WorldWideScience

Sample records for in-situ propellant production

  1. Regenerative Gas Dryer for In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Rocket propellant can be produced anywhere that water is found by splitting it into hydrogen and oxygen, potentially saving several tons of mass per mission and enabling the long term presence of humans in space beyond LEO. When water is split into hydrogen and oxygen, the gaseous products can be very humid (several thousand ppm). Propellant-grade gases need to be extremely dry before being converted into cryogenic liquids (less than 26 ppm water for grade B Oxygen). The primary objective of this project is to design, build and test a regenerative gas drying system that can take humid gas from a water electrolysis system and provide dry gas (less than 26ppm water) to the inlet of a liquefaction system for long durations. State of the art work in this area attempted to use vacuum as a means to regenerate desiccant, but it was observed that water would migrate to the dry zone without a sweep gas present to direct the desorbed vapor. Further work attempted to use CO2 as a sweep gas, but this resulted in a corrosive carbonic acid. In order for in-situ propellant production to work, we need a way to continuously dry humid gas that addresses these issues.

  2. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Rassat, Scot D.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.

    2005-09-01

    An in situ propellant production (ISPP) plant on future Mars robotic missions can produce oxygen (O2) and methane (CH4) that can be used for propellant for the return voyage. By producing propellants from Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) brought from Earth, the initial mass launched in low Earth orbit can be reduced by 20% to 45%, as compared to carrying all of the propellant for a round-trip mission to the Mars surface from Earth. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory used microchannel architecture to develop a Mars-based In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) system. This three year research and development effort focused on process intensification and system miniaturization of three primary subsystems: a thermochemical compressor, catalytic reactors, and components for separating gas phases from liquid phases. These systems were designed based on a robotic direct return mission scenario, but can be scaled up to human flight missions by simply numbering up the microchannel devices. The thermochemical compression was developed both using absorption and adsorption. A multichannel adsorption system was designed to meet the full-scale CO2 collection requirements using temperature swing adsorption. Each stage is designed to achieve a 10x compression of CO2. A compression ratio to collect Martian atmospheric CO2 at ~0.8 kPa and compress it to at least 100 kPa can be achieved with two adsorption stages in series. A compressor stage incorporates eight thermally coupled adsorption cells at various stages in the adsorption/desorption cycle to maximize the recuperation of thermal energy and provide a nearly continuous flow of CO2 to the downstream reactors. The thermochemically compressed CO2 is then mixed with hydrogen gas and fed to two reactors: a Sabatier Reaction unit and a Reverse Water/Gas Shift unit. The microchannel architecture allows better heat control than is possible in an adiabatic system, resulting in significantly higher conversion. The

  3. Mars ISPP Precursor (MIP): The First Flight Demonstration of In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David

    1997-01-01

    Strategic planning for human missions of exploration to Mars has conclusively identified in-situ propellant production (ISPP) as an enabling technology. The Mars reference mission concept predeploys a robotic propellant production plant to the planet two years before the planned departure of the crew from Earth. The successful operation of this plant is necessary for the human journey to begin.

  4. Development of a Microchannel In Situ Propellant Production System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Kriston; Rassat, Scot; Hu, John; Stenkamp, Susie; Schlahta, Steve; Bontha, Jagan; Holladay, Jamie; Simon, Tom; Romig, Kris; Howard, Candice

    2006-01-01

    A microchannel-based system is being developed for NASA to produce propellants from atmospheric CO2 on Mars. This system will provide a means of reducing the earth-based launch mass for both sample return and human exploration missions. The atmospheric CO2 will be collected, separated, and compressed with a microchannel thermal swing adsorption system. It will be reacted with hydrogen that has either been electrolyzed from the available subsurface water or brought from earth. Methane and water will be produced by using microchannel Sabatier and Reverse Water Gas Shift reactors, respectively. The water will then separated with a microchannel condenser/phase separator and electrolyzed to produce oxygen and hydrogen. Feed gases will be separated from the products and recycled. The system design requirements will be presented in this paper. The design and fabrication methods of the microchannel CO2 sorption pump, reactors, and phase separators will be described, and the advantages of microchannel architecture will be delineated for each component. Estimates of system mass and volume will also be provided in comparison to conventional hardware. The testing and integration proposed during this project to meet NASA's Technology Readiness Level 5 will also be presented.

  5. Mars In-Situ Propellant Production Precursor (MIP) Flight Demonstration Project: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Ratliff, J. E.; Baird, R. S.; Sanders, G. B.; Johnson, K. R.; Karlmann, P. B.; Juanero, K. J.; Baraona, C. R.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P. P.; hide

    1999-01-01

    Strategic planning for human missions of exploration to Mars has conclusively identified in-situ propellant production (ISPP) as an enabling technology. A team of scientists and engineers from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Lewis Research Center is preparing the MARS ISPP PRECURSOR (MIP) Flight Demonstration. The objectives of MIP are to characterize the performance of processes and hardware which are important to ISPP concepts and to demonstrate how these processes and hardware interact with the Mars environment. Operating this hardware in the actual Mars environment is extremely important due to both uncertainties in our knowledge of the Mars environment as well as because of conditions that cannot be adequately simulated on Earth. The MIP Flight Demonstration is a payload onboard the MARS SURVEYOR Lander and will be launched in April 2001. MIP will be the first hardware to utilize the indigenous resources of a planet or moon. Its successful operation will pave the way for future robotic and human missions to rely on propellants produced using Martian resources as feedstock.

  6. Modeling and Analysis of the Reverse Water Gas Shift Process for In-Situ Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan E.

    2000-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of mathematical models and simulation tools developed for the Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) process. This process is a candidate technology for oxygen production on Mars under the In-Situ Propellant Production (ISPP) project. An analysis of the RWGS process was performed using a material balance for the system. The material balance is very complex due to the downstream separations and subsequent recycle inherent with the process. A numerical simulation was developed for the RWGS process to provide a tool for analysis and optimization of experimental hardware, which will be constructed later this year at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Attempts to solve the material balance for the system, which can be defined by 27 nonlinear equations, initially failed. A convergence scheme was developed which led to successful solution of the material balance, however the simplified equations used for the gas separation membrane were found insufficient. Additional more rigorous models were successfully developed and solved for the membrane separation. Sample results from these models are included in this report, with recommendations for experimental work needed for model validation.

  7. Information Technology and the Autonomous Control of a Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Sridhar, K. R.; Larson, William E.; Clancy, Daniel J.; Peschur, Charles; Briggs, Geoffrey A.; Zornetzer, Steven F. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    With the rapidly increasing performance of information technology, i.e., computer hardware and software systems, as well as networks and communication systems, a new capability is being developed that holds the clear promise of greatly increased exploration capability, along with dramatically reduced design, development, and operating costs. These new intelligent systems technologies, utilizing knowledge-based software and very high performance computer systems, will provide new design and development tools, scheduling mechanisms, and vehicle and system health monitoring capabilities. In addition, specific technologies such as neural nets will provide a degree of machine intelligence and associated autonomy which has previously been unavailable to the mission and spacecraft designer and to the system operator. One of the most promising applications of these new information technologies is to the area of in situ resource utilization. Useful resources such as oxygen, compressed carbon dioxide, water, methane, and buffer gases can be extracted and/or generated from planetary atmospheres, such as the Martian atmosphere. These products, when used for propulsion and life-support needs can provide significant savings in the launch mass and costs for both robotic and crewed missions. In the longer term the utilization of indigenous resources is an enabling technology that is vital to sustaining long duration human presence on Mars. This paper will present the concepts that are currently under investigation and development for mining the Martian atmosphere, such as temperature-swing adsorption, zirconia electrolysis etc., to create propellants and life-support materials. This description will be followed by an analysis of the information technology and control needs for the reliable and autonomous operation of such processing plants in a fault tolerant manner, as well as the approach being taken for the development of the controlling software. Finally, there will be a brief

  8. In-Situ Propellant Production on Mars: A Sabatier/Electrolysis Demonstration Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David L.

    1997-01-01

    An efficient, reliable propellant production plant has been developed for use on Mars. Using a Sabatier reactor in conjunction with a water electrolysis system, a complete demonstration plant has produced methane and liquid oxygen from simulated Martian atmosphere. The production plant has demonstrated high efficiency, extended duration production and autonomous operations. This paper presents the results and conclusions relating to eventual use in a Mars sample return mission. This work was funded by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The production plant was built and tested at the Propulsion Center of Lockheed Martin at the Denver Colorado facility.

  9. The Mars In-Situ-Propellant-Production Precursor (MIP) Flight Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, D. I.; Ratliff, J. E.; Baird, R. S.; Sanders, G. B.; Johnson, K. R.; Karlmann, P. B.; Baraona, C. R.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P. P.; Scheiman, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Strategic planning for human missions of exploration to Mars has conclusively identified insitu propellant production (ISPP) as an enabling technology. A team of scientists and engineers from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and Glenn Research Center is preparing the MARS ISPP PRECURSOR (MIP) Flight Demonstration. The objectives of MIP are to characterize the performance of processes and hardware that are important to ISPP concepts and to demonstrate how these processes and hardware interact with the Mars environment. Operating this hardware in the actual Mars environment is extremely important due to (1) uncertainties in our knowledge of the Mars environment, and (2) conditions that cannot be adequately simulated on Earth. The MIP Flight Demonstration is a payload onboard the MARS SURVEYOR Lander and will be launched in April 2001. MIP will be the first hardware to utilize the indigenous resources of a planet or moon. Its successful operation will pave the way for future robotic and human missions to rely on propellants produced using Martian resources as feedstock.

  10. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  11. Mars Integrated Propellant Production System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Integrated Mars In-Situ Propellant Production System (IMISPPS) is an end-to-end system that will produce rocket propellant on Mars from CO2 in the Martian...

  12. In-situ tensile testing of propellant samples within SEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedetto, G.L. di; Ramshorst, M.C.J. van; Duvalois, W.; Hooijmeijer, P.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    2015-01-01

    A tensile module system placed within a FEI NovaNanoSEM 650 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) was utilized in this work to conduct in-situ tensile testing of propellant material samples. This tensile module system allows for real-time in-situ SEM analysis of the samples to determine the failure mec

  13. Mars Propellant Production with Ionic Liquids Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falker, John; Thompson, Karen; Zeitlin, Nancy; Muscatello, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This project seeks to develop a single vessel for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and electrolysis for in situ Mars propellant production by eliminating several steps of CO2 processing, two cryocoolers, a high temperature reactor, a recycle pump, and a water condenser; thus greatly reducing mass, volume, and power.

  14. In-Situ Cryogenic Propellant Liquefaction and Storage for a Precursor to a Human Mars Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Paul; Durrant, Tom

    The current mission plan for the first human mission to Mars is based on an in-situ propellant production (ISPP) approach to reduce the amount of propellants needed to be taken to Mars and ultimately to reduce mission cost. Recent restructuring of the Mars Robotic Exploration Program has removed ISPP from the early sample return missions. A need still exists to demonstrate ISPP technologies on one or more robotic missions prior to the first human mission. This paper outlines a concept for an ISPP-based precursor mission as a technology demonstration prior to the first human mission. It will also return Martian soil samples to Earth for scientific analysis. The mission will primarily demonstrate cryogenic oxygen and fuel production, liquefaction, and storage for use as propellants for the return trip. Hydrogen will be brought from Earth as a feedstock to produce the hydrocarbon fuel (most likely methane). The analysis used to develop the mission concept includes several different thermal control and liquefaction options for the cryogens. Active cooling and liquefaction devices include Stirling, pulse tube, and Brayton-cycle cryocoolers. Insulation options include multilayer insulation, evacuated microspheres, aerogel blankets, and foam insulation. The cooling capacity and amount of insulation are traded off against each other for a minimum-mass system. In the case of hydrogen feedstock, the amount of hydrogen boiloff allowed during the trip to Mars is also included in the tradeoff. The spacecraft concept includes a Lander (including the propellant production plant) with a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) mounted atop it. An option is explored where the engines on the MAV are also used for descent and landing on the Martian surface at the beginning of the mission. So the MAV propellant tanks would contain oxygen and methane during the trip from Earth. This propellant would be consumed in descent to the Martian surface, resulting in nearly-empty MAV tanks to be filled by the

  15. In Situ Oxygen Production from Lunar and Martian Regolith Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ oxygen production is of immense importance to NASA in the support of the NASA initiative to sustain man's permanent presence in space. The oxygen produced...

  16. Energy production with a tubular propeller turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samora, I.; Hasmatuchi, V.; Münch-Alligné, C.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.; Ramos, H. M.

    2016-11-01

    Micro-hydropower is a way of improving the energetic efficiency of existent water systems. In the particular case of drinking water systems, several studies have showed that pressure reducing valves can be by-passed with turbines in order to recover the dissipated hydraulic energy to produce electricity. As conventional turbines are not always cost-effective for power under 20 kW, a new energy converter is studied. A five blade tubular propeller (5BTP), assessed through laboratorial tests on a reduced model with a diameter of 85 mm diameter and a maximal output power of 300 W, is addressed in this work. Having showed promising potential for further development, since global efficiencies of around 60% were observed, the turbine has been further used to estimate the potential for energy production in a real case study. A sub-grid of the drinking water system of the city of Lausanne, Switzerland, has been used to obtain an annual energy production through hourly simulations with several turbines.

  17. Atmospheric Processing Module for Mars Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, A.; Devor, R.; Captain, J.

    2014-01-01

    The multi-NASA center Mars Atmosphere and Regolith COllector/PrOcessor for Lander Operations (MARCO POLO) project was established to build and demonstrate a methaneoxygen propellant production system in a Mars analog environment. Work at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Applied Chemistry Laboratory is focused on the Atmospheric Processing Module (APM). The purpose of the APM is to freeze carbon dioxide from a simulated Martian atmosphere containing the minor components nitrogen, argon, carbon monoxide, and water vapor at Martian pressures (approx. 8 torr) by using dual cryocoolers with alternating cycles of freezing and sublimation. The resulting pressurized CO(sub 2) is fed to a methanation subsystem where it is catalytically combined with hydrogen in a Sabatier reactor supplied by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to make methane and water vapor. We first used a simplified once-through setup and later employed a H(sub 2)CO(sub 2) recycling system to improve process efficiency. This presentation and paper will cover (1) the design and selection of major hardware items, such as the cryocoolers, pumps, tanks, chillers, and membrane separators, (2) the determination of the optimal cold head design and flow rates needed to meet the collection requirement of 88 g CO(sub 2) hr for 14 hr, (3) the testing of the CO(sub 2) freezer subsystem, and (4) the integration and testing of the two subsystems to verify the desired production rate of 31.7 g CH(sub 4) hr and 71.3 g H(sub 2)O hr along with verification of their purity. The resulting 2.22 kg of CH(sub 2)O(sub 2) propellant per 14 hr day (including O(sub 2) from electrolysis of water recovered from regolith, which also supplies the H(sub 2) for methanation) is of the scale needed for a Mars Sample Return mission. In addition, the significance of the project to NASAs new Mars exploration plans will be discussed.

  18. Propellant and Terrestrial Fuel Production from Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Build and test in a relevant environment a Mars propellant production plant of an appropriate scale for an initial demonstration on Mars. It will produce sufficient...

  19. In-Space Propellant Production Using Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notardonato, William; Johnson, Wesley; Swanger, Adam; McQuade, William

    2012-01-01

    A new era of space exploration is being planned. Manned exploration architectures under consideration require the long term storage of cryogenic propellants in space, and larger science mission directorate payloads can be delivered using cryogenic propulsion stages. Several architecture studies have shown that in-space cryogenic propulsion depots offer benefits including lower launch costs, smaller launch vehicles, and enhanced mission flexibility. NASA is currently planning a Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) technology demonstration mission that will use existing technology to demonstrate long duration storage, acquisition, mass gauging, and transfer of liquid hydrogen in low Earth orbit. This mission will demonstrate key technologies, but the CPST architecture is not designed for optimal mission operations for a true propellant depot. This paper will consider cryogenic propellant depots that are designed for operability. The operability principles considered are reusability, commonality, designing for the unique environment of space, and use of active control systems, both thermal and fluid. After considering these operability principles, a proposed depot architecture will be presented that uses water launch and on orbit electrolysis and liquefaction. This could serve as the first true space factory. Critical technologies needed for this depot architecture, including on orbit electrolysis, zero-g liquefaction and storage, rendezvous and docking, and propellant transfer, will be discussed and a developmental path forward will be presented. Finally, use of the depot to support the NASA Science Mission Directorate exploration goals will be presented.

  20. Applied in situ product recovery in ABE fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalander, Carl‐Axel; Lee, Jonathan G. M.; Davies, E. Timothy; Harvey, Adam P.

    2017-01-01

    The production of biobutanol is hindered by the product's toxicity to the bacteria, which limits the productivity of the process. In situ product recovery of butanol can improve the productivity by removing the source of inhibition. This paper reviews in situ product recovery techniques applied to the acetone butanol ethanol fermentation in a stirred tank reactor. Methods of in situ recovery include gas stripping, vacuum fermentation, pervaporation, liquid–liquid extraction, perstraction, and adsorption, all of which have been investigated for the acetone, butanol, and ethanol fermentation. All techniques have shown an improvement in substrate utilization, yield, productivity or both. Different fermentation modes favored different techniques. For batch processing gas stripping and pervaporation were most favorable, but in fed‐batch fermentations gas stripping and adsorption were most promising. During continuous processing perstraction appeared to offer the best improvement. The use of hybrid techniques can increase the final product concentration beyond that of single‐stage techniques. Therefore, the selection of an in situ product recovery technique would require comparable information on the energy demand and economics of the process. © 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:563–579, 2017 PMID:28188696

  1. Future directions for in-situ product removal (ISPR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodley, John; Bisschops, Marc; Straathof, Adrie J J

    2008-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited by inhibit......This paper summarizes the main findings of a round-table discussion held to examine the key bottlenecks in the further application and industrial implementation of in-situ product removal (ISPR) techniques. It is well established that ISPR can yield great benefits for processes limited...

  2. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and

  3. Mixing and In situ product removal in micro-bioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Of the thesis :’ Mixing and In-situ product removal in micro bioreactors’ by Xiaonan Li The work presented in this thesis is a part of a large cluster project, which was formed between DSM, Organon, Applikon and two university groups (TU Delft and University of Twente), under the ACTS and

  4. In-situ Production of High Density Polyethylene and Other Useful Materials on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a revolutionary materials structure and power storage concept based on the in-situ production of abiotic carbon 4 compounds. One of the largest single mass penalties required to support the human exploration of Mars is the surface habitat. This proposal will use physical chemical technologies to produce high density polyethylene (HDPE) inflatable structures and construction materials from Mars atmospheric CO2. The formation of polyethylene from Mars CO2 is based on the use of the Sabatier and modified Fischer Tropsch reactions. The proposed system will fully integrate with existing in-situ propellant production concepts. The technology will also be capable of supplementing human caloric requirements, providing solid and liquid fuels for energy storage, and providing significant reduction in mission risk. The NASA Mars Reference Mission Definition Team estimated that a conventional Mars surface habitat structure would weigh 10 tonnes. It is estimated that this technology could reduce this mass by 80%. This reduction in mass will significantly contribute to the reduction in total mission cost need to make a Mars mission a reality. In addition the potential reduction of risk provided by the ability to produce C4 and potentially higher carbon based materials in-situ on Mars is significant. Food, fuel, and shelter are only three of many requirements that would be impacted by this research.

  5. In-situ Production of High Density Polyethylene and Other Useful Materials on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a revolutionary materials structure and power storage concept based on the in-situ production of abiotic carbon 4 compounds. One of the largest single mass penalties required to support the human exploration of Mars is the surface habitat. This proposal will use physical chemical technologies to produce high density polyethylene (HDPE) inflatable structures and construction materials from Mars atmospheric CO2. The formation of polyethylene from Mars CO2 is based on the use of the Sabatier and modified Fischer Tropsch reactions. The proposed system will fully integrate with existing in-situ propellant production concepts. The technology will also be capable of supplementing human caloric requirements, providing solid and liquid fuels for energy storage, and providing significant reduction in mission risk. The NASA Mars Reference Mission Definition Team estimated that a conventional Mars surface habitat structure would weigh 10 tonnes. It is estimated that this technology could reduce this mass by 80%. This reduction in mass will significantly contribute to the reduction in total mission cost need to make a Mars mission a reality. In addition the potential reduction of risk provided by the ability to produce C4 and potentially higher carbon based materials in-situ on Mars is significant. Food, fuel, and shelter are only three of many requirements that would be impacted by this research.

  6. Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lt. Col. B. N Mitra

    1952-01-01

    Full Text Available There is little doubt that explosives had their origin in warfare. In the armed conflict between groups of individuals or of states, where each sought and still seeks to impose its will upon the other by force, it was inevitable that arms should grow and flourish. The sling, the bow and arrow, the sword and firearm typify evolution in warfare weapons. Bs a means of propelling missiles, the gun and gun powder were thought of. The history of explosives, therefore, may be said to begin with black powder.

  7. Advantages of the use of lunar and Mars propellant production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barney

    1991-01-01

    The use of nonterrestrial resources is discussed in the context of facilitating the transport of space-vehicle propellant to be used for lunar and/or Mars missions. A cost-benefit analysis is conducted to determine the feasibility and efficiency of developing propellant-production facilities in space for future mission support. The analysis suggests that after 2-3 years a break-even point is possible for return-on-investment mass, and technological hurdles are described that include systems for automation, mining, and processing.

  8. A Liquefier for Mars Surface Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Lou J.; Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; Kittel, P.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's planned Mars exploration missions will require that cryogenic propellants be manufactured on the surface. The present scenario calls for oxygen and methane gases to he produced using the carbon dioxide atmosphere plus seed hydrogen brought from Earth. Gases will require liquefaction for both storage on the Martian surface and for use in the ascent vehicle. The planned liquefaction rates range from 12.6 g/hr of oxygen for the 2003 robotic mission to 2500 g/hr for the later human missions. This paper presents the results of a nitrogen liquefaction demonstration using a commercially available cryocooler. The experiment was set up to liquefy nitrogen gas instead of oxygen to limit laboratory safety concerns. A nitrogen gas condensor, attached to the cooler's cold tip, was sized to liquefy up to 42 gN2/hr at the intended storage pressure (0.2 MPa). The experiment was conducted inside an atmospheric, air-filled, refrigerated chamber simulating the average Martian daytime temperature (240 K). In this demonstration a liquefaction rate of 9.1 gN2/hr was realized, which is equivalent to 13 gO2/hr.

  9. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  10. An ISRU Propellant Production System to Fully Fuel a Mars Ascent Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Paz, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) will enable the long term presence of humans beyond low earth orbit. Since 2009, oxygen production from the Mars atmosphere has been baselined as an enabling technology for Mars human exploration by NASA. However, using water from the Martian regolith in addition to the atmospheric CO2 would enable the production of both liquid Methane and liquid Oxygen, thus fully fueling a Mars return vehicle. A case study was performed to show how ISRU can support NASA's Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) using methane and oxygen production from Mars resources. A model was built and used to generate mass and power estimates of an end-to-end ISRU system including excavation and extraction water from Mars regolith, processing the Mars atmosphere, and liquefying the propellants. Even using the lowest yield regolith, a full ISRU system would weigh 1.7 mT while eliminating the need to transport 30 mT of ascent propellants from earth.

  11. Production of Dioxins and Furans from the Burning of Excess Gun Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chemical composition of M1 gun propellant Constituents Proportions (weight/weight %) Nitrocellulose 85 ± 2 2,4-dinitrotoluene 10 ± 2...Production of dioxins and furans from the burning of excess gun propellant Isabelle Poulin Sonia Thiboutot Sylvie Brochu DRDC Valcartier Defence...excess gun propellant Isabelle Poulin Sonia Thiboutot Sylvie Brochu DRDC Valcartier Defence R&D Canada – Valcartier

  12. In-Situ Production of Solar Power Systems for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Criswell, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Current proposals for developing an extended human presence, beyond space stations, on the Moon and Mars increasingly consider the processing of non-terrestrial materials essential for keeping the Earth launch burden reasonable. Utilization of in-situ resources for construction of lunar and Mars bases will initially require assessment of resource availability followed by the development of economically acceptable and technically feasible extractive processes. In regard to materials processing and fabrication the lower gravity level on the Moon (0.125 g) and Mars (0.367 g) will dramatically change the presently accepted hierarchy of materials in terms of specific properties, a factor which must be understood and exploited. Furthermore, significant changes are expected in the behavior of liquid materials during processing. In casting, for example, mold filling and associated solidification processes have to be reevaluated. Finally microstructural development and therefore material properties, presently being documented through on-going research in microgravity science and applications, needs to be understood and scaled to the reduced gravity environments. One of the most important elements of a human planetary base is power production. Lunar samples and geophysical measurements returned by the Apollo missions provide detailed data on the composition and physical characteristics of the lunar materials and environment. Based on this knowledge and extrapolations of terrestrial industrial experience it is clear that several types of solar-to-electric converters can be manufactured on the Moon. It is conceivable that well over 90% of a solar-to- electric power system could be made from lunar materials. Production and utilization of photovoltaic devices for solar energy production on Earth is primarily driven by the market economy. On Earth a production plant for photovoltaic devices is intimately linked to the planets massive industrial base. A selection of off the shelf

  13. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  14. In situ primary production in young Antarctic sea ice

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    An in situ incubation technique used successfully to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation of internal algal assemblages within thick multiyear Arctic sea ice was developed and improved to measure the photosynthetic carbon assimilation within young sea ice only 50 cm thick (Eastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica). The new device enabled some of the first precise measurements of in situ photosynthetic carbon assimilation in newly formed Antarctic sea ice.

  15. Combined Detoxification and In-situ Product Removal by a Single Resin During Lignocellulosic Butanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Phragmites australis (an invasive plant in North America) was used as feedstock for ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation by Clostridium saccharobutylicum. Sulphuric acid pretreated phragmites hydrolysate (SAEH) without detoxification inhibited butanol production (0.73 g/L butanol from 30 g/L sugars). The treatment of SAEH with resin L-493 prior the fermentation resulted in no inhibitory effects and an ABE titer of 14.44 g/L, including 5.49 g/L butanol was obtained, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.49 g/g and 0.60 g/L/h, respectively. Dual functionality of the resin was realized by also using it as an in-situ product removal agent. Integrating in-situ product removal allowed for the use of high substrate concentrations without the typical product inhibition. Resin-detoxified SAEH was supplemented with neat glucose and an effective ABE titer of 33 g/L (including 13.7 g/L acetone, 16.4 g/L butanol and 1.9 g/L ethanol) was achieved with resin-based in-situ product removal, corresponding to an ABE yield and productivity of 0.41 g/g and 0.69 g/L/h, respectively. Both detoxification of the substrate and the products was achieved by the same resin, which was added prior the fermentation. Integrating hydrolysate detoxification and in-situ butanol removal in a batch process through single resin can potentially simplify cellulosic butanol production.

  16. In Situ Magnetic Separation for Extracellular Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappler, T.; Cerff, Martin; Ottow, Kim Ekelund

    2009-01-01

    employed directly in the broth during the fermentation, followed by in situ magnetic separation, Proof of the concept was first demonstrated in shake flask culture, then scaled up and applied during a fed batch cultivation ill a 3.7 L bioreactor. It could be demonstrated that growth of B. licheniformis...

  17. Enhanced Enzymatic Production of Cephalexin at High Substrate Concentration with in situ Product Removal by Complexation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengchao Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cephalexin (CEX was synthesized with 7-amino-3-deacetoxycephalosporanic acid (7-ADCA and D(–-phenylglycine methyl ester (PGME using immobilized penicillin G acylase from Escherichia coli. It was found that substrate concentration and in situ product could remarkably influence the ratio of synthesis to hydrolysis (S/H and the efficiency of CEX synthesis. The optimal ratio of enzyme to substrate was 65 IU/mM 7-ADCA. High substrate concentration improved the 7-ADCA conversion from 61 to 81 % in the process without in situ product removal (ISPR, while in the synthetic process with ISPR, high substrate concentration increased the 7-ADCA conversion from 88 to 98 %. CEX was easily separated from CEX/β-naphthol complex and its purity and overall yield were 99 and 70 %, respectively.

  18. Butanol production in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation with in situ product recovery by adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Tang, I-Ching; Zhao, Jingbo; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-11-01

    Activated carbon Norit ROW 0.8, zeolite CBV901, and polymeric resins Dowex Optipore L-493 and SD-2 with high specific loadings and partition coefficients were studied for n-butanol adsorption. Adsorption isotherms were found to follow Langmuir model, which can be used to estimate the amount of butanol adsorbed in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. In serum-bottle fermentation with in situ adsorption, activated carbon showed the best performance with 21.9g/L of butanol production. When operated in a fermentor, free- and immobilized-cell fermentations with adsorption produced 31.6g/L and 54.6g/L butanol with productivities of 0.30g/L·h and 0.45g/L·h, respectively. Thermal desorption produced a condensate containing ∼167g/L butanol, which resulted in a highly concentrated butanol solution of ∼640g/L after spontaneous phase separation. This in situ product recovery process with activated carbon is energy efficient and can be easily integrated with ABE fermentation for n-butanol production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient calcium lactate production by fermentation coupled with crystallization-based in situ product removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ke; Xu, Ping

    2014-07-01

    Lactic acid is a platform chemical with various industrial applications, and its derivative, calcium lactate, is an important food additive. Fermentation coupled with in situ product removal (ISPR) can provide more outputs with high productivity. The method used in this study was based on calcium lactate crystallization. Three cycles of crystallization were performed during the fermentation course using a Bacillus coagulans strain H-1. As compared to fed-batch fermentation, this method showed 1.7 times higher average productivity considering seed culture, with 74.4% more L-lactic acid produced in the fermentation with ISPR. Thus, fermentation coupled with crystallization-based ISPR may be a biotechnological alternative that provides an efficient system for production of calcium lactate or lactic acid.

  20. In situ production and analysis of Weissella confusa dextran in wheat sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katina, Kati; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Juvonen, Riikka; Flander, Laura; Johansson, Liisa; Virkki, Liisa; Tenkanen, Maija; Laitila, Arja

    2009-10-01

    Several lactic acid bacteria belonging to the genera Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, and Weissella have been introduced to wheat sourdough baking for in situ production of exopolysaccharides. This is considered a novel method for improving the shelf-life, volume and nutritional value of bread without additives. However, in situ production of exopolysaccharides during sourdough fermentation is challenged by simultaneous acidification due to metabolic activities of the bacteria, which may significantly diminish the positive technological impact of exopolysaccharides. In this study, the growth, activity and in situ production of dextran by Weissella confusa VTT E-90392 in wheat sourdoughs were investigated. Furthermore, the influence of dextran-enriched sourdoughs, at the addition level of 43%, on the subsequent bread quality was established. W. confusa efficiently produced dextran from the added sucrose in wheat sourdough without strong acid production. A new specific enzyme-assisted method for in situ analysis of dextran in sourdoughs was developed. With this method, we could for the first time proof significant (11-16 g/kg DW) production of polymeric dextran in sourdoughs. Concomitant formation of shorter isomaltooligosaccharides by W. confusa was also detected. The produced dextran significantly increased the viscosity of the sourdoughs. Application of dextran-enriched sourdoughs in bread baking provided mildly acidic wheat bread with improved volume (up to 10%) and crumb softness (25-40%) during 6 days of storage. Hence, W. confusa is a promising new strain for efficient in situ production of dextrans and isomaltooligosaccharides in sourdoughs without strong acidification.

