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Sample records for in-situ stress test

  1. Test plan for in situ stress measurement system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.

    1981-09-01

    The tests are to be performed to provide information regarding the state of stress of the basalt rock beneath the Hanford Site. This test series is designed to obtain information necessary to determine if hydrofracturing stress measurement is feasible in a fractured basalt medium. During the course of these field tests, it will be attempted to adapt the conventional hydrofracturing test method and analysis techniques to the basalt medium. If the test is shown to be feasible, more holes will be identified for testing. A comprehensive in situ stress determination program will be initiated. 2 figs

  2. Operational Review of the First Wireline In Situ Stress Test in Scientific Ocean Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey Moore

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scientific ocean drilling’s first in situ stress measurement was made at Site C0009A during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 319 as part of Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE Stage 2. The Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT, Schlumbergerwireline logging tool was deployed in riser Hole C0009A to measure in situ formation pore pressure, formation permeability (often reported as mobility=permeability/viscosity, and the least principal stress (S3 at several isolated depths (Saffer et al., 2009; Expedition 319 Scientists, 2010. The importance of in situ stress measurements is not only for scientific interests in active tectonic drilling, but also for geomechanical and well bore stability analyses. Certain in situ tools were not previously available for scientific ocean drilling due to the borehole diameter and open hole limits of riserless drilling. The riser-capable drillship, D/V Chikyu,now in service for IODP expeditions, allows all of the techniques available to estimate the magnitudes and orientations of 3-D stresses to be used. These techniques include downhole density logging for vertical stress, breakout and caliper log analyses for maximum horizontal stress, core-based anelastic strain recovery (ASR, used in the NanTroSEIZE expeditions in 2007–2008, and leak-off test (Lin et al., 2008 and minifrac/hydraulic fracturing (NanTroSEIZE Expedition319 in 2009. In this report, the whole operational planning process related to in situ measurements is reviewed, and lessons learned from Expedition 319 are summarized for efficient planning and testing in the future.

  3. Development of in-situ rock shear test under low compressive to tensile normal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Takashi; Shin, Koichi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an in-situ rock shear testing method to evaluate the shear strength under low normal stress condition including tensile stress, which is usually ignored in the assessment of safety factor of the foundations for nuclear power plants against sliding. The results are as follows. (1) A new in-situ rock shear testing method is devised, in which tensile normal stress can be applied on the shear plane of a specimen by directly pulling up a steel box bonded to the specimen. By applying the counter shear load to cancel the moment induced by the main shear load, it can obtain shear strength under low normal stress. (2) Some model tests on Oya tuff and diatomaceous mudstone have been performed using the developed test method. The shear strength changed smoothly from low values at tensile normal stresses to higher values at compressive normal stresses. The failure criterion has been found to be bi-linear on the shear stress vs normal stress plane. (author)

  4. Estimation of In Situ Stress and Permeability from an Extended Leak-off Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiep Quach, Quoc; Jo, Yeonguk; Chang, Chandong; Song, Insun

    2016-04-01

    Among many parameters needed to analyze a variety of geomechanical problems related to subsurface CO2 storage projects, two important ones are in situ stress states and permeability of the storage reservoirs and cap rocks. In situ stress is needed for investigating potential risk of fault slip in the reservoir systems and permeability is needed for assessing reservoir flow characteristics and sealing capability of cap rocks. We used an extended leak-off test (XLOT), which is often routinely conducted to assess borehole/casing integrity as well as fracture gradient, to estimate both in situ least principal stress magnitude and in situ permeability in a CO2 storage test site, offshore southeast Korea. The XLOT was conducted at a casing shoe depth (700 m below seafloor) within the cap rock consisting of mudstone, approximately 50 m above the interface between cap rock and storage reservoir. The test depth was cement-grouted and remained for 4 days for curing. Then the hole was further drilled below the casing shoe to create a 4 m open-hole interval at the bottom. Water was injected using hydraulic pump at an approximately constant flowrate into the bottom interval through the casing, during which pressure and flowrate were recorded continuously at the surface. The interval pressure (P) was increased linearly with time (t) as water was injected. At some point, the slope of P-t curve deviated from the linear trend, which indicates leak-off. Pressure reached its peak upon formation breakdown, followed by a gradual pressure decrease. Soon after the formation breakdown, the hole was shut-in by pump shut-off, from which we determined the instantaneous shut-in pressure (ISIP). The ISIP was taken to be the magnitude of the in situ least principal stress (S3), which was determined to be 12.1 MPa. This value is lower than the lithostatic vertical stress, indicating that the S3 is the least horizontal principal stress. The determined S3 magnitude will be used to characterize the

  5. In situ stress measurements at the Spent Fuel Test-Climax facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creveling, J.B.; Shuri, F.S.; Foster, K.M.; Mills, S.V.

    1984-05-01

    The status of the following studies is given: in situ state of stress; stress gradient into rib from south heater drift; pillar stresses; and rock deformational properties. 11 references, 38 figures, 12 tables

  6. Estimation of In Situ Stresses with Hydro-Fracturing Tests and a Statistical Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hikweon; Ong, See Hong

    2018-03-01

    At great depths, where borehole-based field stress measurements such as hydraulic fracturing are challenging due to difficult downhole conditions or prohibitive costs, in situ stresses can be indirectly estimated using wellbore failures such as borehole breakouts and/or drilling-induced tensile failures detected by an image log. As part of such efforts, a statistical method has been developed in which borehole breakouts detected on an image log are used for this purpose (Song et al. in Proceedings on the 7th international symposium on in situ rock stress, 2016; Song and Chang in J Geophys Res Solid Earth 122:4033-4052, 2017). The method employs a grid-searching algorithm in which the least and maximum horizontal principal stresses ( S h and S H) are varied, and the corresponding simulated depth-related breakout width distribution as a function of the breakout angle ( θ B = 90° - half of breakout width) is compared to that observed along the borehole to determine a set of S h and S H having the lowest misfit between them. An important advantage of the method is that S h and S H can be estimated simultaneously in vertical wells. To validate the statistical approach, the method is applied to a vertical hole where a set of field hydraulic fracturing tests have been carried out. The stress estimations using the proposed method were found to be in good agreement with the results interpreted from the hydraulic fracturing test measurements.

  7. In-situ failure test in the research tunnel at Olkiluoto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autio, J.; Johansson, E.; Kirkkomaeki, T. [Saanio and Riekkola Consulting Engineers, Helsinki (Finland); Hakala, M. [Gridpoint Finland Oy (Finland); Heikkilae, E. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Lab. of Rock Engineering

    2000-05-01

    A failure test suitable for execution in the Research Tunnel at Olkiluoto has been planned to study the failure of rock in-situ. The objectives of the in-situ failure test is to assess the applicability of numerical modelling codes and methods to the study of rock failure and associated crack propagation and to develop a novel technique to be used to determine the strength of rock in-situ. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary design of the failure test, assess the technical feasibility of the test and to give input information for further numerical modelling of the test. The design of the failure test is reported and results of preliminary modelling are given. The input information for future modelling includes a study of rock properties, fracture propagation in rock, in-situ stresses and the development of techniques for using the expanding agent to produce artificial stress field. The study showed that mechanical properties such as strength of gneissic tonalite, the main rock type in the Research Tunnel, depends highly on the orientation of schistocity. The in-situ failure test was shown to be technically feasible and a state of stress high enough to cause failure can be created artificially by using a proper expansive agent and design. (orig.)

  8. Model test study on propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian

    2017-12-01

    The study of propagation law of plane stress wave in jointed rock mass under in-situ stress has important significance for safety excavation of underground rock mass engineering. A model test of the blasting stress waves propagating in the intact rock and jointed rock mass under different in-situ stresses was carried out, and the influencing factors on the propagation law, such as the scale of static loads and the number of joints were studied respectively. The results show that the transmission coefficient of intact rock is larger than that of jointed rock mass under the same loading condition. With the increase of confining pressure, the transmission coefficients of intact rock and jointed rock mass both show an trend of increasing first and then decreasing, and the variation of transmission coefficients in intact rock is smaller than that of jointed rock mass. Transmission coefficient of jointed rock mass decreases with the increase of the number of joints under the same loading condition, when the confining pressure is relatively small, the reduction of transmission coefficients decreases with the increasing of the number of joints, and the variation law of the reduction of transmission coefficients is contrary when the confining pressure is large.

  9. In-Situ Measurement of Power Loss for Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Loading Stress Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    We analyze the degradation of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules undergoing simultaneous thermal, mechanical, and humidity-freeze stress testing to develop a dark environmental chamber in-situ measurement procedure for determining module power loss. We analyze dark I-V curves measured...

  10. Application of hydraulic fracturing to determine virgin in situ stress state around Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - in situ measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wawersik, W.R.; Stone, C.M.

    1985-10-01

    Hydraulic fracturing tests were carried out in horizontal drillholes in rock salt in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM. It was determined that the virgin in situ stress field is isotropic or nearly isotropic. The inferred magnitude of the isotropic in situ stress falls between bounds of 14.28 MPa and 17.9 MPa for the average breakdown/reopening pressures and driving pressures. The best estimate from instantaneous shut-in pressures is 16.61 MPa. Given some uncertainties about the interpretation of hydraulic fracturing data in salt, all of the foregoing values are in acceptable agreement with an average calculated isotropic in situ stress of 14.9 MPa at an average depth of 657 m below surface. Interpretations of breakdown and reopening pressures are based on finite element analyses of the relaxed stress field around a borehole in salt. This stress field varies little between approximately 50 and 200 days after drilling. The finite element analyses were also used to interpret the observed stable pressure-time signatures with little or no pressure drops during primary breakdown of the salt formation. The conclusion about the isotropic nature of the virgin in situ stress field is supported by observations of the induced fracture patterns. The report includes a comparison of the hydrofrac data in the WIPP with the published results of hydraulic fracturing tests in salt at three other locations. 75 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs

  11. In situ stress measurements at 250m gallery off the ventilation shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiro; Sanada, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Yutaka; Kato, Harumi

    2011-06-01

    From FY2000 to FY2005, JAEA had been making research at ground surface of Horonobe town for repository of high-level radioactive waste. During this period, geological investigation, hydrogeology investigation, rock mechanics investigation, geochemical investigation using boreholes were carried out in Hokushin area which is about 3kmx3km in surface area of Horonobe town in order to construct a geological environment model and to confirm the methodology for safety assessment. Now the research program proceeds to the next stage where the underground drifts and shafts are under construction. In the underground rock mass, in situ stress is the sum of tectonic stress as well as overlying stress due to gravity. In situ stresses enter into excavation design and are required in order to predict the response of rock masses to the disturbance associated with those structures. For these reasons, JAEA has carried out in situ stress measurements using vertical boreholes drilled from ground surface to evaluate the state of horizontal stress in the area. In the research during the underground construction, comparison between the stress measurements carried out at surface and at underground is conducted. And if inconsistency between these two measurements is found, the state of stress will be updated based on more reliable information. In order to study the 3D in situ state of stress around Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory, hydraulic fracturing tests and stress relief method (Conical-ended borehole method) were conducted at the 250m gallery located near the bottom of the ventilation shaft. Three 20.0m long boreholes, 09-V250-M01(slightly upwards), 09-V250-M02(slightly upwards) and 09-V250-M03(vertical), were drilled from the gallery using 76mm diameter bit. The results of the measurements are summarized as follows: (1) Hydraulic fracturing technique. Hydraulic fracturing technique using the test equipment with sufficiently small compliance was carried out in the three

  12. In situ subsoil stress-strain behaviour in relation to soil precompression stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, T; Arvidsson, J; Schjønning, Per

    2012-01-01

    is assumed to be elastic and reversible as long as [sigma] work examined soil stress-strain behavior as measured in situ during wheeling experiments and related it to the stress-strain behavior and [sigma]pc measured on soil cores in uniaxial compression tests in the laboratory. The data......Soil compaction negatively influences many important soil functions, including crop growth. Compaction occurs when the applied stress, [sigma], overcomes the soil strength. Soil strength in relation to compaction is typically expressed by the soil precompression stress, [sigma]pc. Deformation...... analyzed were from a large number of wheeling experiments carried out in Sweden and Denmark on soils with a wide range of texture. Contradicting the concept of precompression stress, we observed residual strain, [Latin Small Letter Open E]res, at [sigma

  13. Lithology-dependent In Situ Stress in Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, C. N.; Chang, C.

    2017-12-01

    Characterization of in situ stress state for various geomechanical aspects in petroleum development may be particularly difficult in carbonate reservoirs in which rock properties are generally heterogeneous. We demonstrate that the variation of in situ stress in highly heterogeneous carbonate reservoirs is closely related to the heterogeneity in rock mechanical property. The carbonate reservoir studied consists of numerous sequential layers gently folded, exhibiting wide ranges of porosity (0.01 - 0.29) and Young's modulus (25 - 85 GPa) depending on lithology. Wellbore breakouts and drilling-induced tensile fractures (DITFs) observed in the image logs obtained from several wells indicate that the in situ state of stress orientation changes dramatically with depth and location. Even in a wellbore, the azimuth of the maximum horizontal stress changes by as much as 60° within a depth interval of 500 m. This dramatic change in stress orientation is inferred to be due to the contrast in elastic properties between different rock layers which are bent by folding in the reservoir. The horizontal principal stress magnitudes are constrained by back-calculating stress conditions necessary to induce the observed wellbore failures using breakout width and the presence of DITFs. The horizontal stresses vary widely, which cannot be represented by a constant stress gradient with depth. The horizontal principal stress gradient increases with Young's modulus of layer monotonically, indicating that a stiffer layer conveys a higher horizontal stress. This phenomenon can be simulated using a numerical modelling, in which the horizontal stress magnitudes depend on stiffness of individual layers although the applied far-field stress conditions are constant. The numerical results also suggest that the stress concentration at the wellbore wall is essentially higher in a stiffer layer, promoting the possibility of wellbore breakout formation. These results are in agreement with our

  14. Influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress in tight reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongping; Wei, Xu; Zhang, Ye; Xing, Libo; Xu, Jianjun

    2018-01-01

    Currently, hydraulic fracturing is an important way to develop low permeability reservoirs. The fractures produced during the fracturing process are the main influencing factors of changing in-situ stress. In this paper, the influence of fracture extension on in-situ stress is studied by establishing a mathematical model to describe the relationship between fracture length and in-situ stress. The results show that the growth rate gradually decreases after the fracture reaches a certain length with the increase of fracturing time; the continuous extension of the fracture is the main factor to change the in-situ stress. In order to reduce the impact on the subsequent fracture extension due to the changing of in-situ stress, controlling fracturing time and fracture length without affecting the stimulated reservoir effect is an important way. The results presented in this study can effectively reduce the impact of changing of in-situ stress on subsequent fracturing construction.

  15. Temperature-dependency analysis and correction methods of in-situ power-loss estimation for crystalline silicon modules undergoing potential-induced degradation stress testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Peter; Sera, Dezso

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method of in-situ characterization of the photovoltaic module power at standard test conditions using superposition of the dark current-voltage (I-V) curve measured at elevated stress temperature during potential-induced degradation (PID) testing. PID chamber studies were performed o...

  16. Thermal simulation of drift emplacement (TSS): In-situ instrumentation and numerical modeling of stress measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heusermann, S.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of the planned demonstration test Thermal Simulation of Drift Emplacement (TSS) BGR is carrying out in-situ-measurements of rock stresses, rock deformability and permeability of salt rock and backfill material. The following techniques developed and proved by BGR during the last years are planned to be used in the TSS project: overcoring technique, dilatometer technique, hard inclusion technique, slot-cutting techniques, large-flatjack technique, compensation tests in laboratory, vacuum tests, injection tests, and tracer tests. The purpose of measurements is to determine: the initial stress state; stress gradients around test drifts; stress change caused by mining activities, by creep and stress relaxation and by temperature; the in-situ load-deformation behavior of rock salt; the permeability of rock salt around test drifts; the compaction behavior of backfill material; and the load-deformation behavior of rock salt and borehole grout in laboratory tests

  17. Comparison Between Stress Obtained by Numerical Analysis and In-Situ Measurements on a Flexible Pipe Subjected to In-Plane Bending Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Lukassen, Troels; Glejbøl, Kristian; Lyckegaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    to stress patterns obtained during in-situ OMS measurements carried out during an actual experimental inplane bending test. The study showed a good correlation between the stress variation predicted with the finite element model and the measured stress variation.......To predict the lifetime and long-term properties of tensile armour wires in a dynamically loaded pipe, it is essential to have a tool which allows detailed prediction of the stress variations in the tensile armour wires during global pipe loading. Furthermore, detailed understanding of the stress...... variations will allow for performance optimization of the armour layers. To study the detailed stress variations in flexible pipes during dynamic loading, a comprehensive three-dimensional implicit nonlinear finite element model has been developed. The predicted numerical stress variations will be compared...

  18. Measuring in-situ stress in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The hydrofracturing method of in-situ stress measurement is the only technique which has been proven to be reliable in boreholes below depths of 300 m. The method has been used in a variety of applications at depths of up to 5000m, and in a range of borehole diameters. The equipment used is composed of standard components from proven and long-established oil industry well-logging tools and is simple to operate. This is preferable to the delicate electrical devices used in the overcoring stress measurement method. Electrical components are difficult to waterproof, very small strains are monitored and the tendency of electrical circuits to drift, due to a variety of effects, makes interpretation of the results difficult. However, the interpretation of hydrofracturing test results is often not easy. Many factors can prevent ideal fracturing behaviour from occurring, in which case conventional analyses will yield incorrect answers. The complete state of stress can often not be determined and sweeping assumptions are commonly made about principal stress direction, which cannot always be subsequently verified. (author)

  19. Determination of in-situ rock stresses related to petroleum activities on the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fejerskov, Morten

    1996-12-31

    In-situ rock stresses have proved to be important for exploration and production of hydrocarbons. This thesis uses various stress determination techniques to characterize the in-situ stress field on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. Leak off tests and borehole breakouts have been used to determine the in-situ stress in deep well bores. Overcoring and earthquake focal mechanisms data have also been compiled and evaluated together with stress information from petroleum wells. A new test procedure is suggested to improve the quality of leak off tests that emphasises the importance of accurate pressure determination, longer test periods and digital data sampling. Four-arm calliper logs are used to identify borehole breakouts on the Tampen Spur and Horda Platform. However, it proved difficult to distinguish borehole breakouts from other drilling processes since the elongations of the borehole consistently appeared in the direction of hole azimuth; drilling-induced key seats are here observed in vertical wells. This behaviour is discussed but not fully understood. This reduces the number of reliable stress data and their quality enormously and even casts some doubt about the quality of previous breakout studies from the North Sea. A highly compressive horizontal stress field seems to be present onshore and offshore Norway. Different stress determination techniques yield very consistent stress orientation, regional and internal variation. A 1. order stress direction is identified, where the maximum horizontal stress direction is rotating from N-S in the Barents Sea to NW-SE in the Norwegian Sea and WNW-ESE in the northern North Sea. At Tampen Spur, a dominant WNW-ESE maximum horizontal stress direction, normal to the major tectonic structures is identified as well as a minimum stress close to the vertical stress, the latter indicating high horizontal stresses. 250 refs., 91 figs., 14 tabs.

  20. Residual stress evaluation in brittle coatings using indentation technique combined with in-situ bending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Steinbrech, R.W.; Tanabe, Yuji; Hara, Toshiaki

    2000-01-01

    The indentation crack length approach was adopted and further elaborated to evaluate residual stress and toughness of the brittle coatings: two kinds of glass coatings on steel. The influence of the residual stress on indentation cracking was examined in as-received coating condition and by in-situ superimposing a counteracting tensile stress. For purpose of providing reference toughness values stress-free pieces of separated coating material have also been examined. Thus results of the two complementary sets of experiments were assumed to prove self-consistently toughness and residual stress data of the coating. In particular, the in-situ bending of specimen in combination with the indentation test allowed us to vary deliberately the residual stress situation in glass coating. Thus experiments which utilized the combination of bending test and micro-indentation were introduced as a method to provide unambiguous information about residual compressive stress. Toughness and residual compressive stress of glass coatings used in this study were 0.46-0.50 MPa·m 1/2 and 94-111 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, a thermoelastic calculation of the residual compressive stress was performed and it is found that the value of residual compressive stress at coating surface of specimen was 90-102 MPa. (author)

  1. In situ mechanical TEM: seeing and measuring under stress with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legros, M.

    2014-01-01

    From the first observation of moving dislocations in 1956 to the latest developments of piezo-actuated sample holders and direct electron sensing cameras in modern transmission electron microscopes (TEM), in situ mechanical testing has brought an unequaled view of the involved mechanisms during the plastic deformation of materials. Although MEMS-based or load-cell equipped holders provide an almost direct measure of these quantities, deriving stress and strain from in situ TEM experiments has an extensive history. Nowadays, the realization of a complete mechanical test while observing the evolution of a dislocation structure is possible, and it constitutes the perfect combination to explore size effects in plasticity. New cameras, data acquisition rates and intrinsic image-related techniques, such as holography, should extend the efficiency and capabilities of in situ deformation inside a TEM. (author)

  2. Quantitative analysis of stress-induced martensites by in situ transmission electron microscopy superelastic tests in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, M.L.; Ibarra, A.; Caillard, D.; San Juan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Stress-induced martensite nucleation and further growing, in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys, have been studied during in situ superelastic tests in the transmission electron microscope. Two kinds of martensite, β 3 ' and γ 3 ' , are induced and can coexist under stress, both exhibiting in a high density of stacking faults. The interface plane and the orientation relationships between the different variants of such martensites have been determined, and the atomic configurations of the lattices across the interface have been described. Finally, in light of the results, selection rules for the stress-induced promoted martensites at the nano-scale have been established, being determined by the shear direction and the basal plane of the martensite lattice.

  3. Review of possible correlations between in situ stress and PFL fracture transmissivity data at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Derek (University of Alberta (United States)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB (Sweden))

    2011-11-15

    In laboratory samples, the fracture transmissivity decreases significantly as the confining stress increases. While these experimental relationships are widely accepted and validated on laboratory samples, it is unknown if such relationships exist in situ or if these relationships can be scaled from the centimetre-scale laboratory tests to the metre-scale of in situ fractures. The purpose of this work is to assess the relationship between the structural-hydraulic data gathered in deep, cored boreholes at Forsmark and the in situ stress state acting on the these fractures. In conclusion, there does not appear to be sufficient evidence from these analyses to support the notion that the magnitude of the flow along the fractures at Forsmark is solely controlled by the in situ stress acting on the fracture. This should not be surprising because the majority of the fractures formed more than 1 billion years ago and the current in situ stress state has only been active for the past 12 million years. It is more likely that the transmissivity values are controlled by fracture roughness, open channels within the fracture, fracture stiffness and fracture infilling material

  4. Analysis of in situ stress at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, S.J.; Holland, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been developed to initialize far-field finite element models such that the measured in situ stress state appears to be reproduced well. The method includes use of the mechanical stratigraphy, mechanical effect of pore pressure, gravity loading, a horizontal ''tectonic'' component of stress, and use of a jointed rock model to calculate the mechanical response. Topographic effects and effects related to the vertical variation in mechanical properties are predicted for repository depths (∼ 300 m). Gravity loading with a small horizontal compression is used to calculate a minimum horizontal stress similar in magnitude to that measured in situ. 8 refs., 5 figs

  5. In situ monitored in-pile creep testing of zirconium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, R. W.; Jaworski, A. W.; Webb, T. W.; Smith, R. W.

    2014-01-01

    The experiments described herein were designed to investigate the detailed irradiation creep behavior of zirconium based alloys in the HALDEN Reactor spectrum. The HALDEN Test Reactor has the unique capability to control both applied stress and temperature independently and externally for each specimen while the specimen is in-reactor and under fast neutron flux. The ability to monitor in situ the creep rates following a stress and temperature change made possible the characterization of creep behavior over a wide stress-strain-rate-temperature design space for two model experimental heats, Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-2 + 1 wt%Nb, with only 12 test specimens in a 100-day in-pile creep test program. Zircaloy-2 specimens with and without 1 wt% Nb additions were tested at irradiation temperatures of 561 K and 616 K and stresses ranging from 69 MPa to 455 MPa. Various steady state creep models were evaluated against the experimental results. The irradiation creep model proposed by Nichols that separates creep behavior into low, intermediate, and high stress regimes was the best model for predicting steady-state creep rates. Dislocation-based primary creep, rather than diffusion-based transient irradiation creep, was identified as the mechanism controlling deformation during the transitional period of evolving creep rate following a step change to different test conditions.

  6. Developments in wireline in-situ rock stress measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedroso, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canas, Jesus A.; Holzberg, Bruno; Gmach, Helmut [Schlumberger Servicos de Petroleo Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents recent developments of in-situ stress measurements with wireline tools. The stress measurements are based on the micro hydraulic techniques that can be initialized when an interval is pressurized by pumping fluid until a tensile fracture begins or by packers fracturing (sleeve fracturing). Ultrasonic and Micro-resistivity borehole image logs (before and after the testes) are used as a complement, in order to observe the fractures created by the tests, evaluating the mechanical behavior of the formation. An offshore case study is presented, where shales and tight sandstones at depths deeper than 4500 meters depth were successfully evaluated. A workflow to succeed on stress measurements on such environments is proposed, what includes a planning phase: where breakdown pressures ranges are estimated and compared with the capacity of the tools, a Real Time Monitoring phase, where a decision tree is proposed to help on quick decisions while testing, and an interpretation phase, where appropriate techniques are indicated to evaluate the results. Also, the paper presents the main operational needs to succeed on such environments. Basically, such tests require an entirely software controlled, motorized and modular design tool consisting of dual packer (DP), pump out and flow control modules (Figure 1). These modules were upgraded for the present environment: conditions such as temperatures above 300 deg F, formation pressures above 10,000 psia, very low formation permeability, high pressure differential need and oil based mud (OBM) environment. (author)

  7. In situ stress and pore pressure in the Kumano Forearc Basin, offshore SW Honshu from downhole measurements during riser drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffer, D. M.; Flemings, P. B.; Boutt, D.; Doan, M.-L.; Ito, T.; McNeill, L.; Byrne, T.; Conin, M.; Lin, W.; Kano, Y.; Araki, E.; Eguchi, N.; Toczko, S.

    2013-05-01

    situ stress and pore pressure are key parameters governing rock deformation, yet direct measurements of these quantities are rare. During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition #319, we drilled through a forearc basin at the Nankai subduction zone and into the underlying accretionary prism. We used the Modular Formation Dynamics Tester tool (MDT) for the first time in IODP to measure in situ minimum stress, pore pressure, and permeability at 11 depths between 729.9 and 1533.9 mbsf. Leak-off testing at 708.6 mbsf conducted as part of drilling operations provided a second measurement of minimum stress. The MDT campaign included nine single-probe (SP) tests to measure permeability and in situ pore pressure and two dual-packer (DP) tests to measure minimum principal stress. Permeabilities defined from the SP tests range from 6.53 × 10-17 to 4.23 × 10-14 m2. Pore fluid pressures are near hydrostatic throughout the section despite rapid sedimentation. This is consistent with the measured hydraulic diffusivity of the sediments and suggests that the forearc basin should not trap overpressures within the upper plate of the subduction zone. Minimum principal stresses are consistently lower than the vertical stress. We estimate the maximum horizontal stress from wellbore failures at the leak-off test and shallow MDT DP test depths. The results indicate a normal or strike-slip stress regime, consistent with the observation of abundant active normal faults in the seaward-most part of the basin, and a general decrease in fault activity in the vicinity of Site C0009.

  8. In-situ observations of stress-induced thin film failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Z.B., E-mail: zzhao@firstsolar.co [Delphi Research Labs, 51786 Shelby Parkway, Shelby Twp., MI 48315 (United States); Hershberger, J. [Laird Technologies, 4707 Detroit Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, 44102 (United States); Bilello, J.C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2136 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    In this work, the failure modes of thin films under thermo-mechanical treatments were observed via in-situ white beam X-ray topography. The in-situ experiments were carried out using an experimental setup on Beamline 2-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline thin films of Ta and CrN on Si substrates were selected for the present study due to their disparate states of intrinsic residual stresses: the Ta film was anisotropically compressive and the CrN film was isotropically tensile. Under a similar heating-cooling cycle in air, the two types of films exhibited distinct failure modes, which were observed in-situ and in a quasi-real-time fashion. The failures of the samples have been interpreted based on their distinctive growth stress states, superimposed on the additional stress development associated with different forms of thermal instabilities upon heating. These included the formation of oxide for the Ta/Si sample, which led to an increase in compressive stress, and a phase change for the CrN/Si sample, which caused the isotropic stress in the film to become increasingly tensile.

  9. In-situ observations of stress-induced thin film failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z.B.; Hershberger, J.; Bilello, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the failure modes of thin films under thermo-mechanical treatments were observed via in-situ white beam X-ray topography. The in-situ experiments were carried out using an experimental setup on Beamline 2-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Magnetron sputtered polycrystalline thin films of Ta and CrN on Si substrates were selected for the present study due to their disparate states of intrinsic residual stresses: the Ta film was anisotropically compressive and the CrN film was isotropically tensile. Under a similar heating-cooling cycle in air, the two types of films exhibited distinct failure modes, which were observed in-situ and in a quasi-real-time fashion. The failures of the samples have been interpreted based on their distinctive growth stress states, superimposed on the additional stress development associated with different forms of thermal instabilities upon heating. These included the formation of oxide for the Ta/Si sample, which led to an increase in compressive stress, and a phase change for the CrN/Si sample, which caused the isotropic stress in the film to become increasingly tensile.

  10. Model and calculation of in situ stresses in anisotropic formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuezhi, W.; Zijun, L.; Lixin, H. [Jianghan Petroleum Institute, (China)

    1997-08-01

    In situ stresses in transversely isotropic material in relation to wellbore stability have been investigated. Equations for three horizontal in- situ stresses and a new formation fracture pressure model were described, and the methodology for determining the elastic parameters of anisotropic rocks in the laboratory was outlined. Results indicate significantly smaller differences between theoretically calculated pressures and actual formation pressures than results obtained by using the isotropic method. Implications for improvements in drilling efficiency were reviewed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Experimental Measurement of In Situ Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbo, Maria; Milkereit, Bernd; Nasseri, Farzine; Schmitt, Douglas; Young, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The World Stress Map data is determined by stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanisms, in situ measurement in mining, oil and gas boreholes as well as the borehole cores, and geologic data. Unfortunately, these measurements are not only infrequent but sometimes infeasible, and do not provide nearly enough data points with high accuracy to correctly infer stress fields in deep mines around the world. Improvements in stress measurements of Earth's crust is fundamental to several industries such as oil and gas, mining, nuclear waste management, and enhanced geothermal systems. Quantifying the state of stress and the geophysical properties of different rock types is a major complication in geophysical monitoring of deep mines. Most stress measurement techniques involve either the boreholes or their cores, however these measurements usually only give stress along one axis, not the complete stress tensor. The goal of this project is to investigate a new method of acquiring a complete stress tensor of the in situ stress in the Earth's crust. This project is part of a comprehensive, exploration geophysical study in a deep, highly stressed mine located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and focuses on two boreholes located in this mine. These boreholes are approximately 400 m long with NQ diameters and are located at depths of about 1300 - 1600 m and 1700 - 2000 m. Two borehole logging surveys were performed on both boreholes, October 2013 and July 2015, in order to perform a time-lapse analysis of the geophysical changes in the mine. These multi-parameter surveys include caliper, full waveform sonic, televiewer, chargeability (IP), and resistivity. Laboratory experiments have been performed on borehole core samples of varying geologies from each borehole. These experiments have measured the geophysical properties including elastic modulus, bulk modulus, P- and S-wave velocities, and density. The apparatus' used for this project are geophysical imaging cells capable

  12. An in situ test of vibrating wire stressmeters in granitic rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinney, M.H.

    1990-02-01

    An in situ test was conducted to assess the ability of vibrating-wire stressmeters to measure stress changes in hard, unfractured granitic rock at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Twelve vibrating-wire stressmeters installed ahead of the face and below floor grade of Room 205 were monitored during the excavation of Room 205. The results were compared with results from CSIRO hollow inclusion triaxial strain cells, USBM boreholes deformation gauge overcore tests done before and after excavation, and a two-dimensional numerical model

  13. In situ stress measurement with the new LVDT - Cell - method description and verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.; Christiansson, R.; Martin, D.; Siren, T.; Kemppainen, K.

    2013-11-01

    Posiva Oy and SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB) tested the suitability a new LVDT-cell (Linear Variable Differential Transducer cell) to measure the induced stresses in the vicinity of an excavated surface and further to use these results to interpret the in situ state of stress. It utilises the overcoring methodology, measuring the radial convergence of four diameters using eight LVDTs, and is similar in concept to the USBM-gauge. A 127 mm diameter pilot-hole is required and the overcore diameter is 200 mm. The minimum overcoring length is 350 mm, and hence a compact drill can be utilised. Extensive testing of the LVDT-cell shows it to be robust and suitable for use in an underground environment. Sensitivity tests also show that the cell can withstand a range of operating conditions and still provide acceptable results. The in situ stress at the measurement location can be solved by numerical inversion using the results of at least three overcoring measurements around the three-dimensional tunnel section. The large dimensions of the measurement tool and the ability to utilise multiple measurements at various locations in a tunnel section, provides flexibility in selecting an appropriate rock mass volume. Because the inversion technique relies on knowing the exact location of the measurements and the geometry profile of the tunnel, modern survey techniques such as Lidar or photogrammetric technology should be used. Checks using traditional surveying techniques should also be used to ensure adequate survey resolution, specially in case of sidecoring measurements. To evaluate the suitability of the LVDT-cell to provide the in situ state of stress, tests were carried out in the drill-and-blast TASS tunnel and TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The state of stress established using the LVDT-cell was in agreement with the state of stress established previously using traditional overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods. In this study, the

  14. In situ stress measurement with the new LVDT - Cell - method description and verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [KMS Hakala Oy, Nokia (Finland); Christiansson, R. [Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Martin, D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Siren, T.; Kemppainen, K.

    2013-11-15

    Posiva Oy and SKB (Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB) tested the suitability a new LVDT-cell (Linear Variable Differential Transducer cell) to measure the induced stresses in the vicinity of an excavated surface and further to use these results to interpret the in situ state of stress. It utilises the overcoring methodology, measuring the radial convergence of four diameters using eight LVDTs, and is similar in concept to the USBM-gauge. A 127 mm diameter pilot-hole is required and the overcore diameter is 200 mm. The minimum overcoring length is 350 mm, and hence a compact drill can be utilised. Extensive testing of the LVDT-cell shows it to be robust and suitable for use in an underground environment. Sensitivity tests also show that the cell can withstand a range of operating conditions and still provide acceptable results. The in situ stress at the measurement location can be solved by numerical inversion using the results of at least three overcoring measurements around the three-dimensional tunnel section. The large dimensions of the measurement tool and the ability to utilise multiple measurements at various locations in a tunnel section, provides flexibility in selecting an appropriate rock mass volume. Because the inversion technique relies on knowing the exact location of the measurements and the geometry profile of the tunnel, modern survey techniques such as Lidar or photogrammetric technology should be used. Checks using traditional surveying techniques should also be used to ensure adequate survey resolution, specially in case of sidecoring measurements. To evaluate the suitability of the LVDT-cell to provide the in situ state of stress, tests were carried out in the drill-and-blast TASS tunnel and TBM tunnel at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden. The state of stress established using the LVDT-cell was in agreement with the state of stress established previously using traditional overcoring and hydraulic fracturing methods. In this study, the

  15. Quantitative in situ TEM tensile testing of an individual nickel nanowire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yang; Peng Cheng; Ganesan, Yogeeswaran; Lou Jun; Huang Jianyu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we have demonstrated the usage of a novel micro-mechanical device (MMD) to perform quantitative in situ tensile tests on individual metallic nanowires inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Our preliminary experiment on a 360 nm diameter nickel nanowire showed that the sample fractured at an engineering stress of ∼ 1.2 GPa and an engineering strain of ∼ 4%, which is consistent with earlier experiments performed inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). With in situ high resolution TEM imaging and diffraction capabilities, this novel experimental set-up could provide unique opportunities to reveal the underlying deformation and damage mechanisms for metals at the nanoscale.

  16. In situ mechanical-radiation effects test capsule for simulating fusion material environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, K.E.; Bennett, G.A.; Sommer, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Conditions of radiation and simultaneous cyclic stress on materials are inherent in advanced energy source designs such as inertially and magnetically confined controlled thermonuclear reactors. A test capsule capable of applying a cyclic stress to test specimens while they are being irradiated in the 800-MeV proton beam at the Clinton P. Anderson Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility has been developed. The design and performance of this device are discussed in this report. This machine has facilities for seven pairs of differential samples; one sample of a pair receives an applied cyclic stress and its companion in an identical flux will be the unstressed control. Control of the sample temperature and in situ monitoring of sample elongation and load are provided in the design. Results of an earlier experiment will be discussed, along with those of preliminary bench tests of the redesigned capsule

  17. IN-SITU TEST EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH ON LEAKAGE OF LARGE DIAMETER PRE-STRESSED CONCRETE CYLINDER PIPE (PCCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a big number of large diameter pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP lines have been applied to the Mid-route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project. However, the leakage problem of PCCP causes annually heavy economic losses to our country. In such a context of situation, how to detect leaks rapidly and precisely after pipes appear cracks in water supply system has great significance. Based on the study and analysis of the characteristic structure of large diameter PCCP, a new leak detection system using fiber Bragg grating sensors, which can capture signals of water pressure change, is proposed. The feasibility, reliability and practicability of the system could be acceptable according to data achieved from in–situ tests. Moreover, the leak detection system can monitor in real-time of dynamic change of water pressure. The equations of the leakage quantity and water pressure have been presented in this paper, which can provide technical guidelines for large diameter PCCP lines maintenance.

  18. An in situ Raman spectroscopy study of stress transfer between carbon nanotubes and polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Minfang; Winey, Karen I; Osswald, Sebastian; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-01-01

    The transfer mechanism of applied stress in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy on composite fibers. These SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposite fibers have no specific SWCNT-polymer interactions and the high degree of nanotube alignment minimizes the contributions from nanotube-nanotube interactions. Although tensile testing found significantly improved overall mechanical properties of the fibers, effective stress transfer to SWCNTs is limited to a small strain regime (ε<0.2%). At higher strains, the stress on the SWCNTs decreases due to the slippage at the nanotube-polymer interface. Slippage was also evident in scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces produced by tensile testing of the composite fibers. Above ε = 0.2%, the strain-induced slippage was accompanied by irreversible responses in stress and Raman peak shifts. This paper shows that efficient stress transfer to nanotubes as monitored by Raman spectroscopy is crucial to improving the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites and to detecting internal damage in nanocomposites.

  19. Microseism Induced by Transient Release of In Situ Stress During Deep Rock Mass Excavation by Blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhua; Lu, Wenbo; Chen, Ming; Yan, Peng; Zhou, Chuangbing

    2013-07-01

    During deep rock mass excavation with the method of drill and blast, accompanying the secession of rock fragments and the formation of a new free surface, in situ stress on this boundary is suddenly released within several milliseconds, which is termed the transient release of in situ stress. In this process, enormous strain energy around the excavation face is instantly released in the form of kinetic energy and it inevitably induces microseismic events in surrounding rock masses. Thus, blasting excavation-induced microseismic vibrations in high-stress rock masses are attributed to the combined action of explosion and the transient release of in situ stress. The intensity of stress release-induced microseisms, which depends mainly on the magnitude of the in situ stress and the dimension of the excavation face, is comparable to that of explosion-induced vibrations. With the methods of time-energy density analysis, amplitude spectrum analysis, and finite impulse response (FIR) digital filter, microseismic vibrations induced by the transient release of in situ stress were identified and separated from recorded microseismic signals during a blast of deep rock masses in the Pubugou Hydropower Station. The results show that the low-frequency component in the microseismic records results mainly from the transient release of in situ stress, while the high-frequency component originates primarily from explosion. In addition, a numerical simulation was conducted to demonstrate the occurrence of microseismic events by the transient release of in situ stress, and the results seem to have confirmed fairly well the separated vibrations from microseismic records.

  20. Numerical study on core damage and interpretation of in situ state of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakala, M. [Gridpoint Finland Oy (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    Core disking is a phenomenon where a diamond cored core sample will be sliced when released from a stressed host rock. Ring disking is a similar phenomenon which takes place during overcoring with a pilot hole. Because of the uniform shape and spacing of disk fracturing, it has the potential to be used for estimating the in situ state of stress. If this is feasible, it could be used in high stress states where the traditional stress measuring techniques are not valid or even possible. In this work the both the core disking and ring disking phenomena were studied based on the elastic bottom hole stress application developed and a series of fracture growth stability simulations. The results-showed that both phenomena are very complicated and site specific, but the spacing, shape, extent and initiation point are clearly stress state dependent. Throughout the work, guidelines for the in situ stress field interpretation method were developed and implemented for the borehole aligned orthogonal stress field and Poisson`s ratio of 0.25. Based on this study, the in situ state of stress can be estimated with acceptable accuracy if information on both core disking and ring disking is available. On the other hand, as an indirect method, there are no reasons to use it if direct measurements can be used. (orig.) 35 refs.

  1. Numerical study on core damage and interpretation of in situ state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.

    1999-06-01

    Core disking is a phenomenon where a diamond cored core sample will be sliced when released from a stressed host rock. Ring disking is a similar phenomenon which takes place during overcoring with a pilot hole. Because of the uniform shape and spacing of disk fracturing, it has the potential to be used for estimating the in situ state of stress. If this is feasible, it could be used in high stress states where the traditional stress measuring techniques are not valid or even possible. In this work the both the core disking and ring disking phenomena were studied based on the elastic bottom hole stress application developed and a series of fracture growth stability simulations. The results-showed that both phenomena are very complicated and site specific, but the spacing, shape, extent and initiation point are clearly stress state dependent. Throughout the work, guidelines for the in situ stress field interpretation method were developed and implemented for the borehole aligned orthogonal stress field and Poisson's ratio of 0.25. Based on this study, the in situ state of stress can be estimated with acceptable accuracy if information on both core disking and ring disking is available. On the other hand, as an indirect method, there are no reasons to use it if direct measurements can be used. (orig.)

  2. A test case of the deformation rate analysis (DRA) stress measurement method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dight, P.; Hsieh, A. [Australian Centre for Geomechanics, Univ. of WA, Crawley (Australia); Johansson, E. [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Hudson, J.A. [Rock Engineering Consultants (United Kingdom); Kemppainen, K.

    2012-01-15

    As part of Posiva's site and ONKALO investigations, the in situ rock stress has been measured by a variety of techniques, including hydraulic fracturing, overcoring, and convergence measurements. All these techniques involve direct measurements in a drillhole or at the rock surface. An alternative method is to test drillhole core in a way that enables estimation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ rock stress. The Kaiser Effect (KE) and Deformation Rate Analysis (DRA) are two ways to do this. In the work reported here, a 'blind' DRA test was conducted on core obtained from the POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment) niche in the ONKALO. The term 'blind' means that the two first authors of this report, who conducted the tests at the Australian Centre for Geomechanics, did not know the depths below surface at which the cores had been obtained. The results of this DRA Test Case are presented, together with an explanation of the DRA procedure. Also, additional information that would help in such DRA testing and associated analysis is explained. One of the problems in comparing the DRA results with the known Olkiluoto stress field is that the latter is highly variable across the site, as experienced by the previous in situ stress measurements and as predicted by numerical analysis. The variability is mainly caused by the presence of the large brittle deformation zones which perturb the local stress state. However, this variability reduces with depth and the stress field becomes more stable at the {approx} 350 m at which the drillhole cores were obtained. Another compounding difficulty is that the stress quantity, being a second order tensor, requires six independent components for its specification. In other words, comparison of the DRA results and the known stress field requires comparison of six different quantities. In terms of the major principal stress orientation, the DRA results predict an orientation completely

  3. A test case of the deformation rate analysis (DRA) stress measurement method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dight, P.; Hsieh, A.; Johansson, E.; Hudson, J.A.; Kemppainen, K.

    2012-01-01

    As part of Posiva's site and ONKALO investigations, the in situ rock stress has been measured by a variety of techniques, including hydraulic fracturing, overcoring, and convergence measurements. All these techniques involve direct measurements in a drillhole or at the rock surface. An alternative method is to test drillhole core in a way that enables estimation of the magnitudes and orientations of the in situ rock stress. The Kaiser Effect (KE) and Deformation Rate Analysis (DRA) are two ways to do this. In the work reported here, a 'blind' DRA test was conducted on core obtained from the POSE (Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment) niche in the ONKALO. The term 'blind' means that the two first authors of this report, who conducted the tests at the Australian Centre for Geomechanics, did not know the depths below surface at which the cores had been obtained. The results of this DRA Test Case are presented, together with an explanation of the DRA procedure. Also, additional information that would help in such DRA testing and associated analysis is explained. One of the problems in comparing the DRA results with the known Olkiluoto stress field is that the latter is highly variable across the site, as experienced by the previous in situ stress measurements and as predicted by numerical analysis. The variability is mainly caused by the presence of the large brittle deformation zones which perturb the local stress state. However, this variability reduces with depth and the stress field becomes more stable at the ∼ 350 m at which the drillhole cores were obtained. Another compounding difficulty is that the stress quantity, being a second order tensor, requires six independent components for its specification. In other words, comparison of the DRA results and the known stress field requires comparison of six different quantities. In terms of the major principal stress orientation, the DRA results predict an orientation completely different to the NW-SE regional

  4. Intrinsic stress in ZrN thin films: Evaluation of grain boundary contribution from in situ wafer curvature and ex situ x-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsokeras, L. E.; Abadias, G.

    2012-01-01

    Low-mobility materials, like transition metal nitrides, usually undergo large residual stress when sputter-deposited as thin films. While the origin of stress development has been an active area of research for high-mobility materials, atomistic processes are less understood for low-mobility systems. In the present work, the contribution of grain boundary to intrinsic stress in reactively magnetron-sputtered ZrN films is evaluated by combining in situ wafer curvature measurements, providing information on the overall biaxial stress, and ex situ x-ray diffraction, giving information on elastic strain (and related stress) inside crystallites. The thermal stress contribution was also determined from the in situ stress evolution during cooling down, after deposition was stopped. The stress data are correlated with variations in film microstructure and growth energetics, in the 0.13-0.42 Pa working pressure range investigated, and discussed based on existing stress models. At low pressure (high energetic bombardment conditions), a large compressive stress is observed due to atomic peening, which induces defects inside crystallites but also promotes incorporation of excess atoms in the grain boundary. Above 0.3-0.4 Pa, the adatom surface mobility is reduced, leading to the build-up of tensile stress resulting from attractive forces between under-dense neighbouring column boundary and possible void formation, while crystallites can still remain under compressive stress.

  5. Reliable practical technique for in-situ rock stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The proposed primary output of this research project is the development of a set of equipment and method of in situ stress measurements in a high stress environment typical of the deep level gold mines....

