feet. The mixer speeds required to suspend zeolite particles were measured at each scale. The data were analyzed with various scaling methods to compare their ability to describe the suspension of insoluble solids with the mixers and to apply the data to a full-scale waste tank. The impact of changes in particle properties and operating parameters was also evaluated. The conclusions of the work are: Scaling of the suspension of fast settling zeolite particles was best described by the constant power per unit volume method. Increasing the zeolite particle concentration increased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Decreasing the zeolite particle size from 0.7 mm 0.3 mm decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. Increasing the number of mixers in the tank decreased the required mixer power needed to suspend the particles. A velocity of 1.6 ft/sec two inches above the tank bottom is needed to suspend zeolite particles

  15. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  16. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-09-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the products' properties. (author)

  17. Hanford tanks initiative - test implementation plan for demonstration of in-tank retrieval technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaus, P.S.

    1997-01-01

    This document presents a Systems Engineering approach for performing the series of tests associated with demonstrating in-tank retrieval technologies. The testing ranges from cold testing of individual components at the vendor's facility to the final fully integrated demonstration of the retrieval system's ability to remove hard heel high-level waste from the bottom of a Hanford single-shell tank

  18. Prótese parcial removível associada à prótese fixa adesiva através de encaixe extracoronário = Resin-bonded fixed dentures and extracoronal precision attachments in removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosme, Dúcia Caldas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A prótese parcial removível é uma alternativa de reabilitação que tem como vantagem o pequeno desgaste dos dentes suportes, mas quando compromete os dentes anteriores apresenta um inconveniente estético que é o abraçamento de parte da face vestibular pelos retentores diretos. Para eliminar este efeito estético negativo indica-se o uso de prótese parcial fixa associada à removível através de encaixes, que apresenta a desvantagem biológica provocada pelo preparo dos dentes pilares. Desta forma, a associação de prótese parcial fixa adesiva à prótese parcial removível através de encaixes extracoronários confere uma combinação vantajosa sob os pontos de vista biológico, estético e biomecânico, uma vez que reúne os principais aspectos de ambos os tipos de reabilitação protética como mais uma alternativa de tratamento

  19. Cleanup of TMI-2 demineralizer resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, W.D.; King, L.J.; Knauer, J.B.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Thompson, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Radiocesium is being removed from Demineralizers A and B (DA and DB by a process that was developed from laboratory tests on small samples of resin from the demineralizers. The process was designed to elute the radiocesium from the demineralizer resins and then to resorb it onto the zeolite ion exchangers contained in the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS). The process was also required to limit the maximum cesium activities in the resin eluates (SDS feeds) so that the radiation field surrounding the pipelines would not be excessive. The process consists of 17 stages of batch elution. In the initial stage, the resin is contacted with 0.18 M boric acid. Subsequent stages subject the resin to increasing concentrations of sodium in NaH 2 BO 3 -H 3 BO 3 solution (total B = 0.35 M) and then 1 M sodium hydroxide in the final stages. Results on the performance of the process in the cleanup of the demineralizers at TMI-2 are compared to those obtained from laboratory tests with small samples of the DA and DB resins. To date, 15 stages of batch elution have been completed on the demineralizers at TMI-2 which resulted in the removal of about 750 Ci of radiocesium from DA and about 3300 Ci from DB

  20. Arsenic Removal from Water Using Various Adsorbents: Magnetic Ion Exchange Resins, Hydrous Ion Oxide Particles, Granular Ferric Hydroxide, Activated Alumina, Sulfur Modified Iron, and Iron Oxide-Coated Microsand

    KAUST Repository

    Sinha, Shahnawaz

    2011-09-30

    The equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of arsenic on six different adsorbents were investigated with one synthetic and four natural types (two surface and two ground) of water. The adsorbents tested included magnetic ion exchange resins (MIEX), hydrous ion oxide particles (HIOPs), granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), activated alumina (AA), sulfur modified iron (SMI), and iron oxide-coated mic - rosand (IOC-M), which have different physicochemical properties (shape, charge, surface area, size, and metal content). The results showed that adsorption equilibriums were achieved within a contact period of 20 min. The optimal doses of adsorbents determined for a given equilibrium concentration of C eq = 10 μg/L were 500 mg/L for AA and GFH, 520–1,300 mg/L for MIEX, 1,200 mg/L for HIOPs, 2,500 mg/L for SMI, and 7,500 mg/L for IOC-M at a contact time of 60 min. At these optimal doses, the rate constants of the adsorbents were 3.9, 2.6, 2.5, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.6 1/hr for HIOPs, AA, GFH, MIEX, SMI, and IOC-M, respectively. The presence of silicate significantly reduced the arsenic removal efficiency of HIOPs, AA, and GFH, presumably due to the decrease in chemical binding affinity of arsenic in the presence of silicate. Additional experiments with natural types of water showed that, with the exception of IOC-M, the adsorbents had lower adsorption capacities in ground water than with surface and deionized water, in which the adsorption capacities decreased by approximately 60–95 % .

  1. Dropping of mixing pump in Tank 102-AP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine dropping of the mixing pump in Tank 102-AP during its removal poses the risk of causing a leak in the tank bottom with attendant potential for public exposure from the leak. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the potential for causing such a leak (i.e., estimated frequency of leak occurrence); to qualitatively estimate leak magnitude if its is a credible event; and, finally to compare the worker hazard, in the installation of an impact limiter (should it be required), to that which the public might incur if a leak is manifest in the tank bottom. The ultimate goal of the study is, of course, to assess the need for installation of an impact limiter

  2. Dynamic simulation of the in-tank precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hang, T.; Shanahan, K.L.; Gregory, M.V.; Walker, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    As part of the High-Level Waste Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) facility was designed to decontaminate the radioactive waste supernate by removing cesium as precipitated cesium tetraphenylborate. A dynamic computer model of the ITP process was developed using SPEEDUP TM software to provide guidance in the areas of operation and production forecast, production scheduling, safety, air emission, and process improvements. The model performs material balance calculations in all phase (solid, liquid, and gas) for 50 key chemical constituents to account for inventory accumulation, depletion, and dilution. Calculations include precipitation, benzene radiolytic reactions, evaporation, dissolution, adsorption, filtration, and stripping. To control the ITP batch operation a customized FORTRAN program was generated and linked to SPEEDUP TM simulation This paper summarizes the model development and initial results of the simulation study

  3. Safety evaluation of cation-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    Results are presented of a study to evaluate whether sufficient information is available to establish conservative limits for the safe use of cation-exchange resins in separating radionuclides and, if not, to recommend what new data should be acquired. The study was also an attempt to identify in-line analytical techniques for the evaluation of resin degradation during radionuclide processing. The report is based upon a review of the published literature and upon discussions with many people engaged in the use of these resins. It was concluded that the chief hazard in the use of cation-exchange resins for separating radionuclides is a thermal explosion if nitric acid or other strong oxidants are present in the process solution. Thermal explosions can be avoided by limiting process parameters so that the rates of heat and gas generation in the system do not exceed the rates for their transfer to the surroundings. Such parameters include temperature, oxidant concentration, the amounts of possible catalysts, the radiation dose absorbed by the resin and the diameter of the resin column. Current information is not sufficient to define safe upper limits for these parameters. They can be evaluated, however, from equations derived from the Frank-Kamenetskii theory of thermal explosions provided the heat capacities, thermal conductivities and rates of heat evolution in the relevant resin-oxidant mixtures are known. It is recommended that such measurements be made and the appropriate limits be evaluated. A list of additional safety precautions are also presented to aid in the application of these limits and to provide additional margins of safety. In-line evaluation of resin degradation to assess its safety hazard is considered impractical. Rather, it is recommended that the resin be removed from use before it has received the limiting radiation dose, evaluated as described above

  4. 19 CFR 151.26 - Molasses in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Molasses in tank cars. 151.26 Section 151.26....26 Molasses in tank cars. When molasses is imported in tank cars, the importer shall file with the... sugars or the character of the molasses in the different cars. ...

  5. Assessment of performing an MST strike in Tank 21H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, Michael R.

    2014-09-29

    Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tank mixing studies performed for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) project have shown that 3 Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs) installed in Tank 41 are sufficient to support actinide removal by MST sorption as well as subsequent resuspension and removal of settled solids. Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is pursuing MST addition into Tank 21 as part of the Large Tank Strike (LTS) project. The preliminary scope for LTS involves the use of three standard slurry pumps (installed in N, SE, and SW risers) in a Type IV tank. Due to the differences in tank size, internal interferences, and pump design, a separate mixing evaluation is required to determine if the proposed configuration will allow for MST suspension and strontium and actinide sorption. The author performed the analysis by reviewing drawings for Tank 21 [W231023] and determining the required cleaning radius or zone of influence for the pumps. This requirement was compared with previous pilot-scale MST suspension data collected for SCIX that determined the cleaning radius, or zone of influence, as a function of pump operating parameters. The author also reviewed a previous Tank 50 mixing analysis that examined the ability of standard slurry pumps to suspend sludge particles. Based on a review of the pilot-scale SCIX mixing tests and Tank 50 pump operating experience, three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend sludge and MST to effectively sorb strontium and actinides onto the MST. Using the SCIX data requires an assumption about the impact of cooling coils on slurry pump mixing. The basis for this assumption is described in this report. Using the Tank 50 operating experience shows three standard slurry pumps should be able to suspend solids if the shear strength of the settled solids is less than 160 Pa. Because Tank 21 does not contain cooling coils, the shear strength could be larger.

  6. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) funded Technology Development and Deployment (TDD) to solve technical problems associated with waste tank closure for sites such as Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). One of the tasks supported by this funding at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) was In-Tank Elutriation. Elutriation is the process whereby physical separation occurs based on particle size and density. This report satisfies the first phase of Task WP 1 .3.1.1 In-Tank Elutriation, which is to assess the feasibility of this method of separation in waste tanks at Hanford Site and SRS. This report includes an analysis of scoping tests performed in the Engineering Development Laboratory of SRNL, analysis of Hanford's inadvertent elutriation, the viability of separation methods such as elutriation and hydrocyclones and recommendations for a path forward. This report will demonstrate that the retrieval of Hanford salt waste tank S-112 very successfully decreased the tank's inventories of radionuclides. Analyses of samples collected from the tank showed that concentrations of the major radionuclides Cs-136 and Sr-90 were decreased by factors of 250 and 6 and their total curie tank inventories decreased by factors of 60,000 and 2000. The total tank curie loading decreased from 300,000 Ci to 55 Ci. The remaining heel was nearly all innocuous gibbsite, Al(OH) 3 . However, in the process of tank retrieval approximately 85% of the tank gibbsite was also removed. Significant amounts of money and processing time could be saved if more gibbsite could be left in tanks while still removing nearly all of the radionuclides. There were factors which helped to make the elutriation of Tank S-112 successful which would not necessarily be present in all salt tanks. 1. The gibbsite particles in the tank were surprisingly large, as much as 200 o)m. The gibbsite crystals had probably grown in size over

  7. Ontario Hydro Research Division's program for treatment of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.; Dodd, D.J.R.

    1981-09-01

    A brief review of the evolution of work programmes for chemical treatment of spent ion-exchange resins in Ontario Hydro's Research Division is presented. Attention has been focussed on pre-treatment processes for the treatment of the spent resins prior to encapsulation of the products in solid matrices. Spent Resin Regeneration and Acid Stripping processes were considered in some detail. Particular attention was paid to carbon-14 on spent resins, its determination in and removal from the spent resins (with the acid stripping technique). The use of separate cation and anion resin beds instead of mixed bed resins was examined with a view to reducing the volume of resin usage and consequently the volume of waste radioactive ion-exchange resin generated. (author)

  8. Handling sticky resin by stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Gastauer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available For their nest defense, stingless bees (Meliponini collect plant resins which they stick on intruders like ants or cleptobiotic robber bees causing their immobilization. The aim of this article is to identify all parts of stingless bee workers contacting these sticky resins. Of special interest are those body parts with anti-adhesive properties to resin, where it can be removed without residues. For that, extensive behavioral observations during foraging flight, handling and application of the resin have been carried out. When handling the resin, all tarsi touch the resin while walking above it. For transportation from plants to the nest during foraging flight, the resin is packed to the corbicula via tarsi and basitarsi of front and middle legs. Once stuck to the resin or after the corbicula had been unloaded, the bee's legs have to be cleaned thoroughly. Only the tips of the mandibles, that form, cut and apply the sticky resin, seem to have at least temporarily resin-rejecting properties.

  9. Polyvinyl chloride resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong Jae

    1976-06-01

    This book contains polyvinyl chloride resin industry with present condition such as plastic industry and polyvinyl chloride in the world and Japan, manufacture of polyvinyl chloride resin ; suspension polymerization and solution polymerization, extruding, injection process, hollow molding vinyl record, vacuum forming, polymer powders process, vinyl chloride varnish, vinyl chloride latex, safety and construction on vinyl chloride. Each chapter has descriptions on of process and kinds of polyvinyl chloride resin.

  10. Laboratory testing in-tank sludge washing, summary letter report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, M.V.; Torres-Ayala, F.

    1994-09-01

    In-tank washing is being considered as a means of pretreating high-level radioactive waste sludges, such as neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) sludge. For this process, the contents of the tank will be allowed to settle, and the supernatant solution will be decanted and removed. A dilute sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrite wash solution will be added to the settled sludge and the tank contents will be mixed with a mixer pump system to facilitate washing of the sludge. After thorough mixing, the mixer pumps will be shut off and the solids will be allowed to re-settle. After settling, the supernatant solution will be withdrawn from the tank, and the wash cycle will be repeated several times with fresh wash solution. Core sample data of double shell tank 241-AZ-101 indicate that settling of NCAW solids may be very slow. A complicating factor is that strong thermal currents are expected to be generated from heat produced by radionuclides in the sludge layer at the bottom of the tank. Additionally, there are concerns that during the settling period (i.e., while mixing pumps and air-lift re-circulators are shut off), the radionuclides may heat the residual interstitial water in the sludge to the extent that violent steam discharges (steam bumping) could occur. Finally, there are concerns that during the washing steps sludge settling may be hindered as a result of the reduced ionic strength of the wash solution. To overcome the postulated reduced settling rates during the second and third washing steps, the use of flocculants is being considered. To address the above concerns and uncertainties associated with in-tank washing, PNL has conducted laboratory testing with simulant tank waste to investigate settling rates, steam bump potential, and the need for and use of flocculating agents

  11. Research on deeply purifying effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy to remove uranium by ion exchange. Pt.2: Elution uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the intense fractionation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jianguo; Chen Shaoqiang; Qi Jing

    2002-01-01

    Developing macroporous resin for purifying uranium effluent from uranium mining and metallurgy is presented. The Intense Fractionation Process is employed to elute uranium from lower loaded uranium resin by the eluent of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. The result is indicated that the uranium concentration in the rich elutriant is greatly increased, and the rich liquor is only one bed column volume, uranium concentration in the elutriant is increased two times which concentration is 10.1 g/L. The eluent is saved about 50% compared with the conventional fixed bed elution operation. And also the acidity in the rich elutriant is of benefit to the later precipitation process in uranium recovery

  12. Conceptual design of a Raman probe for inclusion in the in-tank cone penetrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyle, K.R.

    1994-01-01

    Currently, tank wastes are to be characterized by drilling and physically removing core samples. The cores are analyzed in laboratories in a hot cell environment. The purpose of the cone penetrometer is to bring the interrogative methods to the sample in its native environment, providing faster, safer, and more cost effective tank characterization, both in terms of time and effort. Probes currently exist for the physical characterization of tank wastes in terms of porosity, density, temperature, and electrical conductivity. The main tool for chemical analysis in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be a fiber optic Raman spectroscopy probe, which will be used to collect information about the molecular chemical constituents of the tank wastes. This report addresses the design and implementation of a Raman probe with the in-tank cone penetrometer. The scope of this document includes design specifications and recommendations for the following aspects of the in-tank Raman cone penetrometer probe: cone penetrometer probe interface--an unit for the inclusion of a Raman probe in the in-tank cone penetrometer will be described; window materials--chemically resistant and mechanically stable materials for the cone penetrometer probe interface window will be considered; Raman probes--Raman probes for inclusion in the penetrometer will be discussed

  13. Purification of degraded TBP solvent using macroreticular anion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartha, P.K.S.; Kutty, P.V.E.; Janaradanan, C.; Ramanujam, A.; Dhumwad, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) diluted with a suitable diluent is commonly used for solvent extraction in Purex process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuels. This solvent gets degraded due to various factors, the main degradation product being dibutyl phosphoric acid (HDBP). A solvent cleanup step is generally incorporated in the process for removing the degradation products from the used solvent. A liquid-liquid cleanup system using sodium carbonate or sodium hydroxide solution is routinely used. Considering certain advantages, like the possibility of loading the resin almost to saturation capacity and the subsequent disposal of the spent resin by incineration and the feasibility of adopting it to the process, a liquid-solid system has been tried as an alternate method, employing various available macroreticular anion exchange resins in OH - form for the sorption of HDBP from TBP. After standardizing the various conditions for the satisfactory removal of HDBP from TBP using synthetic mixtures, resins were tested with process solvent in batch contacts. The parameters studied were (1) capacity of different resins for HDBP sorption (2) influence of acidity, uranium and HDBP on the sorption behaviour of the latter (3) removal of fission products from the solvent by the resin and (4) regeneration and recycling of the resin. (author). 2 figs., 13 tabs., 17 refs

  14. Development of a High-Throughput Ion-Exchange Resin Characterization Workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Dermody, Daniel; Harris, Keith; Boomgaard, Thomas; Sweeney, Jeff; Gisch, Daryl; Goltz, Bob

    2017-06-12

    A novel high-throughout (HTR) ion-exchange (IEX) resin workflow has been developed for characterizing ion exchange equilibrium of commercial and experimental IEX resins against a range of different applications where water environment differs from site to site. Because of its much higher throughput, design of experiment (DOE) methodology can be easily applied for studying the effects of multiple factors on resin performance. Two case studies will be presented to illustrate the efficacy of the combined HTR workflow and DOE method. In case study one, a series of anion exchange resins have been screened for selective removal of NO 3 - and NO 2 - in water environments consisting of multiple other anions, varied pH, and ionic strength. The response surface model (RSM) is developed to statistically correlate the resin performance with the water composition and predict the best resin candidate. In case study two, the same HTR workflow and DOE method have been applied for screening different cation exchange resins in terms of the selective removal of Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ , and Ba 2+ from high total dissolved salt (TDS) water. A master DOE model including all of the cation exchange resins is created to predict divalent cation removal by different IEX resins under specific conditions, from which the best resin candidates can be identified. The successful adoption of HTR workflow and DOE method for studying the ion exchange of IEX resins can significantly reduce the resources and time to address industry and application needs.

  15. Immobilization of ion-exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions, can be achieved using organic ion-exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilized in cement-based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% ordinary Portland cement, 84% gg blast furnace slag, 6% microsilica with a water/cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This formulation was successfully scaled up to 200 litres, giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. 26 tabs., 22 figs., 29 refs

  16. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement: final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    The removal of activity from spent decontaminating solutions eg LOMI can be achieved using organic ion exchange resins. These resins can be successfully immobilised in cement based matrices. The optimum cement system contained 10% Ordinary Portland Cement 84% gg Blast Furnace Slag, 6% Microsilica with a water cement ratio of 0.5 and a dry resin loading of 36% with respect to total weight. This information was successfully scaled up to 200 litres giving a product with acceptable compressive strength, dimensional stability and elastic modulus. Storage of samples under water appears to have no detrimental effects on the product's properties. (author)

  17. Adsorption behaviour of uranium on immobilized tannin resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Susana; Preval, Ivon; Santana, Jorge L.; Martinez, Francisco; Vargas, Luis M.

    1995-01-01

    The sorption of uranium by Eucalyptus Saligna Sm. tannin resin was investigated. This resin resulted a suitable adsorbent for the concentration of uranium from aqueous systems. The sorption of uranium is pH dependent. The presence of appreciable quantities of sodium chloride does not have any effect on uranium removal. Carbonate and calcium ions in concentrations similar to these found in seawater and other natural water do not decrease the uranium uptake. TANNsorb resin can be used several times without an appreciable decay of their sorption capacity. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  18. Organic resin anion exchangers for the treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, A.; McGinnes, D.F.

    1988-07-01

    Organic anion exchange resins are evaluated for 99-TcO 4 - (pertechnate) removed from aqueous nuclear waste streams. Chemical, thermal and radiation stabilities were studied. Selected resins were examined in detail for their selectivities in the presence of I - , NO 3 - , SO 4 = , CO 3 = , Cl - and OH - . Ion exchange equilibria and kinetic mechanisms were determined. Preliminary investigations of cement encapsulation in polymer modified form were made and some leach studies carried out. (author)

  19. Effect of photoactivation on the reduction of composite resin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, Natalia A; Girotto, Luiza P S; Leite, Françoise H S; Mario, Débora N

    2017-06-01

    Composite resins are predominantly marketed in developing countries in tube form, and the contents of the tube may be used in numerous procedures for different patients. This represents a problem because of the risk of cross-contamination. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in vitro of the internal contents of composite resin tubes in the dental clinics of a higher-education institution, as well as the effect of photoactivation on the level of contamination. Twenty-five tubes containing composite resin were randomly chosen (by lottery). From each tube, two samples of approximately 2 mm of composite resin were removed, and then one sample, but not the other, was photoactivated. These samples were plated on Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI), Sabouraud and MacConkey agars, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h. Colony counting and Gram staining were performed for subsequent microscopic identification of fungi and bacteria. The non-photoactivated composite resin group presented significantly higher microbial contamination in relation to the photoactivated composite resin group. The photoactivation of camphorquinone present in composite resin produces reactive oxygen species, which might promote cell death of contaminant microorganisms. Thus, although the same tube of composite resin may be used for a number of different patients in the dental clinics of developing countries, the photoactivation process potentially reduces the risk of cross-contamination. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Method of heat decomposition for chemical decontaminating resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Akira.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To make resin wastes into non-deleterious state, discharge them into a resin waste storage tank of existent radioactive waste processing facility and store and dispose them. Constitution: In the processing of chemical decontaminating resin wastes, iron exchange resins adsorbing chemical decontaminating agents comprising a solution of citric acid, oxalic acid, formic acid and EDTA alone or as a mixture of them are heated to dry, thermally decomposed and then separated from the ion exchange resins. That is, the main ingredients of the chemical decontaminating agents are heat-decomposed when heated and dried at about 250 deg C in air and converted into non-toxic gases such as CO, CO 2 , NO, NO 2 or H 2 O. Further, since combustion or carbonization of the basic materials for the resin is not caused at such a level of temperature, the resin wastes removed with organic acid and chelating agents are transferred to an existent resin waste storage tank and stored therein. In this way, facility cost and radiation exposure can remarkably be decreased. (Kamimura, M.)

  1. Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin - 12088

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, R.L.; Rinehart, D.E.; Brown, G.N.; Peterson, R.A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing Cs-137. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50 deg. C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow at elevated temperature (45 deg., 50 deg., 55 deg., 60 deg., 65 deg., 75 deg. C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45 deg. C. Above 60 deg. C the resin appears to not load at all. It was observed that the resin disintegrated at 75 deg. C until not much was left and partially disintegrated at 65 deg. C, which caused the column to plug in both tests after ∼336 hours. The results indicate that WTP will lose resin loading capacity if the ion exchange process is performed above 25 deg. C, and the resin will disintegrate above 65 deg. C. Therefore, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures to perform the ion exchange process with this resin. PNNL and WTP are currently evaluating the operating limits of the resin in further detail. Aging in 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} also caused the resin to lose capacity above 25 deg. C and to completely dissolve at 55 deg. C. Again, WTP will have a restricted operating range of temperatures when eluting the resin with nitric acid in order to maintain resin loading capacity and avoid disintegration of the resin

  2. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-01

    morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins

  3. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2007-01-09

    morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24-inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

  4. PILOT-SCALE HYDRAULIC TESTING OF RESORCINOL FORMALDEHYDE ION EXCHANGE RESIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, D

    2006-11-08

    morphology. The skeletal density of the RF resin in the 24 inch IX Column increased slightly with cycling (in both hydrogen and sodium form). The chemical solutions used in the pilot-scale testing remained clear throughout testing, indicating very little chemical breakdown of the RF resin beads. The RF resin particles did not break down and produce fines, which would have resulted in higher pressure drops across the resin bed. Three cesium (Cs) loading tests were conducted on the RF resin in pilot-scale IX columns. Laboratory analyses concluded the Cs in the effluent never exceeded the detection limit. Therefore, there was no measurable degradation in cesium removal performance. Using the pilot-scale systems to add the RF resin to the columns and removing the resin from the columns was found to work well. The resin was added and removed from the columns three times with no operational concerns. Whether the resin was in sodium or hydrogen form, the resin flowed well and resulted in an ideal resin bed formation during each Resin Addition. During Resin Removal, 99+ % of the resin was easily sluiced out of the IX column. The hydraulic performance of the spherical RF resin during cycle testing was found to be superior to all other tested IX resins, and SRNL testing indicates that the resin should hold up to many cycles in actual radioactive Cs separation. The RF resin was found to be durable in the long term cycle testing and should result in a cost saving in actual operations when compared to other IX resins.

  5. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R. [RedZone Robotics, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE`s Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE`s EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site`s waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites.

  6. Houdini: Reconfigurable in-tank robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.W.; Slifko, A.D.; Thompson, B.R.; Fisher, C.G.

    1995-01-01

    RedZone Robotics, Inc. and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) are developing a tethered mobile robot, Houdini, to work inside waste storage tanks in support of the Department of Energy's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Program. This project is funded by the DOE's Environmental Management Office of Technology Development through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Our goal is to develop technology that is useful for in-tank operations throughout the DOE's EM program. The first application of the Houdini system is to support the waste retrieval action planned for the final remediation of the Fernald site's waste silos. RedZone and CMU have discussed potential applications for the system with personnel from several other DOE sites, and have found that the system would be widely useful in the DOE complex for tasks both inside and outside of waste storage tanks. We are tailoring the first implementation of the Houdini system to the specific needs of the Fernald silo remediation. The Fernald application-specific design constraints are primarily interface issues and should not interfere with the utility of the system at other sites. In addition, DOE personnel at the Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) have expressed a strong interest in the Houdini system. They have a target application scheduled for mid-1996. This program represents a unique opportunity to develop a new technology that has immediate application in two CERCLA cleanup actions; the proposed applications at Fernald and ORNL support Federal Facility compliance agreements

  7. Effect of accelerated aging on the microhardness and color stability of flexible resins for dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resins have been widely used due to their acceptable esthetics and desirable characteristics such as easy handling, good thermal conductivity, low permeability to oral fluids and color stability. Flexible resins were introduced on the market as an alternative to the use of conventional acrylic resins in the construction of complete and partial removable dentures. Although these resins present advantages in terms of esthetics and comfort, studies assessing chromatic and microhardness alterations of these materials are still scarce in the related literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chromatic and microhardness alterations of two commercial brands of flexible resins in comparison to the conventional resin Triplex when submitted to accelerated aging. The resins were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions and inserted into a silicone matrix to obtain 21 specimens divided into 3 groups: Triplex, Ppflex and Valplast. Triplex presented the highest microhardness value (p < 0.05 for all the aging periods, which was significantly different from that of the other resins, followed by the values of Valplast and Ppflex. Comparison between the flexible resins (Ppflex and Valplast revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards color. The flexible resin Ppflex and the conventional resin Triplex presented no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards aging. The accelerated aging significantly increased the microhardness values of the resins, with the highest values being observed for Triplex. Valplast presented the greatest chromatic alteration after accelerated aging.

  8. Laboratory studies on enhancing the throughput of demineraliser units by proper selection of ion exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, S V; Unny, V K.P.; Shetiya, R S [Reactor Services and Maintenance Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    In water treatment plants of nuclear reactors, type I strong base anion resins are extensively used in anion units along with strong acid cation resins in cation units for demineralisation of water. There is another kind of strong base anion resin called type II resin which is chemically slightly different from type I resin. Type II resins differ from the type I in that one of the methyl groups in the quaternary ammonium functional group of the latter, is replaced by an ethanol group. This results in lower basicity of the resin and hence, higher regeneration efficiency. However, the resin is not like a weak base resin in its properties since it is capable of removing silica from water, though not with the same efficiency as that of the type I strong base resin. Studies were carried out to compare the performance of presently used type I resins with that of type II resins supplied by local manufacturers to assess the suitability of the latter for use in the DM plants of Trombay reactors. This paper discusses the results of the studies. (author). 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Biocompatibility of acrylic resin after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nike Hendrijatini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acrylic resin as basic material for denture will stay on oral mucosa for a very long time. The polymerization of acrylic resin can be performed by conventional method and microwave, both produce different residual monomer at different toxicity. Acrylic resin can absorb solution, porous and possibly absorb disinfectantt as well, that may have toxic reaction with the tissue. Sodium Hypochlorite as removable denture disinfectant can be expected to be biocompatible to human body. The problem is how biocompatible acrylic resin which has been processed by conventional method and microwave method after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite solution. Purpose: The aim of this study was to understand in vitro biocompatibility of acrylic resin which has polimerated by conventional method and microwave after being soaked in sodium hypochlorite using tissue culture. Methods: Four groups of acrylic resin plate were produced, the first group was acrylic resin plate with microwave polymeration and soaked in sodium hypochlorite, the second group was acrylic resin plate with microwave polymeration but not soaked, the thirdwas one with conventional method and soaked and the last group was one with conventional method but not soaked, and in 1 control group. Each group consists of 7 plates. Biocompatibility test was performed in-vitro on each material using fibroblast tissue culture (BHK-21 cell-line. Result: The percentage between living cells and dead cells from materials which was given acrylic plate was wounted. The data was analyzed statistically with T test. Conclusion: The average value of living cells is higher in acrylic resin poimerization using microwave method compared to conventional method, in both soaked and non soaked (by sodium hypochlorite group. This means that sodium hypochlorite 0.5% was biocompatible to the mouth mucosa as removable denture disinfectant for 10 minutes soaking and washing afterwards.

  10. Determination of trace amounts of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry after iron matrix removal with extractant-contained resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yuyu; Zhou Jianfeng; Wang Guoxin; Zhou Jinfan; Tao Guanhong

    2007-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was applied to the determination of lead, arsenic, nickel and cobalt in high-purity iron oxide pigment. Samples were dissolved with hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The digest was passed through a column, which was packed with a polymer resin containing a neutral organophosphorus extractant, tri-n-butylphosphate. Iron was sorbed selectively on the resin and the analytes of interest passed through the column, allowing the effective separation of them from the iron matrix. Conditions of separation were optimized. The detection limits (3σ) in solution were 10, 40, 7 and 5 μg L -1 , and in pigment were 0.2, 0.8, 0.14 and 0.1 mg kg -1 for lead, arsenic, cobalt and nickel, respectively. The recoveries ranged from 95% to 107% when sample digests were spiked with 5 μg of the analytes of interest, and relative standard deviations (n = 6) were 1.5-17.6% for the determination of the spiked samples. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of these elements in high-purity iron oxide pigment samples

  11. Comparison of mass transfer coefficient approach and Nernst-Planck formulation in the reactive transport modeling of Co, Ni, and Ag removal by mixed-bed ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachet, Martin; Jauberty, Loic; De Windt, Laurent; Dieuleveult, Caroline de; Tevissen, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    Experiments performed under chemical and flow conditions representative of pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary fluid purification by ion exchange resins (Amberlite IRN9882) are modeled with the OPTIPUR code, considering 1D reactive transport in the mixed-bed column with convective/dispersive transport between beads and electro-diffusive transport within the boundary film around the beads. The effectiveness of the purification in these dilute conditions is highly related to film mass transfer restrictions, which are accounted for by adjustment of a common mass transfer coefficient (MTC) on the experimental initial leakage or modeling of species diffusion through the bead film by the Nernst-Planck equation. A detailed analysis of the modeling against experimental data shows that the Nernst-Planck approach with no adjustable parameters performs as well as, or better than, the MTC approach, particularly to simulate the chromatographic elution of silver by nickel and the subsequent enrichment of the solution in the former metal. (authors)

  12. Radiation curable epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najvar, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    A carboxyl containing polymer is either prepared in the presence of a polyepoxide or reacted with a polyepoxide. The polymer has sufficient acid groups to react with only about 1 to 10 percent of the epoxide (oxirane) groups. The remaining epoxide groups are reacted with an unsaturated monocarboxylic acid such as acrylic or methacrylic acid to form a radiation curable resin

  13. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  14. The removal of toxic metals from liquid effluents by ion exchange resins. Part IV: Chromium(III)/H+ /Lewatit SP112; La eliminación de metales tóxicos presentes en efluentes líquidos mediante resinas de cambio iónico. Parte IV: cromo(III)/H+/Lewatit SP112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    2017-09-01

    This investigation presented results on the removal of chromium(III), from aqueous solution in the 0-5 pH range, using Lewatit SP112 cationic exchange resin. Several aspects affecting the ion exchange process were evaluated, including: the influence of the stirring speed, temperature, pH of the solution, resin dosage and aqueous ionic strength. The selectivity of the system was tested against the presence of other metals in the aqueous solution, whereas the removal of chromium(III) from solutions was compared with results obtained using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents. From the batch experimental data, best fit of the results is obtained with the Langmuir model, whereas the ion exchange process is best explained by the pseudo-second order model, moreover, experimental data responded well to the film-diffusion controlled model. Elution of the chromium(III) loaded into the resin is well accomplished by the use of sodium hydroxide solutions. [Spanish] En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la eliminación de cromo(III) de disoluciones acuosas (pH 0-5) mediante la resina de intercambio catiónico Lewatit SP112. Se han investigado algunas variables que pueden afectar al sistema: influencia de la agitación, temperatura, pH y fuerza iónica del medio acuoso y cantidad de resina; también se ha investigado acerca de la selectividad del sistema cuando otros metales están presentes en el medio acuoso, comparándose los resultados de la eliminación del cromo(III) usando la resina con los resultados obtenidos cuando se emplea otro adsorbente como son los nanotubos de carbono de pared múltiple. Los resultados experimentales indican que la carga del cromo(III) en la resina responde mejor al modelo de Langmuir, mientras que los modelos cinéticos indican que la carga del metal en la resina responde al modelo de pseudo-segundo orden y difusión en la capa límite. La elución del cromo(III) se realiza con disoluciones de hidróxid.