  1. In-situ product removal by membrane extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    In bioproduction processes of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, downstream processing usually is a significant cost factor. The products require a high purity (especially biopharmaceutical products), therefore, the process usually contains a large number of separation steps. Moreover, the high costs in

  2. In-situ product removal by membrane extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    In bioproduction processes of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, downstream processing usually is a significant cost factor. The products require a high purity (especially biopharmaceutical products), therefore, the process usually contains a large number of separation steps. Moreover, the high costs in

  3. Space Resource Requirements for Future In-Space Propellant Production Depots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitherman, David; Fikes, John; Roy, Stephanie; Henley, Mark W.; Potter, Seth D.; Howell, Joe T. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 and 2001 studies were conducted at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center on the technical requirements and commercial potential for propellant production depots in low Earth orbit (LEO) to support future commercial, NASA, and other Agency missions. Results indicate that propellant production depots appear to be technically feasible given continued technology development, and there is a substantial growing market that depots could support. Systems studies showed that the most expensive part of transferring payloads to geosynchronous orbit (GEO) is the fuel. A cryogenic propellant production and storage depot stationed in LEO could lower the cost of missions to GEO and beyond. Propellant production separates water into hydrogen and oxygen through electrolysis. This process utilizes large amounts of power, therefore a depot derived from advanced space solar power technology was defined. Results indicate that in the coming decades there could be a significant demand for water-based propellants from Earth, moon, or asteroid resources if in-space transfer vehicles (upper stages) transitioned to reusable systems using water based propellants. This type of strategic planning move could create a substantial commercial market for space resources development, and ultimately lead toward significant commercial infrastructure development within the Earth-Moon system.

  4. Lactic acid Production with in situ Extraction in Membrane Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Ghafouri Taleghani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Lactic acid is widely used in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The major problems associated with lactic acid production are substrate and end-product inhibition, and by-product formation. Membrane technologyrepresents one of the most effective processes for lactic acid production. The aim of this work is to increase cell density and lactic acid productivity due to reduced inhibition effect of substrate and product in membrane bioreactor.Material and Methods: In this work, lactic acid was produced from lactose in membrane bioreactor. A laboratory scale membrane bioreactor was designed and fabricated. Five types of commercial membranes were tested at the same operating conditions (transmembrane pressure: 500 KPa and temperature: 25°C. The effects of initial lactose concentration and dilution rate on biomass growth, lactic acid production and substrate utilization were evaluated.Results and Conclusion: The high lactose retention of 79% v v-1 and low lactic acid retention of 22% v v-1 were obtained with NF1 membrane; therefore, this membrane was selected for membrane bioreactor. The maximal productivity of 17.1 g l-1 h-1 was obtainedwith the lactic acid concentration of 71.5 g l-1 at the dilution rate of 0.24 h−1. The maximum concentration of lactic acid was obtained at the dilution rate of 0.04 h−1. The inhibiting effect of lactic acid was not observed at high initial lactose concentration. The critical lactose concentration at which the cell growth severely hampered was 150 g l-1. This study proved that membrane bioreactor had great advantages such as elimination of substrate and product inhibition, high concentration of process substrate, high cell density,and high lactic acid productivity.Conflict of interest: There is no conflict of interest.

  5. In situ Diagnostics During Carbon Nanotube Production by Laser Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arepalli, Sivaram

    1999-01-01

    The preliminary results of spectral analysis of the reaction zone during the carbon nanotube production by laser ablation method indicate synergetic dependence on dual laser setup. The emission spectra recorded from different regions of the laser ablated plume at different delay times from the laser pulses are used to map the temperatures of C2 and C3. These are compared with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) spectra also obtained during production to model the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. Experiments conducted to correlate the spectral features with nanotube yields as a function of different production parameters will be discussed.

  6. Relationship between in situ degradation kinetics and in vitro gas production fermentation using different mathematical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, M.A.M.; Cone, J.W.; Ferreira, L.M.M.; Blok, M.C.; Guedes, C.

    2009-01-01

    In vitro and in situ studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of different mathematical models, used to fit gas production profiles of 15 feedstuffs, on estimates of nylon bag organic matter (OM) degradation kinetics. The gas production data were fitted to Exponential, Logistic, Gompertz and

  7. In situ ruminal crude protein degradability of by-products from cereals, oilseeds and animal origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, G.; Khan, N.A.; Ali, M.; Bezabih, M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish a database on in situ ruminal crude protein (CP) degradability characteristics of by-products from cereal grains, oilseeds and animal origin commonly fed to ruminants in Pakistan and South Asian Countries. The oilseed by-products were soybean meal, sunflower me

  8. In situ natural product discovery via an artificial marine sponge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J La Clair

    Full Text Available There is continuing international interest in exploring and developing the therapeutic potential of marine-derived small molecules. Balancing the strategies for ocean based sampling of source organisms versus the potential to endanger fragile ecosystems poses a substantial challenge. In order to mitigate such environmental impacts, we have developed a deployable artificial sponge. This report provides details on its design followed by evidence that it faithfully recapitulates traditional natural product collection protocols. Retrieving this artificial sponge from a tropical ecosystem after deployment for 320 hours afforded three actin-targeting jasplakinolide depsipeptides that had been discovered two decades earlier using traditional sponge specimen collection and isolation procedures. The successful outcome achieved here could reinvigorate marine natural products research, by producing new environmentally innocuous sources of natural products and providing a means to probe the true biosynthetic origins of complex marine-derived scaffolds.

  9. Estimating grass and grass silage degradation characteristics by in situ and in vitro gas production methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Karolyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation characteristics of grass and grass silage at different maturities were studied using in situ and in vitro gas production methods. In situ data determined difference between grass and silage. Degradable fraction decreased as grass matured while the undegradable fraction increased. Rate of degradation (kd was slower for silage than fresh grass. Gas production method (GP data showed that fermentation of degradable fraction was different between stage of maturity in both grass and silage. Other data did not show any difference with the exception for the rate of GP of soluble and undegradable fraction. The in situ degradation characteristics were estimated from GP characteristics. The degradable and undegradable fractions could be estimated by multiple relationships. Using the three-phases model for gas production kd and fermentable organic matter could be estimated from the same parameters. The only in situ parameter that could not be estimated with GP parameters was the soluble fraction. The GP method and the three phases model provided to be an alternative to the in situ method for animal feed evaluations.

  10. In-situ product recovery from fermentation broths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, C.

    2010-01-01

    Life sciences will be one of the decisive factors in the 21st century. A major part of this field is the so-called white biotechnology, also known as industrial biotechnology. White biotechnology is an emerging field where bio-chemicals are produced using micro-organisms. However, the production of

  11. In-situ product recovery from fermentation broths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Berg, C.

    2010-01-01

    Life sciences will be one of the decisive factors in the 21st century. A major part of this field is the so-called white biotechnology, also known as industrial biotechnology. White biotechnology is an emerging field where bio-chemicals are produced using micro-organisms. However, the production of

  12. Simulations of terrestrial in-situ cosmogenic-nuclide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nishiizumi, K.; Arnold, J.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Lal, D. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Englert, P.A.J. [San Jose State Univ., CA (United States). Nuclear Science Facility; Klein, J.; Middleton, R. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analysis

    1993-12-31

    Targets of silicon and silicon dioxide were irradiated with spallation neutrons to simulate the production of long-lived radionuclides in the surface of the earth. Gamma-ray spectroscopy was used to measure {sup 7}Be and {sup 22}Na, and accelerator mass spectrometry was used to measure {sup 10}Be, {sup 14}C, and {sup 26}Al. The measured ratios of these nuclides are compared with calculated ratios and with ratios from other simulations and agree well with ratios inferred from terrestrial samples.

  13. Evaluation of some by-Products using In situ and In vitro Gas Production Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besharati Maghsoud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Food by-products in Iran are produced in high levels. In this study, in situ and in vitro gas production techniques were used to describe nutritive value of apple pomace, tomato pomace and noodle waste. For this purpose two ruminal fistulated sheep were used. Nylon bags which were approximately (6×12 cm containing 5 g samples (2 mm screen were incubated in duplicate in the rumen of fistulated sheep for 0,2,4,6,8,12,16,24,36 and 48 h. The gas production was recorded after 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 36 and 48 h of incubation and the equation of P = A (1-e-ct was used to describe the kinetics of gas production. The data was analyzed using completely randomized design. DM and CP disappearance were significantly different among feedstuffs (p<0.05. After 48 h of incubation DM disappearance in noodle waste was highest and in tomato pomace was lowest. Regarding to the results, at the most incubation times tomato pomace had lower CP disappearance among feedstuffs (p<0.05. Potential gas production (A and rates of gas production (c differed among feedstuffs. Apple pomace showed higher potential gas production (A (305.1 mL g1 DM and tomato pomace had higher rate of gas production (c (0.09 h1 than the other feedstuffs. According to gas production volume, the value for the ME, OMD and SCFA ranged from in 8.87 noodle waste to 9.76 in apple pomace, 56.1 in tomato pomace to 64.3 in apple pomace and 0.919 in noodle waste to 1.168 in apple pomace, respectively. Partitioning factor in noodle waste was highest and in tomato pomace was lowest. In the present study, feeds composition significantly affected the degradation parameters.

  14. Advances in in-situ product recovery (ISPR) in whole cell biotechnology during the last decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hecke, Wouter; Kaur, Guneet; De Wever, Heleen

    2014-11-15

    The review presents the state-of-the-art in the applications of in-situ product recovery (ISPR) in whole-cell biotechnology over the last 10years. It summarizes various ISPR-integrated fermentation processes for the production of a wide spectrum of bio-based products. A critical assessment of the performance of various ISPR concepts with respect to the degree of product enrichment, improved productivity, reduced process flows and increased yields is provided. Requirements to allow a successful industrial implementation of ISPR are also discussed. Finally, supporting technologies such as online monitoring, mathematical modeling and use of recombinant microorganisms with ISPR are presented.

  15. Biodiesel production from rice bran by a two-step in-situ process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Pei-Jing; Gunawan, Setiyo; Hsieh, Wen-Hao; Kasim, Novy S; Ju, Yi-Hsu

    2010-02-01

    The production of fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) by a two-step in-situ transesterification from two kinds of rice bran was investigated in this study. The method included an in-situ acid-catalyzed esterification followed by an in-situ base-catalyzed transesterification. Free fatty acids (FFAs) level was reduced to less than 1% for both rice bran A (initial FFAs content=3%) and rice bran B (initial FFAs content=30%) in the first step under the following conditions: 10 g rice bran, methanol to rice bran ratio 15 mL/g, H(2)SO(4) to rice bran mass ratio 0.18, 60 degrees C reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring rate, 15 min reaction time. The organic phase of the first step product was collected and subjected to a second step reaction by adding 8 mL of 5N NaOH solution and allowing to react for 60 and 30 min for rice bran A and rice bran B, respectively. FAMEs yields of 96.8% and 97.4% were obtained for rice bran A and rice bran B, respectively, after this two-step in-situ reaction.

  16. Reduced prokaryotic heterotrophic production at in situ pressure conditions in the dark ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano-Sato, Chie; Sintes, Eva; Reinthaler, Thomas; Utsumi, Motoo; Herndl, Gerhard J.

    2017-04-01

    Prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) is a key process in the ocean's biological carbon cycle. About 50% of the oceanic PHP takes place in the dark ocean characterized by low temperature and high hydrostatic pressure, which increases by 1 MPa (10 atm) every 100 m depth. However, rate measurements of PHP are usually performed under atmospheric pressure conditions. Yet, the difference in pressure conditions and the handling of the samples on board may introduce biases in the PHP measurements. To determine PHP at in situ conditions, we developed an in situ microbial incubator (ISMI) designed to autonomously sample and incubate seawater down to a depth of 4000 m. Natural prokaryotic communities from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans were incubated in the ISMI with 5 nM 3H-leucine at different depths ranging between 10 and 3200 m. For comparison, atmospheric pressure incubations at in situ temperature were also conducted. PHP and single cell activity assessed by microautoradiography combined with catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (MICRO-CARD-FISH) were determined. PHP obtained under in situ pressure conditions was generally lower than under atmospheric pressure conditions, suggesting that incubation under atmospheric pressure on board stimulates activity of dark ocean prokaryotes. The ratio between the bulk PHP obtained under in situ and under atmospheric pressure conditions decreased with depth. Moreover, MICRO-CARD-FISH revealed that some specific prokaryotic groups are apparently more affected by the hydrostatic pressure condition than others. Our results suggest that PHP in the dark ocean might be lower than assumed based on measurements under surface pressure conditions.

  17. Using in situ airborne measurements to evaluate three cloud phase products derived from CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, G.; Chepfer, H.; Winker, D.; Getzewich, B.; Cai, X.; Jourdan, O.; Mioche, G.; Okamoto, H.; Hagihara, Y.; Noel, V.; Reverdy, M.

    2016-05-01

    We compare the cloud detection and cloud phase determination of three independent climatologies based on Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) to airborne in situ measurements. Our analysis of the cloud detection shows that the differences between the satellite and in situ measurements mainly arise from three factors. First, averaging CALIPSO Level l data along track before cloud detection increases the estimate of high- and low-level cloud fractions. Second, the vertical averaging of Level 1 data before cloud detection tends to artificially increase the cloud vertical extent. Third, the differences in classification of fully attenuated pixels among the CALIPSO climatologies lead to differences in the low-level Arctic cloud fractions. In another section, we compare the cloudy pixels detected by colocated in situ and satellite observations to study the cloud phase determination. At midlatitudes, retrievals of homogeneous high ice clouds by CALIPSO data sets are very robust (more than 94.6% of agreement with in situ). In the Arctic, where the cloud phase vertical variability is larger within a 480 m pixel, all climatologies show disagreements with the in situ measurements and CALIPSO-General Circulation Models-Oriented Cloud Product (GOCCP) report significant undefined-phase clouds, which likely correspond to mixed-phase clouds. In all CALIPSO products, the phase determination is dominated by the cloud top phase. Finally, we use global statistics to demonstrate that main differences between the CALIPSO cloud phase products stem from the cloud detection (horizontal averaging, fully attenuated pixels) rather than the cloud phase determination procedures.

  18. Propelled abrasive grit applications for weed management in transitional corn grain production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control is challenging to farmers who are transitioning from production systems that use synthetic herbicides to organic systems. A two-year field study examined weed control efficacy and corn grain yield of air-propelled corncob grit abrasion for in-row weed control. Grits were applied based o...

  19. Efficient solvothermal wet in situ transesterification of Nannochloropsis gaditana for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bora; Chang, Yong Keun; Lee, Jae W

    2017-02-16

    In situ transesterification of wet microalgae is a promising, simplified alternative biodiesel production process that replaces multiple operations of cell drying, extraction, and transesterification reaction. This study addresses enhanced biodiesel production from Nannochloropsis gaditana at elevated temperatures. Compared with the previously reported in situ transesterification process of conducting the reaction at a temperature ranging from 95 to 125 °C, the present work employs higher temperatures of at least 150 °C. This relatively harsh condition allows much less acid catalyst with or without co-solvent to be used during this single extraction-conversion process. Without any co-solvent, 0.58% (v/v) of H2SO4 in the reaction medium can achieve 90 wt% of the total lipid conversion to biodiesel at 170 °C when the moisture content of wet algal paste is 80 wt%. Here, the effects of temperature, acid catalyst, and co-solvent on the FAEE yield and specification were scrutinized, and the reaction kinetic was investigated to understand the solvothermal in situ transesterification reaction at the high temperature. Having a biphasic system (water/chloroform) during the reaction also helped to meet biodiesel quality standard EN 14214, as Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Mg(2+) cations and phosphorus were detected only below 5 ppm. With highlights on the economic feasibility, wet in situ transesterification at the high temperature can contribute to sustainable production of biodiesel from microalgae by reducing the chemical input and relieve the burden of extensive post purification process, therefore a step towards green process.

  20. Validation of Land Surface Temperature products in arid climate regions with permanent in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettsche, F.; Olesen, F.; Trigo, I.; Hulley, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is operationally obtained from several space-borne sensors, e.g. from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) onboard Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) by the Land Surface Analysis - Satellite Application Facility (LSA-SAF) and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on EOS-Terra by the MODIS Land Team. The relative accuracy of LST products can be assessed by cross-validating different products. Alternatively, the so-called 'radiance based validation' can be used to compare satellite-retrieved LST with results from radiative transfer models: however, this requires precise a priori knowledge of land surface emissivity (LSE) and atmospheric conditions. Ultimately, in-situ measurements (';ground truth') are needed for validating satellite LST&E products. Therefore, the LST product derived by LSA-SAF is validated with independent in-situ measurements (';temperature based validation') at permanent validation stations located in different climate regions on the SEVIRI disk. In-situ validation is largely complicated by the spatial scale mismatch between satellite sensors and ground based sensors, i.e. areas observed by ground radiometers usually cover about 10 m2, whereas satellite measurements in the thermal infrared typically cover between 1 km2 and 100 km2. Furthermore, an accurate characterization of the surface is critical for all validation approaches, but particularly over arid regions, as shown by in-situ measurements revealing that LSE products can be wrong by more than 3% [1]. The permanent stations near Gobabeb (Namibia; hyper-arid desert climate) and Dahra (Senegal; hot-arid steppe-prairie climate) are two of KIT's four dedicated LST validation stations. Gobabeb station is located on vast and flat gravel plains (several 100 km2), which are mainly covered by coarse gravel, sand, and desiccated grass. The gravel plains are highly homogeneous in space and time, which makes them ideal for

  1. Tracing hillslope sediment production and transport with in situ and meteoric 10Be

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, Matthew C.; Bierman, Paul R.; Matmon, Ari; Nichols, Kyle; Larsen, Jennifer; Finkel, Robert

    2009-12-01

    We use in situ-produced and meteoric 10Be, analyzed in soils from 28 pits on four hillcrest-parallel transects along a 14° hillslope in the Great Smoky Mountains, North Carolina, as tracers of soil production and transport. We rely upon amalgamation both to investigate and smooth spatial variability in 10Be concentrations. Lidar indicates that the hillslope is topographically complex and that soil is moved downslope diffusively until it encounters the ephemeral channel network and is rapidly exported. In situ-produced 10Be, measured in depth profiles, indicates that over millennial timescales, soils are mixed above the soil-saprolite boundary. In contrast, meteoric 10Be concentrations increase with depth and are correlated to concurrent increases of dithionite-extractable Al and pH, observations explained by similar Al and Be mobility in the soil. The concentrations of both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be increase downslope proportional to the maximum soil particle path length. The data suggest virtual downslope soil velocities of 1.1-1.7 cm yr-1 in a well-mixed active transport layer ˜60 cm thick. The thickness of this transport layer is constant downslope and depends on the rooting depth and consequent root wad thickness of downed trees on the slope, both of which reflect depth to the soil/saprolite boundary. Both meteoric and in situ-produced 10Be suggest that soil production is balanced by surface denudation at rates between 10 and 13 m Myr-1. Soil residence times on the slope range from 21 to 33 kyr based on the meteoric 10Be inventories. Major element geochemical analysis suggests little if any elemental loss during soil transport downslope.

  2. A microfluidic toolbox for the development of in-situ product removal strategies in biocatalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Søren; Mitic, Aleksandar; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic toolbox for accelerated development of biocatalytic processes has great potential. This is especially the case for the development of advanced biocatalytic process concepts, where reactors and product separation methods are closely linked together to intensify the process performance......, e.g., by the use of in-situ product removal (ISPR).This review provides a general overview of currently available tools in a microfluidic toolbox and how this toolbox can be applied to the development of advanced biocatalytic process concepts. Emphasis is placed on describing the possibilities...

  3. Modeling of Liquefaction of Cryogenic Propellant in a Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayat, A.; Bolshinskiy, L. G.; Majumdar, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades NASA has been focusing to develop technology that would to allow for production of cryogenic propellants on the surface of Mars. The in-situ propellant production reduces the amount of propellants needed to be taken to Mars and ultimately to reduce mission cost. Utilizing Martian resources, the produced gaseous propellants (i.e., oxygen and methane) are liquefied and stored prior to use on the Mars ascent vehicle. In this paper, a model for the liquefaction process of gaseous propellants in a cryogenically refrigerated tank is presented. The tank is considered to be cylindrical with elliptical top and bottom domes. A multi-node transient model is developed based on the mass and energy conservation equations and wall-gas and liquid-gas interface mass and heat transfer correlations. Description of the model and predicted results will be presented in the final paper.

  4. Conceptual study of on orbit production of cryogenic propellants by water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility is assessed of producing cryogenic propellants on orbit by water electrolysis in support of NASA's proposed Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) missions. Using this method, water launched into low earth orbit (LEO) would be split into gaseous hydrogen and oxygen by electrolysis in an orbiting propellant processor spacecraft. The resulting gases would then be liquified and stored in cryogenic tanks. Supplying liquid hydrogen and oxygen fuel to space vehicles by this technique has some possible advantages over conventional methods. The potential benefits are derived from the characteristics of water as a payload, and include reduced ground handling and launch risk, denser packaging, and reduced tankage and piping requirements. A conceptual design of a water processor was generated based on related previous studies, and contemporary or near term technologies required. Extensive development efforts would be required to adapt the various subsystems needed for the propellant processor for use in space. Based on the cumulative results, propellant production by on orbit water electrolysis for support of SEI missions is not recommended.

  5. Two-step in situ biodiesel production from microalgae with high free fatty acid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tao; Wang, Jun; Miao, Chao; Zheng, Yubin; Chen, Shulin

    2013-05-01

    The yield of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) from microalgae biomass is generally low via traditional extraction-conversion route due to the deficient solvent extraction. In this study a two-step in situ process was investigated to obtain a high FAME yield from microalgae biomass that had high free fatty acids (FFA) content. This was accomplished with a pre-esterification process using heterogeneous catalyst to reduce FFA content prior to the base-catalyzed transesterification. The two-step in situ process resulted in a total FAME recovery up to 94.87±0.86%, which was much higher than that obtained by a one-step acid or base catalytic in situ process. The heterogeneous catalyst, Amberlyst-15, could be used for 8 cycles without significant loss in activity. This process have the potential to reduce the production cost of microalgae-derived FAME and be more environmental compatible due to the higher FAME yield with reduced catalyst consumption.

  6. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  7. Synthesis of integrated primary production in the Arctic Ocean: II. In situ and remotely sensed estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Victoria J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Olson, Elise; Suttles, S.; Steele, Mike; Codispoti, L. A.; Zimmerman, Richard C.

    2013-03-01

    Recent warming of surface waters, accompanied by reduced ice thickness and extent may have significant consequences for climate-driven changes of primary production (PP) in the Arctic Ocean (AO). However, it has been difficult to obtain a robust benchmark estimate of pan-Arctic PP necessary for evaluating change. This paper provides an estimate of pan-Arctic PP prior to significant warming from a synthetic analysis of the ARCSS-PP database of in situ measurements collected from 1954 to 2007 and estimates derived from satellite-based observations from 1998 to 2007. Vertical profiles of in situ chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PP revealed persistent subsurface peaks in biomass and PP throughout the AO during most of the summer period. This was contradictory with the commonly assumed exponential decrease in PP with depth on which prior satellite-derived estimates were based. As remotely sensed Chl a was not a good predictor of integrated water column Chl a, accurate satellite-based modeling of vertically integrated primary production (IPPsat), requires knowledge of the subsurface distribution of phytoplankton, coincident with the remotely sensed ocean color measurements. We developed an alternative approach to modeling PP from satellite observations by incorporating climatological information on the depths of the euphotic zone and the mixed layer that control the distribution of phytoplankton that significantly improved the fidelity of satellite derived PP to in situ observations. The annual IPP of the Arctic Ocean combining both in situ and satellite based estimates was calculated here to be a minimum of 466 ± 94 Tg C yr-1 and a maximum of 993 ± 94 Tg C yr-1, when corrected for subsurface production. Inflow shelf seas account for 75% of annual IPP, while the central basin and Beaufort northern sea were the regions with the lowest annual integrated productivity, due to persistently stratified, oligotrophic and ice-covered conditions. Although the expansion of summertime

  8. Productivity of chironomid larvae exposed to oil sands process water : in situ vs. lab bioassay results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, K.; Ciborowski, J. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Oil sands process water (OSPW) contains toxic concentrations of salts and napthenic acids that may compromise wetland reclamation efforts. The productivity of wetland biota is one of the criteria used by the Alberta government to determine if land leased to oil sands mining companies is restored. This study determined how chironomid productivity is influenced by the water from oil sands process material (OSPM) affected wetland. In this study, 26 10-day in situ and laboratory bioassays from water of three oil sands process material (OSPM) were compared with water from 3 reference wetlands to determine the influence of water from OSPM affected wetlands on chironomid productivity. Parallel studies were conducted with Chironomus riparius lab-cultured larvae and Chironomus sp larvae cultured from egg masses collected from an OSPW-affected wetland. In situ, chironomids were housed in small cylinders with fine-mesh netting to allow water exchange and contact with the sediment. Preliminary estimates of chironomids emerging from study wetlands indicated that native and lab cultured chironomids are not uniformly responsive to OSPW.

  9. Cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides: Exposure ages and erosion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisinger, B.; Nolte, E.

    2000-10-01

    Experimental data for the cosmogenic in situ production of radionuclides and its depth dependence are used for two applications, the determination of exposure ages and of erosion rates. Concentrations of the long-lived radionuclides 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz are presented as function of exposure age, depth before exposure and erosion rate after exposure. It is shown that the cosmogenic production before exposure can introduce important corrections to the representation without consideration of pre-exposure production. Depth profiles of 10Be, 14C and 26Al in quartz and sulfur, of 36Cl in K 2O, CaCO 3, granite and concrete and of 53Mn in Fe 2O 3 are given as function of erosion rate. Consequences to determinations of neutron fluences in Hiroshima are discussed.

  10. Experimental investigation of the combustion products in an aluminised solid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhu; Li, Shipeng; Liu, Mengying; Guan, Dian; Sui, Xin; Wang, Ningfei

    2017-04-01

    Aluminium is widely used as an important additive to improve ballistic and energy performance in solid propellants, but the unburned aluminium does not contribute to the specific impulse and has both thermal and momentum two-phase flow losses. So understanding of aluminium combustion behaviour during solid propellant burning is significant when improving internal ballistic performance. Recent developments and experimental results reported on such combustion behaviour are presented in this paper. A variety of experimental techniques ranging from quenching and dynamic measurement, to high-speed CCD video recording, were used to study aluminium combustion behaviour and the size distribution of the initial agglomerates. This experimental investigation also provides the size distribution of the condensed phase products. Results suggest that the addition of an organic fluoride compound to solid propellant will generate smaller diameter condensed phase products due to sublimation of AlF3. Lastly, a physico-chemical picture of the agglomeration process was also developed based on the results of high-speed CCD video analysis.

  11. Sources of biogenic methane to form marine gas hydrates: In situ production or upward migration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paull, C.K.; Ussler, W. III; Borowski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    Potential sources of biogenic methane in the Carolina Continental Rise -- Blake Ridge sediments have been examined. Two models were used to estimate the potential for biogenic methane production: (1) construction of sedimentary organic carbon budgets, and (2) depth extrapolation of modern microbial production rates. While closed-system estimates predict some gas hydrate formation, it is unlikely that >3% of the sediment volume could be filled by hydrate from methane produced in situ. Formation of greater amounts requires migration of methane from the underlying continental rise sediment prism. Methane may be recycled from below the base of the gas hydrate stability zone by gas hydrate decomposition, upward migration of the methane gas, and recrystallization of gas hydrate within the overlying stability zone. Methane bubbles may also form in the sediment column below the depth of gas hydrate stability because the methane saturation concentration of the pore fluids decreases with increasing depth. Upward migration of methane bubbles from these deeper sediments can add methane to the hydrate stability zone. From these models it appears that recycling and upward migration of methane is essential in forming significant gas hydrate concentrations. In addition, the depth distribution profiles of methane hydrate will differ if the majority of the methane has migrated upward rather than having been produced in situ.

  12. Comprehensive validation scheme for in situ fiber optics dissolution method for pharmaceutical drug product testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Tahseen; Liu, Qian Julie; Vivilecchia, Richard; Joshi, Yatindra

    2009-03-01

    There has been a growing interest during the past decade in the use of fiber optics dissolution testing. Use of this novel technology is mainly confined to research and development laboratories. It has not yet emerged as a tool for end product release testing despite its ability to generate in situ results and efficiency improvement. One potential reason may be the lack of clear validation guidelines that can be applied for the assessment of suitability of fiber optics. This article describes a comprehensive validation scheme and development of a reliable, robust, reproducible and cost-effective dissolution test using fiber optics technology. The test was successfully applied for characterizing the dissolution behavior of a 40-mg immediate-release tablet dosage form that is under development at Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, New Jersey. The method was validated for the following parameters: linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity, and robustness. In particular, robustness was evaluated in terms of probe sampling depth and probe orientation. The in situ fiber optic method was found to be comparable to the existing manual sampling dissolution method. Finally, the fiber optic dissolution test was successfully performed by different operators on different days, to further enhance the validity of the method. The results demonstrate that the fiber optics technology can be successfully validated for end product dissolution/release testing.

  13. Development of in-situ product removal strategies in biocatalysis applying scaled-down unit operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Søren; Börner, Tim; Ringborg, Rolf Hoffmeyer

    2017-01-01

    An experimental platform based on scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner enables easy and highly flexible testing of advanced biocatalytic process options such as in-situ product removal (ISPR) process strategies. In such a platform it is possible to compartmentalize...... different process steps while operating it as a combined system, giving the possibility to test and characterize the performance of novel process concepts and biocatalysts with minimal influence of inhibitory products. Here the capabilities of performing process development by applying scaled-down unit......-automatically characterize ω-transaminases in a scaled-down packed-bed reactor (PBR) module, showing MPPA as a strong inhibitor. To overcome the inhibition, a two-step liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) ISPR concept was tested using scaled-down unit operations combined in a plug-and-play manner. Through the tested ISPR concept...

  14. Concurrent production of biodiesel and chemicals through wet in situ transesterification of microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hanjin; Kim, Bora; Lee, Jae W

    2015-10-01

    This work addresses an unprecedented way of co-producing biodiesel (FAEE) and valuable chemicals of ethyl levulinate (EL), ethyl formate (EF) and diethyl ether (DEE) from wet in situ transesterification of microalgae. EL, EF, and DEE were significantly produced up to 23.1%, 10.3%, and 52.1% of the maximum FAEE mass with the FAEE yield higher than 90% at 125 °C. Experiments to elucidate a detailed route of EL and EF synthesis were fulfilled and it was found that its main route to the production of EL and EF was the acid hydrolysis of algal cells and esterification with ethanol. To investigate the effect of reaction variables on the products yields, comprehensive experiments were carried out with varying temperatures, solvent and alcohol volumes, moisture contents and catalyst amounts. Coproduction of DEE, EL, EF and FAEE can contribute to elevating the economic feasibility of microalgae-based biodiesel supply chain.

  15. In-situ transesterification of wet spent coffee grounds for sustainable biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongseok; Kim, Bora; Lee, Jae W

    2016-12-01

    This work addresses in-situ transesterification of wet spent coffee grounds (SCGs) for the production of biodiesel. For in-situ transesterification process, the methanol, organic solvent and acid catalyst were mixed with wet SCG in one pot and the mixture was heated for simultaneous lipid extraction and transesterification. Maximum yield of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) was 16.75wt.% based on the weight of dry SCG at 95°C. Comprehensive experiments were conducted with varying temperatures and various amounts of moisture, methanol, co-solvent and acid catalyst. Moderate polar and alcohol-miscible organic solvent is suitable for the high FAME yield. Unsaturated FAMEs are subject to oxidative cleavage by nitric acid and shorter chain (C6 and C10) FAMEs were mainly produced while sulfuric acid yielded long chain unsaturated FAMEs (C16 and C18). Utilization of wet SCGs as a biodiesel feedstock gives economic and environmental benefits by recycling the municipal waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Biomass Production and Ester Synthesis by In Situ Transesterification/Esterification Using the Microalga Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Rodrigues da Silva Baumgartner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing energy demand and reduction in the availability of nonrenewable energy sources, allied with an increase in public environmental awareness, have stimulated a search for alternative energy sources. The present study was aimed at producing biomass from the microalga Spirulina platensis and at assessing in situ synthesis of alkyl esters via acid transesterification/esterification of biomass to produce biodiesel. Two alcohols (ethanol and methanol and two cosolvents (hexane and chloroform were tested, at different temperatures (30, 45, 60, 75, and 90°C and reaction times (10, 20, 30, 60, and 120 min. The factorial analysis of variance detected an interaction between the factors (: temperature, reaction time, alcohol, and cosolvent. The best yields were obtained with the combination ethanol and chloroform at 60°C, after 30 min of reaction, and with hexane at 45°C, after 10 min of reaction. In situ transesterification/esterification of alga biomass to form esters for biodiesel production adds unconventional dynamics to the use of this feedstock.