  6. In-situ thermal testing program strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    In the past year the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project has implemented a new Program Approach to the licensing process. The Program Approach suggests a step-wise approach to licensing in which the early phases will require less site information than previously planned and necessitate a lesser degree of confidence in the longer-term performance of the repository. Under the Program Approach, the thermal test program is divided into two principal phases: (1) short-term in situ tests (in the 1996 to 2000 time period) and laboratory thermal tests to obtain preclosure information, parameters, and data along with bounding information for postclosure performance; and (2) longer-term in situ tests to obtain additional data regarding postclosure performance. This effort necessitates a rethinking of the testing program because the amount of information needed for the initial licensing phase is less than previously planned. This document proposes a revised and consolidated in situ thermal test program (including supporting laboratory tests) that is structured to meet the needs of the Program Approach. A customer-supplier model is used to define the Project data needs. These data needs, along with other requirements, were then used to define a set of conceptual experiments that will provide the required data within the constraints of the Program Approach schedule. The conceptual thermal tests presented in this document represent a consolidation and update of previously defined tests that should result in a more efficient use of Project resources. This document focuses on defining the requirements and tests needed to satisfy the goal of a successful license application in 2001, should the site be found suitable

  7. Test with different stress measurement methods in two orthogonal bore holes in Aespoe HRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janson, Thomas; Stigsson, Martin [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    Within the scope of work, to provide the necessary rock mechanics support for the site investigations, SKB has studied some available pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements in deep boreholes. A project with the objective to compare three different pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements under similar conditions has been carried out. The main objective for the project is to compare the three different pieces of equipment for in situ stress measurements and find a strategy for SKB's Site Investigations to determine the state of stress in the rock mass. Two units of equipment use the overcoring method while the third uses the hydraulic fracturing method. The overcoring was performed by AECL, using Deep Door stopper Gauge System (DDGS), and SwedPower, using their triaxial strain measuring instrument (Borre Probe). MeSy Geo Systeme GmbH performed the hydraulic fracturing. The DDGS system is a new method to SKB while the experience of the SwedPower overcoring and the hydraulic fracturing methods are long. The tests were performed in the same orthogonal boreholes at Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), Oskarshamn, Sweden. The measured results have been verified against known conditions at the Aespoe HRL. The results from the three in situ stress measurement methods rose more questions than answers. Which illustrate the complexity to determine the in situ stresses in a rock mass. To understand the difference in results and answer the questions, it was necessary to do deeper investigations such as laboratory tests and theoretical calculations such as geological structure model, analysis of the influence of a nearby fracture, P-wave measurements, uniaxial tests on small cores from the HQ-3 core, theoretical and numerical analyses of the hole bottom (theoretical strains, stress concentrations and microcracking), auditing of DDGS measurements results and assumptions in the DDGS analyse and microscopy investigations on the cores. The following

  8. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchin, Kirk T.; Wallace, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this hypothesis by using radioactive 73 As labeled arsenite and vacuum filtration methodology to determine the binding affinity and capacity of 73 As arsenite to calf thymus DNA and Type 2A unfractionated histones, histone H3, H4 and horse spleen ferritin. Arsenicals are known to release redox active Fe from ferritin. At concentrations up to about 1 mM, neither DNA nor any of the three proteins studied, Type II-A histones, histone H3, H4 or ferritin, bound radioactive arsenite in a specific manner. Therefore, it appears highly unlikely that initial in situ binding of trivalent arsenicals, followed by in situ oxidative DNA damage, can account for arsenic's carcinogenicity. This experimental evidence (lack of arsenite binding to DNA, histone Type II-A and histone H3, H4) does not rule out other possible oxidative stress modes of action for arsenic such as (a) diffusion of longer lived oxidative stress molecules, such as H 2 O 2 into the nucleus and ensuing oxidative damage, (b) redox chemistry by unbound arsenicals in the nucleus, or (c) arsenical-induced perturbations in Fe, Cu or other metals which are already known to oxidize DNA in vitro and in vivo

  9. Local stress modification during in situ transmission electron microscopy straining experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperle, Antonín; Gemperlová, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 462, - (2007), s. 407-411 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/2016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : in situ TEM straining, Local stress in a strained foil * local stress in a strained foil Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.457, year: 2007

  10. Coupled deformation and fluid-flow behavior of a natural fracture in the CSM in situ test block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gertsch, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal was the evaluation of an in situ block test as a data source for modeling the coupled flow and mechanical behavior of natural rock fractures. The experiments were conducted with the Colorado School of Mines in situ test block, an 8 m 3 (280 ft 3 ) gneiss cube which has been the focus of several previous studies. A single continuous fracture within the block was surrounded with instruments to measure stresses, deformations, and gas conductivity. The setup was subjected to combinations of normal and shear stress by pressurizing the block sides differentially with hydraulic flatjacks. The induced fracture deformation, as measured by two separate sensor systems, did not correlate closely with the fracture conductivity changes or with each other. The test fracture is more complicated physically than two parallel rock faces. Many joints which were not detected by mapping intersect the test fracture and strongly influence its behavior. These invisible joints create sub-blocks which react complexly to changes in applied load. The flow tests reflected the aggregate sub-block dislocations in the flow path. The deformation readings, however, were the movements of discrete points sparsely located among the sub-blocks. High-confidence extrapolation of block test results to large volumes, such as required for nuclear waste repository design, is not feasible currently. Present instrumentation does not sample rock mass behavior in situ at the proper scales. More basically, however, a fundamental gap exists between the nature of jointed rock and our conception of it. Therefore, the near-field rock mass must be discounted as an easily controllable barrier to groundwater flow, until radically different approaches to rock mass testing and modeling are developed

  11. Reliable cost effective technique for in situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stacey, TR

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available on these requirements, an in situ stress measurement technique which will be practically applicable in the deep gold mines, has been developed conceptually. Referring to the figure on the following page, this method involves: • a borehole-based system, using... level mines have not been developed. 2 This is some of the background to the present SIMRAC research project, the title ofwhich is “Reliable cost effective technique for in-situ ground stress measurements in deep gold mines”. A copy of the research...

  12. Test design requirements for overcoring stress measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1985-12-01

    This document establishes the test design requirements for a series of overcoring stress measurements to be performed in the Exploratory Shaft Facility. The stress measurements will be made to determine the in situ state of stress within the candidate repository horizon and to determine the magnitude and distribution of the stresses induced by the mined openings of the facility. The overcoring technique involves the measurement of strain (or deformation) in a volume of rock as the stress acting on the rock volume is relieved. This document presents an overview of the measurements, including objectives and rationale for the measurements. A description of the measurements is included. The support requirements are identified as are constraints for the design of the measurements. Discussions on Quality Assurance and Safety are also included in the document. 13 refs

  13. In situ vitrification laboratory-scale test work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, P.K.; Smith, N.L.

    1991-05-01

    The Buried Waste Program was established in October 1987 to accelerate the studies needed to develop a long-term management plan for the buried mixed waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at Idaho Engineering Laboratory. The In Situ Vitrification Project is being conducted in a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act feasibility study format to identify methods for the long-term management of mixed buried waste. To support the overall feasibility study, the situ vitrification treatability investigations are proceeding along the three parallel paths: laboratory-scale tests, intermediate field tests, and field tests. Laboratory-scale tests are being performed to provide data to mathematical modeling efforts, which, in turn, will support design of the field tests and to the health and safety risk assessment. This laboratory-scale test work plan provides overall testing program direction to meet the current goals and objectives of the in situ vitrification treatability investigation. 12 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  14. A computer program (COSTUM) to calculate confidence intervals for in situ stress measurements. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzik, E.J.; Walker, J.R.; Martin, C.D.

    1989-03-01

    The state of in situ stress is one of the parameters required both for the design and analysis of underground excavations and for the evaluation of numerical models used to simulate underground conditions. To account for the variability and uncertainty of in situ stress measurements, it is desirable to apply confidence limits to measured stresses. Several measurements of the state of stress along a borehole are often made to estimate the average state of stress at a point. Since stress is a tensor, calculating the mean stress and confidence limits using scalar techniques is inappropriate as well as incorrect. A computer program has been written to calculate and present the mean principle stresses and the confidence limits for the magnitudes and directions of the mean principle stresses. This report describes the computer program, COSTUM

  15. Modelling of the in situ stress state at Olkiluoto Site, Western Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valli, J.; Kuula, H.; Hakala, M.

    2011-06-01

    In order to determine the interaction of in situ stress and geological features at Olkiluoto with the ONKALO area under more specific focus, stress modelling work was launched in 2009. This entailed updating a previously used model geometry to suit current needs whilst also updating interpreted brittle deformation zones according to the data provided by Posiva in the beginning of 2010. The previous model geometry was originally used for seismic and glacial load simulations. Brittle deformation zones were updated in the model according to a new selection criterion which added a number of brittle deformation zones. Changes in the geometry of certain brittle deformation zones were also necessary to better fit the early 2010 interpretations from Posiva. Modelling goals were to clarify the effect of joint parameters on stress magnitude and orientation and which of the major brittle deformation zones detected in the ONKALO region could have potential effects on local in situ stress states. Additional goals included modelling the effect of several optional thrust boundary conditions and an ice-age. Compression from the northwest-southeast was used as the default approach whilst north-south, east-west and northeast-southwest were optional conditions. A simplified glaciation cycle was also simulated. Results were clear in demonstrating the critical effect of joint cohesion and joint friction angle, i.e. shear strength, on stress-geology interaction, essentially in this order of importance. The case that utilised both drillhole core-logging and ONKALO tunnel mapping results did not exhibit much if any stress-geology interactions as BFZ strength parameters were too high in order to allow any interactions to occur. The geometry and orientation of brittle deformation zones was found to be of significant importance; deformation zones with a shallow dip roughly in the direction of applied compression were optimal for causing stress rotations and the increase of stress magnitude

  16. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Les; Pan, Zhu; Tao, Zhong; van Riessen, Arie

    2016-01-01

    In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress). Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen. PMID:28773568

  17. In Situ Elevated Temperature Testing of Fly Ash Based Geopolymer Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Les Vickers

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In situ elevated temperature investigations using fly ash based geopolymers filled with alumina aggregate were undertaken. Compressive strength and short term creep tests were carried out to determine the onset temperature of viscous flow. Fire testing using the standard cellulose curve was performed. Applying a load to the specimen as the temperature increased reduced the temperature at which viscous flow occurred (compared to test methods with no applied stress. Compressive strength increased at the elevated temperature and is attributed to viscous flow and sintering forming a more compact microstructure. The addition of alumina aggregate and reduction of water content reduced the thermal conductivity. This led to the earlier onset and shorter dehydration plateau duration times. However, crack formation was reduced and is attributed to smaller thermal gradients across the fire test specimen.

  18. Quantifying in situ stress magnitudes and orientations for Forsmark. Forsmark stage 2.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. Derek

    2007-11-01

    Stephansson et al. concluded that in the Fennoscandia shield: (1) there is a large horizontal stress component in the uppermost 1,000 m of bedrock, and (2) the maximum and minimum horizontal stresses exceed the vertical stress assuming the vertical stress is estimated from the weight of the overburden. Several stress campaigns involving both overcoring and hydraulic fracturing, including the hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures (HTPF), have been carried out at Forsmark to establish the in situ stress state. The results from the initial campaigns were summarised by Sjoeberg et al. which formed the bases for the stresses provided in the Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. Since then additional stress measurement campaigns have been completed. The results from these stress measurement campaigns support the conclusions from Stephansson et al. In addition to these in situ stress measurements the following additional studies were undertaken to aid in assessing the stress state at Forsmark. 1. A detailed televiewer survey of approximately 6,900 m of borehole walls to depths of 1,000 m was carried out to assess borehole wall damage, i.e. borehole breakouts. 2. Evaluation of nonlinear strains in laboratory samples to depths of approximately 800 m to assess if stress magnitudes were sufficient to create stress-induced microcracking. 3. Assessment of the magnitudes required to cause core disking and survey of core disking observed at Forsmark. The magnitudes and orientations from the stress measurement campaigns were analysed to establish the most likely stress magnitudes and orientations for Design Step D2 within the Target Area of the Complete Site Investigations. The maximum and minimum horizontal stress components are essentially the same as the maximum and intermediate principal stresses, σ1 and σ2, respectively. The minimum principal stress (σ3) is synonymous with the vertical stress. The most likely range in values to be used in the design is also shown. The

  19. Quantifying in situ stress magnitudes and orientations for Forsmark. Forsmark stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C. Derek (Univ. of Alberta (Canada))

    2007-11-15

    Stephansson et al. concluded that in the Fennoscandia shield: (1) there is a large horizontal stress component in the uppermost 1,000 m of bedrock, and (2) the maximum and minimum horizontal stresses exceed the vertical stress assuming the vertical stress is estimated from the weight of the overburden. Several stress campaigns involving both overcoring and hydraulic fracturing, including the hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures (HTPF), have been carried out at Forsmark to establish the in situ stress state. The results from the initial campaigns were summarised by Sjoeberg et al. which formed the bases for the stresses provided in the Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. Since then additional stress measurement campaigns have been completed. The results from these stress measurement campaigns support the conclusions from Stephansson et al. In addition to these in situ stress measurements the following additional studies were undertaken to aid in assessing the stress state at Forsmark. 1. A detailed televiewer survey of approximately 6,900 m of borehole walls to depths of 1,000 m was carried out to assess borehole wall damage, i.e. borehole breakouts. 2. Evaluation of nonlinear strains in laboratory samples to depths of approximately 800 m to assess if stress magnitudes were sufficient to create stress-induced microcracking. 3. Assessment of the magnitudes required to cause core disking and survey of core disking observed at Forsmark. The magnitudes and orientations from the stress measurement campaigns were analysed to establish the most likely stress magnitudes and orientations for Design Step D2 within the Target Area of the Complete Site Investigations. The maximum and minimum horizontal stress components are essentially the same as the maximum and intermediate principal stresses, sigma1 and sigma2, respectively. The minimum principal stress (sigma3) is synonymous with the vertical stress. The most likely range in values to be used in the design is also

  20. In situ stress determination by the overcoring of large surface strain gauge rosettes on the walls of a raise-bored shaft at the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, N.A.

    1991-08-01

    AECL Research is conducting a series of experiments to examine the influence of scale on measured in situ stresses in granite rock. The ventilation raise rosette overcoring experiment is one such test. This experiment, modelled on a previous test conducted in Australia, consisted of overcoring four 120-mm strain gauge rosettes glued to the surface of a 1.8-m-diameter bored raise. The in situ stresses were calculated from the measured strains using the equations for stresses around a cylindrical excavation in an elastic material. The possibility of excavation disturbance around the ventilation raise was investigated using overcore stress measurements, elastic modulus tests on retrieved core, and visual inspection of thin sections obtained from removed core. The effect of a stress-dependent elastic modulus (referred to as non-linear elastic behaviour) is also addressed. Results from the ventilation raise rosette overcoring experiment suggest that rosette overcoring in a bored raise is an acceptable stress-measurement method. The effects of scale and excavation damage on the stress measurements were not considered to be significant; however, if the elastic modulus of the rock is strongly stress-dependent, non-linear elastic behaviour may have a small effect on the measured stresses

  1. Probing Stress States in Silicon Nanowires During Electrochemical Lithiation Using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon is considered as a promising anode material for the next-generation lithium-ion battery (LIB due to its high capacity at nanoscale. However, silicon expands up to 300% during lithiation, which induces high stresses and leads to fractures. To design silicon nanostructures that could minimize fracture, it is important to understand and characterize stress states in the silicon nanostructures during lithiation. Synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction has proven to be effective in revealing insights of mechanical stress and other mechanics considerations in small-scale crystalline structures used in many important technological applications, such as microelectronics, nanotechnology, and energy systems. In the present study, an in situ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction experiment was conducted to elucidate the mechanical stress states during the first electrochemical cycle of lithiation in single-crystalline silicon nanowires (SiNWs in an LIB test cell. Morphological changes in the SiNWs at different levels of lithiation were also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM. It was found from SEM observation that lithiation commenced predominantly at the top surface of SiNWs followed by further progression toward the bottom of the SiNWs gradually. The hydrostatic stress of the crystalline core of the SiNWs at different levels of electrochemical lithiation was determined using the in situ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction technique. We found that the crystalline core of the SiNWs became highly compressive (up to -325.5 MPa once lithiation started. This finding helps unravel insights about mechanical stress states in the SiNWs during the electrochemical lithiation, which could potentially pave the path toward the fracture-free design of silicon nanostructure anode materials in the next-generation LIB.

  2. Geotechnical site assessment methodologies relevant to potential deep underground disposal facilities: with particular reference to the determination of in situ rock stress by the hydraulic fracturing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, B.G.; Richards, L.R.

    1986-10-01

    A final report summarizing the research conducted on geotechnical site assessment methodologies relevant to Land 3/4 sites. Two areas of research have been investigated; in situ stress determination by the hydraulic fracturing method in basic volcanics and sediments and the laboratory determination of hydraulic fracture tensile strength. The analysis and interpretation of the hydraulic fracturing test data from a programme of testing in the Vale of Belvoir is discussed in detail particularly in respect of the effects of pore water pressure and fluid diffusion in the rocks being tested. The regional stress regime of the Vale of Belvoir is discussed with respect to the results of the in situ stress determination. A method for determining the hydraulic fracture tensile strength in the laboratory is described. The results of a series of laboratory tests on rock core are reported. (author)

  3. Measurement techniques for in situ stresses around underground constructions in a deep clay formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li X.L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Disposal in deep underground geological formations is internationally recognized as the most viable option for the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste. In Belgium, the Boom clay formation is extensively studied in this context, in particular at the 225 m deep HADES Underground Research Facility in Mol. A cost-effective design of deep underground structures requires an accurate assessment of the in situ stresses; a good estimation of these stresses is also essential when interpreting in situ experiments regarding the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the host formation. Different measurement techniques are available to provide data on the stress evolution and other mechanical properties of the geological formation. The measurement can be direct (measurement of total pressure, or it can be an indirect technique, deriving the stress from related quantities such as strain (changes in structural members. Most total stress measurements are performed through permanently installed sensors; also once-only measurements are performed through specific methods (e.g. pressuremeter. Direct measurement of the stress state is challenging due to the complex mechanical behaviour of the clay, and the fact that the sensor installation inevitably disturbs the original stress field. This paper describes ways to deal with these problems and presents the results obtained using different techniques at HADES.

  4. Needs of in-situ materials testing under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, K.; Hishinuma, A.; Kiuchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    Under neutron irradiation, the component atoms of materials are displaced as primary knock-on atoms, and the energy of the primary knock-on atoms is consumed by electron excitation and nuclear collision. Elementary irradiation defects accumulate to form damage structure including voids and bubbles. In situ test under neutron irradiation is necessary for investigating into the effect of irradiation on creep behavior, the electric properties of ceramics, transport phenomena and so on. The in situ test is also important to investigate into the phenomena related to the chemical reaction with environment during irradiation. Accelerator type high energy neutron sources are preferable to fission reactors. In this paper, the needs and the research items of in situ test under neutron irradiation using a D-Li stripping type high energy neutron source on metallic and ceramic materials are described. Creep behavior is one of the most important mechanical properties, and depends strongly on irradiation environment, also it is closely related to microstructure. Irradiation affects the electric conductibity of ceramics and also their creep behavior. In this way, in situ test is necessary. (K.I.)

  5. In situ respiration testing: A field treatability test for bioventing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kittel, J.A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Miller, R.; Vogel, C.; Hoeppel, R.

    1993-01-01

    Bioventing is the process of aerating subsurface soils to stimulate in situ biological activity and promote bioremediation. Bioventing differs from soil venting in remedial approach. Soil venting is designed and operated to maximize the volatilization of low-molecular-weight compounds, with some biodegradation occurring. In contrast, bioventing is designed to maximize biodegradation of aerobically biodegradable compounds, regardless of their molecular weight, with some volatilization occurring. Bioventing is gaining wide acceptance as a remediation alternative at petroleum-contaminated sites. However, site variability usually requires that a short term treatability test be conducted in situ at potential sites to determine the applicability of bioventing. Battelle has worked with the US Air Force and the US Navy to develop a simple and inexpensive field test to evaluate bioventing potential-contaminated sites. This test has been used to evaluate the applicability of bioventing at over 50 sites. The in situ respiration test consists of injecting air and an inert tracer gas (helium) over a 24-hour period to aerate soils at an oxygen-deficient, petroleum-contaminated site. Soil vapor samples are collected to determine oxygen utilization rates and carbon dioxide production rates. The stoichiometric relationship for the oxidation of hexane is used to calculate the biodegradation rate. The tracer gas is monitored to estimate the effect of diffusion on changes in soil-gas concentrations

  6. In Situ Mechanical Testing of Nanostructured Bijel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Martin F; Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2016-06-28

    Bijels are a class of soft materials with potential for application in diverse areas including healthcare, food, energy, and reaction engineering due to their unique structural, mechanical, and transport properties. To realize their potential, means to fabricate, characterize, and manipulate bijel mechanics are needed. We recently developed a method based on solvent transfer-induced phase separation (STRIPS) that enables continuous fabrication of hierarchically structured bijel fibers from a broad array of constituent fluids and nanoparticles using a microfluidic platform. Here, we introduce an in situ technique to characterize bijel fiber mechanics at initial and final stages of the formation process within a microfluidics device. By manipulation of the hydrodynamic stresses applied to the fiber, the fiber is placed under tension until it breaks into segments. Analysis of the stress field allows fracture strength to be inferred; fracture strengths can be as high as several thousand Pa, depending on nanoparticle content. These findings broaden the potential for the use of STRIPS bijels in applications with different mechanical demands. Moreover, our in situ mechanical characterization method could potentially enable determination of properties of other soft fibrous materials made of hydrogels, capillary suspensions, colloidal gels, or high internal phase emulsions.

  7. Application of in-situ stress measurement on bursts disasters of rock and CO{sub 2} in coal mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian-Jie Wang; Dong-Sheng Sun; Li-Rong Zhang; Guan-Wu Zhou [Ministry of Land and Resources, Beijing (China)

    2009-01-15

    For the purpose of reduction and prevention of rock burst disasters and CO{sub 2}, measurements were made of in-situ stress and mechanical parameters of rock in Yingcheng mine. Geological structure and gas measurements were studied and the stress field was simulated and distribution of stress field was obtained in this area. On the basis of the study, the danger areas of rockbursts and CO{sub 2} were predicted. Preventive measures were suggested to decrease gas pressure and in-situ stress in front of the working face with advance boreholes relieving blasting. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasilainen, K.

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories

  9. In Situ Test Study of Characteristics of Coal Mining Dynamic Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of coal mining dynamic load and high static stress can easily induce such dynamic disasters as rock burst, coal and gas outburst, roof fall, and water inrush. In order to obtain the characteristic parameters of mining dynamic load and dynamic mechanism of coal and rock, the stress wave theory is applied to derive the relation of mining dynamic load strain rate and stress wave parameters. The in situ test was applied to study the stress wave propagation law of coal mine dynamic load by using the SOS microseismic monitoring system. An evaluation method for mining dynamic load strain rate was proposed, and the statistical evaluation was carried out for the range of strain rate. The research results show that the loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is in direct proportion to the seismic frequency of coal-rock mass and particle peak vibration velocity and is in inverse proportion to wave velocity. The high-frequency component damps faster than the low-frequency component in the shockwave propagating process; and the peak particle vibration velocity has a power functional relationship with the transmitting distance. The loading strain rate of mining dynamic load is generally less than class 10−1/s.

  10. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were...... measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro......-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain...

  11. Test plan for suitability assessment of five overcoring stress measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregory, E.C.; Rundle, T.A.; McCabe, W.M.; Kim, K.

    1982-08-01

    Tests are to be conducted at the Near-Surface Test Facility (NSTF) to assess the suitability of five overcoring techniques for in situ stress determination in a jointed basalt. The overcoring methods to be investigated use the following instrumentation to measure strain relief by overcoring a pilot borehole: USBM borehole deformation gage, CSIRO hollow inclusion stress cell, cast epoxy inclusion, the Lulea triaxial strain cell and the ''doorstopper'' biaxial strain cell. The tests are to provide data regarding the state of stress below the NSTF. This information is to be used in the evaluation of each method of overcoring. During the course of field testing, an attempt is to be made to adapt conventional overcoring techniques and analytical methods to the basalt medium. If overcoring stress determination in basalt is shown suitable, then additional studies will be identified to further adapt a technique for use at depth. In addition to the five overcoring techniques to be tested at the NSTF, stress measurements by Hydrofracturing are to be conducted to provide data for direct comparison with overcoring results. 16 refs., 18 figs

  12. WIPP/SRL in-situ tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamsey, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Interface Interactions Test (MIIT) is the only in-situ program involving the burial of simulated high-level waste forms operating in the United States. Fifteen glass and waste form compositions and their proposed package materials, supplied by 7 countries, are interred in salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. A joint effort between Sandia National Laboratories and Savannah River Laboratory, MIIT is the largest international cooperative in-situ venture yet undertaken. The objective of the current study is to document the waste form compositions used in the MIIT program and then to examine compositional correlations based on structural considerations, bonding energies, and surface layer formation. These correlations show important similarities between the many different waste glass compositions studied world wide and suggest that these glasses would be expected to perform well and in a similar manner

  13. Literature survey: Relations between stress change, deformation and transmissivity for fractures and deformation zones based on in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, Aasa (Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This literature survey is focused upon relations between stress change, deformation and transmissivity for fractures and deformation zones and aims at compiling and commenting on relevant information and references with focus on data from in situ investigations. Main issues to investigate are: - Impact of normal stress change and deformation on transmissivity, for fractures and deformation zones. - Impact of shear stress and displacement on transmissivity, for fractures and deformation zones for different normal load conditions. Considering the line of research within the area, the following steps in the development can be identified. During the 1970's and 1980's, the fundamentals of rock joint deformation were investigated and identification and description of mechanisms were made in the laboratory. In the 1990's, coupling of stress-flow properties of rock joints were made using hydraulic testing to identify and describe the mechanisms in the field. Both individual fractures and deformation zones were of interest. In situ investigations have also been the topic of interest the last ten years. Further identification and description of mechanisms in the field have been made including investigation and description of system of fractures, different types of fractures (interlocked/mated or mismatched/unmated) and how this is coupled to the hydromechanical behavior. In this report, data from in situ investigations are compiled and the parameters considered to be important to link fracture deformation and transmissivity are normal stiffness, k{sub n} and hydraulic aperture, b{sub h}. All data except for those from one site originate from investigations performed in granitic rock. Normal stiffness, k{sub n}, and hydraulic aperture, b{sub h}, are correlated, even though data are scattered. In general, the largest variation is seen for small hydraulic apertures and high normal stiffness. The increasing number of contact points (areas) and fracture filling are

  14. Fracture of metal foams : In-situ testing and numerical modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; van Merkerk, R.; de Hosson, J.T.M.; Schmidt, I

    This paper is on a combined experimental/modeling study on the tensile fracture of open-cell foams. In-situ tensile tests show that individual struts can fail in a brittle or ductile mode, presumably depending on the presence of casting defects. In-situ single strut tests were performed, enabling

  15. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  16. Matrix diffusion model. In situ tests using natural analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasilainen, K. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-11-01

    Matrix diffusion is an important retarding and dispersing mechanism for substances carried by groundwater in fractured bedrock. Natural analogues provide, unlike laboratory or field experiments, a possibility to test the model of matrix diffusion in situ over long periods of time. This thesis documents quantitative model tests against in situ observations, done to support modelling of matrix diffusion in performance assessments of nuclear waste repositories. 98 refs. The thesis includes also eight previous publications by author.

  17. Interpretation of the Haestholmen in situ state of stress based on core damage observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, M.

    2000-01-01

    At the Haestholmen investigation site, direct in situ stress measurements, overcoring and hydraulic fracturing have been unsuccessful because of ring disking and horizontal hydraulic fracturing. Prior to this study, a detailed study on both core disking and ring disking was made, and based on those results an in situ state of stress interpretation method was developed. In this work this method is applied to the Haestholmen site. The interpretation is based on disk fracture type, spacing and shape. Also, the Hoek-Brown strength envelope and Poisson's ratio of intact rock are needed. The interpretation result is most reliable if both core disking and ring disking information at the same depth levels is available. A detailed core logging showed that ring disking is systematic below the -365 m level in the vertical overcoring stress measurement hole, HH-KR6. On the other hand, no representative core disking exists except for two points in two differently oriented subvertical boreholes HH-KR2 and HHKR7. Because the interpretation has to be based on ring disking only, upper and lower estimates for the vertical stress were set. These were gravitational and 67% of gravitational. Furthermore, the in situ stress state was assumed to be in horizontal and vertical planes, because the disking in vertical borehole HH-KR6 was not inclined. The interpretation resulted in a good estimate for the major horizontal stress but none of the horizontal stress rations ( 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 ) or vertical stress assumptions studied are clearly more probable the others. At the 500 m level the resulting maximum horizontal stress is 41 MPa. If a linear fit through the zero depth and zero stress point is applied, the maximum horizontal stress gradient is 0.0818 z MPa/m with a standard deviation between 5 and 12 per cent. The orientation of the major horizontal stress is 108 with standard deviation of 21 degrees. The interpreted major horizontal stress state also indicated that systematic

  18. In Situ Investigation of the Evolution of Lattice Strain and Stresses in Austenite and Martensite During Quenching and Tempering of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M.; Niessen, F.; Somers, M. A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate in situ the evolution of lattice strains and stresses in austenite and martensite during quenching and tempering of a soft martensitic stainless steel. In one experiment, lattice strains in austenite and martensite were measured in situ in the direction perpendicular to the sample surface during an austenitization, quenching, and tempering cycle. In a second experiment, the sin2 ψ method was applied in situ during the austenite-to-martensite transformation to distinguish between macro- and phase-specific micro-stresses and to follow the evolution of these stresses during transformation. Martensite formation evokes compressive stress in austenite that is balanced by tensile stress in martensite. Tempering to 748 K (475 °C) leads to partial relaxation of these stresses. Additionally, data reveal that (elastic) lattice strain in austenite is not hydrostatic but hkl dependent, which is ascribed to plastic deformation of this phase during martensite formation and is considered responsible for anomalous behavior of the 200 γ reflection.

  19. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR

  20. Two BASIC computer programs for the determination of in situ stresses using the CSIRO hollow inclusion stress cell and the USBM borehole deformation gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W.K.

    1982-01-01

    The mathematical method of determining in-situ stresses by overcoring, using either the U.S. Bureau of Mines Borehole Deformation Gage or the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Hollow Inclusion Stress Cell, is summarized, and data reduction programs for each type of instrument, written in BASIC, are presented. The BASIC programs offer several advantages over previously available FORTRAN programs. They can be executed on a desk-top microcomputer at or near the field site, allowing the investigator to assess the quality of the data and make decisions on the need for additional testing while the crew is still in the field. Also, data input is much simpler than with currently available FORTRAN programs; either English or SI units can be used; and standard deviations of the principal stresses are computed as well as those of the geographic components.

  1. Natural Fractures Characterization and In Situ Stresses Inference in a Carbonate Reservoir—An Integrated Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shafiei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we characterized the natural fracture systems and inferred the state of in situ stress field through an integrated study in a very complex and heterogeneous fractured carbonate reservoir. Relative magnitudes and orientations of the in-situ principal stresses in a naturally fractured carbonate heavy oil field were estimated with a combination of available data (World Stress Map, geological and geotectonic evidence, outcrop studies and techniques (core analysis, borehole image logs and Side View Seismic Location. The estimates made here using various tools and data including routine core analysis and image logs are confirmatory to estimates made by the World Stress Map and geotectonic facts. NE-SW and NW-SE found to be the dominant orientations for maximum and minimum horizontal stresses in the study area. In addition, three dominant orientations were identified for vertical and sub-vertical fractures atop the crestal region of the anticlinal structure. Image logs found useful in recognition and delineation of natural fractures. The results implemented in a real field development and proved practical in optimal well placement, drilling and production practices. Such integrated studies can be instrumental in any E&P projects and related projects such as geological CO2 sequestration site characterization.

  2. In-situ stress measurements in the earth's crust in the eastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundle, T.A.; Singh, M.M.; Baker, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that the design basis for vibratory ground motion should be determined through correlation of seismicity with tectonic structures or provinces (10CFR100, Appendix A). Such criteria are difficult to apply in the eastern United States, which experiences persistent low level seismicity, with occasional moderate to large earthquakes. This report presents the results of in-situ stress measurements conducted towards reducing this uncertainty at three (3) seismically active sites in the region, namely, near Moodus, Connecticut, around the Ramapo fault zone in New York and New Jersey, and in central Virginia. As far as possible, at each location one bore hole was drilled close to the ''apparent'' epicenter of the seismic activity and one outside the ''known'' seismic zone, so that the data obtained could be compared. The results obtained were very consistent both as to magnitude and direction. No attempt was made to correlate the in-situ stress measurements with the tectonic setting or seismic activity, since this was beyond the scope of this project. Extensive appendices report experimental data. 35 refs

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF IN-SITU STRESS AND PERMEABILITY IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel R. Burns; M. Nafi Toksoz

    2002-12-31

    We have extended a three-dimensional finite difference elastic wave propagation model previously developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Earth Resources Laboratory (ERL) for modeling and analyzing the effect of fractures on seismic waves. The code has been translated into C language and parallelized [using message passing interface (MPI)] to allow for larger models to be run on Linux PC computer clusters. We have also obtained another 3-D code from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, which we will use for verification of our ERL code results and also to run discrete fracture models. Testing of both codes is underway. We are working on a new finite difference model of borehole wave propagation for stressed formations. This code includes coordinate stretching to provide stable, variable grid sizes that will allow us to model the thin fluid annulus layers in borehole problems, especially for acoustic logging while drilling (LWD) applications. We are also extending our analysis routines for the inversion of flexural wave dispersion measurements for in situ stress estimates. Initial results on synthetic and limited field data are promising for a method to invert cross dipole data for the rotation angle and stress state simultaneously. A meeting is being scheduled between MIT and Shell Oil Company scientists to look at data from a fractured carbonate reservoir that may be made available to the project. The Focus/Disco seismic processing system from Paradigm Geophysical has been installed at ERL for field data analysis and as a platform for new analysis modules. We have begun to evaluate the flow properties of discrete fracture distributions through a simple 2D numerical model. Initial results illustrate how fluid flow pathways are very sensitive to variations in the geometry and apertures of fracture network.

  4. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  5. Measurement of in-situ stress in salt and rock using NQR techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schempp, E.; Hirschfeld, T.; Klainer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of how stress and strain affect the quantities which can be measured in an NQR experiment shows that, for stresses of the magnitude to be expected at depths up to about 10,000 feet, quadrupole coupling constants will fall in the range of 1 to 10 kHz for both the sodium and chloride ions in NaCl. The most promising system involves pulsed nuclear double resonance detection; and alterative is to observe the quadrupolar splitting of the NMR signal. Choices to be made in the measurement and mapping techniques are discussed. The well-known perturbation of the homogenous stress field in the neighborhood of a borehole is shown to be advantageous from the point of view of obtaining directional information on the stress. Construction and operation of a borehole stress sensor are considered. The NQR technique seems feasible for measuring the magnitude and direction of underground stress with a resolution of about 25 psi, or 2.5% at 1000 psi. Downhole instrumentation suitable for in-situ determinations of stress appears within the state of the art. Additional tasks required on the project are identified

  6. The Interplay of In Situ Stress Ratio and Transverse Isotropy in the Rock Mass on Prestressed Concrete-Lined Pressure Tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanjuntak, T. D. Y. F.; Marence, M.; Schleiss, A. J.; Mynett, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the mechanical and hydraulic behaviour of passively prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels embedded in elastic transversely isotropic rocks subjected to non-uniform in situ stresses. Two cases are distinguished based on whether the in situ vertical stress in the rock mass is higher, or lower than the in situ horizontal stress. A two-dimensional finite element model was used to study the influence of dip angle, α, and horizontal-to-vertical stress ratio, k, on the bearing capacity of prestressed concrete-lined pressure tunnels. The study reveals that the in situ stress ratio and the orientation of stratifications in the rock mass significantly affect the load sharing between the rock mass and the lining. The distribution of stresses and deformations as a result of tunnel construction processes exhibits a symmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with either horizontal or vertical stratification planes, whereas it demonstrates an unsymmetrical pattern for tunnels embedded in a rock mass with inclined stratification planes. The results obtained for a specific value α with coefficient k are identical to that for α + 90° with coefficient 1/ k by rotating the tunnel axis by 90°. The maximum internal water pressure was determined by offsetting the prestress-induced hoop strains at the final lining intrados against the seepage-induced hoop strains. As well as assessing the internal water pressure, this approach is capable of identifying potential locations where longitudinal cracks may occur in the final lining.

  7. Reasonable assurance and in-situ testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoderick, J.E.; Nelson, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Energy is currently preparing site characterization plans for sites being considered for the first geologic repository. The site investigations described in these plans will be aimed at providing ''reasonable assurance'' to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission that the performance objectives and criteria specified in 10 CFR Part 60 will be met. The in-situ testing being planned by the DOE for site characterization, and the subsequent testing conducted as part of performance confirmation, reflects how the basis for ''reasonable assurance'' will change through the licensing process

  8. Numerical modeling to assess possible influence of the mine openings on far-field in-situ stress measurements at Stripa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Guvanasen, V.; Littlestone, N.

    1981-03-01

    Finite element analyses were carried out to assess the possible effects of the Stripa mine openings on the in-situ stress measured in a 400-m-deep borehole drilled from the surface. For this assessment, four 2-dimensional cases were modeled. These cases variously included two horizontal sections, and two separate, idealized vertical sections. An iron ore body in the mine was assumed to be completely extracted, thereby providing conservative estimates of stress concentration effects. Since no in-situ stress measurements were made before mining, overburden weight and horizontal stresses measured by hyrodfracturing were assumed to be the pre-mining state of stress. The stress state resulting from excavation of the mine was calculated by the finite element model. In the cases using horizontal sections, the model predicted a stress concentration factor at the borehole of approximately 1.15, which is negligible considering the difficulty of obtaining accurate stress measurements. For the vertical sections the model predicted higher stress concentration factors at depths less than 200 m. This was expected because the vertical sections chosen brought the borehole unrealistically close to the mine openings, thereby leading to overly conservative estimates. In general, deviations in the magnitudes and orientations of the calculated redistributed principal stresses from the assumed pre-mining state of stress were found to be comparable to the scatter of overcoring data. It is, therefore, recommended that, for near-field stress calculations, the vertical stress due to overburden weight and the horizontal stresses measured by hydrofracturing at the borehole be considered the unperturbed far-field in situ state of stress

  9. In situ TEM electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Horacio D; Bernal, Rodrigo A; Filleter, Tobin

    2012-11-05

    The emergence of one-dimensional nanostructures as fundamental constituents of advanced materials and next-generation electronic and electromechanical devices has increased the need for their atomic-scale characterization. Given its spatial and temporal resolution, coupled with analytical capabilities, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been the technique of choice in performing atomic structure and defect characterization. A number of approaches have been recently developed to combine these capabilities with in-situ mechanical deformation and electrical characterization in the emerging field of in-situ TEM electromechanical testing. This has enabled researchers to establish unambiguous synthesis-structure-property relations for one-dimensional nanostructures. In this article, the development and latest advances of several in-situ TEM techniques to carry out mechanical and electromechanical testing of nanowires and nanotubes are reviewed. Through discussion of specific examples, it is shown how the merging of several microsystems and TEM has led to significant insights into the behavior of nanowires and nanotubes, underscoring the significant role in-situ techniques play in the development of novel nanoscale systems and materials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. In-Situ Testing of the Thermal Diffusivity of Polysilicon Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Fan Gu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an intuitive yet effective in-situ thermal diffusivity testing structure and testing method. The structure consists of two doubly clamped beams with the same width and thickness but different lengths. When the electric current is applied through two terminals of one beam, the beam serves as thermal resistor and the resistance R(t varies as temperature rises. A delicate thermodynamic model considering thermal convection, thermal radiation, and film-to-substrate heat conduction was established for the testing structure. The presented in-situ thermal diffusivity testing structure can be fabricated by various commonly used micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS fabrication methods, i.e., it requires no extra customized processes yet provides electrical input and output interfaces for in-situ testing. Meanwhile, the testing environment and equipment had no stringent restriction, measurements were carried out at normal temperatures and pressures, and the results are relatively accurate.

  11. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AN AGRICULTURAL SOIL SHEAR STRESS TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Formato

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work a numerical simulation of agricultural soil shear stress tests was performed through soil shear strength data detected by a soil shearometer. We used a soil shearometer available on the market to measure soil shear stress and constructed special equipment that enabled automated detection of soil shear stress. It was connected to an acquisition data system that displayed and recorded soil shear stress during the full field tests. A soil shearometer unit was used to the in situ measurements of soil shear stress in full field conditions for different types of soils located on the right side of the Sele river, at a distance of about 1 km from each other, along the perpendicular to the Sele river in the direction of the sea. Full field tests using the shearometer unit were performed alongside considered soil characteristic parameter data collection. These parameter values derived from hydrostatic compression and triaxial tests performed on considered soil samples and repeated 4 times and we noticed that the difference between the maximum and minimum values detected for every set of performed tests never exceeded 4%. Full field shear tests were simulated by the Abaqus program code considering three different material models of soils normally used in the literature, the Mohr-Coulomb, Drucker-Prager and Cam-Clay models. We then compared all data outcomes obtained by numerical simulations with those from the experimental tests. We also discussed any further simulation data results obtained with different material models and selected the best material model for each considered soil to be used in tyre/soil contact simulation or in soil compaction studies.

  12. IFMIF - Design Study for in Situ Creep Fatigue Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, S.; Heinzel, V.; Simakov, St.; Stratmanns, E.; Vladimirov, P.; Moeslang, A.

    2006-01-01

    While the high flux volume (20-50 dpa/fpy) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is dedicated to the irradiation of ∼ 1100 qualified specimens that will be post irradiation examined after disassembling in dedicated Hot Cells, various in situ experiments are foreseen in the medium flux volume (1-20 dpa/fpy). Of specific importance for structural lifetime assessments of fusion power reactors are instrumented in situ creep-fatigue experiments, as they can simulate realistically a superposition of thermal fatigue or creep fatigue and irradiation with fusion relevant neutrons. Based on former experience with in situ fatigue tests under high energy light ion irradiation, a design study has been performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ creep fatigue tests in the IFMIF medium flux position. The vertically arranged test module for such experiments consists basically of a frame similar to a universal testing machine, but equipped with three pulling rods, driven by independent step motors, instrumentation systems and specimen cooling systems. Therefore, three creep fatigue specimens may be tested at one time in this apparatus. Each specimen is a hollow tube with coolant flow in the specimen interior to maintain individual specimen temperatures. The recently established IFMIF global 3D geometry model was used together the latest McDeLicious code for the neutral and charged particle transport calculations. These comprehensive neutronics calculations have been performed with a fine special resolution of 0.25 cm 3 , showing among others that the specimens will be irradiated with a homogeneous damage rate of up to 13(∼ 9%) dpa/fpy and a fusion relevant damage to helium ratio of 10-12 appm He/dpa. In addition, damage and gas production rates as well as the heat deposition in structural parts of the test module have been calculated. Despite of the vertical gradients in the nuclear heating, CFD code calculations with STAR-CD revealed very

  13. BEM-DDM modelling of rock damage and its implications on rock laboratory strength and in-situ stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hiroya

    2008-03-01

    Within the framework of JAEA's Research and Development on deep geological environments for assessing the safety and reliability of the disposal technology for nuclear waste, this study was conducted to determine the effects of sample damage on the strength obtained from laboratory results (uniaxial compression and Brazilian test). Results of testing on samples of Toki granite taken at Shobasama and at the construction site for the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory (MIU) at Mizunami, Gifu Pref., Japan, were analysed. Some spatial variation of the results along the boreholes suggested the presence of a correlation between the laboratory strength and the in-situ stresses measured by means of the hydro-fracturing method. To confirm this, numerical analyses of the drilling process in brittle rock by means of a BEM-DDM program (FRACOD 2D ) were carried out to study the induced fracture patterns. These fracture patterns were compared with similar results reported by other published studies and were found to be realistic. The correlation between strength and in-situ stresses could then be exploited to estimate the stresses and the location of core discing observed in boreholes where stress measurements were not available. A correction of the laboratory strength results was also proposed to take into account sample damage during drilling. Modelling of Brazilian tests shows that the calculated fracture patterns determine the strength of the models. This is different from the common assumption that failure occurs when the uniform tensile stress in the sample reaches the tensile strength of the rock material. Based on the modelling results, new Brazilian tests were carried out on samples from borehole MIZ-1 that confirmed the failure mechanism numerically observed. A numerical study of the fracture patterns induced by removal of the overburden on a large scale produces fracture patterns and stress distributions corresponding to observations in crystalline hard rock in

  14. In situ evaluation of cadmium biomarkers in green algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Dana F.; Davis, Thomas A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou [Analytical and Biophysical Environmental Chemistry, University of Geneva, Sciences II, 30 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); England, Roxane [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Wilkinson, Kevin J., E-mail: kj.wilkinson@umontreal.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    In situ measurements provide data that are the highly representative of the natural environment. In this paper, laboratory-determined biomarkers of Cd stress that were previously identified for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were tested in two French rivers: a contaminated site on the Riou Mort River and an 'uncontaminated' reference site on the Lot River. Transcript abundance levels were determined by real time qPCR for biomarkers thought to be Cd sensitive. Transcript levels were significantly higher (>5 fold) for organisms exposed to the contaminated site as compared to those exposed at the uncontaminated site. Biomarker mRNA levels were best correlated to free Cd (Cd{sup 2+}) rather than intracellular Cd, suggesting that they may be useful indicators of in situ stress. The paper shows that biomarker expression levels increased with time, were sensitive to metal levels and metal speciation and were higher in the 'contaminated' as opposed to the 'reference' site. - Highlights: > Biomarkers of Cd stress were tested in a contaminated and a reference site. > The organism was viable under exposure conditions and metal accumulation occurred. > Biomarker levels were correlated to Cd{sup 2+} and were higher in the contaminated site. - Algal transcription levels of several biomarkers were studied in two natural waters in situ.

  15. Identification of natural fractures and in situ stress at Rantau Dedap geothermal field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyanto, Andika; Sapiie, Benyamin; Idham Abdullah, Chalid; Permana Sidik, Ridwan

    2017-12-01

    Rantau Dedap Area is a geothermal field which is located in Great Sumatra Fault (GSF). The fault and fracture are main factor in the permeability of the geothermal system. However, not all faults and fractures have capability of to flow the fluids. Borehole image log is depiction of the borehole conditions, it is used to identify the natural fractures and drilling induced fracture. Both of them are used to identify the direction of the fracture, direction of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax), and geomechanics parameters. The natural fractures are the results of responses to stress on a rock and permeability which controlling factor in research area. Breakouts is found in this field as a trace of drilling induced fracture due to in situ stress work. Natural fractures are strongly clustered with true strike trending which first, second, and third major direction are N170°E - N180°E (N-S), N60°E - N70°E (NE-SW), and N310°E - N320°E (NW-SE), while the dominant dip is 80° -90°. Based on borehole breakout analysis, maximum horizontal stress orientation is identified in N162°E - N204°E (N-S) and N242°E (NE-SW) direction. It’s constantly similar with regional stress which is affected by GSF. Several parameters have been identified and analyzed are SHmax, SHmin, and Sy. It can be concluded that Rantau Dedap Geothermal Field is affected by strike-slip regime. The determination of in situ stress and natural fractures are important to study the pattern of permeability which is related to the fault in reservoir of this field.

  16. Development of an in-situ banking shear test method; Moritsuchi no gen'ichi sendan shikenho no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikata, U. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-12-10

    Development was made on a simplified site-use single face shear testing device and a test method that can perform in-situ and direct measurement during construction on shear strength of coarse particle materials having large diameters. The test device consists of shear frames embedded in the in-situ ground bed, a weight for vertical loading, and a traction device to load horizontal force. In the test, prescribed rolling compaction is performed by a vibration roller which presses in the shear frames into unwound banking by using a four-piece vibration roller. Crushed stones are piled on cells of the shear frames to the same height. The specified weight is placed thereon via a loading plate, which is used as the vertical load. The shear force is loaded by horizontally pulling chains connected to the shear frames by using the traction device, and is measured by a load cell. The vertical displacement is measured by two vertical displacement meters, and the horizontal displacement by one horizontal displacement meter. A verification test is continuing using the test device. Four cases with different vertical stresses can be tested in about one day. (NEDO)

  17. In situ stress determination research study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, W.G.; Thompson, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to evaluate and implement rock stress determination instruments and techniques developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at its Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for use in jointed rock and to continue the development of analytical and interpretation methods for stress determination results including effects of scale, structure and anisotropy. Testing and evaluation of the instruments and methods developed at URL need to be done in a similar rock type prior to underground access at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

  18. Impact of In Situ Stress Distribution Characteristics on Jointed Surrounding Rock Mass Stability of an Underground Cavern near a Hillslope Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangxiang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a series of numerical simulations are performed to analyze the in situ stress distribution characteristics of the rock mass near different slope angles hillslope surfaces, which are subjected to the vertical gravity stress and different horizontal lateral stresses and the influence which the in situ stress distribution characteristics of 45° hillslope to the integral stability of surrounding rock mass when an underground cavern is excavated considering three different horizontal distances from the underground cavern to the slope surface. It can be concluded from the numerical results that different slope angles and horizontal lateral stresses have a strong impact on the in situ stress distribution and the integral surrounding rock mass stability of the underground cavern when the horizontal distance from the underground cavern to the slope surface is approximately 100 m to 200 m. The relevant results would provide some important constructive suggestions to the engineering site selection and optimization of large-scale underground caverns in hydropower stations.

  19. Defining in-situ stress magnitude and the responses of geology to stress anisotropy in heterogeneous lithologies for the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingdon, A.; Fellgett, M. W.; Williams, J. D. O.

    2017-12-01

    Exploitation of shale gas in the USA has led to interest in similar UK deposits. After tremors at the Preese Hall well in 2011, the process of hydraulic fracturing has become contentious. In-situ stress orientation controls the direction that fractures propagate from a well. World Stress Map (WSM) data coverage for the UK has historically been sparse. Improvements to the stress orientations for the UK are vital for reducing risk levels of induced seismicity. In some offshore basins, maximum horizontal stress (SHMax) is sub-parallel to major inverted Permo-Triassic faults, episodically reactivated during the Cenozoic, indicating a degree of structural control. Understanding for UK stress magnitude has been poor. Data for Northern England has been augmented with new estimates of vertical stress (Sv), minimum horizontal stress (Shmin) and pore pressure, focussed on potentially prospective basins east and west of the Pennines. Calculated values combined with legacy hydraulic fracturing and overcoring data show vertical stress gradients vary from 23 to 26 MPa/Km-1. Cheshire and Scotland show higher Shmin values by 2 MPa/Km-1 compared to Yorkshire and South East England. SHMax values exceeds the Sv which in turn exceeds Shmin indicating a predominantly strike slip environment. Pore pressure appears to be uniformly hydrostatic across the studied regions. There is some evidence above 1200 m depth of reverse faulting in igneous rocks in Cornwall, Leicestershire and Cumbria. Analysis of borehole imaging for the lithologically heterogeneous Carboniferous Coal Measures, highlights variability failure modes over confined vertical intervals. Breakouts are disproportionately located in "seatearths", palaeosols located stratigraphically beneath coal seams. Drilling induced tensile fractures are located within close proximity in overbank silt/clay facies and relatively massive channel sands that typically over and underlie coal deposits. Strength tests show that breakouts occur in

  20. Testing of in situ and ex situ bioremediation approaches for an oil-contaminated peat bog following a pipeline break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.J.; Lee, D.W.; Yeske, B.M.; Kuipers, F.