  15. Development of a new generation of ion exchange resin for nuclear and fossil power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuzuki, Shintaro; Tagawa, Hidemi; Yamashita, Futoshi; Okamoto, Ryutaro

    2008-01-01

    It is required to maintain water quality supplied to steam generator to the water designed based on its water chemistry in order to keep the sound operation of nuclear power plants or fossil power plants. Condensate Polishing Plant (CPP) is installed for removing ions in the water which uses a mixed bed of cation exchange resin and anion exchange resin. We have developed new generation of CPP resin. The product is a unique combination of super high exchange capacity cation exchange resin and high fouling resistant anion exchange resin. The CPP resin has been used in many power plants. Amberjet 1006 was developed as a cation exchange resin with high oxidative stability, high operational capacity and New IRA900CP was developed as an anion exchange resin with high fouling resistant to leachables released out of cation exchange resin by oxidative degradation over the service period. The novel CPP resin was first used in 2000 and has now been used in many power plants in Japan. The CPP resin has been giving excellent quality of water. (author)

  16. Lysine purification with cation exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayati, GH.; Mottaghi Talab, M.; Hamooni Hagheeghat, M.; Fatemi, M.

    2003-01-01

    L-lysine is an essential amino acid for the growth most of animal species and the number one limiting amino acid for poultry. After production and biomass removal by filtration and centrifugation, the essential next step is the lysine purification and recovery. There are different methods for lysine purification. The ion exchange process is one of the most commonly used purification methods. Lysine recovery was done from broth by ion exchange resin in three different ways: repeated passing, resin soaking and the usual method. Impurities were isolated from the column by repeated wash with distilled water. Recovery and purification was done with NH 4 OH and different alcohol volumes respectively. The results showed that repeated passing is the best method for lysine absorption (maximum range 86.21 %). Washing with alkali solution revealed that most of lysine is obtained in the first step of washing. The highest degree of lysine purification was achieved with the use of 4 volumes of alcohol

  17. Embedding in thermosetting resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzonniere, A. de

    1985-01-01

    Medium activity waste coming either from nuclear power plants in operation such as evaporator concentrates, spent resins, filter cartridges or the dismantling of installations are embedded in order to obtain a product suitable for long term disposal. Embedding in thermosetting resins (polyester or epoxy) is one among currently used techniques; it is being developed by the CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) and Technicatome (subsidiary of CEA and EDF). The process is easy to operate and yields excellent results particularly as far as volume reduction and radioelement containment (cesium particularly) are concerned. The process has already been in operation in four stationary plants for several years. Extension of the process to mobile units has been completed by Technicatome in collaboration with the CEA [fr

  18. Paramagnetic epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Vazquez Barreiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work illustrates that macrocycles can be used as crosslinking agents for curing epoxy resins, provided that they have appropriate organic functionalities. As macrocycles can complex metal ions in their structure, this curing reaction allows for the introduction of that metal ion into the resin network. As a result, some characteristic physical properties of the metallomacrocycle could be transferred to the new material. The bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE, n = 0 and hemin (a protoporphyrin IX containing the Fe(III ion, and an additional chloride ligand have been chosen. The new material has been characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Fe(III remains in the high-spin state during the curing process and, consequently, the final material exhibits the magnetic characteristics of hemin. The loss of the chlorine atom ligand during the cure of the resin allows that Fe(III can act as Lewis acid, catalyzing the crosslinking reactions. At high BADGE n = 0/hemin ratios, the formation of ether and ester bonds occurs simultaneously during the process.

  19. Chemical derivation to enhance the chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, T.L.; Shaw, W.J.; Brown, G.N.; Linehan, J.C.; Franz, J.A.; Hart, T.R.; Hogan, M.O.

    1996-09-01

    Tank wastes at Hanford and SRS contain highly alkaline supernate solutions of conc. Na, K nitrates with large amounts of 137 Cs. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction for vitrification. One candidate ion exchange material for removing the radiocesium is R-F resin. This report summarizes studies into synthesis and characterization of 4-derivatized R-F resins prepared in pursuit of more chemically/oxidatively robust resin. 85% 4-fluororesorcinol/15% phenol formaldehyde resin appears to have good stability in alkaline solution, although there may be some nucleophilic displacement reaction during synthesis; further studies are needed

  20. Amalgam stained dentin: a proper substrate for bonding resin composite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholtanus, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the use of dental amalgam is mostly abandoned and substituted by tooth colored resin composites that can be bonded to teeth tissues by adhesive techniques. The aim of this thesis was to find out whether dark stained dentin, as often observed after removal of amalgam restorations and

  1. Phenolic cation exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebra, Martha A.; Wallace, Richard M.

    1983-01-01

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear waste solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs.sup.+ and Sr.sup.2+ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  2. Phenolic cation-exchange resin material for recovery of cesium and strontium. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebra, M.A.; Wallace, R.M.

    1982-05-05

    A phenolic cation exchange resin with a chelating group has been prepared by reacting resorcinol with iminodiacetic acid in the presence of formaldehyde at a molar ratio of about 1:1:6. The material is highly selective for the simultaneous recovery of both cesium and strontium from aqueous alkaline solutions, such as, aqueous alkaline nuclear wate solutions. The organic resins are condensation polymers of resorcinol and formaldehyde with attached chelating groups. The column performance of the resins compares favorably with that of commercially available resins for either cesium or strontium removal. By combining Cs/sup +/ and Sr/sup 2 +/ removal in the same bed, the resins allow significant reduction of the size and complexity of facilities for processing nuclear waste.

  3. Chemical derivatization to enhance chemical/oxidative stability of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The goal of this task is to develop modified resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin to improve the chemical/oxidative stability of the resin. R-F resin is a regenerable organic ion-exchange resin that is selective for cesium ion in highly alkaline, high ionic-strength solutions. R-F resin tends to undergo chemical degradation, reducing its ability to remove cesium ion from waste solutions; the mechanistic details of these decomposition reactions are currently unknown. The approach used for this task is chemical modification of the resin structure, particularly the resorcinol ring unit of the polymer resin. This approach is based on prior characterization studies conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that indicated the facile chemical degradation of the resin is oxidation of the resorcinol ring to the para-quinone structure, with subsequent loss of ion-exchange sites for cesium ion. R-F resin represents an important alternative to current radiocesium remediation technology for tank wastes at both the Hanford and Savannah River sites, particularly if regenerable resins are needed.

  4. Cost effectiveness of detritiating water with resin columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.H.; Williams, D.S.

    1997-10-01

    There are technologies in use for cleaning up concentrated tritiated process water. These are not cost effective for tritiated water with low concentrations of tritium. There are currently no cost-effective technologies for cleaning up low-tritium-concentration tritiated water, such as most tritiated groundwater, spent fuel storage basin water, or underground storage tank water. Resin removal of tritium from tritiated water at low concentrations (near the order of magnitude of drinking water standard maximums) is being tested on TA-SO (Los Alamos National Laboratory's Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility) waste streams. There are good theoretical and test indications that this may be a technologically effective means of removing tritium from tritiated water. Because of likely engineering design similarity, it is reasonable to anticipate that a resin column system's costs will be similar to some common commercial water treatment systems. Thus, the potential cost effectiveness of a resin treatment system offers hope for treating tritiated water at affordable costs. The TA-50 resin treatment cost projection of $18 per 1,000 gallons is within the same order of magnitude as cost data for typical commercial groundwater cleanup projects. The prospective Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resin treatment system at $18 per 1,000 gallons appears to have a likely cost advantage of at least an order of magnitude over the competing, developmental, water detritiation technologies

  5. Ultrafiltration Membrane Fouling and the Effect of Ion Exchange Resins

    KAUST Repository

    Jamaly, Sanaa

    2011-12-01

    Membrane fouling is a challenging process for the ultrafiltration membrane during wastewater treatment. This research paper determines the organic character of foulants of different kinds of wastewater before and after adding some ion exchange resins. Two advanced organic characterization methods are compared in terms of concentration of dissolved organic carbons: The liquid chromatography with organic carbon (LC-OCD) and Shimadzu total organic carbon (TOC). In this study, two secondary wastewater effluents were treated using ultrafiltration membrane. To reduce fouling, pretreatment using some adsorbents were used in the study. Six ion exchange resins out of twenty were chosen to compare the effect of adsorbents on fouling membrane. Based on the percent of dissolved organic carbon’s removal, three adsorbents were determined to be the most efficient (DOWEX Marathon 11 anion exchange resin, DOWEX Optipore SD2 polymeric adsorbent, and DOWEX PSR2 anion exchange), and three other ones were determined to the least efficient (DOWEX Marathon A2 anion exchange resin, DOWEX SAR anion exchange resin, and DOWEX Optipore L493 polymeric adsorbent). Organic characterization for feed, permeate, and backwash samples were tested using LC-OCD and TOC to better understand the characteristics of foulants to prevent ultrafiltration membrane fouling. The results suggested that the polymeric ion exchange resin, DOWEX SD2, reduced fouling potential for both treated wastewaters. All the six ion exchange resins removed more humic fraction than other organic fractions in different percent, so this fraction is not the main for cause for UF membrane fouling. The fouling of colloids was tested before and after adding calcium. There is a severe fouling after adding Ca2+ to effluent colloids.

  6. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  7. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  8. Contact allergy to epoxy resin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menné, Torkil

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epoxy resin monomers are strong skin sensitizers that are widely used in industrial sectors. In Denmark, the law stipulates that workers must undergo a course on safe handling of epoxy resins prior to occupational exposure, but the effectiveness of this initiative is largely unknown...... in an educational programme. Conclusion. The 1% prevalence of epoxy resin contact allergy is equivalent to reports from other countries. The high occurrence of epoxy resin exposure at work, and the limited use of protective measures, indicate that reinforcement of the law is required....

  9. Branched polymeric media: Perchlorate-selective resins from hyperbranched polyethyleneimine

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Dennis P.

    2012-10-02

    Perchlorate (ClO4 -) is a persistent contaminant found in drinking groundwater sources in the United States. Ion exchange (IX) with selective and disposable resins based on cross-linked styrene divinylbenzene (STY-DVB) beads is currently the most commonly utilized process for removing low concentrations of ClO4 - (10-100 ppb) from contaminated drinking water sources. However, due to the low exchange capacity of perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins (∼0.5-0.8 eq/L), the overall cost becomes prohibitive when treating groundwater with higher concentration of ClO4 - (e.g., 100-1000 ppb). In this article, we describe a new perchlorate-selective resin with high exchange capacity. This new resin was prepared by alkylation of branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) beads obtained from an inverse suspension polymerization process. Batch and column studies show that our new PEI resin with mixed hexyl/ethyl quaternary ammonium chloride exchange sites can selectively extract trace amounts of ClO4 - from a makeup groundwater (to below detection limit) in the presence of competing ions. In addition, this resin has a strong-base exchange capacity of 1.4 eq/L, which is 1.75-2.33 times larger than those of commercial perchlorate-selective STY-DVB resins. The overall results of our studies suggest that branched PEI beads provide versatile and promising building blocks for the preparation of perchlorate-selective resins with high exchange capacity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  11. Resin regenerating device in condensate desalting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Yoshiaki; Igarashi, Hiroo; Oosumi, Katsumi; Nishimura, Yusaku; Ebara, Katsuya; Shindo, Norikazu.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the accuracy in the separation of anionic and cationic exchange resins. Constitution: Resins transferred from a condensate desalting column are charged in a cationic exchange resin column. The temperature of water for separating and transferring the resins is measured by a temperature detector disposed in a purified water injection line, and water is adjusted to a suitable flow rate for the separation and transfer of the resins by an automatic flow rate control valve, and then is injected. The resins are separated into cationic exchange resins and anionic exchange resins, in which only the anionic exchange resins are transferred, through an anionic exchange transfer line, into an anionic exchange resin column. By controlling the flow rate depending on the temperature of the injected water, the developing rate of the resin layer is made constant to enable separation and transfer of the resins at high accuracy. (Seki, T.)

  12. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten; Boren, Hans; Torstenfelt, Boerje; Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  13. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Hou, T. H.; Bai, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    A chemoviscosity model, which describes viscosity rise profiles accurately under various cure cycles, and correlates viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with structural transformations of the thermosetting resin system during cure, was established. Work completed on chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins is reported.

  14. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  15. Uranium removal from the water supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranzadeh, Mohammad Bagher.

    1996-01-01

    Uranium can be naturally occurring radionuclides that contaminate some potable water supplies. Uranium is found both in surface water and ground water supplies. The United States Environmental Protection Agency recently proposed a maximum contaminant of 20 micro gram/liter for uranium because of concerns about its association with kidney disease and cancer. uranium can be removed from the supply by strong base anion-resin. Exhausted resin is regenerated by sodium chloride solution. (Author)

  16. Removal of Legacy Low-Level Waste Reactor Moderator De-ionizer Resins Highly Contaminated with Carbon-14 from the 'Waste with no Path to Disposal List' Through Innovative Technical Analysis and Performance Assessment Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, W.T.; Hiergesell, R.A.; Kaplan, D.I.; Pope, H.L.

    2006-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), nuclear production reactors used de-ionizers to control the chemistry of the reactor moderator during their operation to produce nuclear materials primarily for the weapons program. These de-ionizers were removed from the reactors and stored as a legacy waste and due to the relatively high carbon-14 (C-14) contamination (i.e., on the order of 740 giga becquerel (GBq) (20 curies) per de-ionizer) were considered a legacy 'waste with no path to disposal'. Considerable progress has been made in consideration of a disposal path for the legacy reactor de-ionizers. Presently, 48 - 50 de-ionizers being stored at SRS have 'no path to disposal' because the disposal limit for C-14 in the SRS's low-level waste disposal facility's Intermediate Level Vault (ILV) is only 160 GBq (4.2 curies) per vault. The current C-14 ILV disposal limit is based on a very conservative analysis of the air pathway. The paper will describe the alternatives that were investigated that resulted in the selection of a route to pursue. This paper will then describe SRS's efforts to reduce the conservatism in the analysis, which resulted in a significantly larger C-14 disposal limit. The work consisted of refining the gas-phase analysis to simulate the migration of C-14 from the waste to the ground surface and evaluated the efficacy of carbonate chemistry in cementitious environment of the ILV for suppressing the volatilization of C-14. During the past year, a Special Analysis was prepared for Department of Energy approval to incorporate the results of these activities that increased the C-14 disposal limits for the ILV, thus allowing for disposal of the Reactor Moderator De-ionizers. Once the Special Analysis is approved by DOE, the actual disposal would be dependent on priority and funding, but the de-ionizers will be removed from the 'waste with no path to disposal list'. (authors)

  17. Advances In Hexavalent Chromium Removal At Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neshem, D.O.; Riddelle, J.

    2012-01-01

    At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for

  18. K Basin sludge/resin bead separation test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squier, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    The K Basin sludge is an accumulation of fuel element corrosion products, organic and inorganic ion exchange materials, canister gasket materials, iron and aluminum corrosion products, sand, dirt and minor amounts of other organic material. The sludge will be collected and treated for storage and eventual disposal. This process will remove the large solid materials by a 1/4 inch screen. The screened material will be subjected to nitric acid in a chemical treatment process. The organic ion exchange resin beads produce undesirable chemical reactions with the nitric acid. The resin beads must be removed from the bulk material and treated by another process. An effective bead separation method must extract 95% of the resin bead mass without entraining more than 5% of the other sludge component mass. The test plan I-INF-2729, ''Organic Ion Exchange Resin Separation Methods Evaluation,'' proposed the evaluation of air lift, hydro cyclone, agitated slurry and elutriation resin bead separation methods. This follows the testing strategy outlined in section 4.1 of BNF-2574, ''Testing Strategy to Support the Development of K Basins Sludge Treatment Process''. Engineering study BNF-3128, ''Separation of Organic Ion Exchange Resins from Sludge,'' Rev. 0, focused the evaluation tests on a method that removed the fine sludge particles by a sieve and then extracted the beads by means of a elutriation column. Ninety-nine percent of the resin beads are larger than 125 microns and 98.5 percent are 300 microns and larger. Particles smaller than 125 microns make up the largest portion of sludge in the K Basins. Eliminating a large part of the sludge's non-bead component will reduce the quantity that is lifted with the resin beads in the elutriation column. Resin bead particle size distribution measurements are given in Appendix A The Engineering Testing Laboratory conducted measurements of a elutriation column's ability to extract resin beads from a sieved, non-radioactive sludge

  19. Processing ix spent resin waste for C-14 isotope recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, F. H.; Woodall, K. B.; Sood, S. K.; Vogt, H. K.; Krochmainek, L. S.

    1991-01-01

    A process developed at Ontario Hydro for recovering carbon-14 (C-14) from spent ion exchange resin wastes is described. Carbon-14 is an undesirable by-product of CANDU 1 nuclear reactor operation. It has an extremely long (5730 years) half-life and can cause dosage to inhabitants by contact, inhalation, or through the food cycle via photosynthesis. Release of carbon-14 to the environment must be minimized. Presently, all the C-14 produced in the Moderator and Primary Heat Transport (PHT) systems of the reactor is effectively removed by the respective ion exchange columns, and the spent ion exchange resins are stored in suitably engineered concrete structures. Because of the large volumes of spent resin waste generated each year this method of disposal by long term storage tends to be uneconomical; and may also be unsatisfactory considering the long half-life of the C-14. However, purified C-14 is a valuable commercial product for medical, pharmaceutical, agricultural, and organic chemistry research. Currently, commercial C-14 is made artificially in research reactors by irradiating aluminum nitride targets for 4.5 years. If the C-14 containing resin waste can be used to reduce this unnecessary production of C-14, the total global build-up of this radioactive chemical can be reduced. There is much incentive in removing the C-14 from the resin waste to reduce the volume of C-14 waste, and also in purifying the recovered C-14 to supply the commercial market. The process developed by Ontario Hydro consists of three main steps: C-14 removal from spent resins, enrichment of recovered C-14, and preparation of final product. Components of the process have been successfully tested at Ontario Hydro's Research Division, but the integration of the process is yet to be demonstrated. A pilot scale plant capable of processing 4 m 3 of spent resins annually is being planned for demonstrating the technology. The measured C-14 activity levels on the spent resins ranged from 47

  20. Method of separating radioactive nuclides from ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazunori; Saikoku, Masami; Taneta, Daisuke; Yagi, Takuro.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to safely process radioactive nuclides from spent ion exchange resins by using existent processing facilities. Method: Ion exchange resins in aqueous medium are at first placed to the ultrasonic wave irradiation site and put into such a state where clads and resins are easily separatable from each other by weakening the bonding force between them. Since the clads are magnetic material such as Fe 3 O 4 or NiFe 2 O 4 , the clads can be collected in the direction of the magnetic force by exerting the magnetic field simultaneously. The collected clads are transported by means of the aqueous medium to a collecting tank by removing the effect of magnetic field, for example, by interrupting the current supply to the electromagnet. Finally, they were subjected to stabilization and fixation into inorganic hardening agent such as cement hardener. Thus, processions can be made safely by using existent facilities. (Takahashi, M.)

  1. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2016-03-29

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer resin, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  2. Removal of mercury from sludge using ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory scale batch tests and fluidized bed column tests show that ES-465 cation exchange resin removes >90% of the mercury from formated simulated sludge and formated high-level radioactive sludge. Similar experiments using formated simulated sludge which has been steam stripped indicated that the resin is capable of removing about 75% of the mercury from that system in the same time 90% could be removed from sludge which has not been steam stripped. The percent removed can be improved by operating at higher temperatures. Early batch experiments showed that abrasion from vigorous stirring of the sludge/ES-465 mixture caused the resin to degrade into particles too small to separate from the slurry after reaction. To protect the resin from abrasion, a resin-in-sludge mode of operation was designed wherein the sludge slurry contacts the resin by flowing through a bed retained between two screens in a column. The process has been demonstrated using both a 0.5 in. internal 0.5 in. diameter upflow column containing two milliliters of resin and a 6.4 in. internal diameter stirred bed downflow column containing one liter of resin

  3. Pilot Plant for treating of spent exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Alberto M.; Raffo Calderon, Maria del C.; Varani, Jose L.

    2004-01-01

    similar efficiency to other methods like adsorption on zeolites or on silico titanates. Some preliminary results show that the decontamination was effective and it is useful for evaluating all the parameters involved in the final design of an industrial facility. The amount of removed actives in the first batches was 80 - 94% for Cesium-137 and 36 - 75% for Cobalt-60. If we considered that alpha content in original spent resins varies from 244 Bq/g up to 774 Bq/g we have removed in these experiments about 46 - 89%. (author)

  4. Measurement of net nitrogen and phosphorus mineralization in wetland soils using a modification of the resin-core technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noe, Gregory B.

    2011-01-01

    A modification of the resin-core method was developed and tested for measuring in situ soil N and P net mineralization rates in wetland soils where temporal variation in bidirectional vertical water movement and saturation can complicate measurement. The modified design includes three mixed-bed ion-exchange resin bags located above and three resin bags located below soil incubating inside a core tube. The two inner resin bags adjacent to the soil capture NH4+, NO3-, and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) transported out of the soil during incubation; the two outer resin bags remove inorganic nutrients transported into the modified resin core; and the two middle resin bags serve as quality-control checks on the function of the inner and outer resin bags. Modified resin cores were incubated monthly for a year along the hydrogeomorphic gradient through a floodplain wetland. Only small amounts of NH4+, NO3-, and SRP were found in the two middle resin bags, indicating that the modified resin-core design was effective. Soil moisture and pH inside the modified resin cores typically tracked changes in the surrounding soil abiotic environment. In contrast, use of the closed polyethylene bag method provided substantially different net P and N mineralization rates than modified resin cores and did not track changes in soil moisture or pH. Net ammonification, nitrifi cation, N mineralization, and P mineralization rates measured using modified resin cores varied through space and time associated with hydrologic, geomorphic, and climatic gradients in the floodplain wetland. The modified resin-core technique successfully characterized spatiotemporal variation of net mineralization fluxes in situ and is a viable technique for assessing soil nutrient availability and developing ecosystem budgets.

  5. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  6. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi, E-mail: mizuno.katsutoshi.14@rtri.or.jp; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • We propose a novel REBCO coil structure which applies thermoplastic resin. • The thermoplastic resin bonds the coil winding and cooling plates. • The adhesiveness of the resin is strong enough to withstand the thermal stress. • The thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation because of its high viscosity. • We successfully made a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil with the thermoplastic resin. - Abstract: The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40–50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  7. Chromatography resin support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  8. Removal of radium from drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauch, R.P.

    1992-08-01

    The report summarizes processes for removal of radium from drinking water. Ion exchange, including strong acid and weak acid resin, is discussed. Both processes remove better than 95 percent of the radium from the water. Weak acid ion exchange does not add sodium to the water. Calcium cation exchange removes radium and can be used when hardness removal is not necessary. Iron removal processes are discussed in relation to radium removal. Iron oxides remove much less than 20 percent of the radium from water under typical conditions. Manganese dioxide removes radium from water when competition for sorption sites and clogging of sites is reduced. Filter sand that is rinsed daily with dilute acid will remove radium from water. Manganese dioxide coated filter sorption removes radium but more capacity would be desirable. The radium selective complexer selectively removes radium with significant capacity if iron fouling is eliminated

  9. Diphonix trademark Resin: A review of its properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarizia, R.; Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    The recently developed Diphonix trademark resin is a new multifunctional chelating ion exchange resin containing seminally substituted diphosphonic acid ligands chemically bonded to a styrene-based polymeric matrix. Diphonix can be regarded as a dual mechanism polymer, with a sulfonic acid cation exchange group allowing for rapid access, mostly non-specific, of ions into the polymeric network, and the diphosphonic acid group responsible for specificity (recognition) for a number of metal cations. The Diphonix resin exhibits an extraordinarily strong affinity for actinides, especially in the tetra- and hexavalent oxidation states. It has potential applications in TRU and mixed waste treatment and characterization, and in the development of new procedures for rapid actinide preconcentration and separation from environmental samples. Metal uptake studies have been extended to alkaline earth cations, to transition and post transition metal species, and to metal sorption from neutral or near neutral solutions. Also the kinetic behavior of the resin has been investigated in detail. Influence of the most commonly occurring matrix constituents (Na, Ca, Al, Fe, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, oxalic and phosphoric acids) on the uptake of actinide ions has been measured. This review paper summarizes the most important results studies on the Diphonix resin and gives an overview of the applications already in existence or under development in the fields of mixed waste treatment, actinide separation procedures, treatment of radwaste from nuclear power plants, and removal of iron from copper electrowinning solutions

  10. Dissolution of ion exchange resin by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    The resin dissolution process was conducted successfully in full-scale equipment at the SRL Semiworks. A solution containing 0.001M Fe 2+ , or Fe 3+ , and 3 vol % H 2 O 2 in 0.1M HNO 3 is sufficient to dissolve up to 40 vol % resin slurry (Dowex 50W-X8). Foaming and pressurization can be eliminated by maintaining the dissolution temperature below 99 0 C. The recommended dissolution temperature range is 85 to 90 0 C. Premixing hydrogen peroxide with all reactants will not create a safety hazard, but operating with a continual feed of hydrogen peroxide is recommended to control the dissolution rate. An air sparging rate of 1.0 to 1.5 scfm will provide sufficient mixing. Spent resin from chemical separation contains DTPA (diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) residue, and the resin must be washed with 0.1M NH 4 OH to remove excess DTPA before dissolution. Gamma irradiation of resin up to 4 kW-hr/L did not change the dissolution rate significantly

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin

  12. Synthesis, structural characterization, and performance evaluation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) ion-exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubler, T.L.; Franz, J.A.; Shaw, W.J.; Bryan, S.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Linehan, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The 177 underground storage tanks at the DOE`s Hanford Site contain an estimated 180 million tons of high-level radioactive wastes. It is desirable to remove and concentrate the highly radioactive fraction of the tank wastes for vitrification. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (R-F) resin, an organic ion-exchange resin with high selectivity and capacity for the cesium ion, which is a candidate ion-exchange material for use in remediation of tank wastes. The report includes information on the structure/function analysis of R-F resin and the synthetic factors that affect performance of the resin. CS-100, a commercially available phenol-formaldehyde (P-F) resin, and currently the baseline ion-exchanger for removal of cesium ion at Hanford, is compared with the R-F resin. The primary structural unit of the R-F resin was determined to consist of a 1,2,3,4-tetrasubstituted resorcinol ring unit while CS-100, was composed mainly of a 1,2,4-trisubstituted ring. CS-100 shows the presence of phenoxy-ether groups, and this may account for the much lower decontamination factor of CS-100 for cesium ion. Curing temperatures for the R-F resin were found to be optimal at 105--130C. At lower temperatures, insufficient curing, hence crosslinking, of the polymer resin occurs and selectivity for cesium drops. Curing at elevated temperatures leads to chemical degradation. Optimal particle size for R-F resin is in the range of 20--50 mesh-sized particles. R-F resin undergoes chemical degradation or oxidation which destroys ion-exchange sites. The ion-exchange sites (hydroxyl groups) are converted to quinones and ketones. CS-100, though it has much lower performance for cesium ion-exchange, is significantly more chemically stable than R-F resin. To gamma radiation, CS-100 is more radiolytically stable than R-F resin.

  13. Ion exchange removal of technetium from salt solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ion exchange methods for removing technetium from waste salt solutions have been investigated by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). These experiments have shown: Commercially available anion exchange resins show high selectivity and capacity for technetium. In column runs, 150 column volumes of salt solution were passed through an ion exchange column before 50% 99 Tc breakthrough was reached. The technetium can be eluted from the resin with nitric acid. Reducing resins (containing borohydride) work well in simple hydroxide solutions, but not in simulated salt solutions. A mercarbide resin showed a very high selectivity for Tc, but did not work well in column operation

  14. Effects of blood contamination on resin-resin bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriksson, Sigurdur O; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J; Heymann, Harald O; Sigurdsson, Asgeir

    2004-02-01

    Incremental placement and curing of resin composites has been recommended. However, this requires longer operating time, and therefore, increased risk of contamination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination on microtensile bond strengths (microTBS) between resin interfaces and to determine the best decontamination method to re-establish the original resin-resin bond strength. The top surfaces of 64, 4-mm composite blocks (Z-250, Renew, APX, Pertac II) were untreated as the control, or were treated as follows: blood applied and dried on the surface (Treatment 1), blood applied, rinsed, dried (Treatment 2), blood applied, rinsed, and an adhesive applied (Single Bond, One-Step, Clearfil SE, Prompt L-Pop) (Treatment 3). Fresh composite was applied and light-cured in 2-mm increments. After 24 h storage in water, the specimens were sectioned into 0.7-mm thick slabs, trimmed to a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2), and loaded to failure at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min using an Instron universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (pcontamination resulted in resin-resin bond strengths of only 1.0-13.1 MPa. Rinsing raised bond strengths to over 40 MPa for each material. Use of an adhesive further increased bond strengths except for Pertac II. Rinsing blood from contaminated surfaces increases the resin-resin bond strength significantly and the application of an appropriate adhesive increases the bond strength to control levels.

  15. Trace-level mercury removal from surface water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klasson, K.T.; Bostick, D.T.

    1998-01-01

    Many sorbents have been developed for the removal of mercury and heavy metals from waters; however, most of the data published thus far do not address the removal of mercury to the target levels represented in this project. The application to which these sorbents are targeted for use is the removal of mercury from microgram-per-liter levels to low nanogram-per-liter levels. Sorbents with thiouronium, thiol, amine, sulfur, and proprietary functional groups were selected for these studies. Mercury was successfully removed from surface water via adsorption onto Ionac SR-4 and Mersorb resins to levels below the target goal of 12 ng/L in batch studies. A thiol-based resin performed the best, indicating that over 200,000 volumes of water could be treated with one volume of resin. The cost of the resin is approximately $0.24 per 1,000 gal of water

  16. Bending characteristics of resin concretes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro Maria Cristina Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research work the influence of composition and curing conditions in bending strength of polyester and epoxy concrete is analyzed. Various mixtures of resin and aggregates were considered in view of an optimal combination. The Taguchi methodology was applied in order to reduce the number of tests, and in order to evaluate the influence of various parameters in concrete properties. This methodology is very useful for the planning of experiments. Test results, analyzed by this methodology, shown that the most significant factors affecting bending strength properties of resin concretes are the type of resin, resin content and charge content. An optimal formulation leading to a maximum bending strength was achieved in terms of material parameters.

  17. Mechanism for transporting used resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yusa, Hideo; Kamiya, Kunio.

    1975-01-01

    Object: In the operation of a light water reactor type atomic power plant, to permit transport and reuse of used ion exchange resin used for the filtering or cleaning of cooling water or the desalting of radioactive exhaust liquid through an ejector. Structure: Used ion exchange resin within a desalter having high radioactivity is withdrawn through the action of an ejector and led to a solid-liquid separator for separation into used resin and water. The separated resin is directly collected in a storage tank while the separated water is forced through a circulating pump to a gas-liquid separator for separation into gas having radioactivity and water. The separated gas is led to a radioactive gas treatment station while the water deprived of the gas is recirculated by a drive water pump for repeated use. (Kamimura, M.)

  18. Bulk-Fill Resin Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Havndrup-Pedersen, Cæcilie; Honoré, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization...... for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low......-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk...

  19. Mechanism for transporting used resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, Y; Yusa, H; Kamiya, K

    1975-01-16

    In the operation of a light water reactor type atomic power plant the objectives is to permit transport and reuse of used ion exchange resin used for the filtering or cleaning of cooling water or the desalting of radioactive exhaust liquid through an ejector. Used ion exchange resin within a desalter having high radioactivity is withdrawn through the action of an ejector and led to a solid-liquid separator for separation into used resin and water. The separated resin is directly collected in a storage tank while the separated water is forced through a circulating pump to a gas-liquid separator for separation into gas having radioactivity and water. The separated gas is led to a radioactive gas treatment station while the water deprived of the gas is recirculated by a drive water pump for repeated use.

  20. Decontamination of spent ion-exchangers contaminated with cesium radionuclides using resorcinol-formaldehyde resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamarchuk, Marina; Egorin, Andrey; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Marinin, Dmitry; Avramenko, Valentin

    2017-01-05

    The origin of the emergence of radioactive contamination not removable in the process of acid-base regeneration of ion-exchange resins used in treatment of technological media and liquid radioactive waste streams has been determined. It has been shown that a majority of cesium radionuclides not removable by regeneration are bound to inorganic deposits on the surface and inside the ion-exchange resin beads. The nature of the above inorganic inclusions has been investigated by means of the methods of electron microscopy, IR spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. The method of decontamination of spent ion-exchange resins and zeolites contaminated with cesium radionuclides employing selective resorcinol-formaldehyde resins has been suggested. Good prospects of such an approach in deep decontamination of spent ion exchangers have been demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Method of removing iodine and compounds thereof from gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keener, R.L.; Kittle, P.A.

    1976-01-01

    Anion exchange resins including an acrylic backbone formed by the suspension polymerization of a mixture of an acrylic and a crosslinking monomer are useful in the removal of iodine and iodine compounds from gaseous effluents. Removal of radioactive iodine contaminants, particularly alkyl iodine compounds or hydrogen iodine, under extreme conditions, namely temperatures up to 180 0 C and humidities up to 100 percent, from effluents resulting from a major nuclear accident could probably be adsorbed by these resins described herein

  2. Studies on indigenous ion exchange resins: alkali metal ions-hydrogen ion exchange equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, S.; Kumar, Surender; Venkataramani, B.