  17. An Advanced In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Production Plant Design for Robotic and Human Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T.; Baird, R. S.; Trevathan, J.; Clark, L.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to produce the necessary consumables, rather than relying solely on what is brought from Earth decreases the launch mass, cost, and risk associated with a Mars mission while providing capabilities that enable the commercial development of space. The idea of using natural resources, or "living off the land", is termed In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Trade studies have shown that producing and utilizing consumables such as water, breathing oxygen, and propellant can reduce the launch mass for a human or robotic mission to Mars by 20-45%. The Johnson Space Center and Lockheed Martin Astronautics are currently designing and planning assembly of a complete collection-to-storage production plant design for producing methane (fuel), oxygen, and water from carbon dioxide (Martian atmosphere) and hydrogen (electrolyzed Martian water or Earth-originated), based on lessons learned and design enhancements from a 1st generation testbed. The design and testing of the major subsystems incorporated in the 2nd generation system, including a carbon dioxide freezer, Sabatier reactor, water electrolysis unit, and vacuum-jacketed, cryogenic, common-bulkhead storage tank, will be presented in detail with the goal of increasing the awareness of the readiness level of these technologies. These technologies are mass and power efficient as well as fundamentally simple and reliable. These technologies also have potential uses in Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) applications for removing and recycling crew-exhaled carbon dioxide. Each subsystem is sized for an ISRU-assisted sample return mission, producing in an 8-hour period 0.56 kg water and 0.26 kg methane from the Sabatier reactor and 0.50 kg oxygen from electrolyzed water. The testing of these technologies to date will be discussed as well as plans for integrating the subsystems for a complete end-to-end demonstration at Mars conditions. This paper will also address the history of these subsystem

  18. In situ fermentation dynamics during production of gundruk and khalpi, ethnic fermented vegetable products of the Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamang, Buddhiman; Tamang, Jyoti Prakash

    2010-10-01

    Gundruk is a fermented leafy vegetable and khalpi is a fermented cucumber product, prepared and consumed in the Himalayas. In situ fermentation dynamics during production of gundruk and khalpi was studied. Significant increase in population of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was found during first few days of gundruk and khlapi fermentation, respectively. Gundruk fermentation was initiated by Lactobacillus brevis, Pediococcus pentosaceus and finally dominated by Lb. plantarum. Similarly in khalpi fermentation, heterofermentative LAB such as Leuconostoc fallax, Lb. brevis and P. pentosaceus initiated the fermentation and finally completed by Lb. plantarum. Attempts were made to produce gundruk and khalpi using mixed starter culture of LAB previously isolated from respective products. Both the products prepared under lab condition had scored higher sensory-rankings comparable to market products.

  19. Stimulating in situ surfactant production to increase contaminant bioavailability and augment bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, N. W.; Bentley, H. W.; Yiannakakis, A.; Bentley, A. J.; Cassidy, D. P.

    2006-12-01

    The effectiveness of a bioremediation strategy is largely dependent on relationships between contaminant sequestration (geochemical limitations) and microbial degradation potential (biological limitations). As contaminant bioavailability becomes mass transfer limited, contaminant removal will show less sensitivity to biodegradation enhancements without concurrent enhancements to rates of mass transfer into the bioavailable phase. Implementing a strategy that can simultaneously address geochemical and biological limitations is motivated by a subsurface zone of liquid petroleum hydrocarbons (LPH) contamination that is in excess of 10 acres (40,000 sq. meters). Biodegradation potential at the site is high; however, observed biodegradation rates are generally low, indicative of bioavailability limitations (e.g., low aqueous solubilities, nutrient deficiencies, and/or mass transfer limitations), and estimates indicate that bioremediation (i.e., biosparging/bioventing) with unaugmented biodegradation may be unable to achieve the remedial objectives within an acceptable time. Bench-scale experiments using soils native to the site provide evidence that, in addition to nutrient additions, a pulsed oxygen delivery can increase biodegradation rates by stimulating the microbial production of biosurfactants (rhamnolipids), leading to a reduction in surface tension and an increase in contaminant bioavailability. Pilot-scale tests at the field site are evaluating the effectiveness of stimulating in situ biosurfactant production using cyclic biosparging. The cyclic sparging creates extended periods of alternating aerobic and oxygen-depleted conditions in the submerged smear zone. The increased bioavailability of LPH and the resulting biodegradation enhancements during the test are evaluated using measurements of surface tension (as confirmation of biosurfactant accumulation) and nitrate concentrations (as substantiation of anaerobic biodegradation during shut-off periods). The

  20. Techno-economic and uncertainty analysis of in situ and ex situ fast pyrolysis for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Boyan; Ou, Longwen; Dang, Qi; Meyer, Pimphan; Jones, Susanne; Brown, Robert; Wright, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluates the techno-economic uncertainty in cost estimates for two emerging technologies for biofuel production: in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis. The probability distributions for the minimum fuel-selling price (MFSP) indicate that in situ catalytic pyrolysis has an expected MFSP of $1.11 per liter with a standard deviation of 0.29, while the ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has a similar MFSP with a smaller deviation ($1.13 per liter and 0.21 respectively). These results suggest that a biorefinery based on ex situ catalytic pyrolysis could have a lower techno-economic uncertainty than in situ pyrolysis compensating for a slightly higher MFSP cost estimate. Analysis of how each parameter affects the NPV indicates that internal rate of return, feedstock price, total project investment, electricity price, biochar yield and bio-oil yield are parameters which have substantial impact on the MFSP for both in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis.

  1. Improved Production of Paclitaxel from Suspension Culture of Taxus chinensis var.mairei by in situ Extraction with Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    未作君; 元英进; 吴兆亮; 吴金川

    2003-01-01

    The production of paclitaxel from suspension culture of Taxus chinensis var,mairei was improved by in situ extraction with organic solvents to avoid feedback repression and product degradation.Oleic acid and dibutyl phthalate were proved to be suitable solvents .The optimal volumetric percentage of organic solvents in the culture medium was found to be around 8%,and the favorable time for their introduction was at the exponential phase of cell growth,Paclitaxel production with the in situ extraction was ca 3-fold of that without extraction.

  2. In-situ Transesterification of Jatropha curcas L. Seeds for Biodiesel Production using Supercritical Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak M.A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In-situ supercritical methanol transesterification for production of biodiesel from Jatropha curcas L. (JCL seeds was successfully being carried out via batch-wise reactor system, under varying temperatures of 180 - 300 °C, pressures of 6 - 18 MPa, reaction time of 5 - 35 min and seeds-to-methanol ratio of 1:15 - 1:45 (w/v. In this study, the extracted oil obtained showed the presence of FAME referring as biodiesel, indicating that transesterification reaction had occurred during the extraction process. The results showed that the biodiesel yield was obtained at optimum conditions of 280 °C, 12 MPa, 30 min and 1:40 (w/v were 97.9%.

  3. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Mat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, semi-refined and refined vegetable oils are used as a feedstock in biodiesel production. However, due to competition with conventional fossil fuel, economic reasons, shortage supply of food and its social impact on the global scale has somewhat slowed the development of biodiesel industry. Studies have been conducted to recover oil from mill palm oil operation especially from the spent bleaching earth. Hence, the study was to investigate the potential recovery of oil from spent bleaching earth to be used as a feedstock for biodiesel production. The effect of different types of catalysts (sodium hydroxide alkali and sulfuric acid catalysts on biodiesel yield was studied. In addition, the effect of volume addition of methanol to the weight of spent bleaching earth on the product yield was also studied. Furthermore, the effect of ratio of hexane to methanol was also carried out to determine its product yield. The studies were carried out in an in-situ biodiesel reactor system and the biodiesel product was analyzed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Result shows that the use of alkali catalyst produced the highest yield of biodiesel and the most optimum biodiesel yield was obtained when the methanol to spent bleaching earth ratio was 3.2:1 (gram of methanol: gram of SBE and hexane to methanol ratio of 0.6:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 19th December 2010, Revised: 10th May 2011; Accepted: 18th May 2011[How to Cite: R. Mat, O.S. Ling, A. Johari, M. Mohamed. (2011. In Situ Biodiesel Production from Residual Oil Recovered from Spent Bleaching Earth. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6(1: 53-57. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.678.53-57 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/678 ] | View in 

  4. 21 CFR 700.14 - Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including... Products § 700.14 Use of vinyl chloride as an ingredient, including propellant of cosmetic aerosol products. (a) Vinyl chloride has been used as an ingredient in cosmetic aerosol products including hair...

  5. Sequential acid and enzymatic hydrolysis in situ and bioethanol production from Gracilaria biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang-Chen; Wu, Jane-Yii; Liao, Yi-Jyun; Wang, Man-Ying; Shih, Ing-Lung

    2014-03-01

    Gracilaria sp., a red alga, was used as a feedstock for the production of bioethanol. Saccharification of Gracilaria sp. by sequential acid and enzyme hydrolysis in situ produced a high quality hydrolysate that ensured its fermentability to produce ethanol. The optimal saccharification process resulted in total 11.85g/L (59.26%) of glucose and galactose, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wu-Y2 showed a good performance on co-fermentability of glucose and galactose released in the hydrolysate from Gracilaria sp. The final ethanol concentrations of 4.72g/L (0.48g/g sugar consumed; 94% conversion efficiency) and the ethanol productivity 4.93g/L/d were achieved. 1g of dry Gracilaria can be converted to 0.236g (23.6%) of bioethanol via the processes developed. Efficient alcohol production by immobilized S. cerevisiae Wu-Y2 in batch and repeated batch fermentation was also demonstrated. The findings of this study revealed that Gracilaria sp. can be a potential feedstock in biorefinery for ethanol production.

  6. Validation of two gridded soil moisture products over India with in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, C. K.; George, John P.; Lodh, Abhishek; Maurya, Devesh Kumar; Mallick, Swapan; Rajagopal, E. N.; Mohandas, Saji

    2016-07-01

    Surface level soil moisture from two gridded datasets over India are evaluated in this study. The first one is the UK Met Office (UKMO) soil moisture analysis produced by a land data assimilation system based on Extended Kalman Filter method (EKF), which make use of satellite observation of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil wetness index as well as the screen level meteorological observations. Second dataset is a satellite soil moisture product, produced by National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC) using passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 measurements. In-situ observations of soil moisture from India Meteorological Department (IMD) are used for the validation of the gridded soil moisture products. The difference between these datasets over India is minimum in the non-monsoon months and over agricultural regions. It is seen that the NRSC data is slightly drier (0.05%) and UKMO soil moisture analysis is relatively wet during southwest monsoon season. Standard AMSR-2 satellite soil moisture product is used to compare the NRSC and UKMO products. The standard AMSR-2 and UKMO values are closer in monsoon season and AMSR-2 soil moisture is higher than UKMO in all seasons. NRSC and AMSR-2 showed a correlation of 0.83 (significant at 0.01 level). The probability distribution of IMD soil moisture observation peaks at 0.25 m3/m3, NRSC at 0.15 m3/m3, AMSR-2 at 0.25 m3/m3 and UKMO at 0.35 m3/m3 during June-September period. Validation results show UKMO analysis has better correlation with in-situ observations compared to the NRSC and AMSR-2 datasets. The seasonal variation in soil moisture is better represented in UKMO analysis. Underestimation of soil moisture during monsoon season over India in NRSC data suggests the necessity of incorporating the actual vegetation for a better soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave sensors. Both products have good agreement over bare soil, shrubs and grassland compared to needle leaf tree, broad leaf tree and

  7. Solid propellants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Hutchison, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The basic principles underlying propulsion by rocket motor are examined together with the configuration of a solid propellant motor. Solid propellants and their preparation are discussed, giving attention to homogeneous propellants, composite propellants, energetic considerations in choosing a solid propellant, the processing of composite propellants, and some examples of new developments. The performance of solid propellants is investigated, taking into account characteristics velocity, the specific impulse, and performance calculations. Aspects of propellant development considered include nonperformance requirements for solid propellants, the approach to development, propellant mechanical properties, and future trends.

  8. Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems for In Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Stephen M.; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo; Captain, James G.; Pawate, Ashtamurthy S.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project has been developing technologies to produce oxygen from lunar regolith to provide consumables to a lunar outpost. The processes developed reduce metal oxides in the regolith to produce water, which is then electrolyzed to produce oxygen. Hydrochloic and hydrofluoric acids are byproducts of the reduction processes, as halide minerals are also reduced at oxide reduction conditions. Because of the stringent water quality requirements for electrolysis, there is a need for a contaminant removal process. The Contaminant Removal from Oxygen Production Systems (CROPS) team has been developing a separation process to remove these contaminants in the gas and liquid phase that eliminates the need for consumables. CROPS has been using Nafion, a highly water selective polymeric proton exchange membrane, to recover pure water from the contaminated solution. Membrane thickness, product stream flow rate, and acid solution temperature and concentration were varied with the goal of maximizing water permeation and acid rejection. The results show that water permeation increases with increasing solution temperature and product stream flow rate, while acid rejection increases with decreasing solution temperature and concentration. Thinner membranes allowed for higher water flux and acid rejection than thicker ones. These results were used in the development of the hardware built for the most recent Mars ISRU demonstration project.

  9. Validation of two gridded soil moisture products over India with in-situ observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K Unnikrishnan; John P George; Abhishek Lodh; Devesh Kumar Maurya; Swapan Mallick; E N Rajagopal; Saji Mohandas

    2016-07-01

    Surface level soil moisture from two gridded datasets over India are evaluated in this study. The firstone is the UK Met Office (UKMO) soil moisture analysis produced by a land data assimilation systembased on Extended Kalman Filter method (EKF), which make use of satellite observation of AdvancedScatterometer (ASCAT) soil wetness index as well as the screen level meteorological observations. Seconddataset is a satellite soil moisture product, produced by National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC) usingpassive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 measurements. In-situ observations ofsoil moisture from India Meteorological Department (IMD) are used for the validation of the gridded soilmoisture products. The difference between these datasets over India is minimum in the non-monsoonmonths and over agricultural regions. It is seen that the NRSC data is slightly drier (0.05%) and UKMOsoil moisture analysis is relatively wet during southwest monsoon season. Standard AMSR-2 satellitesoil moisture product is used to compare the NRSC and UKMO products. The standard AMSR-2 andUKMO values are closer in monsoon season and AMSR-2 soil moisture is higher than UKMO in allseasons. NRSC and AMSR-2 showed a correlation of 0.83 (significant at 0.01 level). The probabilitydistribution of IMD soil moisture observation peaks at 0.25 m^3/m^3, NRSC at 0.15 m^3/m^3, AMSR-2 at0.25 m3/m3 and UKMO at 0.35 m^3/m^3 during June–September period. Validation results show UKMOanalysis has better correlation with in-situ observations compared to the NRSC and AMSR-2 datasets.The seasonal variation in soil moisture is better represented in UKMO analysis. Underestimation of soilmoisture during monsoon season over India in NRSC data suggests the necessity of incorporating theactual vegetation for a better soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave sensors. Both productshave good agreement over bare soil, shrubs and grassland compared to needle leaf tree, broad leaf treeand urban land

  10. Towards a merged satellite and in situ fluorescence ocean chlorophyll product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lavigne

    2011-12-01

    time series, demonstrated that the methods have similar accuracy. Applications of the method were then explored on two different data sets. Using fluorescence profiles at BATS, we show that the integration of "satellite-corrected" fluorescence profiles in Chlorophyll-a climatologies could improve both the statistical relevance of Chlorophyll-a averages and the vertical structure of the Chlorophyll-a field. We also show that our method could be efficiently used to process, within near-real time, profiles obtained by a fluorometer deployed on autonomous platforms, in our case a bio-optical profiling float. The wide application of the proposed method should provide a first step toward the generation of a merged satellite/fluorescence Chlorophyll-a product, as the "satellite-corrected" profiles should then be consistent with satellite observations. Improved climatologies and more consistent satellite and in situ data (comprising those from autonomous platforms should strongly enhance the performance of present biogeochemical models.

  11. Towards a merged satellite and in situ fluorescence ocean chlorophyll product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Lavigne

    2012-06-01

    accuracy. The method was applied to two different data sets to demonstrate its utility. Using fluorescence profiles at BATS, we show that the integration of "satellite-corrected" fluorescence profiles in chlorophyll a climatologies could improve both the statistical relevance of chlorophyll a averages and the vertical structure of the chlorophyll a field. We also show that our method could be efficiently used to process, within near-real time, profiles obtained by a fluorometer deployed on autonomous platforms, in our case a bio-optical profiling float. The application of the proposed method should provide a first step towards the generation of a merged satellite/fluorescence chlorophyll a product, as the "satellite-corrected" profiles should then be consistent with satellite observations. Improved climatologies with more consistent satellite and in situ data are likely to enhance the performance of present biogeochemical models.

  12. In-situ liquid storage capacity measurement of subsurface wastewater absorption system products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quisenberry, Virgil; Brown, Philip; Smith, Bill; Hallahan, Dennis F

    2006-11-01

    A method is presented for measuring the in-situ liquid storage capacity of subsurface wastewater infiltration system (SWIS) products. While these products vary in composition, geometry, and porosity, they all have the same function: to provide a conduit for the flow of effluent from a septic tank to and through a trench so that infiltration into the soil can occur. A functional SWIS must also provide temporary liquid storage. Storage is necessary for periods when discharge from the septic tank exceeds the infiltration rate of the soil. Storage is also important during times when the soil in and around the trench is saturated. Many states now have regulatory requirements pertaining to storage volume, and these requirements commonly establish the traditional gravel-pipe system as the standard for minimally acceptable volume. Raliable comparisons between various alternative products and gravel have been difficult or impossible, because there has been no standard method for measuring storage volume. Some products have been evaluated under realistic field conditions; others have been evaluated under theoretical or ideal conditions. The protocol developed by the study reported here can serve as a common, accurate basis for comparisons. A 3-foot-deep trench was excavated, and the bottom was leveled. Markers (nails or rods) were attached to the products to indicate the invert and full-volume heights. The products were then enclosed in plastic, placed in a trench, and covered with soil. A 4-inch-diameter pipe extended from the product to the surface to allow metered additions of water into the products and precise determinations when the systems had been filled to capacity. Four plastic chambers, three expanded polystyrene (ESP) products, two multipipe arrangements, and a standard gravel-pipe system were evaluated. The standard gravel-pipe system held 10.2 gal/ft Three of the four plastic chambers stored from 100 to 130 percent of what the standard system held. The

  13. New approaches investigating production rates of in-situ produced terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France); FZD, Dresden (Germany); Braucher, Regis; Benedetti, Lucilla; Bourles, Didier [CEREGE, CNRS-IRD-Universite Aix-Marseille, Aix-en-Provence (France)

    2010-07-01

    In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides have proved to be valuable tools for environmental and Earth sciences. However, accurate application of this method is only possible, if terrestrial production rates in a certain environment over a certain time period and their depth-dependence within the exposed material are exactly known. Unfortunately, the existing data and models differ up to several tens of percent. Thus, one of the European project CRONUS-EU goals is the high quality calibration of the {sup 36}Cl production rate by spallation at independently dated surfaces. As part of fulfilling this task we have investigated calcite-rich samples from four medieval landslide areas in the Alps: Mont Granier, Le Claps, Dobratsch, and Veliki Vrh (330-1620 m, 1248-1442 AD). For investigating the depth-dependence of the different nuclear reactions, especially, the muon- and thermal neutron-induced contributions, we have analysed mixtures of carbonates and siliceous conglomerate samples - for {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl - exposed at different shielding depths and taken from a core drilled in 2005 at La Ciotat, France (from surface to 11 m shielding). AMS of {sup 36}Cl was performed at LLNL and ETH, {sup 10}Be and {sup 26}Al at ASTER.

  14. In-situ water vaporization improves bitumen production during electrothermal processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); McGee, B. [E-T Energy, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kantzas, A. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Tomographic Imaging and Porous Media Laboratory

    2008-10-15

    Electro-thermal processes are now being considered as an alternative or complementary process to steam injection processes. This study used an in situ vaporized water process to optimize electrothermal processes for steam injection enhanced oil recovery (EOR). A simulation tool was used to model electro-thermal processes in an Athabasca oil sands reservoir. Incremental oil recovery was estimated based on a 3-block conceptual model. A field scale model was then used to investigate the effects of electrode spacing, water injection rates, and electrical heating rates on bitumen recovery. Results of the simulation studies were then analyzed using a statistical tool in order to determine optimal conditions for maximizing bitumen production. Results of the study showed that incremental recovery using the water vaporization technique resulted in oil recovery rates of 25 per cent original oil in place (OOIP). Sensitivity analyses showed that medium electrical heating rates, low water injection rates, and small spacings between electrodes maximized bitumen production rates. It was concluded that the technique can be used alone or combined with other methods to economically produce bitumens. 2 refs., 7 tabs., 9 figs.

  15. In situ detection of lipid peroxidation by-products in chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, V; Kollinger, M; Fabre, M; Holstege, A; Poynard, T; Bedossa, P

    1997-07-01

    Lipid peroxidation is an autocatalytic mechanism leading to oxidative destruction of cellular membranes. The deleterious consequences of this mechanism are related in part to the formation of reactive aldehydic products that bind to intra- or extracellular molecules to form adducts. Specific antibodies directed against malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) adducts, major aldehydic metabolites of lipid peroxidation, allowed us to investigate in situ, with an immunohistochemical procedure, the occurrence of lipid peroxidation in a panel of different chronic liver diseases. Intracellular HNE and MDA adducts were detected respectively in 24 of 39 cases (62%) and in 12 of 34 cases investigated (35%). They were localized mainly in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, with the strongest staining observed in hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, and in areas of acute alcoholic hepatitis in cases of alcoholic liver diseases. A peculiar pattern of immunostaining was observed in primary biliary cirrhosis where biliary cells of destroyed but also intact bile ducts strongly expressed HNE adducts. The liver extracellular matrix also displayed MDA adducts (30 of 34 cases, 88%) and HNE adducts (23 of 39 cases, 59%). While HNE adducts were specifically localized on large bundles of collagen fibers, MDA adducts were detected in a thin reticular network and in sinusoidal cells around portal tracts or fibrous septa. In conclusion, lipid peroxidation by-products are detectable in chronic liver diseases. Immunohistochemical results suggest that this mechanism is implicated very early in the pathogenesis of some of these diseases.

  16. From in situ coal to the final coal product: A case study of the Danville Coal Member (Indiana)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Padgett, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in the handling process.A surface coal mine operation and preparation plant in southwestern Indiana was sampled to examine variations in coal quality and coal petrography parameters for the Danville Coal Member of the Dugger Formation (Pennsylvanian-Desmoinesian, Westphalian D). Representative samples from in situ coal, preparation plant feeds, and a final coal product were collected in order to compare coal quality, coal petrography, trace element concentrations, and ash chemistry of the coal to those of the product. Coal quality parameters of the in situ samples and various feeds, coarse refuse, and final product were variable. The quality of the final coal product was best predicted by the coal quality of the clean coal feed (from the middle portions of the seam). Some trace element contents, especially lead and arsenic, varied between the coal feeds and the product. Lead contents increased in the feeds and product compared to the channel sample of the raw coal, possibly due to contamination in

  17. In-Situ Anaerobic Biosurfactant Production Process For Remediation Of DNAPL Contamination In Subsurface Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, J. D.; Nambi, I. M.

    2009-12-01

    microbial cultures. The microorganisms responsible for biosurfactant production was isolated and identified as Pseudomonas Sp (designated as Pseudomonas Sp ANBIOSURF-1, Gene bank no: FJ930079), Pseudomonas stutzeri (MTCC 10033), Pseudomonas Sp (MTCC 10032) from groundwater, soil and municipal sewage sludge enrichments respectively. This study confirms that biosurfactants can be produced under anaerobic conditions and also in sufficient quantities. The cultures were also able to cometabolically degrade PCE to Ethylene. The isolated microorganisms can be used for remediation of DNAPL contaminated sites by in-situ biosurfactant production.

  18. An ISRU Propellant Production System to Fully Fuel a Mars Ascent Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Paz, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    ISRU of Mars resources was base lined in 2009 Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0, but only for Oxygen production using atmospheric CO2The Methane (LCH4) needed for ascent propulsion of the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) would need to be brought from Earth. HOWEVER: Extracting water from the Martian Regolith enables the production of both Oxygen and Methane from Mars resources Water resources could also be used for other applications including: Life support, radiation shielding, plant growth, etc. Water extraction was not base lined in DRA5.0 due to perceived difficulties and complexity in processing regolith. The NASA Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) requested studies to look at the quantitative benefits and trades of using Mars water ISRU Phase 1: Examined architecture scenarios for regolith water retrieval. Completed October 2015Phase 2: Deep dive of one architecture concept to look at end-to-end system size, mass, power of a LCH4LO2 ISRU production system.Evolvable Mars CampaignPre-deployed Mars ascent vehicle (MAV)4 crew membersPropellants: Oxygen MethaneGenerate a system model to roll up mass power of a full ISRU system and enable parametric trade studies. Leverage models from previous studies and technology development programs Anchor with mass power performance from existing hardware. Whenever possible used reference-able (published) numbers for traceability.Modular approach to allow subsystem trades and parametric studies. Propellant mass needs taken from most recently published MAV study:Polsgrove, T. et al. (2015), AIAA2015-4416MAV engines operate at mixture ratios (oxygen: methane) between 3:1 and 3.5:1, whereas the Sabatier reactor produces at a 4:1 ratio. Therefore:Methane production is the driving requirement-Excess Oxygen will be produced.

  19. Evidence for in-situ methane production in ice based on anomalous isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, T. A.; Priscu, J.

    2004-12-01

    Studying microbial ecology at low temperatures is important for understanding the limits of life processes as well the search for extraterrestrial life. Glacial ice sheets are special habitats where microbes have been preserved for geologically significant periods of time. Glaciers provide three distinct environments for microbial ecosystems. Subglacial lakes beneath the East Antarctic ice sheet provide one of the most intriguing environments that have yet to be explored. The upper portion of a glacier is formed from eolian derived (wind blown) materials (snow, impurities and microbes). Bulk impurity levels tend to be less than a few ppm, cell densities generally below 100 cells/ml and surface temperatures are generally below -15oC. Subglacial environments (lowest 20m), on the other hand, tend to have (by comparison with the overlying glacier ) extremely high impurity concentrations, cell densities on the order of 106 cells/ml, and temperatures close to the pressure melting point (~ 0oC). Microbial communities in the subglacial environments are comprised of eolian derived organisms that have traveled vertically through the ice sheet as well as organisms that inhabited the soil/rock environment before the glacier formed. Cell density measurements in glacier ice are fairly straightforward given proper cleaning techniques. Whether or not the cells in a glacier are able to grow (or at least maintain their metabolic functionality) while immured in the glacier has yet to be determined. This question remains unanswered largely because the metabolic rates of microbial communities in ice have not been measured in the lab. One way to infer in-situ microbial activity in ice is to analyze the elemental and isotopic composition of gaseous metabolic byproducts that are retained in the ice matrix. We present two case studies in which the measured methane (CH4) concentration and isotope values in ice result from in-situ production. Methane measurements spanning the last 25kyr from

  20. Enzymatic method for measuring starch gelatinization in dry products in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, KeShun; Han, Jianchun

    2012-05-02

    An enzymatic method based on hydrolysis of starch by amyloglucosidase and measurement of d-glucose released by glucose oxidase-peroxidase was developed to measure both gelatinized starch and hydrolyzable starch in situ of dried starchy products. Efforts focused on the development of sample handling steps (particle size reduction of dry samples followed by a unique mechanical resolubilization step) prior to the enzymatic hydrolysis using native and fully gelatinized flours of corn and rice. The new steps, when optimized, were able to maximize resolubilization of gelatinized/retrograded starch while minimizing solubilization of native starch in dried samples, thus effectively addressing issues of insusceptibility of retrograded starch and susceptibility of native starch to enzymatic attacks and eliminating the need to isolate starch from dry samples before using an enzymatic method. Various factors affecting these and other steps were also investigated, with the objectives to simplify the procedures and reduce errors. Results are expressed as the percentage of the total starch content. The proposed method, verified by measuring mixed samples of native and fully gelatinized flours of five grain species (corn, rice, barley, oat, and wheat) at different ratios, is simple, accurate, and reliable, with a relative standard deviation of less than 5%.

  1. In Situ Production of Branched Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers in a Great Basin Hot Spring (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanlun eZhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (bGDGTs are predominantly found in soils and peat bogs. In this study, we analyzed core-bGDGTs and polar (P- bGDGTs after hydrolysis of polar fractions using liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry and analyzed intact P-bGDGTs using total lipid extract (TLE without hydrolysis by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-multiple stage mass spectrometry. Our results show multiple lines of evidence for the production of bGDGTs in sediments and cellulolytic enrichments in a hot spring (62-86°C in the Great Basin (USA. First, in situ cellulolytic enrichment led to an increase in the relative abundance of hydrolysis-derived P-bGDGTs over their Core (C-bGDGT counterparts. Second, the hydrolysis-derived P- and C-bGDGT profiles in the hot spring were different from those of the surrounding soil samples; in particular, a monoglycosidic bGDGT Ib containing 13,16-dimethyloctacosane and one cyclopentane moiety was detected in the TLE but it was undetectable in surrounding soil samples even after sample enrichments. Third, previously published 16S rRNA gene pyrotag analysis from the same lignocellulose samples demonstrated the enrichment of thermophiles, rather than mesophiles, and total bGDGT abundance in cellulolytic enrichments correlated with the relative abundance of 16S rRNA gene pyrotags from thermophilic bacteria in the phyla Bacteroidetes, Dictyoglomi, EM3, and OP9 (Atribacteria. These observations conclusively demonstrate the production of bGDGTs in this hot spring; however, the identity of organisms that produce bGDGTs in the geothermal environment remains unclear.

  2. In situ NIR spectroscopy monitoring of plasmid production processes effect of producing strain, medium composition and the cultivation strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Marta B.; Gonçalves, Geisa A. L.; Felício-Silva, Daniel; Prather, Kristala L. J.; Monteiro, Gabriel; Prazeres, Duarte M. F.; Calado, Cecília Ribeiro da Cruz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUNDWhile the pharmaceutical industry keeps an eye on plasmid DNA production for new generation gene therapies, real-time monitoring techniques for plasmid bioproduction are as yet unavailable. This work shows the possibility of in situ monitoring of plasmid production in Escherichia coli cultures using a near infrared (NIR) fiber optic probe. RESULTSPartial least squares (PLS) regression models based on the NIR spectra were developed for predicting bioprocess critical variables su...

  3. Techno-economic and uncertainty analysis of in situ and ex situ fast pyrolysis for biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Boyan; Ou, Longwen; Dang, Qi; Meyer, Pimphan A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Brown, Robert C.; Wright, Mark

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluates the techno-economic uncertainty in cost estimates for two emerging biorefinery technologies for biofuel production: in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis. Stochastic simulations based on process and economic parameter distributions are applied to calculate biorefinery performance and production costs. The probability distributions for the minimum fuel-selling price (MFSP) indicate that in situ catalytic pyrolysis has an expected MFSP of $4.20 per gallon with a standard deviation of 1.15, while the ex situ catalytic pyrolysis has a similar MFSP with a smaller deviation ($4.27 per gallon and 0.79 respectively). These results suggest that a biorefinery based on ex situ catalytic pyrolysis could have a lower techno-economic risk than in situ pyrolysis despite a slightly higher MFSP cost estimate. Analysis of how each parameter affects the NPV indicates that internal rate of return, feedstock price, total project investment, electricity price, biochar yield and bio-oil yield are significant parameters which have substantial impact on the MFSP for both in situ and ex situ catalytic pyrolysis.