    2000-01-01

    The feasibility of treating a 1985 pipeline spill of light Pembina Cardium crude oil at a bog near Violet Grove, Alberta was discussed. Pembina Pipeline Corporation arranged for a treatability test to be conducted on oil-contaminated sphagnum peat moss from the site to determine effective in situ or ex situ remediation options for the site. The test was used to evaluate the biodegradation potential of contaminants. Four tests were designed to simulate field different field treatment approaches and to collect critical data on toxicity and leachability of the peat moss. The tests included a bioslurry test, a soil microcosm test, an aerated water saturated peat column test, and a standard toxicity characteristic leachate potential test. The first three tests gave similar results of at least 74 per cent biodegradation of the residual crude oil on the peat solids and no residual toxicity as measured by the Microtox Assay. It was determined that both in situ bioremediation using an aerated water injection system or an ex situ landfarming approach would achieve required criteria and no fertilizers would be necessary to maintain active bioremediation. The new gas-liquid reactor (GLR) aeration technology used in these tests creates a constant supply of hyperoxygenated water prior to column injection. The continuous release of tiny air bubbles maximizes air surface area and increases the gas transfer rates. 3 tabs., 3 figs

  1. In situ treatability test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This document describes the plans for the in situ treatment zone (ISTZ) treatability test for groundwater contaminated with strontium-90. The treatability test is to be conducted at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, in a portion of the 100-N Area adjacent to the Columbia River referred to as N-Springs. The purpose of the treatability test is to evaluate the effectiveness of an innovative technology to prevent the discharge of strontium-90 contaminated groundwater into the Columbia River. The ISTZ is a passive technology that consists of placing a treatment agent in the path of the groundwater. The treatment agent must restrict target radioactive contaminants and provide time for the contaminant to decay to acceptable levels. The permeability of the treatment zone must be greater than or equal to that of the surrounding sediments to ensure that the contaminated groundwater flows through the treatment zone agent and not around the agent

  2. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-01-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  3. In situ permeability testing of rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Broce, R.D.; Lie, K.

    1981-04-01

    Storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in bedded salt formations requires a knowledge of the in situ permeability of SENM rock salt. Since assumptions for safety assessments have been made in which these wastes could generate gas pressures on the order of the lithostatic pressure over geologic time scales, the permeability of the surrounding formation becomes an important parameter for determining the manner in which the gases will be contained or dispersed. This report describes the series of tests conducted in the AEC-7 borehole, located near the WIPP site, to determine the in situ gas flow characteristics of the bedded salt. In these tests, compressed air was injected into the borehole and flow into the surrounding formation measured. These measured flow rates were interpreted in terms of formation permeabilities and porosities which were, in turn, used as modeling parameters for the repository response analysis. Two series of field tests were performed. The first series consisted of a number of whole-hole flow tests conducted to provide preliminary design information required for future operation of a guarded straddle packer system capable of measuring permeabilities > or = 0.1 μdarcy. The second series of tests were conducted using the Systems, Science and Software (S-Cubed) designed guarded straddle packer system. In these interval permeability tests, 100-foot lengths of borehole were isolated and the flow characteristics of the surrounding formation examined. In this report, a complete description of the test procedures, instrumentation, and measurement techniques is first given. The analytical/numerical methods used for data interpretation are then presented, followed by results of the interval and permeability tests. (The whole-hole tests are summarized in Appendix A.) Conclusions are presented in the final section

  4. An electromechanical material testing system for in situ electron microscopy and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2005-10-11

    We report the development of a material testing system for in situ electron microscopy (EM) mechanical testing of nanostructures. The testing system consists of an actuator and a load sensor fabricated by means of surface micromachining. This previously undescribed nanoscale material testing system makes possible continuous observation of the specimen deformation and failure with subnanometer resolution, while simultaneously measuring the applied load electronically with nanonewton resolution. This achievement was made possible by the integration of electromechanical and thermomechanical components based on microelectromechanical system technology. The system capabilities are demonstrated by the in situ EM testing of free-standing polysilicon films, metallic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes. In particular, a previously undescribed real-time instrumented in situ transmission EM observation of carbon nanotubes failure under tensile load is presented here.

  5. Steel research using neutron beam techniques. In-situ neutron diffraction, small-angle neutron scattering and residual stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Katsumi; Sato, Kaoru; Nakagaito, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Arakaki, Yu; Tomota, Yo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the neutron beam techniques have been applied for steel researches and industrial applications. In particular, the neutron diffraction is a powerful non-destructive method that can analyze phase transformation and residual stress inside the steel. The small-angle neutron scattering is also an effective method for the quantitative evaluation of microstructures inside the steel. In this study, in-situ neutron diffraction measurements during tensile test and heat treatment were conducted in order to investigate the deformation and transformation behaviors of TRIP steels. The small-angle neutron scattering measurements of TRIP steels were also conducted. Then, the neutron diffraction analysis was conducted on the high strength steel weld joint in order to investigate the effect of the residual stress distribution on the weld cracking. (author)

  6. Four-point bend apparatus for in situ micro-Raman stress measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Shawn H.; Mann, Adrian B.

    2018-06-01

    A device for in situ use with a micro-Raman microscope to determine stress from the Raman peak position was designed and validated. The device is a four-point bend machine with a micro-stepping motor and load cell, allowing for fine movement and accurate readings of the applied force. The machine has a small footprint and easily fits on most optical microscope stages. The results obtained from silicon are in good agreement with published literature values for the linear relationship between stress and peak position for the 520.8 cm‑1 Raman peak. The device was used to examine 4H–SiC and a good linear relationship was found between the 798 cm‑1 Raman peak position and stress, with the proportionality coefficient being close to the theoretical value of 0.0025. The 777 cm‑1 Raman peak also showed a linear dependence on stress, but the dependence was not as strong. The device examines both the tensile and compressive sides of the beam in bending, granting the potential for many materials and crystal orientations to be examined.

  7. Panel manipulation in social stress testing: The Bath Experimental Stress Test for Children (BEST-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheetham, Tara J; Turner-Cobb, Julie M

    2016-01-01

    Whilst acute stress paradigms in adults make use of adult panel members, similar paradigms modified for child participants have not manipulated the panel. Most work has utilised an audience of adult confederates, regardless of the age of the population being tested. The aim of this study was to trial a social stress test for children that provided a meaningful environment using age-matched child peers as panel actors. Thirty-three participants (7-11 years) underwent the Bath Experimental Stress Test for Children (BEST-C). Based on the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), it comprises a shortened six-minute public speaking task and four-minute maths challenge. It differs from previous stress tests by using age-matched children on the panel, pre-recorded and presented as a live feed, and includes an expanded manipulation check of subjective experience. Salivary cortisol was assessed at four time points, pre-post stress testing; life events, daily hassles and coping strategies were measured through questionnaires. A simple numerical coding scheme was applied to post-test interview data. The BEST-C generated a typical stress and adaptation response in salivary cortisol (p=.032). Age and gender differences were observed during recovery. Cortisol responses mapped directly onto three distinct subjective response patterns: (i) expected response and recovery; (ii) expected response, no recovery; (iii) no response. The BEST-C, utilising child confederates of participant target age is a meaningful social stress test for children. This is the first social stress test developed specifically for children that manipulates panel characteristics by using child confederates and a pre-recorded sham panel. Greater cortisol responses to the test were also found to match subjective verbal accounts of the experience. It offers a meaningful acute stress paradigm with potential applications to other child and adolescent age groups. Furthermore, it leads the way in the use of panel manipulation

  8. In-situ testing of HEPA filters in the nuclear Karlsruhe filter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlmeyer, M.; Stotz, W.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear plant operators and filter manufacturers are endeavouring to improve environmental protection by intensifying process control and/or improving filter quality. In-situ testing is an important element in these efforts since it represents a direct means of checking the success or otherwise of a particular development. The arrangements for in-situ testing should satisfy the following minimum requirements: the staff should not be exposed to risk during the test; the test method should be objective and reproducible as well as being as sensitive as possible; the test method should permit detection of individual leaks in the filter system so that they can be remedied as efficiently as possible; the test equipment should not necessitate modifications to the extract systems or plant construction; the test should be simple and capable of being carried out with a minimum of effort and equipment. GfK has developed the 'Nuclear-Karlsruhe' filter housing in accordance with these principles. This housing permits in-situ testing similar to the DIN 24184 visual oil-fog test or the DOP test. External visual checks on the general condition of the filter is also possible. A safe system of filter changing with a specially designed plastic bag attachment at an accessible height considerably increases the degree of protection of operating personnel

  9. In situ vitrification engineering-scale test ES-INEL-5 test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoots, P.R.

    1990-06-01

    In 1952, the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) was established at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). RWMC is located on approximately 144 acres in the southwestern corner of the INEL site and was established as a controlled area for the burial of solid low-level wastes generated by INEL operations. In 1954, the 88-acre Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of RWMC began accepting solid transuranic-contaminated waste. From 1954 to 1970, transuranic-contaminated waste was accepted from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) near Golden, CO, as well as from other US Department of Energy (DOE) locations. In 1987, the Buried Waste Program (BWP) was established by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., the prime contractor at INEL. Following the Environmental Restoration guidelines of the Buried Waste Program, the In Situ Vitrification Program is participating in a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for permanent disposal of INEL waste, in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study was requested and is being funded by the Office of Technology Development of the Idaho Operations Office of DOE (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an in situ vitrification (ISV) scoping study on the treatability of mixed low-level and mixed transuranic-contaminated waste is being performed to determine applicability of ISV to remediation of waste at SDA. This In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-5 Test Plan considers the data needs of engineering, regulatory, health, and safety activities for all sampling and analysis activities in support of engineering scale test ES-INEL-5. 5 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  10. In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-4 Product Characterization Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.R.; Stoots, P.R.

    1990-06-01

    In 1987, the Buried Waste Program (BWP) was established within EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., the prime contractor at INEL. Following the Environmental Restoration guidelines of the Buried Waste Program, the In Situ Vitrification Program is participating in a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) for permanent disposal of INEL waste, in compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This study was requested and is being funded by the Office of Technology Development of the Idaho Operations Office of DOE (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an in situ vitrification (ISV) scoping study on the treatability of mixed low-level and mixed transuranic-contaminated waste is being performed to determine the applicability of ISV to remediation of waste at SDA. In examination of the ISV process for applicability to SDA waste, this In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-4 Product Characterization Test Plan identifies the following: sampling and analysis strategy; sampling procedures; methods to conduct analyses; equipment; and procedures to ensure data quality. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  11. Self-contained in-vacuum in situ thin film stress measurement tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, J.; van de Kruijs, R. W. E.; Bijkerk, F.

    2018-05-01

    A fully self-contained in-vacuum device for measuring thin film stress in situ is presented. The stress was measured by measuring the curvature of a cantilever on which the thin film was deposited. For this, a dual beam laser deflectometer was used. All optics and electronics needed to perform the measurement are placed inside a vacuum-compatible vessel with the form factor of the substrate holders of the deposition system used. The stand-alone nature of the setup allows the vessel to be moved inside a deposition system independently of optical or electronic feedthroughs while measuring continuously. A Mo/Si multilayer structure was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the setup. A radius of curvature resolution of 270 km was achieved. This allows small details of the stress development to be resolved, such as the interlayer formation between the layers and the amorphous-to-crystalline transition of the molybdenum which occurs at around 2 nm. The setup communicates with an external computer via a Wi-Fi connection. This wireless connection allows remote control over the acquisition and the live feedback of the measured stress. In principle, the vessel can act as a general metrology platform and add measurement capabilities to deposition setups with no modification to the deposition system.

  12. [Characterization of kale (Brassica oberacea var acephala) under thallium stress by in situ attenuated total reflection FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yan; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Zhen-Chun; Chen, Yong-Heng

    2009-01-01

    The experiment was designed based on consumption of carbon dioxide through the photosynthesis of Brassica oberacea var acephala leaf, and the photosynthesis of kale leaf under thallium stress was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection FTIR (in situ ATR-FTIR). The ATR-FTIR showed that the absorption peaks of leaves had no obvious difference between plants growing in thallium stress soil and plants growing in non-thallium pollution soil, and the strong peaks at 3,380 cm(-1) could be assigned to the absorption of water, carbohydrate, protein or amide; the strong peaks at 2,916 and 2,850 cm(-1) assigned to the absorption of carbohydrate or aliphatic compound; the peaks at 1,640 cm(-1) assigned to the absorption of water. However, as detected by the in situ ATR-FTIR, the double peaks (negative peaks) at 2,360 and 2,340 cm(-1) that are assigned to the absorption of CO2 appeared and became high gradually. It was showed that kale was carrying photosynthesis. At the same time, the carbon dioxide consumption speed of leaf under thallium stress was obviously larger than that of the blank It was expressed that photosynthesis under thallium stress was stronger than the blank All these represented that kale had certain tolerance to the heavy metal thallium. Meanwhile, the carbon dioxide consumption of grown-up leaf was more than that of young leaf whether or not under thallium stress. It was also indicated that the intensity of photosynthesis in grown-up leaf is higher than that in young leaf.

  13. From point-wise stress data to a continuous description of the 3D crustal in situ stress state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbach, O.; Ziegler, M.; Reiter, K.; Hergert, T.

    2017-12-01

    The in situ stress is a key parameter for the safe and sustainable management of geo-reservoirs or storage of waste and energy in deep geological repositories. It is also an essential initial condition for thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) models that investigate man-made induced processes e.g. seismicity due to fluid injection/extraction, reservoir depletion or storage of heat producing high-level radioactive waste. Without a reasonable assumption on the initial stress condition it is not possible to assess if a man-made process is pushing the system into a critical state or not. However, modelling the initial 3D stress state on reservoir scale is challenging since data are hardly available before drilling in the area of interest. This is in particular the case for the stress magnitude data which are a prerequisite for a reliable model calibration. Here, we present a multi-stage 3D geomechani­cal-numerical model approach to estimate for a reservoir-scale volume the 3D in situ stress state. First, we set up a large-scale model which is calibrated by stress data and use the modelled stress field subsequently to calibrate a small-scale model located within the large-scale model. The local model contains a significantly higher resolution representation of the subsurface geometry around boreholes of a projected geothermal power plant. This approach incorporates two models and is an alternative to the required trade-off between resolution, computational cost and calibration data which is inevitable for a single model; an extension to a three-stage approach would be straight forward. We exemplify the two-stage approach for the area around Munich in the German Molasse Basin. The results of the reservoir-scale model are presented in terms of values for slip tendency as a measure for the criticality of fault reactivation. The model results show that variations due to uncertainties in the input data are mainly introduced by the uncertain material properties and missing

  14. Large-scale in situ heater tests for hydrothermal characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Wilder, D.G.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analyses indicate that the ambient hydrological system will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. In situ heater tests are required to provide an understanding of coupled geomechanical-hydrothermal-geochemical behavior in the engineered and natural barriers under repository thermal loading conditions. In situ heater tests have been included in the Site Characterization Plan in response to regulatory requirements for site characterization and to support the validation of process models required to assess the total systems performance at the site. Because of limited time, some of the in situ tests will have to be accelerated relative to actual thermal loading conditions. We examine the trade-offs between the limited test duration and generating hydrothermal conditions applicable to repository performance during the entire thermal loading cycle, including heating (boiling and dry-out) and cooldown (re-wetting). For in situ heater tests to be applicable to actual repository conditions, a minimum heater test duration of 6-7 yr (including 4 yr of full-power heating) is required

  15. Modelling the cooling and partial dismantling of the Febex in-situ test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, M.; Gens, A.; Guimaraes, L.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many designs for radioactive waste disposal the space between the canister and the cavity surface is filled by an engineered barrier made up of compacted expansive clay. Engineered barrier and adjacent host rock will be submitted to the heating effect of the nuclear waste as well as to associated hydraulic and mechanical phenomena that interact in a complex way. In order to achieve a safe and robust repository design, it is necessary to have a good understanding of the processes that occur in the near field and their evolution over time. To this end, properly instrumented full scale in situ tests provide essential information. The in-situ test operated at full scale and under natural conditions at the underground laboratory managed by NAGRA (Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste) at the Grimsel test site in Switzerland. Two 4300 W heaters were placed in the axis of the horizontal drift in the natural rock (granite). The heaters were 4.54 m long and 0.90 m in diameter, and were intended to simulate the release of heat by nuclear waste. The space between the rock surface and the heaters was backfilled using blocks of compacted bentonite. The test area was sealed with a 2.7 m long concrete plug. The test was heavily instrumented, including 632 sensors that were installed in the clay barrier and in the rock with measurements of temperatures, relative humidity (equivalent to total suction), pore pressures, displacements, and stresses. The heaters were symmetrically placed in relation to the central section of the test. The power of the heaters was adjusted to maintain a 100 deg. C temperature at the interface between heaters and bentonite barrier. The test was run in this way for five years when one of the heaters was switched off and dismantled. Dismantling data provided extremely valuable information about the state of the barrier at the end of the experiment and a useful benchmark for

  16. Feasibility testing of in situ vitrification of uranium-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuse, H.; Tsuchino, S.; Tasaka, H.; Timmerman, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    Process feasibility studies using in situ vitrification (ISV) were successfully performed on two different uranium-contaminated wastes. In situ vitrification is a thermal treatment process that converts contaminated soils into durable glass and crystalline form. Of the two different wastes, one waste was uranium mill tailings, while the other was uranium-contaminated soils which had high water contents. Analyses of the data from the two tests are presented

  17. Commercial versus in-situ usability testing of healthcare information systems: towards "public" usability testing in healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kannry, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The need for improved usability in healthcare IT has been widely recognized. In addition, methods from usability engineering, including usability testing and usability inspection have received greater attention. Many vendors of healthcare software are now employing usability testing methods in the design and development of their products. However, despite this, the usability of healthcare IT is still considered to be problematic and many healthcare organizations that have purchased systems that have been tested at vendor testing sites are still reporting a range of usability and safety issues. In this paper we explore the distinction between commercial usability testing (conducted at centralized vendor usability laboratories and limited beta test sites) and usability testing that is carried out locally within healthcare organizations that have purchased vendor systems and products (i.e. public "in-situ" usability testing). In this paper it will be argued that both types of testing (i.e. commercial vendor-based testing) and in-situ testing are needed to ensure system usability and safety.

  18. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ heating of soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) for IITRI Project C06787 entitled open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Heating of Soilclose quotes. A work plan for the above mentioned work was previously submitted. This QAPP describes the sampling and analysis of soil core-samples obtained from the K-25 Site (Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where an in-situ heating and soil decontamination demonstration experiment will be performed. Soil samples taken before and after the experiment will be analyzed for selected volatile organic compounds. The Work Plan mentioned above provides a complete description of the demonstration site, the soil sampling plan, test plan, etc

  19. In-situ tensile test of high strength nanocrystalline bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Mike, E-mail: mike.haddad@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Ivanisenko, Yulia; Courtois-Manara, Eglantine [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany); Fecht, Hans-Jörg [Institute of Micro and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-01-03

    Because of its great importance in modern engineering and technology applications, steel continues to be highly relevant in the modern research field of nanocrystalline materials. Innovative processing methods and procedures are required for the production of such materials, which possess superior properties compared to their conventional counter parts. In this research, the original microstructure of a commercial C45 steel (Fe, 0.42–0.5 wt% C, 0.5–0.8 wt% Mn) was modified from ferritic–pearlitic to bainitic. Warm high pressure torsion for 5 rotations at 6 GPa and 350 °C was used to process the bainitic sample leading to an ultrafine/nano-scale grain size. A unique nano-crystalline microstructure consisting of equiaxed and elongated ferrite grains with a mean size smaller than 150 nm appeared in images taken by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Results of in-situ tensile testing in a scanning electron microscope showed very high tensile strength, on the order of 2100 MPa with a total elongation of 4.5% in comparison with 800 MPa and around 16% in the original state. Fracture occurred abruptly, without any sign of necking, and was typically caused by the stress concentration at a surface flaw. Also, stress concentrations near all surface defects were observed on the sample, visualized by the formation of shear bands. The fracture surface was covered with dimples, indicating ductile fracture. These properties are fully comparable with high strength, high alloyed steels.

  20. Study of the inhomogeneity of critical current under in-situ tensile stress for YBCO tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. P.; Chen, W.; Zhang, H. Y.; Liu, L. Y.; Pan, X. F.; Yang, X. S.; Zhao, Y.

    2018-07-01

    A Hall sensor system was used to measure the local critical current of YBCO tape with high spatial resolution under in-situ tensile stress. The hot spot generation and minimum quench energy of YBCO tape, which depended on the local critical current, was calculated through the thermoelectric coupling model. With the increase in tensile stress, the cracks which have different dimensions and critical current degradation arose more frequently and lowered the thermal stability of the YBCO tape.

  1. Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    interfacial fracture ) in CFRP was recently found in the fuselages of Dreamliner 787, and two types of cracks were found in the rib feet brackets...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0003 Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests Zhenjun Yang UNIVERSITY OF MANCHESTER...Multiscale Stochastic Fracture Mechanics of Composites Informed by In-situ XCT Tests 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER EOARD 12-2100 5b. GRANT NUMBER F8655-12-1

  2. Tests for oil/dispersant toxicity: In situ laboratory assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, D.A.; Coelho, G.M.; Aurand, D.V.

    1995-01-01

    As part of its readiness program in oil spill response, the Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU), Department of Transport, U.K. conducts annual field trials in the North Sea, approximately 30 nautical miles from the southeast coast of England. The trials take the form of controlled releases of crude oil or Medium Fuel/Gas Oil mix (MFO), with and without the application of Corexit 9527 dispersant. In 1994 and 1995 the authors conducted a series of in situ toxicity bioassays in association with these spills with included 48h LC50 tests for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae, a 48 h oyster (C. gigas) embryonic development test and two full life-cycle assays using the copepods Acartia tonsa and Tisbe battagliai. Tests were also conducted in the Chesapeake Bay laboratory using estuarine species including the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the inland silverside Menidia beryllina. Here, the authors report on the results of these assays, together with 1996 in situ toxicity data resulting from Norwegian field trials in the northern North Sea

  3. Large-scale in situ heater tests for hydrothermal characterization at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Wilder, D.G.; Nitao, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    To safely and permanently store high-level nuclear-waste, the potential Yucca Mountain repository site must mitigate the release and transport of radionuclides for tens of thousands of years. In the failure scenario of greatest concern, water would contact a waste package, accelerate its failure rate, and eventually transport radionuclides to the water table. Our analysis indicate that the ambient hydrological system will be dominated by repository-heat-driven hydrothermal flow for tens of thousands of years. In situ heater tests are required to provide an understanding of coupled geomechanical-hydrothermal-geochemical behavior in the engineered and natural barriers under repository thermal loading conditions. In situ heater tests have been included in the Site Characterization Plan in response to regulatory requirements for site characterization and to support the validation of process models required to assess the total systems performance at the site. The success of the License Application (LA) hinges largely on how effectively we validate the process models that provide the basis for performance assessment. Because of limited time, some of the in situ tests will have to be accelerated relative to actual thermal loading conditions. We examine the trade-offs between the limited test duration and generating hydrothermal conditions applicable to repository performance during the entire thermal loading cycle, including heating (boiling and dry-out) and cooldown (re-wetting). For in situ heater tests duration of 6-7 yr (including 4 yr of full-power heating) is required. The parallel use of highly accelerated, shorter-duration tests may provide timely information for the LA, provided that the applicability of the test results can be validated against ongoing nominal-rate heater tests

  4. In situ gas treatment technology demonstration test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.C.; Miller, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document defines the objectives and requirements associated with undertaking a field demonstration of an in situ gas treatment appoach to remediation chromate-contaminated soil. The major tasks presented in this plan include the design and development of the surface gas treatment system, performance of permitting activities, and completion of site preparation and field testing activities

  5. In situ observation of stress relaxation in epitaxial graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N'Diaye, Alpha T; Coraux, Johann; Busse, Carsten; Michely, Thomas; Gastel, Raoul van; Poelsema, Bene; MartInez-Galera, Antonio J; Gomez-RodrIguez, Jose M; Hattab, Hichem; Wall, Dirk; Heringdorf, Frank-J Meyer zu; Hoegen, Michael Horn-von

    2009-01-01

    Upon cooling, branched line defects develop in epitaxial graphene grown at high temperature on Pt(111) and Ir(111). Using atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy, we demonstrate that these defects are wrinkles in the graphene layer, i.e. stripes of partially delaminated graphene. With low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), we investigate the wrinkling phenomenon in situ. Upon temperature cycling, we observe hysteresis in the appearance and disappearance of the wrinkles. Simultaneously with wrinkle formation a change in bright field imaging intensity of adjacent areas and a shift in the moire spot positions for micro diffraction of such areas takes place. The stress relieved by wrinkle formation results from the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of graphene and the substrate. A simple one-dimensional model taking into account the energies related to strain, delamination and bending of graphene is in qualitative agreement with our observations.

  6. In situ corrosion tests on HLW glass as part of a larger approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Iseghem, P.

    1997-01-01

    In-situ corrosion tests were performed on various candidate high-level waste glasses in the underground laboratory in clay underneath SCK x CEN. The tests exposed the glass samples directly to the Boom clay rock, for maximum durations of 7.5 years. We succeeded to interpret the corrosion data at 90 deg C in terms of dissolution mechanisms, and we concluded that the glass composition has a determining effect on the corrosion stability. The data from our in-situ tests were of high relevance for estimating the long-term behaviour of the glasses. The long-term in-situ tests provide corrosion data which show different trends than other corrosion tests, e.g. shorter duration tests in Boom clay, or tests in deionized water. The initial dissolution rate using MCC1 test at 90 deg C is about the same for the three glasses discussed, but the longest duration in Boom clay at 90 deg C shows a difference in mass loss of about 25 times. We finally present some ideas on how the corrosion tests can meet the needs, such as the modelling of the glass corrosion or providing input in the performance assessment. (author)

  7. ATLAS IV in situ heating test in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Guangjing; Li, Xiangling; Verstricht, Jan; Sillen, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The small scale in-situ ATLAS (Admissible Thermal Loading for Argillaceous Storage) tests are performed to assess the hydro-mechanical effects of a thermal transient on the host Boom clay at the HADES underground research facility in Mol, Belgium. The initial test set-up, consisting of a heater borehole and two observation boreholes, was installed in 1991-1992. The first test (later named 'ATLAS I') was then performed from July 1993 to June 1996; during this time, the heater dissipated a constant power of 900 W. During the second phase ('ATLAS II'), the heating power was doubled (1800 W) and maintained constant from June 1996 to May 1997. This was followed by shutdown and natural cooling starting from June 1997 on. To broaden the THM characterization of the Boom clay at a larger scale and at different temperature levels, the test set-up was extended in 2006 by drilling two additional instrumented boreholes (AT97E and AT98E). The heater was switched on again from April 2007 to April 2008 with a stepwise power increase, followed by an instantaneous shutdown. This phase is called 'ATLAS III'. The above tests have provided a large set of good quality and well documented data on temperature, pore water pressure and total stress; these data allowed to make several interesting observations regarding the thermal anisotropy and THM coupling in the Boom clay. The straightforward geometry and well defined boundary conditions of the tests facilitate the comparison between measurement and numerical modeling studies. Based on the three dimensional coupled THM modeling of the ATLAS III test, the good agreement between measurement and numerical modeling of temperature and pore water pressure yields a set of THM parameters and confirms the thermo-mechanical anisotropy of the Boom clay. To get a better insight in the anisotropic THM behavior of the Boom clay, a new upward instrumented borehole was drilled above the ATLAS heater at

  8. Development of the quickmix injector for in-situ filter testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costigan, G.; Loughborough, D.

    1993-01-01

    In-situ filter testing is routinely carried out on nuclear ventilation plant to assess the effectiveness of installed filter systems. Ideally the system is tested by introducing a sub-micron aerosol upstream of the filter, in such a way as to present a uniform challenge to the whole of the upstream filter face. Samples are withdrawn from upstream and downstream of the filter, and the respective concentrations are used to calculate the system (or filter) efficiency. These requirements are documented in the Atomic Energy Code of Practice, AECP 1054. The Filter Development Section at Harwell Laboratory has been investigating methods of improving the accuracy and reliability of the in-situ filter test over the past ten years. The programme has included the evaluation of devices used to mix the aerosol and multi-point samplers to obtain representative aerosol samples. This paper reports the results of laboratory trials on the open-quotes QUICKMIXclose quotes injector developed and patented by Harwell. The Quickmix injector is designed to mix the test aerosol with the air stream and thereby reduce the duct length required to produce uniform concentrations. The injector has been tested in ducts ranging from 150 mm diameter to 610 mm square, at air velocities up to 26 m/s. Upstream mixing lengths required to achieve a ± 10% concentration variation on the mean were reduced to between 2 and 5 duct diameters, with a very small pressure drop. This simple, compact device is being installed in new and existing plants in the UK to improve the accuracy and reliability of in-situ filter testing. Some examples of plant applications are given, together with some of the first results from operating plant

  9. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the '70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid '80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern

  10. WIPP R and D in situ test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a Department of Energy (DOE) RandD Facility for the purpose of developing the technology needed for the safe disposal of the United States' defense-related radioactive waste. The in situ test program focus is to provide the models and data to demonstrate the facility performance for isolation of waste at WIPP. The program is defined for the WIPP sealing system, thermal-structural interactions and waste package performance. A number of integrated large-scale underground tests have been operational since 1983 and are ongoing. The tests address the issues of both systems design and long-term isolation performance of the WIPP repository

  11. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  12. Stress testing in financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2000 the Basle Committee on the Global Financial System defined stress testing as 'a generic term describing various techniques used by financial firms to gauge their potential vulnerability to exceptional but plausible events'. Exceptional events refer to one-off or recurring events with far-reaching consequences for the concerned financial institution and the financial sector s stability overall. Such unexpected (exceptional events include, for instance: bankruptcy in Argentina in 2001, stock markets collapse ('Black Monday' on 19 October 1987, or the fall of the energy giant Enron in 2001. The adoption of the new Basle Accord (better known as Basle II in 2001 envisaged the implementation of stress tests for the identification of events and future changes in economic circumstances that could cause some unfavorable effects on banks' credit exposure, along with the assessment of banks' ability to survive in the new circumstances. Negative experiences from the past, having undermined the stability of financial systems worldwide, made a decisive impact on regulators at all levels to additionally consider the issue of increasing the financial system's resistance to the occurrence of unexpected - exceptional events. To this end, the introduction of stress tests was the turning point in the process of increased banking systems' resistance to shocks. This paper primarily deals with stress testing methodology and bank risk measurement techniques, along with the main results of conducted tests, directly impacting the entire financial system.

  13. Comparative study of in-situ filter test methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.; Stevens, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    Available methods of testing high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filters in-situ have been reviewed. In order to understand the relationship between the results produced by different methods a selection has been compared. Various pieces of equipment for generating and detecting aerosols have been tested and their suitability assessed. Condensation-nuclei, DOP (di-octyl phthalate) and sodium-flame in-situ filter test methods have been studied, using the 500 cfm (9000 m 3 /h) filter test rig at Harwell and in the field. Both the sodium-flame and DOP methods measure the penetration through leaks and filter material. However the measured penetration through filtered leaks depends on the aerosol size distribution and the detection method. Condensation-nuclei test methods can only be used to measure unfiltered leaks since condensation nuclei have a very low penetration through filtered leaks. A combination of methods would enable filtered and unfiltered leaks to be measured. A condensation-nucleus counter using n-butyl alcohol as the working fluid has the advantage of being able to detect any particle up to 1 μm in diameter, including DOP, and so could be used for this purpose. A single-particle counter has not been satisfactory because of interference from particles leaking into systems under extract, particularly downstream of filters, and because the concentration of the input aerosol has to be severely limited. The sodium-flame method requires a skilled operator and may cause safety and corrosion problems. The DOP method using a total light scattering detector has so far been the most satisfactory. It is fairly easy to use, measures reasonably low values of penetration and gives rapid results. DOP has had no adverse effect on HEPA filters over a long series of tests

  14. Cryogenic in situ microcompression testing of Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupinacci, A.; Kacher, J.; Eilenberg, A.; Shapiro, A.A.; Hosemann, P.; Minor, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizing plasticity mechanisms below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is traditionally difficult to accomplish in a systematic fashion. Here, we use a new experimental setup to perform in situ cryogenic mechanical testing of pure Sn micropillars at room temperature and at −142 °C. Subsequent electron microscopy characterization of the micropillars shows a clear difference in the deformation mechanisms at room temperature and at cryogenic temperatures. At room temperature, the Sn micropillars deformed through dislocation plasticity, while at −142 °C they exhibited both higher strength and deformation twinning. Two different orientations were tested, a symmetric (1 0 0) orientation and a non-symmetric (4 5 ¯ 1) orientation. The deformation mechanisms were found to be the same for both orientations

  15. Influence of diaphragm wall installation in overconsolidated sandy clays on in situ stress disturbance and resulting wall deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truty Andrzej Adam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of deep excavations becomes a standard practice in modern geotechnical engineering. A detailed numerical model for a given case is able to reproduce major effects of soil-structure interaction by taking into account any kind of drainage conditions, strong stiffness variation due to effective stress and strain changes, creep and cracking, when reinforced concrete is used as a structural material, but also interface effects between subsoil and structure. Calibrating soil constitutive models is one of the most difficult tasks and due to several sources of uncertainty there is no one unique set of the data that should be used in numerical predictions. Lack or incompleteness of experimental data, significant mismatch between laboratory and field tests is an another source of difficulty. Contrary to several simplified methods, that are usually limited to two dimensions, numerical models allow a full 3D analysis in which many simplifications can be eliminated. This paper is devoted to the problem of in situ stress disturbance caused by diaphragm wall installation in overconsolidated quaternary sandy clays and its influence on final wall deformations.

  16. RESEARCH OF THE STRESS STATE OF A MODIFIED IN-SITU CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article focuses on investigation of the stress state of a modified in-situ concrete of natural hardening. Methodology. To achieve the aim, the research of the microstructure of the modified cement matrix of concrete, as well as the mechanism of structure formation of modified concrete with natural hardening was conducted; the methods for reliable evaluation of concrete strength were defined. Findings. The development of internal stresses affects the properties of concretedifferently. With an increase in temperature-shrinkage deformations in time and, thus, with increasing structural stresses in the cement sheath around the grains of the filler two opposite processes may develop: zone of plastic flow or cracking. Originality. It was established that the structural features complex of the modified concrete when the load transfer leads to the formation of extensive zones of prefracture which is able to absorb a significant amount of elastic strain energy that provides the design deformation properties of the concrete for special purposes. Ideas about the definition of the criteria of cracking modified concrete, hardening under natural conditions had further development. Practical value. The resulting equations allow to solve the problem about the minimum level of structural stress in monolithic concrete in a saturated large placeholder, as well as to assess the influence of structural stresses on the properties of concrete. In normal concrete with a relatively thin cement sheath at temperature-shrinkage deformations, high tangential and low radial tension occur. In vivo, this stress is higher as a result of higher values of Δε(τ, which is not observed in the modified concrete. In the modified concretes only tangential stresses are the greatest danger to structures. The change of shrinkage stress with time is straightforward. The total temperature-shrinkage deformations have a sawtooth graph. For modified concrete the amplitude is 48

  17. Small-scale in-situ burn tests to develop operational proficiencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, M.W.

    1996-01-01

    A small-scale hands-on in-situ burning experiment was conducted to prepare members of a response community in the event of an actual full scale in-situ burn. Two different styles of fire booms were deployed in open water and exposed to multiple test tank burns. Residual burned crude oil was recovered and the booms decontaminated. The experiments showed that all the methods used to gauge the depth of oil contained in the booms created an element of doubt in their accuracy. The main lessons learned pertained to pre-combustion volume estimation, oil slick ignition, and residue recovery. It was concluded that in-situ burning was a potential technique in oil spill response, but some refinement is still needed to be done with the oil retention booms. The operational costs associated with the experiment were minimal, given the nature of the project. 1 tab

  18. Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

  19. Reviews of the In-situ Demonstration Test of the Engineered Barrier System in Many Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heui Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Many nations considering the deep geologic disposal of HLW are now planning or executing in-situ demonstration experiments on their regional EBS (Engineering barrier system) at their deep underground research facilities. The main purpose of the in-situ EBS test is the experimental confirmation of its performance, and the prediction of its long-term evolution through the modeling of EBS based on the experimental data. Additionally, the engineering feasibility for the construction of an engineering barrier system can also be checked through full scale construction of an in-situ test. KAERI is currently preparing an in-situ test at a large 1/3 scale, called IN-DEBS (In-situ Demonstration of EBS) at KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) for the generic EBS suggested in A-KRS (Advanced KAERI Reference System), which was developed to treat the HLW from pyroprocessing. As the first step for the design of IN-DEBS, the foreign in-situ demonstrations of EBS were reviewed in this paper. The demonstration projects, which were completed or are still being executed in some countries such as Sweden, France, Finland, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain, and Japan, were surveyed and summarized. In particular, hardware constitutions such as the heating element or compact bentonite, and the experimental procedures, have focused more on reviews than on experimental results in this survey, since their hardware information is very important for the design of the IN-DEBS.

  20. Reviews of the In-situ Demonstration Test of the Engineered Barrier System in Many Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsoo; Choi, Heui Joo

    2013-01-01

    Many nations considering the deep geologic disposal of HLW are now planning or executing in-situ demonstration experiments on their regional EBS (Engineering barrier system) at their deep underground research facilities. The main purpose of the in-situ EBS test is the experimental confirmation of its performance, and the prediction of its long-term evolution through the modeling of EBS based on the experimental data. Additionally, the engineering feasibility for the construction of an engineering barrier system can also be checked through full scale construction of an in-situ test. KAERI is currently preparing an in-situ test at a large 1/3 scale, called IN-DEBS (In-situ Demonstration of EBS) at KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel) for the generic EBS suggested in A-KRS (Advanced KAERI Reference System), which was developed to treat the HLW from pyroprocessing. As the first step for the design of IN-DEBS, the foreign in-situ demonstrations of EBS were reviewed in this paper. The demonstration projects, which were completed or are still being executed in some countries such as Sweden, France, Finland, Canada, Belgium, Switzerland, Spain, and Japan, were surveyed and summarized. In particular, hardware constitutions such as the heating element or compact bentonite, and the experimental procedures, have focused more on reviews than on experimental results in this survey, since their hardware information is very important for the design of the IN-DEBS

  1. In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R.

    1996-11-01

    This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites

  2. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good

  3. Finite Element Optimised Back Analysis of In Situ Stress Field and Stability Analysis of Shaft Wall in the Underground Gas Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifei Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel optimised back analysis method is proposed in this paper. The in situ stress field of an underground gas storage (UGS reservoir in a Turkey salt cavern is analysed by the basic theory of elastic mechanics. A finite element method is implemented to optimise and approximate the objective function by systematically adjusting boundary loads. Optimising calculation is performed based on a novel method to reduce the error between measurement and calculation as much as possible. Compared with common back analysis methods such as regression method, the method proposed can further improve the calculation precision. By constructing a large circular geometric model, the effect of stress concentration is eliminated and a minimum difference between computed and measured stress can be guaranteed in the rectangular objective region. The efficiency of the proposed method is investigated and confirmed by its capability on restoring in situ stress field, which agrees well with experimental results. The characteristics of stress distribution of chosen UGS wells are obtained based on the back analysis results and by applying the corresponding fracture criterion, the shaft walls are proven safe.

  4. In situ precipitation and sorption of arsenic from groundwater: Laboratory and ex situ field tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whang, J.M.; Adu-Wusu, K.; Frampton, W.H.; Staib, J.G.

    1997-01-01

    Permeable, reactive walls may provide long term, low-maintenance prevention of off-site migration of contaminated groundwater. Laboratory and ex situ field tests conducted on several arsenic-contaminated groundwaters indicate that both precipitation and sorption can remove arsenic to levels of less than 10 ppb. Precipitation has been induced by adjusting pH, adding selected cations, and/or reducing the oxidation-reduction potential. Adjusting pH or adding cations was most effective when there were high levels of other ionic species with which arsenic could coprecipitate. Reducing the oxidation-reduction potential was effective on a variety of groundwaters. Humate was an effective sorbent at low pH; aluminum and iron materials were effective over a large range of conditions. Long term performance of precipitation systems can be limited by formation of precipitate on reactive surfaces. Long term sorption can be reduced by competing ions, such as phosphate. Laboratory and ex situ field tests indicate that reactive walls may have lifetimes of decades or more

  5. Development of a smart key performance indicator for in-situ load tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieteren, G.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.; Yang, Y.; Sangers, A.

    2017-01-01

    In-situ load testing of reinforced concrete (RC) structures is often performed to confirm the presence of the required resistance for the intended use (Conformity Load Testing) or to support the assessments of the residual capacity by models (Supplementary Load Testing for Condition Assessment).

  6. In-situ neutron diffraction measurements of temperature and stresses during friction stir welding of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Wan Chuck; Feng, Zhili; Wang, Xun-Li; Brown, D.W.; Clausen, B.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R.; David, Stan A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of temperature and thermal stresses during friction stir welding of Al6061-T6 was investigated by means of in-situ, time-resolved neutron diffraction technique. A method is developed to deconvolute the temperature and stress from the lattice spacing changes measured by neutron diffraction. The deep penetration capability of neutrons made it possible for the first time to obtain the temperature and thermal stresses inside a friction stir weld

  7. Stress/strain characteristics of Cu alloy sheath in situ processed MgB2 superconducting wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, Kazumune; Kasaba, Koichi; Shoji, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    The mechanical properties of copper and copper alloy (Cu-Zr, Cu-Be and Cu-Cr) sheath in situ PIT-processed MgB 2 superconducting wires were studied at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K. The effects of stress-strain on the critical current (I c ) of the wires have also been studied at 4.2 K and in magnetic fields up to 5 T. It has been clarified that alloying the Cu sheath significantly increases the yield and flow stresses of the wires at both RT and 4.2 K. The 0.5% flow stresses of the Cu alloy sheath wire were 147-237 MPa, whereas that of Cu was 55 MPa. At RT, serration corresponding to multiple cracking was observed around a strain of 0.4% and the stress-strain curves saturated beyond that point. The strain dependence of I c prior to the critical strain (ε irr ) was different depending on the magnetic field; being almost constant at 2 T and increasing with strain at 5 T. The I c decreased beyond ε irr , which is much larger for Cu alloy sheath wires as compared to Cu sheath wire. This is due to the difference in the residual compressive strain in the MgB 2 core during cooling from the heat-treatment temperature to 4.2 K, which is determined through relaxation by yielding in the sheath materials. The transverse compression tests revealed that the I c of the Cu alloy sheath wire did not degrade up to 314 MPa, which is also higher than that of Cu sheath wire. (author)

  8. Product evaluation of in situ vitrification engineering, Test 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loehr, C.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Bates, S.O.

    1991-09-01

    This report is one of several that evaluates the In Situ Vitrification (ISV) Engineering-Scale Test 4 (ES-4). This document describes the chemical and physical composition, microstructure, and leaching characteristics of ES-4 product samples; these data provide insight into the expected performance of a vitrified product in an ISV buried waste application similar to that studied in ES-4

  9. 77 FR 3408 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ...-2011-0029] RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (``OCC... certain companies to conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed by their respective... stress test as prescribed by this proposed rule. In addition to the annual stress test requirement, such...

  10. In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test ES-INEL-4, ES-INEL-5, ES-INEL-6, and ES-INEL-7 Test Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.R.; Stoots, P.R.

    1990-10-01

    The In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Tests ES-4, ES-5, ES-6, and ES-7 Product Characterization Test Plan describes the methods and procedures to be used or the physical and chemical characterization of the solid product(s) resulting from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory engineering scale in situ vitrification tests ES-4, ES-5, ES-6, and ES-7. The goals of this Test Plan are to insure that the product characterization results are sufficient to meet the data needs of the In Situ Vitrification Program and are technically and legally defensible. Important issues addressed by the test plan include sampling and analysis strategy, sampling procedures, laboratory analysis, sample control and document management, equipment, data reporting and validation, quality assurance, specific routine procedures to assess data representativeness, safety and training program, and data management. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Study of twinning behavior of powder metallurgy Ti-Si alloy by interrupted in-situ tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.X., E-mail: ye-xiaoxin@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan); Imai, H.; Shen, J.H.; Chen, B. [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan); Han, G.Q. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology (China); Umeda, J.; Kondoh, K. [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan)

    2017-01-02

    Twinning mechanism of powder metallurgy Ti-Si alloy was investigated by interrupted in-situ tensile tests. Extension twins {10−12}<10-1-1> in the fine-grained Ti-Si alloy were found in the uniform deformation period, but no twinning in the coarse pure Ti. Three deformation twinning nucleation mechanisms were proposed: i) local stress concentration by neighboured slip incompatibility, ii) slip/twin oriented relationship in the parent grain and iii) slip/twin transfer by high Luster-Morris oriented relationship. The interior back-stress state, grains rotation and dislocations pile-up drove the occurrence of detwinning phenomenon. Silicon-facilitation twinning verified the hypothesis that the substitutional Si solutes affected the core structures and thus the mobility of screw dislocations. Enhanced driving force and decreased energy barrier of nucleation in the micro/atomic scale were further proposed in the twinning activation. It was expected to deepen the understanding of twinning/detwinning behaviors and supply direct evidences building immature twinning mechanism. In-depth understanding about the relationship among the processing, mechanical properties and microstructure of Ti alloy was facilitated in the present work.

  12. Pad stress tests with increasing load for the diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimstad, Liv; Larsen, Elsa Skjønhaug; Schiøtz, Hjalmar A; Kulseng-Hanssen, Sigurd

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the study was to test the ability of pad stress tests with increasing load (supine, jumping on the floor, and jumping on a trampoline) to document stress incontinence in subjectively stress incontinent women. In this prospective study 147 subjectively stress and mixed incontinent women performed consecutively the three pad stress tests with a bladder volume of 300 ml. Nineteen women performed a second trampoline pad stress test to test repeatability of the test. Nine continent women performed a trampoline pad stress test in order to determine if subjectively continent women would leak during the test. Seventy-two women (49%) leaked during the supine, 136 (93%) leaked during the jumping, and 146 (99%) leaked during the trampoline pad stress test. The differences between pad stress tests were significant with P trampoline pad stress tests was high at 0.8. None of the nine continent women leaked during the trampoline pad stress test. The supine pad stress test has low sensitivity and is therefore often falsely negative. The jumping pad stress test is a simple test to perform and is satisfactory for everyday use. Subjectively stress incontinent women who do not leak during the jumping pad stress test may perform a trampoline pad stress test to document stress incontinence. The trampoline pad stress test is also simple to perform and detected leakage in 91% of the women who did not leak during the jumping pad stress test. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests of ion irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, K.H., E-mail: kaylayano@u.boisestate.edu [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Swenson, M.J. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Wu, Y. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Center for Advanced Energy Studies, 995 University Blvd, Idaho Falls, ID, 83401 (United States); Wharry, J.P. [Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID, 83725 (United States); Purdue University, 400 Central Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    The growing role of charged particle irradiation in the evaluation of nuclear reactor candidate materials requires the development of novel methods to assess mechanical properties in near-surface irradiation damage layers just a few micrometers thick. In situ transmission electron microscopic (TEM) mechanical testing is one such promising method. In this work, microcompression pillars are fabricated from a Fe{sup 2+} ion irradiated bulk specimen of a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloy. Yield strengths measured directly from TEM in situ compression tests are within expected values, and are consistent with predictions based on the irradiated microstructure. Measured elastic modulus values, once adjusted for the amount of deformation and deflection in the base material, are also within the expected range. A pillar size effect is only observed in samples with minimum dimension ≤100 nm due to the low inter-obstacle spacing in the as received and irradiated material. TEM in situ micropillar compression tests hold great promise for quantitatively determining mechanical properties of shallow ion-irradiated layers.

  14. In-Situ tensile testing of propellants in SEM: influence of temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Benedetto, G.L.; Ramshorst, M.C.J.; Duvalois, W.; Hooijmeijer, P.; Heijden, A. van der

    2017-01-01

    A tensile module system placed within a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was utilized to conduct insitu tensile testing of propellant samples. The tensile module system allows for real-time in-situ SEM analysis of the samples to determine the failure mechanism of the propellant material under

  15. Credibility and Crisis Stress Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lian Ong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Credibility is the bedrock of any crisis stress test. The use of stress tests to manage systemic risk was introduced by the U.S. authorities in 2009 in the form of the Supervisory Capital Assessment Program. Since then, supervisory authorities in other jurisdictions have also conducted similar exercises. In some of those cases, the design and implementation of certain elements of the framework have been criticized for their lack of credibility. This paper proposes a set of guidelines for constructing an effective crisis stress test. It combines financial markets impact studies of previous exercises with relevant case study information gleaned from those experiences to identify the key elements and to formulate their appropriate design. Pertinent concepts, issues and nuances particular to crisis stress testing are also discussed. The findings may be useful for country authorities seeking to include stress tests in their crisis management arsenal, as well as for the design of crisis programs.

  16. IN-SITU TEST OF PRESSURE PIPELINE VIBRATION BASED ON DATA ACQUISITION AND SIGNAL PROCESSING

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Huimin; Xu, Cundong; Liu, Hui; Wang, Rongrong; Jie, Junkun; Ding, Lianying

    2015-01-01

    Pipeline vibration of high frequency and large amplitude is an important factor that impacts the safe operation of pumping station and the efficiency of the pumps. Through conducting the vibration in-situ test of pipeline system in the pumping station, we can objectively analyze the mechanism of pipeline vibration and evaluate the stability of pipeline operation. By using DASP (data acquisition & signal processing) in the in-situ test on the 2# pipeline of the third pumping station in the gen...