    2001-01-01

    With a view to select a suitable ion exchange resin for the removal of radionuclides (such as cesium, strontium etc.) from low level radioactive effluents, alkali metal ion -H' exchanges on nine indigenous gel- and macroporous-type and nuclear grade resins have been studied at a total ionic strength of 0.1 mol dm .3 (in the case ofCs' -H' exchange it was 0.05 mol dm .3 ). The expected theoretical capacities were not attained by all the resins for the alkali metal ions. The water content (moles/equiv.) of the fully swollen resins for different alkali metal ionic forms do not follow the usual sequence of greater the tendency of the cation to hydrate the higher the water uptake, but a reverse trend. The ion exchange isotherms (plots of equivalent fractions of the ion in resin phase, N M1 to that in solution, N M ) were not satisfactory and sorption of cations, for most of the resins, was possible only when the acidity of the solution was lowered. The variations of the selectivity coefficient, K, with N M show that the resins are highly cross linked and the selectivity sequence: Cs + >K + >Na + >Li + , obtained for all the resins indicate that hydrated ions were involved in the exchange process. However, the increase in the selectivity was not accompanied by the release of water, but unusual uptake of water, during the exchange process. The characteristics of macroporous resins were not significantly different from those of the gel-type resins. The results are discussed in terms of heterogeneity in the polymer net work, improper sulphonation process resulting in the formation of functional groups at inaccessible sites with weak acidic character and the overall lack of control in the preparation of different resins. (author)

  3. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  4. Characteristics of resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of resin floc dispersion. The factors related to resin floc dispersion of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index in addition to the measurement of physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin. The effect of adsorption of iron oxide and polymer electrolyte and of ion exchange were determined. In addition, considered floc dispersion with adsorbing iron oxide, it was assumed that the amount and filling ratio of resin floc were related to summation and multiplication of surface electric charge respectively. An experimental expression was obtained for simulation of the change of specific settle volume of resin floc by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  5. Lawps ion exchange column gravity drain of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duignan, M. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Herman, D. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Restivo, M. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Burket, P. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-01-28

    Experiments at several different scales were performed to understand the removal of spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) ion exchange resin using a gravity drain system with a valve located above the resin screen in the ion exchange column (IXC). This is being considered as part of the design for the Low Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to be constructed at the DOE Hanford Site.

  6. Handling sticky Resin by Stingless Bees: Adhesive Properties of Surface Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARKUS GASTAUER

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many Stingless Bees (Hymenoptera: Meliponini like Tetragonisca angustula collect resin to defend their nests against intruders like ants or Robber Bees. Small portions of resin are attached to intruders bodies and extremities causing their immobilization. It has been observed that resin is removed easily from the bee's mandible but adheres strongly to the intruder's cuticle. We tested the hypothesis that resin sticks lesser to the mandibles of Stingless Bees than to the surface of intruders due to special surface structures or adhesive properties of these structures. The surface structures of the mandible of T. angustula and the trochanter of Camponotus sericeiventris were studied by scanning electron microscopy. To measure adhesion properties, selected surfaces were fixed on a fine glass pin and withdrawn from a glass tip covered with resin. The deformation of the glass pin indicates adhesion forces operating between the resin and the selective surface. The absolute value of the forces is computed from the glass pin's stiffness. It has been shown that resin sticks more to the smooth mandible of the bee than to the structured trochanter of the ant. A new hypothesis to be tested says that the bees might lubricate their mandibles with nectar or honey to reduce the resin's adhesion temporarily.

  7. Treatment of radioactive laboratory waste for mercury removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteen, A.B.; Bibler, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Routine analyses of Savannah River Laboratory wastes at the Savannah River Site occasionally reveal mercury concentrations in the waste in excess of the 0.200 μg/L RCRA limit. An ion exchange resin has been demonstrated to be effective for the removal of dissolved mercury from laboratory waste in a special permitted project. The ion exchange material is Duolite trademark GT-73, a polystyrene/divinylbenzene resin with thiol functional groups. As a result of the decontamination demonstration, the resin is in use or under consideration for use with several other SRS radwaste streams as a reliable medium for mercury removal

  8. Adsorption of heavy metal ions and azo dyes by crosslinked nanochelating resins based on poly(methylmethacrylate-co-maleic anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghaemy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chelating resins are suitable materials for the removal of heavy metals in water treatments. A copolymer, Poly(MMA-co-MA, was synthesized by radical polymerization of maleic anhydride (MA and methyl methacrylate (MMA, characterized and transformed into multifunctional nanochelating resin beads (80–150 nm via hydrolysis, grafting and crosslink reactions. The resin beads were characterized by swelling studies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. The main purpose of this work was to determine the adsorption capacity of the prepared resins (swelling ratio ~55% towards metal ions such as Hg2+, Cd2+, Cu2+ from water at three different pH values (3, 6 and 9. Variations in pH and types of metal ions have not significantly affected the chelation capacity of these resins. The maximum chelation capacity of one of the prepared resin beads (Co-g-AP3 for Hg2+ was 63, 85.8 and 71.14 mg/g at pH 3, 6 and 9, respectively. Approximately 96% of the metal ions could be desorbed from the resin. Adsorption capacity of these resins towards three commercial synthetic azo dyes was also investigated. The maximum adsorption of dye AY42 was 91% for the resin Co-g-AP3 at room temperature. This insures the applicability of the synthesized resins for industrial applications.

  9. Method of solidifying radioactive ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Yuji; Tomita, Toshihide

    1989-01-01

    Spent anion exchange resin formed in nuclear power plants, etc. generally catch only a portion of anions in view of the ion exchange resins capacity and most of the anions are sent while possessing activities to radioactive waste processing systems. Then, the anion exchange resins increase the specific gravity by the capture of the anions. Accordingly, anions are caused to be captured on the anion exchange resin wastes such that the specific gravity of the anion exchange resin wastes is greater than that of the thermosetting resins to be mixed. This enables satisfactory mixing with the thermosetting resins and, in addition, enables to form integral solidification products in which anion exchange resins and cation exchange resins are not locallized separately and which are homogenous and free from cracks. (T.M.)

  10. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.N. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass

  11. Sustainable nitrate-contaminated water treatment using multi cycle ion-exchange/bioregeneration of nitrate selective resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Shelir; Roberts, Deborah J

    2013-11-15

    The sustainability of ion-exchange treatment processes using high capacity single use resins to remove nitrate from contaminated drinking water can be achieved by regenerating the exhausted resin and reusing it multiple times. In this study, multi cycle loading and bioregeneration of tributylamine strong base anion (SBA) exchange resin was studied. After each cycle of exhaustion, biological regeneration of the resin was performed using a salt-tolerant, nitrate-perchlorate-reducing culture for 48 h. The resin was enclosed in a membrane to avoid direct contact of the resin with the culture. The results show that the culture was capable of regenerating the resin and allowing the resin to be used in multiple cycles. The concentrations of nitrate in the samples reached a peak in first 0.5-1h after placing the resin in medium because of desorption of nitrate from resin with desorption rate of 0.099 ± 0.003 hr(-1). After this time, since microorganisms began to degrade the nitrate in the aqueous phase, the nitrate concentration was generally non-detectable after 10h. The average of calculated specific degradation rate of nitrate was -0.015 mg NO3(-)/mg VSS h. Applying 6 cycles of resin exhaustion/regeneration shows resin can be used for 4 cycles without a loss of capacity, after 6 cycles only 6% of the capacity was lost. This is the first published research to examine the direct regeneration of a resin enclosed in a membrane, to allow reuse without any disinfection or cleaning procedures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of fouled anion resin on condensate polishing plant performance at Dungeness B power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The return to power, after an outage, at Dungeness B Power Station was delayed because of problems in achieving an in-specification feedwater acid conductivity. Dungeness B has a full flow cation/mixed bed condensate polishing plant (CPP). Investigations showed that the acid conductivity was produced by carbon dioxide and organic impurities both by-passing the CPP and slipping through it. Resin analysis showed that the anion resin had severely impaired sulfate removal kinetics. The paper covers the work done to try and identify the nature and source of the organics and their effect on the anion resin. One significant finding was that the carbonate removal kinetics were as impaired as those for sulfate removal; this had not been previously experienced in the CPP at any British Energy plant. (orig.)

  13. Hair Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hair Removal KidsHealth / For Teens / Hair Removal What's in ... you need any of them? Different Types of Hair Before removing hair, it helps to know about ...

  14. Factorial experimental design for recovering heavy metals from sludge with ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.H.; Kuan, Y.-C.; Chern, J.-M.

    2006-01-01

    Wastewaters containing heavy metals are usually treated by chemical precipitation method in Taiwan. This method can remove heavy metals form wastewaters efficiently, but the resultant heavy metal sludge is classified as hazardous solid waste and becomes another environmental problem. If we can remove heavy metals from sludge, it becomes non-hazardous waste and the treatment cost can be greatly reduced. This study aims at using ion-exchange resin to remove heavy metals such as copper, zinc, cadmium, and chromium from sludge generated by a PCB manufacturing plant. Factorial experimental design methodology was used to study the heavy metal removal efficiency. The total metal concentrations in the sludge, resin, and solution phases were measured respectively after 30 min reaction with varying leaching agents (citric acid and nitric acid); ion-exchange resins (Amberlite IRC-718 and IR-120), and temperatures (50 and 70 deg. C). The experimental results and statistical analysis show that a stronger leaching acid and a higher temperature both favor lower heavy metal residues in the sludge. Two-factors and even three-factor interaction effects on the heavy metal sorption in the resin phase are not negligible. The ion-exchange resin plays an important role in the sludge extraction or metal recovery. Empirical regression models were also obtained and used to predict the heavy metal profiles with satisfactory results

  15. Depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Inaam; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manufacturers have introduced flowable composite resins that reportedly can be placed in increments of 4 mm or greater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins (SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Venus Bulk Fill) and a conventional flowable composite resin (Revolution Formula 2). Depth of cure was measured in terms of bottom-maximum Knoop hardness number (KHN) ratios and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049 scrape technique. Shades A2 and A3 of SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Revolution Formula 2 were tested. Venus Bulk Fill was tested in its only available shade (universal). Specimens in thicknesses of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm were polymerized for 20 or 40 seconds, and a hardness tester was used to determine the hardness ratios for each shade at each thickness. For the scraping technique, after specimens were exposed to the curing light, unpolymerized composite resin was removed with a plastic instrument, the polymerized composite was measured, and the length was divided by 2 per ISO guidelines. According to the KHN ratios and the scrape test, Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the manufacturer's claim of a 4-mm depth of cure at both 20 and 40 seconds of curing time. The overall results for depth of cure showed that Venus Bulk Fill ≥ SureFil SDR Flow ≥ Grandio Flow ≥ Revolution Formula 2.

  16. Action of ionizing radiation on epoxy resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Voorde, M. E.

    1970-12-01

    The resistance of classical and experimental epoxy resins to irradiation was studied. The resistance to irradiation of epoxy resins of diverse compositions as well as the development of resins having a radioresistance that approaches that of certain ceramics are discussed. Sources of irradiation and the techniques of dosimetry used are described. The structures of certain epoxy resins and of hardeners are given. The preparation of these resins and their physical properties is described. The effects of radiation on epoxy resins, as well as conditions of irradiation, and suggested mechanisms for degradation of the irradiated resins are discussed. The relationship between chemical structure of the resins and their physical properties is evaluated. (115 references) (JCB)

  17. Method for loading resin beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.; Rainey, R.H.; Greene, C.W.; Shockley, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145 to 200 0 C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145 0 C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO 3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate

  18. Resin for processing radioactive waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu; Kiba, Hideaki; Kubota, Hirohisa; Sawada, Shintaro.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns an anionic exchange resin having a long service life with less radiation degradation. The resin is an anionic exchange resin in which a trimethyl ammonium group is introduced to a copolymer of 4-bromo-butoxymethyl styrene and divinyl benzene. The resin is excellent in economic performance, and can reduce the frequency for the exchange of cross-linked anionic exchangers. (T.M.)

  19. Resin for processing radioactive waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Teruo; Shindo, Manabu [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Sendai (Japan); Kiba, Hideaki; Kubota, Hirohisa; Sawada, Shintaro

    1995-11-07

    The present invention concerns an anionic exchange resin having a long service life with less radiation degradation. The resin is an anionic exchange resin in which a trimethyl ammonium group is introduced to a copolymer of 4-bromo-butoxymethyl styrene and divinyl benzene. The resin is excellent in economic performance, and can reduce the frequency for the exchange of cross-linked anionic exchangers. (T.M.).

  20. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680 Food... of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane...) For the purpose of this section, polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of the...

  1. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M.; Takahashi, H.

    2008-01-01

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens μm diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 μm width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition

  2. Fabrication of micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin on aluminum by AFM probe processing and electrophoretic coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, S.; Kikuchi, T.; Sakairi, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)], E-mail: takahasi@elechem1-mc.eng.hokudai.ac.jp

    2008-11-30

    Micro-dot arrays and micro-walls of acrylic acid/melamine resin were fabricated on aluminum by anodizing, atomic force microscope (AFM) probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition. Barrier type anodic oxide films of 15 nm thickness were formed on aluminum and then the specimen was scratched with an AFM probe in a solution containing acrylic acid/melamine resin nano-particles to remove the anodic oxide film locally. After scratching, the specimen was anodically polarized to deposit acrylic acid/melamine resin electrophoretically at the film-removed area. The resin deposited on the specimen was finally cured by heating. It was found that scratching with the AFM probe on open circuit leads to the contamination of the probe with resin, due to positive shifts in the potential during scratching. Scratching of the specimen under potentiostatic conditions at -1.0 V, however, resulted in successful resin deposition at the film-removed area without probe contamination. The rate of resin deposition increased as the specimen potential becomes more positive during electrophoretic deposition. Arrays of resin dots with a few to several tens {mu}m diameter and 100-1000 nm height, and resin walls with 100-1000 nm height and 1 {mu}m width were obtained on specimens by successive anodizing, probe processing, and electrophoretic deposition.

  3. An ORMOSIL-Containing Orthodontic Acrylic Resin with Concomitant Improvements in Antimicrobial and Fracture Toughness Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueggeberg, Frederick A.; Niu, Li-na; Mettenberg, Donald; Yiu, Cynthia K. Y.; Blizzard, John D.; Wu, Christine D.; Mao, Jing; Drisko, Connie L.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2012-01-01

    Global increase in patients seeking orthodontic treatment creates a demand for the use of acrylic resins in removable appliances and retainers. Orthodontic removable appliance wearers have a higher risk of oral infections that are caused by the formation of bacterial and fungal biofilms on the appliance surface. Here, we present the synthetic route for an antibacterial and antifungal organically-modified silicate (ORMOSIL) that has multiple methacryloloxy functionalities attached to a siloxane backbone (quaternary ammonium methacryloxy silicate, or QAMS). By dissolving the water-insoluble, rubbery ORMOSIL in methyl methacrylate, QAMS may be copolymerized with polymethyl methacrylate, and covalently incorporated in the pressure-processed acrylic resin. The latter demonstrated a predominantly contact-killing effect on Streptococcus mutans ATCC 36558 and Actinomyces naselundii ATCC 12104 biofilms, while inhibiting adhesion of Candida albicans ATCC 90028 on the acrylic surface. Apart from its favorable antimicrobial activities, QAMS-containing acrylic resins exhibited decreased water wettability and improved toughness, without adversely affecting the flexural strength and modulus, water sorption and solubility, when compared with QAMS-free acrylic resin. The covalently bound, antimicrobial orthodontic acrylic resin with improved toughness represents advancement over other experimental antimicrobial acrylic resin formulations, in its potential to simultaneously prevent oral infections during appliance wear, and improve the fracture resistance of those appliances. PMID:22870322

  4. Fracture resistance of weakened teeth restored with condensable resin with and without cusp coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This in vitro study evaluated the fracture resistance of weakened human premolars (MOD cavity preparation and pulp chamber roof removal restored with condensable resin composite with and without cusp coverage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty human maxillary premolars were divided into three groups: Group A (control, sound teeth; Group B, wide MOD cavities prepared and the pulp chamber roof removed and restored with resin composite without cusp coverage; Group C, same as Group B with 2.0 mm of buccal and palatal cusps reduced and restored with the same resin. The teeth were included in metal rings with self-curing acrylic resin, stored in water for 24 h and thereafter subjected to a compressive axial load in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. RESULTS: The mean fracture resistance values ± standart deviation (kgf were: group A: 151.40 ± 55.32, group B: 60.54 ± 12.61, group C: 141.90 ± 30.82. Statistically significant differences were found only between Group B and the other groups (p<0.05. The condensable resin restoration of weakened human premolars with cusp coverage significantly increased the fracture resistance of the teeth as compared to teeth restored without cusp coverage. CONCLUSION: The results showed that cusp coverage with condensable resin might be a safe option for restoring weakened endodontically treated teeth.

  5. Manufacturing of a REBCO racetrack coil using thermoplastic resin aiming at Maglev application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Katsutoshi; Ogata, Masafumi; Hasegawa, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    The REBCO coated conductor is a promising technology for the Maglev application in terms of its high critical temperature. The operating temperature of the on-board magnets can be around 40-50 K with the coated conductor. The REBCO coils are cooled by cryocoolers directly, and hence the thermal design of the REBCO coils significantly changes from that of LTS coils. We have developed a novel REBCO coil structure using thermoplastic resin. The coil is not impregnated and the thermoplastic resin is used to bond the coil winding and the heat transfer members, e.g. copper and aluminum plates. The viscosity of the thermoplastic resin is high enough for the thermoplastic resin not to permeate between the turns in the coil. Therefore, the thermal stress does not occur and the risk of degradation is removed. This paper contains the following three topics. First, the thermal resistance of the thermoplastic resin was measured at cryogenic temperature. Then, a small round REBCO coil was experimentally produced. It has been confirmed that the thermoplastic resin does not cause the degradation and, the adhesion between the coil winding and copper plates withstands the thermal stress. Finally, we successfully produced a full-scale racetrack REBCO coil applying the coil structure with the thermoplastic resin.

  6. Resins production: batch plant automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banti, M.; Mauri, G.

    1996-01-01

    Companies that look for automation in their plants without external resources, have at their disposal flexible, custom and easy to use DCS, open towards PLC. In this article it is explained why Hoechts has followed this way of new plants for resins production automation

  7. Occupational exposure to epoxy resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwoert, J.; Kersting, K.

    2014-01-01

    Products based on epoxy resins as a binder have become popular in various settings, among which the construction industry and in windmill blade production, as a result of their excellent technical properties. However, due to the same properties epoxy products are a notorious cause of allergic skin

  8. Study PWA8 resin for chromatographic uranium concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coceancigh, Herman; Ramella, J. L.; Marrero, Julieta; Jiménez Rebagliati, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    For many years nuclear industry have been using resins as filler of chromatographic columns. These methods are specific and give reliable results in different applications, for those reasons are extremely useful as separation process. Currently the nuclear industry is growing and this brings new issues such as the need of reduction of the amount of waste, the optimization of the production process and others that the chromatography could solve with great results. AMBERLITETM PWA8 resin is an anion exchange resin which can be used for the removal of uranium from drinking water. In addition to high exchange capacity, this resin has excellent physical stability and a wide range of pH in which is operational. With the idea of concentrating uranium from wastes solution as main goal we made different experiments to understand the AMBERLITETM PWA8 and obtain the most important characteristics like; pH working range; capacity; activation and elution procedures. These procedures were developed and optimized the capacity was determined using a batch experiment and we obtain that the maximum capacity is 882,5 U ug /resin gr at a pH of 4,2. Following on from these results chromatographic experiments were performed in which both were obtained the percentage of recovery and the concentration factor. The percent recovery (% R) calculated as the percentage ratio between the total mass and the load mass eluted (% R = eluted mass / total mass * 100) was 94% with a concentration factor of 5 times From these results it is intended to concentrate wastes solutions from the fuel cycle processes with two main goals: decreasing volume for storage and for future reusing of the uranium coming from production. (author)

  9. Oxygen index tests of thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilwee, W. J., Jr.; Parker, J. A.; Kourtides, D. A.

    1980-01-01

    The flammability characteristics of nine thermosetting resins under evaluation for use in aircraft interiors are described. These resins were evaluated using the Oxygen Index (ASTM 2863) testing procedure. The test specimens consisted of both neat resin and glass reinforced resin. When testing glass-reinforced samples it was observed that Oxygen Index values varied inversely with resin content. Oxygen values were also obtained on specimens exposed to temperatures up to 300 C. All specimens experienced a decline in Oxygen Index when tested at an elevated temperature.

  10. Computational Studies on the Performance of Flow Distributor in Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Soo Jai; Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin

    2014-01-01

    Core make-up tank (CMT) is full of borated water and provides makeup and boration to the reactor coolant system (RCS) for early stage of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and non-LOCA. The top and bottom of CMT are connected to the RCS through the pressure balance line (PBL) and the safety injection line (SIL), respectively. Each PBL is normally open to maintain pressure of the CMT at RCS, and this arrangement enables the CMT to inject water to the RCS by gravity when the isolation valves of SIL are open. During CMT injection into the Reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in CMT and the rapid condensation disturbed the injection operation. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure structural integrity of the reactor system and their safe operation during some transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of flow distributor in tank with different shape factor such as the total number of the holes, the pitch-to-hole diameter ratios (p/d), the diameter of the hole and the area ratios. These data will contribute to the design the flow distributor. In the present study, the model of the flow distributor in tank is simulated using the commercial CFD software, Fluent 13.0 with varying the different shape factor of the flow distributor such as the total number of the holes, the diameter of the holes and the area ratio. As the diameter of the hole is smaller, the velocity difference between holes, which is located at upper position and lower position of the flow distributor, also decreases. For larger area ratio, the velocity of the holes is slower. When the diameter of the hole is large enough for the velocity difference between holes to be large, however, the velocity of the holes is not in inverse proportional to the area ratio

  11. Computational Studies on the Performance of Flow Distributor in Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Soo Jai; Kim, Young In; Ryu, Seungyeob; Bae, Youngmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Core make-up tank (CMT) is full of borated water and provides makeup and boration to the reactor coolant system (RCS) for early stage of loss of coolant accident (LOCA) and non-LOCA. The top and bottom of CMT are connected to the RCS through the pressure balance line (PBL) and the safety injection line (SIL), respectively. Each PBL is normally open to maintain pressure of the CMT at RCS, and this arrangement enables the CMT to inject water to the RCS by gravity when the isolation valves of SIL are open. During CMT injection into the Reactor, the condensation and thermal stratification are observed in CMT and the rapid condensation disturbed the injection operation. The optimal design of the flow distributor is very important to ensure structural integrity of the reactor system and their safe operation during some transient or accident conditions. In the present study, we numerically investigated the performance of flow distributor in tank with different shape factor such as the total number of the holes, the pitch-to-hole diameter ratios (p/d), the diameter of the hole and the area ratios. These data will contribute to the design the flow distributor. In the present study, the model of the flow distributor in tank is simulated using the commercial CFD software, Fluent 13.0 with varying the different shape factor of the flow distributor such as the total number of the holes, the diameter of the holes and the area ratio. As the diameter of the hole is smaller, the velocity difference between holes, which is located at upper position and lower position of the flow distributor, also decreases. For larger area ratio, the velocity of the holes is slower. When the diameter of the hole is large enough for the velocity difference between holes to be large, however, the velocity of the holes is not in inverse proportional to the area ratio.

  12. Geopolymer resin materials, geopolymer materials, and materials produced thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Dong-Kyun; Medpelli, Dinesh; Ladd, Danielle; Mesgar, Milad

    2018-01-09

    A product formed from a first material including a geopolymer resin material, a geopolymer material, or a combination thereof by contacting the first material with a fluid and removing at least some of the fluid to yield a product. The first material may be formed by heating and/or aging an initial geopolymer resin material to yield the first material before contacting the first material with the fluid. In some cases, contacting the first material with the fluid breaks up or disintegrates the first material (e.g., in response to contact with the fluid and in the absence of external mechanical stress), thereby forming particles having an external dimension in a range between 1 nm and 2 cm.

  13. Spray drying of bead resins: feasibility tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Jones, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Rockwell International has developed a volume reduction system for low-level reactor wastes based on drying the wastes in a heated-air spray dryer. The drying of slurries of sodium sulfate, boric acid, and powdered ion exchange resins was demonstrated in previous tests. The drying of bead ion exchange resins can be especially difficult due to the relatively large size of bead resins (about 500 to 800 microns) and their natural affinity for water. This water becomes part of the pore structure of the resins and normally comprises 50 t 60 wt % of the resin weight. A 76-cm-diameter spray dryer was used for feasibility tests of spray drying of cation and anion bead resins. These resins were fed to the dryer in the as-received form (similar to dewatered resins) and as slurries. A dry, free-flowing product was produced in all the tests. The volume of the spray-dried product was one-half to one-third the volume of the as-received material. An economic analysis was made of the potential cost savings that can be achieved using the Rockwel spray dryer system. In-plant costs, transportation costs, and burial costs of spray-dried resins were compared to similar costs for disposal of dewatered resins. A typical utility producing 170 m 3 (6,000 ft 3 ) per year of dewatered resins can save $600,000 to $700,000 per year using this volume reduction system

  14. Effect of Different Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength of Repaired Resin Restorations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engy Fahmy Ismaiel Fekry Abaza

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, growing demands by patients for mercury-free esthetic restorations had markedly increased the use of resin composites in restorative dentistry. However, despite the continuing development of resin composites with improved properties, several factors, such as discoloration, color mismatch, wear; chipping or bulk fracture might present clinical problems (Mjor and Gordan. 2002, Vichi et al. 2004 and Kolbeck et al. 2006). As a result, the clinician should decide whether to replace or simply repair these restorations. Total replacement of the restoration might be regarded as over-treatment since in most cases, large portions of the restorations might be clinically and radio graphically considered free of failure. Moreover, complete removal of the restoration inevitably resulted in weakening of the tooth, unnecessary removal of intact dental tissues, more money and time consuming. For these reasons, the repair of the restoration instead of its removal would be a favorable procedure (Lucena-Martin et al. 2001, Frankenberger et al. 2003 a and Oztas et al. 2003). The key element in the determination of successful repair procedures was the adequate bond strength between the existing resin composite and the new one. Various methods have been suggested to improve the bond strength of the repaired resin restorations (Tezvergil et al. 2003 and Bonstein et al. 2005). Mechanical and/or chemical treatments had been investigated for preparation of the aged resin restorations to be repaired (Tezvergil et al. 2003, Ozcan et al. 2005 and Hannig et al. 2006). These treatments were introduced to counteract the problems of aged resin restorations which were limited amount of residual free radicals available for reaction with the repair material, contaminated surface, and highly cross-linked resin matrix ( Dall Oca et al. 2006 and Papacchini et al. 2007 a) Previous studies emphasized that mechanical treatments are the most important factor in obtaining optimal repair

  15. Salivary bisphenol A levels and their association with composite resin restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ha; Yi, Seung-Kyoo; Kim, Se-Yeon; Kim, Ji-Soo; Son, Sung-Ae; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Jin-Bom

    2017-04-01

    Composite resin has been increasingly used in an effort to remove minimal amount of tooth structure and are used for restoring not just carious cavities but also cervical abrasion. To synthesize composite resin, bisphenol A (BPA) is used. The aim of the study was to measure the changes in salivary BPA level related with composite resin restoration. ELISA was used to examine the BPA levels in the saliva collected from 30 volunteers whose teeth were filled with composite resin. Salivary samples were collected immediately before filling and 5 min and 7 d after filling. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test and linear regression were performed to test the significant differences of the changes in BPA levels in saliva. Before a new composite resin filling, there was no significant difference between with and without existing filling of composite resin and BPA level in the saliva was not correlated to the number of filled surfaces with composite resin. However, BPA level in the saliva increased to average 3.64 μg/L from average 0.15 μg/L after filling 5 min. BPA level increased in proportion with the number of filled surfaces. BPA level decreased to average 0.59 after filling 7 d. However it was higher than the BPA level before a new composite resin filling. Considering 50 μg/kg/day as the Tolerable Daily Intake of BPA suggested by European Food Safety Authority, the amount of BPA eluted in saliva after the composite resin filling is considered a safe level that is not a hazard to health at all. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EDF specifications on nuclear grade resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarenhas, Darren; Gressier, Frederic; Taunier, Stephane; Le-Calvar, Marc; Ranchoux, Gilles; Marteau, Herve; Labed, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchange resins are widely used across EDF, especially within the nuclear division for the purification of water. Important applications include primary circuit, secondary circuit and effluent treatment, which require high quality nuclear grade resins to retain the dissolved species, some of which may be radioactive. There is a need for more and more efficient purification in order to decrease worker dose during maintenance but also to decrease volumes of radioactive resin waste. Resin performance is subject to several forms of degradation, including physical, chemical, thermal and radioactive, therefore appropriate resin properties have to be selected to reduce such effects. Work has been done with research institutes, manufacturers and on EDF sites to select these properties, create specifications and to continuously improve on these specifications. An interesting example of research regarding resin performance is the resin degradation under irradiation. Resins used in the CVCS circuit of EDF nuclear power plants are subject to irradiation over their lifetime. A study was carried out on the effects of total integrated doses of 0.1, 1 and 10 MGy on typically used EDF mixed bed resins in a 'mini-CVCS' apparatus to simultaneously test actual primary circuit fluid. The tests confirmed that the resins still perform efficiently after a typical CVCS radiation dose. Certain resins also need additional specifications in order to maintain the integrity of the particular circuits they are used in. Recently, EDF has updated its requirements on these high purity nuclear grade resins, produced generic doctrines for all products and materials used on site which include resins of all grades, and as a result have also updated a guide on recommended resin usage for the French fleet of reactors. An overview of the evolutions will be presented. (authors)

  17. Nuclear criticality safety bounding analysis for the in-tank-precipitation (ITP) process, impacted by fissile isotopic weight fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, C.E.

    1994-04-22

    The In-Tank Precipitation process (ITP) receives High Level Waste (HLW) supernatant liquid containing radionuclides in waste processing tank 48H. Sodium tetraphenylborate, NaTPB, and monosodium titanate (MST), NaTi{sub 2}O{sub 5}H, are added for removal of radioactive Cs and Sr, respectively. In addition to removal of radio-strontium, MST will also remove plutonium and uranium. The majority of the feed solutions to ITP will come from the dissolution of supernate that had been concentrated by evaporation to a crystallized salt form, commonly referred to as saltcake. The concern for criticality safety arises from the adsorption of U and Pt onto MST. If sufficient mass and optimum conditions are achieved then criticality is credible. The concentration of u and Pt from solution into the smaller volume of precipitate represents a concern for criticality. This report supplements WSRC-TR-93-171, Nuclear Criticality Safety Bounding Analysis For The In-Tank-Precipitation (ITP) Process. Criticality safety in ITP can be analyzed by two bounding conditions: (1) the minimum safe ratio of MST to fissionable material and (2) the maximum fissionable material adsorption capacity of the MST. Calculations have provided the first bounding condition and experimental analysis has established the second. This report combines these conditions with canyon facility data to evaluate the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to the adsorption of the fissionable material from solution. In addition, this report analyzes the potential impact of increased U loading onto MST. Results of this analysis demonstrate a greater safety margin for ITP operations than the previous analysis. This report further demonstrates that the potential for criticality in the ITP process due to adsorption of fissionable material by MST is not credible.

  18. Radium removal from Canadian uranium mining effluents by a radium-selective ion exchange complexer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    A laboratory test program was initiated by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources as part of the National Uranium Tailings Program to investigate the applicability of a radium-selective ion exchange complexer for removing radium from Canadian uranium mining effluents. The ion exchange complexer was shown to be efficient in removing radium from contaminated water of uranium mining operations, with the ultimate loading capacity of the resin on one type of water treated being determined as approximately 1,600 Bq/cm 3 of new resin. The results showed that the resin was effective in removing radium but not any other contaminants

  19. Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system operational test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of operational testing of the 241-C-106 In-Tank Video Camera Imaging System. This imaging system was installed as a component of Project W-320 to monitor sluicing and waste retrieval activities in Tank 241-C-106

  20. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  1. 49 CFR 174.304 - Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3 (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars... (flammable liquid) materials in tank cars. A tank car containing a Class 3 (flammable liquid) material, other... the liquid from the tank car to permanent storage tanks of sufficient capacity to receive the entire...

  2. Solvent purification with high-porosity (macroreticular) ion-exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKibben, J.M.

    Numerous solvent degradation products exist in all of our process solvents that are not efficiently removed in the routine solvent washing operation. Tests indicate that a relatively new type of resin - variously called high-porosity, macroreticular, or macroporous resin - removes at least some of these persistent chemicals and substantially improves the quality of any TBP process solvent. A plant test is proposed for the purification of the first cycle solvent of the HM process, in which a loop will be installed to draw a small side stream of solvent from the washed solvent hold tank (904), pass it through a 2.7 ft 3 resin column, and return it to the same tank

  3. Literature search on the use of resins for treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlMahamid, I.; Smith, B.M.