  4. Towards the continuous production of high crystallinity graphene via electrochemical exfoliation with molecular in situ encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsuan; Yang, Shiou-Wen; Chuang, Min-Chiang; Woon, Wei-Yen; Su, Ching-Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale production of uniform and high-quality graphene is required for practical applications of graphene. The electrochemical exfoliation method is considered as a promising approach for the practical production of graphene. However, the relatively low production rate of graphene currently hinders its usage. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, a rapid and high-yield approach to exfoliate graphite into graphene sheets via an electrochemical method with small molecular additives; where in this approach, the use of melamine additives is able to efficiently exfoliate graphite into high-quality graphene sheets. The exfoliation yield can be increased up to 25 wt% with melamine additives compared to electrochemical exfoliation without such additives in the electrolyte. The proposed mechanism for this improvement in the yield is the melamine-induced hydrophilic force from the basal plane; this force facilitates exfoliation and provides in situ protection of the graphene flake surface against further oxidation, leading to high-yield production of graphene of larger crystallite size. The residual melamine can be easily washed away by water after collection of the graphene. The exfoliation with molecular additives exhibits higher uniformity (over 80% is graphene of less than 3 layers), lower oxidation density (C/O ratio of 26.17), and low defect level (D/G graphene oxide (rGO) or of a previously reported approach of electrochemical exfoliated graphene (EC-graphene). The continuous films obtained by the purified graphene suspension exhibit a sheet resistance of 13.5 kΩ □-1 at ~95% transmittance. A graphene-based nanocomposite with polyvinyl butyral (PVB) exhibits an electrical conductivity of 3.3 × 10-3 S m-1 for the graphene loading fraction of 0.46 vol%. Moreover, the melamine functionalized graphene sheets are readily dispersed in the aqueous solution during the exfoliation process, allowing for the production of graphene in a continuous process. The

  5. In situ extraction of polar product of whole cell microbial transformation with polyethylene glycol-induced cloud point system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhilong; Xu, Jian-He; Zhang, Wenzhi; Zhuang, Baohua; Qi, Hanshi

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyethylene glycol-induced cloud point system (PEG-CPS) was developed for in situ extraction of moderate polar product by setting a microbial transformation of benzaldehyde into L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) as a model reaction. The biocompatibility of the microorganism in PEG-CPS was comparatively studied with a series of water-organic solvent two-phase partitioning systems. The tolerance of microorganism to the toxic substrate benzaldehyde was increased and the moderate polar product L-PAC was extracted into the surfactant-rich phase in the PEG-CPS. The novel PEG-CPS fills the gap of in situ extraction of polar product in microbial transformation left by water-organic solvent two-phase partitioning system. At the same time, the application of PEG-CPS in a microbial transformation also avoids expensive solvent when compared with that of aqueous two-phase system or CPS.

  6. Atmospheric OH reactivity in central London: observations, model predictions and estimates of in situ ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lisa K.; Stone, Daniel; Bandy, Brian; Dunmore, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Hopkins, James; Lee, James D.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Heard, Dwayne E.

    2016-02-01

    9) (particularly α-pinene and limonene) and model-generated intermediates increases the modelled OH concentrations by 41 %, and the magnitude of in situ ozone production calculated from the production of RO2 was significantly lower (60 %). This work highlights that any future ozone abatement strategies should consider the role that biogenic emissions play alongside anthropogenic emissions in influencing London's air quality.

  7. Impacts and mitigations of in situ bitumen production from Alberta oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmunds, Neil

    2010-09-15

    85% or more of Alberta's oil sands is too deep to mine and will be recovered by in situ methods, i.e. from drill holes. This has been made commercially possible through the development in Alberta of Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD). Does this impending development threaten the local ecosystem? A quantitative account is given of the principal impacts of in situ oil sands development in Alberta. Impacts on land (habitats), water, and air are considered in terms of local capacity, global benchmarks, and comparisons to alternative renewable technologies. Improvements due to new solvent-additive technology are highlighted.

  8. Study on the in-situ coupling process of fermentation, extraction and distillation for biobutanol production: process analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Fuqiang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hua, Dongliang; Xu, Haipeng; Li, Yan; Mu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The transfer process of the in-situ coupling process of fermentation, extraction and distillation for biobutanol production was discussed from a theoretical point of view. The existence of temperature gradient in the extraction section was proved. The force of solute in the extracted liquid was discussed. And the mass transfer mechanism and impetus of the FEDIC process was analyzed. The theoretical analysis could provide a foundation for the following research.

  9. Growth Nutritive Value of Saffron Residues Harvested at Different Stages by in situ and in vitro (Gas Production Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Kardan Moghadam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition, ruminal degradability parameters, ruminal and post ruminal digestibility of saffron residues were determined using in situ and in vitro (gas production methods. The harvested residues at late vegetative phase were compared with the residues harvested at the early dormant phase. The results showed that NDF and ADF concentration of harvested residues at early dormant phase were higher where as it content of CP was significantly (P

  10. Compact, Lightweight Adsorber and Sabatier Reactor for CO2 Capture and Reduction for Consumable and Propellant Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junaedi, Christian; Hawley, Kyle; Walsh, Dennis; Roychoudhury, Subir; Busby, Stacy A.; Abney, Morgan B.; Perry, Jay L.; Knox, James C.

    2012-01-01

    The utilization of CO2 to produce (or recycle) life support consumables, such as O2 and H2O, and to generate propellant fuels is an important aspect of NASA's concept for future, long duration planetary exploration. One potential approach is to capture and use CO2 from the Martian atmosphere to generate the consumables and propellant fuels. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), with support from NASA, continues to develop its regenerable adsorber technology for capturing CO2 from gaseous atmospheres (for cabin atmosphere revitalization and in-situ resource utilization applications) and its Sabatier reactor for converting CO2 to methane and water. Both technologies are based on PCI's Microlith(R) substrates and have been demonstrated to reduce size, weight, and power consumption during CO2 capture and methanation process. For adsorber applications, the Microlith substrates offer a unique resistive heating capability that shows potential for short regeneration time and reduced power requirements compared to conventional systems. For the Sabatier applications, the combination of the Microlith substrates and durable catalyst coating permits efficient CO2 methanation that favors high reactant conversion, high selectivity, and durability. Results from performance testing at various operating conditions will be presented. An effort to optimize the Sabatier reactor and to develop a bench-top Sabatier Development Unit (SDU) will be discussed.

  11. In situ lipase-catalyzed reactive extraction of oilseeds with short-chained dialkyl carbonates for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Erzheng; You, Pengyong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2009-12-01

    Dimethyl/diethyl carbonate was adopted as extraction solvent and transesterification reagent at the same time for in situ lipase-catalyzed reactive extraction of oilseeds for biodiesel production in this work. Fatty acid methyl esters and ethyl esters were respectively obtained with higher yields than those achieved by conventional two-step extraction/transesterification. The augment ranged from 15.7% to 31.7%. The key parameters such as solvent/seed ratio and water content were further investigated to find their effects on the in situ reactive extraction. The highest yields of Pistacia chinensis Bunge methyl ester, P. chinensis Bunge ethyl ester, Jatropha curcas L methyl ester and J. curcas L ethyl ester could attain 89.6%, 90.7%, 95.9% and 94.5%, respectively under the optimized conditions.

  12. Oxidation of chlorophenols catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase with in situ production of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Fabio; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Therisod, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) was accomplished by oxidation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Immobilization of the enzyme in a polyacrylamide matrix enhanced DCP oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase's natural substrate, was produced enzymatically in situ to avoid peroxidase inactivation by its too high concentration. In the case of larger scale utilization, the method would also avoid direct handling of this hazardous reagent.

  13. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H.; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations. PMID:26784194

  14. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Lammers, Peter Schulze; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-14

    Oxygen (O₂) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O₂ measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) generated by the introduction of O₂ in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O₂ sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O₂ versus CO₂ (each 0-15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O₂ measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO₂. For the O₂ in situ measurement in silage, all O₂ sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O₂ depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O₂ penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O₂ concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  15. Simulated consumer exposure to propellant HCFC 22 (chlorodifluoromethane) in aerosol personal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartop, P J; Adams, M G

    1989-02-01

    Summary The potential human exposure to the aerosol propellant HCFC 22 (chlorodifluoromethane) arising from its use in personal products has been assessed. HCFC 22 concentrations were measured in the 'breathing zone' of an experimental manikin and an 'accompanying child' designed to simulate human use of hairsprays, body sprays and antiperspirants in a closed room. Results were expressed as the 10-min time-weighted average concentration in the air (TWA 10) and as the peak concentration in the 'breathing zone' of the 'user'. Following a 10-s use of hairspray containing approximately 20-40% HCFC 22, TWA10 values for an adult user and child were 64-116 ppm and 44-100 ppm, respectively. Use of an aerosol body spray containing 20-65% HCFC 22 for 5-20 s gave rise to TWA10 values of 32-411 ppm for an adult user and 20-395 ppm for a child. A 4-s use of an antiperspirant containing approximately 20-40% HCFC 22 sprayed at a distance of 10-30 cm from the breathing zone of the adult user generated TWA 10 values in the range of 14-34 ppm for both the adult user and child. Opening the door of the room prior to hairspray and antiperspirant spraying slightly reduced these TWA 10 values. The peak values recorded in these studies for the adult user were 208 ppm for hairspray, 1415 ppm for body sprays and 82 ppm for antiperspirants.

  16. The Sodankylä in situ soil moisture observation network: an example application of ESA CCI soil moisture product evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Jaakko; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Smolander, Tuomo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Bircher, Simone; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade there has been considerable development in remote sensing techniques relating to soil moisture retrievals over large areas. Within the framework of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) a new soil moisture product has been generated, merging different satellite-based surface soil moisture based products. Such remotely sensed data need to be validated by means of in situ observations in different climatic regions. In that context, a comprehensive, distributed network of in situ measurement stations gathering information on soil moisture, as well as soil temperature, has been set up in recent years at the Finnish Meteorological Institute's (FMI) Sodankylä Arctic research station. The network forms a calibration and validation (CAL-VAL) reference site and is used as a tool to evaluate the validity of satellite retrievals of soil properties. In this paper we present the Sodankylä CAL-VAL reference site soil moisture observation network, its instrumentation as well as its areal representativeness over the study area and the region in general as a whole. As an example of data utilization, comparisons of spatially weighted average top-layer soil moisture observations between the years 2012 and 2014 against ESA CCI soil moisture data product estimates are presented and discussed. The comparisons were made against a single ESA CCI data product pixel encapsulating most of the Sodankylä CAL-VAL network sites. Comparisons are made with daily averaged and running weekly averaged soil moisture data as well as through application of an exponential soil moisture filter. The overall achieved correlation between the ESA CCI data product and in situ observations varies considerably (from 0.479 to 0.637) depending on the applied comparison perspective. Similarly, depending on the comparison perspective used, inter-annual correlation comparison results exhibit even more pronounced variation, ranging from 0.166 to 0.840.

  17. In-situ Alkaline Transesterification of Jatropha curcas seed Oil for Production of Biodiesel and Nontoxic Jatropha seed Cake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novizar Nazir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of fatty acid methyl ester (FAME by direct in situ alkaline-catalyzed transesterification of the triglycerides (TG in Jatropha curcas seeds was examined. The experimental results showed that the amount of Jatropha curcas seed oil dissolved in methanol was approximately 83% of the total oil and the conversion of this oil could achieve 98% under the following conditions: less than 2% moisture content in Jatropha curcas seed flours, 0.3–0.335 mm particle size, 0.08 mol/L NaOH concentration in methanol, 171:1 methanol/oil mole ratio, 45.66 oC reaction temperature and 3.02 h reaction time. The use of alkaline methanol as extraction and reaction solvent, which would be useful for extraction oil and phorbol esters, would reduce the phorbol esters content in the Jatropha curcas seed cake. The cake after in-situ transesterification is rich in protein and is a potential source of livestock feed. Further, the the toxicity studies were also investigated on male rate by feeding the seed cake after after in-situ transesterification as well as the from solvent and mechanical extraction. Food intake, growth rate, protein efficiency ratio (PER and transformation index (TI showed that the meal is potential as protein supplement to livestock feed.

  18. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilin Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen (O2 concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE, galvanic oxygen cell (GOC sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS. Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.% was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A. The second test (Test-B simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  19. Mobius propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid I. Gretchihin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a detailed molecular-kinetic theory of the Mobius propeller functioning and shows the implementation of its computer modelling in different exploitation conditions. The mechanisation of the Mobius propeller can be carried out in such a way that, under certain conditions, it enables using this type of propellers as a heat pump. The developed theory of the Mobius propeller functioning has been experimentally verified in laboratory conditions.

  20. Biodiesel Production from Residual Palm Oil Contained in Spent Bleaching Earth by In Situ Trans-Esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Fahmil QRM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Spent Bleaching Earth (SBE is an industrial solid waste of vegetable oil industry that has a high residual oil to be potentialy converted to biodiesel. This study aims at developing a biodiesel production process technology by utilizing residual palm oil contained in SBE and to test the use of hexane in the trans-esterification process. Optimization process was done by using the Response Surface Method (RSM. The variables studied included catalyst concentration and reaction time. On the other hand, the deoiled SBE resulted from biodiesel production was tested as an adsorbent on biodiesel purification after being reactivated. The method used in the biodiesel production included an in situ acid catalysed esterification followed by in situ base catalysed trans-esterification. The results of RSM showed that the optimum process was obtained at NaOH concentration of 1.8% and reaction time of 104.73 minutes, with a predicted response rate of 97.18% and 95.63% for validation results. The use of hexane could also increase the yield of biodiesel which was obtained on the ratio of hexane to methanol of 0.4:1 (volume of hexane: volume of methanol. On the other hand, the reactivated bleaching earth was effective as an adsorbent in biodiesel production, which was still conform with the Indonesian National Standard.

  1. In situ extractive fermentation for the production of hexanoic acid from galactitol by Clostridium sp. BS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoung Seung; Moon, Chuloo; Kim, Byung-Chun; Kim, Hyunook; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2013-08-15

    Clostridium sp. BS-1 produces hexanoic acid as a metabolite using galactitol and enhanced hexanoic acid production was obtained by in situ extractive fermentation with Clostridium sp. BS-1 under an optimized medium composition. For medium optimization, five ingredients were selected as variables, and among them yeast extract, tryptone, and sodium butyrate were selected as significant variables according to a fractional factorial experimental design, a steepest ascent experimental design, and a Box-Behnken experimental design. The optimized medium had the following compositions in modified Clostridium acetobutyricum (mCAB) medium: 15.5gL(-1) of yeast extract, 10.13gL(-1) of tryptone, 0.04gL(-1) of FeSO4·7H2O, 0.85gL(-1) of sodium acetate, and 6.47gL(-1) of sodium butyrate. The predicted concentration of hexanoic acid with the optimized medium was 6.98gL(-1), and this was validated experimentally by producing 6.96gL(-1) of hexanoic acid with Clostridium sp. BS-1 under the optimized conditions. In situ extractive fermentation for hexanoic acid removal was then applied in a batch culture system with the optimized medium and 10% (v/v) alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol as an extractive solvent. The pH of the culture in the extractive fermentation was maintained at 5.4-5.6 by an acid balance between production and retrieval by extraction. During a 16 day culture, the hexanoic acid concentration in the solvent increased to 32gL(-1) while it was maintained in a range of 1-2gL(-1) in the medium. The maximum rate of hexanoic acid production was 0.34gL(-1)h(-1) in in situ extractive fermentation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Monitoring lactic acid production during milk fermentation by in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteille, R; Gaudet, M; Lecanu, B; This, H

    2013-04-01

    When fermenting milk, lactic bacteria convert part of α- and β-lactoses into d- and l- lactic acids, causing a pH decrease responsible for casein coagulation. Lactic acid monitoring during fermentation is essential for the control of dairy gel textural and organoleptic properties, and is a way to evaluate strain efficiency. Currently, titrations are used to follow the quantity of acids formed during jellification of milk but they are not specific to lactic acid. An analytical method without the use of any reagent was investigated to quantify lactic acid during milk fermentation: in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Two methods using in situ quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were compared: (1) d- and l-lactic acids content determination, using the resonance of their methyl protons, showing an increase from 2.06 ± 0.02 to 8.16 ± 0.74 g/L during 240 min of fermentation; and (2) the determination of the α- and β-lactoses content, decreasing from 42.68 ± 0.02 to 30.76 ± 1.75 g/L for the same fermentation duration. The ratio between the molar concentrations of produced lactic acids and consumed lactoses enabled cross-validation, as the value (2.02 ± 0.18) is consistent with lactic acid bacteria metabolism.

  3. Speciation and Reactivity of Uranium Products Formed during in Situ Bioremediation in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we report the results of in situ U(VI) bioreduction experiments at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Columns filled with sediments were deployed into a groundwater well at the site and, after a period of conditioning with groundwater, were amended with a mixture of groundwater, soluble U(VI), and acetate to stimulate the growth of indigenous microorganisms. Individual reactors were collected as various redox regimes in the column sediments were achieved: (i) during iron reduction, (ii) just after the onset of sulfate reduction, and (iii) later into sulfate reduction. The speciation of U retained in the sediments was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and chemical extractions. Circa 90% of the total uranium was reduced to U(IV) in each reactor. Noncrystalline U(IV) comprised about two-thirds of the U(IV) pool, across large changes in microbial community structure, redox regime, total uranium accumulation, and reaction time. A significant body of recent research has demonstrated that noncrystalline U(IV) species are more suceptible to remobilization and reoxidation than crystalline U(IV) phases such as uraninite. Our results highlight the importance of considering noncrystalline U(IV) formation across a wide range of aquifer parameters when designing in situ remediation plans. PMID:25265543

  4. Speciation and reactivity of uranium products formed during in situ bioremediation in a shallow alluvial aquifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Daniel S; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Janot, Noémie; Suvorova, Elena I; Cerrato, José M; Giammar, Daniel E; Davis, James A; Fox, Patricia M; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Handley, Kim M; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Bargar, John R

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we report the results of in situ U(VI) bioreduction experiments at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Rifle, Colorado, USA. Columns filled with sediments were deployed into a groundwater well at the site and, after a period of conditioning with groundwater, were amended with a mixture of groundwater, soluble U(VI), and acetate to stimulate the growth of indigenous microorganisms. Individual reactors were collected as various redox regimes in the column sediments were achieved: (i) during iron reduction, (ii) just after the onset of sulfate reduction, and (iii) later into sulfate reduction. The speciation of U retained in the sediments was studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and chemical extractions. Circa 90% of the total uranium was reduced to U(IV) in each reactor. Noncrystalline U(IV) comprised about two-thirds of the U(IV) pool, across large changes in microbial community structure, redox regime, total uranium accumulation, and reaction time. A significant body of recent research has demonstrated that noncrystalline U(IV) species are more suceptible to remobilization and reoxidation than crystalline U(IV) phases such as uraninite. Our results highlight the importance of considering noncrystalline U(IV) formation across a wide range of aquifer parameters when designing in situ remediation plans.

  5. Hydrothermal deoxygenation of triglycerides over Pd/C aided by in situ hydrogen production from glycerol reforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollak, Stefan A W; Ariëns, Maxim A; de Jong, Krijn P; van Es, Daan S

    2014-04-01

    A one-pot catalytic hydrolysis-deoxygenation reaction for the conversion of unsaturated triglycerides and free fatty acids to linear paraffins and olefins is reported. The hydrothermal deoxygenation reactions are performed in hot compressed water at 250 °C over a Pd/C catalyst in the absence of external H2 . We show that aqueous-phase reforming (APR) of glycerol and subsequent water-gas-shift reaction result in the in situ formation of H2 . While this has a significant positive effect on the deoxygenation activity, the product selectivity towards high-value, long-chain olefins remains high.

  6. Continuous Recycle Enzymatic Membrane Reactor System for In-situ Production of Pure and Sterile Glucose Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; England, Richard

    In this study, an efficient Continuous Recycle Enzymatic Membrane Reactor (CREMR) system for production of in-situ glucose solution was developed and the Simultaneous Gelatinization, Liquefaction and Saccharification (SGLS) carried out at temperatures below 60°C, is proposed to replace the conventional starch hydrolysis. Using a 30 kD polysulfone hollow fibre membrane and 10% (w/w) tapioca starch concentration, it is found that during the steady state continuous operation, the SGLS process in the CREMR at temperatures of 55 and 60°C and trans-membrane pressures of 0.5 and 1 bar has produced a steady state glucose concentration in the permeate stream as high as 64 g L-1 over a period of eight hours operation. The glucose solution obtained is of high purity greater than 99.9% and sterile, hence can be utilised as intravenous dripping solution and other medical products without post-treatments. In addition, the CREMR system is also relatively easy to scale-up, has a smaller footprint c.f. conventional systems, thus allowing in-situ production.

  7. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Brandon C., E-mail: terry13@purdue.edu [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Sippel, Travis R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Pfeil, Mark A. [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Gunduz, I.Emre; Son, Steven F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, Zucrow Laboratories, 500 Allison Rd, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Al-Li alloy propellant has increased ideal specific impulse over neat aluminum. • Al-Li alloy propellant has a near complete reduction in HCl acid formation. • Reduction in HCl was verified with wet bomb experiments and DSC/TGA-MS/FTIR. - Abstract: Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (I{sub SP}). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal I{sub SP} by ∼7 s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5 ± 4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption.

  8. Production and characterization of Al-xNi in situ composites using hot pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamanoglu R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new metal matrix composite of aluminium was designed with the addition of nickel alloy particles. To produce in situ intermetallic formation, aluminium-nickel powder mixtures with different ratios ranging from 5 to 40 wt% Ni were consolidated at 550ºC for 15 minutes under 40 MPa pressure. The interlayer phase formed during sintering was determined using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of nickel and Al-Ni intermetallics on the mechanical properties of the material was studied. The results demonstrated that the addition of nickel enhanced the hardness and wear behaviour of aluminium by forming a strong bonding interface between the aluminium and nickel particles.

  9. State variables monitoring by in situ multi-wavelength fluorescence spectroscopy in heterologous protein production by Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surribas, Anna; Geissler, David; Gierse, Alexander; Scheper, Thomas; Hitzmann, Bernd; Montesinos, José Luis; Valero, Francisco

    2006-07-13

    State variables throughout non-induced and induced cultivations of Pichia pastoris for the heterologous Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) production were monitored with a multi-wavelength on-line fluorescence sensor. Based on this work, the use of in situ multi-wavelength fluorometry combined with chemometrics models (PLS-1 models) provided a quantitative prediction of biomass and substrates (glycerol and methanol) during non-induced and induced ROL production. The mean prediction errors for both variables were about 7% and 10%, respectively. ROL is also quite satisfactory estimated in the exponential growth phase with prediction errors similar to biomass and substrate variables. However, in the stationary phase, where proteolytic degradation of ROL is observed, the prediction error could get a value about 20%. This fact is due to the lower reproducibility of protein production from batch to batch.

  10. REVERSE ENGINEERING IN MODELING OF AIRCRAFT PROPELLER BLADE - FIRST STEP TO PRODUCT OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Yasir Anwar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Propeller aircrafts have had many ups and downs throughout their use in the aviation history. Due to the current economic recession and price hikes in fuels, propeller aircrafts may yet again be a choice for aerial transport and has thus re-emerged as an active area for research. On modern propeller aircrafts old aluminum propellers are being replaced with fiber reinforced composite propellers. However, owing to their reliability, strength, and integrity, aluminum propellers are still used in military aircrafts. One of the challenges that engineers of these aircraft-type have had to deal with is the non-availability of engineering drawings of these propellers. It is practically impossible to carry out any study, research or modification on such propellers in the absence of correct CAD data. This article proposes a methodology wherein a CAD model of a C-130 aircraft propeller blade can be constructed using reverse engineering techniques. Such a model would help in future aerodynamic as well as structural analyses which includes investigation on structural integrity and the fluid dynamics characteristics of propeller blades. Different steps involved in this process are discussed; starting from laser scanning to obtain the cloud of points data and subsequently generating a CAD model in a commercial CAD software. The model is then imported into an analysis software where quality surface meshes are generated using tetrahedral elements. The purpose is to prepare a meshed model for future computational analysis including CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics and FE (Finite Element analysis. ABSTRAK: Pesawat bebaling mempunyai tempoh pasang surutnya sepanjang penggunaanya dalam sejarah penerbangan. Kini disebabkan oleh kemelesetan ekonomi dan kenaikan harga minyak, pesawat bebaling mungkin akan merupakan pengangkutan udara pilihan dan seterusnya muncul semula sebagai ruangan aktif penyelidikan. Pada pesawat bebaling moden, bebaling aluminium yang

  11. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Toledo Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus, P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients. The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019 between TPH concentration (mg/kg and surface tension (mN/m, When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009 was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  12. [Enhanced production of taxuyunnanine c in cell suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis by methyl jasmonate elicitation and in situ absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mingbo; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Xingju

    2010-02-01

    A bioprocess intensification strategy that combines both elicitation and in situ absorption was developed to improve the production of taxuyunnanine c (Tc) in cell suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis. When 100 micromol/L methyl jasmonate was added as an elicitor on Day 7, the Tc content and yield increased 3.6 and 3.3 times respectively, however the cell growth was reduced by 10%-30%. Significant improvement in Tc yield was observed when an absorbent XAD-7 was added on different time of the culture period. The optimum Tc yield was achieved when 100 g/L XAD-7 was added simultaneously with 100 micromol/L methyl jasmonate on Day 7. The maximum Tc yield of 477.4 mg/L was obtained on Day 21 of the culture, being 6.3-fold of the control and 1.9-fold of the 100 micromol/L methyl jasmonate treatment alone. In the combined treatment, 94% of the Tc produced was secreted outside of the cells and absorbed on XAD-7 absorbents. The results demonstrated that the process strategy combining elicitation and in situ absorption was effective to intensify the Tc biosynthesis via elicitation with the removal of product feedback inhibition via absorption, presenting a great potential in commercial applications.

  13. NMR assignment of structural motifs in intact β-limit dextrin and its α-amylase degradation products in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bent O; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Ø

    2012-10-01

    An increasingly detailed and realistic view of biological processes often hinges on atomic-level characterization of biomacromolecules and of the processes they are involved in, preferably under near-physiological conditions. Structure, degradation, and synthesis of glucose storage polymers have been studied for decades with a range of analytical tools, but the detailed in situ analysis has remained an analytical challenge. Here, we report the NMR assignment of different structural motifs in the β-limit dextrin from lintnerized maize starch as a branched α-glucan model system for starch, which is depleted of repetitive α-(1→4) glycosidic bonds at non-reducing ends but has the α-(1→6) branch points intact. By NMR spectroscopy at 18.7T magnetic field, we assign 12 discernible α-glucopyranosyl spin systems and identify them with different structural motifs. Amylolysis of the β-limit dextrin is directly followed by real-time NMR spectroscopy and four major cleavage products are identified and assigned to different branch point structures. Overall, these NMR assignments facilitate in situ assays under realistic conditions of substrate competition, transglycosylation, and product inhibition and shed light on chemical shift tendencies in different structural motifs of branched α-glucans.

  14. Enhancement of Biodiesel Production from Marine Alga, Scenedesmus sp. through In Situ Transesterification Process Associated with Acidic Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga Vin Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to increase the yield of biodiesel produced by Scenedesmus sp. through in situ transesterification by optimizing various process parameters. Based on the orthogonal matrix analysis for the acidic catalyst, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of reaction temperature (47.5% > solvent quantity (26.7% > reaction time (17.5% > catalyst amount (8.3%. Based on a Taguchi analysis, the effects of the factors decreased in the order of solvent ratio (34.36% > catalyst (28.62% > time (19.72% > temperature (17.32%. The overall biodiesel production appeared to be better using NaOH as an alkaline catalyst rather than using H2SO4 in an acidic process, at 55.07 ± 2.18% (based on lipid weight versus 48.41 ± 0.21%. However, in considering the purified biodiesel, it was found that the acidic catalyst was approximately 2.5 times more efficient than the alkaline catalyst under the following optimal conditions: temperature of 70°C (level 2, reaction time of 10 hrs (level 2, catalyst amount of 5% (level 3, and biomass to solvent ratio of 1 : 15 (level 2, respectively. These results clearly demonstrated that the acidic solvent, which combined oil extraction with in situ transesterification, was an effective catalyst for the production of high-quantity, high-quality biodiesel from a Scenedesmus sp.

  15. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-05

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. LANTR-based Mars missions: Go to phobos for propellant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancati, Michael L.; Jacobs, Mark K.; Rauwolf, Gerald A.

    1999-01-01

    Two of the high-leverage propulsion technologies that have been proposed for human Mars missions-the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) engine and In Situ Propellant Production (ISPP)-show even greater potential when combined. Many previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of manufacturing return propellant in situ to reduce the delivered mass requirement for the Earth launch and outbound transportation elements for any round trip mission. For human Mars exploration, this advantage may well be enabling, given current launch vehicle capability projections and reasonable expectations for a constrained program budget. NASA has proposed that the same LOX-Augmented NTR (LANTR) engine concept designed for use on lunar stages could also be used for Mars vehicle configurations, and that the tanks could be filled with propellants from Phobos for the return trip. This approach preserves the strategy of using a few common design elements for both lunar and Mars missions, while also making a significant mass performance improvement for the Mars return stage. We characterize the likely impact on performance of ``steady-state'' Earth-Mars transportation, as compared to Mars-only ISPP alternatives, and offer a preview of potential cost savings (work still in progress) for steady-state operation with Phobos propellants.

  17. Ocean Colour Products from Remote Sensing Related to In-Situ Data for Supporting Management of Offshore Aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Bruno Dias Duarte; Icely, John; Moore, Gerald; Laanen, Marnix; Ghbrehiwot, Semhar

    2016-08-01

    The EU funded "AQUAculture USEr driven operational Remote Sensing information services project" (AQUA- USERS grant number 607325) is a user driven project for the aquaculture industry that aims at providing this industry with relevant and timely information based on the most recent satellite data and innovative optical in- situ measurements. The Water Insight Spectrometer (WISP-3) is a hand held instrument which can provide measurements of the optical parameters Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), Total Suspended Matter (TSM), Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM), and the Spectral Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient (Kd). Sampling campaigns were carried out between March 2014 and September 2015, to collect water samples at the same time as taking optical reading from the WISP-3 at an offshore aquaculture site off Sagres on the SW Portugal, operated by Finisterra Lda, one of the "users" in the project. The estimates from the WISP-3 for Chla and TSM have been compared with in-situ measurements from the water samples for these two variables, with the objective of calibrating the algorithms used by the WISP-3 for estimation of Chla and TSM. At a later stage in the project, it is expected that WISP-3 readings can be related to remote sensing products developed from the Ocean Land Coloured Instrument (OLCI) from the Sentinel-3 satellite. The key purpose of AQUA- Users is to develop, in collaboration with "users" from the aquaculture industry, a mobile phone application (app) that collates satellite information on optical water quality and temperature together with in-situ data of these variables to develop a decision support system for daily management of the aquaculture.

  18. Chemical composition and the nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (in situ degradation and in vitro gas production techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Bakhshizadeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The nutritive value of pistachio epicarp (PE was evaluated by in situ and in vitro techniques. Chemical analysis indicated that PE was high in crude protein (11.30% and low in neutral detergent fiber (26.20%. Total phenols, total tannins, condensed tannins and hydrolysable tannins contents in PE were 8.29%, 4.48%, 0.49% and 3.79%, respectively. Ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation after 48 hr incubation were 75.21% and 82.52%, respectively. The gas production volume at 48 hr for PE was 122.47 mL g-1DM. As a whole, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG to PE increased (p < 0.05 gas production volumes, organic matter digestibility and the metabolizable energy that illustrated inhibitory effect of phenolics on rumen microbial fermentation and the positive influence of PEG on digestion PE. The results showed that PE possessed potentials to being used as feed supplements.