  17. Stress Tests and Vulnerability Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallner, A. [Austrian Institute of Ecology, Vienna (Austria); Lorenz, P. [ed.; Becker, O. [eds.; Weber, U. [Austrian Institute of Ecology, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    After the accident in Fukushima, nuclear safety as topic in anti-nuclear work has gained importance within the Joint Project countries. Therefore, nuclear safety and in particular the activities of the European stress tests were chosen to be the main focus of the Joint Project 2011/2012 as well as the common theme of the national projects. This brochure describes: A) Vulnerability Assessment A critical review of the EU Nuclear Stress Tests in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Ukraine is presented in chapter 1. The review details the main weaknesses identified within the stress tests. Important shortcomings not mentioned in the stress tests reports are also discussed. These evaluations do not claim to be exhaustive, but the findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of safety and risk of nuclear power plants in Europe. B) Transparency of the stress tests In chapter 2 the experience of the Joint Project NGOs concerning transparency of the stress tests is presented. The information is not meant to be an evaluation of the transparency of the stress tests in general – such an evaluation is not possible within the scope of this brochure. The evaluation aims to show activities concerning stress tests and how they were conceived by the JP NGOs. Some recommendations for improvement are given. C) Safety focus Within the main topic “nuclear safety” of the Joint Project 2011/2012 the NGOs of each JP country selected a special safety relevant topic, which is/was of particular interest in their country: Bulgaria: The short story of Belene NPP – The victory – Key points of the campaign against the nuclear power plant Romania: Risks of the CANDU reactor design Czech Republic: Results of the conference “Power Plant Load Testing: Safety Inspection or Propaganda?“ Slovakia: Safety deficits of the NPP Mochovce These safety relevant issues are discussed in separate sections within the brochure at hand. (author)

  18. Stress Tests and Vulnerability Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A.; Lorenz, P.

    2012-01-01

    After the accident in Fukushima, nuclear safety as topic in anti-nuclear work has gained importance within the Joint Project countries. Therefore, nuclear safety and in particular the activities of the European stress tests were chosen to be the main focus of the Joint Project 2011/2012 as well as the common theme of the national projects. This brochure describes: A) Vulnerability Assessment A critical review of the EU Nuclear Stress Tests in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Ukraine is presented in chapter 1. The review details the main weaknesses identified within the stress tests. Important shortcomings not mentioned in the stress tests reports are also discussed. These evaluations do not claim to be exhaustive, but the findings contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of safety and risk of nuclear power plants in Europe. B) Transparency of the stress tests In chapter 2 the experience of the Joint Project NGOs concerning transparency of the stress tests is presented. The information is not meant to be an evaluation of the transparency of the stress tests in general – such an evaluation is not possible within the scope of this brochure. The evaluation aims to show activities concerning stress tests and how they were conceived by the JP NGOs. Some recommendations for improvement are given. C) Safety focus Within the main topic “nuclear safety” of the Joint Project 2011/2012 the NGOs of each JP country selected a special safety relevant topic, which is/was of particular interest in their country: Bulgaria: The short story of Belene NPP – The victory – Key points of the campaign against the nuclear power plant Romania: Risks of the CANDU reactor design Czech Republic: Results of the conference “Power Plant Load Testing: Safety Inspection or Propaganda?“ Slovakia: Safety deficits of the NPP Mochovce These safety relevant issues are discussed in separate sections within the brochure at hand. (author)

  19. An electromechanical material testing system for in situ electron microscopy and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yong; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2005-01-01

    We report the development of a material testing system for in situ electron microscopy (EM) mechanical testing of nanostructures. The testing system consists of an actuator and a load sensor fabricated by means of surface micromachining. This previously undescribed nanoscale material testing system makes possible continuous observation of the specimen deformation and failure with subnanometer resolution, while simultaneously measuring the applied load electronically with nanonewton resolution...

  20. In-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rock. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Hirano, Kouhei; Tani, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted on high level radioactive waste geological disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. It is noted that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, in-situ heater test was conducted in an underground cavern at a depth of 50 m for the purpose of improving thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled analysis code. This report presents the test result demonstrating the changes of temperature and strain distributions with time at the elevated temperature of the heater up to 90degC. (author)

  1. Execution of pilot tests for an uranium in situ leaching project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Urangesellschaft is presently evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of an in situ leaching (ISL) project in Wyoming/USA. This report describes the basic technical principles for ISL-uranium projects and gives the reasons for conducting pilot tests prior to the construction of a commercial plant. It further describes the licensing requirements for an ISL-pilot plant and evaluates the results of the pilot tests. (orig.) [de

  2. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Golder Associates draft test plan for in situ testing in an exploratory shaft in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hambley, D.F.; Mraz, D.Z.; Unterberter, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents the peer review conducted by Argonne National Laboratory of a document entitled ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared for Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation by Golder Associates, Inc. In general, the peer review panelists found the test plan to be technically sound, although some deficiencies were identified. Recommendations for improving the test plan are presented in this review report. A microfiche copy of the following unpublished report is attached to the inside back cover of this report: ''Draft Test Plan for In Situ Testing in an Exploratory Shaft in Salt,'' prepared by Golder Associates, Inc., for Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio (March 1985)

  3. Panel manipulation in social stress testing:The Bath experimental stress test for children (BEST-C)

    OpenAIRE

    Cheetham, Tara J.; Turner-Cobb, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundWhilst acute stress paradigms in adults make use of adult panel members, similar paradigms modified for child participants have not manipulated the panel. Most work has utilised an audience of adult confederates, regardless of the age of the population being tested. The aim of this study was to trial a social stress test for children that provided a meaningful environment using age-matched child peers as panel actors.MethodsThirty-three participants (7-11 years) underwent the Bath E...

  4. In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing: A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in Ecological Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    field and microcosms than they do under laboratory test conditions. In the case of tributyltin ( TBT ) exposures in San Diego Bay, he found that...TECHNICAL REPORT 1986 September 2009 In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in...Pacific TECHNICAL REPORT 1986 September 2009 In Situ Estuarine and Marine Toxicity Testing A Review, Including Recommendations for Future Use in

  5. Accelerated Stress-Corrosion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Test procedures for accelerated stress-corrosion testing of high-strength aluminum alloys faster and provide more quantitative information than traditional pass/fail tests. Method uses data from tests on specimen sets exposed to corrosive environment at several levels of applied static tensile stress for selected exposure times then subsequently tensile tested to failure. Method potentially applicable to other degrading phenomena (such as fatigue, corrosion fatigue, fretting, wear, and creep) that promote development and growth of cracklike flaws within material.

  6. 77 FR 3166 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ... FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 12 CFR Part 325, Subpart C RIN 3064-AD91 Annual Stress Test... Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the ``Dodd-Frank Act'') regarding stress tests (``proposed rule... to conduct annual stress tests in accordance with the proposed rule, report the results of such...

  7. Horonobe underground research laboratory project. The plan for the in-situ experiments in Phase 2 and Phase 3 in/around URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hiroya

    2005-09-01

    This report describes for preliminary research plan in Phase 2 and Phase 3 taken into consideration of expected geological environment at location of URL based on the results of the investigations until FY 2003/2004. Duration of construction phase and total cost are considered as important factors for planning as well. The below items are planned for in-situ experiments in Phase 2 and Phase 3 in/around URL are planning. Phase 2. (In-situ experiments for understanding of geological environment) Geological survey at tunnel. Inflow measurement in shafts. Water pressure monitoring and groundwater sampling around shafts during excavation of URL. Investigation for EDZ around shafts. Stress measurement on support. Detail investigations for geological environment around drifts. Excavation disturbance experiment in a drift. Investigation for desaturation zone and REDOX condition around drifts. (Engineered barrier system) In-situ experiment on low-alkali concrete. In-situ experiment for gas migration in engineering barrier system. Phase 3. (In-situ experiments for understanding of geological environment) EDZ experiment for stress interference. Investigation of long-term behavior of EDZ around drifts. Detail investigation on fault/fault zone. Monitoring for the change of geological environment at earthquake. Backfill test in boreholes. (Engineered barrier system) T-H-M-C experiment. In-situ experiment for corrosion of overpack. Investigation of the influence of a concrete to engineering barrier system and geological environment. In-situ experiment for interference between backfill material and geological environment. Backfill test in a drift. (Safety assessment) Tracer tests in engineering barrier system, natural barrier and fault/fault zone. (author)

  8. Summary of in-situ tests of filter systems in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesboel, R.; Persson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Iodine filter installations at nuclear power plants are systematically tested regarding light assembly and retention of iodine. Studsvik Energiteknik AB has collected a sizeable amount of test data over the years. The filter installations and test methods are described, followed by an analysis of test results and experience over the past 10 years. As a rule in-situ tests have been carried out at low relative humidity, in 90% of them below 50% relative humidity. Variations in flow have been larger than expected, and the variations in operative conditions affect test results. The test method is, however, regarded acceptable for off-gas filter systems. Additional test methods are required for the auxiliary and energency systems. (G.B.)

  9. In-situ X-ray residual stress measurement on a peened alloy 600 weld metal at elevated temperature under tensile load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yunomura, Tomoaki; Maeguchi, Takaharu; Kurimura, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    In order to verify stability of residual stress improvement effect of peeing for mitigation of stress corrosion cracking in components of PWR plant, relaxation behavior of residual stress induced by water jet peening (WJP) on surface of alloy 600 weld metal (alloy 132) was investigated by in-situ X-ray residual stress measurement under thermal aging and stress condition considered for actual plant operation. Surface residual stress change was observed at the early stage of thermal aging at 360°C, but no significant further stress relaxation was observed after that. Applied stress below yield stress does not significantly affect stress relaxation behavior of surface residual stress. For the X-ray residual stress measurement, X-ray stress constant at room temperature for alloy 600 was determined experimentally with several surface treatment and existence of applied strain. The X-ray stress constant at elevated temperatures were extrapolated theoretically based on the X-ray stress constant at room temperature for alloy 600. (author)

  10. Rock mechanics methods and in situ heater tests for design of a nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of integrating data from the Near-Surface Test Facility into the overall Waste Isolation Program are examined. Discussions are presented dealing primarily with the application of numerical models to the design of a waste repository. The various types of models currently available are discussed with reference to design in basalt and the breakdown of the problem of repository design is summarized. It is shown that the most efficient method for analyzing repository design is to break the problem down into several problems which are based on physical scale. These include the area directly surrounding a single waste canister (the very near field), the area including many canisters and canister emplacement rooms (the near field), and the area including the entire repository and the rock mass to the free surface (the far field). The methods by which numerical models are used for design are discussed. Flow charts are used to show the basic input data required, the calculational processes used, and the preliminary criteria for judgment of suitable repository performance. It is shown that the ultimate design of the allowable gross thermal loading density, and, thus, the layout of the underground workings is highly dependent upon the rock mass properties supplied as base line input data to the numerical models. Of the many input properties required, the thermal conductivity, the thermal expansion coefficient, and elastic moduli of the rock mass have, perhaps, the greatest effect on the calculation of induced temperatures, stresses, and displacements and, thus, repository design. To ensure that the design continues with confidence, field (in situ) values of input data must be obtained. The role of the Near-Surface Test Facility in situ testing in obtaining these basic required data is discussed

  11. STRESSES AND DEFORMABILITY OF ROCK MASS UPON OPEN PIT EXPLOITATION OF DIMENSION STONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Dunda

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of increased stresses and deformability of rock mass in the quarry of Zečevo (exploitation field of Selca – island of Brač has caused a considerable decrease of usability of mineral raw materials, which put into question the survival of the pit. Therefore the research and measurements of the state of stresses and deformability of rock mass within the pit were carried out. Besides detailed laboratory testings (testings on small samples performed were trial in-situ testings on large samples including the corresponding numerical analyses. The exploitation of dimension stone by sowing regularly shaped rectangular blocks has been proved to be appropriate for in-situ testing of bending strength. The paper presents the results of carried out laboratory testings, in-situ testings of bending strength including measuring of deformations after sowing cuts and numerical analyses by which the possible range of horizontal stresses was determined. Since for the case of massive rocks, for which the continuum concept is applied, there are no specifically defined methods of corrections, presented is a possible relation for correction of input size values based on the carried out laboratory and in-situ testings.

  12. Stress transmission in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    We urgently need increased quantitative knowledge on stress transmission in real soils loaded with agricultural machinery. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under tracked wheels were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol (clay content 20 %) continuously cropped with small grain cereals......). Seven load cells were inserted horizontally from a pit with minimal disturbance of soil in each of three depths (0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m), covering the width of the wheeled area. The position of the wheel relative to the transducers was recorded using a laser sensor. Finally, the vertical stresses near...... the soil-tyre interface were measured in separate tests by 17 stress transducers across the width of the tyres. The results showed that the inflation pressure controlled the level of maximum stresses at 0.3 m depth, while the wheel load was correlated to the measured stresses at 0.9 m depth. This supports...

  13. ERG and GRG review of the draft of ''preliminary test plan for in situ testing from an exploratory shaft in salt - October 1983''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, H.N.

    1986-03-01

    The Engineering Review Group (ERG) and Geologic Review Group (GRG) were established by the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) to help evaluate engineering- and geologic-related issues in the US Department of Energy's nuclear waste repository program. The January 1984 meeting of the ERG and GRG reviewed the In Situ Test Plan (ISTP) titled ''Preliminary Test Plan for In Situ Testing From an Exploratory Shaft in Salt - October 1983.'' This report documents the ERG's and GRG's comments and recommendations on this subject and the ONWI responses to the specific points raised by the ERG and GRG. 6 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. In situ bioremediation: Cost effectiveness of a remediation technology field tested at the Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaty, R.P.; Showalter, W.E.; Booth, S.R.

    1995-01-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISBR) is an innovative new remediation technology for the removal of chlorinated solvents from contaminated soils and groundwater. The principal contaminant at the SRID is the volatile organic compound (VOC), tricloroetylene(TCE). A 384 day test run at Savannah River, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development (EM-50), furnished information about the performance and applications of ISBR. In Situ Bioremediation, as tested, is based on two distinct processes occurring simultaneously; the physical process of in situ air stripping and the biolgoical process of bioremediation. Both processes have the potential to remediate some amount of contamination. A quantity of VOCs, directly measured from the extracted air stream, was removed from the test area by the physical process of air stripping. The biological process is difficult to examine. However, the results of several tests performed at the SRID and independent numerical modeling determined that the biological process remediated an additional 40% above the physical process. Given this data, the cost effectiveness of this new technology can be evaluated

  15. 3D geomechanical modeling and numerical simulation of in-situ stress fields in shale reservoirs: A case study of the lower Cambrian Niutitang formation in the Cen'gong block, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingshou; Ding, Wenlong; Yang, Haimeng; Wang, Ruyue; Yin, Shuai; Li, Ang; Fu, Fuquan

    2017-08-01

    An analysis of the in-situ state of stress in a shale reservoir was performed based on comprehensive information about the subsurface properties from wellbores established during the development of an oil and gas field. Industrial-level shale gas production has occurred in the Niutitang formation of the lower Cambrian Cen'gong block, South China. In this study, data obtained from hydraulic fracturing, drilling-induced fractures, borehole breakout, global positioning system (GPS), and well deviation statistics have been used to determine the orientation of the maximum horizontal principal stress. Additionally, hydraulic fracturing and multi-pole array acoustic logging (XMAC) were used to determine the vertical variations in the in-situ stress magnitude. Based on logging interpretation and mechanical experiments, the spatial distributions of mechanical parameters were obtained by seismic inversion, and a 3D heterogeneous geomechanical model was established using a finite element stress analysis approach to simulate the in-situ stress fields. The effects of depth, faults, rock mechanics, and layer variations on the principal stresses, horizontal stress difference (Δσ), horizontal stress difference coefficient (Kh), and stress type coefficient (Sp) were determined. The results show that the direction of the maximum principal stress is ESE 120°. Additionally, the development zones of natural fractures appear to correlate with regions with high principal stress differences. At depths shallower than 375 m, the stress type is mainly a thrust faulting stress regime. At depths ranging from 375 to 950 m, the stress type is mainly a strike-slip faulting stress regime. When the depth is > 950 m, the stress type is mainly a normal faulting stress regime. Depth, fault orientation, and rock mechanics all affect the type of stress. The knowledge regarding the Cen'gong block is reliable and can improve borehole stability, casing set point determination, well deployment

  16. In situ stresses in rock masses: methodology for its study in tunnel projects in Spain; Metodologia de estudio y obtencion de las tensiones in situ en los proyectos de obra subterranea realizados en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madirolas Perez, G.; Perucho Martinez, A.

    2014-07-01

    In situ stress is one of the main factors to be taken into account in the design of tunnels, as it can cause inadmissible stresses and strains leading to high deviations in the budgets. For that reason, the stress state is directly introduced into the numerical models used for the design of tunnels. In Spain, although several tunnels have been carried out with an important overburden in tectonically relevant zones, a quantitative determination of the stresses has not been usually included in civil work projects. Therefore, it is considered necessary to implement a routine procedure of study of civil work projects involving tunnels excavated in rock, and a new detailed methodology is proposed. The challenge is that project managers, who face works in which stresses may play a determinant role, may have a practical reference enabling them to optimize available resources and to include the real stress information in the design of underground works. (Author)

  17. Time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in nanostructured copper: Stress relaxation tests and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xu-Sheng; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Wang, Guo-Yong; Zhai, Hui-Ru; Dai, L.H.; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, stress relaxation tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted on coarse-grained (cg), nanograined (ng), and nanotwinned (nt) copper at temperatures of 22 °C (RT), 30 °C, 40 °C, 50 °C, and 75 °C. The comprehensive investigations provide sufficient information for the building-up of a formula to describe the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation and clarify the relationship among the strain rate sensitivity parameter, stress exponent, and activation volume. The typically experimental curves of logarithmic plastic strain rate versus stress exhibited a three staged relaxation process from a linear high stress relaxation region to a subsequent nonlinear stress relaxation region and finally to a linear low stress relaxation region, which only showed-up at the test temperatures higher than 22 °C, 22 °C, and 30 °C, respectively, in the tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens. The values of stress exponent, stress-independent activation energy, and activation volume were determined from the experimental data in the two linear regions. The determined activation parameters, HRTEM images, and MD simulations consistently suggest that dislocation-mediated plastic deformation is predominant in all tested cg-, ng-, and nt-Cu specimens in the initial linear high stress relaxation region at the five relaxation temperatures, whereas in the linear low stress relaxation region, the grain boundary (GB) diffusion-associated deformation is dominant in the ng- and cg-Cu specimens, while twin boundary (TB) migration, i.e., twinning and detwinning with parallel partial dislocations, governs the time, stress, and temperature-dependent deformation in the nt-Cu specimens.

  18. In situ and postradiation analysis of mechanical stress in Al2O3:Cr induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuratov, V.A.; Bujnarowski, G.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; O'Connell, J.; Havanscak, K.

    2010-01-01

    Optical spectroscopy and TEM techniques have been applied to study the radiation damage and correlated mechanical stresses in Al 2 O 3 and Al 2 O 3 :Cr single crystals induced by (1-3) MeV/amu Kr, Xe and Bi ion irradiation. Mechanical stresses were evaluated in situ using a piezospectroscopic effect through the shift of the respective lines in ionoluminescence spectra. It was found that dose dependence of the stress level for Xe and Bi ions, when ionization energy loss exceeds the threshold of damage formation via electronic excitations, exhibits several alternate stages showing the build-up and relaxation of stresses. The beginning of relaxation stages is observed at fluences associated with beginning of individual ion track regions overlapping. The residual stress profiles through the ion irradiated layers were deduced from depth-resolved photostimulated spectra using laser confocal scanning microscopy set-up. It was determined that stresses are compressive in basal plane and tensile in perpendicular direction in all samples irradiated with high energy ions.

  19. A Randomized Comparative Study Evaluating Various Cough Stress Tests and 24-Hour Pad Test with Urodynamics in the Diagnosis of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Joseph W; Kane, Sarah M; Mangel, Jeffrey M; Kikano, Elias G; Garibay, Jorge A; Pollard, Robert R; Mahajan, Sangeeta T; Debanne, Sara M; Hijaz, Adonis K

    2018-06-01

    The cough stress test is a common and accepted tool to evaluate stress urinary incontinence but there is no agreement on how the test should be performed. We assessed the diagnostic ability of different cough stress tests performed when varying patient position and bladder volume using urodynamic stress urinary incontinence as the gold standard. The 24-hour pad test was also evaluated. We recruited women who presented to specialty outpatient clinics with the complaint of urinary incontinence and who were recommended to undergo urodynamic testing. A total of 140 patients were randomized to 4 cough stress test groups, including group 1-a comfortably full bladder, group 2-an empty bladder, group 3- a bladder infused with 200 cc saline and group 4-a bladder filled to half functional capacity. The sequence of standing and sitting was randomly assigned. The groups were compared by 1-way ANOVA or the generalized Fisher exact test. The κ statistic was used to evaluate agreement between the sitting and standing positions. The 95% CIs of sensitivity and specificity were calculated using the Wilson method. ROC analysis was done to evaluate the performance of the 24-hour pad test. The cough stress test performed with a bladder filled to half functional capacity was the best performing test with 83% sensitivity and 90% specificity. There was no statistically significant evidence that the sensitivity or specificity of 1 cough stress test differed from that of the others. The pad test had no significant predictive ability to diagnose urodynamic stress urinary incontinence (AUC 0.60, p = 0.08). Cough stress tests were accurate to diagnose urodynamic stress urinary incontinence. The 24-hour pad test was not predictive of urodynamic stress urinary incontinence and not helpful when used in conjunction with the cough stress test. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. On the use of SEM correlative tools for in situ mechanical tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qiwei; Roux, Stéphane; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Loisnard, Dominique; Brynaert, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    In situ SEM mechanical tests are key to study crystal plasticity. In particular, imaging and diffraction (EBSD) allow microstructure and surface kinematics to be monitored all along the test. However, to get a full benefit from different modalities, it is necessary to register all images and crystallographic orientation maps from EBSD into the same frame. Different correlative approaches tracking either Pt surface markings, crystal orientations or grain boundaries, allow such registrations to be performed and displacement as well as rotation fields to be measured, a primary information for crystal plasticity identification. However, the different contrasts that are captured in different modalities and unavoidable stage motions also give rise to artifacts that are to be corrected to register the different information onto the same material points. The same image correlation tools reveal very powerful to correct such artifacts. Illustrated by an in situ uniaxial tensile test performed on a bainitic-ferritic steel sample, recent advances in image correlation techniques are reviewed and shown to provide a comprehensive picture of local strain and rotation maps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 77 FR 16484 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ...-2011-0029] RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, Treasury... billion to conduct an annual stress test and comply with certain reporting and disclosure requirements. To... conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed by their respective Federal primary...

  2. Application of heat stress in situ demonstrates a protective role of irradiation on photosynthetic performance in alpine plants

    OpenAIRE

    Buchner, Othmar; STOLL, Magdalena; Karadar, Matthias; Kranner, Ilse; Neuner, Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    The impact of sublethal heat on photosynthetic performance, photosynthetic pigments and free radical scavenging activity was examined in three high mountain species, R hododendron ferrugineum, S enecio incanus and R anunculus glacialis using controlled in situ applications of heat stress, both in darkness and under natural solar irradiation. Heat treatments applied in the dark reversibly reduced photosynthetic performance and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv/Fm), which rem...

  3. The integrated in situ testing program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matalucci, R.V.

    1987-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project in southeastern New Mexico as a research and development (R and D) facility for examining the response of bedded (layered) salt to the emplacement of radioactive wastes generated from defense programs. The WIPP Experimental Program consists of a technology development program, including laboratory testing and theoretical analysis activities, and an in situ testing program that is being done 659 m underground at the project site. This experimental program addresses three major technical areas that concern (1) thermal/structural interactions, (2) plugging and sealing, and (3) waste package performance. To ensure that the technical issues involved in these areas are investigated with appropriate emphasis and timing, an in situ testing plan was developed to integrate the many activities and tasks associated with the technical issues of waste disposal. 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Geomechanics of the Climax mine-by, Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuze, F.E.

    1981-03-01

    A generic test of retrievable geologic storage of spent fuel assemblies in an underground chamber is being conducted at the Nevada Test Site. The horizontal shrinkage of the pillars is not explainable, but the vertical pillar stresses are easily understood. A two-phase project was initiated to estimate the in-situ deformability of the Climax granite and to refine the in-situ stress field data, and to model the mine-by

  5. 77 FR 61238 - Annual Stress Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ...-2011-0029] RIN 1557-AD58 Annual Stress Test AGENCY: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (``OCC... conduct annual stress tests pursuant to regulations prescribed by their respective primary financial... annual stress test as prescribed by this rule. Under the final rule covered institutions are divided into...

  6. (stress) testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, maximal HR was significantly higher in all groups during their sporting activities than during stress testing in the laboratory (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Maximal HR in veteran athletes during specific sporting activities was significantly higher than that attained during a routine sECG. This finding was not sport-specific, ...

  7. Construction of in-situ creep strain test facility for the SFR fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Gyu; Heo, Hyeong Min; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, Sung Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, in-situ laser inspection creep test machine was developed for the measuring the creep strain of SFR fuel cladding materials. Ferritic-martensitic steels are being considered as an attractive candidate material for a fuel cladding of a SFR due to their low expansion coefficients, high thermal conductivities and excellent irradiation resistances to a void swelling. HT9 steel (12CrMoVW) is initially developed as a material for power plants in Europe in the 1960. This steel has experienced to expose up to 200dpa in FFTE and EBR-II. Ferritic-Martensitic steel's maximum creep strength in existence is 180Mpa for 106 hour 600 .deg., but HT9 steel is 60Mpa. Because SFR is difficult to secure in developing and applying materials, HT9 steel has accumulated validated data and is suitable for SFR component. And also, because of its superior dimensional stability against fast neutron irradiation, Ferritic-martensitic steel of 9Cr and 12Cr steels, such as HT9 and FC92(12Cr-2W) are preferable to utilize in the fuel cladding of an SFR in KAERI. The pressurized thermal creep test of HT9 and FC92 claddings are being conducted in KAERI, but the change of creep strain in cladding is not easy to measure during the creep test due to its pressurized and closed conditions. In this paper, in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine developed for SFR fuel cladding specimens is described. Moreover, the creep strain rate of HT9 at 650 .deg. C was examined from the in-situ laser inspection pressurized creep test machine.

  8. SR-Can. Data and uncertainty assessment. Matrix diffusivity and porosity in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinsong Liu; Loefgren, Martin; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2006-12-01

    The molecular diffusion in microscopically small pores of crystalline rock matrices allows radionuclides to enter the stagnant matrix water. The water volume in the matrix is orders of magnitude larger than the mobile water in the flowing fractures. This effect will retard the nuclide migration. A further retardation effect is due to the sorption of the sorbing nuclides on the interior surfaces of the matrix. The internal surfaces are on the order of 100,000 times larger than the surfaces of the flowing fractures. It is therefore important to ensure that matrix diffusion will take place in intact rock under the stresses which prevail at repository depths. Laboratory experiments on drill cores have shown that the matrix porosity is connected over distances of at least several tens of centimetres for un-stressed samples. Samples that have been re-stressed to repository depth stresses have also been found to have connected porosity. Diffusivities in re-stressed samples were found to be up to three times lower than in un-stressed samples. This was found both using actual through-diffusion experiments as well as electrical conductivity measurements. Diffusion experiments are very time consuming, costly and difficult to make in deeply lying rock under undisturbed conditions. An alternative way of measuring the mobility of charged species in porous rock is by using electric current to carry the ions. For bulk water this has a long-standing theoretical basis and is used to determine ion diffusivities. The method has also long been used in laboratory investigation to measure diffusivities in porous rocks. It has been shown to give electrical conductivities that agree well with that expected from diffusivity measurements. A number of tests have been made with AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current) to measure resistivities as well as using DC current to conduct ions through rock samples. These tests clearly confirm that the different methods give comparable results

  9. SR-Can. Data and uncertainty assessment. Matrix diffusivity and porosity in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu; Loefgren, Martin; Neretnieks, Ivars [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-12-15

    The molecular diffusion in microscopically small pores of crystalline rock matrices allows radionuclides to enter the stagnant matrix water. The water volume in the matrix is orders of magnitude larger than the mobile water in the flowing fractures. This effect will retard the nuclide migration. A further retardation effect is due to the sorption of the sorbing nuclides on the interior surfaces of the matrix. The internal surfaces are on the order of 100,000 times larger than the surfaces of the flowing fractures. It is therefore important to ensure that matrix diffusion will take place in intact rock under the stresses which prevail at repository depths. Laboratory experiments on drill cores have shown that the matrix porosity is connected over distances of at least several tens of centimetres for un-stressed samples. Samples that have been re-stressed to repository depth stresses have also been found to have connected porosity. Diffusivities in re-stressed samples were found to be up to three times lower than in un-stressed samples. This was found both using actual through-diffusion experiments as well as electrical conductivity measurements. Diffusion experiments are very time consuming, costly and difficult to make in deeply lying rock under undisturbed conditions. An alternative way of measuring the mobility of charged species in porous rock is by using electric current to carry the ions. For bulk water this has a long-standing theoretical basis and is used to determine ion diffusivities. The method has also long been used in laboratory investigation to measure diffusivities in porous rocks. It has been shown to give electrical conductivities that agree well with that expected from diffusivity measurements. A number of tests have been made with AC (alternating current) and DC (direct current) to measure resistivities as well as using DC current to conduct ions through rock samples. These tests clearly confirm that the different methods give comparable results

  10. The contrasting roles of creep and stress relaxation in the time-dependent deformation during in-situ cooling of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M; Bhowmik, Ayan

    2017-09-11

    Time dependent plastic deformation in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy during cooling from casting relevant temperatures has been studied using a combination of in-situ neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and modelling. Visco-plastic deformation during cooling was found to be dependent on the stress and constraints imposed to component contraction during cooling, which mechanistically comprises creep and stress relaxation. Creep results in progressive work hardening with dislocations shearing the γ' precipitates, a high dislocation density in the γ channels and near the γ/γ' interface and precipitate shearing. When macroscopic contraction is restricted, relaxation dominates. This leads to work softening from a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Changes in lattice strains occur to a similar magnitude in both the γ and γ' phases during stress relaxation, while in creep there is no clear monotonic trend in lattice strain in the γ phase, but only a marginal increase in the γ' precipitates. Using a visco-plastic law derived from in-situ experiments, the experimentally measured and calculated stresses during cooling show a good agreement when creep predominates. However, when stress relaxation dominates accounting for the decrease in dislocation density during cooling is essential.

  11. Kinetics of monofluorophosphate hydrolysis in a bacterial test plaque in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenuta, L M A; Del Bel Cury, A A; Tabchoury, C P M; Moi, G P; Silva, W J; Cury, J A

    2010-01-01

    Models to evaluate the anticaries potential of fluoride (F) formulations containing monofluorophosphate (MFP) should consider the release of F ion to the oral environment by its enzymatic hydrolysis. This was tested in situ, using a test plaque of a strain of Streptococcus mutans which presents high MFPase activity at pH 5.0. The test plaque was exposed to non-F or MFP (1,450 microg F/g) dentifrices and the fluid phase of the plaque was analyzed after 15, 30, 45 and 75 min. MFP concentration in the plaque fluid decreased over time after exposure to MFP dentifrice, but F ion reached 134.9 +/- 32.0 microM at 15 min and decreased significantly only at 75 min, suggesting continuous MFP hydrolysis by the test plaque. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. As-built mechanical and thermomechanical calculations of a spent-fuel test in Climax Stock granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butkovich, T.R.

    1981-09-01

    A generic test of geological storage of spent-fuel assemblies from an operating nuclear reactor in Climax Stock granite has been underway at the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site since spring 1980. The spent-fuel assemblies were emplaced in the floor of the central drift of three parallel drifts. Auxiliary electric heaters were installed in the floors of the side drifts to simulate a large repository. Calculational modeling of the spent-fuel repository was made with the finite element codes, ADINA stress analysis code and the compatible ADINAT heat flow code. The primary purpose for doing the calculations was to provide results with the best estimates of physical and mechanical rock properties and in situ stresses. Field measurements show the effective modulus of Climax Stock granite is a factor of two lower than that obtained in the laboratory on small samples. Comparative calculations using these field measurements and measurements obtained in the laboratory show displacements are approximately inversely proportional to the modulus. They also indicate the importance of knowing the effective in situ modulus. Another comparison, varying the in situ stress loading, shows the importance of knowing the correct value of in situ stress. Calculations using the best-estimate values of rock properties, effective in situ modulus and Poisson's ratio, and in situ stress are not intended to predict the displacement and stress changes from the mining and the imposition of a thermal load. The existing jointing in the Climax Stock granite could have a significant effect on the actual displacements and stress field. Such effects are not accounted for here. However, these calculations do indicate the direction and magnitude of displacements and stresses that would be expected in absence of jointing. Comparison of those results with actual field measurements will, thus, indicate the significance of including a joint model in future calculations

  13. Synopsis of in situ testing for mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnirk, P.F.

    1980-01-01

    The concept of mined geologic disposal of radioactive wastes was proposed about 25 years ago. Until the mid-1970's, research and development activities were directed essentially to the evaluation of the disposal concept fot salt formations. During the past 5 years, the waste disposal technology programs in the USA and other countries have been expanded substantially in effort and scope for evaluation of a broader range of geologic media beyond salt, including basalt, granite, shale, and tuff. From the outset, in situ testing has been an integral part of these programs, and has included activities concerned with rock mass characterization, the phenomenological response of rock to waste or simulated waste emplacement, model development and verification, and repository design. This paper provides a synopsis of in situ tests that have been or are being performed in geologic media in support of the waste disposal programs in the USA, the United Kingdom, Sweden, and the Federal Republic of Germany

  14. Initial tests on in situ vitrification using electrode feeding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Oma, K.H.; Bigelow, C.E.

    1990-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of an engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test conducted to demonstrate the potential for electrode feeding in soils with a high concentration of metals. The engineering-scale test was part of a Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) program to assist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in conducting treatability studies of the potential for applying ISV to the mixed transuranic waste buried at the INEL subsurface disposal area. The purpose of this test was to evaluate the effectiveness of both gravity fed and operator-controlled electrode feeding in reducing or eliminating many of the potential problems associated with fixed-electrode processing of soils with high concentrations of metal. Actual site soils from INEL were mixed with representative concentrations of carbon steel and stainless steel for this engineering-scale test. 18 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Div.; Hoag, D.L.; Blankenship, D.A.; DeYonge, W.F.; Schiermeister, D.M. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information.

  16. Instrumentation of the thermal/structural interactions in situ tests at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Jones, R.L.; Baird, G.T.

    1997-04-01

    The Department of Energy has constructed the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to develop the technology for the disposal of radioactive waste from defense programs. Sandia National Laboratories had the responsibility for the experimental activities at the WIPP and fielded several large-scale Thermal/Structural Interactions (TSI) in situ tests to validate techniques used to predict repository performance. The instrumentation of these tests involved the placement of over 4,200 gages including room closure gages, borehole extensometers, stress gages, borehole inclinometers, fixed reference gages, borehole strain gages, thermocouples, thermal flux meters, heater power gages, environmental gages, and ventilation gages. Most of the gages were remotely read instruments that were monitored by an automated data acquisition system, but manually read instruments were also used to provide early deformation information and to provide a redundancy of measurement for the remote gages. Instruments were selected that could operate in the harsh environment of the test rooms and that could accommodate the ranges of test room responses predicted by pretest calculations. Instruments were tested in the field prior to installation at the WIPP site and were modified to improve their performance. Other modifications were made to gages as the TSI tests progressed using knowledge gained from test maintenance. Quality assurance procedures were developed for all aspects of instrumentation including calibration, installation, and maintenance. The instrumentation performed exceptionally well and has produced a large quantity of quality information

  17. Comparison of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Low and High Throughput HER2 Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Tim S.; Espersen, Maiken L. M.; Kofoed, Vibeke; Dabetic, Tanja; Høgdall, Estrid; Balslev, Eva

    2013-01-01

    The purpose was to evaluate and compare 5 different HER2 genetic assays with different characteristics that could affect the performance to analyze the human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) gene copy number under low and high throughput conditions. The study included 108 tissue samples from breast cancer patients with HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results scored as 0/1+, 2+, and 3+. HER2 genetic status was analysed using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Scoring results were documented through digital image analysis. The cancer region of interest was identified from a serial H&E stained slide following tissue cores were transferred to a tissue microarrays (TMA). When using TMA in a routine flow, all patients will be tested for HER2 status with IHC followed by CISH or FISH, thereby providing individual HER2 results. In conclusion, our results show that the differences between the HER2 genetic assays do not have an effect on the analytic performance and the CISH technology is superior to high throughput HER2 genetic testing due to scanning speed, while the IQ-FISH may still be a choice for fast low throughput HER2 genetic testing. PMID:24383005

  18. The in-situ testing of high efficiency particulate filters in the CEGB south eastern region nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, A.W.; Wilkinson, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    High efficiency air filters are installed in the CEGB's Nuclear Power Stations to prevent discharge of radioactive material to the environment should the ventilation air become contaminated. The Board has determined that these filter units should be tested in-situ to ensure that the stringent design specifications are met. This paper describes the rig work comparing the British Standard method using sodium chloride aerosol with other test methods, such as Dioctyl Phthalate, naturally occurring dust aerosols and artificially produced condensation nuclei. This work led to the development of an in-situ test method using condensation nuclei and a Pollak-Nolan nucleus counter. The advantages and disadvantages of this method over other methods for in-situ testing is discussed. The test method has been used in the South Eastern Region for several years and considerable experience has been gained in its use on a wide variety of filter systems. The method adopted for each system is detailed including the injection, sampling and interpretation of the results obtained. Numerous faults and difficulties have been highlighted from the design, installation and filter changing aspects

  19. The Haw in-situ test at Asse - its conception and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, H.; Hinsch, H.; Monig, J.

    1989-01-01

    The HAW-disposal test is a demonstration and a R and D test utilizing nearly full-size waste canisters with vitrified Cs-137 and Sr-90 as heat and radiation sources in a repository-like setting. It is, however, not intended as an in-situ experiment for testing the glass product of the vitrified waste. The entire test field comprises two separate rooms, A and B, each having four boreholes. The maximum salt temperatures are planned to be 250 0 C (electric heating) and 250/200/200 0 C (γ radiative heating), with essentially the same maximum dose rates for two pairs of boreholes (∼5·10 5 rad/h). The loaded test canisters are now available and do not completely meet the intended specification. Heat loadings as well as dose rates are, for several reasons, lower than planned by about 30%. The designs of the emplacement boreholes in each of the two test rooms are basically the same. For retrievability reasons, all boreholes will have a liner. The only significant difference will be, that the room A-boreholes will have a backfilling of inert alumina pebbles between liner and the salt, whereas these in room B will have a free annulus that allows the salt to converge freely onto the liner surfaces, thus simulating the salt converging onto canisters in an actual repository. Gas sampling from the boreholes will mainly be done in the annular regions. A special dosimetry program, as well as an extensive radiolytic effects program, both in situ and laboratory, are under preparation. A special radiation effects study will be performed with Dummy canisters located at the top of the canister stacks. The entire test is a joint European project with the financial contribution of the CEC and the close cooperation with ECN, ANDRA and ENRESA

  20. In situ vitrification: Preliminary results from the first large-scale radioactive test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Westsik, J.H.

    1988-02-01

    The first large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) has been completed. In Situ Vitrification is a process whereby joule heating immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline waste form. The LSRT was conducted at an actual transuranic contaminated soil site on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The test had two objectives: (1) determine large-scale processing performance and (2) produce a waste form that can be fully evaluated as a potential technique for the final disposal of transuranic-contaminated soil sites at Hanford. This accomplishment has provided technical data to evaluate the ISV process for its potential in the final disposition of transuranic-contaminated soil sites at Hanford. Because of the test's successful completion, within a year technical data on the vitrified soil will be available to determine how well the process incorporates transuranics into the waste form and how well the form resists leaching of transuranics. Preliminary results available include retention of transuranics and other elements within the waste form during processing and the efficiency of the off-gas treatment system in removing contaminants from the gaseous effluents. 13 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, K.

    2004-01-01

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container

  2. In situ vitrification pilot-scale radioactive test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for selected liquid radioactive waste disposal sites. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These ISV process development testing and evaluation studies are being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June of 1983 in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified are discussed. The primary objectives of the radioactive test were to: demonstrate containment and confinement of the radioactive material; verify equipment performance of the power and off-gas systems; identify losses to the off-gas system; and characterize the behavior of the radioactive material in the vitrified soil. The test successfully demonstrated the processing containment of radionuclides both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was measured during testing operations. The vitrified soil had a greater than 99% retention of all radionuclides. Losses to the off-gas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. No migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred, as indicated by analysis of soil samples from around the block. Previous waste form leaching studies indicate an acceptable durability of the ISV product. 8 references, 34 figures, 8 tables

  3. In situ vitrification pilot-scale radioactive test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.H.

    1984-10-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as an in-place stabilization technique for selected liquid radioactive waste disposal sites. The process melts the wastes and surrounding soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form. These ISV process development testing and evaluation studies are being conducted for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June of 1983 in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified are discussed. The primary objectives of the radioactive test were to: demonstrate containment and confinement of the radioactive material; verify equipment performance of the power and off-gas systems; identify losses to the off-gas system; and characterize the behavior of the radioactive material in the vitrified soil. The test successfully demonstrated the processing containment of radionuclides both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was measured during testing operations. The vitrified soil had a greater than 99% retention of all radionuclides. Losses to the off-gas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. No migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred, as indicated by analysis of soil samples from around the block. Previous waste form leaching studies indicate an acceptable durability of the ISV product. 8 references, 34 figures, 8 tables.

  4. Stress-dependent crystal structure of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Philipp T.; Khansur, Neamul H.; Riess, Kevin; Martin, Alexander; Hinterstein, Manuel; Webber, Kyle G.

    2018-02-01

    Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (LSCF) is one of the most studied mixed ionic-electronic conductor materials due to electrical and transport properties, which are attractive for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen permeation membranes, and catalysis. The integration of such materials, however, depends on the thermal as well as mechanical behavior. LSCF exhibits nonlinear hysteresis during compressive stress-strain measurements, marked by a remanent strain and coercive stress, i.e., ferroelasticity. However, the origin of ferroelastic behavior has not been investigated under high compressive stress. This study, therefore, investigates the microscopic origin of stress-induced mechanical behavior in polycrystalline (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The data presented here reveals that the strain response originates from the intrinsic lattice strain as well as the extrinsic domain switching strain without any apparent change in crystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the calculated microscopic strain contribution with that of a macroscopic measurement indicates a significant change in the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic strain depending on the applied stress state, i.e., under maximum stress and after unloading. Direct evidence of the microscopic origin of stress-strain response outlined in this paper may assist in guiding materials design with the improved mechanical reliability of SOFCs.

  5. Current trends and future development in pharmacologic stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Jin Ho; Lee, Jae Tae

    2005-01-01

    Pharmacologic stress testing for myocardial perfusion imaging is a widely used noninvasive method for the evaluation of known or suspected coronary artery disease. The use of exercise for cardiac stress has been practiced for over 60 years and clinicians are familiar with its using. However, there are inevitable situations in which exercise stress is inappropriate. A large number of patients with cardiac problems are unable to exercise to their full potential due to comorbidity such as osteoarthritis, vascular disease and pulmonary disease and a standard exercise stress test for myocardial perfusion imaging is suboptimal means for assessment of coronary artery disease. This problem has led to the development of the pharmacologic stress test and to a great increase in its popularity. All of the currently used pharmacologic agents have well-documented diagnostic value. This review deals the physiological actions, clinical protocols, safety, nuclear imaging applications of currently available stress agents and future development of new vasodilating agents

  6. Stress-induced martensitic transformations in a Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloy studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zárubová, Niva; Gemperlová, Juliana; Gärtnerová, Viera; Gemperle, Antonín

    481-482, č. 5 (2008), s. 457-461 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/2016; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : in situ TEM straining * CuAlNi shape memory alloy * stress -induced formation of martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2008

  7. In situ time-of-flight neutron imaging of NiO-YSZ anode support reduction under influence of stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata Grazyna; Strobl, Markus; Lauridsen, Erik M.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on in situ macroscopic scale imaging of NiO-YSZ (YSZ is yttria-stabilized zirconia) reduction under applied stress - a phase transition taking place in solid oxide electrochemical cells in a reducing atmosphere of a hydrogen/nitrogen mixture and at operation temperatures of u...... of applying energy-resolved neutron imaging with both approaches to the NiO-YSZ reduction investigation indicate enhancement of the reduction rate due to applied stress, which is consistent with the results of the authors’ previous research....

  8. Dual-colour chromogenic in-situ hybridization is a potential alternative to fluorescence in-situ hybridization in HER2 testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheng-Cheng; Pintye, Mariann; Chang, Liang-Che; Chen, Huang-Yang; Yeh, Kun-Yan; Chein, Hui-Ping; Lee, Nin; Chen, Jim-Ray

    2011-11-01

    Dual-colour chromogenic in-situ hybridization (dc-CISH) is an emerging methodology for characterizing genomic alterations. This study was aimed at evaluating the performance of a dc-CISH kit (ZytoVision) in determining human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status in breast cancer. Two hundred and twenty-eight invasive breast carcinomas arranged in tissue microarrays were analysed in parallel with dc-CISH, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry. Of 227 tumours with available FISH and dc-CISH results, HER2 amplification and non-amplification were detected in 49 (21.6%) and 178 (78.4%) tumours, respectively, by both assays. The concordance between dc-CISH and FISH results showed 100% agreement (κ-coefficient=1.00). Immunohistochemically, 162 (71%), 25 (11.0%) and 41 (18%) tumours were scored 0/1+, 2+, and 3+, respectively. The corresponding results with both FISH and dc-CISH demonstrated HER2 amplification in two (3.2%), nine (36%) and 38 (93%) tumours, respectively. Complete consensus among these three methods was observed in 197 cases, representing 98% of all 3+ and 0/1+ tumours (κ-coefficient=0.92). Confirmatory testing of 25 2+ tumours showed complete consensus between FISH and dc-CISH. dc-CISH is a promising alternative to FISH in HER2 testing, and the single-institute incidence of HER2 amplification in breast cancer in Taiwan is 21.2%. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  9. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-01-01

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement

  10. Influence of Steel Reinforcement on In-Situ Stress Evaluation in Concrete Structures by the Core-Drilling Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, M. J.; Pessiki, S.

    2006-03-01

    The core-drilling method is an emerging technique for evaluating in-situ stress in a concrete structure. A small hole is drilled into the structure, and the deformations in the vicinity of the hole are measured and related via elasticity theory to the stress. The method is similar to the ASTM hole-drilling strain-gauge method excepting that displacements rather than strains are the measured quantities. The technique may be considered nondestructive since the ability of the structure to perform its function is unaffected, and the hole is easily repaired. Displacement measurements in the current work are performed using 3D digital image correlation and industrial photogrammetry. The current paper addresses perturbations in the method caused by steel reinforcement within the concrete. The reinforcement is significantly stiffer than the surrounding concrete, altering the expected displacement field. A numerical investigation performed indicates an under-prediction of stress by as much as 18 percent in a heavily reinforced structure, although the effect is significantly smaller for more common amounts of reinforcement.

  11. Evaluation of dynamic characteristics of hard rock based on numerical simulations of in situ rock tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Yuya; Ikusada, Koji; Jiang, Yujing

    2009-01-01

    In situ rock tests of hard rock of conglomerate in which discontinuities in high angle are dominant were conducted. In this study, in order to confirm the validity of the test results and the test condition, and in order to elucidate the deformation behaviour and the mechanism of shear strength of the rock mass, the numerical simulations of the in situ rock tests by using distinct element method were performed. As a result, it was clarified that the behaviour of the rock mass strongly depends on both geometrical distribution of discontinuities and those mechanical properties. It is thought that a series of evaluation processes showed in this study contribute to improve the reliability of the dynamic characteristic evaluation of the rock mass. (author)

  12. GTS-LCS, in-situ experiment 2. Modeling of tracer test 09-03

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manette, M.; Saaltink, M.W.; Soler, J.M.

    2015-02-01

    Within the framework of the GTS-LCS project (Grimsel Test Site - Long-Term Cement Studies), an in-situ experiment lasting about 5 years was started in 2009 to study water-cement-rock interactions in a fractured granite. Prior to the experiment, a tracer test was performed to characterize the initial flow and transport properties of the rock around the experimental boreholes. This study reports on the model interpretation of tracer test 09-03. The calculations were performed by means of a two-dimensional model (homogeneous fracture plane including 3 boreholes) using the Retraso-CodeBright software package. In the tracer test, Grimsel groundwater containing the tracer (uranine) was circulated in the emplacement borehole during 43 days (zero injection flow rate). Circulation continued without tracer afterwards. Water was extracted at the observation and extraction boreholes. Results from a model sensitivity analysis comparing model results with measured tracer concentrations showed 3 cases where the evolution of tracer concentrations in the 3 different boreholes was satisfactory. In these cases a low-permeability skin affected the emplacement and observation boreholes. No skin appeared to affect the extraction borehole. The background hydraulic gradient seems to have no effect on the results of the tracer test. These results will be applied in the calculation of the initial flow field for the reactive transport phase of in-situ experiment 2 (interaction between pre-hardened cement and fractured granite at Grimsel). (orig.)

  13. Effect of external stress on deuteride (hydride) precipitation in Zircaloy-4 using in situ neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jun-li [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); An, Ke; Stoica, Alexandru D. [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Heuser, Brent J., E-mail: bheuser@illinois.edu [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    In situ neutron diffraction is utilized to study the deuteride (hydride) precipitation behavior in a cold-worked stress-relieved (CWSR) Zircaloy-4 material upon cooling from 420 °C to room temperature with a 78 MPa external stress applied along the rolling direction (RD) of the material. Two banks detector capture the diffraction signal from two principal directions of the specimen, the normal direction (ND) and the rolling direction (RD). The evolution of deuterium concentration in zirconium solid solution along the two specimen directions is measured by studying the δ-(220) peak intensity, applying the Rietveld refinement method to the diffraction data and using the measured zirconium c-axis lattice distortion. The deuterium concentration is observed to be higher for zirconium grains in the ND than the RD. The terminal solid solubility of precipitation (TSSp) for deuterium in the solution is then described using the Arrhenius equation. It is observed that the applied stress reduces the energy term Q in the Arrhenius equation when compared with the unstressed Q values from the work of others. A model by Puls is applied to study the effect of stress on deuterium solubility, with polycrystalline hydride precipitation strain calculated using the Kearns factor representative of the studied material. The experimental result does not agree with the model prediction of Puls.