    1997-10-01

    Over 100 commercial providers with mixed-waste treatability capabilities exist in the US. The maturity level of these technologies varies from a bench scale to a pilot or a commercial scale. The techniques include deactivation, chemical oxidation, recovery of metals, stabilization, vitrification, incineration, biodegradation, and chemical extraction. This report focuses on the use of resins to remove actinides and heavy metals from aqueous waste streams. Only the literature that described resins with high removing efficiency are presented here. The majority of the literature reviewed are proceedings and national or international reports ordered through the Berkeley Lab Library. Some of the reports that the authors requested have not yet arrived. Only a few papers were found in the open literature (journals or magazines). Although this report does not include all existing references, it provides an accurate assessment of efficient resins to be considered for waste minimization procedures. 70 refs

  4. Flexible removable partial dentures: a basic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Edward E; Rubel, Barry; Smith, John B

    2014-01-01

    For many years, flexible resin materials have been available for fabricating removable partial denture (RPD) prostheses. Using a nonrigid material for the major connector or other components of an RPD may be a consideration for certain patients. Except for the promotional literature that has been written for flexible resin dentures, there is very little information available in the dental literature concerning nonrigid RPDs. As a result, the decision to use this treatment option depends on the judgment and experience of the dentist and fabricating laboratory. This article summarizes clinically pertinent information about flexible, nonrigid partial dentures.

  5. Foam, Foam-resin composite and method of making a foam-resin composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, John A. (Inventor); MacArthur, Doug E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    This invention relates to a foam, a foam-resin composite and a method of making foam-resin composites. The foam set forth in this invention comprises a urethane modified polyisocyanurate derived from an aromatic amino polyol and a polyether polyol. In addition to the polyisocyanurate foam, the composite of this invention further contains a resin layer, wherein the resin may be epoxy, bismaleimide, or phenolic resin. Such resins generally require cure or post-cure temperatures of at least 350.degree. F.

  6. Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Ion-Exchange Resin - Effects of Oxygen Uptake and Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Paul Allen

    2009-01-01

    An ion-exchange process, using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site in Washington State. The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS)in South Carolina. Testing at ORNL will determine the impact of radiation exposure and oxygen uptake by the RF resin on the hydraulic permeability of the resin. Samples of the resin will be removed periodically to measure physical properties (bead size and compressibility) and cesium capacity. The proposed full-scale treatment system at Hanford, the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP), will use an ion-exchange column containing nominally 680 gal of resin, which will treat 30 gpm of waste solution. The ion-exchange column is designed for a typical pressure drop of 6 psig, with a maximum of 9.7 psig. The lab-scale column is 3-in. clear PVC pipe and is prototypic of the proposed Hanford column. The fluid velocity in the lab-scale test will be much higher than for the full-scale column, in order to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in that column (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity will produce similar forces on the resin in the lab-scale column as would be expected at the bottom of the full-scale column. The chemical changes in the resin caused by radiation exposure and oxygen uptake are expected to cause physical changes in the resin that could reduce the bed porosity and reduce the hydraulic permeability of the resin bed. These changes will be monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and by measuring the physical properties of samples of the resin. The test loop with the lab-scale column is currently being fabricated, and operation will start by late May. Testing will be completed by the

  7. Uranium speciation and removal from well water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayaz, B.; DeVol, T.; Navratil, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the form of uranium present in the well water and to test the effectiveness of common household treatment devices to remove uranium and radium. Batch tests with activated carbon, iron powder, anion exchange resin and cation exchange resin were used to characterize the form of uranium in the drinking water. In the tests, water and the separation materials were first equilibrated, filtered and then analyzed by alpha spectrometry. The results of the batch tests showed that it is possible to remove greater than 90% of the uranium and radium in the drinking water by using any of the sorbents listed above. Simple filtration with 0.1 μm had little to no impact on uranium removal. Results of tests using household treatment devices will also be presented. (authors)

  8. Prediction model for exhausted point of ion exchange resin column of moderator purification circuit at Korean CANDU plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Wook; Kang, Duck-Won; Ahn, Hyun Kyoung; Rhee, In Hyoung

    2005-01-01

    Most of the carbon-14 produced at CANDU plants are removed by an Ion eXchange (IX) resin column of the moderator purification circuit, and a column is replaced based on an empirical guideline. Since the amount of carbon-14 released from CANDU plants is governed by the performance of a column, optimal operation of IX resin columns through the timely replacement based on an objective criterion is very important. For this, the model for predicting the exhausted point of an IX resin column has been developed based on local chemical equilibrium. The performance evaluation at Wolsong Unit 3 showed that the model was able to simulate the removal of species by an IX resin column to such a high degree that the model could provide an objective criterion to replace an IX resin column timely. The derived maximum service time of a fresh IX resin column was 4,080 h, about twice that of the existing empirical guideline (up to 2,000h). Accordingly, if the maximum service time derived in this paper is applied to Wolsong Unit 3, it is expected to reduce the cost needed for the replacement of IX resin column by about 50%. (author)

  9. Electrodeionization 2: the migration of nickel ions adsorbed in a flexible ion-exchange resin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoor, P.B.; Veen, ter W.R.; Janssen, L.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    The removal of nickel ions from a low cross-linked ion-exchange resin using an applied electrical potential gradient was studied. The potential gradient across a bed of ion-exchange particles, in which nickel ions were absorbed, was varied by two methods. One involved a change of cell voltage across

  10. Bonding of Glass Ceramic and Indirect Composite to Non-aged and Aged Resin Composite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco; Ozcan, Mutlu; Muis, Maarten; Kalk, Warner

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Since adhesion of the restorative materials to pre-polymerized or aged resin composites presents a challenge to the clinicians, existing restorations are often removed and remade prior to cementation of fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). This study evaluated bond strength of non-aged and aged

  11. Houdini{trademark}: Reconfigurable in-tank mobile robot. Final report, June 1995--January 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, B.; Slifko, A.

    1998-12-31

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup system called Houdini{trademark}. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini{trademark} represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini{trademark} is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini{trademark} utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobilize waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini{trademark} system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini{trademark} system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks.

  12. Houdini trademark: Reconfigurable in-tank mobile robot. Final report, June 1995 - January 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, B.; Slifko, A.

    1998-01-01

    This report details the development of a reconfigurable in-tank robotic cleanup system called Houdini trademark. Driven by the general need to develop equipment for the removal of radioactive waste from hundreds of DOE waste storage tanks and the specific needs of DOE sites such as Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Fernald, Houdini trademark represents one of the possible tools that can be used to mobilize and retrieve this waste material for complete remediation. Houdini trademark is a hydraulically powered, track driven, mobile work vehicle with a collapsible frame designed to enter underground or above ground waste tanks through existing 24 inch riser openings. After the vehicle has entered the waste tank, it unfolds and lands on the waste surface or tank floor to become a remotely operated mini-bulldozer. Houdini trademark utilizes a vehicle mounted plow blade and 6-DOF manipulator to mobilize waste and carry other tooling such as sluicing pumps, excavation buckets, and hydraulic shears. The complete Houdini trademark system consists of the tracked vehicle and other support equipment (e.g., control console, deployment system, hydraulic power supply, and controller) necessary to deploy and remotely operate this system at any DOE site. Inside the storage tanks, the system is capable of performing heel removal, waste mobilization, waste size reduction, and other tank waste retrieval and decommissioning tasks. The first Houdini trademark system was delivered on September 24, 1996 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The system acceptance test was successfully performed at a cold test facility at ORNL. After completion of the cold test program and the training of site personnel, ORNL will deploy the system for clean-up and remediation of the Gunite storage tanks

  13. Research and development for decontamination system of spent resin in Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Gi Hong [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    When reactor coolant leaks occur due to cracks of a steam generator tube, radioactive materials contained in the primary cooling water in nuclear power plant are forced out toward the secondary systems. At this time the secondary water purification resin in the ion exchange resin tower of the steam generator blowdown system is contaminated by the radioactivity of the leaked radioactive materials, so we pack this in special containers and store temporarily because we could not dispose it by ourselves. If steam generator tube leakage occurs, it produces contaminated spent resins annually about 5,000-7,000 liters. This may increase the amount of nuclear waste productions, a disposal working cost and a unit price of generating electricity in the plant. For this reasons, it is required to develop a decontamination process technique for reducing the radioactive level of these resins enough to handle by the self-disposal method. In this research, First, Investigated the structure and properties of the ion exchange resin used in a steam generator blowdown system. Second, Checked for a occurrence status of contaminated spent resin and a disposal technology. Third, identified the chemical characteristics of the waste radionuclides of the spent resin, and examined ionic bonding and separation mechanism of radioactive nuclear species and a spent resin. Finally, we carried out the decontamination experiment using chemicals, ultrasound, microbubbles, supercritical carbon dioxide to process these spent resin. In the case of the spent resin decontamination method using chemicals, the higher the concentration of the drug decontamination efficiency was higher. In the ultrasound method, foreign matter of the spent resin was removed and was found that the level of radioactivity is below of the MDA. In the microbubbles method, we found that the concentration of the radioactivity decreased after the experiment, so it can be used to the decontamination process of the spent resin. In

  14. Research and development for decontamination system of spent resin in Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Gi Hong

    2015-01-01

    When reactor coolant leaks occur due to cracks of a steam generator tube, radioactive materials contained in the primary cooling water in nuclear power plant are forced out toward the secondary systems. At this time the secondary water purification resin in the ion exchange resin tower of the steam generator blowdown system is contaminated by the radioactivity of the leaked radioactive materials, so we pack this in special containers and store temporarily because we could not dispose it by ourselves. If steam generator tube leakage occurs, it produces contaminated spent resins annually about 5,000-7,000 liters. This may increase the amount of nuclear waste productions, a disposal working cost and a unit price of generating electricity in the plant. For this reasons, it is required to develop a decontamination process technique for reducing the radioactive level of these resins enough to handle by the self-disposal method. In this research, First, Investigated the structure and properties of the ion exchange resin used in a steam generator blowdown system. Second, Checked for a occurrence status of contaminated spent resin and a disposal technology. Third, identified the chemical characteristics of the waste radionuclides of the spent resin, and examined ionic bonding and separation mechanism of radioactive nuclear species and a spent resin. Finally, we carried out the decontamination experiment using chemicals, ultrasound, microbubbles, supercritical carbon dioxide to process these spent resin. In the case of the spent resin decontamination method using chemicals, the higher the concentration of the drug decontamination efficiency was higher. In the ultrasound method, foreign matter of the spent resin was removed and was found that the level of radioactivity is below of the MDA. In the microbubbles method, we found that the concentration of the radioactivity decreased after the experiment, so it can be used to the decontamination process of the spent resin. In

  15. DETERMINATION OF THE FRACTION OF GIBBSITE AND BOEHMITE FORMS OF ALUMINUM IN TANK 51H SLUDGE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, M; Kofi Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D

    2008-01-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a test to determine the fraction of the gibbsite and boehmite forms of aluminum in the sludge solids. Knowledge of the fractions of gibbsite and boehmite in the sludge contained in various waste tanks would facilitate better sludge mass reduction estimates and allow better planning/scheduling for sludge batch preparation. The composite sludge sample prepared for use in the test from several small samples remaining from the original 3-L sample appears to be representative of the original sample based on the characterization data. A Gibbsite/Boehmite Test was developed that uses 8 M NaOH and a temperature of 65 C to dissolve aluminum. The soluble aluminum concentration data collected during the test indicates that, for the three standards containing gibbsite, all of the gibbsite dissolved in approximately 2 hours. Under the test conditions boehmite dissolved at more than an order of magnitude more slowly than gibbsite. An estimate based on the soluble aluminum concentration from the sludge sample at two hours into the test indicates the sludge solids contain a form of aluminum that dissolves at a rate similar to the 100% Boehmite standard. Combined with the XRD data from the original 3-L sample, these results provide substantial evidence that the boehmite form of aluminum predominates in the sludge. A calculation from the results of the Gibbsite/Boehmite test indicates the sludge contains ∼3% gibbsite and ∼97% boehmite. The sludge waste in Tank 51H was recently treated under Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD) conditions and a substantial fraction of aluminum (i.e., sludge mass) was removed, avoiding production of over 100 glass canisters in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Results of the Gibbsite/Boehmite test indicate that the aluminum in this sludge was in the form of the more difficult to dissolve boehmite form of aluminum. Since boehmite may be the dominant form of

  16. Rainfall changes affect the algae dominance in tank bromeliad ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Aliny Patricia Flauzino; Leal, Juliana da Silva; Peeters, Edwin T. H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change and biodiversity loss have been reported as major disturbances in the biosphere which can trigger changes in the structure and functioning of natural ecosystems. Nonetheless, empirical studies demonstrating how both factors interact to affect shifts in aquatic ecosystems are still unexplored. Here, we experimentally test how changes in rainfall distribution and litter diversity affect the occurrence of the algae-dominated condition in tank bromeliad ecosystems. Tank bromeliads are miniature aquatic ecosystems shaped by the rainwater and allochthonous detritus accumulated in the bases of their leaves. Here, we demonstrated that changes in the rainfall distribution were able to reduce the chlorophyll-a concentration in the water of bromeliad tanks affecting significantly the occurrence of algae-dominated conditions. On the other hand, litter diversity did not affect the algae dominance irrespective to the rainfall scenario. We suggest that rainfall changes may compromise important self-reinforcing mechanisms responsible for maintaining high levels of algae on tank bromeliads ecosystems. We summarized these results into a theoretical model which suggests that tank bromeliads may show two different regimes, determined by the bromeliad ability in taking up nutrients from the water and by the total amount of light entering the tank. We concluded that predicted climate changes might promote regime shifts in tropical aquatic ecosystems by shaping their structure and the relative importance of other regulating factors. PMID:28422988

  17. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives

  18. Light Duty Utility Arm deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, M.W.

    1999-12-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of Non-Compliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  19. Light Duty Utility Arm Deployment in Tank WM-188

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, Michael W

    2000-01-01

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) was successfully deployed in Tank WM-188 during February and March of 1999 at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) tank farm at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Some equipment problems were identified, but most were indicative of any first time activity. Deployment during cold weather imposed additional equipment risks, but in general, equipment response to the winter conditions was better than expected. Three end effectors were demonstrated during the deployment. All performed as expected, although the limited resolution of the Alternating Current Field Measurement end effector cannot absolutely confirm tank integrity, which is necessary for future tank inspections. Four heel samples were taken with the sampler end effector and a broad spectrum of analyses were performed. A detailed inspection of the tank interior was performed with the High Resolution Stereo Video System end effector. The sample information is proving invaluable to the development of new treatment flowsheets and waste forms. It is expected that the LDUA will be deployed for tank inspections through the next several years to support other Notice of NonCompliance (NON) Consent Order requirements and several other ongoing initiatives.

  20. Effect of bench time polymerization on depth of cure of dental composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, K.; Yudhit, A.; Sari, F.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of bench time before light cured polymerization on the depth of cure of dental composite resin. Nanofiller composite resin (Filtek Z350 XT,3M, ESPE,China) was used in this study. Sixty samples of nanofiller composite resin were made and divided into control and test groups with bench time for 0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 min. For the test group, composite resins were stored in refrigerator with 4°C temperatures. Meanwhile, for the control groups, the composite resin was stored at room temperature. The samples were prepared using metal mould with size diameter of 6 mm and 4 mm in thickness. Samples were cured for 20 s by using visible blue light curing unit. Part of samples that unpolymerized were removed by using a plastic spatula. The remaining parts of samples were measured by digital caliper and noted as depth of cure (mm). Data were analyzed to one-way ANOVA and LSD tests (p≤0.05). Results showed there was no significance differences between test groups (p=0.5). A 60 minutes bench time group showed the highest depth of cure value among test group, and it was almost similar with control group value. It can be concluded that longer bench time can increase the depth of cure of composite resin.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and applications of a new cation exchanger tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A V; Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Rathore, Abhay S

    2012-01-01

    A new composite cation exchanger, tamarind sulphonic acid (TSA) resin has been synthesized. The chemically modified TSA ion exchange resin has been used for the removal and preconcentration of Zn2+, Cd2+, Fe2+, Co2+ and Cu2+ ions in aqueous solution and effluent from the Laxmi steel plant in Jodhpur, India. This type of composite represents a new class of hybrid ion exchangers with good ion exchange capacity, stability, reproducibility and selectivity for toxic metal ions found in effluent from the steel industry. The characterization of the resin was carried out by determining the ion-exchange capacity, elemental analysis, pH titration, Fourier transform infrared spectra and thermal analysis. The distribution coefficients (K(d)) of toxic metal ions were determined in a reference aqueous solution and the steel plant effluent at different pH values; the absorbency of different metal ions on the TSA resin was studied for up to 10 cycles. The adsorption of different metal ions on TSA resin follows the order: Co2+ > Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Cd2+. The ion exchange capacity of TSA resin is 2.87%.

  2. Irradiation effects in the storage and disposal of radioactive ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Dodge, C.E.; Dayal, R.; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Research is under way to characterize the effects of self-irradiation on radwastes which may be generated when organic ion-exchange media are used in water demineralization or decontamination operations at nuclear facilities. External factors affecting the relation between laboratory evaluations and field performance are emphasized. Initial experiments do not yet indicate substantial radiation dose-rate effects on radiolytic gas yields or acid product formation, when (fully swollen) sulfonic acid resins are irradiated in a sealed air environment. At the same time, oxygen gas is removed from the environment of irradiated resins. Interaction between mild steel coupons and acidic species produced in the irradiation induced decomposition of sulfonic acid resin results in irradiation enhanced corrosion. Corrosion rates depend on radiation dose rate, moisture content and resin chemical loading. In some cases, corrosion rates decrease with time, suggesting depletion of acidic species within the resin bed, or a synergistic interaction between resin and corrosion coupon. Implications of these and other results on evaluating field behavior of radwaste containing ion-exchange media are discussed. 4 figures, 2 tables

  3. Studies of Vitrification of Ion-Exchange Resins. A Joint USA-Argentina Collaborative Work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutson, N.D.; Herman, C.A.; Zamecnik, J.R.; Sundaram, S.K.; Perez, J.M.; Hoeffner, S.L.; Russo, D.O.; Sterba, M.

    2003-01-01

    Under the Science and Technology Implementing Arrangement for Cooperation on Radioactive and Mixed Waste Management (JCCRM), the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) is helping to transfer waste treatment technology to international atomic energy commissions.As part of the JCCRM, DOE has established a collaborative research agreement with the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Cnea).The Cnea is investigating treatment and disposal options for organic ion exchange resins currently stored at two nuclear power plants in the Republic of Argentina.The major hazards of the ion exchange resins are their organic composition and the contaminants that are present on the resins after purification processes.The principal contaminants are usually the radioactive species that are removed.For these studies, actual non-radioactive resins from Argentina's Embalse and Atucha plants were tested.The glass produced during the runs was durable was measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT).The product had a predictable, mostly amorphous composition throughout the demonstrations; though there was some evidence of the formation of clinopyroxene crystals.The immobilized product represented an approximately 70% volume reduction from the simulated Argentine ion exchange resin (i.e., a reduction from the volume of as-stored wet resin to the volume of the ultimate borosilicate glass product).For all runs, the radioactive surrogate retention was near 100%

  4. Solidifying power station resins and sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, A.S.D.; Haigh, C.P.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive ion exchange resins and sludges arise at nuclear power stations from various operations associated with effluent treatment and liquid waste management. As the result of an intensive development programme, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) has designed a process to convert power station resins and sludges into a shielded, packaged solid monolithic form suitable for final disposal. Research and development, the generic CEGB sludge/resin conditioning plant and the CEGB Active Waste Project are described. (U.K.)

  5. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    OpenAIRE

    Nagem Filho, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill ...

  6. Concentrating cesium-137 from seawater using resorcinol-formaldehyde resin for radioecological monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorin, Andrei; Tokar, Eduard; Tutov, Mikhail; Avramenko, Valentin [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Far Eastern Federal Univ., Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Palamarchuk, Marina; Marinin, Dmitry [Institute of Chemistry FEBRAS, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-04-01

    A method of preconcentrating cesium-137 from seawater using a resorcinol-formaldehyde resin, which enables one to optimize the ecological monitoring procedure, has been suggested. Studies of sorption of cesium-137 from seawater by resorcinol-formaldehyde resin have been performed, and it has been demonstrated that the cation exchanger is characterized by high selectivity with respect to cesium-137. It was found that the selectivity depended on the temperature of resin solidification and the seawater pH value. The maximal value of the cesium-137 distribution coefficient is equal to 4.1-4.5 x 10{sup 3} cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. Under dynamic conditions, the ion-exchange resin capacity is 310-910 bed volumes depending on the seawater pH, whereas the efficiency of cesium removal exceeds 95%. The removal of more than 95% of cesium-137 has been attained using 1-3 M solutions of nitric acid: here, the eluate volume was 8-8.4 bed volumes. Application of 3 M solution of nitric acid results in resin degradation with the release of gaseous products.

  7. The study on the ion exchange behavior of metal ions using composite ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kukki; Lee, Kunjai [Nuclear Engineering Department Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Youngkyun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin; Yang, Hoyeon; Ha, Jonghyun [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-04-15

    In this study, a series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenol sulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. And a separation of metal ions in the liquid radioactive waste have been performed using organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenol sulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite. The PSF-F (phenol sulphonic formaldehyde-iron ferrite) composite resin prepared by the above method shows stably high removal efficiency to Co(II), Fe, Cs species from wastewater in a wide range of solution pH. The wide range of applicable solution pH (i. e. pH 4.0 to 10.3) implies that the PSF-F composite resin overcomes the limitations of the conventional ferrite process which is practically applicable only to alkaline conditions. The experiment proceeded using batch reactor in a constant temperature with water bath. The experiments divided into three parts. The first one is TG/DTA (Thermogravimetry / Differential Thermal Analysis) which can analyze the trend of pyrolysis of PSF-F ion exchanger. The Second one is equilibrium experiment in which the separation factor of metal ions and Langmuir, Freundlich isotherm was achieved. The last one is kinetics experiment in which the equilibrium reaction time and removal efficiency is estimated.

  8. The study on the ion exchange behavior of metal ions using composite ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kukki; Lee, Kunjai; Kim, Youngkyun; Lee, Sangjin; Yang, Hoyeon; Ha, Jonghyun

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a series of stepwise procedures to prepare a new organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenol sulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite was established, based upon wet-and-neutralization method for synthesizing iron ferrite and pearl-polymerization method for synthesizing rigid bead-type composite resin. And a separation of metal ions in the liquid radioactive waste have been performed using organic-inorganic composite magnetic resin with phenol sulphonic-formaldehyde and freshly formed iron ferrite. The PSF-F (phenol sulphonic formaldehyde-iron ferrite) composite resin prepared by the above method shows stably high removal efficiency to Co(II), Fe, Cs species from wastewater in a wide range of solution pH. The wide range of applicable solution pH (i. e. pH 4.0 to 10.3) implies that the PSF-F composite resin overcomes the limitations of the conventional ferrite process which is practically applicable only to alkaline conditions. The experiment proceeded using batch reactor in a constant temperature with water bath. The experiments divided into three parts. The first one is TG/DTA (Thermogravimetry / Differential Thermal Analysis) which can analyze the trend of pyrolysis of PSF-F ion exchanger. The Second one is equilibrium experiment in which the separation factor of metal ions and Langmuir, Freundlich isotherm was achieved. The last one is kinetics experiment in which the equilibrium reaction time and removal efficiency is estimated

  9. Radioactive spent resins conditioning by the hot super-compaction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, Andreas; Centner, Baudouin; Lemmens, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Spent ion exchanger media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion exchange materials, following to pretreatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using Cement, Bitumen, Polymer or High Integrity Containers, - The destruction of the organic compounds by using Thermochemical processes or Oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal, - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Compaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Compaction Process is used to make dense homogenous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of two 200 L drums (Figure). In the oil heated drying and mixing unit, the resins are heated to the necessary process temperature for the hot pressing step and then placed into special metal drums, which are automatically lidded and immediately transferred to a high force compactor. After high force compaction the pellets are transferred to a measuring unit, where the dose rate, height and weight are automatically measured and recorded. A volume reduction factor of approximately up to four (depending on the type of

  10. The absorption of plutonium by anion resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, R. W.; Mills, R.

    1961-10-15

    Equilibrium experiments have shown Pu{sup +4} to be absorbed from nitric acid onto an anion resin as a complex anion Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup -2}. The amount of absorption is dependent on the plutonium and nitric acid concentrations in the equilibrium solution with a maximum at 7N to 8N HNO{sub 3}. A low cross-linked resin has a higher capacity and reaches equilibrium more rapidly than the normally supplied resin. Saturation capacity of one per cent cross-linked Nalcite SBR (Dowex 1), 50 -- 100 mesh, is 385 mg Pu/gram dry resin. (author)

  11. Anterior makeover on fractured teeth by simple composite resin restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Priyo Prasetyo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In daily practice dentists usually treat tooth fractures with more invasive treatments such as crown, veneer and bridges which preparation require more tooth structure removal. While currently there is trend toward minimal invasive dentistry which conserves more tooth structure. This is enhanced with the vast supply of dental materials and equipment in the market, including restorative materials. Provided with these supporting materials and equipment and greater patient’s demand for esthetic treatment, dentists must aware of the esthetics and basic principle of conserving tooth which should retain tooth longevity. Purpose: This article showed that a simple and less invasive composite resin restoration can successfully restore anterior esthetic and function of fractured teeth which generally treated with more invasive treatment options. Case: A 19 year-old female patient came with fracture on 21 and 22. This patient had a previous history of dental trauma about nine years before and was brought to a local dentist for debridement and was given analgesic, the involved teeth were not given any restorative treatment. Case management: The fractured 21 and 22 were conventionally restored with simple composite resin restoration. Conclusion: Fracture anterior teeth would certainly disturbs patient’s appearance, but these teeth could be managed conservatively and economically by simple composite resin restoration.Latar belakang: Dalam praktek sehari-hari pada umumnya dokter gigi merawat fraktur dengan restorasi invasif seperti mahkota, veneer dan jembatan yang semuanya memerlukan pengambilan jaringan gigi lebih banyak, sedangkan saat ini trend perawatan gigi lebih menuju kearah invasif minimal yang mempertahankan jaringan gigi sebanyak mungkin. Keadaan ini ditunjang oleh tersedianya berbagai macam bahan dan peralatan kedokteran gigi di pasaran, termasuk bahan restorasi. Dengan tersedianya bahan dan peralatan yang mendukung serta tingginya

  12. Structure of straw biochar/amino resin doping nanoSiO2 and its phosphorus removal characteristic%纳米SiO2/氨基淀粉黏合剂秸秆炭的结构及除磷特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙恩惠; 钱玉婷; 靳红梅; 黄慧; 武国峰; 常志州; 黄红英

    2017-01-01

    , some studies have been conducted on preparation of straw biochar for removal of phosphate radical from aqueous solutions. In this study, a porous nano biochar composite (nanoSiO2/AR-biochar) was prepared by nanoSiO2 doping, which was homogeneously cladded using amino starch resin, and kneading molding, then foaming coking technology were adopted in situ preparation as well as the carbonizing treatment. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermogravimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), specific surface area analysis, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isothermal and compression were used to characterize the pore structure, thermal stability, microstructure and compression performance of nanoSiO2/AR-biochar. Phosphate adsorption process of nanoSiO2/AR-biochar was studied by means of isothermal and adsorption kinetics. Results showed that the specific surface area, total pore volume, and micropore volume of nanoSiO2/AR-biochars increased monotonously. The nanoSiO2/AR-biochars prepared at 550℃ possessed the maximum single point adsorption total pore volume (0.1775 cm3/g), and the pore diameter of the ultramicropores was mainly in the range from 1 to 50 nm. The t-plot micropore area, and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area of this kind of nanoSiO2/AR-biochar were 302.86 and 352.70 m2/g, respectively, when the doping amount of nanoSiO2 was 6% of straw powder quality. SEM and TEM analysis showed that the surface of the porous granular biochar materials doped nanoSiO2could form the similar sponge flocculent structure, which could provide more adsorption sites for removal of phosphate ions. More it was worth mentioning that the compressive strength of nanoSiO2/AR-biochars was increasing from 3.89 to 7.96 MPa, a growth of 104.6%, which could solve the problems such as short service life, difficulty in recycle and dust pollution of traditional biochar. Adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption capacity of the nanoSiO2/AR-biochar could be as high as 18.42 mg

  13. Capacity oil absorbing resin cardanol/furfural; Capacidade de absorcao de petroleo de resinas cardanol/furfural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, Aline M.A.; Delazare, Thais; Souza Junior, Fernando G. [Instituto de Macromoleculas Professora Eloisa Mano - IMA/Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: fernando_gomes@ima.ufrj.br

    2011-07-01

    The marine pollution by oil is almost an inevitable consequence to the growing energy demand required by our civilization.The development of an alternative to remove the oil through the use of renewable resources is each day more important. This project is focused on the use of bio resins which are the product of the reaction between cardanol and furfuraldehyde, both are derived from renewable resources produced in large scale in Brazil in the absorption and removal of oil from water. From this resine, flotation tests, FTIR-ATR, and test of oil absorption were performed, achieving success in the complete removal of it. These tests showed that the resin obtained has absorption capacity of oil of 100% depending on the proportion of reagents used in the reaction. (author)

  14. The development of 126Sn separation procedure by means of TBP resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andris, Boris; Bena, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Separation possibilities of 126 Sn with a new extraction-chromatographic material TBP Resin were studied. Suitable conditions for tin separation were determined in hydrochloric acid medium. 126 Sn was concentrated on TBP resin from 6 mol L -1 HCl and was eluted with 0.1 mol L -1 HCl. A purification step to remove 137 Cs with AMP-PAN column was necessary to obtain sufficiently purified samples which were directly measured with gamma spectrometry for 126 Sn activity. Separation of 126 Sn from a raw sludge sample was done according to proposed procedure, 126 Sn was detected and its activity was determined. (author)

  15. Test plan for demonstrating plutonium extraction from 10-L solutions using EIChrom extraction chromatographic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosive plutonium solutions stored in 10-L containers at the Plutonium Finishing Plant must be treated to convert the plutonium to a safe, solid form for storage and to remove the americium so that radiation exposure can be reduced. Extraction chromatographic resins will be tested for separating plutonium from these solutions in the laboratory. Separation parameters will be developed during the testing for large scale processing of the 10-L solutions and solutions of similar composition. Use of chromatographic resins will allow plutonium separation with minimum of chemical addition to the feed and without the need for plutonium valence adjustment. The separated plutonium will be calcined to plutonium oxide by direct solution calcination

  16. Input to Resin Column Structural Analysis if Autocatalytic Resin Reaction Occurs in HB-Line Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallman, D.F.

    2001-07-10

    Solutions of plutonium in nitric acid are purified and concentrated using anion resin prior to precipitation. There have been instances of resin column explosions caused by autocatalytic reactions of anion resins in nitric acid within the DOE complex

  17. Properties of the Carboxylate ion exchange resins; Karboxylatjonbytarmassans egenskaper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, Bert; Dario, Maarten [Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Boren, Hans [Linkoepings Univ. (Sweden); Torstenfelt, Boerje [Swedpower, Stockholm (Sweden); Puigdomenech, Ignasi; Johansson, Claes [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-09-01

    Weakly acidic, carboxylic resin has been selected, together with strong base anion resins, for water purification at the Forsmark 1 and 2 reactors. For the strong (but not the weak) ion exchange resin the Nuclear Power Inspectorate has given permission to dispose the spent resins in the SFR 1 (the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste). This report gives a review of the carboxylic resins and comes to the conclusion that the resins are very stable and that there should not exist any risks for increased leaching of radionuclides from SFR 1 if these resins are disposed (compared to the strong resins)

  18. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2018-06-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  19. Overview on resins available in microlithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serre, B.; Schue, F.; Montginoul, C.; Giral, L.

    1985-01-01

    Lithographic equipments using electrons and X radiation are developed. Velocity and resolution requirements fix the nature of the material to irradiate. Circuit making principles are recalled here; resists (organic polymers) are employed for it. The different types of resins and then needed characteristics are reviewed here. In the scope of electron sensitive resins methyl polymethacrylate and derivative and its copolymers (and copolymers of methacrylonitrile) and reticulated copolymers are studied. Polysulfones are also presented (poly(buten-1 sulfone), poly(styrene sulfone), poly(methyl-1 cyclopentene-1 sulfone). The interest in photosensitive resins (such as AZ) as electron sensitive resins is recalled. In the field of negative resins, the polyepoxyds, polystyrene and halogenated derivates from polystyrene (CMS and PCMS), the poly(vinyl-2 naphtalene) and its derivatives (PSTTF) are presented. The X radiation sensitive resins are also reviewed: the methyl polymethacrylate and its halogenated derivates, the acrylic homopolymers and copolymers (example of poly(acrylate of chlorinated alcoyls). The resins developable by plasma are mentioned. At last, for photosensitive resins, the diazide polydiene systems are presented together with systems diazo-2 2H-naphtalenone-1. The systems with salt photolysis are just recalled [fr

  20. Epoxidation of linseed oil-Alkyd resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motawie, A.M.; Ismail, E.A.; Mazroua, A.M.; Abd EI Aziem, M.S.; Ramadan, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    Three types of different linseed oil-alkyd resin ( Alk (I), Alk (II), and Alk (III) ) were prepared with the calculated amounts of mono glycerides and adipic acid (1:1, 1:2, and 2:1 Eq.Wt) respectively via monoglyceride method. The obtained alkyd resins were epoxidized via reaction with the calculated quantities of peracetic acid, which was prepared by the reaction of acetic anhydride with H 2 O 2 . Epoxidation occurred with the ratio (1: 1, 1 :3, and 1:6 Eq. Wt) of alkyd to peracetic acid. The effect of reaction time on the epoxy group content was measured during the epoxidation process. The prepared alkyd resins were analyzed by IR and H 1 NMR. The metal coated film properties of epoxidized alkyd resins were compared with those of unmodified alkyd resins. It was observed that the coating films of epoxidized alkyd resins have better in drying properties, hardness, adhesion, impact and flexibility than those of un epoxidized alkyd resins. The flammability properties of the paper coated films for the prepared brominated epoxidized alkyd resins were found to be fire retardant

  1. 21 CFR 177.1655 - Polysulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... disodium salt of 4,4′-isopropylidenediphenol is made to react with 4,4′-dichlorodiphenyl sulfone in such a... Limitations Dimethyl sulfoxide Not to exceed 50 parts per million as residual solvent in finished basic resin... residual solvent in finished basic resin in paragraph (a)(1) of this section. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone Not to...