  19. A comparison of the energy use of in situ product recovery techniques for the Acetone Butanol Ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outram, Victoria; Lalander, Carl-Axel; Lee, Jonathan G M; Davis, E Timothy; Harvey, Adam P

    2016-11-01

    The productivity of the Acetone Butanol Ethanol (ABE) fermentation can be significantly increased by application of various in situ product recovery (ISPR) techniques. There are numerous technically viable processes, but it is not clear which is the most economically viable in practice. There is little available information about the energy requirements and economics of ISPR for the ABE fermentation. This work compares various ISPR techniques based on UniSim process simulations of the ABE fermentation. The simulations provide information on the process energy and separation efficiency, which is fed into an economic assessment. Perstraction was the only technique to reduce the energy demand below that of a batch process, by approximately 5%. Perstraction also had the highest profit increase over a batch process, by 175%. However, perstraction is an immature technology, so would need significant development before being integrated to an industrial process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In situ olive mill residual co-composting for soil organic fertility restoration and by-product sustainable reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Casacchia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of organic matter in the form of compost improves overall physical, chemical and biological properties of soils but, to be really sustainable, the composting process should be carried out using the by-products available in situ. Two different soils of a Mediterranean olive orchard, one managed traditionally (NAS and the other amended with compost (AS, were investigated in a two-year experiment. Increases in total organic matter, total nitrogen and pH, were detected in AS if compared to NAS. Significant increases in total and specific microbial counts were observed in AS, with a clear amelioration of microbiological soil quality. The results demonstrated that soil amendment using compost deriving from olive mill by-products can be an important agricultural practice for supporting and stimulating soil microorganisms and, at the same time, for re-using these byproducts, so avoiding their negative environmental impact.

  1. A novel anaerobic two-phase system for biohydrogen production and in situ extraction of organic acid byproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Le Bihan, Yann; Buelna, Gerardo

    2015-06-01

    Owing to CO2-free emission, hydrogen is considered as a potential green alternative of fossil fuels. Water is the major emission of hydrogen combustion process and gravimetric energy density of hydrogen is nearly three times more than that of gasoline and diesel fuel. Biological hydrogen production, therefore, has commercial significance; especially, when it is produced from low-cost industrial waste-based feedstock. Light independent anaerobic fermentation is simple and mostly studied method of biohydrogen production. During hydrogen production by this method, a range of organic acid byproducts are produced. Accumulation of these byproducts is inhibitory for hydrogen production as it may result in process termination due to sharp decrease in medium pH or by possible metabolic shift. For the first time, therefore, a two-phase anaerobic bioreactor system has been reported for biohydrogen production which involves in situ extraction of different organic acids. Among different solvents, based on biocompatibility oleyl alcohol has been chosen as the organic phase of the two-phase system. An organic:aqueous phase ratio of 1:50 has been found to be optimum for hydrogen production. The strategy was capable of increasing the hydrogen production from 1.48 to 11.65 mmol/L-medium.

  2. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  3. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  4. Development of a fermented ice-cream as influenced by in situ exopolysaccharide production: Rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertli, Enes; Toker, Omer S; Durak, M Zeki; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Tatlısu, Nevruz Berna; Sagdic, Osman; Cankurt, Hasan

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to investigate the role of in situ exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by EPS(+)Streptococcus thermophilus strains on physicochemical, rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory properties of ice cream in order to develop a fermented and consequently functional ice-cream in which no stabilizers would be required in ice-cream production. For this purpose, the effect of EPS producing strains (control, strain 1, strain 2 and mixture) and fermentation conditions (fermentation temperature; 32, 37 and 42 °C and time; 2, 3 and 4h) on pH, S. thermophilus count, EPS amount, consistency coefficient (K), and apparent viscosity (η50) were investigated and optimized using single and multiple response optimization tools of response surface methodology. Optimization analyses indicated that functional ice-cream should be fermented with strain 1 or strain mixture at 40-42 °C for 4h in order to produce the most viscous ice-cream with maximum EPS content. Optimization analysis results also revealed that strain specific conditions appeared to be more effective factor on in situ EPS production amount, K and η50 parameters than did fermentation temperature and time. The rheological analysis of the ice-cream produced by EPS(+) strains revealed its high viscous and pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid behavior, which demonstrates potential of S. thermophilus EPS as thickening and gelling agent in dairy industry. FTIR analysis proved that the EPS in ice-cream corresponded to a typical EPS, as revealed by the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups with additional α-glycosidic linkages. SEM studies demonstrated that it had a web-like compact microstructure with pores in ice-cream, revealing its application possibility in dairy products to improve their rheological properties.

  5. Propeller tone bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  6. In-situ product removal from fermentations by membrane extraction: conceptual process design and economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerema, L.; Roelands, C.P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Verdoes, D.; Keurentjes, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a conceptual process design for the production of the model component phenol by a recombinant strain of the micro-organism Pseudomonas putida S12. The (bio)production of the inhibiting component phenol in a bioreactor is combined with direct product removal by membrane extractio

  7. Dissolved organic carbon concentration controls benthic primary production: results from in situ chambers in north-temperate lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Sean C.; Jones, Stuart E.; Weidel, Brian C.; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated several potential drivers of primary production by benthic algae (periphyton) in north-temperate lakes. We used continuous dissolved oxygen measurements from in situ benthic chambers to quantify primary production by periphyton at multiple depths across 11 lakes encompassing a broad range of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations. Light-use efficiency (primary production per unit incident light) was inversely related to average light availability (% of surface light) in 7 of the 11 study lakes, indicating that benthic algal assemblages exhibit photoadaptation, likely through physiological or compositional changes. DOC alone explained 86% of the variability in log-transformed whole-lake benthic production rates. TP was not an important driver of benthic production via its effects on nutrient and light availability. This result is contrary to studies in other systems, but may be common in relatively pristine north-temperate lakes. Our simple empirical model may allow for the prediction of whole-lake benthic primary production from easily obtained measurements of DOC concentration.

  8. High efficiency production and genomic in situ hybridization analysis of Brassica aneuploids and homozygous plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Interspecific and intergeneric hybridizations have been widely used in plant genetics and breeding to construct stocks for genetic analysis and to introduce into crops the desirable traits and genes from their relatives. The intergeneric crosses between Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss., B. carinata A. Braun and Orychophragmus violaceus (L.) O. E. Schulz were made and the plants produced were subjected to genomic in situ hybridization analysis. The mixoploids from the cross with B. juncea were divided into three groups. The partially fertile mixoploids in the first group (2n = 36-42) mainly contained the somatic cells and pollen mother cells (PMCs) with the 36 chromosomes of B. juncea and additional chromosomes of O. violaceus. The mixoploids (2n = 30-36) in the second and third groups were morphologically quite similar to the mother plants B. juncea and showed nearly normal fertility. The plants in the second group produced the majority of PMCs (2n = 36) with their chromosomes paired and segregated normally, but 1-4 pairs of the O. violaceus chromosomes were included in some PMCs. The plants in the third group produced only PMCs with the 36 B. juncea chromosomes, which were paired and segregated normally. The mixoploids (2n = 29-34) from the cross with B. carinata produced the majority of PMCs (2n = 34) with normal chromosome pairing and segregation, but some plants had some PMCs with 1-3 pairs of chromosomes from O. violaceus and other plants had only PMCs with the B. carinata chromosomes. The Brassica homozygous plants and aneuploids with complete or partial chromosome complements of Brassica parents and various numbers of O. violaceus chromosomes were derived from these progeny plants. The results in this study provided the molecular cytogenetic evidence for the separation of parental genomes which was previously proposed to occur in the hybridizations of these two genera.

  9. THE USE OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey A. Canty; Jess W. Everett

    2004-09-30

    In 1994 a demonstration project was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of using CCBs for the in situ treatment of acidic mine water. Actual injection of alkaline material was performed in 1997 with initial positive results; however, the amount of alkalinity added to the system was limited and resulted in short duration treatment. In 1999, a CBRC grant was awarded to further investigate the effectiveness of alkaline injection technology (AIT). Funds were released in fall 2001. In December 2001, 2500 tons of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash were injected into the wells used in the 1997 injection project. Post injection monitoring continued for 24 months. During this period the mine chemistry had gone through a series of chemical changes that manifested as stages or ''treatment phases.'' The mine system appeared to be in the midst of reestablishing equilibrium with the partial pressure of mine headspace. Alkalinity and pH appeared to be gradually increasing during this transition. As of December 2003, the pH and alkalinity were roughly 7.3 and 65 ppm, respectively. Metal concentrations were significantly lower than pre-injection levels, but iron and manganese concentrations appeared to be gradually increasing (roughly 30 ppm and 1.25 ppm, respectively). Aluminum, nickel, and zinc were less than pre-injection concentrations and did not appear to be increasing (roughly

  10. Global sediment production from in-situ cosmogenic nuclides in large river basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedke, H.; Wittmann, H.; von Blanckenburg, F.; Gaillardet, J.

    2016-12-01

    The worlds 30 largest rivers represent half of the total runoff to the ocean and thus integrate the fluxes of Earth surface weathering and erosion over a large portion of global tectonic, geomorphic, and climatic zones. In-situ produced cosmogenic nuclides (10Be, 26Al) in detrital quartz sand can be used to constrain the mean millennial-scale denudation of these large basins. Yet cosmogenic nuclides have mostly been applied to small and intermediate size basins of significant relief. One reason is that in these settings, lowland sediment storage and burial are short compared to the half life of the nuclide (e.g. 1.4 Myr for 10Be). However, if sediment storage is long compared to the half-life, paired nuclides (e.g. 26Al/10Be), through their differential decay, allow to assess the duration of sediment transfer and burial ages from source to sink[1]. Here we present a new dataset of cosmogenic nuclides from 60 large rivers that integrate over 30% of Earth's terrestrial surface. 26Al/10Be ratios of around 6 to 7.5 for most rivers reveal burial durations shorter than the nuclides' decay time scales, indicating high source-sink connectivity. In slowly-eroding basins such as the tectonically quiescent Australian Murray-Darling or the central African Okavango and Congo rivers, 26Al/10Be ratios of millennial-scale sediment fluxes to global source areas provides an estimate of the global sediment flux. The comparison with estimates of modern sediment fluxes from river load gauging offers to deciphering the controls of sediment generation versus sediment transport across large basins. [1] Wittmann and von Blanckenburg (2016), Earth Science Reviews, 159,118-141.

  11. In situ degradability of elephant grass ensiled with increasing levels of pineapple agro-industrial by-product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Holanda Ferreira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the in situ degradability of dry matter (DM, crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF, acid detergent fiber (ADF, and hemicellulose of elephant grass (Pennisetumpurpureum, Schum. with increasing levels (0; 35.0; 70.0, 105.0, and 140.0 g kg-1 of dried pineapple (Ananascomosus, L. by-product (DPBP. The experimental silos consisted of plastic drums with 210 L capacity. After weighing and homogenizing the elephant grass with the DABP, the material was inserted in the silos (126 kg silage, at a density of 600 kg m-3 and compressed. After 45 days of ensilage, silos were opened and samples of the silages were collected for the trial. The study of degradability in situ was conducted using a rumen-fistulated male cattle. The animal was fed with corn silage supplemented with 1 kg concentrate daily. Five levels of addition of the by-product were tested, with three replicates and five times of incubation with an animal. The experimental design was completely randomized with split plots, in which the proportions of DPBP were the treatments (plots, the different silos were the replicates, and the incubation times were the subplots. The levels of inclusion of DPBP provided an increase (P < 0.05 in disappearance of DM and CP and in the effective degradability of DM, NDF, ADF, and hemicellulose. The dried pineapple by-product is a potential alternative to be used as additive in the ensilage of elephant grass, as it provides an increase in the rumen degradability parameters.

  12. Agglomerates, smoke oxide particles, and carbon inclusions in condensed combustion products of an aluminized GAP-based propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Wen; Liu, Peijin; Yang, Wenjing

    2016-12-01

    In solid propellants, aluminum is widely used to improve the performance, however the condensed combustion products especially the large agglomerates generated from aluminum combustion significantly affect the combustion and internal flow inside the solid rocket motor. To clarify the properties of the condensed combustion products of aluminized propellants, a constant-pressure quench vessel was adopted to collect the combustion products. The morphology and chemical compositions of the collected products, were then studied by using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) method. Various structures have been observed in the condensed combustion products. Apart from the typical agglomerates or smoke oxide particles observed before, new structures including the smoke oxide clusters, irregular agglomerates and carbon-inclusions are discovered and investigated. Smoke oxide particles have the highest amount in the products. The highly dispersed oxide particle is spherical with very smooth surface and is on the order of 1-2 μm, but due to the high temperature and long residence time, these small particles will aggregate into smoke oxide clusters which are much larger than the initial particles. Three types of spherical agglomerates have been found. As the ambient gas temperature is much higher than the boiling point of Al2O3, the condensation layer inside which the aluminum drop is burning would evaporate quickly, which result in the fact that few "hollow agglomerates" has been found compared to "cap agglomerates" and "solid agglomerates". Irregular agglomerates usually larger than spherical agglomerates. The formation of irregular agglomerates likely happens by three stages: deformation of spherical aluminum drops; combination of particles with various shape; finally production of irregular agglomerates. EDS results show the ratio of O to Al on the surface of agglomerates is lower in comparison to smoke oxide particles. C and O account for

  13. Spatial analysis of ecosystem production from coordinated in-situ and satellite observations over semi-arid East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, G.; Wang, H.; Zhang, A.

    2016-12-01

    Ecosystem production is a fundamental component of biogeochemical cycles and land-atmosphere interactions at various scales. Semi-arid ecosystems are key contributors to the global carbon cycle and may even dominate the inter-annual variability and decadal trends of the land carbon sink, as demonstrated by several recent studies. Over past years, major achievements have been made to estimate ecosystem productions with satellite data at global and regional scales. However, those estimates were often done with very sparse in-situ data, especially in semi-arid East Asia portion. To better estimate finer resolution primary and ecosystem productions at regional scales, localized field measurements and integration with state-of-art satellite data are necessary. In-situ measurements of green vegetation fractions and CO2 flux between land and atmosphere are critical for understanding regional land-atmosphere interactions and for validating satellite data. Here, we integrated multi-scale satellite data and eddy covariance flux measurements from a pilot experiment of coordinated observation with 24 participant field sites to estimate the gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) over semi-arid East Asia from site to regional scale at high temporal and spatial resolution. The coordination started with intensive instruments calibration and field survey based on common protocol. We calculated the footprint sizes and landscape heterogeneity over each site with fine resolution satellite data (Landsat and GF) and evaluated the contribution of vegetation patches to flux signals. The vegetation photosynthesis model was driven with MODIS derived albedo and EVI and coordinated flux measurements. Generally, the GPP in this region were higher in east and lower in west, with distinguished green spots over oasis and montane forests. The estimated annual GPP was 40% greater than MOD17 products. Further, we validated and corrected microwave (AMSR-E and AMSR2) derived

  14. Effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film as determined by use of microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Satoshi; Santegoeds, Cecilia M; De Beer, Dirk

    2003-03-01

    Microelectrode, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses were used to investigate the effect of nitrite and nitrate on in situ sulfide production in an activated sludge immobilized agar gel film. Microelectrode measurements of O(2), H(2)S, NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), and pH revealed that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) forced sulfate reduction zones deeper in the agar gel and significantly reduced the in situ sulfide production levels. The sulfate reduction zone was consequently separated from O(2) and NO(2)(-) or NO(3)(-) respiration zones with increasing the concentrations of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-). These NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) treatments had only a transient effect on sulfide production. The in situ sulfide production quickly recovered to the previous levels when NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) were removed. The PCR-DGGE and FISH analyses revealed that 2-day-continuous addition of 500 microM NO(3)(-) did not change the metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacterial (SRB) community. On the basis of these data, it could be concluded that the addition of NO(2)(-) and NO(3)(-) did not kill SRB, but induced the interspecies competition for common carbon source (i.e., acetate) between nitrate-reducing heterotrophic bacteria and SRB and enhanced the oxidation of the produced sulfide, which were main possible causes of the suppression of in situ sulfide production in the agar gel.

  15. Simulating spatiotemporal dynamics of sichuan grassland net primary productivity using the CASA model and in situ observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chuanjiang; Fu, Xinyu; Jiang, Dong; Fu, Jingying; Zhang, Xinyue; Zhou, Su

    2014-01-01

    Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important indicator for grassland resource management and sustainable development. In this paper, the NPP of Sichuan grasslands was estimated by the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA) model. The results were validated with in situ data. The overall precision reached 70%; alpine meadow had the highest precision at greater than 75%, among the three types of grasslands validated. The spatial and temporal variations of Sichuan grasslands were analyzed. The absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (APAR), light use efficiency (ε), and NPP of Sichuan grasslands peaked in August, which was a vigorous growth period during 2011. High values of APAR existed in the southwest regions in altitudes from 2000 m to 4000 m. Light use efficiency (ε) varied in the different types of grasslands. The Sichuan grassland NPP was mainly distributed in the region of 3000-5000 m altitude. The NPP of alpine meadow accounted for 50% of the total NPP of Sichuan grasslands.

  16. Expression of the c-kit protein product in carcinoma-in-situ and invasive testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1994-01-01

    Carcinoma-in-situ of the testis (CIS) is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumours. It is believed that CIS cells may originate from early fetal gonocytes. Recently, the proto-oncogene c-kit has been implicated as crucial for the development and migration of primordial germ cells. In this study......, CIS and overtly invasive human male germ cell tumours were analysed immunohistochemically for expression of the c-kit proto-oncogene protein product. Testicular tissue samples from 36 patients with various types of testicular germ cell neoplasia and 19 control specimens were stained using an indirect...... in 61% of the samples while focal expression was observed in 39% of the samples studied. No expression of c-kit was detected in non-seminomas or in normal testicular germ cells. High expression of the proto-oncogene in CIS cells supports the hypothesis of their origin from primordial germ cells...

  17. In Situ Production of Chlorine-36 in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho: Implications for Describing Ground-Water Contamination Near a Nuclear Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. D. Cecil; L. L. Knobel; J. R. Green (USGS); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo)

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the calculated contribution to ground water of natural, in situ produced 36Cl in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer and to compare these concentrations in ground water with measured concentrations near a nuclear facility in southeastern Idaho. The scope focused on isotopic and chemical analyses and associated 36Cl in situ production calculations on 25 whole-rock samples from 6 major water-bearing rock types present in the eastern Snake River Plain. The rock types investigated were basalt, rhyolite, limestone, dolomite, shale, and quartzite. Determining the contribution of in situ production to 36Cl inventories in ground water facilitated the identification of the source for this radionuclide in environmental samples. On the basis of calculations reported here, in situ production of 36Cl was determined to be insignificant compared to concentrations measured in ground water near buried and injected nuclear waste at the INEEL. Maximum estimated 36Cl concentrations in ground water from in situ production are on the same order of magnitude as natural concentrations in meteoric water.

  18. Constraining Regolith Production on a Hillslope Over Long Timescales: Interpreting In Situ 10Be Concentrations on an Evolving Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, M. A.; Anderson, R. S.; Duehnforth, M.; Kelly, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    In situ produced 10Be cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) concentrations provide geomorphologists with a quantitative tool to calculate regolith production rates in a variety of landscapes. However, the power of CRN dating is limited by the care with which these hard-earned numbers are interpreted. As rock is exhumed through the weathered zone, it accumulates in situ produced CRNs. Most studies assume a steady-state condition to calculate regolith production rates from 10Be concentrations obtained from rock at the base of mobile regolith; ignoring decay, the regolith production rate becomes simply Poe-H/z*/[10Be]. Although the balance of regolith production and the spatial pattern of divergence required to maintain steady regolith thickness is valid in some landscapes, steady-state is unlikely on hillslopes where time scales for generating soils are longer than climatic cycles. We report in situ 10Be concentrations to calculate production rates for mobile regolith in 8 soil pits along north- and south-facing slopes in Gordon Gulch, an intensively studied catchment in the Boulder Creek CZO. Gordon Gulch hillslopes exhibit variable regolith and saprolite thicknesses over gneissic and granitic parent rock; mean regolith thickness is 0.65 m. Local denudation rates in nearby catchments are 25 ± 8 m/Ma (Dethier and Lazarus, 2006). The mean residence time of mobile regolith in Gordon Gulch catchment is therefore 20-45 ka; less than half of this time is spent in Holocene climatic conditions. Although Gordon Gulch presently has mean annual temperature (MAT) ~4°C, it was likely at least 6°C cooler during the Last Glacial Maximum, meaning that periglacial conditions likely dominated. We therefore anticipate that parent rock could be more rapidly damaged by increased frost-cracking, and regolith transport be enhanced by increased frost-heave; thus steady-state conditions cannot be assumed over this timescale. To develop strategies for interpretation of 10Be, we employ a 1D

  19. Biotechnological and in situ food production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Maria Eugenia; Bleckwedel, Juliana; Raya, Raúl R; Mozzi, Fernanda

    2013-06-01

    Polyols such as mannitol, erythritol, sorbitol, and xylitol are naturally found in fruits and vegetables and are produced by certain bacteria, fungi, yeasts, and algae. These sugar alcohols are widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and in medicine because of their interesting physicochemical properties. In the food industry, polyols are employed as natural sweeteners applicable in light and diabetic food products. In the last decade, biotechnological production of polyols by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as an alternative to their current industrial production. While heterofermentative LAB may naturally produce mannitol and erythritol under certain culture conditions, sorbitol and xylitol have been only synthesized through metabolic engineering processes. This review deals with the spontaneous formation of mannitol and erythritol in fermented foods and their biotechnological production by heterofermentative LAB and briefly presented the metabolic engineering processes applied for polyol formation.

  20. In situ detoxification of the fermentation medium during gamma-decalactone production with the yeast sporidiobolus salmonicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufosse; Souchon; Feron; Latrasse; Spinnler

    1999-01-01

    gamma-Decalactone (gamma-C10) is known to be highly toxic for the microorganims used for its production. In this work, three techniques were studied in order to overcome this toxicity during a bioconversion process using ricinoleic acid as precursor of the lactone: in situ trapping in oily phases, in porous hydrophobic sorbents and in beta-cyclodextrins. Oily phases added to the media (olive, Miglyol, tributyrin, and paraffin) had a protective effect on Sp. salmonicolor, and they improved the lactone production. beta-cyclodextrins, which have a hydrophobic cavity that can trap molecules such as gamma-C10, have been used to protect the yeasts. The results showed insufficient preservation of cell viability. Some sorbents (activated carbon and polystyrene-based sorbents) were successfully tested during bioconversion. In all cases viability exceeded the reference one. Nevertheless the aroma production was 30% lower than the reference. All of these solutions led to some enhancement of the cell viability during bioconversion of methyl ricinoleate to gamma-C10. For improvement of the lactone production, the oil trapping method seemed to be the best with the experimental conditions tested.

  1. Producing propellants from water in lunar soil using solar lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais Mendonca Teles, Antonio

    The exploration of the Solar System is directly related to the efficiency of engines designed to explore it, and consequently, to the propulsion techniques, materials and propellants for those engines. With the present day propulsion techniques it is necessary great quantities of propellants to impulse a manned spacecraft to Mars and beyond in the Solar System, which makes these operations financially very expensive because of the costs involved in launching it from planet Earth, due to its high gravity field strength. To solve this problem, it is needed a planetary place with smaller gravity field strength, near to the Earth and with great quantities of substances at the surface necessary for the in-situ production of propellants for spacecrafts. The only place available is Earth's natural satellite the Moon. So, here in this paper, I propose the creation of a Lunar Propellant Manufacturer. It is a robot-spacecraft which can be launched from Earth using an Energia Rocket, and to land on the Moon in an area (principally near to the north pole where it was discovered water molecules ice recently) with great quantities of oxygen and hydrogen (propellants) in the silicate soil, previously observed and mapped by spacecrafts in lunar orbit, for the extraction of those molecules from the soil and the in-situ production of the necessary propellants. The Lunar Propellant Manufacturer (LPM) spacecraft consists of: 1) a landing system with four legs (extendable) and rovers -when the spacecraft touches down, the legs retract in order that two apparatuses, analogue to tractor's wheeled belts parallel sided and below the spacecraft, can touch firmly the ground -it will be necessary for the displacement of the spacecraft to new areas with richer propellants content, when the early place has already exhausted in propellants; 2) a digging machine -a long, resistant extendable arm with an excavator hand, in the outer part of the spacecraft -it will extend itself to the ground

  2. Products of in Situ Corrosion of Depleted Uranium Ammunition in Bosnia and Herzegovina Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuheng; von Gunten, Konstantin; Bartova, Barbora; Meisser, Nicolas; Astner, Markus; Burger, Mario; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2016-11-15

    Hundreds of tons of depleted uranium (DU) ammunition were used in previous armed conflicts in Iraq, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Serbia/Kosovo. The majority (>90%) of DU penetrators miss their target and, if left in the environment, corrode in these postconflict zones. Thus, the best way to understand the fate of bulk DU material in the environment is to characterize the corrosion products of intact DU penetrators under field conditions for extended periods of time. However, such studies are scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we characterized corrosion products formed from two intact DU penetrators that remained in soils in Bosnia and Herzegovina for over seven years. We used a combination of X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that metaschoepite (UO3(H2O)2) was a main component of the two DU corrosion products. Moreover, studtite ((UO2)O2(H2O)2·2(H2O)) and becquerelite (Ca(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8(H2O)) were also identified in the corrosion products. Their formation through transformation of metaschoepite was a result of the geochemical conditions under which the penetrators corroded. Moreover, we propose that the transformation of metaschoepite to becquerelite or studtite in the DU corrosion products would decrease the potential for mobilization of U from corroded DU penetrators exposed to similar environments in postconflict areas.

  3. Utilizing Free and Open Source Software to access, view and compare in situ observations, EO products and model output data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Aleksander; Hamre, Torill; Lygre, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    The GreenSeas project (Development of global plankton data base and model system for eco-climate early warning) aims to advance the knowledge and predictive capacities of how marine ecosystems will respond to global change. A main task has been to set up a data delivery and monitoring core service following the open and free data access policy implemented in the Global Monitoring for the Environment and Security (GMES) programme. The aim is to ensure open and free access to historical plankton data, new data (EO products and in situ measurements), model data (including estimates of simulation error) and biological, environmental and climatic indicators to a range of stakeholders, such as scientists, policy makers and environmental managers. To this end, we have developed a geo-spatial database of both historical and new in situ physical, biological and chemical parameters for the Southern Ocean, Atlantic, Nordic Seas and the Arctic, and organized related satellite-derived quantities and model forecasts in a joint geo-spatial repository. For easy access to these data, we have implemented a web-based GIS (Geographical Information Systems) where observed, derived and forcasted parameters can be searched, displayed, compared and exported. Model forecasts can also be uploaded dynamically to the system, to allow modelers to quickly compare their results with available in situ and satellite observations. We have implemented the web-based GIS(Geographical Information Systems) system based on free and open source technologies: Thredds Data Server, ncWMS, GeoServer, OpenLayers, PostGIS, Liferay, Apache Tomcat, PRTree, NetCDF-Java, json-simple, Geotoolkit, Highcharts, GeoExt, MapFish, FileSaver, jQuery, jstree and qUnit. We also wanted to used open standards to communicate between the different services and we use WMS, WFS, netCDF, GML, OPeNDAP, JSON, and SLD. The main advantage we got from using FOSS was that we did not have to invent the wheel all over again, but could use

  4. In situ hydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from oleaginous fungal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Elhagag Ahmed; Abd-Alla, Mohamed Hemida; Bagy, Magdy Mohamed Khalil; Morsy, Fatthy Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    An in situ batch fermentation technique was employed for biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and microdiesel production from oleaginous fungal biomass using the anaerobic fermentative bacterium Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824. Oleaginous fungal Cunninghamella echinulata biomass which has ability to accumulate up to 71% cellular lipid was used as the substrate carbon source. The maximum cumulative hydrogen by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 from crude C. echinulata biomass was 260 ml H2 l(-1), hydrogen production efficiency was 0.32 mol H2 mole(-1) glucose and the hydrogen production rate was 5.2 ml H2 h(-1). Subsequently, the produced acids (acetic and butyric acids) during acidogenesis phase are re-utilized by ABE-producing clostridia and converted into acetone, butanol, and ethanol. The total ABE produced by C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 during batch fermentation was 3.6 g l(-1) from crude fungal biomass including acetone (1.05 g l(-1)), butanol (2.19 g l(-1)) and ethanol (0.36 g l(-1)). C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 has ability to produce lipolytic enzymes with a specific activity 5.59 U/mg protein to hydrolyze ester containing substrates. The lipolytic potential of C. acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was used as a biocatalyst for a lipase transesterification process using the produced ethanol from ABE fermentation for microdiesel production. The fatty acid ethyl esters (microdiesel) generated from the lipase transesterification of crude C. echinulata dry mass was analyzed by GC/MS as 15.4% of total FAEEs. The gross energy content of biohydrogen, acetone, butanol, ethanol and biodiesel generated through C. acetobutylicum fermentation from crude C. echinulata dry mass was 3113.14 kJ mol(-1). These results suggest a possibility of integrating biohydrogen, acetone, butanol and ethanol production technology by C. acetobutylicum with microdiesel production from crude C. echinulata dry mass and therefore improve the feasibility and commercialization of bioenergy production

  5. In situ prebiotics for weaning piglets: In vitro production and fermentation of potato galactorhamnogalacturonan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Ravn, Helle Christine; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Post weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs is a leading cause of economic loss in pork production worldwide. The current practice of using antibiotics and zinc to treat PWD is unsustainable due to the potential of antibiotic resistance and ecological disturbance, and novel methods are required. In this ......Post weaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs is a leading cause of economic loss in pork production worldwide. The current practice of using antibiotics and zinc to treat PWD is unsustainable due to the potential of antibiotic resistance and ecological disturbance, and novel methods are required...

  6. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hechun Cao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production.

  7. Direct vacuum inlet system enabling highly sensitive in-situ analysis of chemical reaction products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trimarco, Daniel Bøndergaard; Scott, Søren Bertelsen; Pedersen, Thomas

    , a capillary maintaining a controlled flow over a pressure drop to ultra-high vacuum, and inlet and outlet channels for an inert make up gas. The use of a direct inlet enables orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than differentially pumped systems without a loss in time response for volatile products, while...

  8. Direct Biodiesel Production from Wet Microalgae Biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through In Situ Transesterification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production. PMID:24195081

  9. Direct biodiesel production from wet microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa through in situ transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hechun; Zhang, Zhiling; Wu, Xuwen; Miao, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    A one-step process was applied to directly converting wet oil-bearing microalgae biomass of Chlorella pyrenoidosa containing about 90% of water into biodiesel. In order to investigate the effects of water content on biodiesel production, distilled water was added to dried microalgae biomass to form wet biomass used to produce biodiesel. The results showed that at lower temperature of 90°C, water had a negative effect on biodiesel production. The biodiesel yield decreased from 91.4% to 10.3% as water content increased from 0% to 90%. Higher temperature could compensate the negative effect. When temperature reached 150°C, there was no negative effect, and biodiesel yield was over 100%. Based on the above research, wet microalgae biomass was directly applied to biodiesel production, and the optimal conditions were investigated. Under the optimal conditions of 100 mg dry weight equivalent wet microalgae biomass, 4 mL methanol, 8 mL n-hexane, 0.5 M H2SO4, 120°C, and 180 min reaction time, the biodiesel yield reached as high as 92.5% and the FAME content was 93.2%. The results suggested that biodiesel could be effectively produced directly from wet microalgae biomass and this effort may offer the benefits of energy requirements for biodiesel production.