  14. In situ testing of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station electrical circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsel, M.R.; Donaldson, M.R.; Soberano, F.T.

    1987-04-01

    This report discusses the results of electrical in situ testing of selected circuits and components at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station in Shippingport, Pennsylvania. Testing was performed by EG and G Idaho in support of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. The goal was to determine the extent of aging or degradation of various circuits from the original plant, and the two major coreplant upgrades (representing three distinct age groups), as well as to evaluate previously developed surveillance technology. The electrical testing was performed using the Electrical Circuit Characterization and Diagnostic (ECCAD) system developed by EG and G for the US Department of Energy to use at TMI-2. Testing included measurements of voltage, effective series capacitance, effective series inductance, impedance, effective series resistance, dc resistance, insulation resistance and time domain reflectometry (TDR) parameters. The circuits evaluated included pressurizer heaters, control rod position indicator cables, miscellaneous primary system Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs), nuclear instrumentation cables, and safety injection system motor operated valves. It is to be noted that the operability of these circuits was tested after several years had elapsed because plant operations had concluded at Shippingport. There was no need following plant shutdown to retain the circuits in working condition, so no effort was expended for that purpose. The in situ measurements and analysis of the data confirmed the effectiveness of the ECCAD system for detecting degradation of circuit connections and splices because of high resistance paths, with most of the problems caused by corrosion. Results indicate a correlation between the chronological age of circuits and circuit degradation

  15. Application of heat stress in situ demonstrates a protective role of irradiation on photosynthetic performance in alpine plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Othmar; Stoll, Magdalena; Karadar, Matthias; Kranner, Ilse; Neuner, Gilbert

    2015-04-01

    The impact of sublethal heat on photosynthetic performance, photosynthetic pigments and free radical scavenging activity was examined in three high mountain species, Rhododendron ferrugineum, Senecio incanus and Ranunculus glacialis using controlled in situ applications of heat stress, both in darkness and under natural solar irradiation. Heat treatments applied in the dark reversibly reduced photosynthetic performance and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (Fv /Fm), which remained impeded for several days when plants were exposed to natural light conditions subsequently to the heat treatment. In contrast, plants exposed to heat stress under natural irradiation were able to tolerate and recover from heat stress more readily. The critical temperature threshold for chlorophyll fluorescence was higher under illumination (Tc (')) than in the dark (Tc). Heat stress caused a significant de-epoxidation of the xanthophyll cycle pigments both in the light and in the dark conditions. Total free radical scavenging activity was highest when heat stress was applied in the dark. This study demonstrates that, in the European Alps, heat waves can temporarily have a negative impact on photosynthesis and, importantly, that results obtained from experiments performed in darkness and/or on detached plant material may not reliably predict the impact of heat stress under field conditions. © 2014 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. In situ vitrification: Test results for a contaminated soil-melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1989-10-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy to stabilize soils and sludges that are contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product similar to obsidian and basalt. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic-contaminated soil site. The test constituted the first full-scale demonstration of ISV at an actual site. This paper summarizes the results of that test and describes the potential adaptation of the process to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste-contaminated soils. 15 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Stress Testing with Student's t Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.W.G. Kole (Erik); C.G. Koedijk (Kees); M.J.C.M. Verbeek (Marno)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn this study we propose the use of the Student's t dependence function to model dependence between asset returns when conducting stress tests. To properly include stress testing in a risk management system, it is important to have accurate information about the (joint) probabilities of

  18. In-situ stress analysis with X-Ray diffraction for yield locus characterization of sheet metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güner, A.; Tekkaya, A. E. [Institute of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction, TU Dortmund University, Baroper Str. 301, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Zillmann, B.; Lampke, T. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Chemnitz University of Technology, Erfenschlager Strasse 73 D-09125 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-12-16

    A main problem in the field of sheet metal characterization is the inhomogeneous plastic deformation in the gauge regions of specimens which causes the analytically calculated stresses to differ from the sought state of stress acting in the middle of the gauge region. To overcome this problem, application of X-Ray diffraction is analyzed. For that purpose a mobile X-ray diffractometer and an optical strain measurement system are mounted on a universal tensile testing machine. This enables the recording of the whole strain and stress history of a material point. The method is applied to uniaxial tension tests, plane strain tension tests and shear tests to characterize the interstitial free steel alloy DC06. The applicability of the concepts of stress factors is verified by uniaxial tension tests. The experimentally obtained values are compared with the theoretical values calculated with crystal elasticity models utilizing the orientation distribution functions (ODF). The relaxation problem is addressed which shows itself as drops in the stress values with the strain kept at a constant level. This drop is analyzed with elasto-viscoplastic material models to correct the measured stresses. Results show that the XRD is applicable to measure the stresses in sheet metals with preferred orientation. The obtained yield locus is expressed with the Yld2000–2D material model and an industry oriented workpiece is analyzed numerically. The comparison of the strain distribution on the workpiece verifies the identified material parameters.

  19. Planning, developing, and fielding of thermal/structural interactions in situ tests for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, D.E.; Matalucci, R.V.

    1986-01-01

    Large-scale, well-instrumented underground tests to determine in situ thermal/structural response of bedded salt are being constructed in the WIPP facility in southeastern New Mexico. These tests are an essential component of a broad research and development program to resolve thermal/structural issues, to validate long-term prediction methods, and to develop a design basis for a future repository. They are the result of an extensive planning and evaluation procedure to determine the appropriate test configuration. All details of the tests, including background, decisions, design, site operations, and testing organization are explained. These procedures may be useful in developing other in situ tests

  20. Investigation of creep threshold stresses using in situ TEM straining experiment in an Al-5Y2O3-10SiC composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshmukh, S.P.; Mishra, R.S.; Robertson, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    Creep behavior of metal matrix composites is similar to dispersion strengthen alloys and characterized by the presence of a threshold stress below which the creep rate is negligible. This threshold stress is attributed, at least in dispersion-strengthened alloys, to dislocation particle interactions in which the detachment of the dislocations from the particle is the rate-limiting step. Creep experiments were performed on an Al-5Y 2 O 3 -10SiC composite in the temperature range of 473 and 573 K and the nature of the dislocation-particle interaction was determined by performing in situ straining experiments at elevated temperature in a transmission electron microscope. The threshold stress and the detachment stress are temperature dependent and the detachment stress is less than the threshold stress emphasizing the contribution of load transfer from the matrix to the reinforcement phase.

  1. Rock stress investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, A.; Heusermann, St.; Braeuer, V.; Gloeggler, W.

    1989-04-01

    On the research project 'Rock Stress Mesurements' the BGR has developed and tested several methods for use in boreholes at a depth of 200 m. Indirect stress measurements using overcoring methods with BGR-probes and CSIR-triaxial cells as well as direct stress measurements using the hydraulic-fracturing method were made. To determine in-situ rock deformation behavior borehole deformation tests, using a BGR-dilatometer, were performed. Two types of the BGR-probe were applied: a four-component-probe to determine horizontal stresses and a five-component-probe to determine a quasi three-dimensional stress field. The first time a computer for data processing was installed in the borehole together with the BGR-probe. Laboratory tests on low cylinders were made to study the stress-deformation behavior. To validate and to interprete the measurement results some test methods were modelled using the finite-element method. The dilatometer-tests yielded high values of Young's modulus, whereas laboratory tests showed lower values with a distinct deformation anisotropy. Stress measurements with the BGR-probe yielded horizontal stresses being higher than the theoretical overburden pressure. These results are comparable to the results of the hydraulic fracturing tests, whereas stresses obtained with CSIR-triaxial cells are lower. The detailed geological mapping of the borehole indicated relationships between stress and geology. With regard to borehole depth different zones of rock structure joint frequency, joint orientation, and orientation of microfissures as well as stress magnitude, stress direction, and degree of deformation anisotropy could be distinguished. (author) 4 tabs., 76 figs., 31 refs

  2. In situ vitrification large-scale operational acceptance test analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Carter, J.G.

    1986-05-01

    A thermal treatment process is currently under study to provide possible enhancement of in-place stabilization of transuranic and chemically contaminated soil sites. The process is known as in situ vitrification (ISV). In situ vitrification is a remedial action process that destroys solid and liquid organic contaminants and incorporates radionuclides into a glass-like material that renders contaminants substantially less mobile and less likely to impact the environment. A large-scale operational acceptance test (LSOAT) was recently completed in which more than 180 t of vitrified soil were produced in each of three adjacent settings. The LSOAT demonstrated that the process conforms to the functional design criteria necessary for the large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) to be conducted following verification of the performance capabilities of the process. The energy requirements and vitrified block size, shape, and mass are sufficiently equivalent to those predicted by the ISV mathematical model to confirm its usefulness as a predictive tool. The LSOAT demonstrated an electrode replacement technique, which can be used if an electrode fails, and techniques have been identified to minimize air oxidation, thereby extending electrode life. A statistical analysis was employed during the LSOAT to identify graphite collars and an insulative surface as successful cold cap subsidence techniques. The LSOAT also showed that even under worst-case conditions, the off-gas system exceeds the flow requirements necessary to maintain a negative pressure on the hood covering the area being vitrified. The retention of simulated radionuclides and chemicals in the soil and off-gas system exceeds requirements so that projected emissions are one to two orders of magnitude below the maximum permissible concentrations of contaminants at the stack

  3. Biaxial Stress Tests of Plain Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.K.; Cho, M.S.; Song, Y.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-07-01

    Containment concrete specimens(4000, 5000psi) were tested under biaxial stress and presented basic physical properties and biaxial failure envelops for the concrete specimens. Failure behaviors of concrete under biaxial stress were assessed with stress-strain responses and failure modes. Here provided real test data to develop nonlinear finite element concrete models. (author). 15 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Contact sponge water absorption test implemented for in situ measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggero, Laura; Scrivano, Simona

    2016-04-01

    The contact sponge method is a non-destructive in-situ methodology used to estimate a water uptake coefficient. The procedure, unlike other in-situ measurement was proven to be directly comparable to the water uptake laboratory measurements, and was registered as UNI 11432:2011. The UNI Normal procedure requires to use a sponge with known density, soaked in water, weighed, placed on the material for 1 minute (UNI 11432, 2011; Pardini & Tiano, 2004), then weighed again. Difficulties arise in operating on test samples or on materials with porosity varied for decay. While carrying on the test, fluctuations in the bearing of the environmental parameters were negligible, but not the pressure applied to the surface, that induced the release of different water amounts towards the material. For this reason we designed a metal piece of the same diameter of the plate carrying the sponge, to be screwed at the tip of a pocket penetrometer. With this instrument the sponge was kept in contact with the surface for 1 minute applying two different loads, at first pushed with 0.3 kg/cm2 in order to press the sponge, but not its holder, against the surface. Then, a load of 1.1 kg/ cm2 was applied, still avoiding deviating the load to the sponge holder. We applied both the current and our implemented method to determine the water absorption by contact sponge on 5 fresh rock types (4 limestones: Fine - and Coarse grained Pietra di Vicenza, Rosso Verona, Breccia Aurora, and the silicoclastic Macigno sandstone). The results show that 1) the current methodology imply manual skill and experience to produce a coherent set of data; the variable involved are in fact not only the imposed pressure but also the compression mechanics. 2) The control on the applied pressure allowed reproducible measurements. Moreover, 3) the use of a thicker sponge enabled to apply the method even on rougher surfaces, as the device holding the sponge is not in contact with the tested object. Finally, 4) the

  5. Test plan for In Situ Vitrification Engineering-Scale Test No. 6, EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., Job Number 318230

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    The objectives of the test included the effects of in situ vitrification on containerized sludge contained in a simulated randomly-disposed array. From this arrangement, the test results obtained the following data applicable to Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Large Field Testing: canister burst pressure and temperature, canister depressurization rate, melt encapsulation rate of the canister and the hood area plenum temperatures, pressures, compositional analyses, and flows as affected by gas releases. 10 figs., 1 tab

  6. Evaluation of Rock Stress Estimation by the Kaiser effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtonen, A.

    2005-11-01

    The knowledge of in situ stress is the key input parameter in many rock mechanics analyses. Information on stress allows the definition of boundary conditions for various modelling and engineering tasks. Presently, the estimation of stresses in bedrock is one of the most difficult, time-consuming and high-priced rock mechanical investigations. In addition, the methods used today have not evolved significantly in many years. This brings out a demand for novel, more economical and practical methods for stress estimation. In this study, one such method, Kaiser effect based on acoustic emission of core samples, has been evaluated. It can be described as a 'memory' in rock that is indicated by a change in acoustic emission emitted during uniaxial loading test. The most tempting feature of this method is the ability to estimate the in situ stress state from core specimens in laboratory conditions. This yields considerable cost savings compared to laborious borehole measurements. Kaiser effect has been studied in order to determine in situ stresses for decades without any major success. However, recent studies in Australia and China have been promising and made the estimation of stress tensor possible from differently oriented core samples. The aim of this work has been to develop a similar estimation method in Finland (including both equipment and data reduction), and to test it on samples obtained from Olkiluoto, Eurajoki. The developed measuring system proved to work well. The quality of obtained data varied, but they were still interpretable. The results obtained from these tests were compared with results of previous overcoring measurements, and they showed quite good correlation. Thus, the results were promising, but the method still needs further development and more testing before the final decision on its feasibility can be made. (orig.)

  7. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    YANG, J.S.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes2. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in2 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses

  8. In-situ load-deformation characterization of the CSM/OCRD jointed test block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, A.M.; Hustrulid, W.; Brown, S.; Ubbes, W.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive ambient-temperature test series has recently been completed on a block of Precambrian Gneiss at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) Experimental Mine in Idaho Springs, Colorado. Block tests came into existence out of a desire to test a relatively large volume of rock and thereby minimize the scaling problems encountered when laboratory test results are used to obtain modeling parameters for full-size structures. A typical block test involves isolation of a large, approximately two-meter cube of rock by cutting slots on four sides and inserting flatjacks for loading. Much interest has recently centered around block tests as a promising method for in-situ characterization of rock-masses for licensing future commercial nuclear-waste repositories in crystalline rock. To date only a few block tests have been conducted

  9. Estimation of in-situ stresses in concrete members using polarized ultrasonic shear waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Andrew; Schumacher, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic testing is commonly used to detect flaws, estimate geometries, and characterize properties of materials and structures. Acoustoelasticity refers to the dependency of stress wave velocity with applied stresses and is a phenomenon that has been known by geophysicists since the 1960s. A way to capitalize on this effect for concrete applications is by using ultrasonic shear waves which are particularly sensitive to applied stresses when polarized in the direction of the applied stress. The authors conducted an experiment on a 150 mm (6 in.) diameter concrete cylinder specimen with a length of 305 mm (12 in.) that was loaded in discrete load steps to failure. At each load step two ultrasonic shear waves were transmitted through the specimen, one with the polarization perpendicular and the other transverse to the applied stress. The velocity difference between the two sets of polarized shear waves was found to correlate with the applied stress in the specimen. Two potential applications for this methodology include estimation of stresses in pre-stressed concrete bridge girders and investigation of load redistribution in structural support elements after extreme events. This paper introduces the background of the methodology, presents an analysis of the collected data, and discusses the relationship between the recorded signals and the applied stress.

  10. Field and in-situ rock-mechanics testing manual. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuri, F.S.; Feves, M.L.; Peterson, G.L.; Foster, K.M.; Kienle, C.F. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    Standardized field and in situ rock mechanics testing procedures have been prepared for use in the National Terminal Waste Storage Program. The procedures emphasize equipment performance specifications, documentation and reporting, and Quality Assurance acceptance criteria. Sufficient theoretical background is included to allow the user to perform the necessary data reduction. These procedures incorporate existing standards when possible, otherwise they represent the current state of the art. Maximum flexibility in equipment design has been incorporated to allow use of this manual by existing groups and to encourage future improvements

  11. SEALEX in-situ experiments-performance tests of repository seals: experimental observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes observations and numerical analysis of SEALEX performance tests installed in Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL. One of the objectives of the large scale in-situ tests is to investigate the impact of technological gaps on the long term performance of bentonite based seals. The swelling cores consist of pre-compacted blocks of a natural sodic Wyoming bentonite (MX80 type mixed with quartz sand in a ratio of 70/30 (in dry mass with different geometries (monolithic disks or four jointed disks. Several technological gaps exist within the in situ tests: Gaps between the blocks and annular gap with variable width between the bentonite-based core and the host rock. All the tests are extensively instrumented for monitoring the main Hydro-Mechanical (HM variables. Comparison of the experimental results showed that the presence of technological gaps constituted new hydration sources (annular gaps and flow paths (gaps between the blocks that changed the saturation kinetics. A coupled HM formulation that incorporates the relevant processes involved in the problem under consideration has been adopted to analyse the effect of the annular technological gap on dry density homogenization of the bentonite based core as hydration progresses. Technological gaps were demonstrated to have an impact on dry density distribution.

  12. Final Design and Installation of the ''In Situ'' test at GRIMSEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Cantillana, J. L.; Garcia-Sineriz, J. L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the FEBEX project (Full-Scale Engineered Barriers Experiment) is the study of the near-field for a repository of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in crystalline rock. The experiment has three major parts: 1) an in situ test, in natural conditions and at full scale; 2) a mack-up test, at almost full scale, and 3) a set of experimental laboratory tests, to complement the information from the two large-scale tests. The experiment is based on the Spanish reference concept for crystalline rock, in which the waste canisters are placed in horizontal drifts surrounded by a clay formed from highly-compacted bentonite blocks. The complete project, with about seven years of duration (1994-2001), has been divided into four sequential stages, defined by the main features of each stage of the two large-scale tests. This report is part of the pre-operational stage (1994-1996). (Author)

  13. Stress Testing as a Tool of Bank Risk Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonyuk Oksana I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article is development of theoretical, methodological and practical recommendations on the use of stress testing by Ukrainian commercial banks. Stress testing is defined as a part of bank risk management on the basis of scientific studies of domestic and foreign scientists. The article marks the essence of the bank stress testing and identifies its role in the structure of banks’ risk management in Ukraine. It considers goals of conducting stress testing in banking institutions. It identifies main aspects and specific features of conducting stress testing of bank risks. It characterises main advantages and shortcomings of use of stress testing in the modern bank risk management. It generalises the world and European approaches to the methods of conducting stress testing in commercial banks in comparison with the Ukrainian methodical recommendations. It shows that results of stress testing have practical value, since they help to preliminary assess influence of potentially negative events upon the state of the loan portfolio of the bank and make relevant managerial decisions.

  14. In-situ high efficiency filter testing at AEE Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses experience in the testing of high efficiency filters in a variety of reactor and plant installations at AEE Winfrith. There is rarely any concern about the effectiveness of the filter as supplied by any reputable manufacturer. Experience has shown there is a need to check for defects in the installation of filters which could lead to by-passing of aerosols and it is desirable to perform periodical re-tests to ensure that no subsequent deterioration occurs. It is important to use simple, portable apparatus for such tests; methods based on the use of sodium chloride aerosols, although suitable for the testing of filters prior to installation, involve apparatus which is too bulky for in-situ testing. At Winfrith a double automatic Pollak counter has been developed and used routinely since 1970. The aerosol involved has a particle size far smaller than the size most likely to penetrate intact filters, but this is irrelevant when one is primarily interested in particles which by-pass the filter. Comparisons with other methods of testing filters will be described. There is remarkably good agreement between the efficiency of the filter installation as measured by a Pollak counter compared with techniques involving aerosols of sodium chloride and Dioctyl Phthalate (DOP), presumably because the leakage around the filter is independent of particle size

  15. Elastic properties of nanolaminar Cr_2AlC films and beams determined by in-situ scanning electron microscope bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieseler, Rolf; Theska, Felix; Stürzel, Thomas; Hähnlein, Bernd; Stubenrauch, Mike; Hopfeld, Marcus; Kups, Thomas; Pezoldt, Jörg; Schaaf, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Cr_2AlC MAX phase structures were investigated by in-situ bending tests. Freestanding structures such as cantilevers and doubly clamped beams of Cr_2AlC were produced. The structures exhibit a Young's modulus of 184 GPa which is close to the value obtained by vibrational measurements. The in-situ bending test allows the determination of the mechanical properties with a lower variance of the measurement results compared to the vibrational measurement. The results are a good starting point for the development of microelectromechanical structures based on MAX phases. - Highlights: • Cr_2AlC were produced by deposition multilayers and subsequent rapid annealing. • Freestanding doubly clamped beams and cantilevers of Cr_2AlC were prepared. • A finite elements model was implemented showing the displacement of the structure. • In-situ bending test at doubly clamped beams and cantilevers were performed. • An in-situ bending test is a valid approach to determine mechanical properties.

  16. Development of In situ Geological Investigation and Test Equipment in KURT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Yong Kweon; Kim, Kyung Su; Park, Kyung Woo; Koh, Yong Kweon; Choi, Jong Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    For establishment of the advanced infrastructures of KURT, geological investigation and in situ test equipment were installed. The optical sensor technique could be applicable to monitoring system for the safe operation of various kinds of facilities having static and/or dynamic characteristics, such as chemical plant, pipeline, rail, huge building, long and slim structures, bridge, subway and marine vessel. etc. The micro-seismic monitoring system is able to predict the location and timing of fracturing of rock mass and rock fall around an underground openings as well as analysis on safety of various kinds of engineering structures such as nuclear facilities and other structures. The straddle packer system for hydro-testing in a deep borehole will lead to not only improve current technical level in the field of hydraulic testing but also provide important information to radioactive waste disposal technology development and site characterization project

  17. Thermal stress measurement in continuous welded rails using the hole-drilling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Fateh, Mahmood

    2016-04-01

    The absence of expansion joints in Continuous Welded Rail (CWR) has created the need for the railroad industry to determine the in-situ level of thermal stresses so as to prevent train accidents caused by rail buckling in hot weather and by rail breakage in cold weather. The development of non-destructive or semi-destructive methods for determining the level of thermal stresses in rails is today a high research priority. This study explores the known hole-drilling method as a possible solution to this problem. A new set of calibration coefficients to compute the relieved stress field with the finer hole depth increments was determined by a 3D Finite Element Analysis that modeled the entire hole geometry, including the mechanics of the hole bottom and walls. To compensate the residual stress components, a linear relationship was experimentally established between the longitudinal and the vertical residual stresses of two common sizes of rails, the 136RE and the 141RE, with statistical significance. This result was then utilized to isolate the longitudinal thermal stress component in hole-drilling tests conducted on the 136RE and 141RE thermally-loaded rails at the Large-scale CWR Test-bed of UCSD's Powell Research Laboratories. The results from the Test-bed showed that the hole-drilling procedure, with the appropriate residual stress compensation, can indeed estimate the in-situ thermal stresses to achieve a +/-5°F accuracy of Neutral Temperature determination with a 90% statistical confidence, which is the desired industry gold standard.

  18. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-01-01

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design

  19. HER2 testing in the UK: recommendations for breast and gastric in-situ hybridisation methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bartlett, J. M. S.

    2011-01-01

    These guidelines supplement existing guidelines on HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridisation(ISH) methods in the UK. They provide a specific focus on aspects of guidance relevant to HER2 ISH testing methods, both fluorescent and chromogenic. They are formulated to give advice on methodology, interpretation and quality control for ISH-based testing of HER2 status in common tumour types, including both breast and gastric tumours. The aim is to ensure that all ISH-based testing is accurate, reliable and timely.

  20. Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress predict test anxiety in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Augner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to identify predictors of test anxiety in nursing students. Design: Cross sectional pilot study. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to 112 students of an Austrian nursing school (mean age = 21.42, SD = 5.21. Test anxiety (measured by the standardized PAF Test Anxiety Questionnaire, perceived chronic stress, depressive symptoms, pathological eating and further psychological and health parameters were measured. Results: We found highly significant correlations between test anxiety and working hours (0.25, depression score (0.52, emotional stability (-0.31, and perceived chronic stress (0.65 (p < 0.01, for all. Regression analysis revealed chronic stress and emotional instability as best predictors for test anxiety. Furthermore, path analysis revealed that past negative academic performance outcomes contribute to test anxiety via depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress. Conclusion: Depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress are strongly related to test anxiety. Therefore therapy and training methods that address depressive symptoms and perceived chronic stress, and thereby aim to modify appraisal of potential stressful situations, may be successful in addressing test anxiety.

  1. The Beishan underground research laboratory for geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste in China: Planning, site selection, site characterization and in situ tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Wang

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of nuclear power in China, the disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW has become an important issue for nuclear safety and environmental protection. Deep geological disposal is internationally accepted as a feasible and safe way to dispose of HLW, and underground research laboratories (URLs play an important and multi-faceted role in the development of HLW repositories. This paper introduces the overall planning and the latest progress for China's URL. On the basis of the proposed strategy to build an area-specific URL in combination with a comprehensive evaluation of the site selection results obtained during the last 33 years, the Xinchang site in the Beishan area, located in Gansu Province of northwestern China, has been selected as the final site for China's first URL built in granite. In the process of characterizing the Xinchang URL site, a series of investigations, including borehole drilling, geological mapping, geophysical surveying, hydraulic testing and in situ stress measurements, has been conducted. The investigation results indicate that the geological, hydrogeological, engineering geological and geochemical conditions of the Xinchang site are very suitable for URL construction. Meanwhile, to validate and develop construction technologies for the Beishan URL, the Beishan exploration tunnel (BET, which is a 50-m-deep facility in the Jiujing sub-area, has been constructed and several in situ tests, such as drill-and-blast tests, characterization of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ, and long-term deformation monitoring of surrounding rocks, have been performed in the BET. The methodologies and technologies established in the BET will serve for URL construction. According to the achievements of the characterization of the URL site, a preliminary design of the URL with a maximum depth of 560 m is proposed and necessary in situ tests in the URL are planned. Keywords: Beishan, Xinchang site, Granite

  2. In situ tests for investigating thermal and mechanical rock behaviors at an underground research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sangki; Cho, Won-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviors expected to be happened around an underground high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is important for a successful site selection, construction, operation, and closure of the repository. In this study, the thermal and mechanical behaviors of rock and rock mass were investigated from in situ borehole heater test and the studies for characterizing an excavation damaged zone (EDZ), which had been carried out at an underground research tunnel, KURT, constructed in granite for the validation of a HLW disposal concept. Thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic properties in EDZ could be predicted from various in situ and laboratory tests as well as numerical simulations. The complex thermo-mechanical coupling behavior of rock could be modeled using the rock properties. (author)

  3. A novel and compact nanoindentation device for in situ nanoindentation tests inside the scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Huang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In situ nanomechanical tests provide a unique insight into mechanical behaviors of materials, such as fracture onset and crack propagation, shear band formation and so on. This paper presents a novel in situ nanoindentation device with dimensions of 103mm×74mm×60mm. Integrating the stepper motor, the piezoelectric actuator and the flexure hinge, the device can realize coarse adjustment of the specimen and precision loading and unloading of the indenter automatically. A novel indenter holder was designed to guarantee that the indenter penetrates into and withdraws from the specimen surface vertically. Closed-loop control of the indentation process was established to solve the problem of nonlinearity of the piezoelectric actuator and to enrich the loading modes. The in situ indentation test of Indium Phosphide (InP inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM was carried out and the experimental result indicates the feasibility of the developed device.

  4. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube

  5. In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M. G.

    2013-09-27

    The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube

  6. IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.S.Y. YANG

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what

  7. In situ thermal residual stress evolution in ultrathin ZnO and Ag films studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renault, P.O., E-mail: Pierre.olivier.renault@univ-poitiers.fr [Institut P' , CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, UPR 3346, 86962 Futuroscope (France); Krauss, C.; Le Bourhis, E.; Geandier, G. [Institut P' , CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, UPR 3346, 86962 Futuroscope (France); Benedetto, A. [Saint-Gobain Recherche (SGR), 93303 Aubervilliers (France); Grachev, S.Y.; Barthel, E. [Lab. Surface du Verre et Interfaces (SVI), UMR-CNRS 125, 93303 Aubervilliers (France)

    2011-12-30

    Residual-stress evolution in sputtered encapsulated ZnO/Ag/ZnO stack has been studied in-situ by synchrotron x-ray diffraction when heat treated. The ZnO/Ag/ZnO stack encapsulated into Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers and deposited on (001) Si substrates was thermally heated from 25 Degree-Sign C to 600 Degree-Sign C and cooled down to 25 Degree-Sign C. X-ray diffraction 2D patterns captured continuously during the heat treatment allowed monitoring the diffraction peak shifts of both Ag (15 nm thick) and ZnO (10 nm and 50 nm thick) sublayers. Due to the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion, the silicon substrate induced compressive thermal stresses in the films during heating. We first observed a linear increase of the compressive stress state in both Ag and ZnO films and then a more complex elastic-stress evolution starts to operate from about 100 Degree-Sign C for Ag and about 250 Degree-Sign C for ZnO. Thermal contraction upon cooling seems to dominate so that the initial compressive film stresses relax by about 300 and 700 MPa after thermal treatment for ZnO and Ag, respectively. The overall behavior is discussed in terms of structural changes induced by the heat treatment.

  8. In-situ Observation of Cross-Sectional Microstructural Changes and Stress Distributions in Fracturing TiN Thin Film during Nanoindentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Angelika; Todt, Juraj; Krywka, Christina; Müller, Martin; Ecker, Werner; Sartory, Bernhard; Meindlhumer, Michael; Stefenelli, Mario; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian; Keckes, Jozef

    2016-03-07

    Load-displacement curves measured during indentation experiments on thin films depend on non-homogeneous intrinsic film microstructure and residual stress gradients as well as on their changes during indenter penetration into the material. To date, microstructural changes and local stress concentrations resulting in plastic deformation and fracture were quantified exclusively using numerical models which suffer from poor knowledge of size dependent material properties and the unknown intrinsic gradients. Here, we report the first in-situ characterization of microstructural changes and multi-axial stress distributions in a wedge-indented 9 μm thick nanocrystalline TiN film volume performed using synchrotron cross-sectional X-ray nanodiffraction. During the indentation, needle-like TiN crystallites are tilted up to 15 degrees away from the indenter axis in the imprint area and strongly anisotropic diffraction peak broadening indicates strain variation within the X-ray nanoprobe caused by gradients of giant compressive stresses. The morphology of the multiaxial stress distributions with local concentrations up to -16.5 GPa correlate well with the observed fracture modes. The crack growth is influenced decisively by the film microstructure, especially by the micro- and nano-scopic interfaces. This novel experimental approach offers the capability to interpret indentation response and indenter imprint morphology of small graded nanostructured features.

  9. Engineering test plan for Tank 241-SY-101 in situ viscometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobocinski, R.G.; Stokes, T.I.; Pearce, K.L.

    1994-11-01

    To obtain in situ measurements of the rheological properties within tank 241-SY-101, this document will implement the test strategy defined in PNLMIT-041994, acquisition and Reduction of Data Obtained in Tank SY-101 with the Ball Rheometer. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure

  10. Determination of near surface in-situ stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garritty, P.; Irvin, R.

    1983-06-01

    One of the major unknowns affecting aspects of underground construction and the geohydrology of rock masses is the magnitude and direction of the geostatic principal stresses in the earth's crust. This is particularly the case in near surface rocks where there are indications that high horizontal stresses may exist. The techniques, experiences and results of a preliminary rock stress measurement programme conducted at shallow depth in the Carnmenellis Granite, Cornwall, using C.S.I.R.O. triaxial hollow inclusion cells are described. (author)

  11. In situ and postradiation analysis of mechanical stress in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr induced by swift heavy-ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratov, V.A., E-mail: skuratov@jinr.r [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Bujnarowski, G. [Institute of Physics, Opole University, 45-052 Opole (Poland); Kovalev, Yu.S. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); O' Connell, J. [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Havanscak, K. [Eoetvoes University, Pazmany P. setany 1/A, H-1117 Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy and TEM techniques have been applied to study the radiation damage and correlated mechanical stresses in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr single crystals induced by (1-3) MeV/amu Kr, Xe and Bi ion irradiation. Mechanical stresses were evaluated in situ using a piezospectroscopic effect through the shift of the respective lines in ionoluminescence spectra. It was found that dose dependence of the stress level for Xe and Bi ions, when ionization energy loss exceeds the threshold of damage formation via electronic excitations, exhibits several alternate stages showing the build-up and relaxation of stresses. The beginning of relaxation stages is observed at fluences associated with beginning of individual ion track regions overlapping. The residual stress profiles through the ion irradiated layers were deduced from depth-resolved photostimulated spectra using laser confocal scanning microscopy set-up. It was determined that stresses are compressive in basal plane and tensile in perpendicular direction in all samples irradiated with high energy ions.

  12. Simulation on following Performance of High-Speed Railway In Situ Testing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Long Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subgrade bears both the weight of superstructures and the impacts of running trains. Its stability affects the line smoothness directly, but in situ testing method on it is inadequate. This paper presents a railway roadbed in situ testing device, the key component of which is an excitation hydraulic servo cylinder that can output the static pressure and dynamic pressure simultaneously to simulate the force of the trains to the subgrade. The principle of the excitation system is briefly introduced, and the transfer function of the closed-loop force control system is derived and simulated; that, it shows without control algorithm, the dynamic response is very low and the following performance is quite poor. So, the improvedadaptive model following control (AMFC algorithm based on direct state method is adopted. Then, control block diagram is built and simulated with the input of different waveforms and frequencies. The simulation results show that the system has been greatly improved; the output waveform can follow the input signal much better except for a little distortion when the signal varies severely. And the following performance becomes even better as the load stiffness increases.

  13. Partial discharge testing of in-situ power cable accessories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orban, H. E.

    2002-07-01

    An overview of commercially available diagnostic methods for in-situ power cable accessories is given and relevant field experiences with these diagnostics are described. The discussion includes both PILC and polymeric insulated cables. Two major types of degradation are most frequently involved in cable systems. One is an overall condition caused by chemical aging and /or water treeing. Diagnostics for this type of aging include dissipation factor (loss angle), harmonic analysis, return voltage, isothermal relaxation current, dielectric response, or dc leakage current. The second type of degradation is discrete or incremental; condition assessment utilizes dissipation factor measurements or partial discharge (PD) level measurements. The focus in this paper is on PD diagnostics, especially off-line methods such as the 60 Hz test, the combined AC and VLF diagnostic, and the oscillating wave test system test. Among on-line diagnostics, ultrasonic detection of partial discharge and measurement of partial discharge by installing direct, capacitive or inductive couplers near cable accessories, are described. Overall, partial discharge detection and location in cable accessories is considered inadequate, since interpretation of results is difficult due to the number of variables involved. 28 refs., 1 tab.

  14. Changes in In Situ Stress Across the Nankai and Cascadia Convergent Margins From Borehole Breakout Measurements During Ocean Drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, L.; Moore, J. C.; Yamada, Y.; Chang, C.; Tobin, H.; Kinoshita, M.; Gulick, S.; Moore, G.; Iodp Exp. 314/315/316 Science Party, &

    2008-12-01

    Borehole breakouts are commonly observed in borehole images shortly after drilling of continental margin sites. This study aims to compile and compare these results to determine what in situ shallow stress measurements can tell us about the larger scale tectonic regime. Recent Logging While Drilling resistivity images across the Kumano transect of the Nankai subduction zone, during Expedition 314, Stage 1 of the IODP NanTroSEIZE project, add to this dataset. Expedition 314 site data within the prism (C0001, C0004, C0006, including the megasplay fault system which may overlie the seismogenic updip limit) suggest maximum compressive stress (SHmax) is perpendicular to the margin (not parallel to the convergence vector) but is rotated through 90° at the forearc basin site (C0002). These results may point to changes in stress state of the shallow forearc from east to west: compression in the aseismic active prism (with evidence of strain partitioning of oblique convergence); and extension above the updip seismogenic zone suggesting focus of plate coupling at the plate boundary and not in the shallow forearc. Further south, ODP Leg 196 drilled the prism toe (808) with breakouts indicating SHmax parallel to the convergence vector, in contrast to Exp. 314 results. The stress state in the shallow prism at Site 808 may be affected by nearby seamount subduction or may represent differences in strain partitioning. On the Cascadia margin, two drilling legs have collected LWD borehole images (Leg 204 and Exp. 311). Leg 204 drilled 3 sites at hydrate ridge in the C Cascadia outer prism with breakout orientations variable between closely spaced sites. Prism fold axes are parallel to the margin so we might expect SHmax perpendicular to the margin as in Exp. 314. Deviations from this orientation may reflect local and surface effects (Goldberg and Janik, 2006). Exp. 311, N Cascadia, drilled 5 sites across the prism with breakouts in LWD images. Subduction is not oblique here, in

  15. Understanding the extremely low fracture toughness of freestanding gold thin films by in-situ bulge testing in an AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preiß, Eva I., E-mail: eva.preiss@fau.de; Merle, Benoit; Göken, Mathias

    2017-04-13

    The fracture toughness of freestanding gold films with thicknesses between 60 nm and 320 nm was determined by bulge testing to be around 2 MPa m{sup 1/2}. This surprisingly low value confirms the trend also observed for other metals that thin films exhibit only a fraction of the bulk fracture toughness. In order to understand this behavior, the fracture process of freestanding gold films with a crack introduced by focused ion beam (FIB) milling was observed in-situ in an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM scans of the crack tip region show stable crack growth mainly along grain boundaries. Plastic deformation is localized in a narrow corridor in front of the crack tip. A large plastic zone, as one would typically expect under plane stress, is not observed. Instead, strong local necking is evidenced. We conclude that the spatial confinement of the plastic deformation is the primary reason for the low fracture toughness of metallic thin films.

  16. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Tu, King-Ning; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2009-12-01

    Electromigration-induced hydrostatic elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray white beam microdiffraction. The elastic stresses in two different grains with similar crystallographic orientation, one located at the anode end and the other at the cathode end, were analyzed based on the elastic anisotropy of the Beta-Sn crystal structure. The stress in the grain at the cathode end remained constant except for temperature fluctuations, while the compressive stress in the grain at the anode end was built-up as a function of time during electromigration until a steady state was reached. The measured compressive stress gradient between the cathode and the anode is much larger than what is needed to initiate Sn whisker growth. The effective charge number of Beta-Sn derived from the electromigration data is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  17. In situ measurement of electromigration-induced transient stress in Pb-free Sn-Cu solder joints by synchrotron radiation based X-ray polychromatic microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Kai; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Tu, King-Ning; Lai, Yi-Shao

    2009-05-15

    Electromigration-induced hydrostatic elastic stress in Pb-free SnCu solder joints was studied by in situ synchrotron X-ray white beam microdiffraction. The elastic stresses in two different grains with similar crystallographic orientation, one located at the anode end and the other at the cathode end, were analyzed based on the elastic anisotropy of the {beta}-Sn crystal structure. The stress in the grain at the cathode end remained constant except for temperature fluctuations, while the compressive stress in the grain at the anode end was built-up as a function of time during electromigration until a steady state was reached. The measured compressive stress gradient between the cathode and the anode is much larger than what is needed to initiate Sn whisker growth. The effective charge number of {beta}-Sn derived from the electromigration data is in good agreement with the calculated value.

  18. Advantages of the in-situ LTP distortion profile test on high-heat-load mirrors and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, S.; Jark, W.; Sostero, G.; Gambitta, A.; Mazzolini, F.; Savoia, A.

    1996-01-01

    The first in-situ distortion profile measurement of a high heat load mirror by use of the penta-prism LTP is presented. A maximum height distortion of 0.47 micron in tangential direction over a length of 180 mm was measured for an internally water-cooled mirror of a undulator beam line at ELETTRA while exposed to a total emitted power of 600 W (undulator gap 30 mm and current 180 mA). The experiment has an accuracy and repeatability of 0.04 micron. The test schematic and the test equipment are presented. Two measuring methods to scan a penta-prism being installed either outside or inside the vacuum chamber are introduced. Advantages and some possible applications of adopting the penta-prism LTP to make the in-situ profile test are explained

  19. In situ measurement of methane oxidation in groundwater by using natural-gradient tracer tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.L.; Howes, B.L.; Garabedian, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane oxidation was measured in an unconfined sand and gravel aquifer (Cape Cod, Mass.) by using in situ natural-gradient tracer tests at both a pristine, oxygenated site and an anoxic, sewage-contaminated site. The tracer sites were equipped with multilevel sampling devices to create target grids of sampling points; the injectate was prepared with groundwater from the tracer site to maintain the same geochemical conditions. Methane oxidation was calculated from breakthrough curves of methane relative to halide and inert gas (hexafluoroethane) tracers and was confirmed by the appearance of 13 C-enriched carbon dioxide in experiments in which 13 C-enriched methane was used as the tracer. A V max for methane oxidation could be calculated when the methane concentration was sufficiently high to result in zero-order kinetics throughout the entire transport interval. Methane breakthrough curves could be simulated by modifying a one-dimensional advection-dispersion transport model to include a Michaelis-Menten-based consumption term for methane oxidation. The K m values for methane oxidation that gave the best match for the breakthrough curve peaks were 6.0 and 9.0 μM for the uncontaminated and contaminated sites, respectively. Natural-gradient tracer tests are a promising approach for assessing microbial processes and for testing in situ bioremediation potential in groundwater systems

  20. Final design and performance of in situ testing in Grimsel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes-Cantillana, J.L.; Garcia-SiNeriz, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report is focused on the design, engineering, and construction aspects of the in situ test carried out at the Grimsel underground laboratory in Switzerland. This reproduces the AGP-granite concept of ENRESA for HLW repositories in crystalline rock. Two heaters, similar in dimensions and weight to the canisters in the reference concept, have been placed in a horizontal drift with a 2.28-m diameter, a total test length of 17.4 m, and backfilled with a total of 115.7 † of highly-compacted bentonite blocks. The backfilled area has been closed with a concrete plug which is 2.7 m thick. More than 600 sensors have been installed in the test to monitor different parameters such as temperature, pressures, humidity, etc., within both the buffer material and the host rock. The installation was completed and commissioned in February 1997, and then the heating phase, which will last for at least 3 years, was started. During this period, the test will basically be operated in an automatic mode, controlled and monitored from Spain via modem. The report is the Final Report from AITEMIN for Phase 4 of the project and includes a description of the test configuration and layout; the design, engineering, and manufacturing aspects of the different test components and equipment; the emplacement operation; and the as built information regarding the final position of the main components and the sensors. (Author)

  1. In-situ heater test in sedimentary soft rocks under high temperature (Phase I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Okada, Tetsuji; Sawada, Masataka; Hirano, Kouhei; Tani, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    Various researches have been conducted on high level radioactive waste geological disposal in sedimentary soft rocks. It's noted that the long-term mechanical behaviors of sedimentary soft rocks can be affected by various environmental factors such as temperatures or hydraulic conditions. Therefore, in-situ heater test was conducted in an underground cavern at a depth of 50 meters for the purpose of improving thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled analysis code. This report presents the test result demonstrating the changes of temperature and strain distributions with time at the elevated temperature of the heater up to 40 degrees Celsius. (author)

  2. Lab scale testing of novel natural analog in situ stabilization agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the laboratory-scale test results on several novel in situ treatment and stabilization agents for buried hazardous and radioactive waste. Paraffin, hematite and phosphate materials were examined when combined with soil and other wastes representative of what might be present at buried waste DOE sites. Hematite was made from the reaction of agricultural iron and lime slurries to form gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide. Common household paraffin was melted, both with and without a zeolitic additive, waste added and then cooled. Magnesium phosphate was made from the reaction of magnesium oxide and phosphoric acid or potassium biphosphate to form, magnesium phosphate. All were tested with soil and some with additional waste sumulants such as ash, machine oil and nitrate salts. The following laboratory-generated data indicate that all waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate materials, for field in situ testing. Compressive strengths of treated Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) soil and the waste encapsulation material were sufficient to prevent collapse of the void space in waste, i.e., greater than the NRC 60 psi minimum. The mineralogy and microstructure of hematite was amorphous but should progress to an interlocking crystalline solid. Phosphate was crystalline with characteristics of higher temperature ceramics. Paraffin is non crystalline but encapsulates even very fine grained INEEL soils. Each agent appears to be chemically and physically inert to possible waste materials such as, nitrates and machine cutting oil. Two of the agents hematite and phosphate react favorably with ash increasing the metals retention at higher waste loadings than Portland cement. Hematite, phosphate and zeolite decrease leaching of most hazardous metals from waste when compared to untreated waste and soil. Solution pH, time for reaction initiation, and viscosity values are conducive to jet-grouting application

  3. The State of stress in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead South Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moo Y. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SubTER (Subsurface Technology and Engineering Research, Development and Demonstration) initiative, University of Wisconsin- Madison, Sandia National Laboratories, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory conducted the Permeability (k) and Induced Seismicity Management for Energy Technologies (kISMET) project. The objectives of the project are to define the in situ status of stress in the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota and to establish the relations between in situ stress and induced fracture through hydraulically stimulating the fracture. (SURF) in Lead, South Dakota. In situ tests are conducted in a 7.6 cm diameter and 100 long vertical borehole located in the 4850 Level West Access Drift near Davies Campus of SURF (Figure 1). The borehole is located in the zone of Precambrian Metamorphic Schist.

  4. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ling Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  5. What Is Stress Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... would during exercise. You can then have the stress test. The medicine may make you flushed and anxious, but the effects go away as soon as the test is over. The medicine also may give you a headache. While you're exercising or getting medicine to ...

  6. In situ radiological characterization to support a test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keele, B.D.; Bauer, R.G.; Blewett, G.R.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-05-01

    An in situ radiological detection system was developed to support a small test excavation at a liquid waste disposal site at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Instrumentation, calibration and comparisons to samples are discussed

  7. Surface mechanical property and residual stress of peened nickel-aluminum bronze determined by in-situ X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengxi; Jiang, Chuanhai; Zhao, Yuantao; Chen, Ming; Ji, Vincent

    2017-10-01

    As one of the most important surface strengthening method, shot peening is widely used to improve the fatigue and stress corrosion crack resistance of components by introducing the refined microstructure and compressive residual stress in the surface layer. However, the mechanical properties of this thin layer are different from the base metal and are difficult to be characterized by conventional techniques. In this work, a micro uniaxial tensile tester equipped with in-situ X-ray stress analyzer was employed to make it achievable on a nickel-aluminum bronze with shot peening treatment. According to the equivalent stress-strain relationship based on Von Mises stress criterion, the Young's modulus and yield strength of the peened layer were calculated. The results showed that the Young's modulus was the same as the bulk material, and the yield strength corresponding to the permanent plastic strain of 0.2% was increased by 21% after SP. But the fractographic analysis showed that the fracture feature of the surface layer was likely to transform from the dimple to the cleavage, indicating the improved strength might be attained at the expense of ductility. The monotonic and cyclic loading were also performed via the same combined set-up. In addition, the specific relaxation behavior of compressive residual stress was quantified by linear logarithm relationship between residual stress and cycle numbers. It was found that the compressive residual stress mainly relaxed in the first few cycles, and then reached steady state with further cycles. The relaxation rate and the stable value were chiefly depended on the stress amplitude and number of cycles. The retained residual stress kept in compressive under all given applied stress levels, suggesting that the shot peening could introduce a more stable surface layer of compressive residual stress other than the elevated strength of nickel-aluminum bronze alloy.

  8. Scintigraphic ventriculography and stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goris, M.L.; Hung, J.; Debusk, R.F.

    1982-01-01

    Scintigraphic stress ventriculography yields information which is complex and defies description by the difference in ejection fraction between rest and maximum exercise only. The complexity results in part from the ''derived'' nature of the ejection fraction measurement, which is physiologically secondary to stroke volume and end-diastolic volume. Furthermore, the nature of the stress test in which the pulse (stress) is not independent from the response forces an analysis which considers ''when'' as much as ''what'' happens. Automation in data processing, however, has made oversimplification unnecessary and allows a more exhaustive but correct analysis

  9. Basis for in-situ geomechanical testing at the Yucca Mountain site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, M.

    1989-07-01

    This report presents an analysis of the in-situ geomechanical testing needs for the Exploratory Shaft (ES) test facility at the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada. The testing needs are derived from 10CFR60 regulations and simple thermomechanical canister- and room-scale numerical studies. The testing approach suggested is based on an ''iterative'' procedure of full-scale testing combined with numerical and empirical modeling. The testing suggested is based heavily on demonstration of excavation and thermal loading of full-scale repository excavations. Numerical and/or empirical models are compared to the full-scale response, allowing for adjustment of the model and evaluation of confidence in their predictive ability. Additional testing may be specified if confidence in prediction of the rock mass response is low. It is suggested that extensive drifting be conducted within the proposed repository area, including exploration of the bounding Drill Hole Wash and Imbricate fault structures, as well as the Ghost Dance fault. This approach is opposed to an a priori statistical specification of a number of ''point'' tests which attempt to measure a given property at a specific location. 40 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Review of current capabilities for the measurement of stress, displacement, and in situ deformation modulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrauf, T.W.; Pratt, H.R.