  2. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...′-iso-propylidenediphenol with molten diphenyl carbonate in the presence of the disodium salt of 4,4... chloride Monochlorobenzene Not to exceed 500 p.p.m. as residual solvent in finished resin. Pentaerythritol...-88-3) Not to exceed 800 parts per million as residual solvent in finished resin. Triethylamine (c...

  3. 21 CFR 177.1595 - Polyetherimide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polyetherimide resin identified in this section may be safely used as an article or component of an article... substances required in the production of basic resins or finished food-contact articles. The optional... and Applied Nutrition (HFS-200), Food and Drug Administration, 5100 Paint Branch Pkwy., College Park...

  4. 21 CFR 177.2440 - Polyethersulfone resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2440 Polyethersulfone resins. Polyethersulfone resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended... Petition Control (HFS-215), Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, 1110 Vermont Ave. NW., suite 1200...

  5. Measurement of opalescence of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Lu, Huan; Powers, John M

    2005-11-01

    Opalescence is an optical property, where there is light scattering of the shorter wavelengths of the visible spectrum, giving the material a bluish appearance under reflected light and an orange/brown appearance under transmitted light. The objective of this study was to determine the opalescence of resin composites with a color measuring spectrophotometer. Colors of A2 and enamel or translucent shades of four resin composites and of an unfilled resin measured in the reflectance and transmittance modes were compared, and the opalescence parameter (OP) was calculated as the difference in blue-yellow coordinate (Deltab*) and red-green parameter (Deltaa*) between the reflected and transmitted colors of 1-mm thick specimens. The masking effect was calculated as the color difference between the color of a black background and the color of specimen over the black background. The range of OP in resin composites was 5.7-23.7, which was higher than that of the unfilled resin. However, there were significant differences among the brands and shades of the resin composites. Opalescence varied by brand and shade of the resin composites, and contributed to the masking of background color along with translucency parameter. Some of the resin composites actually displayed opalescence.

  6. Oxalate Mass Balance During Chemical Cleaning in Tank 5F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is preparing Tank 5F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRS personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 5F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate.

  7. Embedding of reactor wastes in plastic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    STEAG Kernenergie GmbH is so far the only firm commercially to condition radioactive bead ion exchange resins by embedding in polystyrene resins. The objective of the work reported here was to study and develop methods for immobilization of other reactor wastes in plastic resins. Comparison studies on high quality cement however showed favourable results for cement with respect to process safety and economy. For this reason STEAG interrupted its work in the field of resin embedding after about one year. The work carried out during this period is surveyed in this report, which includes a comprehensive literature study on reactor wastes and their solidification in plastic resins as well as on regulations with regard to radioactive waste disposal in the member states of the European Communities

  8. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resin was formulated. The model is developed by modifying the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By assuming a linear relationship between the glass transition temperature and the degree of cure of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants were determined from the isothermal cure data of Lee, Loos, and Springer for the Hercules 3501-6 resin system. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data reported by Carpenter. A chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformations of the thermosetting resin systems during cure was established.

  9. Removal of radionuclides from acid mine waters by retention on adsorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, M.R.L.; Fukuma, H.T.; Costa da, W.C.; Quinelato, A.L.; Gomes, H.A.; Garcia, O.Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study proposes a method for decontamination of acid drainage water from a uranium mine, as an alternative process to lime treatment. The research embodied the recovery of uranium with an ion-exchange resin, treatment of effluent resin with lime, or with inorganic adsorbents and biosorbents. The uranium decontamination level using the resin process was 94% and allowed the recovery of this element as a commercial product. Among the inorganic adsorbents studied, phosphogypsum was effective for 226 Ra, 228 Ra, and 210 Pb removal. Among the biosorbents, Sargassum sp. was superior in relation to its specific capacity to accumulate and remove 226 Ra. (author)

  10. OXALATE MASS BALANCE DURING CHEMICAL CLEANING IN TANK 6F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-07-22

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is preparing Tank 6F for closure. The first step in preparing the tank for closure is mechanical sludge removal. Following mechanical sludge removal, SRS performed chemical cleaning with oxalic acid to remove the sludge heel. Personnel are currently assessing the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning to determine whether the tank is ready for closure. SRR personnel collected liquid samples during chemical cleaning and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for analysis. Following chemical cleaning, they collected a solid sample (also known as 'process sample') and submitted it to SRNL for analysis. The authors analyzed these samples to assess the effectiveness of the chemical cleaning process. Analysis of the anions showed the measured oxalate removed from Tank 6F to be approximately 50% of the amount added in the oxalic acid. To close the oxalate mass balance, the author collected solid samples, leached them with nitric acid, and measured the concentration of cations and anions in the leachate. Some conclusions from this work are: (1) Approximately 65% of the oxalate added as oxalic acid was removed with the decanted liquid. (2) Approximately 1% of the oxalate (added to the tank as oxalic acid) formed precipitates with compounds such as nickel, manganese, sodium, and iron (II), and was dissolved with nitric acid. (3) As much as 30% of the oxalate may have decomposed forming carbon dioxide. The balance does not fully account for all the oxalate added. The offset represents the combined uncertainty in the analyses and sampling.

  11. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative 137 Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either 85 Sr or 60 Co. Release rates of 137 Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. 137 Cs, 85 Sr, and 60 Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement

  12. Ion exchange resins destruction in a stirred supercritical water oxidation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leybros, A.; Roubaud, A.; Guichardon, P.; Boutin, O.

    2010-01-01

    Spent ion exchange resins (IERs) are radioactive process wastes for which there is no satisfactory industrial treatment. Supercritical water oxidation offers a viable treatment alternative to destroy the organic structure of resins, used to remove radioactivity. Up to now, studies carried out in supercritical water for IER destruction showed that degradation rates higher than 99% are difficult to obtain even using a catalyst or a large oxidant excess. In this study, a co-fuel, isopropanol, has been used in order to improve degradation rates by initiating the oxidation reaction and increasing temperature of the reaction medium. Concentrations up to 20 wt% were tested for anionic and cationic resins. Total organic carbon reduction rates higher than 99% were obtained from this process, without the use of a catalyst. The influence of operating parameters such as IERs feed concentration, nature and counterions of exchanged IERs were also studied. (authors)

  13. Spleen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spleen. Sickle cell anemia . Splenic artery aneurysm (rare). Trauma to the spleen. Risks Risks for anesthesia and surgery in general ... removal - series References Brandow AM, Camitta BM. Hyposplenism, splenic trauma, and splenectomy. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. ...

  14. Characteristics of competitive uptake between Microcystin-LR and natural organic matter (NOM) fractions using strongly basic anion exchange resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Fuhar; Barbeau, Benoit; Mohseni, Madjid

    2018-03-29

    Microcystins are the most commonly occurring cyanotoxins, and have been extensively studied across the globe. In the present study, a strongly basic anion exchange resin was employed to investigate the removal of Microcystin-LR (MCLR), one of the most toxic microcystin variants. Factors influencing the uptake behavior included the MCLR and resin concentrations, resin dosage, and natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics, specifically, the charge density and molecular weight distribution of source water NOM. Equivalent background concentration (EBC) was employed to evaluate the competitive uptake between NOM and MCLR. The experimental data were compared with different mathematical and physical models and pore diffusion was determined as the rate-limiting step. The resin dose/solute concentration ratio played a key role in the MCLR uptake process and MCLR removal was attributed primarily to electrostatic attractions. Charge density and molecular weight distribution of the background NOM fractions played a major role in MCLR removal at lower resin dosages (200 mg/L ∼ 1 mL/L and below), where a competitive uptake was observed due to the limited exchange sites. Further, evidences of pore blockage and site reduction were also observed in the presence of humics and larger molecular weight organic fractions, where a four-fold reduction in the MCLR uptake was observed. Comparable results were obtained for laboratory studies on synthetic laboratory water and surface water under similar conditions. Given their excellent performance and low cost, anion exchange resins are expected to present promising potentials for applications involving the removal of removal of algal toxins and NOM from surface waters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiolytic preparation of thin Au film directly on resin substrate using high-energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, Yuji, E-mail: okubo@upst.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Seino, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kugai, Junichiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ueno, Koji [Japan Electron Beam Irradiation Service Ltd., 5-3 Ozushima, Izumiohtsu, Osaka 595-0074 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takao A. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    A novel method for preparing thin Au films directly on resin substrates using an electron beam was developed. The thin Au films were prepared on a resin substrate by the reduction of Au ions in an aqueous solution via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam (4.8 MeV). This reduction method required 7 s of the irradiation time of the electron beam. Furthermore, no reductant or catalyst was needed. As the concentration of Au ions in the precursor solution was increased, the amount of Au deposited on the resin substrate increased, too, and the structure of the prepared Au film changed. As a result, the film color changed as well. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscope images of the thus-prepared Au film indicated that the Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. There was strong adhesion between the Au films and the underlying resin substrates. This was confirmed by the tape-peeling test and through ultrasonic cleaning. After both processes, Au remained on the resin substrates, while most of the particle-like moieties were removed. This indicated that the thin Au films prepared via irradiation with a high-energy electron beam adhered strongly to the resin substrates. - Highlights: • A thin gold (Au) film was formed by EBIRM for the first time. • The irradiation time of the electron beam was less than 10 s. • Thin Au films were obtained without reductant or catalyst. • Au films were consisted of two layers: a particle layer and a bottom bulk layer. • There was strong adhesion between the bottom bulk layer and the underlying resin substrates.

  16. Temperature-dependence of creep behaviour of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2013-04-01

    To determine the effect of temperature, over a clinically relevant range, on the creep behaviour of a set of conventional and flowable resin-composites including two subgroups having the same resin matrix and varied filler loading. Eight dental resin-composites: four flowable and four conventional were investigated. Stainless steel split moulds (4 mm × 6 mm) were used to prepare cylindrical specimens for creep examination. Specimens were irradiated in the moulds in layers of 2mm thickness (40s each), as well as from the radial direction after removal from the moulds, using a light-curing unit with irradiance of 650 mW/cm(2). A total of 15 specimens from each material were prepared and divided into three groups (n=5) according to the temperature; Group I: (23°C), Group II: (37°C) and Group III: (45°C). Each specimen was loaded (20 MPa) for 2h and unloaded for 2h. Creep was measured continuously over the loading and unloading periods. At higher temperatures greater creep and permanent set were recorded. The lowest mean creep occurred with GS and GH resin-composites. Percentage of creep recovery decreased at higher temperatures. At 23°C, the materials exhibited comparable creep. At 37°C and 45°C, however, there was a greater variation between materials. For all resin-composites, there was a strong linear correlation with temperature for both creep and permanent set. Creep parameters of resin-composites are sensitive to temperature increase from 23 to 45°C, as can occur intra-orally. For a given resin matrix, creep decreased with higher filler loading. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Biodiesel purification methodology produced in the RECOPE experimental plant, using ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon Hernandez, Teresita

    2016-01-01

    A methodology was proposed for the biodisel purification of crude palm oil produced in a plant located on the Refinadora Costarricense de Petroleo (RECOPE) campus in Alto de Ochomogo, using ion exchange resins. A comparison between two resins was carried out: the USF C-211H, which had been acquired together with the RECOPE experimental plant and the PD206 resin, which was in the process of being acquired at the time of starting the project. The biodisel was eluted by glass columns packed with each resin, to determine the saturation of the same. The percentage of free and bound glycerin and the presence of soaps were analyzed as response variables. With the results obtained, it was determined that the PD206 resin is more efficient in the removal of glycerin, soaps and methanol than the resin USF C-211H. However, neither of the two resins diminishes the acidity of the biodisel. A biodisel sample was eluted by the PD206 resin and the quality of the obtained product was analyzed. A flash point of 145 degrees was obtained. A total acid number of 0.82 mg KOH / G was shown, no presence of water or sediment was observed. The percentage value of carbon residue was 0.01% m / m, the cloud point was 12 degrees, the density at 15 degrees was 0.8713 g / cm 3 , the viscosity at 40 degrees was 2.75 mm 2 /s; the stability to oxidation was 14.5 h, the percentage of free glycerin was 0.01% m / m and the percentage of total glycerin was 0.06% m / m, finally a percentage of Fatty Acids Methyl Esters (FAME) of 98,6%. Of the analyzed parameters, all are within the limits established in the Reglamento Tecnico Centroamericano except the acidity value, which exceeds the maximum value of 0.05 mg KOH / g sample. An economic analysis was carried out to evaluate which resin provides the best option to complete the purification process of the biodisel produced. The PD206, despite being more expensive, purifies a larger volume of biodiesel, so for a better negotiation in the purchase price, this

  18. Decomposing method for ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Takeshi; Sato, Shinshi; Akai, Yoshie; Moniwa, Shinobu; Yamada, Kazuo

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method of decomposing ion exchange resins generated in a nuclear power plant to carbon dioxide reliably in a short period of time. (1) The ion exchange resins are mixed with water, and then they are kept for a predetermined period of time in the presence of an inert gas at high temperature and high pressure exceeding the critical point of water to decompose the ion exchange resins. (2) The ion exchange resins is mixed with water, an oxidant is added and they are kept for a predetermined time in the presence of an inert gas at a high temperature and a high pressure exceeding a critical point of water of an inert gas at a high temperature to decompose the ion exchange resins. (3) An alkali or acid is added to ion exchange resins and water to control the hydrogen ion concentration in the solution and the ion exchange resins are decomposed in above-mentioned (1) or (2). Sodium hydroxide is used as the alkali and hydrochloric acid is used as the acid. In addition, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide or ozone is used as an oxidant. (I.S.)

  19. Use of Anion Exchange Resins for One-Step Processing of Algae from Harvest to Biofuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poenie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Some microalgae are particularly attractive as a renewable feedstock for biodiesel production due to their rapid growth, high content of triacylglycerols, and ability to be grown on non-arable land. Unfortunately, obtaining oil from algae is currently cost prohibitive in part due to the need to pump and process large volumes of dilute algal suspensions. In an effort to circumvent this problem, we have explored the use of anion exchange resins for simplifying the processing of algae to biofuel. Anion exchange resins can bind and accumulate the algal cells out of suspension to form a dewatered concentrate. Treatment of the resin-bound algae with sulfuric acid/methanol elutes the algae and regenerates the resin while converting algal lipids to biodiesel. Hydrophobic polymers can remove biodiesel from the sulfuric acid/methanol, allowing the transesterification reagent to be reused. We show that in situ transesterification of algal lipids can efficiently convert algal lipids to fatty acid methyl esters while allowing the resin and transesterification reagent to be recycled numerous times without loss of effectiveness.

  20. Phosphorus recovery as struvite from eutropic waters by XDA-7 resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanwen; Ye, Zhiping; Lin, Ying; Wang, Fengying

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus releases into aquatic environment and its subsequent contribution to eutrophication have resulted in a widespread global pollution issue. However, phosphorus is a non-renewable source. The potential supplies of phosphorus are decreasing worldwide. Therefore, removal and recovery of phosphorus from the eutropic waters is important, emergent and necessary. In this research, experiments for recovering phosphate from eutropic waters by anion exchange combined with struvite precipitation were conducted. The results indicated that the prepared XDA-7 resin was an effective adsorbent for phosphate. The adsorption isotherm of XDA-7 resin was found to be a modified Freundlich type. The maximum phosphate adsorption (20.9 mg/g) occurred in the pH range of 6.0-8.0. Phosphate adsorbed on the XDA-7 resin was effectively desorbed with 8% NaCl solution, and the resin was able to be regenerated with 3% NaClO and 4% NaOH solutions. Phosphate desorbed from the resin was recovered as magnesium ammonium phosphate (struvite). The obtained struvite was analyzed by acid dissolution method, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The struvite precipitate was found to be 75.8% in purity, a high-value fertilizer.

  1. Surface morphology changes of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucio Serra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The finishing and polishing phases are essential to improve smoothness and shining on the surface of acrylic resins used to make removable orthodontic appliances. A good surface finishing reduces roughness, which facilitates hygiene, prevents staining and provides greater comfort to the patients. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper was to analyze the changes on surface morphology of acrylic resins during finishing and polishing phases. METHODS: Thirty discs (10 mm in diameter and 5 mm in length were made with acrylic resin and randomly divided into ten groups. The control group did not receive any treatment while the other groups received gradual finishing and polishing. The last group received the entire finishing and polishing procedures. Surface morphology was qualitatively analyzed through scanning electron microscopy and quantitatively analyzed through a laser profilometer test. RESULTS: The acrylic resin surfaces without treatment showed bubbles which were not observed in the subsequent phases. Wearing out with multilaminated burs, finishing with wood sandpaper and finishing with water sandpaper resulted in surfaces with decreasing irregularities. The surfaces that were polished with pumice and with low abrasive liquids showed high superficial smoothness. CONCLUSION: Highly smooth acrylic resin surfaces can be obtained after mechanical finishing and polishing performed with multilaminated burs, wood sandpaper, water sandpaper, pumice and low abrasive liquids.

  2. Pyrolysis of Spent Ion Exchange Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braehler, Georg; Slametschka, Rainer

    2012-09-01

    Ion exchangers (IEX in international language) are used to remove radionuclides from the primary coolant in all nuclear power stations with a water cooling circuit. This is done by continuously removing a volume of coolant from the primary circuit and passing it through coolers, filters and the ion exchange beds. Cation and anion exchangers, in the form of coarse-grained resin beads in pressurized-water reactors and as finely ground powdered resins in boiling water reactors, are used. The trend for new power stations is to exploit all the possibilities for avoiding the generation of contaminated liquids and then to clean, as far as possible, the solutions that are nevertheless generated using ion exchange for it to be possible to dispose of them as non-radioactive waste. This relieves the burden on evaporator facilities, or means that these can even be dispensed with entirely. Regeneration is possible in principle, but little use is made of it. As the regeneration usual in conventional technologies is not employed in nuclear power stations, it is necessary to dispose of this material as radioactive waste. On the international level, a great number of processes are offered that are intended to meet the relevant national regulations, and these will be discussed in brief with their advantages and disadvantages. The aim is then to find a process which reduces the volume, yields an inert or mineralized product, works at temperatures of no more than approximately 600 deg. C and can be run in a simple facility. Originally, the pyrolysis process was developed to treat liquid organic waste from reprocessing. A typical application is the decomposition of spent solvent (TBP, tributyl phosphate, mixed with kerosene). In this process TBP is pyrolyzed together with calcium hydroxide in a fluidized bed facility at temperatures of around 500 deg. C, the calcium hydroxide reacts with the phosphate groups directly to form calcium pyrophosphate which contains all the radioactivity

  3. Posterior bulk-filled resin composite restorations.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    up to 4mm as needed to fill the cavity 2mm short of the occlusal cavosurface. The occlusal part was completed with the nano-hybrid resin composite (Ceram X mono+). In the other cavity, the resin composite-only (Ceram X mono+) was placed in 2mm increments. The restorations were evaluated using...... Class II, 4 SDR-CeramX mono+ and 6 CeramXmono+-only restorations. The main reasons for failurewere tooth fracture (6) and secondary caries (4). The annual failure rate (AFR) for all restorations (Class I and II) was for the bulk-filled-1.1% and for the resin composite-only restorations 1...

  4. Thermosetting resins for nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M.

    1985-01-01

    Several new thermosetting resins with a three dimensional network structure like CR-39 were polymerized to study their characteristics for use as nuclear track detectors. During the course of this study, thermosetting resins with good etching properties and various sensitivities have been obtained. The comparison of the molecular structures of these resins gives up an important clue for the development of highly sensitive polymeric track detectors. They will also be useful for observations of ultra-heavy cosmic rays and heavily ionizing particles at low energies. (orig.)

  5. Thermosetting resins for nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Masami; Yokota, Rikio

    1985-01-01

    Several new thermosetting resins with a three dimensional network structure like CR-39 were polymerized to study their characteristics for use as nuclear track detectors. During the course of this study, thermosetting resins with good etching properties and various sensitivities have been obtained. The comparison of the molecular structures of these resins gives us an important clue for the development of highly sensitive polymeric track detectors. They will also be useful for observations of ultra-heavy cosmic rays and heavily ionizing particles at low energies. (author)

  6. Incineration of ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkiainen, M.; Nykyri, M.

    1985-01-01

    Incineration of ion-exchange resins in a fluidized bed was studied on a pilot plant scale at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. Both granular and powdered resins were incinerated in dry and slurry form. Different bed materials were used in order to trap as much cesium and cobalt (inactive tracers) as possible in the bed. Also the sintering of the bed materials was studied in the presence of sodium. When immobilized with cement the volume of ash-concrete is 4 to 22% of the concrete of equal compressive strength acquired by direct solidification. Two examples of multi-purpose equipment capable of incinerating ion-exchange resins are presented. (orig.)

  7. SEM and elemental analysis of composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoda, H.; Yamada, T.; Inokoshi, S.

    1990-01-01

    Twenty-four chemically cured, 21 light-cured anterior, three light-cured anterior/posterior, and 18 light-cured posterior composite resins were examined using scanning electron microscopy, and the elemental composition of their filler particles was analyzed with an energy dispersive electron probe microanalyzer. According to the results obtained, the composite resins were divided into five groups (traditional, microfilled type, submicrofilled type, hybrid type, and semihybrid), with two additional hypothetical categories (microfilled and hybrid). Characteristics of each type were described with clinical indications for selective guidance of respective composite resins for clinical use

  8. Thermosetting behavior of pitch-resin from heavy residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qingfang, Z.; Yansheng, G.; Baohua, H.; Yuzhen, Z. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Dongying, Shandong (China). State Key LAboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Heavy Oil Research Inst.

    2006-07-01

    Thermosetting resins are widely employed as a basic matrix for c/c composites in carbon materials production. A new type of synthesized thermosetting resin is called pitch resin. Pitch resin is a cheaper resin and possesses a potential opportunity for future use. However, the thermosetting behavior of pitch resin is not very clear. The hardening process and conditions for thermosetting are very important for future use of pitch resin. B-stage pitch resin is a soluble and meltable inter-media condensed polymer, which is not fully reacted and is of a low molecular weight. The insoluble and unmelted pitch resin can only be obtained from synthesized B-stage resin after a hardening stage. This paper presented an experiment that synthesized B-stage pitch resin with a link agent (PXG) under catalyst action from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) of the slurry's aromatic enriched component (FCCDF). The paper discussed the experiment, including the synthesis of pitch resin and thermosetting of pitch resin. Two kinds of thermosetting procedures were used in the study called one-step thermosetting and two-step thermosetting. It was concluded that the B-stage pitch resin could be hardened after a thermosetting procedure by heat treatment. The thermosetting pitch resin from 2-step thermosetting possesses was found to have better thermal resistant properties than that of the 1-step thermosetting pitch resin. 13 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  9. Condensate-polisher resin-leakage quantification and resin-transport studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, C.C.; Doss, P.L.

    1983-04-01

    The objectives of this program were to: (1) determine the extent of resin leakage from current generation condensate polisher systems, both deep bed and powdered resin design, during cut-in, steady-state and flow transient operation, (2) analyze moisture separator drains and other secondary system samples for resin fragments and (3) document the level of organics in the secondary system. Resin leakage samples were obtained from nine-power stations that have either recirculating steam generators or once through steam generators. Secondary system samples were obtained from steam generator feedwater, recirculating steam generator blowdown and moisture separator drains. Analysis included ultraviolet light examination, SEM/EDX, resin quantification and infrared analysis. Data obtained from the various plants were compared and factors affecting resin leakage were summarized

  10. The mechanism of uranium adsorption on Resin 508 and isoelectric point of the resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Qingping; Lu Weichang; Su Huijuan; Hu Jinbo; Zhang Liqin; Chen Banglin

    1990-01-01

    The adsorption process of uranium by Resin 508 at the solid-liquid interface was investigated and the mechanism of uranium adsorption including adsorption dynamics, adsorption thermodynamics and isoelectric point of resin was studied. The results are as follows: The maximum of uranium adsorption is attained at pH5-7; Uranium adsorption isotherm by Resin 508 in experimental conditions agrees with Langmuir's adsorption isotherm, the maximum of uranium adsorbed (Vm) is 716 mg U/g-dried resin; The adsorption of uranium by Resin 508 is an endothermic reaction and ΔH = 16.87 kJ/mol; The exchange-adsorption rate is mainly controlled by liquid film diffusion; The isoelectric points of Resin 508 before and after uranium adsorption are found to be pH7.5 and pH5.7 respectively. It is a specific adsorption for uranium

  11. Hair Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hædersdal, Merete

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  12. Hair removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, Merete; Haak, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Hair removal with optical devices has become a popular mainstream treatment that today is considered the most efficient method for the reduction of unwanted hair. Photothermal destruction of hair follicles constitutes the fundamental concept of hair removal with red and near-infrared wavelengths...... suitable for targeting follicular and hair shaft melanin: normal mode ruby laser (694 nm), normal mode alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), long-pulse Nd:YAG laser (1,064 nm), and intense pulsed light (IPL) sources (590-1,200 nm). The ideal patient has thick dark terminal hair......, white skin, and a normal hormonal status. Currently, no method of lifelong permanent hair eradication is available, and it is important that patients have realistic expectations. Substantial evidence has been found for short-term hair removal efficacy of up to 6 months after treatment with the available...

  13. Extracorporeal adsorption of anti-factor VIII allo-antibodies on randomly functionalized polystyrene resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Hélène-Céline; Lasne, Dominique; Rothschild, Chantal; Siali, Rosa; Jozefonvicz, Jacqueline

    2004-02-01

    The occurrence of anti-factor VIII (FVIII) allo-antibodies is a severe complication of the treatment of haemophilia A patients, leading to the inhibition of transfused FVIII activity. The effective elimination of these inhibitory antibodies plays a decisive role in the management of affected patients. To achieve this, immunoadsorption devices employing synthetic adsorbers, which selectively eliminate inhibitors, are of interest in the treatment strategy of haemophilia A patients with inhibitors. Adsorbers consisting of polystyrene-based beads substituted with sulphonate and L-tyrosyl methylester groups, which mimic part of epitope of FVIII molecule recognized by inhibitors, exhibit selective binding capacities towards anti-FVIII antibodies. The adsorption of FVIII inhibitors was investigated by simulating an extracorporeal circulation of haemophilic plasma over these functionalized resins. These innovative adsorbers are able to remove around 25% of anti-FVIII antibodies in 15 minutes depending on the plasma tested. Furthermore, they do not modify the amount of essential plasmatic proteins or residual immunoglobulins G. Experiments which were carried out using different plasmas with various inhibitor titres demonstrate a good reproducibility regarding the adsorption capacity of the synthetic resin. The characteristics of adsorption are similar on either native or regenerated resins. Both the purely synthetic nature of the resin and its easy processability demonstrate the real advantages over currently available protocols. This synthetic adsorber is a major technological advance in selective removal of FVIII inhibitory antibodies.

  14. Expansive failure reactions and their prevention in the encapsulation of phenol formaldehyde type ion exchange resins in cement based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constable, M.; Howard, C.G.; Johnson, M.A.; Jolliffe, C.B. (AEA Decommissioning and Waste Management, Winfrith (United Kingdom)); Sellers, R.M. (Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    Lewatit DN is a phenol formaldehyde based ion exchange resin used to remove radioactive caesium from liquid waste streams such as fuel cooling ponds and effluents. This paper presents the results of a study of the encapsulation of the bead form of the resin in cement with particular reference to the mechanisms of its interaction with the encapsulant. When incorporated in pure ordinary Portland cement (OPC) at loadings in excess of 15 wt % an unstable product results due to expansion of the systems and at higher waste loadings failure results after only a few days. Evidence from differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy all indicate the cause of the expansive reaction to be the formation of crystals of calcium salts around and within the resin beads. Addition of BFS and sodium hydroxide prevent the formation of these salts by removal of calcium hydroxide from the system in other reactions. (author).

  15. 5-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin modified glass ionomer restorative system in non-carious cervical lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Eduardo Batista; Benetti, Ana Raquel; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions.......To comparatively assess the 5-year clinical performance of a 1-bottle adhesive and resin composite system with a resin-modified glass ionomer restorative in non-carious cervical lesions....

  16. Nanosilica Modification of Elastomer-Modified VARTM Epoxy Resins for Improved Resin and Composite Toughness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robinette, Jason; Bujanda, Andres; DeSchepper, Daniel; Dibelka, Jessica; Costanzo, Philip; Jensen, Robert; McKnight, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Recent publications have reported a synergy between rubber and silica in modified epoxy resins that results in significantly improved fracture toughness without reductions in other material properties...

  17. A method for producing a hydrocarbon resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsachev, A B; Andonov, K S; Igliyev, S P

    1980-11-25

    Rock coal resin (KS), for instance, with a relative density of 1,150 to 1,190 kilograms per cubic meter, which contains 8 to 10 percent naphthaline, 1.5 to 2.8 percent phenol and 6 to 15 percent substances insoluble in toluene, or its mixture with rock coal or oil fractions of resin are subjected to distillation (Ds) in a pipe furnace with two evaporators (Is) and a distillation tower with a temperature mode in the second stage of 320 to 360 degrees and 290 to 340 degrees in the pitch compartment. A hydrocarbon resin is produced with a high carbon content, especially for the production of resin and dolomite refractory materials, as well as fuel mixtures for blast furnace and open hearth industry.

  18. Synthesis of improved phenolic and polyester resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delano, C. B.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-seven cured phenolic resin compositions were prepared and tested for their ability to provide improved char residues and moisture resistance over state of the art epoxy resin composite matrices. Cyanate, epoxy novolac and vinyl ester resins were investigated. Char promoter additives were found to increase the anaerobic char yield at 800 C of epoxy novolacs and vinyl esters. Moisture resistant cyanate and vinyl ester compositions were investigated as composite matrices with Thornel 300 graphite fiber. A cyanate composite matrix provided state of the art composite mechanical properties before and after humidity exposure and an anaerobic char yield of 46 percent at 800 C. The outstanding moisture resistance of the matrix was not completely realized in the composite. Vinyl ester resins showed promise as candidates for improved composite matrix systems.

  19. Integrating Porous Resins In Enzymatic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Haque, Naweed

    . Screening resins for moderately hydrophobic multi-component systems is challenging. Often it is found that the capacity of the resin is inversely related with product selectivity. Therefore a tradeoff has to be made between these parameters which can be crucial from an economic point of view. A low resin...... procedure. The screening therefore becomes a multi-objective task that has to be solved simultaneously. Such an approach has been applied in the method formulated in this framework. To overcome these challenges, different process strategies are required to obtain high yields. A number of different...... inhibition, has gained considerable recognition. The resins act as a reservoir for the inhibitory substrate and a sink for the inhibitory product and simultaneously attain the required high substrate loading to make the process economically feasible. In this way the potential benefit of the enzyme can...

  20. Feasibility of vitrifying EPICOR II organic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Two laboratory-scale runs have recently been completed to test the feasibility of a single-step incineration/vitrification process for Three Mile Island EPICOR II resins. The process utilizes vitrification equipment, specifically a 15-cm-dia in-can melter, and a specially designed feed technique. Two process tests, each conducted with 1.2 kg of EPICOR II resins loaded with nonradioactive cesium and strontium, showed excellent operational characteristics. Less than 0.8 wt% of the resins were entrained with the gaseous effluents in the second test. Cesium and strontium losses were controlled to 0.71 wt% and less. In addition, all the carbonaceous resins were converted completely to CO 2 with no detectable CO. Future activities are being directed to longer-term tests in laboratory-scale equipment to determine attainable volume reduction, process rates, and material conformance to processing conditions

  1. Photopolymerizable silicone monomers, oligomers, and resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobine, A.F.; Nakos, S.T.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to acquaint the general photopolymer researcher with the historical development of the chemistry and technology of photopolymerizable silicone monomers, fluids, and resins. The current status of research in these areas is assessed. The focus of this chapter is not only on the polymer chemistry and application of this technology, but also on important aspects of the synthetic chemistry involved in the preparation of UV-curable silicone monomers, oligomers, and resins. 236 refs., 6 tabs

  2. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  3. Volumetric polymerization shrinkage of contemporary composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Nagem Filho

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (a or = 0.05 was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01 and Definite (1.89±0.01 shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06, Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03, and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02 presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation.

  4. Copper Removal from A-01 Outfall by Ion Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oji, L.N.

    1999-01-01

    Chelex100, a commercially available ion exchange resin, has been identified in this study as having a significant affinity for copper and zinc in the A-01 outfall water. Removal of copper and zinc from A-01 outfall water will ensure that the outfall meets the state of South Carolina's limit on these heavy metals

  5. [Shaping ability of multi-taper nickel-titanium files in simulated resin curved root canal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong-Xia; Huang, Ding-Ming; Jia, Liu-He; Luo, Shi-Gao; Gao, Xiao-Jie; Tan, Hong; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2006-08-01

    To compare the shaping ability of ISO standard stainless steel K files and multi-taper ProTaper nickel-titanium files in simulated resin curved root canals. METHODS Thirty simulated resin root canals were randomly divided into three groups and prepared by stainless steel K files, hand ProTaper, rotary ProTaper, respectively. The amount of material removed from inner and outer wall and canal width after canal preparation was measured, while the canal curvature before and after canal preparation and canals aberrations were recorded. The stainless steel K files removed more material than hand ProTaper and rotary ProTaper at the outer side of apex and inner side of curvature (P ProTaper group (P ProTaper had no evident aberration. The shaping ability of ProTaper is better than stainless steel K files.