  10. The materials and elements production practice of counter-erosional and thermal protection system of the SPR-solid-propellant sustainer nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkurenko, V. M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper presents the production scheme for heat- and erosion-protective carbon plastic materials for heat shield elements of solid-propellant nozzles. Attention is also given the method of manufacturing adhesive joint assemblies, and the production scheme is included.

  11. Enhanced Product Recovery from Glycerol Fermentation into 3-Carbon Compounds in a Bioelectrochemical System Combined with In Situ Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roume, Hugo; Arends, Jan B. A.; Ameril, Camar P.; Patil, Sunil A.; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-01-01

    Given the large amount of crude glycerol formed as a by-product in the biodiesel industries and the concomitant decrease in its overall market price, there is a need to add extra value to this biorefinery side stream. Upgrading can be achieved by new biotechnologies dealing with recovery and conversion of glycerol present in wastewaters into value-added products, aiming at a zero-waste policy and developing an economically viable process. In microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), the mixed microbial community growing on the cathode can convert glycerol reductively to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO). However, the product yield is rather limited in BESs compared with classic fermentation processes, and the synthesis of side-products, resulting from oxidation of glycerol, such as organic acids, represents a major burden for recovery of 1,3-PDO. Here, we show that the use of an enriched mixed-microbial community of glycerol degraders and in situ extraction of organic acids positively impacts 1,3-PDO yield and allows additional recovery of propionate from glycerol. We report the highest production yield achieved (0.72 mol1,3-PDO mol−1glycerol) in electricity-driven 1,3-PDO biosynthesis from raw glycerol, which is very close to the 1,3-PDO yield reported thus far for a mixed-microbial culture-based glycerol fermentation process. We also present a combined approach for 1,3-PDO production and propionate extraction in a single three chamber reactor system, which leads to recovery of additional 3-carbon compounds in BESs. This opens up further opportunities for an economical upgrading of biodiesel refinery side or waste streams. PMID:27725929

  12. In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buizert, Christo; Petrenko, Vasilii V.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey L.; Cuffey, Kurt M.; Lifton, Nathaniel A.; Brook, Edward J.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    2012-06-01

    Radiocarbon measurements at ice margin sites and blue ice areas can potentially be used for ice dating, ablation rate estimates and paleoclimatic reconstructions. Part of the measured signal comes from in situ cosmogenic 14C production in ice, and this component must be well understood before useful information can be extracted from 14C data. We combine cosmic ray scaling and production estimates with a two-dimensional ice flow line model to study cosmogenic 14C production at Taylor Glacier, Antarctica. We find (1) that 14C production through thermal neutron capture by nitrogen in air bubbles is negligible; (2) that including ice flow patterns caused by basal topography can lead to a surface 14C activity that differs by up to 25% from the activity calculated using an ablation-only approximation, which is used in all prior work; and (3) that at high ablation margin sites, solar modulation of the cosmic ray flux may change the strength of the dominant spallogenic production by up to 10%. As part of this effort we model two-dimensional ice flow along the central flow line of Taylor Glacier. We present two methods for parameterizing vertical strain rates, and assess which method is more reliable for Taylor Glacier. Finally, we present a sensitivity study from which we conclude that uncertainties in published cosmogenic production rates are the largest source of potential error. The results presented here can inform ongoing and future 14C and ice flow studies at ice margin sites, including important paleoclimatic applications such as the reconstruction of paleoatmospheric 14C content of methane.

  13. Enhanced product recovery from glycerol fermentation into 3-carbon compounds in a bioelectrochemical system combined with in situ extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Roume

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the large amount of crude glycerol formed as a by-product in the biodiesel industries and the concomitant decrease in its overall market price, there is a need to add extra value to this biorefinery side stream. Upgrading can be achieved by new biotechnologies dealing with recovery and conversion of glycerol present in wastewaters into value-added products, aiming at a zero-waste policy and developing an economically viable process. In microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs, the mixed microbial community growing on the cathode can convert glycerol reductively to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO. However, the product yield is rather limited in BESs compared to classic fermentation processes, and the synthesis of side-products, resulting from oxidation of glycerol, such as organic acids represents a major burden for recovery of 1,3-PDO. Here, we show that the use of an enriched mixed microbial community of glycerol degraders and in situ extraction of organic acids positively impacts 1,3-PDO yield and allows additional recovery of propionate from glycerol. We report the highest production yield achieved (0.72 mol1,3-PDO mol-1glycerol in electricity driven 1,3-PDO biosynthesis from raw glycerol, which is very close to the 1,3-PDO yield reported thus far for a mixed microbial culture based glycerol fermentation process. We also present a combined approach for 1,3-PDO production and propionate extraction in a single three chamber reactor system, which leads to recovery of additional 3-carbon compounds in BESs. This opens up further opportunities for an economical upgrading of biodiesel refinery side or waste streams.

  14. The WATERMED field experiment: validation of the AATSR LST product with in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, E.; Soria, G.; Sobrino, J.; Remedios, J.; Llewellyn-Jones, D.; Corlett, G.

    The Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) onboard ESA's Envisat Satellite, is the third in a series of a precision radiometers designed to measure Sea Surface Temperature (SST) with accuracies of better than ± 0.3 K (within 1-sigma limit). Since its launch in March 2001, a prototype AATSR Land Surface Temperature (LST) product has been produced for validation purposes only, with the product becoming operational from mid-2004. The (A)ATSR instrument design is unique in that it has both a nadir- and a forward-view, allowing the Earth's surface to be viewed along two different atmospheric path lengths, thus enabling an improved atmospheric correction to be made when retrieving surface temperature. It also uses an innovative and exceptionally stable on-board calibration system for its infrared channels, which, together with actively cooled detectors, gives extremely high radiometric sensitivity and precision. In this presentation, results from a comparison of the prototype LST product with ground-based measurements obtained at the WATERMED (WATer use Efficiency in natural vegetation and agricultural areas by Remote sensing in the MEDiterranean basin) field site near Marrakech, Morocco, are presented. The comparison shows that the AATSR has a positive bias of + 1.5 K, with a standard deviation of 0.7 K, indicating that the product is operating within the target specification (± 2.5 K) over the WATERMED field site. However, several anomalous validation points were observed during the analysis and we will discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of these data, including their coincidence with the presence of an Envisat blanking pulse (indicating the presence of a radar pulse at the time of AATSR pixel integration). Further investigation into this matter is required as previous investigations have always indicated that the presence of a payload radar pulse does not have any effect on (A)ATSR data quality.

  15. Evaluation of OSCAR ocean surface current product in the tropical Indian Ocean using in situ data

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh Sikhakolli; Rashmi Sharma; Sujit Basu; B S Gohil; Abhijit Sarkar; K V S R Prasad

    2013-02-01

    The OSCAR (ocean surface current analysis real-time),which is a product derived from various satellite observations,has been evaluated in the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO)in two di fferent ways.First,the OSCAR-derived monthly climatology has been compared with available drifter-derived climatology in the TIO.From the comparison of the two climatologies,one can infer that OSCAR product is able to capture the variabilities of the well-known surface current systems in the TIO reasonably well.Fourier analysis of the major current systems,as reproduced by OSCAR,shows that the dominant annual and semiannual periodicities,known to exist in these systems,have been faithfully picked up by OSCAR. Next,the evaluation has been carried out by comparing the OSCAR currents with currents measured by moored buoys.The zonal component of OSCAR-current is in good agreement with corresponding component of buoy-observed current with a correlation exceeding 0.7,while the match between the meridional components is poorer.The locations of the peaks of the mean and eddy kinetic energies are matching in both the climatologies,although the peak in the drifter climatology is stronger than the same in the OSCAR product.Finally,an important feature of Indian Ocean circulation,namely the reverse Wyrtki jet,occurring during anomalous dipole years,has been well-reproduced by OSCAR currents.

  16. Microbial transformations 59: first kilogram scale asymmetric microbial Baeyer-Villiger oxidation with optimized productivity using a resin-based in situ SFPR strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilker, Iris; Wohlgemuth, Roland; Alphand, Véronique; Furstoss, Roland

    2005-12-20

    This study is demonstrating the scale up of asymmetric microbial Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of racemic bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one (1) to the kilogram scale using a 50 L bioreactor. The process has been optimized with respect to bottlenecks identified in downscaled experiments. A high productivity was obtained combining a resin-based in situ substrate feeding and product removal methodology (in situ SFPR), a glycerol feed control, and an improved oxygenation device (using a sintered-metal sparger). As expected both regioisomeric lactones [(-)-(1S,5R)-2 and (-)-(1R,5S)-3] were obtained in nearly enantiopure form (ee > 98%) and good yield. This represents the first example of such an asymmetric Baeyer-Villiger biooxidation reaction ever operated at that scale. This novel resin-based in situ SFPR technology therefore clearly opens the way to further (industrial) upscaling of this highly valuable (asymmetric) reaction.

  17. In situ gas fuel production during the treatment of textile wastewater at supercritical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kıpçak, Ekin; Akgün, Mesut

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical water gasification has recently received much attention as a potential alternative to energy conversion methods applied to aqueous/non-aqueous biomass sources, industrial wastes or fossil fuels such as coal because of the unique physical properties of water above its critical conditions (i.e. 374.8 °C and 22.1 MPa). This paper presents the results obtained for the hydrothermal gasification of textile wastewater at supercritical conditions. The experiments were carried out at five reaction temperatures (between 450 and 650 °C) and five reaction times (between 30 and 150 s), under a constant pressure of 25 MPa. It was found that the gaseous products contained considerable amounts of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and C(1)-C(4) hydrocarbons, such as methane, ethane, propane and propylene. The maximum amount of the obtained gaseous product was 1.23 mL per mL textile wastewater, at a reaction temperature of 600 °C, with a reaction time of 150 s. At this state, the product comprised 13.02% hydrogen, 38.93% methane, 4.33% ethane, 0.10% propane, 0.01% propylene, 7.97% carbon monoxide, 27.22% carbon dioxide and 8.00% nitrogen. In addition, a 62.88% decrease in the total organic carbon (TOC) content was observed and the color of the wastewater was removed. Moreover, for the hydrothermal decomposition of the textile wastewater, a first-order reaction rate was designated with an activation energy of 50.42 (±2.33) kJ/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 13.29 (±0.41) s(-1).

  18. Multivariate prediction of odor from pig production based on in-situ measurement of odorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Michael J.; Jonassen, Kristoffer E. N.; Løkke, Mette Marie; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.; Feilberg, Anders

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate a prediction model for odor from pig production facilities based on measurements of odorants by Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Odor measurements were performed at four different pig production facilities with and without odor abatement technologies using a newly developed mobile odor laboratory equipped with a PTR-MS for measuring odorants and an olfactometer for measuring the odor concentration by human panelists. A total of 115 odor measurements were carried out in the mobile laboratory and simultaneously air samples were collected in Nalophan bags and analyzed at accredited laboratories after 24 h. The dataset was divided into a calibration dataset containing 94 samples and a validation dataset containing 21 samples. The prediction model based on the measurements in the mobile laboratory was able to explain 74% of the variation in the odor concentration based on odorants, whereas the prediction models based on odor measurements with bag samples explained only 46-57%. This study is the first application of direct field olfactometry to livestock odor and emphasizes the importance of avoiding any bias from sample storage in studies of odor-odorant relationships. Application of the model on the validation dataset gave a high correlation between predicted and measured odor concentration (R2 = 0.77). Significant odorants in the prediction models include phenols and indoles. In conclusion, measurements of odorants on-site in pig production facilities is an alternative to dynamic olfactometry that can be applied for measuring odor from pig houses and the effects of odor abatement technologies.

  19. Development of an In Situ Biosurfactant Production Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.J. McInerney; R.M. Knapp; Kathleen Duncan; D.R. Simpson; N. Youssef; N. Ravi; M.J. Folmsbee; T.Fincher; S. Maudgalya; Jim Davis; Sandra Weiland

    2007-09-30

    The long-term economic potential for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is large with more than 300 billion barrels of oil remaining in domestic reservoirs after conventional technologies reach their economic limit. Actual EOR production in the United States has never been very large, less than 10% of the total U. S. production even though a number of economic incentives have been used to stimulate the development and application of EOR processes. The U.S. DOE Reservoir Data Base contains more than 600 reservoirs with over 12 billion barrels of unrecoverable oil that are potential targets for microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). If MEOR could be successfully applied to reduce the residual oil saturation by 10% in a quarter of these reservoirs, more than 300 million barrels of oil could be added to the U.S. oil reserve. This would stimulate oil production from domestic reservoirs and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign imports. Laboratory studies have shown that detergent-like molecules called biosurfactants, which are produced by microorganisms, are very effective in mobilizing entrapped oil from model test systems. The biosurfactants are effective at very low concentrations. Given the promising laboratory results, it is important to determine the efficacy of using biosurfactants in actual field applications. The goal of this project is to move biosurfactant-mediated oil recovery from laboratory investigations to actual field applications. In order to meet this goal, several important questions must be answered. First, it is critical to know whether biosurfactant-producing microbes are present in oil formations. If they are present, then it will be important to know whether a nutrient regime can be devised to stimulate their growth and activity in the reservoir. If biosurfactant producers are not present, then a suitable strain must be obtained that can be injected into oil reservoirs. We were successful in answering all three questions. The specific

  20. Soybean epoxide production with in situ peracetic acid using homogeneous catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alejandro Boyacá Mendivelso

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Using vegetable oils has become an excellent option for petrochemical product substitution. The epoxides obtained from such oils have wide applications as plastifiers and PVC stabilisers and as raw material in polyol synthesis for the polyurethane industry. This paper presents soybean oil epoxidation using a homogeneous catalyst in a well-mixed, stirred reactor being operated in iso- thermal conditions. The best result achieved was a 6.4% oxyrane oxygen content using hydrogen peroxide (25% molar excess, a- cetic acid (5% p/p and sulphuric acid (2% p/p concentrations at 80°C.

  1. Characterization of Oxidation Product Films on Lead in Aqueous Media by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-02-01

    coated with beeswax to allow only a measured area -’A or the sample to come in contact with the solution. The coi=nection between the copper wire and the...which polyworph of PbO is present. In air saturated exposures to sodium chloride solutions, a different product formed. Instead of adull, gray PbO coating ...approximately 500 nm. Althouqh accurate measurement of the titickness of the carbonate coatings could not be made, the ldyiyr was estimated to be nearly a

  2. Optimizing production and evaluating biosynthesis in situ of a herbicidal compound, mevalocidin, from Coniolariella sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Vincent P; Figueroa, Mario; Raja, Huzefa A; El-Elimat, Tamam; Darveaux, Blaise A; Pearce, Cedric J; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2016-08-01

    Mevalocidin is a fungal secondary metabolite produced by Coniolariella sp. It is a unique phytotoxin that demonstrates broad spectrum post-emergent herbicidal properties. With limited options for weed control, the commercialization of a natural product pesticide would be beneficial to organic farming. In this study, two mevalocidin-producing fungal strains, coded MSX56446 and MSX92917, were explored under a variety of growth conditions, including time, temperature, and media. The concentration of mevalocidin was quantitatively measured via LC-MS to determine the optimal setting for each condition. Maximum production was achieved for each condition at 20 days, at 30 °C, with YESD + agar, and with a media containing 2.5 % dextrose. Furthermore, an advanced surface sampling technique was incorporated to gain a better understanding of the fungal culture's natural ability to biosynthesize and distribute this herbicide into its environment. It was shown that both fungi actively exude mevalocidin into their environment via liquid droplet formations known as guttates.

  3. Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathe, Mandar [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Xu, Dikai [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Hsieh, Tien-Lin [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Simpson, James [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Statnick, Robert [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Tong, Andrew [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Fan, Liang-Shih [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-31

    This document is the final report for the project titled “Chemical Looping Gasification for Hydrogen Enhanced Syngas Production with In-Situ CO2 Capture” under award number FE0012136 for the performance period 10/01/2013 to 12/31/2014.This project investigates the novel Ohio State chemical looping gasification technology for high efficiency, cost efficiency coal gasification for IGCC and methanol production application. The project developed an optimized oxygen carrier composition, demonstrated the feasibility of the concept and completed cold-flow model studies. WorleyParsons completed a techno-economic analysis which showed that for a coal only feed with carbon capture, the OSU CLG technology reduced the methanol required selling price by 21%, lowered the capital costs by 28%, increased coal consumption efficiency by 14%. Further, using the Ohio State Chemical Looping Gasification technology resulted in a methanol required selling price which was lower than the reference non-capture case.

  4. Usage of waste products from thermal recycling of plastics waste in enhanced oil recovery or in-situ coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, M.; Fink, J.K. [Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria)

    1998-09-01

    In this contribution a thermal method for crude oil mobilization and in-situ liquefaction of coal is discussed, which will finally yield more organic material, as which has been put in from plastics waste originally into the process. The conversion product from thermal treatment is pumped down into exhausted crude oil reservoirs, where the hydrogen can degrade the residual high viscous oil to cause it to become more prone to flow so that it can be recovered. Such a process will envision two goals: 1. more organic raw material (as crude oil) will be recovered than is initially put in as waste product. 2. atmospheric pollutants from the conversion plant will be trapped in the reservoir, which simplifies the construction of the plant. An analogous process may be performed with coal seams. Coal seams with their high porosity and large specific surface are believed to be in particular useful to filter atmospheric pollutants. Depending on the type of coal the mobilization of organic material by this process may be in the background. (orig./SR)

  5. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Fangfang; Lu, Congcong; Yang, Shang-Tian; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L·h vs. 0.30 g/L·h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. IVO, a device for In situ Volatilization and On-line detection of products from heavy ion reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Duellmann, C E; Eichler, R; Gäggeler, H W; Jost, D T; Piguet, D; Türler, A

    2002-01-01

    A new gaschromatographic separation system to rapidly isolate heavy ion reaction products in the form of highly volatile species is described. Reaction products recoiling from the target are stopped in a gas volume and converted in situ to volatile species, which are swept by the carrier gas to a chromatography column. Species that are volatile under the given conditions pass through the column. In a cluster chamber, which is directly attached to the exit of the column, the isolated volatile species are chemically adsorbed to the surface of aerosol particles and transported to an on-line detection system. The whole set-up was tested using short-lived osmium (Os) and mercury (Hg) nuclides produced in heavy ion reactions to model future chemical studies with hassium (Hs, Z=108) and element 112. By varying the temperature of the isothermal section of the chromatography column between room temperature and -80 deg. C, yield measurements of given species can be conducted, yielding information about the volatility o...

  7. Surfactant-assisted direct biodiesel production from wet Nannochloropsis occulata by in situ transesterification/reactive extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamoru A. Salam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an in situ transesterification/reactive extraction of Nannochloropsis occulata for fatty acid methyl ester (FAME production using H2SO4, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS plus H2SO4 and zirconium dodecyl sulphate (ZDS. A maximum 67 % FAME yield was produced by ZDS. Effect of inclusion of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS in H2SO4 for FAME enhancement and water tolerance was also studied by hydrating the algae with 10 % - 30 % distilled water (w/w dry algae. Treatment with SDS in H2SO4 increases the FAME production rate and water tolerance of the process. Inclusion of SDS in H2SO4 produced a maximum 98.3 % FAME yield at 20 % moisture in the algae. The FAME concentration began to diminish only at 30 % moisture in the algae. Furthermore, the presence of a small amount of water in the biomass or methanol increased the lipid extraction efficiency, improving the FAME yield, rather than inhibiting the reaction.

  8. Two-stage in situ gas stripping for enhanced butanol fermentation and energy-saving product recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, C; Zhao, JB; Liu, FF; Lu, CC; Yang, ST; Bai, FW

    2013-05-01

    Two-stage gas stripping for butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation with Clostridium acetobutylicum JB200 in a fibrous bed bioreactor was studied. Compared to fermentation without in situ gas stripping, more ABE (10.0 g/L acetone, 19.2 g/L butanol, 1.7 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced, with a higher butanol yield (0.25 g/g vs. 0.20 g/g) and productivity (0.40 g/L.h vs. 0.30 g/L-h) due to reduced butanol inhibition. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 175.6 g/L butanol (227.0 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 612.3 g/L butanol (660.7 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 101.3 g/L butanol (153.2 g/L ABE). After second-stage gas stripping, a highly concentrated product containing 420.3 g/L butanol (532.3 g/L ABE) was obtained. The process is thus effective in producing high-titer butanol that can be purified with much less energy. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of Glycerol Steam Reforming for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogen and carbon dioxide separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Joel M.; Soria, M. A.; Madeira, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic study of Glycerol Steam Reforming (GSR) for hydrogen production with in situ carbon dioxide and hydrogen (reaction products) simultaneous removal was performed. The sorption-enhanced membrane reactor (SEMR) was divided into multiple sub-Gibbs reactors and the Gibbs free energy minimization method was employed. The effects of temperature (600-800 K), molar water-to-glycerol feed ratio (WGFR) (3-9), pressure (1-5 atm) and fraction of hydrogen and carbon dioxide removal (f, 0-0.99) on the GSR process were target of investigation. A hydrogen yield (total moles of hydrogen produced/mole of reacted glycerol) very close to the stoichiometric value of 7 was obtained at 700 K, WGFR of 9, 1 atm and for fCO2 = 0.99 and fH2 = 0.80. This corresponds to an enhancement of 217%, 47% and 22% in terms of hydrogen yield comparatively to the traditional reactor (TR), sorption-enhanced reactor (SER) with carbon dioxide capture (fCO2 = 0.99) and membrane reactor (MR) with hydrogen separation (fH2 = 0.80) , respectively. In terms of coke, its formation was only observed under WGFRs below the stoichiometric value of 3.

  10. Highly efficient synthesis of endomorphin-2 under thermodynamic control catalyzed by organic solvent stable proteases with in situ product removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiaxing; Sun, Honglin; He, Xuejun; Bai, Zhongzhong; He, Bingfang

    2013-02-01

    An efficient enzymatic synthesis of endomorphin-2 (EM-2) was achieved using organic solvent stable proteases in nonaqeous media, based on thermodynamic control and an in situ product removal methodology. The high stability of biocatalysts in organic solvents enabled the aleatoric modulation of the nonaqueous reaction media to shift thermodynamic equilibrium toward synthesis. Peptide Boc-Phe-Phe-NH2 was synthesized with a high yield of 96% by the solvent stable protease WQ9-2 in monophase medium with an economical molar ratio of the substrate of 1:1. The tetrapeptide Boc-Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 was synthesized with a yield of 88% by another organic solvent tolerant protease PT121 from Boc-Tyr-Pro-OH and Phe-Phe-NH2 in an organic-aqueous biphasic system. The reaction-separation coupling in both enzymatic processes provides "driving forces" for the synthetic reactions and gives a high yield and high productivity without purification of the intermediate, thereby making the synthesis more amenable to scale-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Application of aerobic microorganisms in bioremediation in situ of soil contaminated by petroleum products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolicka, Dorota; Suszek, Agnieszka; Borkowski, Andrzej; Bielecka, Aleksandra

    2009-07-01

    Aerobic microorganisms able to biodegrade benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (BTEX) have been isolated from an area contaminated by petroleum products. The activity of the isolated communities was tested under both laboratory and field conditions. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene were added to the cultures as the sole carbon source, at a concentration of 500 mg/L. In batch cultures under laboratory conditions, an 84% reduction of benzene, 86% of toluene and 82% of xylene were achieved. In cultures with ethylbenzene as the sole carbon source, the reduction was around 80%. Slightly lower values were observed under field conditions: 95% reduction of benzene and toluene, 81% of ethylbenzene and 80% of xylene. A high biodegradation activity of benzene (914 microM/L/24h), toluene (771 microM/L/24h), xylene (673 microM/L/24h) and ethylbenzene (644 microM/L/24h) was observed in the isolated communities.

  12. Reflexion M\\"ossbauer analysis of the in situ oxidation products hydroxycarbonate green rust

    CERN Document Server

    Naille, Sebastien; Louber, Didier; Jean, Paul Moulin; Ruby, Christian; 10.1088/1742-6596/217/1/012084

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the nature of the oxidation products of FeII-III hydroxycarbonate FeII4FeIII2(OH)12CO3~3H2O (green rust GR(CO32-)) by using the miniaturised M\\"ossbauer spectrometer MIMOS II. Two M\\"ossbauer measurements methods are used: method (i) with green rust pastes coated with glycerol and spread into Plexiglas sample holders, and method (ii) with green rust pastes in the same sample holders but introduced into a gas-tight cell with a beryllium window under a continuous nitrogen flow. Method (ii) allows us to follow the continuous deprotonation of GR(CO32-) into the fully ferric deprotonated form FeIII6O4(OH)8CO3~3H2O by adding the correct amount of H2O2, without any further oxidation or degradation of the samples.

  13. In Situ Measurement of Local Hydrogen Production Rate by Bubble-Evolved Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen visibly bubbles during photocatalytic water splitting under illumination with above-bandgap radiation, which provides a direct measurement of local gas-evolving reaction rate. In this paper, optical microscopy of superfield depth was used for recording the hydrogen bubble growth on Cd0.5Zn0.5S photocatalyst in reaction liquid and illuminated with purple light. By analyzing change of hydrogen bubble size as a function of time, we understood that hydrogen bubble growth experienced two periods, which were inertia effect dominated period and diffusion effect dominated period, respectively. The tendency of hydrogen bubble growth was similar to that of the gas bubble in boiling, while the difference in bubble diameter and growth time magnitude was great. Meanwhile, we obtained the local hydrogen production rate on photocatalyst active site by measuring hydrogen bubble growth variation characteristics. This method makes it possible to confirm local actual hydrogen evolution rate quantitatively during photocatalytic water splitting.

  14. Evaluation of four global reanalysis products using in situ observations in the Amundsen Sea Embayment, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. W.; Renfrew, I. A.; Orr, A.; Webber, B. G. M.; Holland, D. M.; Lazzara, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    The glaciers within the Amundsen Sea Embayment (ASE), West Antarctica, are amongst the most rapidly retreating in Antarctica. Meteorological reanalysis products are widely used to help understand and simulate the processes causing this retreat. Here we provide an evaluation against observations of four of the latest global reanalysis products within the ASE region—the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Interim Reanalysis (ERA-I), Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55), Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), and Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA). The observations comprise data from four automatic weather stations (AWSs), three research vessel cruises, and a new set of 38 radiosondes all within the period 2009-2014. All four reanalyses produce 2 m temperature fields that are colder than AWS observations, with the biases varying from approximately -1.8°C (ERA-I) to -6.8°C (MERRA). Over the Amundsen Sea, spatially averaged summertime biases are between -0.4°C (JRA-55) and -2.1°C (MERRA) with notably larger cold biases close to the continent (up to -6°C) in all reanalyses. All four reanalyses underestimate near-surface wind speed at high wind speeds (>15 m s-1) and exhibit dry biases and relatively large root-mean-square errors (RMSE) in specific humidity. A comparison to the radiosonde soundings shows that the cold, dry bias at the surface extends into the lower troposphere; here ERA-I and CFSR reanalyses provide the most accurate profiles. The reanalyses generally contain larger temperature and humidity biases, (and RMSE) when a temperature inversion is observed, and contain larger wind speed biases (~2 to 3 m s-1), when a low-level jet is observed.

  15. In-situ biodiesel and sugar production from rice bran under subcritical condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullaikah, Siti; Rahkadima, Yulia Tri

    2015-12-01

    An integrated method of producing biodiesel and sugar using subcritical water and methanol has been employed as a potential way to reduce the high cost of single biofuel production from rice bran. The effects of temperature, methanol to water ratio and reaction time on the biodiesel yield and purity, and the concentration of sugar in hydrolysate were investigated systematically. Biodiesel with yield and purity of 65.21%and 73.53%, respectively, was obtained from rice bran with initial free fatty acid (FFA) content of 37.64% under the following conditions: T= 200 oC, P= 4.0 MPa (using CO2 as pressurizing gas), ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/2/6 (g/mL/mL), and 3 h of reaction time. FFAs level was reduced to 10.00% with crude biodiesel recovery of 88.69%. However, the highest biodiesel yield (67.39%) and crude biodiesel recovery (100.00%) were obtained by decreasing the amount of methanol so that the ratio of rice bran/water/methanol became 1/4/4, g/mL/mL. In addition, the highest sugar concentration of 0.98 g/L was obtained at 180 oC and 4.0 MPa with ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/4/4 (g/mL/mL) and reaction time of 3 h. Since no catalyst was employed and the biodiesel and reducing sugar were produced directly from rice bran with high water and FFA contents, the process was simple and environmentally friendly, which would make the production of biofuel more economical and sustainable.

  16. Digestibilidad in situ de dietas con harina de nopal deshidratado conteniendo un preparado de enzimas fibrolíticas exógenas In situ digestibility in dehydrated ground prickly pear diets containing a fybrolitic enzymes product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medina Romo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el efecto de un preparado de enzimas fibrolíticas exógenas (celulasas y xilanasas en la degradabilidad in situ de la materia seca (DisMS, fibra detergente neutro (DFDNr y fibra detergente ácido residual (DFDAr, en dietas altas o bajas en harina de nopal deshidratado. Se aplicaron concentraciones de 0, 1, 2 y 3 g de enzima por kilogramo de materia seca al inicio y 24 horas antes de la degradación in situ. Se determinó la concentración de ácidos grasos volátiles totales y de nitrógeno amoniacal a las 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 y 24 horas después de aplicarse la enzima. No se observaron efectos en DisMS, DFDNr y DFDAr; la aplicación al inicio de la degradación in situ mostró valores más altos que a 24 horas para DisMS y DFDNr, pero fue menor para DFDAr. No se observaron diferencias en las interacciones entre niveles de enzima, tipo de dieta y tiempo de pretratamiento. La aplicación de 1 y 3 g de enzima, en la dieta con bajo contenido de harina de nopal, tuvo efectos en el incremento de los ácidos grasos volátiles totales; para el nitrógeno amoniacal, los mejores resultados ocurrieron con 0 y 1 g de enzima.It was evaluated the effect of a fybrolitic enzyme product (cellulases and xylanases on in situ digestibility of dry matter (DisMS, residual neutral detergent fiber (DFDNr and acid detergent fiber (DFDAr, in dehydrated ground prickly pear diets with a low or high level. Enzyme concentrations of 0, 1, 2, and 3 g kg-1 of dry matter applied at the beginning (0 hour and 24 hours before starting in situ digestibility were used. Total volatile fatty acids and ammonia nitrogen were determined at: 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours after the enzyme application. There were no effects on DisMS, DFDNr, and DFDAr. Initial application of enzyme concentrations (0 hour was higher than 24 hours for DisMS and DFDNr but lower for DFDAr. No differences were observed in interactions among enzyme level, diet and application time. Application of 1 and 3 g of

  17. In situ observation of self-assembled hydrocarbon Fischer-Tropsch products on a cobalt catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Violeta; van Spronsen, Matthijs A.; Frenken, Joost W. M.

    2016-10-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that creates approximately 2% of the world's fuel. It involves the synthesis of linear hydrocarbon molecules from a gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high pressures (from a few to tens of bars) and high temperatures (200-350 °C). To gain further insight into the fundamental mechanisms of this industrial process, we have used a purpose-built scanning tunnelling microscope to monitor a cobalt model catalyst under reaction conditions. We show that, after 30 minutes of reaction, the terraces of the cobalt catalyst are covered by parallel arrays of stripes. We propose that the stripes are formed by the self-assembly of linear hydrocarbon product molecules. Surprisingly, the width of the stripes corresponds to molecules that are 14 or 15 carbon atoms long. We introduce a simple model that explains the accumulation of such long molecules by describing their monomer-by-monomer synthesis and explicitly accounting for their thermal desorption.