    1979-12-01

    Current capabilities for the measurement of stress, displacement, and in situ deformation modulus in rock masses are reviewed as to their accuracy, sensitivity, advantages, and limitations. Consideration is given to both the instruments themselves and the measurement technique. Recommendations concerning adaptation of existing measurement techniques to repository monitoring are also discussed. These recommendations include: (1) development of a modified borehole deformation gage with improved long-term stability and reliability and reduced thermal sensitivity; (2) development of a downhole transducer type of extensometer; (3) development of a rigid inclusion type gage; (4) development of an improved vibrating wire stressmeter with greater accuracy and simplified calibration and installation requirements; and (5) modification of standard rod extensometers to improve their sensitivity

  11. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  12. Female False Positive Exercise Stress ECG Testing - Fact Verses Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Benjamin T; Scalia, William M; Scalia, Gregory M

    2018-03-07

    Exercise stress testing is a well validated cardiovascular investigation. Accuracy for treadmill stress electrocardiograph (ECG) testing has been documented at 60%. False positive stress ECGs (exercise ECG changes with non-obstructive disease on anatomical testing) are common, especially in women, limiting the effectiveness of the test. This study investigates the incidence and predictors of false positive stress ECG findings, referenced against stress echocardiography (SE) as a standard. Stress echocardiography was performed using the Bruce treadmill protocol. False positive stress ECG tests were defined as greater than 1mm of ST depression on ECG during exertion, without pain, with a normal SE. Potential causes for false positive tests were recorded before the test. Three thousand consecutive negative stress echocardiograms (1036 females, 34.5%) were analysed (age 59+/-14 years. False positive (F+) stress ECGs were documented in 565/3000 tests (18.8%). F+ stress ECGs were equally prevalent in females (194/1036, 18.7%) and males (371/1964, 18.9%, p=0.85 for the difference). Potential causes (hypertension, left ventricular hypertrophy, known coronary disease, arrhythmia, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease) were recorded in 36/194 (18.6%) of the female F+ ECG tests and 249/371 (68.2%) of the male F+ ECG tests (preinforce the value of stress imaging, particularly in women. Copyright © 2018 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

  13. Engineering-scale tests of in situ vitrification to PCB and radioactive contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liikala, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is a thermal treatment technology applicable to the remediation of hazardous chemical and radioactive contaminated soil and sludge sites. The ISV process utilizes electricity, through joule heating, to melt contaminated soil and form an inert glass and microcrystalline residual product. Applications of ISV to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and radionuclides have been demonstrated at engineering-scale in numerous tests (1,2,3). An updated evaluation of ISV applicability to treatment of PCBs and radionuclides, and recent test results are presented herein

  14. History Dependence of the Microstructure on Time-Dependent Deformation During In-Situ Cooling of a Nickel-Based Single-Crystal Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwisawas, Chinnapat; D'Souza, Neil; Collins, David M.; Bhowmik, Ayan; Roebuck, Bryan

    2018-05-01

    Time-dependent plastic deformation through stress relaxation and creep deformation during in-situ cooling of the as-cast single-crystal superalloy CMSX-4® has been studied via neutron diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, electro-thermal miniature testing, and analytical modeling across two temperature regimes. Between 1000 °C and 900 °C, stress relaxation prevails and gives rise to softening as evidenced by a decreased dislocation density and the presence of long segment stacking faults in γ phase. Lattice strains decrease in both the γ matrix and γ' precipitate phases. A constitutive viscoplastic law derived from in-situ isothermal relaxation test under-estimates the equivalent plastic strain in the prediction of the stress and strain evolution during cooling in this case. It is thereby shown that the history dependence of the microstructure needs to be taken into account while deriving a constitutive law and which becomes even more relevant at high temperatures approaching the solvus. Higher temperature cooling experiments have also been carried out between 1300 °C and 1150 °C to measure the evolution of stress and plastic strain close to the γ' solvus temperature. In-situ cooling of samples using ETMT shows that creep dominates during high-temperature deformation between 1300 °C and 1220 °C, but below a threshold temperature, typically 1220 °C work hardening begins to prevail from increasing γ' fraction and resulting in a rapid increase in stress. The history dependence of prior accumulated deformation is also confirmed in the flow stress measurements using a single sample while cooling. The saturation stresses in the flow stress experiments show very good agreement with the stresses measured in the cooling experiments when viscoplastic deformation is dominant. This study demonstrates that experimentation during high-temperature deformation as well as the history dependence of the microstructure during cooling plays a key role in deriving

  15. Color Shift Modeling of Light-Emitting Diode Lamps in Step-Loaded Stress Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, Miao; Yang, Daoguo; Huang, J.; Zhang, Maofen; Chen, Xianping; Liang, Caihang; Koh, S.W.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2017-01-01

    The color coordinate shift of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps is investigated by running three stress-loaded testing methods, namely step-up stress accelerated degradation testing, step-down stress accelerated degradation testing, and constant stress accelerated degradation testing. A power

  16. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them

  17. Liquid salt environment stress-rupture testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weiju; Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2016-03-22

    Disclosed herein are systems, devices and methods for stress-rupture testing selected materials within a high-temperature liquid salt environment. Exemplary testing systems include a load train for holding a test specimen within a heated inert gas vessel. A thermal break included in the load train can thermally insulate a load cell positioned along the load train within the inert gas vessel. The test specimen can include a cylindrical gage portion having an internal void filled with a molten salt during stress-rupture testing. The gage portion can have an inner surface area to volume ratio of greater than 20 to maximize the corrosive effect of the molten salt on the specimen material during testing. Also disclosed are methods of making a salt ingot for placement within the test specimen.

  18. A negative bioventing feasibility test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Greene, D.W.; Herbes, S.E.; Walzel, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    A bioventing feasibility test was conducted at a hydrocarbon fuel spill site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The soils at this site are generally of low air permeability and are representative of the clayey soils encountered at several Department of Energy sites and throughout the southeastern United States. The tests included an in situ air permeability test and in situ respiration tests at three well where highest soil contamination was measured. The in situ respiration tests showed that there was the potential for significant biodegradation in the soil with adequate oxygenation. The in situ permeability tests indicated that the majority of flow was trough fractures, rather than through the bulk soils. A helium tracer test verified that injected gas flowed directly to the surface through a small number of fractures, with no flow reaching the monitoring wells. These results indicate that oxygen transport to the bulk soils would be severely limited by diffusion, such that bioventing was deemed not feasible for this site. In light of these results, the importance of testing for fracture flow in soils of lower permeability is stressed -- whether the technology is bioventing or conventional soil venting

  19. 40 CFR 90.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 90.329... Equipment Provisions § 90.329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for thermally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10...

  20. 40 CFR 91.329 - Catalyst thermal stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Catalyst thermal stress test. 91.329....329 Catalyst thermal stress test. (a) Oven characteristics. The oven used for termally stressing the test catalyst must be capable of maintaining a temperature of 500 ±5 °C and 1000 ±10 °C. (b) Evaluation...

  1. In-situ testing of high efficiency filters at AEE Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraser, D.C.

    1977-10-01

    This paper discusses experience in the testing of high efficiency filters in a variety of reactor and plant installations at AEE Winfrith. There is rarely any concern about the effectiveness of the filter as supplied by any reputable manufacturer. Experience has shown there is a need to check for defects in the installation of filters which could lead to by-passing of aerosols and it is desirable to perform periodical re-tests to ensure that no subsequent deterioration occurs. It is important to use simple, portable apparatus for such tests; methods based on the use of sodium chloride aerosols, although suitable for the testing of filters prior to installation, involve apparatus which is too bulky for in-situ testing. At Winfrith a double automatic Pollak counter has been developed and used routinely since 1970. The aerosol involved has a particle size far smaller than the size most likely to penetrate intact filters, but this is irrelevant when one is primarily interested in particles which by-pass the filter. Comparisons with other methods of testing filters will be described. There is remarkably good agreement between the efficiency of the filter installation as measured by a Pollak counter compared with techniques involving aerosols of sodium chloride and di octyl phthalate (DOP), presumably because the leakage around the filter is independent of particle size. (author)

  2. Examining the validity of Stoney-equation for in-situ stress measurements in thin film electrodes using a large-deformation finite-element procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jici; Wei, Yujie; Cheng, Yang-Tse

    2018-05-01

    During the lithiation and delithiation of a thin film electrode, stress in the electrode is deduced from the curvature change of the film using the Stoney equation. The accuracy of such a measurement is conditioned on the assumptions that (a) the mechanical properties of the electrode remain unchanged during lithiation and (b) small deformation holds. Here, we demonstrate that the change in elastic properties can influence the measurement of the stress in thin film electrodes. We consider the coupling between diffusion and deformation during lithiation and delithiation of thin film electrodes and implement the constitutive behavior in a finite-deformation finite element procedure. We demonstrate that both the variation in elastic properties in thin film electrodes and finite-deformation during lithiation and delithiation would challenge the applicability of the Stoney-equation for in-situ stress measurements of thin film electrodes.

  3. Testing the stress shadow hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzer, Karen R.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2005-05-01

    A fundamental question in earthquake physics is whether aftershocks are predominantly triggered by static stress changes (permanent stress changes associated with fault displacement) or dynamic stresses (temporary stress changes associated with earthquake shaking). Both classes of models provide plausible explanations for earthquake triggering of aftershocks, but only the static stress model predicts stress shadows, or regions in which activity is decreased by a nearby earthquake. To test for whether a main shock has produced a stress shadow, we calculate time ratios, defined as the ratio of the time between the main shock and the first earthquake to follow it and the time between the last earthquake to precede the main shock and the first earthquake to follow it. A single value of the time ratio is calculated for each 10 × 10 km bin within 1.5 fault lengths of the main shock epicenter. Large values of the time ratio indicate a long wait for the first earthquake to follow the main shock and thus a potential stress shadow, whereas small values indicate the presence of aftershocks. Simulations indicate that the time ratio test should have sufficient sensitivity to detect stress shadows if they are produced in accordance with the rate and state friction model. We evaluate the 1989 MW 7.0 Loma Prieta, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, 1994 MW 6.7 Northridge, and 1999 MW 7.1 Hector Mine main shocks. For each main shock, there is a pronounced concentration of small time ratios, indicating the presence of aftershocks, but the number of large time ratios is less than at other times in the catalog. This suggests that stress shadows are not present. By comparing our results to simulations we estimate that we can be at least 98% confident that the Loma Prieta and Landers main shocks did not produce stress shadows and 91% and 84% confident that stress shadows were not generated by the Hector Mine and Northridge main shocks, respectively. We also investigate the long hypothesized existence

  4. Role of in-situ simulation for training in healthcare: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Viji; Matei, Veronica; Ray, Jessica

    2017-12-01

    Simulation has now been acknowledged as an important part of training in healthcare, and most academic hospitals have a dedicated simulation center. In-situ simulation occurs in patient care units with scenarios involving healthcare professionals in their actual working environment. The purpose of this review is to describe the process of putting together the components of in-situ simulation for training programs and to review outcomes studied, and challenges with this approach. In-situ simulation has been used to 'test-drive' new centers, train personnel in new procedures in existing centers, for recertification training and to uncover latent threats in clinical care areas. It has also emerged as an attractive alternative to traditional simulations for institutions that do not have their own simulation center. In-situ simulation can be used to improve reliability and safety especially in areas of high risk, and in high-stress environments. It is also a reasonable and attractive alternative for programs that want to conduct interdisciplinary simulations for their trainees and faculty, and for those who do not have access to a fully functional simulation center. Further research needs to be done in assessing effectiveness of training using this method and the effect of such training on clinical outcomes.

  5. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  6. A pressure core ultrasonic test system for on-board analysis of gas hydrate-bearing sediments under in situ pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Zhou, Weihua; Xue, Kaihua; Wei, Rupeng; Ling, Zheng

    2018-05-01

    The enormous potential as an alternative energy resource has made natural gas hydrates a material of intense research interest. Their exploration and sample characterization require a quick and effective analysis of the hydrate-bearing cores recovered under in situ pressures. Here a novel Pressure Core Ultrasonic Test System (PCUTS) for on-board analysis of sediment cores containing gas hydrates at in situ pressures is presented. The PCUTS is designed to be compatible with an on-board pressure core transfer device and a long gravity-piston pressure-retained corer. It provides several advantages over laboratory core analysis including quick and non-destructive detection, in situ and successive acoustic property acquisition, and remission of sample storage and transportation. The design of the unique assembly units to ensure the in situ detection is demonstrated, involving the U-type protecting jackets, transducer precession device, and pressure stabilization system. The in situ P-wave velocity measurements make the detection of gas hydrate existence in the sediments possible on-board. Performance tests have verified the feasibility and sensitivity of the ultrasonic test unit, showing the dependence of P-wave velocity on gas hydrate saturation. The PCUTS has been successfully applied for analysis of natural samples containing gas hydrates recovered from the South China Sea. It is indicated that on-board P-wave measurements could provide a quick and effective understanding of the hydrate occurrence in natural samples, which can assist further resource exploration, assessment, and subsequent detailed core analysis.

  7. Triaxial Wetting Test on Rockfill Materials under Stress Combination Conditions of Spherical Stress p and Deviatoric Stress q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-yi Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A GCTS medium-sized triaxial apparatus is used to conduct a single-line method wetting test on three kinds of rockfill materials of different mother rocks such as mixture of sandstone and slate, and dolomite and granite, and the test stress conditions is the combination of spherical stress p and deviatoric stress q. The test results show that (1 for wetting shear strain, the effects of spherical stress p and deviatoric stress q are equivalent, and wetting shear strain and deviatoric stress q show the power function relationship preferably. (2 For wetting volumetric strain, the effect of deviatoric stress q can be neglected because it is extremely insignificant, and spherical stress p is the main influencing factor and shows the power function relationship preferably. (3 The wetting strains decrease significantly with the increase in initial water content and sample density generally, but the excessively high dry density will increase the wetting deformation. Also, the wetting strains will decrease with the increase in the saturated uniaxial compressive strength and average softening coefficient of the mother rock. Based on the test results, a wetting strain model is proposed for rockfill materials. The verification results indicate that the model satisfactorily reflects the development law of wetting deformation.

  8. Analysis of in-situ rock joint strength using digital borehole scanner images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, Bhaskar Bahadur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The availability of high resolution digital images of borehole walls using the Borehole Scanner System has made it possible to develop new methods of in-situ rock characterization. This thesis addresses particularly new approaches to the characterization of in-situ joint strength arising from surface roughness. An image processing technique is used to extract the roughness profile from joints in the unrolled image of the borehole wall. A method for estimating in-situ Rengers envelopes using this data is presented along with results from using the method on joints in a borehole in porphyritic granite. Next, an analysis of the joint dilation angle anisotropy is described and applied to the porphyritic granite joints. The results indicate that the dilation angle of the joints studied are anisotropic at small scales and tend to reflect joint waviness as scale increases. A procedure to unroll the opposing roughness profiles to obtain a two dimensional sample is presented. The measurement of apertures during this process is shown to produce an error which increases with the dip of the joint. The two dimensional sample of opposing profiles is used in a new kinematic analysis of the joint shear stress-shear deformation behavior. Examples of applying these methods on the porphyritic granite joints are presented. The unrolled opposing profiles were used in a numerical simulation of a direct shear test using Discontinuous Deformation Analysis. Results were compared to laboratory test results using core samples containing the same joints. The simulated dilatancy and shear stress-shear deformation curves were close to the laboratory curves in the case of a joint in porphyritic granite.

  9. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  10. CATSIUS CLAY PROJECT: Calculation and testing of behaviour of unsaturated clay as barrier in radioactive waste repositories: stage 3: validation exercises at a large in situ scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E E; Alcoverro, J

    1999-07-01

    Stage 3 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at a Large in situ Scale includes two Benchmarks: Benchmark 3.1: In situ Hydration of Boom Clay Pellets (BACCHUS 2) and Benchmark 3.2: FEBEX Mock-up Test. The BACCHUS 2 in situ test was performed in the HADES underground laboratory (Mol, Belgium) to demonstrate and optimize an installation procedure for a clay based material and to study its hydration process. After drilling a vertical shaft (540 mm in diameter, 3.0 m in length) in the host Boom clay, a central filter (90 mm in diameter) was placed, the remaining space was filled with a mixture of clay pellets and clay powder and the assembly was sealed at the upper end by a resin plug (0.20 m in thickness) over which concrete was poured. The test was instrumented so that it could be used as a validation experiment. Total stress, pore water pressure and water content measurements were performed both in the backfill material and in the surrounding clay massif. Once the installation was complete, the natural hydration of the backfill material began (day 0). To accelerate the hydration process, on day 516 water was injected through the central filter. On day 624, after the saturation of the backfill was reached, the hydraulic circuit was closed and the undrained response of the system backfill-host clay was monitored until an overall steady state was reached. Partners were asked to provide predictions for the evolution of the pore water pressure and total pressure of various points where appropriate sensors are installed. This benchmark addresses the Hydro-Mechanical response of an unsaturated low density clay barrier under natural and artificial hydration. (Author)

  11. A Hydraulic Stress Measurement System for Deep Borehole Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ask, Maria; Ask, Daniel; Cornet, Francois; Nilsson, Tommy

    2017-04-01

    Luleå University of Technology (LTU) is developing and building a wire-line system for hydraulic rock stress measurements, with funding from the Swedish Research Council and Luleå University of Technology. In this project, LTU is collaborating with University of Strasbourg and Geosigma AB. The stress state influences drilling and drillability, as well as rock mass stability and permeability. Therefore, knowledge about the state of in-situ stress (stress magnitudes, and orientations) and its spatial variation with depth is essential for many underground rock engineering projects, for example for underground storage of hazardous material (e.g. nuclear waste, carbon dioxide), deep geothermal exploration, and underground infrastructure (e.g. tunneling, hydropower dams). The system is designed to conduct hydraulic stress testing in slim boreholes. There are three types of test methods: (1) hydraulic fracturing, (2) sleeve fracturing and (3) hydraulic testing of pre-existing fractures. These are robust methods for determining in situ stresses from boreholes. Integration of the three methods allows determination of the three-dimensional stress tensor and its spatial variation with depth in a scientific unambiguously way. The stress system is composed of a downhole and a surface unit. The downhole unit consists of hydraulic fracturing equipment (straddle packers and downhole imaging tool) and their associated data acquisition systems. The testing system is state of the art in several aspects including: (1) Large depth range (3 km), (2) Ability to test three borehole dimensions (N=76 mm, H=96 mm, and P=122 mm), (3) Resistivity imager maps the orientation of tested fracture; (4) Highly stiff and resistive to corrosion downhole testing equipment; and (5) Very detailed control on the injection flow rate and cumulative volume is obtained by a hydraulic injection pump with variable piston rate, and a highly sensitive flow-meter. At EGU General Assembly 2017, we would like to

  12. Study on development of evaluation technique of in-situ tracer test in Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory project (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hideharu; Amano, Kenji; Maekawa, Keisuke; Kunimaru, Takanori; Naemura, Yumi; Ijiri, Yuji; Motoshima, Takayuki; Suzuki, Shunichi; Teshima, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    In the Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory Project, in-situ tracer tests are valuable and important as the investigations to obtain the mass transportation data of fractures in hostrock. However, it is difficult that the in-situ tests are executed under various conditions due to long test period and the tests results are evaluated about permeable heterogeneity in a fracture and/or scale effects. In this study, a number of tracer tests are simulated in a fictitious single plate fracture generated on computer. And the transport parameters are identified by fitting one- and two-dimensional models to the breakthrough curves obtained from the simulations in order to investigate the applicability of these models to the evaluation of in-situ tracer test. As a result, one-dimensional model yields larger longitudinal dispersion length than two-dimensional model in the both cases of homogeneous and heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields of the fictitious fracture. This is because that the effect of transverse dispersion has to be included in the longitudinal dispersion length parameter in the one-dimensional model. It is also found that the larger dipole ratio and the larger natural groundwater flow crossing the flow generated between two boreholes make the identified longitudinal dispersion length larger. And, the longitudinal dispersion length identified from a tracer test is smaller and/or larger than the macroscopic longitudinal dispersion length identified from whole fracture. It is clarified that these are occurred by shorter or longer distance between boreholes compare to the correlation length of geostatistical heterogeneity of fictitious fracture. (author)

  13. Have you stress tested your assay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Cao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: When a clinical assay is stressed with extraordinarily high volume of specimens over a short period of time, extra caution may be needed to avoid systematic errors and biases. Here we report our experience with a HgbA1c assay used for high volume wellness screening purpose, to illustrate the importance of stress testing during assay validation. Design and Methods: Over 15,000 whole blood specimens were tested for HgbA1c in a period of 2 months. HgbA1c was tested by an immunoturbidimetric method on a high through-put automation line. The HgbA1c population distribution in our study was compared to that from the NHANES database. Daily distributions of HgbA1c values ≥6%, means and medians were plotted. Correlation studies were performed between the high through-put immunoturbidimetric assay and a medium through-put HPLC method. Results: We observed a shift of HgbA1c distribution to the higher values compared to the NHANES. A bias of 15–20% was noted from further stress testing where large number of samples were batched and tested using the immunoturbidimetric assay. A 5–7% higher bias remained after implementing a cuvette washing program after each HgbA1c sample. We hypothesized this bias was caused by build-up of blood cell fragments in the cuvettes when continuous whole blood samples are run through the system. Our experience suggests stress testing needs to be incorporated early in the test validation process for high volume batched screening applications. This seemingly extra validation step may save significant troubleshooting and retesting efforts down the road. Keywords: Hemoglobin A1c, Immunoturbidimetric assay, HPLC, Quality assurance, Systematic bias, High volume, Automation

  14. A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M.; Siegrist, R.L.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO 4 ). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO 4 , and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated

  15. Critical wall shear stress for the EHEDG test method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Friis, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In order to simulate the results of practical cleaning tests on closed processing equipment, based on wall shear stress predicted by computational fluid dynamics, a critical wall shear stress is required for that particular cleaning method. This work presents investigations that provide a critical...... wall shear stress of 3 Pa for the standardised EHEDG cleaning test method. The cleaning tests were performed on a test disc placed in a radial flowcell assay. Turbulent flow conditions were generated and the corresponding wall shear stresses were predicted from CFD simulations. Combining wall shear...... stress predictions from a simulation using the low Re k-epsilon and one using the two-layer model of Norris and Reynolds were found to produce reliable predictions compared to empirical solutions for the ideal flow case. The comparison of wall shear stress curves predicted for the real RFC...

  16. Comprehensive validation scheme for in situ fiber optics dissolution method for pharmaceutical drug product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Tahseen; Liu, Qian Julie; Vivilecchia, Richard; Joshi, Yatindra

    2009-03-01

    There has been a growing interest during the past decade in the use of fiber optics dissolution testing. Use of this novel technology is mainly confined to research and development laboratories. It has not yet emerged as a tool for end product release testing despite its ability to generate in situ results and efficiency improvement. One potential reason may be the lack of clear validation guidelines that can be applied for the assessment of suitability of fiber optics. This article describes a comprehensive validation scheme and development of a reliable, robust, reproducible and cost-effective dissolution test using fiber optics technology. The test was successfully applied for characterizing the dissolution behavior of a 40-mg immediate-release tablet dosage form that is under development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey. The method was validated for the following parameters: linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness. In particular, robustness was evaluated in terms of probe sampling depth and probe orientation. The in situ fiber optic method was found to be comparable to the existing manual sampling dissolution method. Finally, the fiber optic dissolution test was successfully performed by different operators on different days, to further enhance the validity of the method. The results demonstrate that the fiber optics technology can be successfully validated for end product dissolution/release testing. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrissi, Hosni; Kobler, Aaron; Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique; Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas; Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane; Raskin, Jean-Pierre; Kübel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected

  18. Plasticity mechanisms in ultrafine grained freestanding aluminum thin films revealed by in-situ transmission electron microscopy nanomechanical testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrissi, Hosni, E-mail: hosni.idrissi@ua.ac.be [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Kobler, Aaron [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials (KIT and TUD) at Technische Universität Darmstadt (TUD), Petersenstr. 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Schryvers, Dominique [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Coulombier, Michael; Pardoen, Thomas [Institute of Mechanics, Materials and Civil Engineering, Université catholique de Louvain, Place Sainte Barbe 2, B-1348 Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium); Galceran, Montserrat; Godet, Stéphane [Matters and Materials Department, Université Libre de Bruxelles, 50 Av. FD Roosevelt CP194/03, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Information and Communications Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Microwave Laboratory, Université catholique de Louvain, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Kübel, Christian [Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - KIT, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-03-10

    In-situ bright field transmission electron microscopy (TEM) nanomechanical tensile testing and in-situ automated crystallographic orientation mapping in TEM were combined to unravel the elementary mechanisms controlling the plasticity of ultrafine grained Aluminum freestanding thin films. The characterizations demonstrate that deformation proceeds with a transition from grain rotation to intragranular dislocation glide and starvation plasticity mechanism at about 1% deformation. The grain rotation is not affected by the character of the grain boundaries. No grain growth or twinning is detected.

  19. Mid-scale tests of in situ burning in a new wave tank at Prudhoe Bay, AK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buist, I.; McCourt, J.; Mullin, J.; Glover, N.; Hutton, C.; McHale, J.

    1998-01-01

    A series of mid-scale research burns with weathered Alaska North Slope crude, Milne Pt. crude and emulsion slicks were carried out in the fall of 1997 in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. A suitable wave tank was developed for the in-situ burning tests. The objective was to determine the effects of oil type, emulsification, temperature and waves on in situ burning in Arctic open water conditions. More than 60 individual burns were conducted under various parameters including varying slick thickness, water content, wave energy, degree of weathering and oil type. Results showed that a spill of 60 per cent water emulsion of weathered Alaska North Slope crude was successfully burned in the highest waves tested, with an oil removal efficiency of 79 per cent, after treatment with emulsion breakers. A slick of 60 per cent water emulsion of weathered Milne Pt. crude was also successfully burned under the same conditions but without the addition of emulsion breakers. 10 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs

  20. Technical baseline description for in situ vitrification laboratory test equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beard, K.V.; Bonnenberg, R.W.; Watson, L.R.

    1991-09-01

    IN situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as possible waste treatment technology. ISV was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington, as a thermal treatment process to treat contaminated soils in place. The process, which electrically melts and dissolves soils and associated inorganic materials, simultaneously destroys and/or removes organic contaminants while incorporating inorganic contaminants into a stable, glass-like residual product. This Technical Baseline Description has been prepared to provide high level descriptions of the design of the Laboratory Test model, including all design modifications and safety improvements made to data. Furthermore, the Technical Baseline Description provides a basic overview of the interface documents for configuration management, program management interfaces, safety, quality, and security requirements. 8 figs

  1. Fabrication and testing of an electrochemical microcell for in situ soft X-ray microspectroscopy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoncelli, A.; Kaulich, B.; Kiskinova, M.; Mele, C.; Prasciolu, M.; Sgura, I.; Bozzini, B.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we report on the fabrication and testing of a novel concept of electrochemical microcell for in-situ soft X-ray microspectroscopy in transmission. The microcell, fabricated by electron-beam lithography, implements an improved electrode design, with optimal current density distribution and minimised ohmic drop, allowing the same three-electrode electrochemical control achievable with traditional cells. Moreover standard electroanalytical measurements, such as cyclic voltammetry, can be routinely performed. As far as the electrolyte is concerned, we selected a room-temperature ionic-liquid. Some of the materials belonging to this class, in addition to a broad range of outstanding electrochemical properties, feature two highlights that are crucial for in situ, soft X-ray transmission work: spinnability, enabling accurate thickness control, and stability to UHV, allowing operation of an open cell in the analysis chamber vacuum (10-6 mbar). The cell can, of course, be used also with non-vacuum stable electrolytes in the sealed version developed in previous work in our group. In this study, the microcell designed, fabricated and tested in situ by applying an anodic polarisation to a Au electrode and following the formation of a distribution of corrosion features. This specific material combination presented in this work does not limit the cell concept, that can implement any electrodic material grown by lithography, any liquid electrolyte and any spinnable solid electrolyte.

  2. Deformation path effects on the internal stress development in cold worked austenitic steel deformed in tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, I.I.; Grant, B.; Sherry, A.H.; Quinta da Fonseca, J.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of cold work level and strain paths on the flow stress of austenitic stainless steels, including Bauschinger effect and associated internal stresses were investigated with both mechanical testing and neutron diffraction techniques. The main objective was to assess the effects of cold rolling: to 5%, 10%, 20% and 40% reduction and uniaxial straining on the evolution of the internal strains during the re-straining to 5% tensile strain in-situ, which is relevant for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) studies. The results of mechanical testing showed that the yield strength of material increased when it was reloaded in the forward direction and decreased well below the flow stress when the loading direction was reversed, showing a strong Bauschinger effect. The magnitude of Bauschinger effect is independent on whether tensile or compressive prestraining comes first but rather on the amount of prestrain. The assessment of the effect of prestraining methods showed that the magnitude of yield asymmetry was higher in the material prestrained by uniaxial deformation than those prestrained by cold rolling. Neutron diffraction test results showed that the elastic lattice strain difference between the maximum and minimum strain values increased consistently with the applied stress during the re-straining to 5% tensile strain in-situ along the 3 orthogonal directions of the rolled plate. It also emerged that, following the in-situ loading of cold rolled materials to 5% tensile strain, the largest strain difference occurred in the material prestrained to 20% reduction. In cold rolled samples, the peak width increased with cold work levels and during re-straining to 5% along rolling, transverse to rolling and normal directions which simulated reversed condition. In contrast to the cold rolled samples, there was neither increase nor decrease in the peak width of samples prestrained by uniaxial deformation on re-straining in reverse direction. This was rationalised in

  3. In Situ Vitrification: Recent test results for a contaminated soil melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Timmerman, C.L.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    In Situ Vitrification (ISV) is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the Department of Energy and other clients for the stabilization of soils and sludges contaminated with radioactive and hazardous chemical wastes. ISV is a process that immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline product that is similar to obsidian. In June 1987, a large-scale test of the process was completed at a transuranic- contaminated soil site. This constituted the first full-scale demonstration of the ISV process at an actual site. This paper summarizes the preliminary results of this test and describes the processes' potential adaptation to radioactive and hazardous chemical waste contaminated soils. 10 refs., 10 figs

  4. In-situ testing methods using radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauzay, G.

    1976-01-01

    Some typical applications of tracer techniques in hydrology are presented: study of the extraction of sands and gravels in a estuary; in-situ study of the transport of sediments by the swell at a depth ranging from 8 to 22m; study of the transport of sands on the site Bonne Anse - Saint Palais [fr

  5. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Loehr, C.A.; Bates, S.O.; Thompson, L.E.; McGrail, B.P.

    1991-08-01

    This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs

  6. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100 degrees to 400 degrees C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85 degrees to 95 degrees C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 degrees to 95 degrees C

  7. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.

    1994-08-16

    Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

  8. In situ measurement of solvent-mediated phase transformations during dissolution testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaltonen, Jaakko; Heinänen, Paula; Peltonen, Leena

    2006-01-01

    In this study, solvent-mediated phase transformations of theophylline (TP) and nitrofurantoin (NF) were measured in a channel flow intrinsic dissolution test system. The test set-up comprised simultaneous measurement of drug concentration in the dissolution medium (with UV-Vis spectrophotometry......) and measurement of the solid-state form of the dissolving solid (in situ with Raman spectroscopy). The solid phase transformations were also investigated off-line with scanning electron microscopy. TP anhydrate underwent a transformation to TP monohydrate, and NF anhydrate (form beta) to NF monohydrate (form II......). Transformation of TP anhydrate to TP monohydrate resulted in a clear decrease in the dissolution rate, while the transformation of NF anhydrate (form beta) to NF monohydrate (form II) could not be linked as clearly to changes in the dissolution rate. The transformation of TP was an order of magnitude faster than...

  9. Demonstration, testing, ampersand evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-01-01

    This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, open-quotes Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,close quotes Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120 degrees to 130 degrees C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow

  10. The theory and method of two-well field test for in-situ leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yixuan; Huo Jiandang; Xiang Qiulin; Tang Baobin

    2007-01-01

    Because leaching area in field test for in-situ leaching uranium is not accounted exactly, the reliability of obtaining parameters by calculating can not be ensured, and the whole test needs a long time and great investment. In two-well field test, lixiviant is injected from one well, pregnant solution is pumped out from the other, flow rate of the production well is more than that of the injection well, and uranium is not recoveried. In the case of keeping invariable ratio of pumping capacity to injecting capacity during the testing process, leaching area is not variable, can be exactly calculated. The full field test needs six months to one year. Two-well test is a scientific, rapid, minimal spending field test method, and is widely used in Commonwealth of Independent States. (authors)

  11. In-Situ Leak Testing And Replacement Of Glovebox Isolator, Or Containment Unit Gloves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Julio M.; Macdonald, John M.; Steckle, Jr., Warren P.

    2004-11-02

    A test plug for in-situ testing a glove installed in a glovebox is provided that uses a top plate and a base plate, and a diametrically expandable sealing mechanism fitting between the two plates. The sealing mechanism engages the base plate to diametrically expand when the variable distance between the top plate and the bottom plate is reduced. An inlet valve included on the top plate is used to introducing a pressurized gas to the interior of the glove, and a pressure gauge located on the top plate is used to monitor the interior glove pressure.

  12. When we test, do we stress? Impact of the testing environment on cortisol secretion and memory performance in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindi, Shireen; Fiocco, Alexandra J; Juster, Robert-Paul; Pruessner, Jens; Lupien, Sonia J

    2013-08-01

    The majority of studies find that older adults have worse memory performance than young adults. However, contextual features in the testing environment may be perceived as stressful by older adults, increasing their stress hormone levels. Given the evidence that older adults are highly sensitive to the effects of stress hormones (cortisol) on memory performance, it is postulated that a stressful testing environment in older adults can lead to an acute stress response and to memory impairments. The current study compared salivary cortisol levels and memory performance in young and older adults tested in environments manipulated to be stressful (unfavourable condition) or not stressful (favourable condition) for each age group. 28 young adults and 32 older adults were tested in two testing conditions: (1) a condition favouring young adults (constructed to be less stressful for young adults), and (2) a condition favouring older adults (constructed to be less stressful for older adults). The main outcome measure was salivary cortisol levels. Additionally, immediate and delayed memory performances were assessed during each condition. In older adults only, we found significantly high cortisol levels and low memory performance in the condition favouring young adults. In contrast, cortisol levels were lower and memory performance was better when older adults were tested in conditions favouring them. There was no effect of testing condition in young adults. The results demonstrate that older adults' memory performance is highly sensitive to the testing environment. These findings have important implications for both research and clinical settings in which older adults are tested for memory performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Stress corrosion testing of irradiated cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunde, L.; Olshausen, K.D.

    1980-01-01

    Samples from two fuel rods with different cladding have been stress corrosion tested by closed-end argon-iodine pressurization at 320 0 C. The fuel rods with stress relieved and recrystallized Zircaloy-2 had received burnups of 10.000 and 20.000 MWd/ton UO 2 , respectively. It was found that the SCC failure stress was unchanged or slightly higher for the irradiated than for the unirradiated control tubes. The tubes failed consistently in the end with the lowest irradiation dose. The diameter increase of the irradiated cladding during the test was 1.1% for the stress-relieved samples and 0.24% for the recrystallized samples. SEM examination revealed no major differences between irradiated and unirradiated cladding. A ''semi-ductile'' fracture zone in recrystallized material is described in some detail. (author)

  14. A single well pumping and recovery test to measure in situ acrotelm transmissivity in raised bogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, van der S.

    2004-01-01

    A quasi-steady-state single pit pumping and recovery test to measure in situ the transmissivity of the highly permeable upper layer of raised bogs, the acrotelm, is described and discussed. The basic concept is the expanding depression cone during both pumping and recovery. It is shown that applying

  15. Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1994-07-07

    A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

  16. Sex and stress: Men and women show different cortisol responses to psychological stress induced by the Trier social stress test and the Iowa singing social stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke-Hernández, Alaine E; Okerstrom, Katrina L; Bowles Edwards, Angela; Tranel, Daniel

    2017-01-02

    Acute psychological stress affects each of us in our daily lives and is increasingly a topic of discussion for its role in mental illness, aging, cognition, and overall health. A better understanding of how such stress affects the body and mind could contribute to the development of more effective clinical interventions and prevention practices. Over the past 3 decades, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) has been widely used to induce acute stress in a laboratory setting based on the principles of social evaluative threat, namely, a judged speech-making task. A comparable alternative task may expand options for examining acute stress in a controlled laboratory setting. This study uses a within-subjects design to examine healthy adult participants' (n = 20 men, n = 20 women) subjective stress and salivary cortisol responses to the standard TSST (involving public speaking and math) and the newly created Iowa Singing Social Stress Test (I-SSST). The I-SSST is similar to the TSST but with a new twist: public singing. Results indicated that men and women reported similarly high levels of subjective stress in response to both tasks. However, men and women demonstrated different cortisol responses; men showed a robust response to both tasks, and women displayed a lesser response. These findings are in line with previous literature and further underscore the importance of examining possible sex differences throughout various phases of research, including design, analysis, and interpretation of results. Furthermore, this nascent examination of the I-SSST suggests a possible alternative for inducing stress in the laboratory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. In situ impulse test: an experimental and analytical evaluation of data interpretation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    Special experimental field testing and analytical studies were undertaken at Fort Lawton in Seattle, Washington, to study ''close-in'' wave propagation and evaluate data interpretation procedures for a new in situ impulse test. This test was developed to determine the shear wave velocity and dynamic modulus of soils underlying potential nuclear power plant sites. The test is different from conventional geophysical testing in that the velocity variation with strain is determined for each test. In general, strains between 10 -1 and 10 -3 percent are achieved. The experimental field work consisted of performing special tests in a large test sand fill to obtain detailed ''close-in'' data. Six recording transducers were placed at various points on the energy source, while approximately 37 different transducers were installed within the soil fill, all within 7 feet of the energy source. Velocity measurements were then taken simultaneously under controlled test conditions to study shear wave propagation phenomenology and help evaluate data interpretation procedures. Typical test data are presented along with detailed descriptions of the results

  18. In situ measurements of Merensky pillar behaviour at Impala Platinum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Watson, BP

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available to stabilize the stoping excavations. This paper describes the in situ measurement, of stress within a Merensky pillar from Impala Platinum. These measurements were used to derive a stress-strain curve that includes pre and post failure behaviour. 2D FLAC...

  19. In-situ observation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in AA2024-T3 under constant load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Frankel, G.S.; Zoofan, B.; Rokhlin, S.I.

    2007-01-01

    A specially designed setup was used to apply a constant load to a thin sheet sample of AA2024-T3 and, using microfocal X-ray radiography, to observe in situ the resulting intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) from the exposed edge of the sample. The growth of and competition between multiple IGSCC sites was monitored. In many experiments twin cracks initiated close to each other. Furthermore, the deepest crack at the beginning of every experiment was found to slow or stop growing, and was then surpassed by another crack that eventually penetrated through the sample. These observations cannot be explained by the theory of fracture mechanics in inert environments. The possible mechanisms underlying the competition between cracks are discussed

  20. Relationships between adolescents' test anxiety, stress and sleep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewald, J.F.; Meijer, A.M.; Oort, F.J.; Bögels, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to investigate the relationship between adolescents' test anxiety, stress and different aspects of sleep. Method. 175 adolescents (70.8% girls, mean age 15.14 years) participated in the study. Test anxiety, stress and chronic sleep reduction were assessed at baseline using

  1. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Interim report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-02-01

    This report describes the two in situ vitrification field tests conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in- place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste, indicating the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste

  2. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Interim report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the two in situ vitrification field tests conducted in July and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste, indicating the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 8 refs., 91 figs., 13 tabs

  3. In Situ Vitrification preliminary results from the first large-scale radioactive test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buelt, J.L.; Westsik, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The first large-scale radioactive test (LSRT) of In Situ Vitrification (ISV) has been completed. In Situ Vitrification is a process whereby joule heating immobilizes contaminated soil in place by converting it to a durable glass and crystalline waste form. The LSRT was conducted at an actual transuranic contaminated soil site on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The test had two objectives: 1) determine large-scale processing performance and 2) produce a waste form that can be fully evaluated as a potential technique for the final disposal of transuranic-contaminated soil sites at Hanford. This accomplishment has provided technical data to evaluate the ISV process for its potential in the final disposition of transuranic-contaminated soil sites at Hanford. The LSRT was completed in June 1987 after 295 hours of operation and 460 MWh of electrical energy dissipated to the molten soil. This resulted in a minimum of a 450-t block of vitrified soil extending to a depth of 7.3m (24 ft). The primary contaminants vitrified during the demonstration were Pu and Am transuranics, but also included up to 26,000 ppm fluorides. Preliminary data show that their retention in the vitrified product exceeded predictions meaning that fewer contaminants needed to be removed from the gaseous effluents by the processing equipment. The gaseous effluents were contained and treated throughout the run; that is, no radioactive or hazardous chemical releases were detected

  4. In-situ SCC observation on thermally-sensitized type 304 stainless steel irradiated to 1 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, J.; Nemoto, Y.; Tsukada, T.; Usami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hide, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is concerned as being one of the specific problems for water-cooled first wall/blanket components in the design activity of international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). To examine the crack initiation and growth behaviors of IASCC, in-situ observation on gage length of specimens was conducted during slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in high temperature water. Results from in-situ observation on Type 304 stainless steel (SS) irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} have been reported already. Type 304 SS was subjected to a solution annealing (SA), a thermally sensitization (TS) or a cold working (CW, 20%) and irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). After neutron irradiation, SSRT for the specimens was conducted in oxygenated high purity water at 561 K. The gage length of the specimen was observed through a window equipped on an autoclave during the SSRT. Subsequently, fracture surface examination was performed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In fracture surface examination of the specimens irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, almost entire intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was exhibited for the TS material while mixtures of transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and ductile dimple fracture were observed for the SA and the CW materials. Although crack initiation was observed immediately after maximum stress for the CW irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2}, crack initiation was observed immediately before maximum stress (99% of maximum stress) for the CW irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in in-situ observation. (authors)

  5. The application of in situ analytical transmission electron microscopy to the study of preferential intergranular oxidation in Alloy 600

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M.G., E-mail: m.g.burke@manchester.ac.uk; Bertali, G.; Prestat, E.; Scenini, F.; Haigh, S.J.

    2017-05-15

    In situ analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) can provide a unique perspective on dynamic reactions in a variety of environments, including liquids and gases. In this study, in situ analytical TEM techniques have been applied to examine the localised oxidation reactions that occur in a Ni-Cr-Fe alloy, Alloy 600, using a gas environmental cell at elevated temperatures. The initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation, shown to be an important precursor phenomenon for intergranular stress corrosion cracking in pressurized water reactors (PWRs), have been successfully identified using the in situ approach. Furthermore, the detailed observations correspond to the ex situ results obtained from bulk specimens tested in hydrogenated steam and in high temperature PWR primary water. The excellent agreement between the in situ and ex situ oxidation studies demonstrates that this approach can be used to investigate the initial stages of preferential intergranular oxidation relevant to nuclear power systems. - Highlights: • In situ analytical TEM has been performed in 1 bar H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O vapor at 360–480 °C. • Nanoscale GB migration and solute partitioning correlate with ex situ data for Alloy 600 in H{sub 2}-steam. • This technique can provide new insights into localised reactions associated with localised oxidation.

  6. Nonexercise cardiac stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.L.; Baldwin, T.

    1989-01-01

    Many patients who require evaluation for coronary artery disease are unable to undergo exercise stress testing because of physiologic or psychological limitations. Drs Vacek and Baldwin describe three alternative methods for assessment of cardiac function in these patients, all of which have high levels of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. 23 references

  7. Iterative procedure for in-situ EUV optical testing with an incoherent source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyawaka, Ryan; Naulleau, Patrick; Zakhor, Avideh

    2009-12-01

    We propose an iterative method for in-situ optical testing under partially coherent illumination that relies on the rapid computation of aerial images. In this method a known pattern is imaged with the test optic at several planes through focus. A model is created that iterates through possible aberration maps until the through-focus series of aerial images matches the experimental result. The computation time of calculating the through-focus series is significantly reduced by a-SOCS, an adapted form of the Sum Of Coherent Systems (SOCS) decomposition. In this method, the Hopkins formulation is described by an operator S which maps the space of pupil aberrations to the space of aerial images. This operator is well approximated by a truncated sum of its spectral components.

  8. In situ micro Raman spectroscopy for characterization of oxide film formed on the new surface and for measurements of the stress of oxide film formed on 304L stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, A.; Takegoshi, M.; Shoji, T. [Fracture Research Inst., Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) consists of two distinct events viz., i) crack initiation and ii) crack propagation. On a smooth surface, the EAC initiates by the rupture or by the degradation of the surface film due to the combined action of stress and an electrochemical reaction of the materials with the environment. The mechanical properties of the surface oxide films are also important considerations when determining the susceptibility to EAC. In this research, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (MRS) was applied for in-situ oxides characterization and for in-situ measurements of the stress in oxide film formed on the surface of 304L stainless steel during the scratching electrode and the slow strain rate test (SSRT), respectively. The passive oxide film growth formed on the bare surface was continuously monitored by MRS as a function of time. For stress measurements, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was focused on and raman shift at Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} peak of Raman spectrum was measured continuously. The strain rate was 8.2 x 10{sup -7}/sec. In the initial stage of SSRT, the Raman shift of surface film decreased gradually with strain. At 5% strain, the Raman shift of surface film increased rapidly to around the initial value of Raman shift. It is considered that the surface film was ruptured at this time. At 5% strain, the shift value of Raman peak of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} reached to 5 cm{sup -1}. This value (5 cm{sup -1}) corresponds to 1.2 GPa which value of tensile stress is calculated from reference data. These characteristics of oxide film will be implemented into the theoretical formulation of EAC and their implication to EAC growth rate will be discussed. (orig.)

  9. Color Shift Modeling of Light-Emitting Diode Lamps in Step-Loaded Stress Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Miao; Yang, Daoguo; Huang, J.; Zhang, Maofen; Chen, Xianping; Liang, Caihang; Koh, S.W.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2017-01-01

    The color coordinate shift of light-emitting diode (LED) lamps is investigated by running three stress-loaded testing methods, namely step-up stress accelerated degradation testing, step-down stress accelerated degradation testing, and constant stress accelerated degradation testing. A power model is proposed as the statistical model of the color shift (CS) process of LED products. Consequently, a CS mechanism constant is obtained for detecting the consistency of CS mechanisms among various s...

  10. An exploration of unsaturated zone during in-situ heating test in sedimentary soft rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Suzuki, Koichi; Ikenoya, Takafumi; Takakura, Nozomu; Tani, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    In-situ heating test has been conducted to evaluate the influence of high temperature in an underground facility at a depth of 50 m. Resistivity monitoring is thought to be effective to map the extent of the high temperature and unsaturated zone. So we have conducted resistivity tomography during the heating test. As a result, the resistivity of the rock mass around the heating well was decreased and this area was gradually expanded from the heated area during the heating. This suggests that high temperature zone is detected by resistivity tomography. The results also suggested that resistivity was increased by unsaturation of rock mass around the heating well. (author)

  11. In Situ Neutron Diffraction Analyzing Stress-Induced Phase Transformation and Martensite Elasticity in [001]-Oriented Co49Ni21Ga30 Shape Memory Alloy Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reul, A.; Lauhoff, C.; Krooß, P.; Gutmann, M. J.; Kadletz, P. M.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Niendorf, T.; Schmahl, W. W.

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies demonstrated excellent pseudoelastic behavior and cyclic stability under compressive loads in [001]-oriented Co-Ni-Ga high-temperature shape memory alloys (HT-SMAs). A narrow stress hysteresis was related to suppression of detwinning at RT and low defect formation during phase transformation due to the absence of a favorable slip system. Eventually, this behavior makes Co-Ni-Ga HT-SMAs promising candidates for several industrial applications. However, deformation behavior of Co-Ni-Ga has only been studied in the range of theoretical transformation strain in depth so far. Thus, the current study focuses not only on the activity of elementary deformation mechanisms in the pseudoelastic regime up to maximum theoretical transformation strains but far beyond. It is shown that the martensite phase is able to withstand about 5% elastic strain, which significantly increases the overall deformation capability of this alloy system. In situ neutron diffraction experiments were carried out using a newly installed testing setup on Co-Ni-Ga single crystals in order to reveal the nature of the stress-strain response seen in the deformation curves up to 10% macroscopic strain.