  6. Kinetic and isotherm studies of Cu(II) biosorption onto valonia tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengil, I. Ayhan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, 54100 Sakarya (Turkey)], E-mail: asengil@sakarya.edu.tr; Ozacar, Mahmut [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Sakarya University, 54100 Sakarya (Turkey); Tuerkmenler, Harun [Institute of Sciences and Technology, Sakarya University, 54040 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The biosorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions by valonia tannin resin was investigated as a function of particle size, initial pH, contact time and initial metal ion concentration. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms that govern copper removal and find a suitable equilibrium isotherm and kinetic model for the copper removal in a batch reactor. The experimental isotherm data were analysed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. The equilibrium data fit well in the Langmuir isotherm. The experimental data were analysed using four sorption kinetic models - the pseudo-first- and second-order equations, the Elovich and the intraparticle diffusion model equation - to determine the best fit equation for the biosorption of copper ions onto valonia tannin resin. Results show that the pseudo-second-order equation provides the best correlation for the biosorption process, whereas the Elovich equation also fits the experimental data well.

  7. Cesium Isotherm Testing with Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin at High Sodium Concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fiskum, Sandra K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smoot, Margaret R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rinehart, Donald E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing a Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) to provide low-activity waste (LAW) directly to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low-Activity Waste Facility for immobilization. The pretreatment that will be conducted on tank waste supernate at the LAWPS facility entails filtration to remove entrained solids and cesium (Cs) ion exchange to remove Cs from the product sent to the WTP. Currently, spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin (Microbeads AS, Skedsmokorset, Norway) is the Cs ion exchange resin of choice. Most work on Cs ion exchange efficacy in Hanford tank waste has been conducted at nominally 5 M sodium (Na). WRPS is examining the possibility of processing supernatant at high Na concentrations—up to 8 M Na—to maximize processing efficiency through the LAWPS. Minimal Cs ion exchange work has been conducted at 6 M and 8 M Na concentrations..

  8. Studies of decontamination using easy removable coatings technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oglaza, J.; Nowak, Z.

    1991-01-01

    The usefulness of removable coatings for decontamination of steel and epoxy-resin painted surfaces was examined. Natural latex, Revultex, butadiene-styrene latex as well as mixtures of latex with complexing agents and surfactants were used as decontaminating coats. The best decontamination was obtained by removable coatings of natural latex with EDTA additive for all surfaces and radionuclides tested. (author). 16 refs, 5 tabs

  9. Surface Engineering of PAMAM-SDB Chelating Resin with Diglycolamic Acid (DGA) Functional Group for Efficient Sorption of U(VI) and Th(IV) from Aqueous Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaiyaraja, P.; Venkatraman, B., E-mail: chemila07@gmail.com [Radiological Safety Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Deb, A.K. Singha [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Ponraju, D. [Safety Engineering Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ali, Sk. Musharaf [Chemical Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • A new DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin has been synthesized for actinide sorption. • Maximum sorption capacities of resin are 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1}for U(VI) and Th(IV). • DGA-PAMAM-SDB chelating resin could be regenerated and reused. • DFT calculation of actinides interaction with resin corroborates the experimental. • Resin is effective for sorption of actinides from both aqueous and HNO{sub 3} medium. - Abstract: A novel chelating resin obtained via growth of PAMAM dendron on surface of styrene divinyl benzene resin beads, followed by diglycolamic acid functionalization of the dendrimer terminal. Batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of pH, nitric acid concentration, amount of adsorbent, shaking time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature on U(VI) and Th(IV) adsorption efficiency. Diglycolamic acid terminated PAMAM dendrimer functionalized styrene divinylbenzene chelating resin (DGA-PAMAM-SDB) is found to be an efficient candidate for the removal of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions from aqueous (pH > 4) and nitric acid media (> 3 M). The sorption equilibrium could be reached within 60 min, and the experimental data fits with pseudo-second-order model. Langmuir sorption isotherm model correlates well with sorption equilibrium data. The maximum U(VI) and Th(IV) sorption capacity onto DGA-PAMAMG{sub 5}-SDB was estimated to be about 682 and 544.2 mg g{sup −1} respectively at 25 °C. The interaction of actinides and chelating resin is reversible and hence, the resin can be regenerated and reused. DFT calculation on the interaction of U(VI) and Th(IV) ions with chelating resin validates the experimental findings.

  10. The recovery of gold from the aqua regia leachate of electronic parts using a core–shell type anion exchange resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cyganowski

    2017-09-01

    The investigated resins revealed great selectivity towards gold. Despite the fact that the obtained solutions contained only 1.5% (CPU or 0.1% (PIN of Au, its removal reached 86% and the logarithms of partition coefficients indicate that affinity of the applied resins to gold is almost ten times greater than the very competitive nickel present in the obtained solutions. Finally, the gold-containing core–shell polymers were effectively eluted, recovering 100% of the taken from the solutions gold.

  11. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-01-01

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and

  12. New system applying image processor to automatically separate cation exchange resin and anion exchange resin for condensate demineralizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tsuneyasu; Nagao, Nobuaki; Yoshimori, Yasuhide; Inoue, Takashi; Yoda, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    In PWR plant, condensate demineralizer is equipped to remove corrosive ion in condensate water. Mixed bed packing cation exchange resin (CER) and anion exchange resin (AER) is generally applied, and these are regenerated after separation to each layer periodically. Since the AER particle is slightly lighter than the CER particle, the AER layer is brought up onto the CER layer by feeding water upward from the bottom of column (backwashing). The separation performance is affected by flow rate and temperature of water for backwashing, so normally operators set the proper condition parameters regarding separation manually every time for regeneration. The authors have developed the new separation system applying CCD camera and image processor. The system is comprised of CCD camera, LED lamp, image processor, controller, flow control valves and background color panel. Blue color of the panel, which is corresponding to the complementary color against both ivory color of AER and brown color of CER, is key to secure the system precision. At first the color image of the CER via the CCD camera is digitized and memorized by the image processor. The color of CER in the field of vision of the camera is scanned by the image processor, and the position where the maximum difference of digitized color index is indicated is judged as the interface. The detected interface is able to make the accordance with the set point by adjusting the flow rate of backwashing. By adopting the blue background panel, it is also possible to draw the AER out of the column since detecting the interface of the CER clearly. The system has provided the reduction of instability factor concerning separation of resin during regeneration process. The system has been adopted in two PWR plants in Japan, it has been demonstrating its stable and precise performance. (author)

  13. Thermal stability relationships between PMR-15 resin and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.; Jayne, Douglas; Leonhardt, Todd A.; Bors, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 matrix resin and the stability of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites that contain this resin as the matrix material. Three areas were investigated. The first was the effect of fiber/matrix interfacial bond strength on the isothermal aging weight loss of composites. By using type-A graphite fibers produced by Hercules, it was possible to study composites reinforced with fibers that were processed to receive different surface treatments. One of the fibers was untreated, a second fiber was treated by oxidation to enhance fiber/matrix bonding, and the third type of fiber was coated with an epoxy sizing. These treatments produced three significantly different interfacial bond strengths. The epoxy sizing on the third fiber was quickly oxidized from the bare fiber surfaces at 288, 316, and 343 C. The weight loss due to the removal of the sizing was constant at 1.5 percent. This initial weight loss was not observed in thermo-oxidative stability studies of composites. The PMR-15 matrix satisfactorily protected the reinforcemnt at all three temperatures.

  14. PETIs as High-Temperature Resin-Transfer-Molding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John N.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Compositions of, and processes for fabricating, high-temperature composite materials from phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) oligomers by resin-transfer molding (RTM) and resin infusion have been developed. Composites having a combination of excellent mechanical properties and long-term high-temperature stability have been readily fabricated. These materials are particularly useful for the fabrication of high-temperature structures for jet-engine components, structural components on highspeed aircraft, spacecraft, and missiles. Phenylethynyl-terminated amide acid oligomers that are precursors of PETI oligomers are easily made through the reaction of a mixture of aromatic diamines with aromatic dianhydrides at high stoichiometric offsets and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) as an end-capper in a polar solvent such as N-methylpyrrolidinone (NMP). These oligomers are subsequently cyclodehydrated -- for example, by heating the solution in the presence of toluene to remove the water by azeotropic distillation to form low-molecular-weight imide oligomers. More precisely, what is obtained is a mixture of PETI oligomeric species, spanning a range of molecular weights, that exhibits a stable melt viscosity of less than approximately 60 poise (and generally less than 10 poise) at a temperature below 300 deg C. After curing of the oligomers at a temperature of 371 deg C, the resulting polymer can have a glass-transition temperature (Tg) as high as 375 C, the exact value depending on the compositions.

  15. Removing Bureaucracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    11 Defense AT&L: July–August 2015 Removing Bureaucracy Katharina G. McFarland McFarland is Assistant Secretary of Defense for Acquisition. I once...involvement from all of the Service warfighting areas came together to scrub the program requirements due to concern over the “ bureaucracy ” and... Bureaucracy ” that focuses on reducing cycle time, staffing time and all forms of inefficiencies. This includes review of those burdens that Congress

  16. Immobilisation in cement of ion exchange resins arising from the purification of reagents used for the decontamination of reactor circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.; Lee, D.J.

    1988-04-01

    The aim of the programme is to show that ion exchange resins used to remove activity from decontaminating agents used in water reactors can be successfully immobilised in cement. To achieve this, blends of Ordinary Portland Cement and ground granulated Blast Furnace Slag (ratio 9:1) have been used. Improvements in the properties of the product and the waste loading of 50 w/o damp resin can be achieved using microsilica, a finely divided form of silicon dioxide, as an additive to the blended cement. This report contains data on the effects of anion resins, and mixed anion/cation resins, on the performance of the cemented product. The effects of organic acids, especially picolinic and formic acids, bound to anion resins have also been investigated. In addition, formulations developed have been assessed at commercial scale (200 litres of cemented product) for their process and product characteristics. The final part of the report deals with the long-term product performance of samples prepared from cation resins which are now nearly one year old. (author)

  17. Multi-podant diglycolamides and room temperature ionic liquid impregnated resins: An excellent combination for extraction chromatography of actinides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujar, R B; Ansari, S A; Verboom, W; Mohapatra, P K

    2016-05-27

    Extraction chromatography resins, prepared by impregnating two multi-podant diglycolamide ligands, viz. diglycolamide-functionalized calix[4]arene (C4DGA) and tripodal diglycolamide (T-DGA) dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (RTIL: C4mimTf2N) on Chromosorb-W (an inert solid support), gave excellent results for the removal of trivalent actinides from acidic waste solutions. Distribution coefficient measurements on several metal ions showed selective sorption of Am(III) over hexavalent uranyl ions and other fission product elements such as strontium and cesium. The sorbed metal ions could be efficiently desorbed with a complexing solution containing guanidine carbonate and EDTA buffer. The sorption of Am(III) on both resins followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics with rate constants of 1.37×10(-6) and 6.88×10(-7)g/cpmmin for T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The metal sorption on both resins indicated the Langmuir monolayer chemisorption phenomenon with Eu(III) sorption capacities of 4.83±0.21 and 0.52±0.05mg per g of T-DGA and C4DGA resins, respectively. The results of column studies show that these resins are of interest for a possible application for the recovery of hazardous trivalent actinides from dilute aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Yoshio Furuse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of saliva-contaminated resin-resin interfaces. Flat resin surfaces were fabricated. In the control group, no contamination or surface treatment was performed. The resin surfaces of the experimental groups were contaminated with saliva and air-dried, and then submitted to: (G1 rinsing with water and drying; (G2 application of an adhesive system; (G3 rinsing and drying, abrasion with finishing disks, etching and application of adhesive system; (G4 rinsing and drying, etching, application of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin-resin interfaces with saliva significantly reduced shear strength, especially after prolonged storage (p<0.05. Similar values to the original bond strength were obtained after abrasion and application of adhesive (G3 or etching and application of silane and adhesive (G4. If contamination occurs, a surface treatment is required to guarantee an adequate interaction between the resin increments.

  19. Bond strength of resin-resin interfaces contaminated with saliva and submitted to different surface treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2007-01-01

    of silane and adhesive system. Resin cylinders were placed over the treated surfaces. The specimens were stored in water or ethanol. Shear bond strength tests were performed and the mode of failure was evaluated. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Dunnett T3 test. Contamination of resin...

  20. Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing organics by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal Chetty, K.; Gamare, Jayashree S.; Vaidya, V.N.

    2004-01-01

    Removal of nitrate from ammonium hydroxide solution containing HMTA (hexamethyltetramine) and Urea was studied using indigenously available anion exchange resins. This type of waste is produced during nuclear fuel preparation by internal gelation process. The resins used are Tulsion A-27(MP) and Duolite A. 102D. The time of equilibration and capacity of the resins were determined from distribution ratios obtained by equilibrating resin with nitrate solution. The loading, washing and elution behavior of nitrate on these resins were studied using synthetic mixture having similar composition of the waste produced. Elution studies were carried out using sodium hydroxide, hydrochloric acid and ammonium chloride. The studies were also carried out at higher temperature of around 60 degC. The data was compared with that obtained using Dowex 1x4 for the same purpose. (author)

  1. [Acrylic resin reinforcement with metallic and nonmetallic inserts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preoteasa, Elena; Murariu, Cătălina Măgureanu; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora

    2007-01-01

    In the current use of acrylic resin for removable dentures and orthodontic treatments we are frequently facing the fact of base fracture. The repairing of this, determine most of the time, discomfort of the patient, by excluding the prosthetic device, affecting the treatment, loosing patient's time, doctor's time, implying the dental laboratory and extra expenses. The causes of fractures are many, from clinical cases with some specific anatomic and functional particularities, or parafunctional, to the incorrect designing, manufacturing or wearing of the prosthetic part, being connected with the materials characteristics. The consequences and costs of these fractures are leading to unsatisfying results in some of the clinical cases, in presence of parafunctions like bruxism or clenching and specifically for the new types of prosthetic rehabilitation, on natural teeth or implants.

  2. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, J.; Gillam, J.

    2008-01-01

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved

  3. Study of methods for removing strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from Savannah River Plant waste supernate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiley, J.R.

    1976-06-01

    As a part of long-term waste management studies at the Savannah River Laboratory, tests were made to study removal of strontium, plutonium, and ruthenium from simulated and actual waste supernates. Plutonium was sorbed by Duolite ARC-359 ion exchange resin, the same resin that is used to remove cesium from waste supernate. Strontium was removed from supernate by sorption on a chelating resin Chelex 100, or by precipitation as Sr 3 (PO 4 ) 2 . Activities of 137 Cs, 90 Sr, and 238-241 Pu remaining in processed waste supernate should be 1-10 nanocuries of each element per gram of salt. Of the methods that were tested, none was adequate for plant-scale removal of ruthenium

  4. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Centrifuge experiments for removal of aluminium turbidity from Dhruva heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetiya, R.S.; Unny, V.K.P.; Nayak, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Aluminium turbidity and associated radioactivity was observed in the moderator cum coolant system of Dhruva during initial power operation. Ion exchange resin beds of the purification system were not able to remove aluminium turbidity and radioactivity of system heavy water. Centrifuge technique was used as a convenient alternative method to remove the turbidity and radioactivity. (author)

  6. Factors governing the ability of clean-up plant to remove settling particles from contaminants: theory for stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longworth, J.P.

    1979-11-01

    Consideration is given to the processes by which particles are removed from fluid systems. In particular, it is noted that in tank, as opposed to loop, systems the natural process of gravitational settling competes with engineered removal systems. Calculational methods are given for estimating the relative amounts of settling and removal to clean-up plant for well-mixed fluids, unmixed fluids with horizontal or vertical flow, and turbulent diffusion with incomplete mixing. The criteria for complete mixing are discussed. (author)

  7. JASPAS programme task JC-4: Isotopic and isotope dilution analysis of spent fuel solutions by resin bead mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Terakado, S.; Kuno, Y.

    1988-05-01

    The use of resin beads for mass spectrometry of U and Pu has been extensively developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the USA and tested in a number of intercomparison experiments between the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory (SAL) of the IAEA and the Power Reactor and Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) - Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) in Japan. Resin beads represent a convenient way to concentrate the U and Pu in spent fuel dissolver solution samples from reprocessing facilities, with the added advantage that fission product elements and other actinides such as Am are removed. Measurements on the resin bead samples at SAL were performed on the ORNL-designed 2-Stage Mass Spectrometer. For the dried tracer samples, the U measurements were obtained on the VG54E instrument and the Pu results were obtained with the Finnigan MAT 261 of SAL. PNC/TRP used a VG54 mass spectrometer and obtained their mass fractionation correction factor for the resin bead measurements from the mixed tracer plus chemical standard resin bead samples. The Safeguards Laboratory (NMCC) used their MAT 260 instrument and obtained the fractionation correction factor from resin bead standards provided with the TIGR-82 programme. Both PNC/TRP and NMCC reported problems with obtaining a sufficient ion beam intensity with the resin bead samples. This problem was overcome by both labs and further improvements in the loading and measurement techniques can be expected to yield even better results. It has been demonstrated that the resin bed sampling method can provide results of sufficient quality for safeguards purposes. 2 refs, 3 figs, 16 tabs

  8. THE INFLUENCE OF MIEX® RESIN FOR WATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCYIN A HYBRID MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Rajca

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies related to the effectiveness of removal of natural organic matter (NOM from water using hybrid membrane reactor in which ion exchange and ultrafiltration processes were performed. MIEX® resin by Orica Watercare and immersed ultrafiltration polyvinylidene fluoride capillary module ZeeWeed 1 (ZW 1 by GE Power&Water operated at negative pressure were used. The application of multifunctional reactor had a positive effect on the removal of contaminants and enabled the production of high quality water. Additionally, in refer to single stage ultrafiltration it minimalized the occurrence of membrane fouling.

  9. Characterization of Polyimide Matrix Resins and Prepregs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximovich, M. G.; Galeos, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Graphite/polyimide composite materials are attractive candidates for a wide range of aerospace applications. They have many of the virtues of graphite/epoxies, i.e., high specific strengths and stiffness, and also outstanding thermal/oxidative stability. Yet they are not widely used in the aerospace industry due to problems of procesability. By their nature, modern addition polyimide (PI) resins and prepregs are more complex than epoxies; the key to processing lies in characterizing and understanding the materials. Chemical and rheological characterizations are carried out on several addition polyimide resins and graphite reinforced prepregs, including those based on PMR-15, LARC 160 (AP 22), LARC 160 (Curithane 103) and V378A. The use of a high range torque transducer with a Rheometrics mechanical spectrometer allows rheological data to be generated on prepreg materials as well as neat resins. The use of prepreg samples instead of neat resins eliminates the need for preimidization of the samples and the data correlates well with processing behavior found in the shop. Rheological characterization of the resins and prepregs finds significant differences not readily detected by conventional chemical characterization techniques.

  10. Milk removal

    OpenAIRE

    Ferneborg, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Milk from dairy cows is a staple dietary component for humans all over the world. Regardless of whether milk is consumed in its purest, unaltered form or as high-end products such as fine cheese or ice cream, it needs to be of high quality when taken from the cow, produced at a low price and produced in a system that consider aspects such as animal health, animal welfare and sustainability. This thesis investigated the role of milk removal and the importance of residual milk on milk yield...

  11. Removable partial dentures: clinical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review of the traditional clinical concepts for the design and fabrication of removable partial dentures (RPDs). Although classic theories and rules for RPD designs have been presented and should be followed, excellent clinical care for partially edentulous patients may also be achieved with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and unique blended designs. These nontraditional RPD designs and fabrication methods provide for improved fit, function, and esthetics by using computer-aided design software, composite resin for contours and morphology of abutment teeth, metal support structures for long edentulous spans and collapsed occlusal vertical dimensions, and flexible, nylon thermoplastic material for metal-supported clasp assemblies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 27 CFR 19.349 - Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mingled spirits or wines... of Spirits § 19.349 Mingled spirits or wines held in tanks. When spirits of less than 190 degrees of proof or wines are mingled in a tank, the proprietor shall gauge the spirits or wines in the tank and...

  13. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS & RADIOLOGICAL & TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2005-03-03

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farm safety analyses. The current revision also includes atmospheric dispersion coefficients used for analyses of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System. The basic equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included.

  14. ATR/OTR-SY Tank Camera Purge System and in Tank Color Video Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werry, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    This procedure will document the satisfactory operation of the 101-SY tank Camera Purge System (CPS) and 101-SY in tank Color Camera Video Imaging System (CCVIS). Included in the CPRS is the nitrogen purging system safety interlock which shuts down all the color video imaging system electronics within the 101-SY tank vapor space during loss of nitrogen purge pressure

  15. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  16. New Test Method for Rotating Spray Head Performance in Tank Cleaning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenby, Mette; Dethlefsen, Markus Wied; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk

    2011-01-01

    on a standardised stainless steel plate; positioning the steel plate in tank; record total cleaning time. The method was tested on four different RSHs from Alfa Laval. Cleaning times were recorded at different distances and flow rates. Using the new method, it is possible to distinguish between RSHs based...

  17. Ion chromatography for the analysis of salt splitting capacities of cation and anion resin in premixed resin sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Satinath; Kumar, Rakesh; Tripathy, M.K.; Dhole, K.; Sharma, R.S.; Varde, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    Mixed bed ion exchange resin is commonly used in various plants including nuclear reactors for the purpose of fine polishing. The analysis of ion exchange capacities of cation and anion resin in resin mixture is therefore an agenda in the context of purchasing of premixed resin from the manufacturer. An ion chromatographic method for assaying ion exchange capacities of pure as well as mixed resin has been optimized. The proposed method in contrast to the conventional ASTM method has been found to be quite encouraging to consider it as an alternate method for the analysis of premixed resin. (author)

  18. Ponderosa pine resin defenses and growth: metrics matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Sharon; Sala, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae) cause widespread tree mortality in coniferous forests worldwide. Constitutive and induced host defenses are important factors in an individual tree's ability to survive an attack and in bottom-up regulation of bark beetle population dynamics, yet quantifying defense levels is often difficult. For example, in Pinus spp., resin flow is important for resistance to bark beetles but is extremely variable among individuals and within a season. While resin is produced and stored in resin ducts, the specific resin duct metrics that best correlate with resin flow remain unclear. The ability and timing of some pine species to produce induced resin is also not well understood. We investigated (i) the relationships between ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) resin flow and axial resin duct characteristics, tree growth and physiological variables, and (ii) if mechanical wounding induces ponderosa pine resin flow and resin ducts in the absence of bark beetles. Resin flow increased later in the growing season under moderate water stress and was highest in faster growing trees. The best predictors of resin flow were nonstandardized measures of resin ducts, resin duct size and total resin duct area, both of which increased with tree growth. However, while faster growing trees tended to produce more resin, models of resin flow using only tree growth were not statistically significant. Further, the standardized measures of resin ducts, density and duct area relative to xylem area, decreased with tree growth rate, indicating that slower growing trees invested more in resin duct defenses per unit area of radial growth, despite a tendency to produce less resin overall. We also found that mechanical wounding induced ponderosa pine defenses, but this response was slow. Resin flow increased after 28 days, and resin duct production did not increase until the following year. These slow induced responses may allow

  19. Effect of a New Salivary Contaminant Removal Method on Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    was to evaluate the effect of various salivary- contaminant removal methods on the shear bond strength of resin cement to hydrofluoric-acid (HF) etched...mold (Ultradent) to a height of 3mm and light cured . Specimens were stored for 24 hours in 37°C distilled water and then tested in shear in a... contamination which may compromise the bond strength of the resin cement to the ceramic (Aboush, 1998; van Schalkwyk et al., 2003). Saliva affects bond

  20. Removal of plutonium from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions using anion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasar, U.M.; Pawar, S.M.; Joshi, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    An anion exchange method using Amberlyst A-26 (MP) resin was developed for removal of Pu from nitric acid-oxalic acid solutions without destroying oxalate. The method consists of sorption of Pu(IV) on Amberlyst A-26, a macroporous anion exchange resin, from nitric acid-oxalic acid medium in the presence of Al(NO 3 ) 3 . Pu(IV) breakthrough capacity of Amberlyst A-26 using synthetic feed solution was determined. (author)

  1. Necessity and opportunity of building a mobile facility for conditioning the spent ionic resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barariu, Gheorghe

    2002-01-01

    The ionic resins utilized in nuclear industry for purification of different working fluids become contaminated by important amounts of radionuclides incorporated in their structure. Thus, these resins become intermediate-level radioactive wastes, containing radioisotopes of rather long lifetimes, and so their conditioning is required to ensure binding and isolation of the radionuclides over a period long enough, until their decay. Binding the radionuclides in stable matrices and their isolation by means of engineered barriers ensures protection of environment against contamination. In the frame of Radioactive Waste Management Program related to Cernavoda NPP, optimal technologies for processing the radioactive waste generated during the NPP operation were developed and also a site for final disposal of the low and intermediate level waste was selected. The last one is a modern, ground repository with multiple engineered barriers based on the natural properties of the host geological formation. The final disposal concept implies building a conditioning facility to ensure: a super-compacting stage of the already compacted wastes; cementing the uncompactable wastes; cementing spent filters; cementing the pellets resulted from the super-compacting stage and drums with conditioned wastes in concrete modules; cementing the organic wastes; cementing the spent ionic resins by means of a mobile facility. The spent ionic resins removed from the technologic purification systems of the station are discharged by means of demineralized water and transferred, corresponding to source, to one of the 3 storage 200 m 3 basins from the basement of the CANDU 6 NPP servicing building. To avoid the danger of spent resins being cemented at basin's bottom the basins should be emptied at every 10-15 years. To comply with IAEA requirements concerning the radioactive waste final disposal, a procedure for establishing the quantitative concentration of solidification agents and additives

  2. Separation of boron isotopes by ion exchange chromatography: studies on regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, B.K.; Subramanian, R.; Mathur, P.K.

    1994-01-01

    The optimum conditions for the regeneration of strong base anion exchange resins of type-I and type-II were determined for cost-effective separation of isotopes of boron by ion exchange chromatography where the hydroxyl form of an anion exchange resin is equilibrated with boric acid solution containing mannitol as a complexing reagent. The possibility of using unspent alkali content of the effluent was also exploited. Removal of carbonate impurity from Rayon grade caustic lye (used as regenerant after dilution) and recycling of Ba(OH) 2 was studied to avoid waste disposal problems. (author)

  3. Immobilisation of ion exchange resins in cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, C.G.; Jolliffe, C.B.; Lee, D.J.

    1990-02-01

    Over the last seven years, Low Oxidation State Metal Ion reagents (LOMI) have been used to decontaminate the 100 MW(e) Steam Generating Heavy Water Ractor (SGHWR) at Winfrith. The use of these reagents has resulted in a dilute ionic solution containing activation products which are produced by corrosion of metallic components in the reactor. It has been demonstrated that the amount of activity in the solution can be reduced using organic ion exchanger resins. These resins consist of a cross linked polystyrene with sulphonic acid or quaternary ammonium function groups and can be successfully immobilised in blended cement systems. The formulation which has been developed is produced from a 9 to 1 blend of ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) and ordinary Portland cement (OPC) containing 28% ion exchange resin in the water saturated form. If 6% Microsilica is added to the blended cement the waste loading can be increased to 36 w/o. (author)

  4. Thermosetting resins for nuclear track detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, M.; Yokota, R.

    1986-01-01

    Several new thermosetting resins with a three dimensional network structure similar to that of CR-39 were polymerized to study their characteristics as nuclear track detectors. The comparison of the molecular structures of these resins gives us an important clue to develop highly sensitive polymeric track detectors. For example, butanediol bis allylcarbonate (BuAC) shows the sensitivity about ten times higher than diallyl and adipate (DAA). This suggests the carbonate groups in the BuAC molecule provide a much higher sensitivity than the ester groups in the DAA. During the course of this study, thermosetting resins with good etching properties and various sensitivities have been developed. Though the sensitivity of DAA is low, it will be useful for observations of ultra heavy cosmic rays and heavily ionizing particles at low energies. (author)

  5. Aging in CTBN modified epoxy resin stocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creed, K.E. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The cause of degradation in the glass transition temperature (T/sub G/) of a partially crystallized polymer was investigated. Sample epoxy resin filled capacitors were cured at 90 0 C for 24 hours, then stored at room atmospheric conditions. These showed typical degradation in T/sub G/ after storage for one month. One set of epoxy resin castings was stored at room atmosphere and another set was stored in a dry box at 0% relative humidity and 27 0 C. The samples at room atmospheric conditions showed typical degradation in T/sub G/, while the T/sub G/ for those stored in the dry box increased. Further tests were then made on epoxy resin castings at various curing temperatures and times at both room atmosphere and 0% humidity. Resulting data indicated that absorption of moisture during storage was the predominant cause of T/sub G/ degradation, with stress relaxation another, though smaller, contributing factor

  6. Restoration of traumatized teeth with resin composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Ulla; van Dijken, Jan WV

    2018-01-01

    For a long time, the primary choice for initial restoration of a crown-fractured front tooth has been resin composite material. The restoration can in most cases be performed immediately after injury if there is no sign of periodontal injury. The method’s adhesive character is conservative to tooth...... present an aesthetic problem due to exposure of un-aesthetic crown-margins. The invasive permanent crown restorations are therefore often not suc-cessful on a long-term scale. On the other hand, a conservative direct restoration of an extensively fractured incisor crown with resin composite may......-structure and with minimal risk of pulpal complication. In addition, it offers an aesthetic solution to the patient immediately after an injury, which may bring a little comfort in a sad situation. The resin composite build-up is often changed or repaired a couple of times, before the tooth is restored with a porcelain...

  7. Incineration of spent ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Chiaki

    1990-01-01

    It is a pressing need to reduce radioactive waste which is generated from the maintenance and operation of a nuclear power plant. Incineration of low level combustible solid waste such as polyethylene seats, paper and others have been successfully performed since 1984 at the Shimane Nuclear Power Station. Furthermore, for extending incineration treatment to spent ion exchange resin, the incineration test was carried out in 1989. However, as the cation exchange resin contains sulfur and then incineration generates SOx gases, so the components of this facility will be in a corrosive environment. We surveyed incineration conditions to improve the corrosive environment at the exhaust gas treatment system. This paper includes these test results and improved method to incinerate spent ion exchange resin. (author)

  8. Comparative study of resin sealant and resin modified glass ionomer as pit and fissure sealant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Malek

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to compare the marginal integrity of resin modified glass ionomer cement with that of resin sealant, in vitro. Forty artificial pit and fissure cavities were prepared in occlusal surface of extracted premolar teeth by using ¼ round carbide bur. Cavities were condensed with artificial organic debris followed by cleaning with prophylaxis pumice brush and paste and then separated into two treatment groups. In Group A, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin sealant and in Group B, 15 fissure cavities were sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant. These specimens were subjected to thermo-cycling followed by dye penetration test. The remaining 5 cavities from each group were analyzed for debris score by the SEM. The results of the microleakage test showed that the efficacy of preventing microleakage of samples sealed by resin modified glass ionomer sealant was higher than the samples sealed by resin sealant. However, no significant differences were found. It can be concluded that use of resin modified glass ionomer sealant is a good alternative for sealing pits and fissures.

  9. Microshear bond strength of composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates utilizing unfilled versus filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi-Abrandabadi, Ahmad; Najafi-Abrandabadi, Siamak; Ghasemi, Amir; Kotick, Philip G

    2014-11-01

    Failures such as marginal discoloration and composite chipping are still the problems of tooth-colored restorations on the substrate of enamel and porcelain, which some of these problems are consequently as a result of failures in the bonding layer. Using filled resin has been recently introduced to increase the bond strength of this layer. The aim of this study was to compare the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins to enamel incubated in periods of 24 h and 9 months and porcelain with unfilled resin and flowable composites (filled resin). In this in vitro study, two groups of 75 enamel samples with different storage times (24 h and 9 months) and a group of 75 porcelain samples were used. They were divided into 5 experimental groups of 15 samples in each. Composite cylinders in tygon tubes were bonded on the surface of acid-etched enamel and pretreated porcelain. Wave, Wave MV, Wave HV, Grandioflow and Margin Bond were used as bonding agents. The μ-SBS was measured at the speed of 1.0 mm/min. The bond strengths were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey test. P composites (filled resins) can be used instead of unfilled resins in bonding composite resins to enamel and porcelain substrates.

  10. Review of disposal techniques for radioactively contaminated organic ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inman, J.R.; Mack, J.

    1993-03-01

    Organic ion-exchange resins are used in the UK nuclear industry to remove radioactive nuclides from dilute aqueous solution. Resins represent a significant proportion of the organic content of ILW and LLW, particularly ILW. Spent resins are destined to be disposed of in the UK deep repository. There are concerns regarding the potential effects of organic materials on long-term repository performance, and these effects have been the subject of much recent research work. The object of this study has been to conduct a worldwide review of treatment and conditioning techniques available for spent organic ion-exchange resins with the intention of recommending the best option for dealing with the waste in the UK. Data on available techniques have been gathered together, and are presented in tabular form at the back of the report. The techniques have been reviewed and compared considering safety, practicality and cost, and a best option selected on the basis of current knowledge. On balance it would appear that wet oxidation using hydrogen peroxide with residue encapsulation in BFS/OPC is the most appropriate technique, probably implemented using a mobile plant. This conclusion and recommendation is not however clear cut and further advice regarding the acceptability of organic material in the repository is necessary before a definite recommendation can be made. (Author)

  11. New ion exchange resin designs and regeneration procedures yield improved performance for various condensate polishing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmy, S.W.