  18. Doppler Broadening Analysis of Steel Specimens Using Accelerator Based In Situ Pair Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarashvili, V.; Wells, D. P.; Roy, A. K.

    2009-03-01

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) techniques can be utilized as a sensitive probe of defects in materials. Studying these microscopic defects is very important for a number of industries in order to predict material failure or structural integrity. We have been developing gamma-induced pair-production techniques to produce positrons in thick samples (˜4-40 g/cm2, or ˜0.5-5 cm in steel). These techniques are called 'Accelerator-based Gamma-induced Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy' (AG-PAS). We have begun testing the capabilities of this technique for imaging of defect densities in thick structural materials. As a first step, a linear accelerator (LINAC) was employed to produce photon beams by stopping 15 MeV electrons in a 1 mm thick tungsten converter. The accelerator is capable of operating with 30-60 ns pulse width, up to 200 mA peak current at 1 kHz repetition rate. The highly collimated bremsstrahlung beam impinged upon our steel tensile specimens, after traveling through a 1.2 m thick concrete wall. Annihilation radiation was detected by a well-shielded and collimated high-purity germanium detector (HPGe). Conventional Doppler broadening spectrometry (DBS) was performed to determine S, W and T parameters for our samples.

  19. In situ production of terrestrial cosmogenic helium and some applications to geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mark D.

    1986-01-01

    The concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 have been measured in a series of basaltic drill core samples from Hawaiian volcanoes Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The He-3 concentration in the surface of a radiocarbon dated Mauna Loa flow (20,000 years) gives reasonable agreement with a theoretical production rate of 140 atoms/g/yr, and suggests that the uncertainty in this rate is roughly 10 percent. The results illustrate the feasibility of using He-3 to measure exposure ages of young basaltic lava flows and for measuring erosion rates. Erosion rates calculated from the three Haleakala cores range from 7 to 11 meters/million years. The drill core data demonstrate that accurate depth control is crucial to the use and evaluation of cosmogenic helium. Depth profiles from several of the older cores display a nonexponential depth dependence of He-3(c) below 170 g/sq cm, which is attributed to the contribution from Li-6(n, alpha)T, where the neutrons are from stopped muons. This has important implications for depth dependence of cosmogenic He-3 because muons are weakly attenuated compared to the nucleonic component that produces spallation.

  20. In situ production of terrestrial cosmogenic helium and some applications to geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mark D.

    1986-12-01

    The concentrations of cosmogenic He-3 have been measured in a series of basaltic drill core samples from Hawaiian volcanoes Haleakala and Mauna Loa. The He-3 concentration in the surface of a radiocarbon dated Mauna Loa flow (20,000 years) gives reasonable agreement with a theoretical production rate of 140 atoms/g/yr, and suggests that the uncertainty in this rate is roughly 10 percent. The results illustrate the feasibility of using He-3 to measure exposure ages of young basaltic lava flows and for measuring erosion rates. Erosion rates calculated from the three Haleakala cores range from 7 to 11 meters/million years. The drill core data demonstrate that accurate depth control is crucial to the use and evaluation of cosmogenic helium. Depth profiles from several of the older cores display a nonexponential depth dependence of He-3(c) below 170 g/sq cm, which is attributed to the contribution from Li-6(n, alpha)T, where the neutrons are from stopped muons. This has important implications for depth dependence of cosmogenic He-3 because muons are weakly attenuated compared to the nucleonic component that produces spallation.

  1. Development of a dynamic web mapping service for vegetation productivity using earth observation and in situ sensors in a sensor web based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, L.; Bergsma, A.R.; Chuma, B.; Bruin, de S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Nethe

  2. In situ growth of carbon nanotubes on Ni/MgO: a facile preparation of efficient catalysts for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, M T; Lin, J D; Zhang, H B; Liao, D W

    2015-11-07

    Ni/MgO-CNTs catalysts are prepared by in situ chemical vapor deposition growth of CNTs on Ni/MgO. These catalysts exhibit an improved performance for the production of synthetic natural gas from syngas, which is attributed to the formation of highly catalytic active interfaces among Ni, CNTs and MgO.

  3. IN-SITU MONITORING OF PRODUCT STREAMS FROM A SPINNING TUBE-IN-TUBE REACTOR USING A METTLER-TOLEDO REACT-IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Mettler-Toledo ReactIR system has been used for in-line, real-time monitoring of the product stream from a spinning tube-in-tube reactor (STT®, Kreido Laboratories, Camarillo California). This combination of a process intensified continuous-flow reactor and an in-situ analytic...

  4. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products. Chemical characterization and computer modeling of the exhaust products from four propellant formulations: Final report, September 23, 1987--April 1, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

    1991-12-09

    The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army`s Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

  5. In-situ measured primary productivity of ice algae in Arctic sea ice floes using a new incubation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ho Jung; Lee, Jae Hyung; Kim, Gawn Woo; Ahn, So Hyun; Joo, Houng-Min; Jeong, Jin Young; Yang, Eun Jin; Kang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Sang Heon

    2016-09-01

    Recent changes in climate and environmental conditions have had great negative effects such as decreasing sea ice thickness and the extent of Arctic sea ice floes that support ice-related organisms. However, limited field observations hinder the understanding of the impacts of the current changes in the previously ice-covered regions on sea ice algae and other ice-related ecosystems. Our main objective in this study was to measure recent primary production of ice algae and their relative contribution to total primary production (ice plus pelagic primary production). In-situ primary productivity experiments with a new incubation system for ice algae were conducted in 3 sea ice cores at 2 different ice camps in the northern Chukchi Sea, 2014, using a 13C and 15N isotope tracer technique. A new incubation system was tested for conducting primary productivity experiments on ice algae that has several advantages over previous incubation methods, enabling stable carbon and nitrogen uptake experiments on ice algae under more natural environmental conditions. The vertical C-shaped distributions of the ice algal chl- a, with elevated concentrations at the top and bottom of the sea ice were observed in all cores, which is unusual for Arctic sea ice. The mean chl- a concentration (0.05 ± 0.03 mg chl- a m-3) and the daily carbon uptake rates (ranging from 0.55 to 2.23 mg C m-2 d-1) for the ice algae were much lower in this study than in previous studies in the Arctic Ocean. This is likely because of the late sampling periods and thus the substantial melting occurring. Ice algae contributed 1.5-5.7% of the total particulate organic carbon (POC) contents of the combined euphotic water columns and sea ice floes. In comparison, ice algae contributed 4.8-8.6% to the total primary production which is greater than previously reported in the Arctic Ocean. If all of the ice-associated productions were included, the contributions of the sea ice floes to the total primary production

  6. Microbial production of propionic acid with Propionibacterium freudenreichii using an anion exchanger-based in situ product recovery (ISPR) process with direct and indirect contact of cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wang, Yunshan; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-02-01

    The recovery of an inhibiting product from a bioreactor soon after its formation is an important issue in industrial bioprocess development. In the present study, the potential of the anion exchanger-based in situ product recovery (ISPR) technique for the biocatalytic production of propionic acid was discussed. The focus of the current work was the selection of a suitable configuration of metabolically active cells for application in propionic acid production. Accumulation of propionic acid in fermentation broth caused feedback inhibition of the growth and biotransformation activity of Propionibacterium freudenreichii CICC 10019. Relevant product inhibition kinetics was discussed, and the results showed that keeping the aqueous propionic acid concentration below 10.02 g L⁻¹ was an essential prerequisite for ISPR process. A batch study, in which three ISPR configuration mode designs were compared, was conducted. The comparison indicated that employing an external direct mode had significant advantages over other modes in terms of increased productivity and product yield, with a corresponding decrease in the number of downstream processing steps, as well as in substrate consumption. The fed-batch culture using an external direct mode for the continuous accumulation of propionic acid resulted in a cumulative propionic acid concentration of 62.5 g L⁻¹, with a corresponding product yield of 0.78 g propionic acid/g glucose.

  7. In-Situ Continuous Production of Hydrogen Gas from Molasses Using Mutated Enterobacter aerogenes ADH43 for Fuel Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Salam

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR for the in-situ production of hydrogen gas (H2 integrated with a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC was investigated. Facultative anaerobe fermentation of Enterobacter aerogenes ADH-43 was conducted into CSTR 50 rpm of agitation speed , 37 0C of temperature, 6.3 of pH, and 0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.60 h-1 of dilution rate. Bio-H2 produced was assesed after inserting it into a fuel cell to generate electricity and measuring voltages. The system was integrated with a ceramic membrane having 0.2 µm pore size for recycling the retentate cell into reactor and separating the permeate supernatant during the fermentation. The obtained H2 was purified from CO2 by absorption in Ca(OH2 solution prior to feed to PEMFC. The CSTR was initially operated on batch basis to increase the bacterial cell density to ensure the production of sufficient H2 and develop a feeding culture strategy for the continues operation mode. The result showed that the highest H2 production was achieved at continuous system resulted in 0.30 h-1 of optimum dilution rate. The maximum H2 volume of 9.76 l H2/l sugar , the yield of 1.84 mol H2/mol sugar, and the flow rate of 115 ml H2/min were obtained. Furthermore, colony count of 9.81 log cfu/ml, pH of 5.73, maximum electrical current of 0.38 Ampere, electrical power of 2.20 Watt, and electrical voltage of 5.75 volt after given resistance using LED of 25 ohm was also reached.

  8. Validation of the AATSR L2 GSST product with in situ measurements from the M-AERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, E.; Minnett, P.; Remedios, J.; Mannerings, B.; Corlett, G.; Edwards, M.; Llewellyn-Jones, D.

    Precise, in situ, measurements of skin Sea Surface Temperature (SSST) have been obtained over the Eastern Caribbean Sea, using the Marine Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (M-AERI) deployed onboard the Explorer of the Seas cruise ship. These measurements provide a near-continuous SSST dataset and have been used to validate the Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) Level 2 operational dual-view Gridded Sea Surface Temperature (GSST) product over the area. The (A)ATSR instrument has a unique design in that it has both a nadir- and forward-view, allowing the Earth's surface to be viewed along two different atmospheric path lengths and enabling an improved atmospheric correction to be made when retrieving measurements of SST. The infrared radiometer also uses an innovative and exceptionally stable on-board calibration system, which, together with actively cooled detectors, gives exceptionally high radiometric sensitivity and precision, enabling SSTs to be retrieved to within ± 0.3 K (1-sigma limit). The unprecedented number of measurements provided by the M-AERI project enables us to validate the AATSR SST products on a scale that has not been possible with its two predecessors, ATSR-1 and ATSR-2. Validation results obtained between September 2002 and September 2003 are presented and indicate that, although the AATSR appears to measure slightly warm (circa + 0.14 K), the GSST product is accurate to within 0.28-0.41 K (Root Mean Square difference) in this geographical region, depending on the validation criteria used. We also present the results of further investigations into a number of validation points that do not fall within the target ± 0.3 K accuracy zone.

  9. In-Situ Treatment of Groundwater Contaminated with Underground Coal Gasification Products / Oczyszczanie In-Situ WÓD Podziemnych Zanieczyszczonych Przez Produkty Podziemnego Zgazowania WĘGLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suponik, Tomasz; Lutyński, Marcin

    2013-12-01

    In the paper the contaminants that may be generated in Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) process were listed and include mainly mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, heavy metals, cyanides, ammonium, chloride and sulphate. As a method of UCG contaminated groundwater treatment a Permeable Reactive Barrier technology was proposed. To assess the effectiveness of this technology two tests were carried out. Granulated activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite, and granulated activated carbon and scrap iron were applied in the first and second test respectively. For these materials the hydro geological parameters called reactive material parameters were determined and discussed. The results of the experiments showed that GAC seems to be the most effective material for phenols, BTX, PAH, cyanides and slightly lowers ammonia removal, while zeolites and scrap iron removed free cyanide, ammonia and heavy metals respectively. Podziemne Zgazowanie Węgla (PZW) jest alternatywną metodą pozyskiwania energii z węgla. Jest to zespół przemian termicznych i chemicznych przebiegających bezpośrednio w złożu węgla, zachodzących pomiędzy substancją organiczną a czynnikiem zgazowującym, jakim może być powietrze, tlen, para wodna, dwutlenek węgla. Poza wieloma zaletami metoda ta niesie za sobą także wiele zagrożeń, które były rozważane w ramach projektu HUGE 2 (nr RFCR-CT-2011-00002). Jednym z nich jest zagrożenie środowiska wód podziemnych produktami PZW, do których należą wielopierścieniowe węglowodory aromatyczne, BTX, fenole, metale ciężkie, cyjanki, jony amonowe, chlorki i siarczany. W celu zminimalizowania tego zagrożenia w pracy rozważono zastosowanie w obszarze reaktora PZW technologii Przepuszczalnej Bariery Reaktywnej (PRB). W technologii tej zanieczyszczenia usuwane są in-situ poprzez przepływ wód przez odpowiednio dobrany materiał reaktywny. W tablicy 1 przedstawiono podstawowe parametry bariery, które należy określić, aby

  10. Simulating Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Sichuan Grassland Net Primary Productivity Using the CASA Model and In Situ Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Net primary productivity (NPP is an important indicator for grassland resource management and sustainable development. In this paper, the NPP of Sichuan grasslands was estimated by the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CASA model. The results were validated with in situ data. The overall precision reached 70%; alpine meadow had the highest precision at greater than 75%, among the three types of grasslands validated. The spatial and temporal variations of Sichuan grasslands were analyzed. The absorbed photosynthetic active radiation (APAR, light use efficiency (ε, and NPP of Sichuan grasslands peaked in August, which was a vigorous growth period during 2011. High values of APAR existed in the southwest regions in altitudes from 2000 m to 4000 m. Light use efficiency (ε varied in the different types of grasslands. The Sichuan grassland NPP was mainly distributed in the region of 3000–5000 m altitude. The NPP of alpine meadow accounted for 50% of the total NPP of Sichuan grasslands.

  11. Experimental forward and reverse in situ combustion gasification of lignite with production of hydrogen-rich syngas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Cui; Jie Liang; Zhangqing Wang; Xiaochun Zhang; Chenzi Fan; Xuan Wang

    2014-01-01

    This research focused on the feasibility of applying the forward and reverse combustion approach to the in situ gasification of lignite with the production of hydrogen-rich syngas (H2 and CO). The so-called forward combustion gasification (FCG) and reverse combustion gasification (RCG) approach in which oxygen and steam are simultaneously fed to the simulated system of underground coal gasification (UCG) was studied. A simulated system of UCG was designed and established. The underground conditions of the coal seam and strata were simulated in the system. The combustion gasification of lignite has been carried out experimentally for almost 6.5 days. The average effective content (H2 ? CO) of syngas during the FCG phase was 62.31%and the maximum content was 70.92%. For the RCG phase the corresponding figures are 61.33%and 67.91%. Thus, the feasibility of using RCG way for UCG has been demonstrated. The temperature profiles have been provided by using of 85 thermocouples during the model experiment, which portrayed the several nephograms of thermal data in the gasifier were of significance for the prospective gasification processes.

  12. Comparison of biodiesel production from sewage sludge obtained from the A²/O and MBR processes by in situ transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Juanjuan; Zhu, Fenfen; Wei, Xiang; Zhao, Luyao; Xiong, Yiqun; Wu, Xuemin; Yan, Fawei

    2016-03-01

    The potential of two types of sludge obtained from the anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A(2)/O) and membrane bioreactor (MBR) processes as lipid feedstock for biodiesel production via in situ transesterification was investigated. Experiments were conducted to determine the optimum conditions for biodiesel yield using three-factor and four-level orthogonal and single-factor tests. Several factors, namely, methanol-to-sludge mass ratio, acid concentration, and temperature, were examined. The optimum yield of biodiesel (16.6% with a fatty acid methyl ester purity of 96.7%) from A(2)/O sludge was obtained at a methanol-to-sludge mass ratio of 10:1, a temperature of 60°C, and a H2SO4 concentration of 5% (v/v). Meanwhile, the optimum yield of biodiesel (4.2% with a fatty acid methyl ester purity of 92.7%) from MBR sludge was obtained at a methanol-to-sludge mass ratio of 8:1, a temperature of 50°C, and a H2SO4 concentration of 5% (v/v). In this research, A(2)/O technology with a primary sedimentation tank is more favorable for obtaining energy from wastewater than MBR technology.

  13. Validation of MODIS aerosol product with in-situ AERONET data (a study case in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, M.; Leyva-Contreras, A.; Bonifaz, R.; Llamas, R.

    2009-12-01

    The aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is known as blocking particles which avoid the transmission of solar radiation coming from the Sun, and is defined as the integral of the coefficient of extinction over a vertical column of the Atmosphere. This coefficient of extinction is also defined as the limited fraction of the irradiance over the trajectory at a specific wavelength. The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensor provides aerosol data products all over the planet. However this data requires constant evaluation and validation using in-situ data such as the provided by the network of photometers managed by AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network). In this work, the procedure of validation of the MODIS AOT data using AERONET data in the wavelengths of 660 and 675 nm is presented. It is expected that using validate remote sensing data which provides spatial and temporal information about the AOT will help to a better understanding of the behavior of the complex atmospheric conditions which characterize the NW of Mexico and SW of the US such as the Mexican monsoon.

  14. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Lammert; Bergsma, Aldo; Chuma, Beatus; de Bruin, Sytze

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS). A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS) were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  15. Development of a Dynamic Web Mapping Service for Vegetation Productivity Using Earth Observation and in situ Sensors in a Sensor Web Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sytze de Bruin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a sensor web based approach which combines earth observation and in situ sensor data to derive typical information offered by a dynamic web mapping service (WMS. A prototype has been developed which provides daily maps of vegetation productivity for the Netherlands with a spatial resolution of 250 m. Daily available MODIS surface reflectance products and meteorological parameters obtained through a Sensor Observation Service (SOS were used as input for a vegetation productivity model. This paper presents the vegetation productivity model, the sensor data sources and the implementation of the automated processing facility. Finally, an evaluation is made of the opportunities and limitations of sensor web based approaches for the development of web services which combine both satellite and in situ sensor sources.

  16. Enhanced biomethane production rate and yield from lignocellulosic ensiled forage ley by in situ anaerobic digestion treatment with endogenous cellulolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speda, Jutta; Johansson, Mikaela A; Odnell, Anna; Karlsson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Enzymatic treatment of lignocellulosic material for increased biogas production has so far focused on pretreatment methods. However, often combinations of enzymes and different physicochemical treatments are necessary to achieve a desired effect. This need for additional energy and chemicals compromises the rationale of using enzymes for low energy treatment to promote biogas production. Therefore, simpler and less energy intensive in situ anaerobic digester treatment with enzymes is desirable. However, investigations in which exogenous enzymes are added to treat the material in situ have shown mixed success, possibly because the enzymes used originated from organisms not evolutionarily adapted to the environment of anaerobic digesters. In this study, to examine the effect of enzymes endogenous to methanogenic microbial communities, cellulolytic enzymes were instead overproduced and collected from a dedicated methanogenic microbial community. By this approach, a solution with very high endogenous microbial cellulolytic activity was produced and tested for the effect on biogas production from lignocellulose by in situ anaerobic digester treatment. Addition of enzymes, endogenous to the environment of a mixed methanogenic microbial community, to the anaerobic digestion of ensiled forage ley resulted in significantly increased rate and yield of biomethane production. The enzyme solution had an instant effect on more readily available cellulosic material. More importantly, the induced enzyme solution also affected the biogas production rate from less accessible cellulosic material in a second slower phase of lignocellulose digestion. Notably, this effect was maintained throughout the experiment to completely digested lignocellulosic substrate. The induced enzyme solution collected from a microbial methanogenic community contained enzymes that were apparently active and stable in the environment of anaerobic digestion. The enzymatic activity had a profound effect on the

  17. Technology of foamed propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnlein-Mauss, Jutta; Kroeber, Hartmut [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Chemische Technologie ICT, Pfinztal (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Foamed propellants are based on crystalline explosives bonded in energetic reaction polymers. Due to their porous structures they are distinguished by high burning rates. Energy content and material characteristics can be varied by using different energetic fillers, energetic polymers and porous structures. Foamed charges can be produced easily by the reaction injection moulding process. For the manufacturing of foamed propellants a semi-continuous remote controlled production plant in pilot scale was set up and a modified reaction injection moulding process was applied. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  18. Ensiling Characteristics and the In situ Nutrient Degradability of a By-product Feed-based Silage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. I.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, K. K.; Kwak, W. S.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the ensiling characteristics and the in situ degradability of a by-product feed (BF)-based silage. Before ensilation, the BF-based mixture was composed of 50% spent mushroom substrate, 21% recycled poultry bedding, 15% ryegrass straw, 10.8% rice bran, 2% molasses, 0.6% bentonite, and 0.6% microbial inoculant on a wet basis and ensiled for up to 4 weeks. The BF-based silage contained on average 39.3% moisture, 13.4% crude protein (CP), and 52.2% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), 49% total digestible nutrient, and 37.8% physically effective NDF1.18 on a dry matter (DM) basis. Ensiling the BF-based silage for up to 4 weeks affected (p<0.01) the chemical composition to a small extent, increased (p<0.05) the lactic acid and NH3-N content, and decreased (p<0.05) both the total bacterial and lactic acid bacterial counts from 109 to 108 cfu/g when compared to that before ensiling. These parameters indicated that the silage was fermented and stored well during the 4-week ensiling period. Compared with rice or ryegrass straws, the BF-based silage had a higher (p<0.05) water-soluble and filterable fraction, a lower insoluble degradable DM and CP fraction (p<0.05), a lower digestible NDF (p<0.05) fraction, a higher (p<0.05) DM and CP disappearance and degradability rate, and a lower (p<0.05) NDF disappearance and degradability rate. These results indicated that cheap, good-quality BF-based roughage could be produced by ensiling SMS, RPB, rice bran, and a minimal amount of straw. PMID:25049944

  19. In situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix by reactive milling and hot extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manotas-Albor, Milton, E-mail: manotasm@uninorte.edu.co [Grupo de Investigación en Física Aplicada, Departamento de Física, Universidad del Norte, Km. 5 vía a Puerto Colombia, Barranquilla (Colombia); Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Vargas-Uscategui, Alejandro [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile); Palma, Rodrigo [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile); Mosquera, Edgar [Laboratorio de Materiales a Nanoescala, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Tupper Av. 2069, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-06-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum carbide nanodispersoids were obtained in a copper matrix. • Nanodispersoids were obtained by means of reactive milling followed by hot extrusion. • Hexane was used as the liquid medium for the reactive mechanical alloying process. • Hexane provides the carbon (C) needed for the process. • The reaction of tantalum carbide formation takes place in the hot extrusion. - Abstract: This paper presents a study of the in situ production of tantalum carbide nanodispersoids in a copper matrix. The copper matrix composites were produced by means of reactive milling in hexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) followed by hot extrusion. The composite materials were characterized by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Vickers micro-hardness. The effect of milling time was analyzed in 10, 20 and 30 h in a composite with a nominal composition Cu–5 vol.% TaC. A systematic increase of the dislocations density and the carbon concentration were observed when the milling time was increased, whereas the crystallite size of the composite matrix decreased. The material milled for 30 h and hot-extruded showed a density of 9037 kg m{sup −3} (98.2% densification) and a softening resistance of 204 HV; however the latter value showed an abrupt drop after an annealing treatment at 923 K for 1 h. Finally, the TEM analysis showed the presence of tantalum carbide (Ta{sub 4}C{sub 3}) nanodispersoids.

  20. In situ NMR spectroscopy: inulin biomass conversion in ZnCl₂ molten salt hydrate medium-SnCl₄ addition controls product distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingxiong; Pedersen, Christian Marcus; Qiao, Yan; Deng, Tiansheng; Shi, Jing; Hou, Xianglin

    2015-01-22

    The dehydration of inulin biomass to the platform chemicals, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium was investigated. The influence of the Lewis acid catalyst, SnCl4, on the product distribution was examined. An in situ(1)H NMR technique was employed to follow the reaction at the molecular level. The experimental results revealed that only 5-HMF was obtained from degradation of inulin biomass in ZnCl2 molten salt hydrate medium, while the LA was gradually becoming the main product when the reaction temperature was increased in the presence of the Lewis acid catalyst SnCl4. In situ NMR spectroscopy could monitor the reaction and give valuable insight.

  1. Low acid producing solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    The potential environmental effects of the exhaust products of conventional rocket propellants have been assessed by various groups. Areas of concern have included stratospheric ozone, acid rain, toxicity, air quality and global warming. Some of the studies which have been performed on this subject have concluded that while the impacts of rocket use are extremely small, there are propellant development options which have the potential to reduce those impacts even further. This paper discusses the various solid propellant options which have been proposed as being more environmentally benign than current systems by reducing HCI emissions. These options include acid neutralized, acid scavenged, and nonchlorine propellants. An assessment of the acid reducing potential and the viability of each of these options is made, based on current information. Such an assessment is needed in order to judge whether the potential improvements justify the expenditures of developing the new propellant systems.

  2. Testosterone production is better preserved after 16 than 20 Gray irradiation treatment against testicular carcinoma in situ cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne K; Petersen, Jørgen H; Petersen, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the effect of 16 Gy radiotherapy (RT) vs. 20 Gy RT on Leydig cell function in men treated with radiotherapy against carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the testis. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifty-one men who were treated between 1985 and 2005 were included. Fourteen men had been treated wit...

  3. Les méthodes thermiques de production des hydrocarbures. Chapitre 5 : Combustion "in situ". Pricipes et études de laboratoire Thermal Methods of Hydrocarbon Production. Chapter 5 : "In Situ" Combustion. Principles and Laboratory Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burger J.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available II existe plusieurs variantes de la combustion in situ, suivant le sens de déplacement du front de combustion, à co-courant ou à contre-courant, et suivant la nature des fluides injectés, air seul ou injection combinée d'air et d'eau. Les réactions de pyrolyse, d'oxydation et de combustion mises en jeu par ces techniques sont discutées, en particulier la cinétique des principaux mécanismes réactionnels, l'importance du dépôt de coke et l'exothermicité des réactions d'oxydation et de combustion. Les résultats d'essais de déplacement unidirectionnel du front de combustion dans des cellules de laboratoire sont présentés et discutés. Enfin on indique les conditions pratiques d'application des méthodes de combustion in situ sur champ. Possible variations of in situ combustion technique ore as follows : forward or reverse combustion depending on the relative directions of the air flow and the combustion front, dry combustion if air is the only fluid injected into the oil-bearing formation, or fixe/woter flooding if water is injected along with air. The chemical reactions of pyrolysis, oxidation and combustion involved in these processes are described. The kinetics of these reactions is discussed as well as fuel availability in forward combustion and the exothermicity of the oxidation and combustion reactions. The results obtained in the laboratory when a combustion front propagates in unidirectional adiabatic tells are described and discussed. This type of experimentation provides extensive information on the characteristics of the processes. Screening criteria for the practical application of in situ combustion techniques are presented.

  4. Effect of in situ exopolysaccharide production on physicochemical, rheological, sensory, and microstructural properties of the yogurt drink ayran: an optimization study based on fermentation kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, M T; Dertli, E; Toker, O S; Tatlisu, N B; Sagdic, O; Arici, M

    2015-03-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing starter cultures are preferred for the manufacture of fermented milk products to improve rheological and technological properties. However, no clear correlation exists between EPS production and the rheological and technological properties of fermented milk products such as the yogurt drink ayran. In this study, 4 different strain conditions (EPS- and EPS+ Streptococcus thermophilus strains) were tested as a function of incubation temperature (32, 37, or 42°C) and time (2, 3, or 4 h) to determine the effect of culture type and in situ EPS production on physicochemical, rheological, sensory, and microstructural properties of ayran. Furthermore, we assessed the effect of fermentation conditions on amounts of EPS production by different EPS-producing strains during ayran production. A multifactorial design of response surface methodology was used to model linear, interaction, and quadratic effects of these variables on steady shear rheological properties of ayran samples and in situ EPS production levels. The physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of ayran samples altered depending on incubation conditions and strain selection. Steady shear tests showed that ayran samples inoculated with EPS+ strains exhibited pseudoplastic flow behavior. Production of ayran with EPS- strain (control sample) resulted in the lowest apparent viscosity values (η50), whereas those produced with the combination of 2 EPS+ strains yielded ayran with notably increased η50 values. We concluded that incubation time was the variable with the greatest effect on η50, consistency coefficient (K), and flow behavior index (n) values. In situ EPS production was also affected by these conditions during ayran fermentation in which strain-specific metabolism conditions were found to be the most important factor for EPS production. In addition, these findings correlated the amount of in situ EPS produced with the rheological properties of ayran. Scanning

  5. A fast H2O total column density product from GOME – Validation with in-situ aircraft measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2003-01-01

    high accuracy of our GOME H2O data is also confirmed by the excellent agreement with in-situ aircraft measurements during the MINOS campaign in Greece in summer 2001 (slope of 0.97 (r2 = 0.86, and an average bias of only 0.2%. Our H2O algorithm can be directly adapted to the nadir observations of SCIAMACHY (SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY which was launched on ENVISAT in March 2002. Near real time H2O column data from GOME and SCIAMACHY might be of great value for meteorological weather forecast.

  6. Effects of in-situ and reanalysis climate data on estimation of cropland gross primary production using the Vegetation Photosynthesis Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Cui; Xiao, Xiangming; Wagle, Pradeep; Griffis, Timothy; Dong, Jinwei; Wu, Chaoyang; Qin, Yuanwei; Cook, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Satellite-based Production Efficiency Models (PEMs) often require meteorological reanalysis data such as the North America Regional Reanalysis (NARR) by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) as model inputs to simulate Gross Primary Production (GPP) at regional and global scales. This study first evaluated the accuracies of air temperature (TNARR) and downward shortwave radiation (RNARR) of the NARR by comparing with in-situ meteorological measurements at 37 AmeriFlux non-crop eddy flux sites, then used one PEM – the Vegetation Photosynthesis Model (VPM) to simulate 8-day mean GPP (GPPVPM) at seven AmeriFlux crop sites, and investigated the uncertainties in GPPVPM from climate inputs as compared with eddy covariance-based GPP (GPPEC). Results showed that TNARR agreed well with in-situ measurements; RNARR, however, was positively biased. An empirical linear correction was applied to RNARR, and significantly reduced the relative error of RNARR by ~25% for crop site-years. Overall, GPPVPM calculated from the in-situ (GPPVPM(EC)), original (GPPVPM(NARR)) and adjusted NARR (GPPVPM(adjNARR)) climate data tracked the seasonality of GPPEC well, albeit with different degrees of biases. GPPVPM(EC) showed a good match with GPPEC for maize (Zea mays L.), but was slightly underestimated for soybean (Glycine max L.). Replacing the in-situ climate data with the NARR resulted in a significant overestimation of GPPVPM(NARR) (18.4/29.6% for irrigated/rainfed maize and 12.7/12.5% for irrigated/rainfed soybean). GPPVPM(adjNARR) showed a good agreement with GPPVPM(EC) for both crops due to the reduction in the bias of RNARR. The results imply that the bias of RNARR introduced significant uncertainties into the PEM-based GPP estimates, suggesting that more accurate surface radiation datasets are needed to estimate primary production of terrestrial ecosystems at regional and global scales.