  12. Sanitary landfill in situ bioremediation optimization test. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This work was performed as part of a corrective action plan for the Savannah River Site Sanitary Landfill. This work was performed for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company Environmental Restoration Department as part of final implementation of a groundwater remediation system for the SRS Sanitary Landfill. Primary regulatory surveillance was provided by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control and the US Environmental Protection Agency (Region IV). The characterization, monitoring and remediation systems in the program generally consisted of a combination of innovative and baseline methods to allow comparison and evaluation. The results of these studies will be used to provide input for the full-scale groundwater remediation system for the SRS Sanitary Landfill. This report summarizes the performance of the Sanitary Landfill In Situ Optimization Test data, an evaluation of applicability, conclusions, recommendations, and related information for implementation of this remediation technology at the SRS Sanitary Landfill

  13. In situ test plan for concrete materials using low alkaline cement at Horonobe URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Yasushi; Yamada, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Masashi; Matsui, Hiroya; Matsuda, Takeshi; Konishi, Kazuhiro; Iriya, Keishiro; Noda, Masaru

    2007-03-01

    HLW (high-level radioactive waste) repository is to be constructed at depths of over three hundred meters below the surface. Shotcrete and lining will be used for safety under construction and operational period. Concrete is a kind of composite material which is constituted by aggregate, cement and additives. Low alkaline cement has been developed from the viewpoint of long term stability of the barrier systems which would be influenced by high alkaline arising from cement material. HFSC (Highly Fly-ash contained Silica-fume Cement) is one of a low alkaline cement, which contains silica fume and coal ash. It has been developed in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). JAEA are now implementing the construction of the under ground research laboratory (URL) at Horonobe for the purpose of research in deep geological science and repository engineering technology. This report shows the in situ test plan for shotcrete using HFSC at Horonobe URL with identifying requirements for cement materials to be used in HLW repository, and also reviews major literatures of low alkaline cement. This in situ test plan is aiming to assess the performance of HFSC shotcrete in terms of mechanics, workability, durability, and so on. (author)

  14. In situ TEM observation of microcrack nucleation and propagation in pure tin solder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Ying; Wang Chunqing; Li, Mingyu; Wang Weiqiang

    2006-01-01

    Microcrack nucleation and propagation behavior in pure tin solder was investigated by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) through in situ tensile test. Observation results showed that fracture process was completed in this visco-plastic material by connecting discontinuous cracks or voids. Depending on remarkable vacancy diffusion ability, microvoids were nucleated and developed in the dislocation free zone (DFZ) or super thinned area ahead of crack tip under local high stress concentration. The cracks were linked with each other by mutual dislocation emission which expedites the propagation of crack tips effectively

  15. Motivation for a High Explosive Testing Program in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    environment for several decades. Much has been learned about the impact of high in situ stress and its influence on rock bursts (violent rock ...is the possibility of evasive nuclear testing in deep mine environments where the release of high stress fields by an explosion can resemble a rock ... burst or natural earthquake. This paper provides background information on previous research in and around the deep mines of South Africa and lays

  16. On bacteria oxidizing enlargement scale test for uranium in-situ leaching at. 381 mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Kaiguang; Wang Qingliang; Liu Yingjiu; Shi Wenge; Hu Shihe; Hu Yincai; Fang Qiu

    1999-01-01

    The results of enlarged scale test of bacteria as oxidizer for uranium in-situ leaching at No 381 mine showed that redox potential of the oxidized absorbed tailing water by bacteria is more than 510 mV, without any effects on after treatments by using bacteria as oxidizer and reduce oxidizer costs 70% compared with H 2 O 2 as oxidizer

  17. Comparison of exercise stress testing with dobutamine stress echocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography for diagnosis of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, K.; Kisacik, H.L.; Oguzhan, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dobutamine stress echocardiography, Tc-99m radionuclide ventriculography (RNVG), and exercise stress testing were performed prospectively in 63 patients with suspected coronary artery disease to compare the values of exercise testing, dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG in the non-invasive diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The sensitivities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were found to be higher than that of exercise testing (93-62%, p 0.05). There were no differences between the sensitivities of the three techniques in multiple vessel disease (p>0.05). The specificities of dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG were higher than that of exercise testing (for both of the tests 86-62%, p 0.05). The results of dobutamine stress echocardiography RNVG were concordant with each other in 46 patients (76%, kappa=65%) in sectional analysis. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG tests were comparable with each other in 85% of the 189 segments (kappa=64%). The expected 5% decrease at peak doses of dobutamine was not detected in stress echocardiography in 25 patients and in RNVG in 26 of the patients. Dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG are superior to exercise testing in the diagnosis of single vessel disease and there is no significant difference between the two techniques. When the ejection fraction is considered in dobutamine stress echocardiography and RNVG, it does not make an additional contribution to the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. (author)

  18. In situ detection of porosity initiation during aluminum thin film anodizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Overmeere, Quentin; Nysten, Bernard; Proost, Joris

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution curvature measurements have been performed in situ during aluminum thin film anodizing in sulfuric acid. A well-defined transition in the rate of internal stress-induced curvature change is shown to allow for the accurate, real-time detection of porosity initiation. The validity of this in situ diagnostic tool was confirmed by a quantitative analysis of the spectral density distributions of the anodized surfaces. These were obtained by analyzing ex situ atomic force microscopy images of surfaces anodized for different times, and allowed to correlate the in situ detected transition in the rate of curvature change with the appearance of porosity.

  19. Thermal stresses in the space shuttle orbiter: Analysis versus test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grooms, H.R.; Gibson, W.F. Jr.; Benson, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    Significant temperature differences occur between the internal structure and the outer skin of the Space Shuttle Orbiter as it returns from space. These temperature differences cause important thermal stresses. A finite element model containing thousands of degrees of freedom is used to predict these stresses. A ground test was performed to verify the prediction method. The analysis and test results compare favorably. (orig.)

  20. In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided

  1. Ambient temperature testing of the G-tunnel heated block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Board, M.P.; Hardin, E.L.; Voegele, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The G-Tunnel heated block experiment is being conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project (NNWSI). The purpose of the ambient temperature testing phase is to evaluate rock-mass mechanical properties of a block (≅8 m/sup 3/) under biaxial stress changes up to 7.5 MPa above an initialization in situ value of 3.1 MPa. Results indicate that the modulus of deformation ranges from 9.7 to 17.0 GPa and Poisson's ratio ranges from 0.21 to 0.33. In general, the higher values of the modulus and Poisson's ratio were influenced by fracture propagations parallel to the compressive stress field. Other measurements indicated that cross-hole compression (p) wave velocities and single fracture permeability values were relatively insensitive to stress changes above the in situ value

  2. [Unpredictable chronic mild stress effects on antidepressants activities in forced swim test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryashov, N V; Kalinina, T S; Voronina, T A

    2015-02-01

    The experiments has been designed to study unpredictable chronic mild stress effect on anti-depressive activities of amitriptyline (10 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) in forced swim test in male outbred mice. It is shown that acute treatment with fluoxetine does not produce any antidepressant effects in mice following stress of 14 days while the sub-chronic injections of fluoxetine result in more deep depressive-like behavior. In 28 daily stressed mice, antidepressant effect of fluoxetine is observed independently of the injection rates. Amitriptyline demonstrates the antidepressant activity regardless of the duration of stress or administration scheduling, but at the same time the severity of anti-immobilization effect of amitriptyline in stressed mice is weaker in compare to non-stressed trails. Thus, the injection rates and duration of unpredictable mild chronic stress are the parameters that determine the efficiency of antidepressants in the mouse forced swimming test.

  3. Improvements in in-situ filter test methods using a total light-scattering detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, M.; Stevens, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents research aimed at providing useful data on a commonly used technique; a DOP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) aerosol and a total light-scattering photometer. Methods of increasing the sensitivity of this technique are described. Alternative methods of in-situ filter testing are also considered. The sensitivity of a typical, modern, total light-scattering photometer, as a function of particle diameter, has a broad maximum in mass terms between 0.1 and 0.4 um. At its maximum usable sensitivity the instrument can detect approx. 1 particle/cm 3 . This response can be explained by light scattering theory and particle loss in the instrument inlet. The mass median diameter of the aerosols produced by various DOP generators varies from 0.2 to 1.0μm. Experiments with good quality HEPA filters indicate a maximum penetration for particles of 0.15 - 0.2μm. Details of the studies are given and the consequences discussed. It is shown that filter penetration of -3 % can be measured in-situ with existing equipment. Methods of extending the sensitivity to measure a penetration of approx.10 -5 % are described. (author)

  4. Present-day stress magnitude at depth from leak-off tests in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariucci, M. T.; Montone, P.; Pierdominici, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present new results from the analysis of leak-off tests, performed in deep oil wells in Italy, to characterize the present-day stress magnitude and regime in the crust. In the last years we have collected a large number of data (more than 500) from different stress indicators, mainly borehole breakouts, earthquake focal mechanisms and fault data, which provided information on the present-day stress orientations. In some areas the tectonic regime has been inferred either from fault plane solutions of M≥4 earthquakes or from stress inversions of smaller earthquakes. Where seismicity lacks, the regime is not well constrained and little or no information on the magnitude of the crustal stresses is available. In order to improve our knowledge in stress regime and its magnitude in Italy, in this work we use the leak-off test technique. Each test is performed at the bottom of an open hole by sealing off a section and then slowly pressurizing with a fluid until hydraulic tensile fractures develop. The minimum horizontal stress is inferred by leak-off pressure record, the vertical stress is computed by rock density data and the maximum horizontal stress is estimated applying a specific formula from the literature. Thanks to ENI S.p.A. (Italian oil company), that kindly provided new well data, we have been able to perform a critical review of our preliminary calculations and to enhance our previous results concerning stress magnitudes. Totally, we have analyzed 192 leak-off tests at depth between 200 and 5400m (average 1800m). In particular, wells are located along the Italian peninsula and in Sicily: most of them are in the Po Plain and along the Apenninic foredeep; few are in southern Apenninic belt and a few tens are in Sicily. After an accurate selection of the most robust results, we better characterize the Italian stress regime at depth.

  5. Stress Tests for Chest Pain: When You Need an Imaging Test -- and When You Don't

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Adult , Geriatric Stress Tests for Chest Pain Stress Tests for Chest Pain When you need an ... pain isn’t from heart disease. A cardiac stress test makes the heart work hard so your ...

  6. Some factors affecting agitation leach test during in-situ leaching of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Wensheng; Jiang Yan; Wang Limin; Shi Zhenfeng; Zhao Qiaofu; MARMAR

    2014-01-01

    The agitation leaching test is one of the most fundamental research works in in-situ leaching of uranium. Some factors affecting the test results were analyzed including stirring, leaching time, oxidizer used in alkaline leach, washing solution, the amount and size of ore samples. The results indicate that stirring can enhance diffusion velocity. The leach time l or 2 days is suitable for the samples containing accessible uranium and low acid consumption minerals; whereas 3 or 4 days for those containing refractory ore to leach and slowly acid consuming minerals. For the oxidizer used in alkaline leach, potassium permanganate is better than hydrogen peroxide. Recovery calculated by the leach solution can be directly obtained by its uranium level and the original volume of lixiviant without analyzing and calculating the washing solution. The appropriate amount and size of ore samples for the agitation leaching test are 60 g and <1 mm. By controlling the above factors, the agitation leach test can improve the applicability of the different ore samples and give the more reliable data. (authors)

  7. In situ monitoring of localized shear stress and fluid flow within developing tissue constructs by Doppler optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2008-02-01

    Mechanical stimuli can be introduced to three dimensional (3D) cell cultures by use of perfusion bioreactor. Especially in musculoskeletal tissues, shear stress caused by fluid flow generally increase extra-cellular matrix (ECM) production and cell proliferation. The relationship between the shear stress and the tissue development in situ is complicated because of the non-uniform pore distribution within the cell-seeded scaffold. In this study, we firstly demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) is capable of monitoring localized fluid flow and shear stress in the complex porous scaffold by examining their variation trends at perfusion rate of 5, 8, 10 and 12 ml/hr. Then, we developed the 3D porous cellular constructs, cell-seeded chitosan scaffolds monitored during several days by DOCT. The fiber based fourier domain DOCT employed a 1300 nm superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 52 nm and a xyz resolution of 20×20×15 μm in free space. This setup allowed us not only to assess the cell growth and ECM deposition by observing their different scattering behaviors but also to further investigate how the cell attachment and ECM production has the effect on the flow shear stress and the relationship between flow rate and shear stress in the developing tissue construct. The possibility to monitor continuously the constructs under perfusion will easily indicate the effect of flow rate or shear stress on the cell viability and cell proliferation, and then discriminate the perfusion parameters affecting the pre-tissue formation rate growth.

  8. Accelerated stress testing of terrestrial solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, J. W.; Hawkins, D. C.; Prince, J. L.; Walker, H. A.

    1982-01-01

    The development of an accelerated test schedule for terrestrial solar cells is described. This schedule, based on anticipated failure modes deduced from a consideration of IC failure mechanisms, involves bias-temperature testing, humidity testing (including both 85-85 and pressure cooker stress), and thermal-cycle thermal-shock testing. Results are described for 12 different unencapsulated cell types. Both gradual electrical degradation and sudden catastrophic mechanical change were observed. These effects can be used to discriminate between cell types and technologies relative to their reliability attributes. Consideration is given to identifying laboratory failure modes which might lead to severe degradation in the field through second quadrant operation. Test results indicate that the ability of most cell types to withstand accelerated stress testing depends more on the manufacturer's design, processing, and worksmanship than on the particular metallization system. Preliminary tests comparing accelerated test results on encapsulated and unencapsulated cells are described.

  9. 77 FR 60948 - Stress Testing of Regulated Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... regulated by a primary federal financial regulatory agency, to conduct annual stress tests to determine... the regulated entities under the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of... regulated by a primary Federal financial regulatory agency shall conduct annual stress tests * * * (emphasis...

  10. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  11. Comparison of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization and Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization for Low and High Throughput HER2 Genetic Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Tim S; Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Kofoed, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    cancer patients with HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results scored as 0/1+, 2+, and 3+. HER2 genetic status was analysed using chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Scoring results were documented through digital image analysis. The cancer region...

  12. Critical Review of EU Nuclear Stress Tests in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, O.; Lorenz, P.; Wallner, A.

    2012-01-01

    In March 2011, the core melt accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) showed the world that the nuclear industry cannot prevent severe accidents from happening. The accidents in Japan proved that highly unlikely accidents cannot be excluded. The Fukushima accident confirmed the mistrust towards nuclear power among the Japanese but also European citizens. In reaction to the devastating nuclear disaster in Japan the European Council concluded in March 2011, that the safety of all EU nuclear plants should be reviewed on the basis of a comprehensive and transparent risk and safety assessment ('stress tests'). The EU Nuclear Safety Regulators Group – ENSREG took over the task to provide a “targeted reassessment of the safety margins of nuclear power plants”, thus examining whether the safety margins which were used in the licensing of NPPs are sufficient to cover unexpected events. It is important to understand that the stress tests could not take into account all key safety issues such as the capability to prevent accidents - the scope of the stress tests defined by ENSREG didn´t promise to deliver a comprehensive risk and safety assessment. According to some observers the stress tests were mainly set up to improve the confidence in the safety of European NPPs. Nevertheless, the stress tests provided some interesting findings concerning safety: This study assesses the safety of the nuclear power plants in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and the Ukraine. The introduction contains an overview of the content and procedure of the stress tests. This “Critical Review of the Stress Tests” is based on the national stress tests reports written by the national nuclear safety authorities and on the Peer review country reports attached to the Peer review report - Stress tests performed on European nuclear power plants written by the Peer review Teams, the Peer Review Board respectively, and endorsed by ENSREG [ENSREG 2012a, ENSREG 2012c]. It

  13. Critical Review of EU Nuclear Stress Tests in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, O.; Lorenz, P.; Wallner, A.

    2012-07-01

    In March 2011, the core melt accidents at the Fukushima Daiichi 1 nuclear power plant (NPP) showed the world that the nuclear industry cannot prevent severe accidents from happening. The accidents in Japan proved that highly unlikely accidents cannot be excluded. The Fukushima accident confirmed the mistrust towards nuclear power among the Japanese but also European citizens. In reaction to the devastating nuclear disaster in Japan the European Council concluded in March 2011, that the safety of all EU nuclear plants should be reviewed on the basis of a comprehensive and transparent risk and safety assessment ('stress tests'). The EU Nuclear Safety Regulators Group – ENSREG took over the task to provide a “targeted reassessment of the safety margins of nuclear power plants”, thus examining whether the safety margins which were used in the licensing of NPPs are sufficient to cover unexpected events. It is important to understand that the stress tests could not take into account all key safety issues such as the capability to prevent accidents - the scope of the stress tests defined by ENSREG didn´t promise to deliver a comprehensive risk and safety assessment. According to some observers the stress tests were mainly set up to improve the confidence in the safety of European NPPs. Nevertheless, the stress tests provided some interesting findings concerning safety: This study assesses the safety of the nuclear power plants in Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania and the Ukraine. The introduction contains an overview of the content and procedure of the stress tests. This “Critical Review of the Stress Tests” is based on the national stress tests reports written by the national nuclear safety authorities and on the Peer review country reports attached to the Peer review report - Stress tests performed on European nuclear power plants written by the Peer review Teams, the Peer Review Board respectively, and endorsed by ENSREG [ENSREG 2012a, ENSREG 2012c]. It continues

  14. Effect of Applied Stress and Temperature on Residual Stresses Induced by Peening Surface Treatments in Alloy 600

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telang, A.; Gnäupel-Herold, T.; Gill, A.; Vasudevan, V. K.

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the effects of applied tensile stress and temperature on laser shock peening (LSP) and cavitation shotless peening (CSP)-induced compressive residual stresses were investigated using neutron and x-ray diffraction. Residual stresses on the surface, measured in situ, were lower than the applied stress in LSP- and CSP-treated Alloy 600 samples (2 mm thick). The residual stress averaged over the volume was similar to the applied stress. Compressive residual stresses on the surface and balancing tensile stresses in the interior relax differently due to hardening induced by LSP. Ex situ residual stress measurements, using XRD, show that residual stresses relaxed as the applied stress exceeded the yield strength of the LSP- and CSP-treated Alloy 600. Compressive residual stresses induced by CSP and LSP decreased by 15-25% in magnitude, respectively, on exposure to 250-450 °C for more than 500 h with 10-11% of relaxation occurring in the first few hours. Further, 80% of the compressive residual stresses induced by LSP and CSP treatments in Alloy 600 were retained even after long-term aging at 350 °C for 2400 h.

  15. A pilot-scale radioactive test using in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmerman, C.L.; Oma, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing in situ vitrification (ISV) as a potential remedial action technique for previously disposed radioactive liquid drain sites. The process melts the contaminated soil to produce a durable glass and crystalline waste form and encapsulates the radionuclides. The development of this alternative technology is being performed for the US Department of Energy. The results of an ISV pilot-scale test conducted in June 1983 are discussed in which soils contaminated with actual radioactive transuranic and mixed fission product elements were vitrified. The test successfully demonstrated the containment of radionuclides during processing, both within the vitrified mass and in the off-gas system. No environmental release of radioactive material was detectable during testing operations. The vitrified soil retained >99% of all radionuclides. Losses to the offgas system varied from less than or equal to 0.03% for particulate materials (plutonium and strontium) to 0.8% for cesium, which is a more volatile element. The off-gas system effectively contained both volatile and entrained radioactive materials. Analysis of the vitrified soil revealed that all radionuclides were distributed throughout the vitrified zone, some more uniformly than others. Analysis of soil samples taken adjacent to the block indicated that no migration of radionuclides outside the vitrification zone occurred. Leaching studies have shown that the ISV process generates a highly durable waste form, comparable to Pyrex and granite. Based on geologic data from the hydration of obsidian, which is chemically similar to the ISV glass, the hydration or weathering rate is predicted to be much less than 1 mm in 10,000 yr

  16. Dipyridamole cerebral flow stress test evaluating ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiu, Y.; Chen, S.; Sun, X.; Liu, S.; Li, W.; Fan, W.; Wang, X.

    2000-01-01

    To detect the clinical value of dipyridamole cerebral blood flow stress test in cerebrovascular diseases (CVD). Nineteen patients (9 male, 10 female, mean age=65) who were diagnosed as CVD were included. One suffered from infarct, two suffered from thrombosis, one feel dizziness. All 4 performed rest and stress test. The other 15 were VBI, 9 of them performed stress test. Rest and stress test were done two-day method using Elscint Apex SP-6 SPECT equipped with low energy all purpose collimator. Rest perfusion imaging was started 30 min after injecting 1.11 GBq 99m Tc-ECD. Dipyridamole stress test was done within one week. 0.56 mg/Kg dipyridamole was injected intravenously during 4 min the same dose of ECD was injected 2 min later. The acquisition started 30 min later with the same parameter. Heart rate, ECG and the patient's complaint were monitored 2 min before and after dipyridamole. After correction for attenuation, transverse, coronal and sagittal slices were reconstructed. Eighteen ROIs were drawn symmetrically on cingulate, frontal, temporal-parietal, temporal, occipital, vision cortex, basal ganglia, superior frontal and parietal on the 3 rd , 6 th , 9 th transverse slices, selecting the contralateral as the reference region. The counts per pixel in each ROI were divided by the counts of the mirror region to obtain the relative uptake ratio. We think it abnormality when the ratio is above 1,1 or below 0.9. The sensitivity for rest and stress rCBF test was compared. rCBF was decreased at 10 of 19 patients (sensitivity 52.6%). 14 had low rCBF after dipyridamole (sensitivity 72.3%), Among the patients who studied stress test, 6 had normal rCBF at rest and low rCBF after stress. The abnormal area was enlarged after dipyridamole for 1 patients, 2 improved and 2 unchanged. 8 of 15 VBI had normal rCBF at rest (sensitivity 53.3%). 9 of 15 VBI performed stress test. rCBF was normal at rest for 5 patients, rCBF was decreased after stress, it was improved for one

  17. Scoping analysis of in situ thermal-hydrological testing at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1996-01-01

    In situ thermal tests, which are to be conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, are required to test coupled thermal-hydrological-geomechanical-geochemical (T-H-M-C) process models that support total system performance assessment. The ESF thermal tests must provide an understanding of coupled T-H-M-C processes that are relevant to expected repository conditions. Current planning includes the possibility of two large-scale tests: (1) the first ESF (drift-scale) thermal test, which will be conducted under an accelerated heatup and cooldown schedule, and (2) a second ESF (multi-drift) test, which will be larger-scale, longer-duration test, conducted under a less accelerated heatup and cooldown schedule. With the V-TOUGH (vectorized transport of unsaturated groundwater and heat) code, the authors modeled and evaluated a range of heater test sizes, heating rates, and heating durations under a range of plausible hydrological conditions to develop a test design that provides sufficient (and timely) information to determine the following: the dominant mode(s) of heat flow; the major T-H regime(s) and the T-H-M-C processes that determine the magnitude and direction of vapor and condensate flow; and the influence of heterogeneous conditions on the flow of heat, vapor, and condensate. A major purpose of the ESF thermal tests is to determine which major decay-heat-driven T-H flow regime(s) will govern the magnitude and direction of vapor and condensate flow in the UZ. Another major purpose of the thermal tests is to determine the degree of vapor diffusion enhancement

  18. Testing on air cleaning systems: Testing of the components in-place tests; Controle des installations d'epuration de l'air essais de conformite des elements: Tests in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billard, F; Brion, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    The reliability of air cleaning systems is dependent on testing they are submitted to. Although in-place tests are the most important as they act as final tests upon achieved plants, component tests are necessary too. They allow detection of defective units before they are installed, partition of unit defects from mounting defects and they are more sensitive. For similar reasons, material teats are most useful. The various tests are described, about aerosol filters for one part, iodine trap for the other. The checked features are: materials nature, units sizes, efficiency, air resistance, flammability, humidity resistance, temperature resistance, adsorbent friability, etc... On iodine trapping systems, small check traps, working by-pass with the main trap are periodically subjected to efficiency test. This control allow to cut down the in-place tests frequency, particularly when poisoning from organic vapours is to be feared. (authors) [French] La surete de fonctionnement des installations d'epuratition de l'air esf fonction des controles auxquels ces installations sont soumises. Si les tests in situ sont les plus importants puisqu'ils constituent le controle final de l'installation terminee, les essais de conformite des elements constitutifs sont egalement necessaires. Ils permettent l'elimination d'elements defectueux avant leur mise en place, la discrimination des defauts du montage de ceux de l'element et sont en outre plus sensibles. De meme, le controle des materiaux constitutifs de l'element s'avere fort utile. On decrit les differents controles, d'une part, pour les fittres a aerosols, d'autre part, pour les pieges a iode. Les caracteristiques verifiees sont: nature des materiaux, dimenesions des elements, efficacite, perte de charge, resistance mecanique, inflammabilite, tenue a l'humidite, tenue a la temperature, resistance au detassement des pieges a iode, friabilite du materiau adsorbant, etc... En ce qui concerne les installations de piegeage d

  19. The measurement of in-situ stress in near surface environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garritty, P.; Irvin, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    One of the major unknowns affecting aspects of underground construction and the geohydrology of rock masses is the magnitude and direction of the geostatic principal stresses in the earth's crust. This is particularly the case in near surface rocks where there are indications that high horizontal stresses may exist. The measurement of stress in near surface environments is particularly difficult. The techniques, experience and results of a geostatic stress measurement programme using four commercially available devices at shallow depth in the Carnmenellis Granite are critically discussed and compared. This report also brings together some of the conclusions of two previous reports in the series, Garritty (1983) and Garritty and Irvin (1983), and emphasises the fundamental relationship between the state of stress in the earth's crust and the geohydrology of rock masses. (author)

  20. Revision report about the in-situ tests of 1000 MW unit 5 Kozloduy (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzzi, F.

    1995-01-01

    This report refers to the technical revision performed on the technical report about the in-situ tests performed on 1000 Unit 5 nuclear power station of Kozloduy (Bulgaria), within the frame of the IAEA benchmark study for the seismic analysis and testing of an existing Nuclear Power Plant. After a foreword to define the aims of the job and the identification of the scope of the work, a brief description of the plant is made. A brief description of the theory about the modal parameter determination and the soil-structure interaction analysis by experimental tests is made. The following chapters collect some comments about the tests carried out in Kozloduy, with special reference to the general correctness of testing procedure and to data special requirements for the seismic safety margin assessment procedures to be applied on the existing power station

  1. G-Tunnel pressurized slot-testing preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National laboratories elected to conduct a development program on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of the potentials of pressurized slot strength testing. This report describes the preparations leading to the measurements and evaluations

  2. In-situ stress measurements - results of experiments performed at the ASSE salt mine - Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feddersen, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    High-level nuclear wastes are heat generating wastes. Heat will be transferred to the surrounding salt formation. This heating of the host rock will result in an increased temperature and in stress changes. From 1983 through 1985 two underground tests were conducted in the Asse Salt Mine (Federal Republic of Germany) in which, among others, thermally induced stress changes were investigated. These tests are discussed in this paper

  3. [Stress-corrosion test of TIG welded CP-Ti].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Wang, Y; Zhou, Z; Meng, X; Liang, Q; Zhang, X; Zhao, Y

    2000-12-01

    In this study TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welded CP-Ti were subjected to stress-corrosion test under 261 MPa in artificial saliva of 37 degrees C for 3 months. No significant difference was noted on mechanical test (P > 0.05). No color-changed and no micro-crack on the sample's surface yet. These results indicate that TIG welded CP-Ti offers excellent resistance to stress corrosion.

  4. Facility-level association of preoperative stress testing and postoperative adverse cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Javier A; Graham, Laura; Thiruvoipati, Thejasvi; Grunwald, Gary; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Maddox, Thomas M; Hawn, Mary T; Bradley, Steven M

    2018-06-22

    Despite limited indications, preoperative stress testing is often used prior to non-cardiac surgery. Patient-level analyses of stress testing and outcomes are limited by case mix and selection bias. Therefore, we sought to describe facility-level rates of preoperative stress testing for non-cardiac surgery, and to determine the association between facility-level preoperative stress testing and postoperative major adverse cardiac events (MACE). We identified patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery within 2 years of percutaneous coronary intervention in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System, from 2004 to 2011, facility-level rates of preoperative stress testing and postoperative MACE (death, myocardial infarction (MI) or revascularisation within 30 days). We determined risk-standardised facility-level rates of stress testing and postoperative MACE, and the relationship between facility-level preoperative stress testing and postoperative MACE. Among 29 937 patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery at 131 VA facilities, the median facility rate of preoperative stress testing was 13.2% (IQR 9.7%-15.9%; range 6.0%-21.5%), and 30-day postoperative MACE was 4.0% (IQR 2.4%-5.4%). After risk standardisation, the median facility-level rate of stress testing was 12.7% (IQR 8.4%-17.4%) and postoperative MACE was 3.8% (IQR 2.3%-5.6%). There was no correlation between risk-standardised stress testing and composite MACE at the facility level (r=0.022, p=0.81), or with individual outcomes of death, MI or revascularisation. In a national cohort of veterans undergoing non-cardiac surgery, we observed substantial variation in facility-level rates of preoperative stress testing. Facilities with higher rates of preoperative stress testing were not associated with better postoperative outcomes. These findings suggest an opportunity to reduce variation in preoperative stress testing without sacrificing patient outcomes. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  5. Exertional headache and coronary ischemia despite normal electrocardiographic stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrer, F Michael; Huerter, Karina

    2006-01-01

    Exertional headaches may under certain conditions reflect coronary ischemia. We report the case of a patient seen in a neurology referral practice whose exertional headaches, even in the face of two normal electrocardiographic stress tests and in the absence of underlying chest pain were the sole symptoms of coronary ischemia as detected by Tc-99m Sestamibi testing SPECT stress testing. Stent placement resulted in complete resolution of headaches. Exertional headache in the absence of chest pain may reflect underlying symptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) even when conventional electrocardiographic stress testing does not indicate ischemia.

  6. Tensile Stress Rupture Behavior of a Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite in Humid Environments at Intermediate Temperature

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaRochelle, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    Stress rupture tests on the Sylramic(TM) fiber with an in-situ layer of boron nitride, boron nitride interphase, and SiC matrix ceramic matrix composite were performed at 550 degrees C and 750 degrees C with 0.0, 0.2...

  7. Polluted soils with heavy metals. Stabilization by magnesium oxide. Ex-situ and in-situ testings; Suelos contaminados con metales pesados. Estabilizacion con oxido de magnesio. Ensayos ex situ-in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenoz, S.; Hernandez, J.; Gangutia, N.

    2004-07-01

    This work describes the use of Low-Grade MgO as a stabiliser agent for polluted soil reclaim. Low-Grade MgO may be an economically feasible alternative in the stabilisation of heavy metals from heavily contaminated soils. The effectiveness of Low-Grade MgO has been studied in three ex-situ stabilisation of heavily polluted soils contaminated by the flue-dust of pyrite roasting. LG-MgO provides an alkali reservoir guaranteeing long-term stabilisation without varying the pH conditions. The success of the ex-situ stabilisation was corroborated with the analysis of heavy metals in the leachates collected from the landfill o ver a long period of time. The study also includes the results obtained in an in-situ pilot scale stabilisation of contaminated soil. (Author) 17 refs.

  8. An introduction to the 'Psycho-Physiological-Stress-Test' (PPST-A standardized instrument for evaluating stress reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Neureiter

    Full Text Available Using a standardized instrument to evaluate patients' stress reactions has become more important in daily clinical routines. Different signs or symptoms of stress are often unilaterally explored: the physiological, psychological or social aspects of stress disorders are each viewed on a single dimension. However, all dimensions afflict patients who have persistent health problems due to chronic stress. Therefore, it is important to use a multidimensional approach to acquire data. The 'Psycho-Physiological-Stress-Test' (PPST was established to achieve a comprehensive understanding of stress and was further developed at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin in collaboration with the Psychological Department of Freie Universität Berlin. The PPST includes a series of varying stress phases, embedded in two periods of rest. Physiological and psychological parameters are simultaneously measured throughout the test session. Specifically, the PPST activates the sympathetic stress axis, which is measured by heart rate, blood pressure, respiration depth and rate, electro dermal activation and muscle tension (frontalis, masseter, trapezius. Psychological data are simultaneously collected, and include performance, motivation, emotion and behavior. After conducting this diagnostic test, it is possible to identify individual stress patterns that can be discussed with the individual patient to develop and recommend (outpatient treatment strategies. This paper introduces the PPST as a standardized way to evaluate stress reactions by presenting the results from a sample of psychosomatic inpatients (n = 139 who were treated in Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. We observed that the varying testing conditions provoked adjusted changes in the different physiological parameters and psychological levels.

  9. Stress testing - ettevaatliku investori abimees / Peeter Teder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Teder, Peeter

    2005-01-01

    Autor selgitab stress testingut kui investeerimisportfelli varade väärtuse hindamist ning tutvustab selle võimalusi ja ohtusid. Diagrammid: Portfelli testimis-stsenaariumiks sobivad hästi börsikrahhid. Vt. samas: Stress testing toimib ka mujal

  10. Laboratory treatability studies preparatory to field testing a resting-cell in situ microbial filter bioremediation strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.T.; Hanna, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    Prior to a down-hole-column treatability test of a Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b attached-resting-cell in situ biofilter strategy, a set of three sequential laboratory experiments were carried out to define several key operational parameters and to evaluate the likely degree of success at a NASA Kennedy Space Center site. They involved the cell attachment to site-specific sediments, the intrinsic resting-cell biotransformation capacities for the contaminants of interest plus their time-dependent extents of biodegradative removal at the concentrations of concern, and a scaled in situ mini-flow-through-column system that closely mimics the subsurface conditions during a field-treatability or pilot test of an emplaced resting-cell filter. These experiments established the conditions required for the complete metabolic removal of a vinyl chloride (VC), cis-dichlororthylene (cis-DCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE) mixture. However, the gas chromatographic (GC) procedures that we utilized and the mini-flow-through column data demonstrated that, at most, only about 50--70% of the site-water VC, cis-DCE, and TCE would be biodegraded. This occurred because of a limiting level of dissolved oxygen, which was exacerbated by the simultaneous presence of several additional previously unrecognized groundwater components, especially methane, that are also competing substrates for the whole-cell soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme complex. Irrespective, collectively the simplicity of the methods that we have developed and the results obtainable with them appear to provide relevant laboratory-based test-criteria before taking our microbial filter strategy to an in situ field treatability or pilot demonstration stage at other sites in the future

  11. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpith Siddaiah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the “byproduct effects” in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear–corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  12. Performance Analysis of Retrofitted Tribo-Corrosion Test Rig for Monitoring In Situ Oil Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaiah, Arpith; Khan, Zulfiqar Ahmad; Ramachandran, Rahul; Menezes, Pradeep L

    2017-09-28

    Oils and lubricants, once extracted after use from a mechanical system, can hardly be reused, and should be refurbished or replaced in most applications. New methods of in situ oil and lubricant efficiency monitoring systems have been introduced for a wide variety of mechanical systems, such as automobiles, aerospace aircrafts, ships, offshore wind turbines, and deep sea oil drilling rigs. These methods utilize electronic sensors to monitor the "byproduct effects" in a mechanical system that are not indicative of the actual remaining lifecycle and reliability of the oils. A reliable oil monitoring system should be able to monitor the wear rate and the corrosion rate of the tribo-pairs due to the inclusion of contaminants. The current study addresses this technological gap, and presents a novel design of a tribo-corrosion test rig for oils used in a dynamic system. A pin-on-disk tribometer test rig retrofitted with a three electrode-potentiostat corrosion monitoring system was used to analyze the corrosion and wear rate of a steel tribo-pair in industrial grade transmission oil. The effectiveness of the retrofitted test rig was analyzed by introducing various concentrations of contaminants in an oil medium that usually leads to a corrosive working environment. The results indicate that the retrofitted test rig can effectively monitor the in situ tribological performance of the oil in a controlled dynamic corrosive environment. It is a useful method to understand the wear-corrosion synergies for further experimental work, and to develop accurate predictive lifecycle assessment and prognostic models. The application of this system is expected to have economic benefits and help reduce the ecological oil waste footprint.

  13. In situ testing of titanium and mild steel nuclear waste containers at the WIPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in situ tests on the corrosion of titanium and mild steel for high level waste containers is presented. The tests at Sandia have moved out of the laboratory into a test underground facility in order to evaluate the performance of the waste package material. The tests are being performed under both near-reference and accelerated salt repository conditions. Some containers are filled with high level waste glass (non-radioactive); others contain electric heaters. Backfill material is either bentonite/sand or crushed salt. In other tests metals and glasses are exposed directly to brine. The tests are designed to study the corrosion and metallurgy of the canister and overpack materials; the feasibility and performance of backfill materials; and near-field effects such as brine migration

  14. Central Japan's Atera Active Fault's Wide-Fractured Zone: An Examination of the Structure and In-situ Crustal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, R.; Omura, K.; Matsuda, T.; Mizuochi, Y.; Uehara, D.; Chiba, A.; Kikuchi, A.; Yamamoto, T.

    2001-12-01

    In-situ downhole measurements and coring within and around an active fault zone are needed to better understand the structure and material properties of fault rocks as well as the physical state of active faults and intra-plate crust. Particularly, the relationship between the stress concentration state and the heterogeneous strength of an earthquake fault zone is important to estimate earthquake occurrence mechanisms which correspond to the prediction of an earthquake. It is necessary to compare some active faults in different conditions of the chrysalis stage and their relation to subsequent earthquake occurrence. To better understand such conditions, "Active Fault Zone Drilling Project" has been conducted in the central part of Japan by the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention. The Nojima fault which appeared on the surface by the 1995 Great Kobe earthquake (M=7.2) and the Neodani fault created by the 1981 Nobi earthquake, the greatest inland earthquake M=8.0 in Japan, have been drilled through the fault fracture zones. During these past four years, a similar experiment and research at the Atera fault, of which some parts seem to have been dislocated by the 1586 Tensyo earthquake, has been undertaken. The features of the Atera fault are as follows: (1) total length is about 70 km, (2) general trend is NW45_Kwith a left-lateral strike slip, (3) slip rate is estimated as 3-5 m/1000 yrs. and the average recurrence time as 1700 yrs., (4) seismicity is very low at present, and (5) lithologies around the fault are basically granitic rocks and rhyolite. We have conducted integrated investigations by surface geophysical survey and drilling around the Atera fault. Six boreholes have been drilled from the depth of 400 m to 630 m. Four of these boreholes are located on a line crossing the fracture zone of the Atera fault. Resistivity and gravity structures inferred from surface geophysical surveys were compared with the physical properties

  15. Stress relaxation in tempered glass caused by heat soak testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Jens; Hilcken, Jonas; Aronen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Heat soak testing of tempered glass is a thermal process required after the tempering process itself to bring glasses of commercial soda-lime-silica-glass to failure that are contaminated with nickel sulphide inclusions, diameter 50 mm to 500 mm typically. Thus, the tests avoid a so-called "spont...... of commercial soda-lime-silica glass, it causes stress relaxation in tempered glass and the fracture pattern of the glass changes accordingly, especially thin glasses are affected. Based on the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Model, this paper comprises the theoretical background of the stress...

  16. Tensile testing study of dynamic interactions between dislocations and precipitate in vanadium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tougou, Kouichi; Nogiwa, Kimihiro; Tachikawa, Kazuhiro; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the hardening of fine Ti(OCN) precipitate, we performed in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations during tensile testing of dislocations gliding through fine Ti(OCN) precipitates in thermally aged V–4Cr–4Ti alloys. The obstacle strength parameter was estimated from the critical bow-out angle, ϕ, of the dislocation lines from the microstructural change during tensile deformation observed in the TEM images. From image processing analysis of the dislocation motion, the value of the obstacle strength parameter of Ti(OCN) precipitates of 4-nm size was determined to be 0.30. The increase in yield stress calculated from the measured dislocation behavior pinned around precipitates was Δσ in situ = 43 MPa, and the increase in yield stress measured by the micro-Vickers hardness test was Δσ HV = 49.5 MPa. Data from in situ TEM observations during tensile testing and from micro-Vickers hardness tests were in good agreement; thus, the obstacle strength parameter of the Ti(OCN) precipitates of 4-nm size was successfully obtained experimentally. The obstacle strength parameter also was compared with data from a previous study, and there was also quite good agreement. Therefore, the obstacle strength parameter obtained from this study is measurable and is a reliable measure of mechanical property changes following precipitation in V–4Cr–4Ti alloys

  17. In situ vitrification: Application to buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification field tests were conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification is a technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form and is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate buried waste structures found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests were designed as part of a treatability study to provide essential information on field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes, and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology provided valuable operational control for successfully processing the high metal content waste. The results indicate that in situ vitrification is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Transmission of vertical stress in a real soil profile. Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2011-01-01

    The transmission of stress in soils is extremely sensitive to changes in water content. According to the elasticity theory, for a given load applied to a given soil, an increase in soil water content yields a higher concentration of stresses under the centre of the load and a deeper propagation...... of stresses. We quantified the effect of soil water content of topsoil/subsoil layers (wet/wet, wet/dry, and dry/dry) on stress transmission. 3D measurements of vertical stresses under a towed wheel (800/50R34) were performed in situ in a Stagnic Luvisol. The tyre was loaded with 60 kN, and we used...... were measured in separate tests. Increase of water content in the topsoil by 114% increased the contact area by 149%, decreased the vertical stresses at the tyre–soil interface by 50%, and decreased the maximum vertical stress at 0.3 and 0.6 m depth by 46 and 63%, respectively. Stress attenuation...

  19. In situ synchrotron analysis of lattice rotations in individual grains during stress-induced martensitic transformations in a polycrystalline CuAlBe shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berveiller, S.; Malard, B.; Wright, J.; Patoor, E.; Geandier, G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 3DXRD, Laue microdiffraction measurements of grain rotation in a shape memory alloy. → During stress-induced martensitic transformation, the austenite grains rotate. → This rotation reverses with the reverse transformation. → The austenite grains splits into various orientations with martensite formation. - Abstract: Two synchrotron diffraction techniques, three-dimensional X-ray diffraction and Laue microdiffraction, are applied to studying the deformation behaviour of individual grains embedded in a Cu 74 Al 23 Be 3 superelastic shape memory alloy. The average lattice rotation and the intragranular heterogeneity of orientations are measured during in situ tensile tests at room temperature for four grains of mean size ∼1 mm. During mechanical loading, all four grains rotate and the mean rotation angle increases with austenite deformation. As the martensitic transformation occurs, the rotation becomes more pronounced, and the grain orientation splits into several sub-domains: the austenite orientation varies on both sides of the martensite variant. The mean disorientation is ∼1 o . Upon unloading, the sub-domains collapse and reverse rotation is observed.

  20. Microscopic creep models and the interpretation of stress-dip tests during creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.P.

    1976-09-01

    A critical analysis is made of the principal divergent view points concerning stress-dip tests. The raw data are examined and interpreted in the light of various creep models. The following problems are discussed: is the reverse strain anelastic or plastic; is the zero creep rate periodic due to recovery or is it spurious; can the existence or inexistence of an internal stress be deduced from stress-dip tests; can stress-dip tests allow to determine whether glide is jerky or viscous; can the internal stress be measured by stress-dip tests

  1. The Application of Normal Stress Reduction Function in Tilt Tests for Different Block Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Gratchev, Ivan; Hein, Maw; Balasubramaniam, Arumugam

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on the influence of the shapes of rock cores, which control the sliding or toppling behaviours in tilt tests for the estimation of rock joint roughness coefficients (JRC). When the JRC values are estimated by performing tilt tests, the values are directly proportional to the basic friction of the rock material and the applied normal stress on the sliding planes. Normal stress obviously varies with the shape of the sliding block, and the basic friction angle is also affected by the sample shapes in tilt tests. In this study, the shapes of core blocks are classified into three representative shapes and those are created using plaster. Using the various shaped artificial cores, a set of tilt tests is carried out to identify the shape influences on the normal stress and the basic friction angle in tilt tests. The test results propose a normal stress reduction function to estimate the normal stress for tilt tests according to the sample shapes based on Barton's empirical equation. The proposed normal stress reduction functions are verified by tilt tests using artificial plaster joints and real rock joint sets. The plaster joint sets are well matched and cast in detailed printed moulds using a 3D printing technique. With the application of the functions, the obtained JRC values from the tilt tests using the plaster samples and the natural rock samples are distributed within a reasonable JRC range when compared with the measured values.

  2. Impulsivity and Stress Response in Pathological Gamblers During the Trier Social Stress Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maniaci, G.; Goudriaan, A. E.; Cannizzaro, C.; van Holst, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    Gambling has been associated with increased sympathetic nervous system output and stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However it is unclear how these systems are affected in pathological gambling. This study aimed to investigate the effect of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST)

  3. Biological and psychological markers of stress in humans: focus on the Trier Social Stress Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew P; Kennedy, Paul J; Cryan, John F; Dinan, Timothy G; Clarke, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Validated biological and psychological markers of acute stress in humans are an important tool in translational research. The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), involving public interview and mental arithmetic performance, is among the most popular methods of inducing acute stress in experimental settings, and reliably increases hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation. However, although much research has focused on HPA axis activity, the TSST also affects the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system, the immune system, cardiovascular outputs, gastric function and cognition. We critically assess the utility of different biological and psychological markers, with guidance for future research, and discuss factors which can moderate TSST effects. We outline the effects of the TSST in stress-related disorders, and if these responses can be abrogated by pharmacological and psychological treatments. Modified TSST protocols are discussed, and the TSST is compared to alternative methods of inducing acute stress. Our analysis suggests that multiple readouts are necessary to derive maximum information; this strategy will enhance our understanding of the psychobiology of stress and provide the means to assess novel therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Novel Two-Axis Load Sensor Designed for in Situ Scratch Testing inside Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengli Shi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of a lack of available miniaturized multiaxial load sensors to measure the normal load and the lateral load simultaneously, quantitative in situ scratch devices inside scanning electron microscopes and the transmission electron microscopes have barely been developed up to now. A novel two-axis load sensor was designed in this paper. With an I-shaped structure, the sensor has the function of measuring the lateral load and the normal load simultaneously, and at the same time it has compact dimensions. Finite element simulations were carried out to evaluate stiffness and modal characteristics. A decoupling algorithm was proposed to resolve the cross-coupling between the two-axis loads. Natural frequency of the sensor was tested. Linearity and decoupling parameters were obtained from the calibration experiments, which indicate that the sensor has good linearity and the cross-coupling between the two axes is not strong. Via the decoupling algorithm and the corresponding decoupling parameters, simultaneous measurement of the lateral load and the normal load can be realized via the developed two-axis load sensor. Preliminary applications of the load sensor for scratch testing indicate that the load sensor can work well during the scratch testing. Taking advantage of the compact structure, it has the potential ability for applications in quantitative in situ scratch testing inside SEMs.

  5. SFC/SFBMN guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures: stress testing in adults and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manrique, A.; Marie, P.Y.; Maunoury, Ch.; Acar, Ph.; Agostini, D.

    2002-01-01

    The guidelines update for nuclear cardiology procedures are studied in this article. We find the minimum technique conditions for the stress testing practice, the recommendations for the different ischemia activation tests, the choice of the stress test. (N.C.)

  6. G-tunnel pressurized slot-testing evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.; Sifre-Soto, C.; Mann, K.L.; Bellman, R.A. Jr.; Luker, S.; Dodds, D.J.

    1992-04-01

    Designers and analysts of radioactive waste repositories must be able to predict the mechanical behavior of the host rock. Sandia National Laboratories elected to conduct a development program to enhance mechanical-type measurements. The program was focused on pressurized slot testing and featured (1) development of an improved method to cut slots using a chain saw with diamond-tipped cutters, (2) measurements useful for determining in situ stresses normal to slots, (3) measurements applicable for determining the in situ modulus of deformation parallel to a drift surface, and (4) evaluations of pressurized slot strength testing results and methods. This report contains data interpretation and evaluations. Included are recommendations for future efforts. This third report contains the interpretations of the testing with emphasis on the measurement results as they apply to describing rock behavior. In particular, emphases are placed on (1) normal stress determinations using the flatjack cancellation (FC) method, (2) modulus of deformation determinations, and (3) high pressure investigations. Most of the material in the first two reports is not repeated here. Appropriate data are repeated in tabular form

  7. SCC Initiation Testing of Alloy 600 in High Temperature Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etien, Robert A.; Richey, Edward; Morton, David S.; Eager, Julie

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation tests have been conducted on Alloy 600 at temperatures from 304 to 367°C. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load in hydrogenated environments. A reversing direct current electric potential drop (EPD) system was used for all of the tests to detect SCC initiation. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of stress (and strain), coolant hydrogen, and temperature on SCC initiation time. The thermal activation energy of SCC initiation was measured as 103 ± 18 kJ/mol in hydrogenated water, which is similar to the thermal activation energy for SCC growth. Results suggest that the fundamental mechanical parameter which controls SCC initiation is plastic strain not stress. SCC initiation was shown to have a different sensitivity than SCC growth to dissolved hydrogen level. Specifically, SCC initiation time appears to be relatively insensitive to hydrogen level in the nickel stability region.

  8. Visualizing Stress and Temperature Distribution During Elevated Temperature Deformation of IN-617 Using Nanomechanical Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Wang, Hao; Tomar, Vikas

    2018-04-01

    This work presents direct measurements of stress and temperature distribution during the mesoscale microstructural deformation of Inconel-617 (IN-617) during 3-point bending tests as a function of temperature. A novel nanomechanical Raman spectroscopy (NMRS)-based measurement platform was designed for simultaneous in situ temperature and stress mapping as a function of microstructure during deformation. The temperature distribution was found to be directly correlated to stress distribution for the analyzed microstructures. Stress concentration locations are shown to be directly related to higher heat conduction and result in microstructural hot spots with significant local temperature variation.

  9. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  10. Alternate immersion stress corrosion testing of 5083 aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J.L.; Dringman, M.R.; Hausburg, D.E.; Jackson, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    The stress corrosion susceptibility of Type 5083 aluminum--magnesium alloy in plate form and press-formed shapes was determined in the short transverse direction. C-ring type specimens were exposed to alternate immersion in a sodium chloride solution. The test equipment and procedure, with several innovative features, are described in detail. Statistical test results are listed for seven thermomechanical conditions. A certain processing scheme was shown to yield a work-strengthened part that is not sensitized with respect to stress corrosion cracking

  11. Validation of the German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, Arne; Helbig, Susanne; Drake, Christopher L; Backhaus, Jutta

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test with groups with and without sleep problems. Three studies were analysed. Data set 1 was based on an initial screening for a sleep training program (n = 393), data set 2 was based on a study to test the test-retest reliability of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test (n = 284) and data set 3 was based on a study to examine the influence of competitive sport on sleep (n = 37). Data sets 1 and 2 were used to test internal consistency, factor structure, convergent validity, discriminant validity and test-retest reliability of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test. Content validity was tested using data set 3. Cronbach's alpha of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test was good (α = 0.80) and test-retest reliability was satisfactory (r = 0.72). Overall, the one-factor model showed the best fit. Furthermore, significant positive correlations between the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test and impaired sleep quality, depression and stress reactivity were in line with the expectations regarding the convergent validity. Subjects with sleep problems had significantly higher scores in the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test than subjects without sleep problems (P Stress Test had significantly lower sleep quality (P = 0.01), demonstrating that vulnerability for stress-induced sleep disturbances accompanies poorer sleep quality in stressful episodes. The findings show that the German version of the Ford Insomnia Response to Stress Test is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess the vulnerability to stress-induced sleep disturbances. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Accelerated Testing Methodology in Constant Stress-Rate Testing for Advanced Structural Ceramics: A Preloading Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Huebert, Dean; Bartlett, Allen; Choi, Han-Ho

    2001-01-01

    Preloading technique was used as a means of an accelerated testing methodology in constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing for two different brittle materials. The theory developed previously for fatigue strength as a function of preload was further verified through extensive constant stress-rate testing for glass-ceramic and CRT glass in room temperature distilled water. The preloading technique was also used in this study to identify the prevailing failure mechanisms at elevated temperatures, particularly at lower test rates in which a series of mechanisms would be associated simultaneously with material failure, resulting in significant strength increase or decrease. Two different advanced ceramics including SiC whisker-reinforced composite silicon nitride and 96 wt% alumina were used at elevated temperatures. It was found that the preloading technique can be used as an additional tool to pinpoint the dominant failure mechanism that is associated with such a phenomenon of considerable strength increase or decrease.