    2002-01-01

    Condensate polishing is an application with many different design and operational aspects. The past decade has brought new challenges for improved water quality with respect to both soluble and insoluble contaminants. Nonetheless, the endeavors to understand the compositional complexities of the ion exchange resin bead and the convoluted dynamics of ion exchange chemistry and chemical engineering mechanisms occurring within the mixed bed condensate polisher have brought new ideas and expectations for ion exchange resin in deep-bed condensate polishers than ever before. The new products and procedures presented here are a collaboration of a great deal of effort on the part of researchers, consultants, system engineers, station chemists, lab technicians and others. The studies discussed in this paper unequivocally demonstrate the merits of: 1. A specially designed cation resin to achieve greater than 95% insoluble iron removal efficiency, 2. A less-separable mixed resin for improved control of reactor water sulfate in BWR primary cycles, 3. Applying increased levels of regeneration chemicals and retrofitting the service vessels with re-mixing capability to improve the operation of deep-bed condensate polishers in PWR secondary cycles. (authors)

  12. Adhesion of Candida albicans to Vanillin Incorporated Self-Curing Orthodontic PMMA Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, K.; Sawaengkit, P.; Thaweboon, S.; Thaweboon, B.

    2018-02-01

    It has been observed that there is an increase in Candida carriers during the treatment with orthodontic removable appliance. Vanillin is flavouring agent, which is known to have antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of vanillin incorporated PMMA on adhesion of Candida albicans. A total of 36 orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin samples were fabricated. The samples were divided into 3 groups depending on percentage of vanillin incorporated (0.1%, 0.5% and PMMA without vanillin as control). PMMA samples were coated with saliva. The adhesion assay was performed with C. albicans (ATCC 10231). The adherent yeast cells were stained with crystal violet and counted under microscope by random selection of 3 fields at 10X magnification. The statistical analyses performed by Kruskal Wallis and Mann Whitney non-parametric test. It was found that the PMMA resin samples with vanillin incorporation significantly reduced the adhesion of C. albicans as compared to the control group. This study indicates that vanillin incorporated resin can impede the adhesion of C. albicans to about 45 - 56 %. With further testing and development, vanillin can be employed as an antifungal agent to prevent adhesion of C. albicans to orthodontic self-curing PMMA resin.

  13. Biphenyl liquid crystalline epoxy resin as a low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sheng-Hao; Chen, Rung-Shu; Chang, Yuan-Ling; Chen, Min-Huey; Cheng, Kuo-Chung; Su, Wei-Fang

    2012-11-01

    Low-shrinkage resin-based photocurable liquid crystalline epoxy nanocomposite has been investigated with regard to its application as a dental restoration material. The nanocomposite consists of an organic matrix and an inorganic reinforcing filler. The organic matrix is made of liquid crystalline biphenyl epoxy resin (BP), an epoxy resin consisting of cyclohexylmethyl-3,4-epoxycyclohexanecarboxylate (ECH), the photoinitiator 4-octylphenyl phenyliodonium hexafluoroantimonate and the photosensitizer champhorquinone. The inorganic filler is silica nanoparticles (∼70-100 nm). The nanoparticles were modified by an epoxy silane of γ-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane to be compatible with the organic matrix and to chemically bond with the organic matrix after photo curing. By incorporating the BP liquid crystalline (LC) epoxy resin into conventional ECH epoxy resin, the nanocomposite has improved hardness, flexural modulus, water absorption and coefficient of thermal expansion. Although the incorporation of silica filler may dilute the reinforcing effect of crystalline BP, a high silica filler content (∼42 vol.%) was found to increase the physical and chemical properties of the nanocomposite due to the formation of unique microstructures. The microstructure of nanoparticle embedded layers was observed in the nanocomposite using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. This unique microstructure indicates that the crystalline BP and nanoparticles support each other and result in outstanding mechanical properties. The crystalline BP in the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite was partially melted during exothermic photopolymerization, and the resin expanded via an order-to-disorder transition. Thus, the post-gelation shrinkage of the LC epoxy resin-based nanocomposite is greatly reduced, ∼50.6% less than in commercialized methacrylate resin-based composites. This LC epoxy nanocomposite demonstrates good physical and chemical properties and good biocompatibility

  14. 76 FR 8774 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-386 (Third Review)] Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five... revocation of the antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan would be likely...

  15. Development of amino resin for paint formulation: Copolymerization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... IR spectroscopy and macro phase separation techniques. At a given TEA ... form aldehyde emission from urea formaldehyde resin through one step ..... of resin molecules (Barminas and Osemeahon, 2007;. Sekaran et al.

  16. Composite resin fillings and inlays: An 11-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, U.; Qvist, V.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth......Clinical trial, composite resin, direct restorations, indirect restorations, long-term behaviour, posterior teeth...

  17. Rapid viscosity measurements of powdered thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. L.; Burks, H. D.; Dalal, S. K.

    1978-01-01

    A rapid and inexpensive method of obtaining processing-related data on powdered thermosetting resins has been investigated. The method involved viscosity measurements obtained with a small specimen (less than 100 mg) parallel plate plastometer. A data acquisition and reduction system was developed which provided a value of viscosity and strain rate about 12-13 second intervals during a test. The effects of specimen compaction pressure and reduction of adhesion between specimen and parallel plates were examined. The plastometer was used to measure some processing-related viscosity changes of an addition polyimide resin, including changes caused by pre-test heat treatment, test temperature, and strain rate.

  18. Thermal behavior of halogenated imidebismaleimide resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammad, A.; Al-Halim, N.Z.

    1995-01-01

    Several new poly-halogenated malecimides, bismaleimides and therir copoly resins were synthessised thermally from their corresponding amic acids. The synthesis was accomplished by two way method (amic acid-polimide) instead of the well-known three way method (amic acid-imide-polyimide). Thermal characterization of monomers and their cured resins was achieved using differential thermal analysis (DTA), dynamic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and isothermal gravimetric analysis (IGA). The effect of halogen substituent, especially in the ortho postion, is clear in the imidization proces, while polymerization proceeds almost equally in all systems. Thermal properties of homo and copolymers were correlated with their chemical structures. (author). 15 refs., 4

  19. Understanding of the color in composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Won Park

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In clinic, esthetic restoration of a defective natural tooth with composite resin is challenging procedure and needs complete understanding of the color of tooth itself and materials used. The optical characteristics of the composites are different because the chemical compositions and microstructures are not same. This review provided basic knowledge of the color and the color measurement devices, and analyze the color of the natural tooth. Further, the accuracy of the shade tab, color of the composite resins before and after curing, effect of the water, food and bleaching agent, and translucency, opalescence, and fluorescence effects were evaluated.

  20. Removal of radionuclides from household water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterbacka, P.; Turtiainen, T.; Haemaelaeinen, K.; Salonen, L.; Arvela, H.

    2003-10-01

    Research upon methods for removing radionuclides from household water was initiated in Finland in 1995. Three research projects, of which two were carried out with National Technology Agency of Finland and one with CEC, have been completed by the end of 2002. One of the main objectives of the research was to compose a guidebook for consumers and water treatment companies. Radon can be removed from household water by aeration and by activated carbon filtration. Aerators that are well designed and set up can remove over 90% of waterborne radon. The best aerators have achieved removal efficiencies that are nearly 100%. However, setting up an aeration system requires thorough planning. Also, activated carbon filtration removes radon efficiently. The removal efficiencies have been over 90%, often nearly 100%. Depending on the water quality and usage, the carbon batch inside the filter needs to be changed every 2-3 years. Since activated carbon filters emit gamma radiation while in use, they should not be installed inside the dwelling but in a separate building or by the well. It is recommended that uranium be removed from drinking water by anion exchange, which is the most efficient removal method for this purpose. Typically, the removal efficiencies are nearly 100%. The one exception is the so called tap filter, the removal efficiency of which depends on uranium concentration in raw water and the rate of water flow. High saline concentration in water may extricate uranium from ion exchange resin. Changes in plumbing pressure or pH-value do not have any significant influence in uranium retention. Removal efficiencies of lead and polonium vary a lot depending on the chemical form in which they occur in water. They can be reliably removed from water by reverse osmosis only. Other treatment methods, such as ion exchange and activated carbon filtration, remove lead and polonium partly. Lead and polonium are removed more efficiently when they are bound onto smaller particles

  1. Removal of radionuclides from household water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesterbacka, P.; Turtiainen, T.; Haemaelaeinen, K.; Salonen, L.; Arvela, H.

    2007-02-01

    Research upon methods for removing radionuclides from household water was initiated in Finland in 1995. Three research projects, of which two were carried out with National Technology Agency of Finland and one with CEC, have been completed by the end of 2002. One of the main objectives of the research was to compose a guidebook for consumers and water treatment companies. Radon can be removed from household water by aeration and by activated carbon filtration. Aerators that are well designed and set up can remove over 90% of waterborne radon. The best aerators have achieved removal efficiencies that are nearly 100%. However, setting up an aeration system requires thorough planning. Also, activated carbon filtration removes radon efficiently. The removal efficiencies have been over 90%, often nearly 100%. Depending on the water quality and usage, the carbon batch inside the filter needs to be changed every 2 - 3 years. Since activated carbon filters emit gamma radiation while in use, they should not be installed inside the dwelling but in a separate building or by the well. It is recommended that uranium be removed from drinking water by anion exchange, which is the most efficient removal method for this purpose. Typically, the removal efficiencies are nearly 100%. The one exception is the so called tap filter, the removal efficiency of which depends on uranium concentration in raw water and the rate of water flow. High saline concentration in water may extricate uranium from ion exchange resin. Changes in plumbing pressure or pH-value do not have any significant influence in uranium retention. Removal efficiencies of lead and polonium vary a lot depending on the chemical form in which they occur in water. They can be reliably removed from water by reverse osmosis only. Other treatment methods, such as ion exchange and activated carbon filtration, remove lead and polonium partly. Lead and polonium are removed more efficiently when they are bound onto smaller

  2. Study on the Novel Dicyanate Ester Resin Containing Naphthalene Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Qiang YAN; Hong Yun PENG; Li JI; Guo Rong QI

    2004-01-01

    The novel dicyanate ester resin containing naphthalene unit (DNCY) was synthesized, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and elemental analysis (EA).The thermal properties of DNCY resin was studied by thermal degradation analysis at a heating rate of 10 (C /min-1 in N2 and air. The DNCY resin exhibited better thermal and thermal-oxidative stability than bisphenol A dicyanate (BACY) resin.

  3. Modification of Aliphatic Petroleum Resin by Peracetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Bondaletov, Vladimir Grigoryevich; Bondaletova, Lyudmila Ivanovna; Hamlenko, A.; Bondaletov, Oleg Vladimirovich; Starovoit, M.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining modified aliphatic resin (PRC5) by means of petroleum resin oxidation by peracetic acid. We have experimentally determined oxidation conditions that lead to producing resin with maximum epoxy and acid numbers. Ratio of "oxidative system: PRC5" is 0.5:1, process duration is 2 hours. The modified resin structure is determined by IR and NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Performances and improvement of copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Fenfen; Zhang Hao; Sun Haijun; Liu Xiaojie

    2012-01-01

    Copper-hydrazine complexation deoxidising resin is tested to examine its performances including effluent water quality and capacity of deoxidisation. By the means of changing the resin type and regeneration, the deoxidising capacity of the resin can be improved to 13 times more than before. At the same time, physical performances of the resin are also greatly improved while maintaining its velocity of deoxidisation and effluent quality. (authors)

  5. Recovery of tretrachloroaurate through ion exchange with Dowex 11 resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguacil, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    The recovery of the tretrachloroaurate complex by the anionic ion exchange resin Dowex 11 has been studied. The kinetics of gold adsorption were dependent of both gold and resin concentrations and temperature. The adsorption isotherm can be described by the expression Q=kC''n. The loaded resin could be eluted by an acidic thiourea solution at 20 degree centigree. After several adsorption-elution cycles there is not any apparent loss in the adsorption properties of the resin. (Author) 6 refs

  6. Evaluation of an Experimental Adhesive Resin for Orthodontic Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durgesh, B. H.; Alkheraif, A. A.; Pavithra, D.; Hashem, M. I.; Alkhudhairy, F.; Elsharawy, M.; Divakar, D. D.; Vallittu, P. K.; Matinlinna, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of an experimental adhesive resin for orthodontic bonding by measuring some the chemical and mechanical properties. The resin demonstrated increased values of nanohardness and elastic modulus, but the differences were not significant compared with those for the Transbond XT adhesives. The experimental adhesive resin could be a feasible choice or a substitute for the traditional bis-GMA-based resins used in bonding orthodontic attachments.

  7. 40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... thermosetting resins subcategory. 414.50 Section 414.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Thermosetting Resins § 414.50 Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory. The provisions... the products classified under SIC 28214 thermosetting resins including those resins and resin groups...

  8. The influence of resin flexural modulus on the magnitude of ceramic strengthening.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to determine the magnitude of ceramic resin-strengthening with resin-based materials with varying flexural moduli using a regression technique to assess the theoretical strengthening at a \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness. The hypothesis tested was that experimentally, increasing resin flexural modulus results in increased resin-strengthening observed at a theoretical \\'zero\\' resin-coating thickness.

  9. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kimura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring co-reacted with cyanate ester group. The properties of the cured thermosetting resin were estimated by mechanical properties, electrical resistivity, water resistance and heat resistance. The cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and cyanate ester resin showed good heat resistance, high electrical resistivity and high water resistance, compared with the cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and epoxy resin.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a material, such as...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a water...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3310 - Coating material for resin fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coating material for resin fillings. 872.3310... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3310 Coating material for resin fillings. (a) Identification. A coating material for resin fillings is a device intended to be applied to the...

  13. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION... resin from Italy and Japan. SUMMARY: The Commission hereby gives notice that it has instituted reviews... revocation of the antidumping duty orders on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3670 - Resin impression tray material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3670 Resin impression tray material. (a) Identification. Resin impression tray material is a device intended for use in a two-step dental mold fabricating... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resin impression tray material. 872.3670 Section...

  15. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  16. 21 CFR 177.2410 - Phenolic resins in molded articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Phenolic resins in molded articles. 177.2410... as Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2410 Phenolic resins in molded articles. Phenolic resins identified in this section may be safely used as the food-contact surface of molded...

  17. Evaluation of some anionic exchange resins as potential tablet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of resin concentration and compression force on the properties of tablets using the selected resin was investigated. In addition, the disintegrant efficacy of the selected resin in the tablet formulations containing either a basic drug, e.g., dextromethorphan hydrobromide (DMP), or an acidic drug, e.g., diclofenac ...

  18. Development of radiation-curable resin based on natural rubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd, Dahlan; Harun, Abdul Ghani [Nuclear Energy Unit, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1994-12-31

    A new radiation curable resin based on natural rubber has been developed. The resin was based on the reaction between low molecular weight epoxidised natural rubber and acrylic acid. When formulated with reactive monomers and photoinitiator, it solidified upon irradiation with UV light. The resin may find applications in coating for cellulosic-based substrates and pressure-sensitive adhesive.

  19. 21 CFR 177.2430 - Polyether resins, chlorinated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyether resins, chlorinated. 177.2430 Section 177... Components of Articles Intended for Repeated Use § 177.2430 Polyether resins, chlorinated. Chlorinated polyether resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for repeated use in...

  20. Development of radiation-curable resin based on natural rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlan Mohd; Abdul Ghani Harun

    1993-01-01

    A new radiation curable resin based on natural rubber has been developed. The resin was based on the reaction between low molecular weight epoxidised natural rubber and acrylic acid. When formulated with reactive monomers and photoinitiator, it solidified upon irradiation with UV light. The resin may find applications in coating for cellulosic-based substrates and pressure-sensitive adhesive

  1. Color change of composite resins subjected to accelerated artificial aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Cremonezzi Tornavoi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All composite resins presented unacceptable color changes after 382 h of aging and different composite resins with same hue, presented different colors before being subjected to the aging process (B2 and C2 and after (B2. It was also observed color difference within a group of the same composite resin and same hue.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3820 - Root canal filling resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Root canal filling resin. 872.3820 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3820 Root canal filling resin. (a) Identification. A root canal filling resin is a device composed of material, such as methylmethacrylate, intended...

  3. Studies Regarding As(V Adsorption from Underground Water by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA Impregnated Resin. Equilibrium Sorption and Fixed-Bed Column Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ciopec

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of arsenic adsorption onto Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin were studied on the laboratory scale using aqueous solutions and natural underground waters. Amberlite XAD8 resin was impregnated with di(2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid (DEHPA via the dry method of impregnation. Fe(III ions were loaded onto the impregnated resin by exploiting the high affinity of arsenic towards iron. The studies were conducted by both in contact and continuous modes. Kinetics data revealed that the removal of arsenic by Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin is a pseudo-second-order reaction. The equilibrium data were modelled with Freundlich Langmuir and Dubinin Radushkevich (D-R isotherms and it was found that the Freundlich model give the poorest correlation coefficient. The maximum adsorption capacity obtained from the Langmuir isotherm is 22.6 µg As(V/g of Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin. The mean free energy of adsorption was found in this study to be 7.2 kJ/mol and the ΔG° value negative (−9.2 kJ/mol. This indicates that the sorption process is exothermal, spontaneous and physical in nature. The studied Fe-XAD8-DEHPA resin showed excellent arsenic removal performance by sorption, both from synthetic solution and the natural water sample, and could be regenerated simply by using aqueous NaOH or HCl solutions.

  4. Resin Flow in Fiber Preformed by Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding with Flexible Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Shokrieh

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, as a sub-branch of RTM is a method of manufacturing composite specimens. Considering the industrial development of this method, different modified techniques are designed to improve its performance. Among these techniques, using a half flexible mold is regarded as an important method. In this work, dominant equations of resin flow through the mold in polar coordinates are solved analytically. Based on this approach, closed-form solutions have been presented for different parameters such as thickness variation of preformed fiber, resin pressure, resin velocity and fiber volume fraction as functions of two variables, namely, time and the distance from injection port. After verification of the approach employed in this work, the results are presented. Important parameters influencing the quality and the rate production are studied in detail.

  5. Distribution of 14 elements from two solutions simulating Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY (acid-dissolved sludge and acidified supernate) on four cation exchange resins and five anion exchange resins having different functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated a series of cation exchange and anion exchange resins for their ability to remove hazardous components from radioactive high-level waste (HLW). The anion exchangers were Reillex TM HPQ, a polyvinyl pyridine resin, and four strong-base polystyrene resins having trimethyl, tri ethyl, tri propyl, and tributyl amine as their respective functional groups. The cation exchange resins included Amberlyst TM 15 and Amberlyst tM XN-1010 with sulfonic acid functionality, Duolite TM C-467 with phosphonic acid functionality, and poly functional Diphonix TM with di phosphonic acid, sulfonic acid, and carboxylic acid functionalities. We measured the distributions of 14 elements on these resins from solutions simulating acid-dissolved sludge (pH 0.6) and acidified supernate (pH 3.5) from underground storage tank 102-SY at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, USA. To these simulants, we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U, Pu, and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr). For each of the 252 element/resin/solution combinations, distribution coefficients (Kds) were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 minutes, 2 hours, and 6 hours to obtain information about sorption kinetics from these complex media. Because we measured the sorption of many different elements, the tabulated results indicate which unwanted elements are most likely to interfere with the sorption of elements of special interest. On the basis of these 756 measured Kd values, we conclude that some of the tested resins appear suitable for partitioning hazardous components from Hanford HLW. (author). 10 refs., 11 tabs

  6. 21 CFR 177.1555 - Polyarylate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyarylate resins. 177.1555 Section 177.1555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... in contact with all foods except beverages containing more than 8 volume percent ethanol under...

  7. Microbial treatment of ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Kniazev, O.

    2001-01-01

    A bioavailability of ion exchange resins to a microbial destruction as one of the alternative methods of compacting used ionites from the nuclear fuel manufacturing cycle enterprises has been investigated. The bio-destruction was studied after a preliminary chemical treatment or without it. A sensitivity of the ion exchange resins (including highly acidic cationite KU-2-8) to the microbial destruction by heterotrophic and chemo-litho-trophic microorganisms under aerobic conditions was shown in principle. The biodegradation of the original polymer is possible in the presence of the water soluble fraction of the resin obtained after its treatment by Fenton reagent and accelerated in the presence of Mn-ions in optimal concentration 1-2 g of Mn per liter of medium. Thus, the process of bio-destruction of ionite polymer by heterotrophic microorganisms can be compared with the bio-destruction of lignin or humic substances. The optimum parameters of bio-destruction and microorganisms used must be different for resins with different functional groups. (authors)

  8. [Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    A resin-bonded fixed partial denture is a prosthetic construction which can replace I or several teeth in an occlusal system and which comprises a pontic element which is adhesively attached to 1 or more abutment teeth. To compensate for the limited shear strength of the adhesive layer, the Jixed

  9. Studies on chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J. M.; Hou, T. H.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    A new analytical model for simulating chemoviscosity of thermosetting resins has been formulated. The model is developed by modifying the well-established Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) theory in polymer rheology for thermoplastic materials. By introducing a relationship between the glass transition temperature Tg(t) and the degree of cure alpha(t) of the resin system under cure, the WLF theory can be modified to account for the factor of reaction time. Temperature dependent functions of the modified WLF theory constants C sub 1 (t) and C sub 2 (t) were determined from the isothermal cure data. Theoretical predictions of the model for the resin under dynamic heating cure cycles were shown to compare favorably with the experimental data. This work represents progress toward establishing a chemoviscosity model which is capable of not only describing viscosity profiles accurately under various cure cycles, but also correlating viscosity data to the changes of physical properties associated with the structural transformation of the thermosetting resin systems during cure.

  10. 21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Polyestercarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or components of articles intended for use in producing.... Copies are available from the Office of Premarket Approval, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition... examined at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition's Library, Food and Drug Administration, 5100...

  11. Effect of Resin Extract from Commiphora swynnertonii

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    of Commiphora swynnertonii resin on biochemical parameters in rats was investigated. Sixty rats were ... significantly elevated protein and albumin levels but had no significant effect on bilirubin and all the liver enzymes in the rats. These findings are ... hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects against high fat diet- induced ...

  12. Evaluation of resins for use in brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Luiz Claudio F.M. Garcia; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Santos, Ana Maria M., E-mail: ferrazw@cdtn.b, E-mail: amms@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Brachytherapy is an advanced cancer treatment where radioactive seeds or sources are placed near or directly into the tumor thus reducing the radiation exposure in the surrounding healthy tissues. Prostate cancer can be treated with interstitial brachytherapy in initial stage of the disease in which tiny radioactive seeds with cylindrical geometry are used. Several kinds of seeds have been developed in order to obtain a better dose distribution around them and with a lower cost manufacturing. These seeds consist of an encapsulation, a radionuclide carrier, and X-ray marker. Among the materials that have potential for innovation in the construction of seeds, biocompatible resins appear as an important option. In this paper, we present some characterization results with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) performed on two types of resins in which curing temperatures for each one were varied as also the results of coatings with these resins under titanium substrates. Interactions of these resins in contact with the simulated body fluid were evaluated by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  13. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  14. Comparative study of the effect of ultrasound on the removal of intracanal posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Neilor Mateus Antunes; Resende, Leandro Marques; Vasconcellos, Walisom Arthuso; Paulino, Silvana Maria; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damiao

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how ultrasound affected the removal of stainless steel and titanium posts that had been attached with two different resin cements. The crowns of 32 maxillary canines were removed, the roots were embedded in acrylic resin blocks, and the canals were treated endodontically. The specimens were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 16) according to the brand of cement and subdivided (n = 8) according to the type of post. The specimens were submitted to ultrasonic vibration applied perpendicularly to the long axis of the tooth for 60 seconds. Data were submitted to ANOVA and showed no significant statistical difference among the groups (p > 0.05). It may be concluded that the effects of ultrasonic vibration used to remove intraradicular posts were not significantly different when applied to stainless steel or titanium posts cemented with chemically or dual-activated resin cements.

  15. ANALYSIS OF VENTING OF A RESIN SLURRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurinat, J.; Hensel, S.

    2012-03-27

    A resin slurry venting analysis was conducted to address safety issues associated with overpressurization of ion exchange columns used in the Purex process at the Savannah River Site (SRS). If flow to these columns were inadvertently interrupted, an exothermic runaway reaction could occur between the ion exchange resin and the nitric acid used in the feed stream. The nitric acid-resin reaction generates significant quantities of noncondensable gases, which would pressurize the column. To prevent the column from rupturing during such events, rupture disks are installed on the column vent lines. The venting analysis models accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) tests and data from tests that were performed in a vented test vessel with a rupture disk. The tests showed that the pressure inside the test vessel continued to increase after the rupture disk opened, though at a slower rate than prior to the rupture. Calculated maximum discharge rates for the resin venting tests exceeded the measured rates of gas generation, so the vent size was sufficient to relieve the pressure in the test vessel if the vent flow rate was constant. The increase in the vessel pressure is modeled as a transient phenomenon associated with expansion of the resin slurry/gas mixture upon rupture of the disk. It is postulated that the maximum pressure at the end of this expansion is limited by energy minimization to approximately 1.5 times the rupture disk burst pressure. The magnitude of this pressure increase is consistent with the measured pressure transients. The results of this analysis demonstrate the need to allow for a margin between the design pressure and the rupture disk burst pressure in similar applications.

  16. Correlation between factors associated with the removable partial dentures use and Candida spp. in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, João Milton Rocha; Ferreira dos Santos, Silvana Soleo; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Faria, Ms Ivan

    2011-12-01

    To correlate the presence and number of Candida spp. in the saliva of wearers of removable partial dentures retained with precision attachments with the proportion of metal/acrylic resin present in the dentures. Saliva samples from 40 removable partial denture wearers (test) and one paired sample of individuals, non-wearers of any type of removable denture (control) were collected, seeded, and the colony forming units of Candida counted and identified. The metal/acrylic resin proportion of each denture was quantified, using silicone plates pressed over each denture. Candida spp. was found in the saliva of 80% of the individuals in the test group and 65% of the control, with C. albicans being the most prevalent species. The test group presented with the highest number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva, and there was weak correlation between this number and the metal and resin area of the denture (Pearson's coefficient of correlation). Greater prevalence and a higher number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva occurred in removable partial denture wearers (p = 0.04) with a weak positive correlation between the metal and resin area and the number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva. However, this correlation was more significant for the area of resin. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Resin-based preparation of HTGR fuels: operation of an engineering-scale uranium loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.

    1977-10-01

    The fuel particles for recycle of 233 U to High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors are prepared from uranium-loaded carboxylic acid ion exchange resins which are subsequently carbonized, converted, and refabricated. The development and operation of individual items of equipment and of an integrated system are described for the resin-loading part of the process. This engineering-scale system was full scale with respect to a hot demonstration facility, but was operated with natural uranium. The feed uranium, which consisted of uranyl nitrate solution containing excess nitric acid, was loaded by exchange with resin in the hydrogen form. In order to obtain high loadings, the uranyl nitrate must be acid deficient; therefore, nitric acid was extracted by a liquid organic amine which was regenerated to discharge a NaNO 3 or NH 4 NO 3 solution waste. Water was removed from the uranyl nitrate solution by an evaporator that yielded condensate containing less than 0.5 ppM of uranium. The uranium-loaded resin was washed with condensate and dried to a controlled water content via microwave heating. The loading process was controlled via in-line measurements of the pH and density of the uranyl nitrate. The demonstrated capacity was 1 kg of uranium per hour for either batch loading contractors or a continuous column as the resin loading contractor. Fifty-four batch loading runs were made without a single failure of the process outlined in the chemical flowsheet or any evidence of inability to control the conditions dictated by the flowsheet

  18. Incineration of ion exchange resins using concentric burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukasawa, T.; Chino, K.; Kawamura, F.; Kuriyama, O.; Yusa, H.

    1985-01-01

    A new incineration method, using concentric burners, is studied to reduce the volume of spent ion exchange resins generated from nuclear power plants. Resins are ejected into the center of a propane-oxygen flame and burned within it. The flame length is theoretically evaluated by the diffusion-dominant model. By reforming the burner shape, flame length can be reduced by one-half. The decomposition ratio decreases with larger resin diameters due to the loss of unburned resin from the flame. A flame guide tube is adapted to increase resin holding time in the flame, which improves the decomposition ratio to over 98 wt%

  19. Method for curing alkyd resin compositions by applying ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.; Murata, K.; Maruyama, T.

    1975-01-01

    An alkyd resin composition is prepared by dissolving a polymerizable alkyd resin having from 10 to 50 percent of oil length into a vinyl monomer. The polymerizable alkyd resin is obtained by a half-esterification reaction of an acid anhydride having a polymerizable unsaturated group and an alkyd resin modified with conjugated unsaturated oil having at least one reactive hydroxyl group per one molecule. The alkyd resin composition thus obtained is coated on an article, and ionizing radiation is applied on the article to cure the coated film thereon. (U.S.)

  20. Method for detecting resin leakage in LWR coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, J.E.

    1988-05-01

    Resin leakage from condensate polishing units can result in steam generator corrosion. This report describes the development of a resin leakage detection method based in analyzing the organic breakdown products released from resin on heating. The breakdown products are analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection. Some of the organic products formed have been identified. A design for a resin monitoring unit, suitable for incorporation into the IONTRAC system, is presented. Theoretically, detection of ppB levels of resin by processing about one liter of water, is possible

  1. Theoretical study of solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    . Originality/value - Many different Solar Combisystem designs have been commercialized over the years. In the IEA-SHC Task 26, twenty one solar combisystems have been described and analyzed. Maybe the mantle tank approach also for solar combisystems can be used with advantage? This might be possible...... if the solar heating system is based on a so called bikini tank. Therefore the new developed solar combisystems based on bikini tanks is compared to the tank-in-tank solar combisystems to elucidate which one is suitable for three different houses with low energy heating demand, medium and high heating demand.......Purpose - Low flow bikini solar combisystems and high flow tank-in-tank solar combisystems have been studied theoretically. The aim of the paper is to study which of these two solar combisystem designs is suitable for different houses. The thermal performance of solar combisystems based on the two...

  2. Separation of hemicellulose-derived saccharides from wood hydrolysate by lime and ion exchange resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhuang, Jingshun; Fu, Yingjuan; Tian, Guoyu; Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua

    2016-04-01

    A combined process of lime treatment and mixed bed ion exchange was proposed to separate hemicellulose-derived saccharides (HDS) from prehydrolysis liquor (PHL) of lignocellulose as value added products. The optimization of lime treatment achieved up to 44.2% removal of non-saccharide organic compounds (NSOC), mainly colloidal substances, with negligible HDS degradation at 0.5% lime level and subsequent neutralization by phosphoric acid. The residual NSOC and calcium ions in lime-treated PHL were eliminated by mixed bed ion exchange. The breakthrough curves of HDS and NSOC showed selective retention toward NSOC, leading to 75% HDS recovery with 95% purity at 17 bed volumes of exchange capacity. In addition, macroporous resin showed higher exchange capacity than gel resin as indicated by the triple processing volume. The remarkable selectivity of the combined process suggested the feasibility for HDS separation from PHL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modified technique for preparation of venous circulation resin casts in the cirrhotic liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ OLÍMPIO MAIA DE VASCONCELOS FILHO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study describes two major adaptations for the preparation of resin casts in human cirrhotic liver, harvested at the time of transplantation. The first is the way of fixing the catheter in the ostia of the hepatic and portal veins through a cerclage, so as to prevent displacement of the catheter and / or leakage of the resin during its injection. The second is the extension of corrosion time in the NaOH solution, averaging 6.8 days, with daily replacement the solution until complete removal of parenchymal tissue. We applied the method in 14 cirrhotic livers, with good filling and coloring of the portal and hepatic vein territories, using different colors. This allows an anatomical study of these vessels, able to complement the knowledge of the histopathology in research work, and the planning of therapeutic procedures, such as the Trans-Jugular Intrahepatic Port-Systemic Shunt (TIPS.

  4. Eichrom's ABEC trademark resins: Alkaline radioactive waste treatment, radiopharmaceutical, and potential hydrometallurgical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.H.; Gula, M.J.; Chang, F.; Rogers, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Eichrom's ABEC trademark resins selectivity extract certain anions from high ionic strength acidic, neutral, or strongly alkaline media, and solute stripping can be accomplished by eluting with water. ABEC resins are stable to pH extreme and radiolysis and operate in high ionic strength and/or alkaline solutions where anion-exchange is often ineffective. Potential applications of the ABEC materials include heavy metal and ReO 4 - separations in hydrometallurgy and purification of perrhenate iodide, and iodate in radiopharmaceutical production. Separation of 99m TcO 4 - from its 99 MoO 4 2- parent and stripping with water or physiological saline solution have been demonstrated for radiopharmaceutical applications. Removal of 99 TcO 4 - and 129 I - from alkaline tank wastes has also been successfully demonstrated. The authors will discuss the scale-up studies, process-scale testing, and market development of this new extraction material

  5. Adsorption of Monobutyl Phthalate from Aqueous Phase onto Two Macroporous Anion-Exchange Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwen Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As new emerging pollutants, phthalic acid monoesters (PAMs pose potential ecological and human health risks. In the present study, adsorption performance of monobutyl phthalate (MBP onto two macroporous base anion-exchange resins (D-201 and D-301 was discussed. It was found that the adsorption isotherms were best fitted by the Langmuir equation while the adsorption kinetics were well described by pseudo-first-order model. Analyses of sorption isotherms and thermodynamics proved that the adsorption mechanisms for DBP onto D-201 were ion exchange. However, the obtained enthalpy values indicate that the sorption process of MBP onto D-301 is physical adsorption. The equilibrium adsorption capacities and adsorption rates of DBP on two different resins increased with the increasing temperature of the solution. D-301 exhibited a higher adsorption capacity of MBP than D-201. These results proved that D-301, as an effective sorbent, can be used to remove phthalic acid monoesters from aqueous solution.

  6. Spectrophotometric flow injection catalytic determination of molybdenum in plant digest using ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pessenda, L.C.R.