  13. Full-field fabric stress mapping by micro Raman spectroscopy in a yarn push-out test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Z K; Qin, F Y; Fang, Q C; Bai, R X; Qiu, W; Chen, X

    2018-02-01

    The full-field stress distribution of a two-dimensional plain fabric was mapped using micro Raman spectroscopy (MRS) through a novel yarn push-out test, simulating a quasi-static projectile impact on the fabric. The stress-strain relationship for a single yarn was established using a digital image correlation method in a single-yarn tensile test. The relationship between Raman peak shift and aramid Kevlar 49 yarn stress was established using MRS in a single-yarn tensile test. An out-of-plane loading test was conducted on an aramid Kevlar 49 plain fabric, and the yarn stress was measured using MRS. From the full-field fabric stress distribution, it can be observed that there is a cross-shaped distribution of high yarn stress; this result would be helpful in further studies on load transfer on a fabric during a projectile impact.

  14. Market risk stress testing for internationally active financial institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Petar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper develops a comprehensive framework for market risk stress testing in internationally active financial institutions. We begin by defining the scope and type of the stress test and explaining how to select risk factors and the stress time horizon. We then address challenges related to data gathering, followed by in-depth discussion of techniques for developing realistic shock scenarios. Next the process of shock application to a particular portfolio is described, followed by determination of portfolio profit and loss. We conclude by briefly discussing the issue of assigning probability to stress scenarios. We illustrate the framework by considering the development of a ‘worst case’ scenario using global financial market data from Thomson Reuters Datastream.

  15. Geologic, geochemical, microbiologic, and hydrologic characterization at the In Situ Redox Manipulation Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermeul, V.R.; Teel, S.S.; Amonette, J.E.

    1995-07-01

    This report documents results from characterization activities at the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Test Site which is located within the 100-HR-3 Operable Unit of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Information obtained during hydrogeologic characterization of the site included sediment physical properties, geochemical properties, microbiologic population data, and aquifer hydraulic properties. The purpose of obtaining this information was to improve the conceptual understanding of the hydrogeology beneath the ISRM test site and provide detailed, site specific hydrogeologic parameter estimates. The resulting characterization data will be incorporated into a numerical model developed to simulate the physical and chemical processes associated with the field experiment and aid in experiment design and interpretation

  16. Methods for FEM stress initialization based on stress functions, and application to a reservoir cross-section

    OpenAIRE

    Aliguer Piferrer, Ignasi; Rafels Ybern, Carles; Jaqués Adell, Irene; Carol, Ignacio; Prat Catalán, Pere; Lakashmikhanta, Ramasesha; Segura Segarra, José María

    2013-01-01

    An accurate description of the in-situ stress field in a rock mass is crucial in different areas of geo-engineering such as: underground excavations, hydrocarbon extraction, CO2 storage, hydraulic fracture etc. In this paper, a novel methodology to numerically generate the in-situ stress state within the Finite Elements framework is presented. It involves two steps: 1) an estimate of the stress components is given for integration point of the discretization, and 2) global equilibrium is verif...

  17. Influence of mechanical stress level in preliminary stress-corrosion testing on fatigue strength of a low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleskerova, S.A.; Pakharyan, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Effect of corrosion and mechanical factors of preliminary stress corrosion of a metal in its fatigue strength, has been investigated. Smooth cylindrical samples of 20 steel have been tested. Preliminary corrosion under stress has been carried out under natural sea conditions. It is shown that mechanical stresses in the case of preliminary corrosion affect fatigue strength of low-carbon steels, decreasing the range of limited durability and fatigue limit. This effect increases with the increase of stress level and agressivity of corrosive medium

  18. Stress analysis of martensitic transformation in Cu-Al-Be polycrystalline and single-crystalline shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaouache, B.; Berveiller, S.; Inal, K.; Eberhardt, A.; Patoor, E.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the martensitic transformation in a shape memory alloy during a superelastic loading, focusing on internal strains, stresses and phases fractions. The behavior of the austenite phase is studied by X-ray diffraction stress analysis during in situ tensile test at room temperature. Both single-crystal and polycrystal samples have been investigated. The results are discussed with the aim to correlate the microstructural variations with the local stress state evolution in the austenitic phase while variants of martensite form and develop during a superelastic loading

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization in combination with the comet assay and micronucleus test in genetic toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovhannisyan Galina G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comet assay and micronucleus (MN test are widely applied in genotoxicity testing and biomonitoring. While comet assay permits to measure direct DNA-strand breaking capacity of a tested agent MN test allows estimating the induced amount of chromosome and/or genome mutations. The potential of these two methods can be enhanced by the combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH techniques. FISH plus comet assay allows the recognition of targets of DNA damage and repairing directly. FISH combined with MN test is able to characterize the occurrence of different chromosomes in MN and to identify potential chromosomal targets of mutagenic substances. Thus, combination of FISH with the comet assay or MN test proved to be promising techniques for evaluation of the distribution of DNA and chromosome damage in the entire genome of individual cells. FISH technique also permits to study comet and MN formation, necessary for correct application of these methods. This paper reviews the relevant literature on advantages and limitations of Comet-FISH and MN-FISH assays application in genetic toxicology.

  20. Stress transfer in microdroplet tensile test: PVC-coated and uncoated Kevlar-29 single fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenkun, Lei; Quan, Wang; Yilan, Kang; Wei, Qiu; Xuemin, Pan

    2010-11-01

    The single fiber/microdroplet tensile test is applied for evaluating the interfacial mechanics between a fiber and a resin substrate. It is used to investigate the influence of a polymer coating on a Kevlar-29 fiber surface, specifically the stress transfer between the fiber and epoxy resin in a microdroplet. Unlike usual tests, this new test ensures a symmetrical axial stress on the embedded fiber and reduces the stress singularity that appears at the embedded fiber entry. Using a homemade loading device, symmetrical tensile tests are performed on a Kevlar-29 fiber with or without polyvinylchloride (PVC) coating, the surface of which is in contact with two epoxy resin microdroplets during curing. Raman spectra on the embedded fiber are recorded by micro-Raman Spectroscopy under different strain levels. Then they are transformed to the distributions of fiber axis stress based on the relationship between stress and Raman shift. The Raman results reveal that the fiber axial stresses increase with the applied loads, and the antisymmetric interfacial shear stresses, obtained by a straightforward balance of shear-to-axial forces argument, lead to the appearance of shear stress concentrations at a distance to the embedded fiber entry. The load is transferred from the outer fiber to the embedded fiber in the epoxy microdroplet. As is observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), the existence of a flexible polymer coating on the fiber surface reduces the stress transfer efficiency.

  1. A new method for in-situ filter testing using pulses of aerosol and photometric detection with computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.R.C.; Bosley, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique, developed at the Harwell Laboratory, for the in-situ testing of High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters using multiple pulses of test aerosol. The pulse test apparatus consists of a modified forward light scattering photometer coupled to a portable micro-computer fitted with an external data acquisition and control card. The micro-computer switches an aerosol generator on and off via an external relay driver unit. Using this apparatus the filter bank is challenged by a small number of equal length, constant concentration, pulses of aerosol at timed intervals. The aerosol concentration data upstream of the filter bank is logged, to disk, by the computer. The process is then repeated for the downstream concentration with the photometer gain increased to give maximum sensitivity. The collected data is analysed using a computer spread-sheet package; the recorded aerosol pulses are combined, integrated and the background data subtracted; the downstream data is then divided by the upstream pulse data to give the filter penetration. Using this technique the sensitivity of the in-situ filter test has been greatly improved, penetrations approaching 10 -5 % can now be measured, allowing HEPA filters mounted in series to be successfully tested. In addition, filter loading is reduced considerably

  2. In-situ medical simulation for pre-implementation testing of clinical service in a regional hospital in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P P; Tsui, N Tk; Fung, A Sw; Chiu, A Hf; Wong, W Cw; Leong, H T; Lee, P Sf; Lau, J Yw

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of a new clinical service is associated with anxiety and challenges that may prevent smooth and safe execution of the service. Unexpected issues may not be apparent until the actual clinical service commences. We present a novel approach to test the new clinical setting before actual implementation of our endovascular aortic repair service. In-situ simulation at the new clinical location would enable identification of potential process and system issues prior to implementation of the service. After preliminary planning, a simulation test utilising a case scenario with actual simulation of the entire care process was carried out to identify any logistic, equipment, settings or clinical workflow issues, and to trial a contingency plan for a surgical complication. All patient care including anaesthetic, surgical, and nursing procedures and processes were simulated and tested. Overall, 17 vital process and system issues were identified during the simulation as potential clinical concerns. They included difficult patient positioning, draping pattern, unsatisfactory equipment setup, inadequate critical surgical instruments, blood products logistics, and inadequate nursing support during crisis. In-situ simulation provides an innovative method to identify critical deficiencies and unexpected issues before implementation of a new clinical service. Life-threatening and serious practical issues can be identified and corrected before formal service commences. This article describes our experience with the use of simulation in pre-implementation testing of a clinical process or service. We found the method useful and would recommend it to others.

  3. Safety of a rapid diagnostic protocol with accelerated stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olan A; Hamedani, Azita; Shofer, Frances S; O'Conor, Katie J; Svenson, James; Hollander, Judd E

    2014-02-01

    Most patients at low to intermediate risk for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) receive a 12- to 24-hour "rule out." Recently, trials have found that a coronary computed tomographic angiography-based strategy is more efficient. If stress testing were performed within the same time frame as coronary computed tomographic angiography, the 2 strategies would be more similar. We tested the hypothesis that stress testing can safely be performed within several hours of presentation. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients presenting to a university hospital from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011, with potential ACS. Patients placed in a clinical pathway that performed stress testing after 2 negative troponin values 2 hours apart were included. We excluded patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction or with an elevated initial troponin. The main outcome was safety of immediate stress testing defined as the absence of death or acute myocardial infarction (defined as elevated troponin within 24 hours after the test). A total of 856 patients who presented with potential ACS were enrolled in the clinical pathway and included in this study. Patients had a median age of 55.0 (interquartile range, 48-62) years. Chest pain was the chief concern in 86%, and pain was present on arrival in 73% of the patients. There were no complications observed during the stress test. There were 0 deaths (95% confidence interval, 0%-0.46%) and 4 acute myocardial infarctions within 24 hours (0.5%; 95% confidence interval, 0.14%-1.27%). The peak troponins were small (0.06, 0.07, 0.07, and 0.19 ng/mL). Patients who present to the ED with potential ACS can safely undergo a rapid diagnostic protocol with stress testing. © 2013.

  4. Fabrication and performance tests of a prototype in-situ coating machine for JT-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Kenjiro; Abe, Tetsuya; Murakami, Yoshio

    1987-09-01

    Prior to the design and construction of the JT-60's in-situ coating device, a prototype machine was fabricated and tested to confirm the applicability of proposed driving methods and mechanical elements to the device which would be operated in very severe conditions including high ambient temperature and high vacuum. The machine basically consists of an in-vessel manipulator, a fiberscope and an ohmically heated titanium evaporator. From the test results, we recommended to use the combination of Inconel 625 and a self-lubricating alloy for the solid-lubricated bearings and MoS 2 -coated Inconel 625 for the solid-lubricated gears. It was also found that TiC coating showed a effect for the prevention of welding between bolts and nuts. In order to optimize the operating parameters of the machine, many wall inspection tests and titanium evaporation tests were carried out in a large vacuum vessel by simulating the JT-60 conditions. (author)

  5. Experimental investigation of in situ cleanable HEPA filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, South Carolina is currently testing the feasibility of developing an in situ cleanable high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. Sintered metal filters are being tested for regenerability or cleanability in simulated conditions found in a high level waste (HLW) tank ventilation system. The filters are being challenged using materials found in HLW tanks. HLW simulated salt, HLW simulated sludge and South Carolina road dust. Various cleaning solutions have been used to clean the filters in situ. The tanks are equipped with a ventilation system to maintain the tank contents at negative pressure to prevent the release of radioactive material to the environment. This system is equipped with conventional disposable glass-fiber HEPA filter cartridges. Removal and disposal of these filters is not only costly, but subjects site personnel to radiation exposure and possible contamination. A test apparatus was designed to simulate the ventilation system of a HLW tank with an in situ cleaning system. Test results indicate that the Mott sintered metal HEPA filter is suitable as an in situ cleanable or regenerable HEPA filter. Data indicates that high humidity or water did not effect the filter performance and the sintered metal HEPA filter was easily cleaned numerous times back to new filter performance by an in situ spray system. The test apparatus allows the cleaning of the soiled HEPA filters to be accomplished without removing the filters from process. This innovative system would eliminate personnel radiation exposure associated with removal of contaminated filters and the high costs of filter replacement and disposal. The results of these investigations indicate that an in situ cleanable HEPA filter system for radioactive and commercial use could be developed and manufactured

  6. Efficacy monitoring of in situ fuel bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, J.; Borchert, S.; Heard, C.

    1996-01-01

    The wide-scale, multiple-purpose use of fossil fuels throughout the industrialized world has resulted in the inadvertent contamination of myriad environments. Given the scope and magnitude of these environmental contamination problems, bioremediation often represents the only practical and economically feasible solution. This is especially true when depth of contamination, magnitude of the problem, and nature of contaminated material preclude other remedial actions, short of the no-response alternative. From the perspective, the effective, safe and scientifically valid use of in situ bioremediation technologies requires cost-efficient and effective implementation strategies in combination with unequivocal approaches for monitoring efficacy of performance. Accordingly, with support from the SERDP program, the authors are field-testing advanced in situ bioremediation strategies and new approaches in efficacy monitoring that employ techniques instable carbon and nitrogen isotope biogeochemistry. One field demonstration has been initiated at the NEX site in Port Hueneme, CA (US Navy's National Test Site). The objectives are: (1) to use stable isotopes as a biogeochemical monitoring tool for in situ bioremediation of refined petroleum (i.e., BTEX), and (2) to use vertical groundwater circulation technology to effect in situ chemical containment and enhanced in situ bioremediation

  7. The Force of Crystallization and Fracture Propagation during In-Situ Carbonation of Peridotite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinier van Noort

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface mineralization of CO2 by injection into (hydro-fractured peridotites has been proposed as a carbon sequestration method. It is envisaged that the expansion in solid volume associated with the mineralization reaction leads to a build-up of stress, resulting in the opening of further fractures. We performed CO2-mineralization experiments on simulated fractures in peridotite materials under confined, hydrothermal conditions, to directly measure the induced stresses. Only one of these experiments resulted in the development of a stress, which was less than 5% of the theoretical maximum. We also performed one method control test in which we measured stress development during the hydration of MgO. Based on microstructural observations, as well as XRD and TGA measurements, we infer that, due to pore clogging and grain boundary healing at growing mineral interfaces, the transport of CO2, water and solutes into these sites inhibited reaction-related stress development. When grain boundary healing was impeded by the precipitation of silica, a small stress did develop. This implies that when applied to in-situ CO2-storage, the mineralization reaction will be limited by transport through clogged fractures, and proceed at a rate that is likely too slow for the process to accommodate the volumes of CO2 expected for sequestration.

  8. MDMA does not alter responses to the Trier Social Stress Test in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Anya K; Miller, Melissa A; de Wit, Harriet

    2017-07-01

    ±3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") is a stimulant-psychedelic drug with unique social effects. It may dampen reactivity to negative social stimuli such as social threat and rejection. Perhaps because of these effects, MDMA has shown promise as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the effect of single doses of MDMA on responses to an acute psychosocial stressor has not been tested. In this study, we sought to test the effects of MDMA on responses to stress in healthy adults using a public speaking task. We hypothesized that the drug would reduce responses to the stressful task. Volunteers (N = 39) were randomly assigned to receive placebo (N = 13), 0.5 mg/kg MDMA (N = 13), or 1.0 mg/kg MDMA (N = 13) during a stress and a no-stress session. Dependent measures included subjective reports of drug effects and emotional responses to the task, as well as salivary cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure. The stress task produced its expected increase in physiological responses (cortisol, heart rate) and subjective ratings of stress in all three groups, and MDMA produced its expected subjective and physiological effects. MDMA alone increased ratings of subjective stress, heart rate, and saliva cortisol concentrations, but contrary to our hypothesis, it did not moderate responses to the Trier Social Stress Test. Despite its efficacy in PTSD and anxiety, MDMA did not reduce either the subjective or objective responses to stress in this controlled study. The conditions under which MDMA relieves responses to negative events or memories remain to be determined.

  9. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. Development and testing of an approach to modelling the state of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakami, Eva; Hakami, Hossein [Itasca Geomekanik AB, Solna (Sweden); Cosgrove, John [Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop, test and establish a method for creating a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model for a site considered in the site investigation programme. The work was divided into three parts, the empirical and theoretical 'property models' and the 'stress model'. The work on the stress model is presented in this report. The work consisted of i) a literature review about geological factors controlling in situ stress and a review about the use of numerical models for this subject, ii) the development of recommendations on the methodology to be applied during a site investigation and iii) the Test Case exercise, where the suggested methods were tested. The main mechanism controlling the in situ stress magnitudes in Sweden is plate tectonics causing the stress field to show similarities in most parts of north-western Europe, having a NW-SE trend of the maximum principal stress. The orientation of the stress field is largely determined by the relative movements by the plates. However, the stress orientation may also be influenced by the presence of large regional weak zones, such as the Tornquist deformation zone that lies between Sweden and Denmark. The strike of the Tornquist deformation zone is parallel to the maximum principal stress as observed in central and southern Sweden. The magnitude of the stress is more difficult to estimate, but the general pattern is an increase in magnitude with depth, at least for the upper kilometres. To determine the stress magnitude at a certain site and depth, with reasonable certainty, stress measurement should be used. A methodology for building a stress model has been proposed. It involves different steps starting with a preliminary stress estimation, followed by steps for interpreting site-specific information. If the stress pattern and structural geology of the site are complex, including major fracture zones intersecting the area, numerical analyses of the

  10. Strategy for a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model. Development and testing of an approach to modelling the state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, Eva; Hakami, Hossein; Cosgrove, John

    2002-05-01

    The overall objective of this project has been to develop, test and establish a method for creating a Rock Mechanics Site Descriptive Model for a site considered in the site investigation programme. The work was divided into three parts, the empirical and theoretical 'property models' and the 'stress model'. The work on the stress model is presented in this report. The work consisted of i) a literature review about geological factors controlling in situ stress and a review about the use of numerical models for this subject, ii) the development of recommendations on the methodology to be applied during a site investigation and iii) the Test Case exercise, where the suggested methods were tested. The main mechanism controlling the in situ stress magnitudes in Sweden is plate tectonics causing the stress field to show similarities in most parts of north-western Europe, having a NW-SE trend of the maximum principal stress. The orientation of the stress field is largely determined by the relative movements by the plates. However, the stress orientation may also be influenced by the presence of large regional weak zones, such as the Tornquist deformation zone that lies between Sweden and Denmark. The strike of the Tornquist deformation zone is parallel to the maximum principal stress as observed in central and southern Sweden. The magnitude of the stress is more difficult to estimate, but the general pattern is an increase in magnitude with depth, at least for the upper kilometres. To determine the stress magnitude at a certain site and depth, with reasonable certainty, stress measurement should be used. A methodology for building a stress model has been proposed. It involves different steps starting with a preliminary stress estimation, followed by steps for interpreting site-specific information. If the stress pattern and structural geology of the site are complex, including major fracture zones intersecting the area, numerical analyses of the stress field is

  11. Canopy Vegetation Indices from In situ Hyperspectral Data to Assess Plant Water Status of Winter Wheat under Powdery Mildew Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Qi, Shuangli; Heng, Yarong; Zhou, Yi; Wu, Yapeng; Liu, Wandai; He, Li; Li, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Plant disease and pests influence the physiological state and restricts the healthy growth of crops. Physiological measurements are considered the most accurate way of assessing plant health status. In this paper, we researched the use of an in situ hyperspectral remote sensor to detect plant water status in winter wheat infected with powdery mildew. Using a diseased nursery field and artificially inoculated open field experiments, we detected the canopy spectra of wheat at different developmental stages and under different degrees of disease severity. At the same time, destructive sampling was carried out for physical tests to investigate the change of physiological parameters under the condition of disease. Selected vegetation indices (VIs) were mostly comprised of green bands, and correlation coefficients between these common VIs and plant water content (PWC) were generally 0.784-0.902 ( p powdery mildew stress. The Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) was sensitive to physiological response influenced by powdery mildew, and the relationships of PRI with chlorophyll content, the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm), and the potential activity of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fo) were good with R 2 = 0.639, 0.833, 0.808, respectively. Linear regressions showed PRI demonstrated a steady relationship with PWC across different growth conditions, with R 2 = 0.817 and RMSE = 2.17. The acquired PRI model of wheat under the powdery mildew stress has a good compatibility to different experimental fields from booting stage to filling stage compared with the traditional water signal vegetation indices, WBI, FWBI 1 , and FWBI 2 . The verification results with independent data showed that PRI still performed better with R 2 = 0.819 between measured and predicted, and corresponding RE = 8.26%. Thus, PRI is recommended as a potentially reliable indicator of PWC in winter wheat with powdery mildew stress. The results will help to understand the physical state of

  12. Field tests of a chemiresistor sensor for in-situ monitoring of vapor-phase contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C.; McGrath, L.; Wright, J.

    2003-04-01

    An in-situ chemiresistor sensor has been developed that can detect volatile organic compounds in subsurface environmental applications. Several field tests were conducted in 2001 and 2002 to test the reliability, operation, and performance of the in-situ chemiresistor sensor system. The chemiresistor consists of a carbon-loaded polymer deposited onto a microfabricated circuit. The polymer swells reversibly in the presence of volatile organic compounds as vapor-phase molecules absorb into the polymer, causing a change in the electrical resistance of the circuit. The change in resistance can be calibrated to known concentrations of analytes, and arrays of chemiresistors can be used on a single chip to aid in discrimination. A waterproof housing was constructed to allow the chemiresistor to be used in a variety of media including air, soil, and water. The integrated unit, which can be buried in soils or emplaced in wells, is connected via cable to a surface-based solar-powered data logger. A cell-phone modem is used to automatically download the data from the data logger on a periodic basis. The field tests were performed at three locations: (1) Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) Nevada Test Site; and (3) Sandia's Chemical Waste Landfill near Albuquerque, NM. The objectives of the tests were to evaluate the ruggedness, longevity, operation, performance, and engineering requirements of these sensors in actual field settings. Results showed that the sensors could be operated continuously for long periods of time (greater than a year) using remote solar-powered data-logging stations with wireless telemetry. The sensor housing, which was constructed of 304 stainless steel, showed some signs of corrosion when placed in contaminated water for several months, but the overall integrity was maintained. The detection limits of the chemiresistors were generally found to be near 0.1% of the saturated vapor pressure of the target analyte in controlled laboratory conditions (e

  13. In-situ neutron diffraction study on work-hardening behavior in a ferrite-martensite dual phase steel

    OpenAIRE

    Morooka, Satoshi; Sato, Naoko; Ojima, Mayumi; Harjo, Stefanus; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Tomota, Yo; Umezawa, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Strength and work-hardening in steels have been discussed from the viewpoint of heterogeneous deformation. In-situ neutron diffraction techniques made clear that the misfit strains between grains accompanied with the grain-scaled internal stress (intergranular stress). In the dual phase steel, the intergranular stress was superposed on phase stress. Both long-range internal stress and short-range one like forest dislocation hardening may cause the resistance for dislocation motion in the steels.

  14. Pilot Testing of the NURSE Stress Management Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Colleen; Barrere, Cynthia; Robertson, Sue; Zahourek, Rothlyn; Diaz, Desiree; Lachapelle, Leeanne

    2016-12-01

    Student nurses experience significant stress during their education, which may contribute to illness and alterations in health, poor academic performance, and program attrition. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and potential efficacy of an innovative stress management program in two baccalaureate nursing programs in Connecticut, named NURSE (Nurture nurse, Use resources, foster Resilience, Stress and Environment management), that assists nursing students to develop stress management plans. An explanatory sequential mixed-methods design was used to evaluate the effects of the intervention with 40 junior nursing students. Results from this study provide evidence that the NURSE intervention is highly feasible, and support further testing to examine the effect of the intervention in improving stress management in nursing students. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. In situ heating test in Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone: measurement and interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conil, N.; Armand, G.; De La Vaissiere, R.; Morel, J.; Garitte, B.; Jobmann, M.; Jellouli, M.; Filippi, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. To study the thermo -hydro-mechanical effects of the early thermal phase on the clay host rock of a deep repository, Andra has performed a new in-situ heating test called TED experiment. This experiment is the second one being carried out in the Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory The aim of the TED experiment is to measure the evolution of the temperature; deformation and pore pressure fields around several heaters and to back-analyse the thermo-hydro-mechanical properties of the rock. The TED experiment was also designed to estimate the overpressure generated by heat in the zero flux plan between several heaters and to study the evolution of the damaged zone due to heat. Analysis of the experimental results will help in calibrating numerical models which will be applied to the disposal cell cases. The test set-up consists of three boreholes containing the heaters and twenty one instrumented observation boreholes. Each heater is 4 m long and may generate a power of 1500 W. The distance between each heater is about 2.6 m, which is close to the ratio of the disposal cell geometry concept. The surrounding boreholes were strategically located to follow the anisotropic THM behavior of the clay-stone. There are twelve pore pressure measurement boreholes (a total of eighteen piezometers), nine temperature measurement boreholes (108 temperature sensors) and 2 strain measurement boreholes. In order to optimize the inverse problem analysis, special attention has been paid to the reduction of uncertainties regarding the sensors location in the boreholes. Possible sensors location errors were indeed found to be a problematic issue for analysis and parameter determination in the previous thermal experiment ([1]). The central heater was activated on January 25, 2010 starting with a relatively low heating power of 150 W, then the heating power was increased to 300 W and finally to 600 W. Each step was about four

  16. Cardiac stress test as a risk-stratification tool for posttransplant cardiac outcomes in diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj; Parikh, Samir; Bhatt, Udayan; Vonvisger, Jon; Nori, Uday; Hasan, Ayesha; Samavedi, Srinivas; Andreoni, Kenneth; Henry, Mitchell; Pelletier, Ronald; Rajab, Amer; Elkhammas, Elmahdi; Pesavento, Todd

    2012-12-27

    The utility of cardiac stress testing as a risk-stratification tool before kidney transplantation remains debatable owing to discordance with coronary angiography and outcome yields at different centers. We conducted a retrospective study of 273 diabetic kidney transplant recipients from 2006 to 2010. By protocol, all diabetic patients underwent pharmacological radionucleotide stress test or dobutamine stress echocardiography before transplant. We compared the 1-year cardiac outcomes between those with negative stress test results and those with positive stress test results. Patients with a positive stress test result (n=67) underwent coronary angiogram, and significant coronary artery disease (≥70% coronary stenosis) was found in 35 (52.2%) patients. Of the latter, 32 (91.4%) underwent cardiac revascularization (24 underwent cardiac stenting and 8 underwent coronary artery bypass grafting). The rest (n=35) were treated medically. Within 1 year after transplant, the group with positive stress test results experienced more cardiac events (34.3% vs. 3.9%, P<0.001) including acute myocardial infarction (22.4% vs. 3.4%, P<0.001) and ventricular arrhythmias (8.9% vs. 0.05%, P=0.001), higher all-cause mortality (19.4% vs. 4.8%, P<0.001), and cardiac mortality (17.9% vs. 0.9%, P<0.001) compared with the group with negative stress test results. In this diabetic population, stress testing showed positive and negative predictive values of 34.3% and 96.1%, respectively. Pharmacological cardiac stress testing provided excellent risk stratification in diabetic kidney transplant recipients.

  17. Soil behavior under earthquake loading conditions. In situ impulse test for determination of shear modulus for seismic response analyses. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-06-01

    Progress is reported in the determination of the best methods of evaluation and prediction of soil behavior of potential nuclear power plant sites under seismic loading conditions. Results are reported of combined experimental and analytical studies undertaken to continue development of an in situ impulse test for determination of the soil shear modulus. Emphasis of the field work was directed toward making the field measurements at frequent depth intervals and at shear strains in the strong motion earthquake range. Emphasis of the analytical work was aimed toward supporting the field effort through processing and evaluation of the experimental test results combined with additional calculations required to gain insight into data interpretation and the in situ test setup itself. Continuing studies to evaluate free field soil behavior under earthquake loading conditions are discussed. (U.S.)

  18. Development of a crosshole sonic logging system for the integrity test of cast-in-situ piles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tai-Sup; Sung, Nak-Hoon; Hwang, Hak-Soo [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Taejeon(Korea)

    2001-09-01

    To evaluate the integrity of cast-in-situ concrete piles, a notebook PC-based crosshole sonic logging system which can be handled by one operator was developed using PCMCIA-type analog to digital converter card. User-interactive software for operation of the system were also developed using Labview. The system was tested with the field model pile to confirm the performance of the developed system. The test result shows that the system is very stable and efficient for detecting defects of the pile. (author). 3 refs., 9 figs.

  19. In-situ investigation of stress conditions during expansion of bare metal stents and PLLA-coated stents using the XRD sin(2)ψ-technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Wolfgang; Dammer, Markus; Bakczewitz, Frank; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Grabow, Niels; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Drug eluting stents (DES) consist of platform, coating and drug. The platform often is a balloon-expandable bare metal stent made of the CoCr alloy L-605 or stainless steel 316 L. The function of the coating, typically a permanent polymer, is to hold and release the drug, which should improve therapeutic outcome. Before implantation, DES are compressed (crimped) to allow implantation in the human body. During implantation, DES are expanded by balloon inflation. Crimping, as well as expansion, causes high stresses and high strains locally in the DES struts, as well as in the polymer coating. These stresses and strains are important design criteria of DES. Usually, they are calculated numerically by finite element analysis (FEA), but experimental results for validation are hardly available. In this work, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) sin(2)ψ-technique is applied to in-situ determination of stress conditions of bare metal L-605 stents, and Poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) coated stents. This provides a realistic characterization of the near-surface stress state and a validation option of the numerical FEA. XRD-results from terminal stent struts of the bare metal stent show an increasing compressive load stress in tangential direction with increasing stent expansion. These findings correlate with numerical FEA results. The PLLA-coating also bears increasing compressive load stress during expansion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. FlowPing - The New Tool for Throughput and Stress Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Vondrous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new tool for network throughput and stress testing. The FlowPing tool is easy to use, and its basic output is very similar to standard Linux ping application. The FlowPing tool is not limited to reach-ability or round trip time testing but is capable of complex UDP based throughput stress testing with rich reporting capabilities on client and server sides. Our new tool implements features, which allow the user to perform tests with variable packet size and traffic rate. All these features can be used in one single test run. This allows the user to use and develop new methodologies for network throughput and stress testing. With the FlowPing tool, it is easy to perform the test with the slowly increasing the amount of network traffic and monitor the behavior of network when the congestion occurs.

  1. Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume II: Appendices A to E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

    1996-02-12

    This document is a draft final report for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report This document is Volume II, containing appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees}to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

  2. Barents Sea field test of herder to thicken oil for in-situ burning in drift ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buist, I.; Potter, S.; Sorstrom, S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Thick oil slicks are the key to effective in situ burning. Pack ice can enable in situ burning by keeping slicks thick. Oil spills in drift ice conditions can rapidly spread and become too thin to ignite. The application of chemical surface-active agents known as oil herders are commonly used in open waters to clean and contain oil slicks. Herders result in the formation of a monolayer of surfactants on the water surface and reduce the surface tension on the surrounding water considerably. When the surfactant monolayer reaches the edge of a thin oil slick, it changes the balance of interfacial forces acting on the slick edge and allows the interfacial tensions to contract the oil into thicker layers. This study examined the use of chemical herding agents to thicken oil spills in broken ice to allow them to be ignited and burned in situ. Two meso-scale field burn tests were conducted in May 2008 with crude oil slicks of about 0.1 and 0.7 m 3 in open drift ice off Svalbard in the Barents Sea. Prior to the field experiments, 2 series of small laboratory tests were conducted using Heidrun and Statfjord crudes to determine the ability of the U.S. Navy herding agent to contract slicks of the oil. In the first field experiment involving 102 litres of fresh Heidrun, the slick was unexpectedly carried by currents to a nearby ice edge where the oil was ignited and burned. Approximately 80 per cent of the oil was consumed in the burn. In the second field experiment involving 630 litres of fresh Heidrun, the free-drifting oil was allowed to spread for 15 minutes until it was much too thin to ignite. When the herding agent was applied, the slick contracted and thickened for about 10 minutes and was then ignited using a gelled gas igniter. A 9-minute long burn consumed about 90 per cent of the oil. 9 refs., 5 tabs., 34 figs.

  3. Accelerated stress testing of thin film solar cells: Development of test methods and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    If thin film cells are to be considered a viable option for terrestrial power generation their reliability attributes will need to be explored and confidence in their stability obtained through accelerated testing. Development of a thin film accelerated test program will be more difficult than was the case for crystalline cells because of the monolithic construction nature of the cells. Specially constructed test samples will need to be fabricated, requiring committment to the concept of accelerated testing by the manufacturers. A new test schedule appropriate to thin film cells will need to be developed which will be different from that used in connection with crystalline cells. Preliminary work has been started to seek thin film schedule variations to two of the simplest tests: unbiased temperature and unbiased temperature humidity. Still to be examined are tests which involve the passage of current during temperature and/or humidity stress, either by biasing in the forward (or reverse) directions or by the application of light during stress. Investigation of these current (voltage) accelerated tests will involve development of methods of reliably contacting the thin conductive films during stress.

  4. Modeling Slip System Strength Evolution in Ti 7Al Informed by In situ Grain Stress Measurements (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    incipient damage nucleation and growth , is that which comprises a local neighbor- hood of grains. Heterogeneities in the local intergranular stresses and...After yielding, there was a small drop in the flow stress to 525 MPa followed by work hardening to 535 MPa by the end of the test. Overall, the...collected on a large panel area detector that was located 756 mm downstream of the sample. The detector was a GE amorphous silicon area detector with 2048

  5. Analysis of the existing correlations of effective friction angle for eastern piedmont soils of Bogota from in situ tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    July E. Carmona-Álvarez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the effective friction angle of soil from in situ test is a complicated job, due to high rates of strain existing in this kind of tests, which tend to be too invasive and disturb the vicinities of test depth, even the sample that eventually is taken at the site. Likewise, the most of the correlations found in the current bibliography to obtain the effective friction angle using field tests, have been developed for soils from different regions. For that reason when are implemented on tropical soils present high scatter, to compare the field parameter values with real results obtained at the lab. This research aims to use in situ tests define through of analysis of different correlations, which fits adequately to the specific conditions of the piedmont soils of Bogota. For the present study will be utilized data from SPT (widely used in Colombia and SPT-T (never before conducted in the country, carried out considering the appropriated norms to each test, taking in account to SPT-T, doesn’t exist local standard governing such tests. The correlations for field procedures of the tests implemented were for effective confining and energy transference of the SPT hammer, since the state-of-the-art mentions it as the most affect the reliability of the final results. The final results show the tendency of the methodologies used to obtain the correlation, in relation with the real value of effective friction angle from of lab tests.

  6. The influence of the roll diameter in flat rolling of of superconducting in situ and ex situ MgB2 tape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancock, Michael Halloway; Bay, Niels

    2007-01-01

    , 150 and 210 mm in each step. The investigation has shown that the in situ powder is more readily compacted than the ex situ powder, with an average increase of relative density after mechanical processing of 37% for in situ powder and 19% for ex situ powder. Statistical analysis showed that the choice......Applying the powder in tube (PIT) method, single-filament MgB2/Fe wire and tape has been manufactured applying both the ex situ and the in situ approach. The influence of the roll diameter in three-step flat rolling on the powder density and critical temperature has been examined using rolls of 70...... roll in the first and second reductions followed by the 150 mm or 210 mm roll in the last reduction was the optimum strategy for both powder types. AC susceptibility testing showed that for the in situ tapes there was no correlation between the powder density and the critical temperature. For ex situ...

  7. Fifth in situ vitrification engineering-scale test of simulated INEL buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsman, T.M.; Shade, J.W.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1992-06-01

    In September 1990, an engineering-scale in situ vitrification (ISV) test was conducted on sealed canisters containing a combined mixture of buried waste materials expected to be present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The test was part of a Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) program to assist INEL in treatability studies of the potential application of ISV to mixed transuranic wastes at the INEL SDA. The purpose of this test was to determine the effect of a close-packed layer of sealed containers on ISV processing performance. Specific objectives included determining (1) the effect of releases from sealed containers on hood plenum pressure and temperature, (2) the release pressure ad temperatures of the sealed canisters, (3) the relationships between canister depressurization and melt encapsulation, (4) the resulting glass and soil quality, (5) the potential effects of thermal transport due to a canister layer, (6) the effects on particle entrainment of differing angles of approach for the ISV melt front, and (7) the effects of these canisters on the volatilization of voltatile and semivolatile contaminants into the hood plenum

  8. Disorder–order phase transformation in a fluorite-related oxide thin film: In-situ X-ray diffraction and modelling of the residual stress effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F.; Lacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the transformation of the disordered fluorite cubic-F phase to the ordered cubic-C bixbyite phase, induced by isothermal annealing as a function of the residual stresses resulting from different concentrations of microstructural defects in the yttrium oxide, Y_2O_3. This transformation was studied using in-situ X-ray diffraction and was modelled using Kolmogorov–Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (KJMA) analysis. The degree of the disorder of the oxygen network was associated with the residual stress, which was a key parameter for the stability and the kinetics of the transition of the different phases that were present in the thin oxide film. When the degree of disorder/residual stress level is high, this transition, which occurs at a rather low temperature (300 °C), is interpreted as a transformation of phases that occurs by a complete recrystallization via the nucleation and growth of a new cubic-C structure. Using the KJMA model, we determined the activation energy of the transformation process, which indicates that this transition occurs via a one-dimensional diffusion process. Thus, we present the analysis and modelling of the stress state. When the disorder/residual stress level was low, a transition to the quasi-perfect ordered cubic-C structure of the yttrium oxide appeared at a rather high temperature (800 °C), which is interpreted as a classic recovery mechanism of the cubic-C structure. - Highlights: • Rare earth oxide thin films • XRD analysis • Phase transformation modelling • Residual stress effects • Crystallographic phase stability

  9. Disorder–order phase transformation in a fluorite-related oxide thin film: In-situ X-ray diffraction and modelling of the residual stress effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaboriaud, R.J.; Paumier, F. [Institut Pprime, Department of Material Sciences, CNRS-University of Poitiers SP2MI-BP 30179, 86962 Futuroscope-Chasseneuil cedex (France); Lacroix, B. [CSIC, Institut de Ciencia de Materiales, University of Sevilla, Avenida Américo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2016-02-29

    This work is focused on the transformation of the disordered fluorite cubic-F phase to the ordered cubic-C bixbyite phase, induced by isothermal annealing as a function of the residual stresses resulting from different concentrations of microstructural defects in the yttrium oxide, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This transformation was studied using in-situ X-ray diffraction and was modelled using Kolmogorov–Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (KJMA) analysis. The degree of the disorder of the oxygen network was associated with the residual stress, which was a key parameter for the stability and the kinetics of the transition of the different phases that were present in the thin oxide film. When the degree of disorder/residual stress level is high, this transition, which occurs at a rather low temperature (300 °C), is interpreted as a transformation of phases that occurs by a complete recrystallization via the nucleation and growth of a new cubic-C structure. Using the KJMA model, we determined the activation energy of the transformation process, which indicates that this transition occurs via a one-dimensional diffusion process. Thus, we present the analysis and modelling of the stress state. When the disorder/residual stress level was low, a transition to the quasi-perfect ordered cubic-C structure of the yttrium oxide appeared at a rather high temperature (800 °C), which is interpreted as a classic recovery mechanism of the cubic-C structure. - Highlights: • Rare earth oxide thin films • XRD analysis • Phase transformation modelling • Residual stress effects • Crystallographic phase stability.

  10. Molecular Tagging Velocimetry Development for In-situ Measurement in High-Temperature Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    The High Temperature Test Facility, HTTF, at Oregon State University (OSU) is an integral-effect test facility designed to model the behavior of a Very High Temperature Gas Reactor (VHTR) during a Depressurized Conduction Cooldown (DCC) event. It also has the ability to conduct limited investigations into the progression of a Pressurized Conduction Cooldown (PCC) event in addition to phenomena occurring during normal operations. Both of these phenomena will be studied with in-situ velocity field measurements. Experimental measurements of velocity are critical to provide proper boundary conditions to validate CFD codes, as well as developing correlations for system level codes, such as RELAP5 (http://www4vip.inl.gov/relap5/). Such data will be the first acquired in the HTTF and will introduce a diagnostic with numerous other applications to the field of nuclear thermal hydraulics. A laser-based optical diagnostic under development at The George Washington University (GWU) is presented; the technique is demonstrated with velocity data obtained in ambient temperature air, and adaptation to high-pressure, high-temperature flow is discussed.

  11. Effects of stress on memory in children and adolescents: testing causal connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quas, Jodi A; Rush, Elizabeth B; Yim, Ilona S; Nikolayev, Mariya

    2014-01-01

    Although a sizeable body of research has examined children's memory for stressful prior experiences, relatively few studies have experimentally manipulated stress during a to-be-remembered event to draw causal inferences about the effects of stress, especially across wide age ranges. We exposed children and adolescents to a more or a less arousing version of the Trier Social Stress Test-Modified (TSST-M), a widely used laboratory stress task. Two weeks later, we tested their memory for what happened. Interviewers behaved in a supportive or non-supportive manner. In adolescents, those who completed the high-arousal TSST-M provided fewer correct responses to recognition questions and fewer incorrect responses to misleading questions for which any answer would have been incorrect, compared to those who completed the lower-arousal TSST-M. Thus, arousal seemed to have reduced the adolescents' willingness to answer questions rather than having influenced their memory per se. In children, across TSST-M conditions, greater physiological arousal during the TSST-M predicted enhanced recall. Finally, interviewer support reduced the amount of factual information provided in free recall but increased correct responses to misleading questions. Results highlight the complex ways in which event stress and interviewer demeanour shape recounting of prior experiences across development.

  12. Use of Hawaii Analog Sites for Lunar Science and In-Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, G. B.; Larson, W. E.; Picard, M.; Hamilton, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) and lunar science share similar objectives with respect to analyzing and characterizing the physical, mineral, and volatile materials and resources at sites of robotic and human exploration. To help mature and stress instruments, technologies, and hardware and to evaluate operations and procedures, space agencies have utilized demonstrations at analog sites on Earth before use in future missions. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), and the German Space Agency (DLR) have utilized an analog site on the slope of Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to test ISRU and lunar science hardware and operations in two previously held analog field tests. NASA and CSA are currently planning on a 3rd analog field test to be held in June, 2012 in Hawaii that will expand upon the successes from the previous two field tests.

  13. Studies on laws of stress-magnetization based on magnetic memory testing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shangkun; Ren, Xianzhi

    2018-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory (MMM) testing technique is a novel testing method which can early test stress concentration status of ferromagnetic components. Under the different maximum tensile stress, the relationship between the leakage magnetic field of at certain point of cold rolled steel specimen and the tensile stress was measured during the process of loading and unloading by repeated. It shows that when the maximum tensile stress is less than 610 MPa, the relationship between the magnetic induction intensity and the stress is linear; When the maximum tensile stress increase from 610 MPa to 653 MPa of yield point, the relationship between the magnetic induction intensity and the tensile becomes bending line. The location of the extreme point of the bending line will move rapidly from the position of smaller stress to the larger stress position, and the variation of magnetic induction intensity increases rapidly. When the maximum tensile stress is greater than the 653 MPa of yield point, the variation of the magnetic induction intensity remains large, and the position of the extreme point moves very little. In theoretical aspects, tensile stress is to be divided into ordered stress and disordered stress. In the stage of elastic stress, a microscopic model of the order stress magnetization is established, and the conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental data. In the plastic deformation stage, a microscopic model of disordered stress magnetization is established, and the conclusions are in good agreement with the experimental data, too. The research results can provide reference for the accurate quantitative detection and evaluation of metal magnetic memory testing technology.

  14. In situ measurement on TSV-Cu deformation with hotplate system based on sheet resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunna; Wang, Bo; Wang, Huiying; Wu, Kaifeng; Yang, Shengyong; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2017-12-01

    The in situ measurement of TSVs deformation at different temperature is meaningful for learning more about the thermal deformation schemes of 3D TSVs in the microelectronic devices. An efficient and smart hotplate based on sheet resistance is designed for offering more heat, producing a uniform temperature distribution, relieving thermal stress and heat concentration issues, and reducing room space, which was optimized by the finite element method (FEM). The fabricated hotplate is efficient and smart (2.5 cm  ×  2.0 cm  ×  0.5 cm) enough to be located in the limited space during measuring. The thermal infrared imager was employed as the temperature sensor for monitoring the temperature distribution of TSVs sample. The 3D profilometry was adopted as the observer for TSVs profiles survey. The in situ 2D top surface profiles and 3D displacement profiles of TSVs sample at the different temperature were measured by 3D profilometer. The in situ average relative deformation and effective plastic deformation of the TSV sample were measured. With optical measurement method, 3D profilometry, the TSV sample can be tested repeatedly.

  15. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, E.; Alvarez, B. J.; Patiño, H.; Telenti, A.; Barreiro, J.

    2016-05-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed.

  16. Testing coordinate measuring arms with a geometric feature-based gauge: in situ field trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuesta, E; Alvarez, B J; Patiño, H; Telenti, A; Barreiro, J

    2016-01-01

    This work describes in detail the definition of a procedure for calibrating and evaluating coordinate measuring arms (AACMMs or CMAs). CMAs are portable coordinate measuring machines that have been widely accepted in industry despite their sensitivity to the skill and experience of the operator in charge of the inspection task. The procedure proposed here is based on the use of a dimensional gauge that incorporates multiple geometric features, specifically designed for evaluating the measuring technique when CMAs are used, at company facilities (workshops or laboratories) and by the usual operators who handle these devices in their daily work. After establishing the procedure and manufacturing the feature-based gauge, the research project was complemented with diverse in situ field tests performed with the collaboration of companies that use these devices in their inspection tasks. Some of the results are presented here, not only comparing different operators but also comparing different companies. The knowledge extracted from these experiments has allowed the procedure to be validated, the defects of the methodologies currently used for in situ inspections to be detected, and substantial improvements for increasing the reliability of these portable instruments to be proposed. (paper)

  17. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing: Part II. Precipitates by in situ aluminum alloy corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahn, Chi Bum; Kasza, Ken E.; Shack, William J.; Natesan, Ken; Klein, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → Sump strainer head loss testing to evaluate chemical effects. → Aluminum hydroxide precipitates by in situ Al alloy corrosion caused head loss. → Intermetallic particles released from Al alloy can also cause significant head loss. → When evaluating Al effect on head loss, intermetallics should be considered. - Abstract: Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 o C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH) 3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH) 3 when intermetallic particles are present.

  18. A prognostic scoring system for arm exercise stress testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Xian, Hong; Chandiramani, Pooja; Bainter, Emily; Wan, Leping; Martin, Wade H

    2016-01-01

    Arm exercise stress testing may be an equivalent or better predictor of mortality outcome than pharmacological stress imaging for the ≥50% for patients unable to perform leg exercise. Thus, our objective was to develop an arm exercise ECG stress test scoring system, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, for predicting outcome in these individuals. In this retrospective observational cohort study, arm exercise ECG stress tests were performed in 443 consecutive veterans aged 64.1 (11.1) years. (mean (SD)) between 1997 and 2002. From multivariate Cox models, arm exercise scores were developed for prediction of 5-year and 12-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and 5-year cardiovascular mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Arm exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs), 1 min heart rate recovery (HRR) and ST segment depression ≥1 mm were the stress test variables independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality by step-wise Cox analysis (all pstatistic of 0.81 before and 0.88 after adjustment for significant demographic and clinical covariates. Arm exercise scores for the other outcome end points yielded C-statistic values of 0.77-0.79 before and 0.82-0.86 after adjustment for significant covariates versus 0.64-0.72 for best fit pharmacological myocardial perfusion imaging models in a cohort of 1730 veterans who were evaluated over the same time period. Arm exercise scores, analogous to the Duke Treadmill Score, have good power for prediction of mortality or MI in patients who cannot perform leg exercise.

  19. Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology, and Glass Standard Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    ARL-TN-0756 ● MAY 2016 US Army Research Laboratory Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology , and Glass Standard Evaluation...Stress Optical Coefficient, Test Methodology , and Glass Standard Evaluation by Clayton M Weiss Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Educ