    1987-03-01

    A spectrophotometric flow injection analytical method based on the catalytic action of molybdenum on the oxidation of iodide by hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium is proposed for the molybdenum determination in plant digests. A cation exchange resin column is incorporated into a flow injection system for removal of interferents. The following system variables were investigated and optimized: reagent concentrations, sample injection volume, mixing and reaction coil lengths, temperature, sampling time, pumping rate and concentration of eluting agents. The effects of interfering species and of the acidity of samples on the molybdenum retention by the ion exchange resin column were investigated. The proposed method is characterized by good precision (r.s.d. (2.0%), a sampling rate of about 40 samples per hour, and permits the determination of molybdenum in plant digests in the range 1.0 to 40.0 μg/l. The results compare well with those obtained by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. (author) [pt

  7. Chronic swelling from entrapment of acrylic resin in a surgical extraction site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiting Ho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available When acrylic resin is inadvertently embedded in oral tissue, it can result in a pronounced chronic inflammatory response. This report describes a case in which temporary crown and bridge resin was forced into a surgical extraction site after the two adjacent teeth were prepared for a bridge immediately following extraction of a maxillary premolar. The patient experienced swelling at the extraction site over a ten month period despite treatment with antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs. After detection and removal of the foreign body, the symptoms resolved. The episode contributed to periodontal bone loss around an adjacent tooth. While morbidity of this nature is rare, this case reinforces the need to investigate persistent signs of inflammation and account for dental materials that are lost during the course of treatment.

  8. Potential problems associated with ion-exchange resins used in the decontamination of light-water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soo, P.; Adams, J.W.; Kempf, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    During a typical decontamination event, ion-exchange resin beds are used to remove corrosion products (radioactive and nonradioactive) and excess decontamination reagents from waste streams. The spent resins may be solidified in a binder, such as cement, or sealed in a high-integrity container (HIC) in order to meet waste stability requirements specified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Lack of stability of low-level waste in a shallow land burial trench may lead to trench subsidence, enhanced water infiltration and waste leaching, which would result in accelerated transport of radionuclides and the complexing agents used for decontamination. The current program is directed at investigating safety problems associated with the handling, solidification and containerization of decontamination resin wastes. The three tasks currently underway include freeze-thaw cycling of cementitious and vinyl ester-styrene forms to determine if mechanical integrity is compromised, a study of the corrosion of container materials by spent decontamination waste resins, and investigations of resin degradation mechanisms

  9. Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements.

  10. Synthesis and Structure Characterization of Phenol-Urea-Formaldehyde Resins in the Presence of Magnesium Oxide as Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Bin Fan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to provide a useful approach of polymer synthesis for accelerating the fast cure of phenol-urea-formaldehyde (PUF resin as wood adhesive by optimizing its structure and composition. The PUF resins containing high contents of very reactive groups such as para-methylol groups were synthesized by reacting methylolurea, phenol, and formaldehyde in the presence of magnesium oxide (MgO as catalyst. The effects of synthesis parameters including F/(P + U, OH/P, and MgO/P mole ratios on the structure, composition, curing characteristics, and their relationships of PUF resins were investigated. The results indicated that MgO seemed to be an efficacious catalyst for PUF resin synthesis and promote its faster cure. The increase in the F/(P + U mole ratio or/and OH/P mole ratio appeared to be beneficial for the formation of para-methylol groups and cocondensed methylene linkages between phenolic methylol groups and urea units, and for the removal of unreacted urea. In case of Catalyst/P mole ratio, an appropriate dosage of added metal-ion was very important for synthesizing the high-content reactive groups of PUF resins, otherwise leading to the reverse effects.

  11. Acceptance test report for the Tank 241-C-106 in-tank imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, L.T.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the results of Acceptance Testing of the 241-C-106 in-tank video camera imaging system. The purpose of this imaging system is to monitor the Project W-320 sluicing of Tank 241-C-106. The objective of acceptance testing of the 241-C-106 video camera system was to verify that all equipment and components function in accordance with procurement specification requirements and original equipment manufacturer's (OEM) specifications. This document reports the results of the testing

  12. Biofilm development by blastospores and hyphae of Candida albicans on abraded denture acrylic resin surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Sarah; Coulthwaite, Lisa; Loewy, Zvi; Scallan, Anthony; Verran, Joanna

    2014-10-01

    Candida albicans is a known etiologic agent of denture stomatitis. Candida hyphae exhibit the ability to respond directionally to environmental stimuli. This characteristic is thought to be important in the penetration of substrata such as resilient denture liners and host epithelium. It has been suggested that hyphal production also enhances adhesion and survival of Candida on host and denture surfaces. Surface roughness, in addition, can enhance adhesion where stronger interactions occur between cells and surface features of similar dimensions. The purpose of this study was to assess the development of hyphal and blastospore biofilms on abraded denture acrylic resin specimens and measure the ease of removal of these biofilms. Biofilms were grown for 48 hours on abraded 1-cm² denture acrylic resin specimens from adhered hyphal phase C albicans or from adhered blastospores. Subsequently, all specimens were stained with Calcofluor White and examined with confocal scanning laser microscopy. Biofilms were removed by vortex mixing in sterile phosphate buffered saline solution. Removed cells were filtered (0.2-μm pore size). Filters were dried at 37°C for 24 hours for dry weight measurements. Any cells that remained on the acrylic resin specimens were stained with 0.03% acridine orange and examined with epifluorescence microscopy. Biofilms grown from both cell types contained all morphologic forms of C albicans. Although the underlying surface topography did not affect the amount of biofilm produced, biofilms grown from hyphal phase Candida were visibly thicker and had greater biomass (Phyphae in early Candida biofilms increased biofilm mass and resistance to removal. Increased surface roughness enhances retention of hyphae and yeast cells, and, therefore, will facilitate plaque regrowth. Therefore, minimization of denture abrasion during cleaning is desirable. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. Design alternatives report for the cesium removal demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Cesium Removal Demonstration (CRD) project will use liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Melton Valley Storage Tanks to demonstrate cesium removal from sodium nitrate-based supernates. This report presents the results of a conceptual design study to scope the alternatives for conducting the demonstration at ORNL. Factors considered included (1) sorbent alternatives, (2) facility alternatives, (3) process alternatives, (4) process disposal alternatives, and (5) relative cost comparisons. Recommendations included (1) that design of the CRD system move forward based on information obtained to date from tests with Savannah River Resin, (2) that the CRD system be designed so it could use crystalline silicotitanates (CST) if an engineered form of CST becomes available prior to the CRD, (3) that the system be designed without the capability for resin regeneration, (4) that the LLLW solidification facility be used for the demonstration (5) that vitrification of the loaded resins from the CRD be demonstrated at the Savannah River Site, and (6) that permanent disposal of the loaded and/or vitrified resin at the Nevada Test Site be pursued.

  14. Design alternatives report for the cesium removal demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Youngblood, E.L.

    1995-09-01

    The Cesium Removal Demonstration (CRD) project will use liquid low-level waste (LLLW) stored in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Melton Valley Storage Tanks to demonstrate cesium removal from sodium nitrate-based supernates. This report presents the results of a conceptual design study to scope the alternatives for conducting the demonstration at ORNL. Factors considered included (1) sorbent alternatives, (2) facility alternatives, (3) process alternatives, (4) process disposal alternatives, and (5) relative cost comparisons. Recommendations included (1) that design of the CRD system move forward based on information obtained to date from tests with Savannah River Resin, (2) that the CRD system be designed so it could use crystalline silicotitanates (CST) if an engineered form of CST becomes available prior to the CRD, (3) that the system be designed without the capability for resin regeneration, (4) that the LLLW solidification facility be used for the demonstration (5) that vitrification of the loaded resins from the CRD be demonstrated at the Savannah River Site, and (6) that permanent disposal of the loaded and/or vitrified resin at the Nevada Test Site be pursued

  15. Method of burning ion-exchange resin contaminated with radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigenori.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To process spent ion exchange resins to reduce their volume, without increasing the load on a off-gas system and in a stable state and at the same time not leaving any uncombusted portions. Method: The water slurries of the ion exchange resins contaminated with radioactive materials is dehydrated or dry combusted to reduce the water content. A binder is then added to solidify the ion exchange resin. The solidified ion exchange resins are then combusted in a furnace. This prevents the ion exchange resin from being dispersed by air and combustion gases. Furthermore, the solidified ion exchange resins in the form of small pellets burn from the surface inwards. Moreover the binder is carbonized by the combustion heat and promotes combustion to convert the ion exchange resins into a solid mass, making sure that no uncombusted portion is left. (Takahashi, M.)

  16. Commercial Ion Exchange Resin Vitrification in Borosilicate Glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero-Herman, C.A.; Workman, P.; Poole, K.; Erich, D.; Harden, J.

    1998-05-01

    Bench-scale studies were performed to determine the feasibility of vitrification treatment of six resins representative of those used in the commercial nuclear industry. Each resin was successfully immobilized using the same proprietary borosilicate glass formulation. Waste loadings varied from 38 to 70 g of resin/100 g of glass produced depending on the particular resin, with volume reductions of 28 percent to 68 percent. The bench-scale results were used to perform a melter demonstration with one of the resins at the Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL). The resin used was a weakly acidic meth acrylic cation exchange resin. The vitrification process utilized represented a approximately 64 percent volume reduction. Glass characterization, radionuclide retention, offgas analyses, and system compatibility results will be discussed in this paper

  17. Comparison of Mechanical Properties of Resin Composites with Resin Modified Glass Ionomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha NA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There are controversial reports regarding physical and mechanical properties of resin composites and glass ionomer cements. Some revealed higher strength and hardness for resin composites while others showed a comparable value for glass ionomer cements. Evaluation of mechanical properties of different types of resin composites in comparison with resin modified glass ionomers is not widely studied. Objectives: To measure and compare the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of three resin composites and two resins modified glass ionomer cements before and after ageing. Materials and Methods: Three resin composites, i.e. Filtek Supreme XTE (3M ESPE, Ice (SDI, Gradia (GC, and two resins modified glass ionomers, i.e. Fuji II LC (GC and Riva Light Cure (SDI, were selected. Ten barshaped specimens were prepared for each material and cured using LED curing light. After 24 hours storage in distilled water at 37oC, the specimens were randomly divided into two equal groups (n=5. The first group was tested as a baseline and the second group was restored at 37oC for another 29 days. Flexural strength was performed by four-point bending test using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min, and the maximum load at failure was recorded. The specimen’s halves were used for evaluating Vickers hardness, using a Digital Hardness Tester (300 g/15 sec and the Vickers hardness number (VHN was recorded. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey’s and student’s t-test. Results: After 24 hours of immersion, the highest hardness number was found for Filtek Supreme and Ice and the highest flexural strength was obtained for Gradia. After 30 days of storage, hardness of Fuji II LC and Gradia showed a significant decrease; flexural strength of Ice and Fuji II LC revealed a significant increase while Gradia and Filtek Supreme showed a significant decrease. Conclusions: Resin modified glass ionomers showed

  18. Study of plasma off-gas treatment from spent ion exchange resin pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hernán Ariel; Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo Luis

    2017-03-23

    Polystyrene divinylbenzene-based ion exchange resins are employed extensively within nuclear power plants (NPPs) and research reactors for purification and chemical control of the cooling water system. To maintain the highest possible water quality, the resins are regularly replaced as they become contaminated with a range of isotopes derived from compromised fuel elements as well as corrosion and activation products including 14 C, 60 Co, 90 Sr, 129 I, and 137 Cs. Such spent resins constitute a major proportion (in volume terms) of the solid radioactive waste generated by the nuclear industry. Several treatment and conditioning techniques have been developed with a view toward reducing the spent resin volume and generating a stable waste product suitable for long-term storage and disposal. Between them, pyrolysis emerges as an attractive option. Previous work of our group suggests that the pyrolysis treatment of the resins at low temperatures between 300 and 350 °C resulted in a stable waste product with a significant volume reduction (>50%) and characteristics suitable for long-term storage and/or disposal. However, another important issue to take into account is the complexity of the off-gas generated during the process and the different technical alternatives for its conditioning. Ongoing work addresses the characterization of the ion exchange resin treatment's off-gas. Additionally, the application of plasma technology for the treatment of the off-gas current was studied as an alternative to more conventional processes utilizing oil- or gas-fired post-combustion chambers operating at temperatures in excess of 1000 °C. A laboratory-scale flow reactor, using inductively coupled plasma, operating under sub-atmospheric conditions was developed. Fundamental experiments using model compounds have been performed, demonstrating a high destruction and removal ratio (>99.99%) for different reaction media, at low reactor temperatures and moderate power consumption

  19. [Physical properties of resins for veneer crown. (Part 1) Bending strength of thermosetting methacrylic resins (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwada, T

    1979-01-01

    The physical properties of thermosetting methacrylic resins contain a kind or more than two kinds of cross linking agents were investigated. Knoop hardness and bending strength after drying, water sorption and thermal cycling were listed in table 4 and 5. Hydrophilic resins absorbed water about 3 times as much as hydrophobic resins. The materials contain a small amount of hydrophobic cross linking agents in MMA indicate comparatively excellent properties after drying, water sorption and thermal cycling. Knoop hardness of resins generally reduced by water sorption, especially in the case of the resin contains a large amount of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate.

  20. Maximum Potential Hydrogen Gas Retention in the sRF Resin Ion Exchange Column for the LAWPS Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bottenus, Courtney LH [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-01-22

    The Low-Activity Waste Pretreatment System (LAWPS) is being developed to provide treated supernatant liquid from the Hanford tank farms directly to the Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vitrification Facility at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The design and development of the LAWPS is being conducted by Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC. A key process in LAWPS is the removal of radioactive Cs in ion exchange (IX) columns filled with spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (sRF) resin. One accident scenario being evaluated is the loss of liquid flow through the sRF resin bed after it has been loaded with radioactive Cs and hydrogen gas is being generated by radiolysis. In normal operations, the generated hydrogen is expected to remain dissolved in the liquid and be continuously removed by liquid flow. For an accident scenario with a loss of flow, hydrogen gas can be retained within the IX column both in the sRF resin and below the bottom screen that supports the resin within the column. The purpose of this report is to summarize calculations that estimate the upper-bound volume of hydrogen gas that can be retained in the column and potentially be released to the headspace of the IX column or to process equipment connected to the IX column and, thus, pose a flammability hazard.

  1. Characteristics of floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Tetsurou; Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu.

    1989-01-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of floc formation. The physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin were measured and the factors related to floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index. It was found that these factors were mixing ratio, nature of resins and particle size of resins. In addition, it was assumed on the bases of these results that the amount of resin floc was related to sum of the surface electric charges of both resins. The filling ratio of resin floc was related to their product by multiplication and an experimental expression was obtained. The specific settle volume of resin floc could then be simulated by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author)

  2. Characteristics of floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin in precoat filter using powdered ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Tetsurou (Nitto Denko Corp., Ibaraki, Osaka (Japan)); Sawa, Toshio; Shindoh, Toshikazu

    1989-09-01

    The filtration performance of mixed filter aid consisting of powdered anion and cation exchange resins used in the precoat filter is closely related to the characteristics of floc formation. The physical, chemical and electrochemical properties of powdered ion exchange resin were measured and the factors related to floc formation of anion and cation exchange resin were investigated by measuring the specific settle volume of resin floc as an evaluating index. It was found that these factors were mixing ratio, nature of resins and particle size of resins. In addition, it was assumed on the bases of these results that the amount of resin floc was related to sum of the surface electric charges of both resins. The filling ratio of resin floc was related to their product by multiplication and an experimental expression was obtained. The specific settle volume of resin floc could then be simulated by particle size, surface area, ion exchange capacity and degree of ionization of the powdered ion exchange resin. (author).

  3. Nanomechanical properties of dental resin-composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, S; Akhtar, R; Silikas, N; Watts, D C

    2012-12-01

    To determine by nanoindentation the hardness and elastic modulus of resin-composites, including a series with systematically varied filler loading, plus other representative materials that fall into the categories of flowable, bulk-fill and conventional nano-hybrid types. Ten dental resin-composites: three flowable, three bulk-fill and four conventional were investigated using nanoindentation. Disc specimens (15mm×2mm) were prepared from each material using a metallic mold. Specimens were irradiated in the mold at top and bottom surfaces in multiple overlapping points (40s each) with light curing unit at 650mW/cm(2). Specimens were then mounted in 3cm diameter phenolic ring forms and embedded in a self-curing polystyrene resin. After grinding and polishing, specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were investigated using an Agilent Technologies XP nanoindenter equipped with a Berkovich diamond tip (100nm radius). Each specimen was loaded at one loading rate and three different unloading rates (at room temperature) with thirty indentations, per unloading rate. The maximum load applied by the nanoindenter to examine the specimens was 10mN. Dependent on the type of the resin-composite material, the mean values ranged from 0.73GPa to 1.60GPa for nanohardness and from 14.44GPa to 24.07GPa for elastic modulus. There was a significant positive non-linear correlation between elastic modulus and nanohardness (r(2)=0.88). Nonlinear regression revealed a significant positive correlation (r(2)=0.62) between elastic moduli and filler loading and a non-significant correlation (r(2)=0.50) between nanohardness and filler loading of the studied materials. Varying the unloading rates showed no consistent effect on the elastic modulus and nanohardness of the studied materials. For a specific resin matrix, both elastic moduli and nanohardness correlated positively with filler loading. For the resin-composites investigated, the group-average elastic

  4. Ion exchange system design for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Sapkal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the methodology used to determine the optimal ion-exchange column size to process all separate batchesof feeds from acid mine drainage wastewater.The optimal design ensures the best utilization of resin material and therefore results in a minimum amount of spent resins.Ion exchanger materials have been studied for removing heavy metals from a metal bearing wastes. For the current treatment,a facility has been designed for the removal of heavy metals from the acid mine drainage (AMD waste by the ion-exchange technology.

  5. Study on the pyrolysis of phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and modified PF resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jigang, E-mail: wangjigang@seu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Jiang, Haiyun [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallic Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 210013 (China); Jiang, Nan [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2009-12-10

    The pyrolysis of pure phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) modified PF resin was investigated by using thermogravimetry (TG) and pyrolysis gas-chromatography-mass-spectrometry (PY-GC/MS). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were also employed to investigate the micro-structural evolution. It was shown from the TG analysis that the char residues of pure PF resin were 62.9 and 60.5% after being pyrolyzed at 700 and 1000 {sup o}C, respectively. The degradation and failure of the resin matrix were mainly resulted from the release of volatiles. The phenol and its methyl derivates took a large proportion in the amount of volatiles. In comparison with the pure PF resin, the char residues of B{sub 4}C modified PF resin were obviously higher, with the values of 71.9 and 68.4% at 700 and 1000 {sup o}C, respectively. Due to the oxidation-reduction reactions between B{sub 4}C additive and oxygen-containing volatiles including CO and H{sub 2}O, partial carbon and oxygen elements in the volatiles remained in the resin matrix in the forms of amorphous carbon and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. The results of SEM and FT-IR characterization demonstrated the occurrence of the modification, and the amorphous carbon existed in the form of reticular substance. In addition, the amount of the released phenol and its methyl derivates was also decreased drastically due to the formation of borate.

  6. Effect of Resin Coating and Chlorhexidine on Microleakage of Two Resin Cements after Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluating the effect of resin coating and chlorhexidine on microleakage of two resin cements after water storage.Materials and Methods: Standardized class V cavities were prepared on facial and lingual surfaces of one hundred twenty intact human molars with gingival margins placed 1mm below the cemento-enamel junction. Indirect composite inlays were fabricated and thespecimens were randomly assigned into 6 groups. In Groups 1 to 4, inlays were cemented with Panavia F2.0 cement. G1: according to the manufacturer’s instruction. G2: with light cured resin on the ED primer. G3: chlorhexidine application before priming. G4: withchlorhexidine application before priming and light cured resin on primer. G5: inlays were cemented with Nexus 2 resin cement. G6: chlorhexidine application after etching. Each group was divided into two subgroups based on the 24-hour and 6-month water storagetime. After preparation for microleakage test, the teeth were sectioned and evaluated at both margins under a 20×stereomicroscope. Dye penetration was scored using 0-3 criteria.The data was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and complementary Dunn tests.Results: There was significantly less leakage in G2 and G4 than the Panavia F2.0 control group at gingival margins after 6 months (P<0.05. There was no significant differences in leakage between G1 and G3 at both margins after 24 hours and 6 months storage. After 6months, G6 revealed significantly less leakage than G5 at gingival margins (P=0.033. In general, gingival margins showed more leakage than occlusal margins.Conclusion: Additionally, resin coating in self-etch (Panavia F2.0 and chlorhexidine application in etch-rinse (Nexus resin cement reduced microleakage at gingival margins after storage.

  7. Post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yap, A.U.J.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the post-irradiation hardness of resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a polyacid-modified composite resin using a digital microhardness tester. Change in hardness of these materials over a period of 6 months was compared to that of conventional glass ionomer cements and a composite resin. With the exception of the composite resin, all materials showed a significant increase in hardness over 24 h after their initial set. Dual-cure resin-modified glass ionomer cements showed decreased hardness with increased storage time in saline at 37 o C. Results suggest that the addition of resins to glass ionomer cements does not improve initial hardness and does not negate the acid-base reaction of conventional cements. Resin addition may, however, lead to increased water sorption and decreased hardness. (author)

  8. Removal of natural radionuclides from drinking water from private wells in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huikuri, Pia; Salonen, Laina; Turtiainen, Tuukka

    1999-01-01

    Removal of natural radionuclides is often necessary in Finland when household water is taken from a drilled well. Removal of radionuclides by various methods from Finnish groundwaters were studied in a EU-research project, TENAWA. The results indicated that radon can be removed very efficiently (up to 99%) by applying aeration or granular activated carbon (GAC) filtration. Uranium and radium were also removed (over 94%) by using strong base anion (SBA) and strong acid cation (SAC) resins. The capability of reverse osmosis (RO) equipment to remove radionuclides was over 90% for uranium, radium and polonium. The water quality analyses indicated that water quality remained mostly good during the water treatment. (au)

  9. COMPOSITE RESIN BOND STRENGTH TO ETCHED DENTINWITH ONE SELF PRIMING ADHESIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P SAMIMI

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength of composite resins to etched dentin in both dry and wet dentin surface with active and inactive application of a single-bottle adhesive resin (Single Bond, 3M Dental products. Methods. Fourthy four intact human extracted molars and premolars teeth were selected. The facial surfaces of the teeth were grounded with diamond bur to expose dentin. Then specimens were divided into four groups of 11 numbers (9 Molars and 2 Premolars. All the samples were etched with Phosphoric Acid Gel 35% and then rinsed for 10 seconds. The following stages were carried out for each group: Group I (Active-Dry: After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds, air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive resin layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Inactive-Dry:After rinsing, air drying of dentin surface for 15 seconds, adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group III (Active-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, active priming of adhesive resin for 15 seconds and air drying for 5 seconds, the adhesive layer was light cured for 10 seconds. Group IV (Inactive-Wet:After rinsing, removal of excess water of dentin surface with a cotton roll, the adhesive resin was applied and air dryied for 5 seconds and then cured for 10 seconds. After adhesive resin application, composite resin (Z250, 3M Dental products was applied on prepared surface with cylindrical molds (with internal diameter of 2.8mm, & height of 5mm and light-cured for 100 seconds (5x20s. The samples were then thermocycled. They were located in 6±3c water .temperature for 10 seconds and then 15 seconds in inviromental temperature, 10s in 55±3c water temperature and then were located at room temperature for 15s. This test was repeated for 100s. All of the specimens

  10. Guide-Plane Retention in Designing Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothopi-Peri, Matshediso; Owen, C Peter

    To compare the influence of abutment teeth guide planes and guiding surfaces on retention of a removable partial denture (RPD). Extracted teeth embedded into a maxillary cast in the first premolar and second molar positions simulated two bounded saddles. Acrylic resin RPDs were made with no guide planes, then with guide planes, then with guiding surfaces added to directly contact the guide planes. The maximum loads on removal from the cast were recorded. There was a significant increase in retention force of 1.6 times when only guide planes were present and of 10.2 times when guiding surfaces intimately contacted the guide planes. The retention of acrylic resin RPDs can be substantially increased by making their guiding surfaces intimately contact the guide planes of the teeth.

  11. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghattas, N.K.; Ikladious, N.E.; Eskander, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    PMMA was studied with the aim to evaluate its usefulness as an incorporation medium for the final containment of spent ion-exchange resins. The study of the effect of water content (ranging from 25 to 100%) of the incorporated resin into PMMA on the compression strength of the final solid products shows that with the increasing water content the compression strength of the final products decreases sharply. Hardness of the final products follows nearly the same trend of compression strength. Increasing gamma irradiation doses, up to 7.77x10 7 rad, PMMA shows increase in compression strength and hardness for small doses and then decreases with increasing irradiation dose due to the increase in polymerization process and the degradation of the incorporation medium

  12. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  13. Removal of Copper ions from aqueous solutions using polymer derivations of poly (styrene-alt-maleic anhydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser Samadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study chelating resins have been considered to be suitable materials for the recovery of Copper (II ions in water treatments. Furthermore, these modified resins were reacted with 1,2-diaminoethane in the presence of ultrasonic irradiation for the preparation of a tridimensional chelating resin on the Nano scale for the recovery of Copper (II ions from aqueous solutions. This method which is used for removing and determining Copper (II ions using copolymers derived resins of poly (styrene-alternative-maleic anhydride (SMA and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The method is simple, sensitive, inexpensive and fast. The various parameters such as pH, contact time, concentrations of metal ions, mass of resin, and agitation speed were investigated on adsorption effect. The adsorption behavior of Copper (II ions were investigated by the synthesis of chelating resins at various pHs. The prepared resins showed a good tendency for removing the selected metal ions from aqueous solution, even at an acidic pH. Also, the prepared resins were examined for the removal of Copper (II ions from real samples such as industrial wastewater and were shown to be very efficient at adsorption in the cases of Copper (II ions. The pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetics equations were used for modeling of adsorption data and it was shown that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation could best describe the adsorption kinetics. The intra-particle diffusion study revealed that external diffusion might be involved in this case. The resins were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  14. Evaluation of the resin oxidation process using Fenton's reagent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Leandro G.; Goes, Marcos M.; Marumo, Julio T.

    2013-01-01

    The ion exchange resin is considered radioactive waste after its final useful life in nuclear reactors. Usually, this type of waste is treated with the immobilization in cement Portland, in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, reducing the possibility of radionuclides release in to environment. Because of the characteristic of expansion and contraction of the resins in presence of water, its incorporation in the common Portland cement is limited in 10% in direct immobilization, causing high costs in the final product. A pre-treatment would be able to reduce the volume, degrading the resins and increasing the load capacity of this material. This paper is about a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Fenton's reagent. The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic and anionic resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25 to 80 mM), with and without external heat. The time of reaction was two hours. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%. The resin degradation was confirmed by the presence of CaCO 3 as a white precipitate resulting from the reaction between the Ca(OH) 2 and the CO 2 from the resin degradation. It was possible to degrade the resins without external heating. The calcium carbonates showed no correlation with the residual resin mass. (author)

  15. 4-META opaque resin--a new resin strongly adhesive to nickel-chromium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Nagata, K; Takeyama, M; Atsuta, M; Nakabayashi, N; Masuhara, E

    1981-09-01

    1) A new adhesive opaque resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxy-ethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), was prepared, and its application to thermosetting acrylic resin veneer crowns was studied. 2) The 4-META opaque resin was applied to a variety of nickel-chromium dental alloy specimens which had undergone different treatment, and endurance tests were conducted to evaluate the durability of adhesion. 3) Stable adhesion against water penetration was achieved with metal surfaces first etched with HCl and then oxidized with HNO3. A bond strength of 250 kg/cm2 was maintained even after immersion in water at 37 degrees C for 30 wk or at 80 degrees C for ten wk. Furthermore, this value did not decrease even after the specimens were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. 4) The 4-META opaque resin studied can eliminate the necessity for retention devices on metal castings. 5) The smooth 4-META opaque resin should have no adverse effects on gingivae.

  16. Chemoviscosity modeling for thermosetting resin systems, 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, T. H.; Huang, Joan Y. Z.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study on the changes of chemorheological properties has been conducted and analyzed on commercial Hercules 3501-6 resin system cured under several isothermal conditions between 375 and 435 K. For the cure temperatures equal to or greater than 385 K, the storage modulus curing curves, G prime (t), exhibited abrupt changes in slope which occurred at various times depending on the curing temperatures and were attributed to the onset of gelation reactions. The crossover points between G prime (t) and G double prime (t) curves were observed for curing temperatures equal to or greater than 400 K. The gelation and the crossover points obtained from the chemorheological measurements, therefore, defined two characteristic resin states during cure. Approximately the same value for the degree of cure was reached by the advancement of the reaction at each of these states. The temperature dependency of the viscosities for the characteristic resin states and the rate constants of increase in moduli at different stages of curing were analyzed. Various G prime (t) and G double prime (t) isothermal curing curves were also shown to be capable of being superimposed on one another by the principle of time-temperature superposition. The resultant shift factors a sub t(t) and a Eta(T) were shown to follow the Arrhenius type relationship. Values of the activation energy suggested that the reaction kinetics, instead of the diffusion mechanism, was the limiting step in the overall resin advancement for the cure at temperatures equal to or greater than 385 K.

  17. Processable polyimide adhesive and matrix composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Progar, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature polyimide composition prepared by reacting 4,4'-isophthaloyldiphthalic anhydride with metaphenylenediamine is employed to prepare matrix resins, adhesives, films, coatings, moldings, and laminates, especially those showing enhanced flow with retention of mechanical and adhesive properties. It can be used in the aerospace industry, for example, in joining metals to metals or metals to composite structures. One area of application is in the manufacture of lighter and stronger aircraft and spacecraft structures.

  18. Potential contribution of exposed resin to ecosystem emissions of monoterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Allyson S. D.; Harley, Peter; Monson, Russell K.

    2013-10-01

    Conifers, especially pines, produce and store under pressure monoterpene-laden resin in canals located throughout the plant. When the plants are damaged and resin canals punctured, the resin is exuded and the monoterpenes are released into the atmosphere, a process that has been shown to influence ecosystem-level monoterpene emissions. Less attention has been paid to the small amounts of resin that are exuded from branches, expanding needles, developing pollen cones, and terminal buds in the absence of any damage. The goal of this study was to provide the first estimate of the potential of this naturally-exposed resin to influence emissions of monoterpenes from ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) ecosystems. When resin is first exuded as small spherical beads from undamaged tissues it emits monoterpenes to the atmosphere at a rate that is four orders of magnitude greater than needle tissue with an equivalent exposed surface area and the emissions from exuded beads decline exponentially as the resin dries. We made measurements of resin beads on the branches of ponderosa pine trees in the middle of the growing season and found, on average, 0.15 cm2 of exposed resin bead surface area and 1250 cm2 of total needle surface area per branch tip. If the resin emerged over the course of 10 days, resin emissions would make up 10% of the ecosystem emissions each day. Since we only accounted for exposed resin at a single point in time, this is probably an underestimate of how much total resin is exuded from undamaged pine tissues over the course of a growing season. Our observations, however, reveal the importance of this previously unrecognized source of monoterpenes emitted from pine forests and its potential to influence regional atmospheric chemistry dynamics.

  19. Curing kinetics of alkyd/melamine resin mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Mirjana C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkyd resins are the most popular and useful synthetic resins applied as the binder in protective coatings. Frequently they are not used alone but are modified with other synthetic resins in the manufacture of the coatings. An alkyd/melamine resin mixture is the usual composition for the preparation of coating called 'baking enamel' and it is cured through functional groups of resins at high temperatures. In this paper, curing kinetics of alkyd resins based on castor oil and dehydrated castor oil with melamine resin, has been studied by DSC method with programmed heating and in isothermal mode. The results determined from dynamic DSC curves were mathematically transformed using the Ozawa isoconversional method for obtaining the isothermal data. These results, degree of curing versus time, are in good agreement with those determined by the isothermal DSC experiments. By applying the Ozawa method it is possible to calculate the isothermal kinetic parameters for the alkyd/melamine resin mixtures curing using only calorimetric data obtained by dynamic DSC runs. Depending on the alkyd resin type and ratio in mixtures the values of activation energies of curing process of resin mixtures are from 51.3 to 114 kJ mol-1. The rate constant of curing increases with increasing the content of melamine resin in the mixture and with curing temperature. The reaction order varies from 1.12 to 1.37 for alkyd based on dehydrated castor oil/melamine resin mixtures and from 1.74 to 2.03 for mixtures with alkyd based on castor oil. Based on the results obtained, we propose that dehydrated castor oil alkyd/melamine resin mixtures can be used in practice (curing temperatures from 120 to 160°C.

  20. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, A C; Dharmapurikar, R; Strevel, S D

    1994-01-01

    The following investigations were performed: (1) batch mode screening of eleven(11) commercially available resins and selection of three candidate resins for further evaluation in a fixed-bed setup. (2) Process variables study using three candidate resins in the fixed-bed setup and selection of the ``best`` resin for process economics development. (3) Exhaustion efficiency and solution concentration were found to be inversely related necessitating a trade-off between the resin cost versus the cost of evaporation/concentration of ensuing effluents. (4) Higher concentration of the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} form of active sites over less active CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} form of sites in the resin was believed to be the main reason for the observed increase in the equilibrium capacity of the resin at an elevated static CO{sub 2}-pressure. This Increase in capacity was found to level off around 80--120 psig range. The increase in CO{sub 2}-pressure, however, did not appear to affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics. (5) In the fixed-bed mode, the solution concentration was found to affect the equilibrium capacity of candidate resins. Their relationship was well satisfied by the Langmuir type non-linear equilibrium isotherm. Alternatively, the effect of solution concentration on overall ion-exchange kinetics varied from resin to resin. (6) Product inhibition effect on the resin was observed as an initial increase followed by a significant decrease in the resin`s equilibrium capacity for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} as the HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} molar ratio in the solution was increased from 0 to 1.0. This ratio, however, did not affect the overall ion-exchange kinetics.