  7. In situ measurements of benthic primary production, respiration and nutrient fluxes in a hypersaline coastal lagoon of SE Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan Knoppers

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentbic oxygen and nutrient ftuxes were measured in a section of the hypersaline carbonate-rich coastal lagoon of Araruama, SE-Brazil. In situ incubations of the sediment surface (Zm - 1.5 were performed at one station with light/dark chambers during september 1993 (early spring period and april 1995 (earlyautumn period. The carbonate..rich aediments were covered by 1-3 mm thick microalgal mats, dominated by the cyanobaeteria Phormidium sp, Oscillatoria sp, and Lyngbya sp. Benthic net primary production rates were 15.4 ± 0.7 mmolC/m²/d in early spring and 33.8 ± 8.8 mmolC/m²/d in early autumn, total community respiration rates attained 35.3 ± 7.2 and 65.7 ± 16.9 mmolC/m²/d, and pelagic primary production rates 1.7 ± 0.7 and 4.0 ± 1.4 mmolC/m²/d, respectively. Total community metabolism was thus heterauophic and mainly driven by benthic metabolism. The benthic release rates af ammonia were 0.65 ± 0.32 mmolC/m²/day in early spring and 0.58± 0.42mmoVm ldaym early autumn, butwere near to negligible for orthophosphate. Pelagic primaryproduction was limited byphosphorous, in part, by the preferential release of étmmonia over orthophosphate from the sediment-water interface. The benthic primary production and nutrient release rates were within the range of other eury-to hypersaline carbonate-rich environments characterized by non- consolidated algat rats.Fluxos bênticos de oxigênio e nutrientes foram medidos numa seção da lagoa hipersalina e carbonática de Araruama, SE-Brasil Incubações in situ da superfície do sedimento (Zm = 1,5 foram realizadas em uma estação com câmaras claras/escuras nos meses de setembro de 1993 (início da primavera e abril de 1995 (início do outono. Os sedimentos ricos em carbonatos eram recobertos por um tapete microalgal de 1-3 mm, dominados pelas cianobactérias Phormidium sp,Oscillatoria spLyngbya sp. As taxas de produção primária yquida foram 15,4 ± 0,7 mmolC/m²/d Id no iníCIO da primavera e

  8. Thermostable DNA ligase-mediated PCR production of circular plasmid (PPCP) and its application in directed evolution via in situ error-prone PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Yilin; Chen, Huayou; Zagursky, Robert; Wu, J H David; Shao, Weilan

    2013-08-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a powerful method to produce linear DNA fragments. Here we describe the Tma thermostable DNA ligase-mediated PCR production of circular plasmid (PPCP) and its application in directed evolution via in situ error-prone PCR. In this thermostable DNA ligase-mediated whole-plasmid amplification method, the resultant DNA nick between the 5' end of the PCR primer and the extended newly synthesized DNA 3' end of each PCR cycle is ligated by Tma DNA ligase, resulting in circular plasmid DNA product that can be directly transformed. The template plasmid DNA is eliminated by 'selection marker swapping' upon transformation. When performed under an error-prone condition with Taq DNA polymerase, PPCP allows one-step construction of mutagenesis libraries based on in situ error-prone PCR so that random mutations are introduced into the target gene without altering the expression vector plasmid. A significant difference between PPCP and previously published methods is that PPCP allows exponential amplification of circular DNA. We used this method to create random mutagenesis libraries of a xylanase gene and two cellulase genes. Screening of these libraries resulted in mutant proteins with desired properties, demonstrating the usefulness of in situ error-prone PPCP for creating random mutagenesis libraries for directed evolution.

  9. FORMULATION AND EVALUATION OF LIQUID PROPELLANT DISPERSIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STRESSES, DECOMPOSITION, PRODUCTION , GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY (U) ALUMINUM, THIXOTROPIC ROCKET PROPELLANTS, HYDRAZINE, BENZENE, AMINES, CARBOXYMETHYLCELLULOSE , ALUMINUM ALLOYS, STAINLESS STEEL, AMMONIA, HYDROGEN, NITROGEN

  10. An assessment of phytoplankton primary productivity in the Arctic Ocean from satellite ocean color/in situ chlorophyll‐a based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, Patricia A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Saba, Vincent S.; Antoine, David; Ardyna, Mathieu; Asanuma, Ichio; Babin, Marcel; Bélanger, Simon; Benoît‐Gagné, Maxime; Devred, Emmanuel; Fernández‐Méndez, Mar; Gentili, Bernard; Hirawake, Toru; Kang, Sung‐Ho; Kameda, Takahiko; Katlein, Christian; Lee, Sang H.; Lee, Zhongping; Mélin, Frédéric; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim J.; Tang, Shilin; Turpie, Kevin R.; Waters, Kirk J.; Westberry, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated 32 net primary productivity (NPP) models by assessing skills to reproduce integrated NPP in the Arctic Ocean. The models were provided with two sources each of surface chlorophyll‐a concentration (chlorophyll), photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), sea surface temperature (SST), and mixed‐layer depth (MLD). The models were most sensitive to uncertainties in surface chlorophyll, generally performing better with in situ chlorophyll than with satellite‐derived values. They were much less sensitive to uncertainties in PAR, SST, and MLD, possibly due to relatively narrow ranges of input data and/or relatively little difference between input data sources. Regardless of type or complexity, most of the models were not able to fully reproduce the variability of in situ NPP, whereas some of them exhibited almost no bias (i.e., reproduced the mean of in situ NPP). The models performed relatively well in low‐productivity seasons as well as in sea ice‐covered/deep‐water regions. Depth‐resolved models correlated more with in situ NPP than other model types, but had a greater tendency to overestimate mean NPP whereas absorption‐based models exhibited the lowest bias associated with weaker correlation. The models performed better when a subsurface chlorophyll‐a maximum (SCM) was absent. As a group, the models overestimated mean NPP, however this was partly offset by some models underestimating NPP when a SCM was present. Our study suggests that NPP models need to be carefully tuned for the Arctic Ocean because most of the models performing relatively well were those that used Arctic‐relevant parameters. PMID:27668139

  11. An assessment of phytoplankton primary productivity in the Arctic Ocean from satellite ocean color/in situ chlorophyll-a based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younjoo J; Matrai, Patricia A; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Saba, Vincent S; Antoine, David; Ardyna, Mathieu; Asanuma, Ichio; Babin, Marcel; Bélanger, Simon; Benoît-Gagné, Maxime; Devred, Emmanuel; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Gentili, Bernard; Hirawake, Toru; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kameda, Takahiko; Katlein, Christian; Lee, Sang H; Lee, Zhongping; Mélin, Frédéric; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim J; Tang, Shilin; Turpie, Kevin R; Waters, Kirk J; Westberry, Toby K

    2015-09-01

    We investigated 32 net primary productivity (NPP) models by assessing skills to reproduce integrated NPP in the Arctic Ocean. The models were provided with two sources each of surface chlorophyll-a concentration (chlorophyll), photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), sea surface temperature (SST), and mixed-layer depth (MLD). The models were most sensitive to uncertainties in surface chlorophyll, generally performing better with in situ chlorophyll than with satellite-derived values. They were much less sensitive to uncertainties in PAR, SST, and MLD, possibly due to relatively narrow ranges of input data and/or relatively little difference between input data sources. Regardless of type or complexity, most of the models were not able to fully reproduce the variability of in situ NPP, whereas some of them exhibited almost no bias (i.e., reproduced the mean of in situ NPP). The models performed relatively well in low-productivity seasons as well as in sea ice-covered/deep-water regions. Depth-resolved models correlated more with in situ NPP than other model types, but had a greater tendency to overestimate mean NPP whereas absorption-based models exhibited the lowest bias associated with weaker correlation. The models performed better when a subsurface chlorophyll-a maximum (SCM) was absent. As a group, the models overestimated mean NPP, however this was partly offset by some models underestimating NPP when a SCM was present. Our study suggests that NPP models need to be carefully tuned for the Arctic Ocean because most of the models performing relatively well were those that used Arctic-relevant parameters.

  12. Medium factors on anaerobic production of rhamnolipids by Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG and a simplifying medium for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Jidong; Han, Siqin; Ma, Fang; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Aerobic production of rhamnolipid by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was extensively studied. But effect of medium composition on anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa was unknown. A simplifying medium facilitating anaerobic production of rhamnolipid is urgently needed for in situ microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). Medium factors affecting anaerobic production of rhamnolipid were investigated using P. aeruginosa SG (Genbank accession number KJ995745). Medium composition for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid by P. aeruginosa is different from that for aerobic production of rhamnolipid. Both hydrophobic substrate and organic nitrogen inhibited rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions. Glycerol and nitrate were the best carbon and nitrogen source. The commonly used N limitation under aerobic conditions was not conducive to rhamnolipid production under anaerobic conditions because the initial cell growth demanded enough nitrate for anaerobic respiration. But rhamnolipid was also fast accumulated under nitrogen starvation conditions. Sufficient phosphate was needed for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. SO4(2-) and Mg(2+) are required for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Results will contribute to isolation bacteria strains which can anaerobically produce rhamnolipid and medium optimization for anaerobic production of rhamnolipid. Based on medium optimization by response surface methodology and ions composition of reservoir formation water, a simplifying medium containing 70.3 g/l glycerol, 5.25 g/l NaNO3, 5.49 g/l KH2PO4, 6.9 g/l K2HPO4·3H2O and 0.40 g/l MgSO4 was designed. Using the simplifying medium, 630 mg/l of rhamnolipid was produced by SG, and the anaerobic culture emulsified crude oil to EI24 = 82.5 %. The simplifying medium was promising for in situ MEOR applications.

  13. Design of a chamber for production and in-situ characterization of small-molecule photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligorio, Giovanni; Lange, Simeon; Lorch, Christopher; Reinhardt, Jens; Hinderhofer, Alexander; Gerlach, Alexander; Schreiber, Frank [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The design and construction of an integrated ultra-high vacuum system to produce and characterize organic small-molecule solar cells is presented. Through the new system, it is possible to produce several solar cells simultaneously on the same ITO substrate via organic molecular beam deposition under vacuum conditions. In-situ electric contact is achieved through aluminum deposition. With the sample holder the temperature can be systematically modified between 200 K and 700 K while liquid nitrogen cooling or resistive heating to control the deposition process and to permit temperature dependent measurements. We present first results for OPV cells of diindenoperylene (DIP)/C{sub 60} and DIP/perfluoropentacene (PFP).

  14. In situ measurements of benthic primary production, respiration and nutrient fluxes in a hypersaline coastal lagoon of SE Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Bastiaan Knoppers; Weber Friederichs Landim de Souza; Marcelo Friederichs Landim de Souza; Eliane Gonzalez Rodriguez; Elisa de Fátima da Cunha Vianna Landim; Antonio Romanazzi Vieira

    1996-01-01

    Bentbic oxygen and nutrient ftuxes were measured in a section of the hypersaline carbonate-rich coastal lagoon of Araruama, SE-Brazil. In situ incubations of the sediment surface (Zm - 1.5) were performed at one station with light/dark chambers during september 1993 (early spring period) and april 1995 (earlyautumn period). The carbonate..rich aediments were covered by 1-3 mm thick microalgal mats, dominated by the cyanobaeteria Phormidium sp, Oscillatoria sp, and Lyngbya sp. Benthic net prim...

  15. The enhancement of butanol production by in situ butanol removal using biodiesel extraction in the fermentation of ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yi-Cheng

    2013-10-01

    High butanol accumulation is due to feedback inhibition which leads to the low butanol productivity observed in acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. The aim of this study is to use biodiesel as an extractant for the in situ removal of butanol from the broth. The results indicate that adding biodiesel as an extractant at the beginning of fermentation significantly enhances butanol production. No significant toxicity of biodiesel on the growth of Clostridium acetobutylicum is observed. In the fed-batch operation with glucose feeding, the maximum total butanol obtained is 31.44 g/L, as compared to the control batch (without the addition of biodiesel) at 9.85 g/L. Moreover, the productivity obtained is 0.295 g/L h in the fed-batch, which is higher than that of 0.185 g/L h for the control batch. The in situ butanol removal by the addition of biodiesel has great potential for commercial ABE production. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Processive pulses of retinoic acid propel asynchronous and continuous murine sperm production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Cathryn A; Arnold, Samuel; Kent, Travis; Mitchell, Debra; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    The asynchronous cyclic nature of spermatogenesis is essential for continual sperm production and is one of the hallmarks of mammalian male fertility. While various mRNA and protein localization studies have indirectly implicated changing retinoid levels along testis tubules, no quantitative evidence for these changes across the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium currently exists. This study utilized a unique mouse model of induced synchronous spermatogenesis, localization of the retinoid-signaling marker STRA8, and sensitive quantification of retinoic acid concentrations to determine whether there are fluctuations in retinoid levels at each of the individual stages of germ cell differentiation and maturation to sperm. These data show that processive pulses of retinoic acid are generated during spermatogonial differentiation and are the likely trigger for cyclic spermatogenesis and allow us, for the first time, to understand how the cycle of the seminiferous epithelium is generated and maintained. In addition, this study represents the first direct quantification of a retinoid gradient controlling cellular differentiation in a postnatal tissue.

  17. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with tip-modified propellers and the methods which, over a period of two decades, have been applied to develop such propellers. The development is driven by the urge to increase the efficiency of propellers and can be seen as analogous to fitting end plates and winglets to aircraft...... wings. The literature on four different designs is reviewed: the end-plate propeller; the two-sided, shifted end-plate propeller; the tip-fin propeller; and the bladelet propeller. The conclusion is that it is indeed possible to design tip-modified propellers that, relative to an optimum conventional...

  18. In situ ESEM study of the thermal decomposition of chrysotile asbestos in view of safe recycling of the transformation product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti; Tonelli, Massimo

    2008-08-15

    The thermal transformation of asbestos into non-hazardous crystalline phases and their recycling is a promising solution for the "asbestos problem". The most common asbestos-containing industrial material produced worldwide is cement-asbestos. Knowledge of the kinetics of thermal transformation of asbestos fibers in cement-asbestos is of paramount importance for the optimization of the firing process at industrial scale. Here, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used for the first time to follow in situ the thermal transformation of chrysotile fibers present in cement-asbestos. It was found that the reaction kinetics of thermal transformation of chrysotile was highly slowed down in the presence of water vapor in the experimental chamber with respect to He. This was explained by chemisorbed water on the surface of the fibers which affected the dehydroxylation reaction and consequently the recrystallization into Mg-silicates. In the attempt to investigate alternative and faster firing routes for the decomposition of asbestos, a low melting glass was mixed with cement-asbestos and studied in situ to assess to which extent the decomposition of asbestos is favored. It was found that the addition of a low melting glass to cement-asbestos greatly improved the decomposition reaction and decreased the transformation temperatures.

  19. In situ ESEM study of the thermal decomposition of chrysotile asbestos in view of safe recycling of the transformation product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it; Gualtieri, Magdalena Lassinantti [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/1, I-41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: magdalena.gualtieri@unimore.it; Tonelli, Massimo [Centro Interdipartimentale Grandi Strumenti, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 213/1, I-41100 Modena (Italy)], E-mail: tonelli@mail.cigs.unimo.it

    2008-08-15

    The thermal transformation of asbestos into non-hazardous crystalline phases and their recycling is a promising solution for the 'asbestos problem'. The most common asbestos-containing industrial material produced worldwide is cement-asbestos. Knowledge of the kinetics of thermal transformation of asbestos fibers in cement-asbestos is of paramount importance for the optimization of the firing process at industrial scale. Here, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used for the first time to follow in situ the thermal transformation of chrysotile fibers present in cement-asbestos. It was found that the reaction kinetics of thermal transformation of chrysotile was highly slowed down in the presence of water vapor in the experimental chamber with respect to He. This was explained by chemisorbed water on the surface of the fibers which affected the dehydroxylation reaction and consequently the recrystallization into Mg-silicates. In the attempt to investigate alternative and faster firing routes for the decomposition of asbestos, a low melting glass was mixed with cement-asbestos and studied in situ to assess to which extent the decomposition of asbestos is favored. It was found that the addition of a low melting glass to cement-asbestos greatly improved the decomposition reaction and decreased the transformation temperatures.

  20. Performance of Regolith Feed Systems for Analog Field Tests of In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen Production Plants in Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Mantovani, James G.; Zacny, Kris A.; Craft, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on practical aspects of mechanical auger and pneumatic regolith conveying system feeding In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen production plants. The subsystems of these feedstock delivery systems include an enclosed auger device, pneumatic venturi educator, jet-lift regolith transfer, innovative electro-cyclone gas-particle separation/filtration systems, and compressors capable of dealing with hot hydrogen and/or methane gas re-circulating in the system. Lessons learned from terrestrial laboratory, reduced gravity and field testing on Mauna Kea Volcano in Hawaii during NASA lunar analog field tests will be discussed and practical design tips will be presented.

  1. 14 CFR 21.129 - Tests: propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tests: propellers. 21.129 Section 21.129 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Production Under Type Certificate Only § 21.129 Tests: propellers....

  2. Upscaling sparse, irregularly spaced in situ soil moisture measurements for calibration and validation of SMAP soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; Silva, A. R. D.

    2015-12-01

    There is a large difference in the footprints over which remote sensing instruments, such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, retrieve soil moisture and that of in situ networks. Therefore a method for upscaling in situ measurements is required before they can be used to validate remote sensing instruments. The upscaling problem is made more difficult when measurements are sparse and irregularly spaced within the footprint. To address these needs, we have developed a method for producing upscaled estimates of soil moisture based on a network of in situ soil moisture measurements and airborne P-band SAR data, and utilizing a Random Forests-based regression algorithm. Sites within the SoilSCAPE network, for which the technique was developed, typically contains sensors at ~30 locations, with each location sampled at multiple depths. Measurements are taken at 20 minute intervals and averaged over a selectable time interval, thereby supporting near-real time generation of soil moisture maps. The collected measurements are automatically uploaded to a central database from which they can be accessed for use in the regression algorithm. Our regression-based approach works well with irregularly-spaced sensors by incorporating a set of data layers that correlate well with soil moisture. The layers include thematic land cover, elevation, slope, aspect, flow accumulation, clay fraction, air temperature, precipitation, and P-Band HH, VV, and HV backscatter. Values from these data layers are extracted for each sensor location and applied to train the Random Forests algorithm. The decision trees generated are then applied to estimate soil moisture at a 100 m spacing throughout the network region, after which the evenly-spaced values are averaged to accord with the 3-, 9-, and 36-km SMAP measurement grids. The resulting set of near-real time soil moisture estimates suitable for SMAP calibration and validation is placed online for use by the SMAP Cal/Val team

  3. Net community production of oxygen derived from in vitro and in situ 1-D modeling techniques in a cyclonic mesoscale eddy in the Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mouriño-Carballido

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the disagreement traditionally reported between in vitro incubation and in situ estimates of oxygen net community production (NCP could be explained, at least partially, by undersampling episodic pulses of net autotrophy associated with mesoscale dynamics. In this study we compare in vitro incubation estimates of net community production with in situ estimates, derived from oxygen profiles and a 1-D model, within a cyclonic eddy investigated in the Sargasso Sea in summer 2004. The in vitro NCP rates measured at the center of the eddy showed a shift from net autotrophy (7±3 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 to net heterotrophy (−25±5 mmol O2 m−2 d−1 from late June to early August. The model-derived NCP rates also showed a temporal decline (19±6 to −3±7 and 11±8 mmol O2 m−2 d−1, but they were systematically higher than the in vitro estimates and reported net autotrophy or balance for the sampling period. In this comparison episodic pulses in photosynthesis or respiration driven by mesoscale eddies can not explain the discrepancy between the in vitro and in situ estimates of NCP. This points to methodological artefacts or temporal or submesoscale variability as the mechanisms responsible for the disagreement between the techniques, at least in this dataset.

  4. Organoclay-assisted interfacial polymerization for microfluidic production of monodisperse PEG-microdroplets and in situ encapsulation of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kye Won; Lee, Kyoung G; Park, Tae Jung; Lee, Young-Chul; Yang, Ji-Won; Kim, Do Hyun; Lee, Seok Jae; Park, Jung Youn

    2012-01-01

    We developed a novel one-pot synthetic strategy for preparing monodisperse polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) microdroplets via organoclay-assisted interfacial polymerization approach for Escherichia coli encapsulation. Based on the mechanism of spontaneous and rapid polymerization of PEGDA precursor solution with Mg-organoclay, the prepared PEGDA microdroplets have uniform size and fine round shape, with size range of 74-118 µm. The size of microdroplets can be controlled through the changing continuous phase flow rate. Organoclay-assisted polymerization method provides a unique environment to produce non-toxic ways of fabricating microorganism encapsulated microdroplets and to prohibit microdroplets merge during the processes. Furthermore, we successfully carried out to entrap E. coli inside of the PEGDA microdroplets. E. coli expressing a green fluorescent protein shows a good viability inside the PEGDA microdroplets. The in situ microfluidic synthetic method provides a novel approach for the preparation of monodisperse PEGDA microdroplets via a one-pot route.

  5. In situ trace gas and particle measurements in the summer lower stratosphere during STREAM II. Implications for O{sub 3} production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bregman, A.; Lelieveld, J.; Scheeren, H.A. [Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Utrecht (Netherlands); Arnold, F.; Buerger, V.; Schneider, J. [Max-Planck-Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg (Germany); Fischer, H.; Waibel, A. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Siegmund, P.C.; Wauben, W.M.F. [Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Inst., De Bilt (Netherlands); Stroem, J. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1997-12-31

    In situ aircraft measurements of O{sub 3}, CO, HNO{sub 3}, and aerosol particles are presented, performed over the North Sea region in the summer lower stratosphere during the STREAM-II campaign (Stratosphere Troposphere Experiments by Aircraft Measurements). Elevated CO mixing ratios are attributed to mixing of polluted tropospheric air into the lowermost extra-tropical stratosphere. Model calculations illustrate that the O{sub 3} production efficiency of NO{sub x} is smaller than previously assumed, under conditions with relatively high HNO{sub 3} mixing ratios, as observed during STREAM-II. The model simulations further suggest a relatively high O{sub 3} production efficiency from CO oxidation, as a result of the relatively high ambient HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations, implying that upward transport of CO rich air enhances O{sub 3} production in the lowermost stratosphere. (author) 13 refs.

  6. Microwave-antenna induced in situ synthesis of Cu nanowire threaded ZIF-8 with enhanced catalytic activity in H2 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dieqing; Liu, Peijue; Xiao, Shuning; Qian, Xufang; Zhang, Hui; Wen, Meicheng; Kuwahara, Yasutaka; Mori, Kohsuke; Li, Hexing; Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-03-01

    A microwave-antenna strategy was developed for the in situ synthesis of Cu nanowire (CuNW) threaded ZIF-8. The CuNWs acted as microwave-antennas to generate surface ``super hot'' dots. The high temperature of ``super hot'' dots induced adsorption and coordination of metal ions and organic ligands, followed by in situ assembly and crystal-growth along the CuNWs. This catalyst exhibited high activity and stability in H2 production via NH3BH3 hydrolysis owing to the synergetic effect. The CuNWs supplied a rapid electron transfer channel while ZIF-8 assembled on the CuNWs offered a large capacity for adsorbing reactants and channels for rapidly transferring H-/H+ ions toward Cu active sites. Other one-dimensional threaded MOFs, including CuNW threaded MOF-5 and UIO-66, or carbon nanotube threaded ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 could also be prepared using the microwave-antenna strategy.A microwave-antenna strategy was developed for the in situ synthesis of Cu nanowire (CuNW) threaded ZIF-8. The CuNWs acted as microwave-antennas to generate surface ``super hot'' dots. The high temperature of ``super hot'' dots induced adsorption and coordination of metal ions and organic ligands, followed by in situ assembly and crystal-growth along the CuNWs. This catalyst exhibited high activity and stability in H2 production via NH3BH3 hydrolysis owing to the synergetic effect. The CuNWs supplied a rapid electron transfer channel while ZIF-8 assembled on the CuNWs offered a large capacity for adsorbing reactants and channels for rapidly transferring H-/H+ ions toward Cu active sites. Other one-dimensional threaded MOFs, including CuNW threaded MOF-5 and UIO-66, or carbon nanotube threaded ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 could also be prepared using the microwave-antenna strategy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07505j

  7. Optimization of five environmental factors to increase beta-propeller phytase production in Pichia pastoris and impact on the physiological response of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viader-Salvadó, José M; Castillo-Galván, Miguel; Fuentes-Garibay, José A; Iracheta-Cárdenas, María M; Guerrero-Olazarán, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we engineered Pichia pastoris Mut(s) strains to produce several beta-propeller phytases, one from Bacillus subtilis and the others designed by a structure-guided consensus approach. Furthermore, we demonstrated the ability of P. pastoris to produce and secrete these phytases in an active form in shake-flask cultures. In the present work, we used a design of experiments strategy (Simplex optimization method) to optimize five environmental factors that define the culture conditions in the induction step to increase beta-propeller phytase production in P. pastoris bioreactor cultures. With the optimization process, up to 347,682 U (82,814 U/L or 6.4 g/L culture medium) of phytase at 68 h of induction was achieved. In addition, the impact of the optimization process on the physiological response of the host was evaluated. The results indicate that the increase in extracellular phytase production through the optimization process was correlated with an increase in metabolic activity of P. pastoris, shown by an increase in oxygen demand and methanol consumption, that increase the specific growth rate. The increase in extracellular phytase production also occurred with a decrease in extracellular protease activity. Moreover, the optimized culture conditions increased the recombinant protein secretion by up to 88%, along with the extracellular phytase production efficiency per cell.

  8. Solid propellant rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowler, W. L.; Shafer, J. I.; Behm, J. W.; Strand, L. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of a solid propellant rocket engine with a controlled rate of thrust buildup to a desired thrust level are discussed. The engine uses a regressive burning controlled flow solid propellant igniter and a progressive burning main solid propellant charge. The igniter is capable of operating in a vacuum and sustains the burning of the propellant below its normal combustion limit until the burning propellant surface and combustion chamber pressure have increased sufficiently to provide a stable chamber pressure.

  9. 16S rRNA in situ Hybridization Followed by Flow Cytometry for Rapid Identification of Acetic Acid Bacteria Involved in Submerged Industrial Vinegar Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Lipoglavšek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid bacteria are involved in many biotechnological processes such as vitamin C, gluconic acid, miglitol or acetic acid production, and others. For a technologist trying to control the industrial process, the ability to follow the microbiological development of the process is thus of importance. During the past few years hybridization in a combination with flow cytometry has often been used for this purpose. Since vinegar is a liquid, it is an ideal matrix for flow cytometry analysis. In this work we have constructed a specific probe for highly acetic acid-resistant species of the acetic acid bacteria and a protocol for in situ hybridization, which in combination with flow cytometry enables direct monitoring of bacteria producing vinegar with >10 % of acetic acid. The approach was successfully applied for monitoring microbiota during industrial vinegar production.

  10. The mixing of solid propellant by an artificial muscle actuator

    OpenAIRE

    岩崎, 祥大; 伴, 遼介; 吉浜, 舜; 中村, 太郎; 羽生, 宏人; Iwasaki, Akihiro; Ban, Ryosuke; Yoshihama, Shun; Nakamura, Taro; Habu, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to reduce the cost of the solid rocket motor production, mainly solid propellant. The production process of the solid rocket propellant are usually employed the multi-batch mixing. However, this study using a peristaltic pump as a mixer will lead to the continuous process. The pump system can mix the powder materials for propellant and we consider that it will make the slurry of the solid propellant efficiently by the mechanism of the fluid dynamics in the pump.

  11. Enhanced Production of Botrallin and TMC-264 with in Situ Macroporous Resin Adsorption in Mycelial Liquid Culture of the Endophytic Fungus Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyu Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12, an endophytic fungus from the hybrid “Neva” of Populus deltoides × P. nigra, is a high producer of the bioactive dibenzo-α-pyrones botrallin and TMC-264. However, both the botrallin and TMC-264 produced by Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12 were retained as both intracellular and extracellular products. The aim of this study was to evaluate an in situ macroporous resin adsorption for enhancement of botrallin and TMC-264 production in mycelial liquid culture of Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12. Production of botrallin and TMC-264 was most effectively enhanced by macroporous resin DM-301 among the thirteen nonionic macroporous resins tested. The highest botrallin yield (51.47 mg/L, which was 2.29-fold higher than the control at 22.49 mg/L was obtained by adding resin DM-301 at 4.38% (g/mL to the culture broth on day 24 and allowing a period of 4 days for adsorption. The highest TMC-264 yield reached 47.74 mg/L, which was 11.76-fold higher than that of the control (4.06 mg/L, and was achieved by adding DM-301 resin at 4.38% (w/v in the culture broth on day 24 and allowing a period of 6 days for adsorption. The results show that in situ resin adsorption is an effective strategy for enhancing production of botrallin and TMC-264, and also for facilitating their recovery from mycelial liquid culture of Hyalodendriella sp. Ponipodef12.

  12. Heat production in depth up to 2500m via in situ combustion of methane using a counter-current heat-exchange reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schicks, Judith Maria; Spangenberg, Erik; Giese, Ronny; Heeschen, Katja; Priegnitz, Mike; Luzi-Helbing, Manja; Thaler, Jan; Abendroth, Sven; Klump, Jens

    2014-05-01

    In situ combustion is a well-known method used for exploitation of unconventional oil deposits such as heavy oil/bitumen reservoirs where the required heat is produced directly within the oil reservoir by combustion of a small percentage of the oil. A new application of in situ combustion for the production of methane from hydrate-bearing sediments was tested at pilot plant scale within the first phase of the German national gas hydrate project SUGAR. The applied method of in situ combustion was a flameless, catalytic oxidation of CH4 in a counter-current heat-exchange reactor with no direct contact between the catalytic reaction zone and the reservoir. The catalyst permitted a flameless combustion of CH4 with air to CO2 and H2O below the auto-ignition temperature of CH4 in air (868 K) and outside the flammability limits. This led to a double secured application of the reactor. The relatively low reaction temperature allowed the use of cost-effective standard materials for the reactor and prevented NOx formation. Preliminary results were promising and showed that only 15% of the produced CH4 was needed to be catalytically burned to provide enough heat to dissociate the hydrates in the environment and release CH4. The location of the heat source right within the hydrate-bearing sediment is a major advantage for the gas production from natural gas hydrates as the heat is generated where it is needed without loss of energy due to transportation. As part of the second period of the SUGAR project the reactor prototype of the first project phase was developed further to a borehole tool. The dimensions of this counter-current heat-exchange reactor are about 540 cm in length and 9 cm in diameter. It is designed for applications up to depths of 2500 m. A functionality test and a pressure test of the reactor were successfully carried out in October 2013 at the continental deep drilling site (KTB) in Windischeschenbach, Germany, in 600 m depth and 2000 m depth, respectively

  13. Calculation of Thermochemical Constants of Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Rao

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculation of thermo chemical constants and products of explosion of propellants from the knowledge of molecular formulae and heats of formation of the ingredients is given. A computer programme in AUTOMATH-400 has been established for the method. The results of application of the method for a number of propellants are given.

  14. Materials characterization of propellants using ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Gary L.; Jones, David

    1993-01-01

    Propellant characteristics for solid rocket motors were not completely determined for its use as a processing variable in today's production facilities. A major effort to determine propellant characteristics obtainable through ultrasonic measurement techniques was performed in this task. The information obtained was then used to determine the uniformity of manufacturing methods and/or the ability to determine non-uniformity in processes.

  15. Aircraft propeller control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Stanley G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In the invention, the speeds of both propellers in a counterrotating aircraft propeller pair are measured. Each speed is compared, using a feedback loop, with a demanded speed and, if actual speed does not equal demanded speed for either propeller, pitch of the proper propeller is changed in order to attain the demanded speed. A proportional/integral controller is used in the feedback loop. Further, phase of the propellers is measured and, if the phase does not equal a demanded phase, the speed of one propeller is changed, by changing pitch, until the proper phase is attained.

  16. Bioprocess design guided by in situ substrate supply and product removal: process intensification for synthesis of (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmölzer, Katharina; Mädje, Katharina; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kratzer, Regina

    2012-03-01

    We report herein on bioprocess development guided by the hydrophobicities of substrate and product. Bioreductions of o-chloroacetophenone are severely limited by instability of the catalyst in the presence of aromatic substrate and (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol. In situ substrate supply and product removal was used to protect the utilized Escherichia coli whole cell catalyst based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase during the reaction. Further engineering at the levels of the catalyst and the reaction media was matched to low substrate concentrations in the aqueous phase. Productivities obtained in aqueous batch reductions were 21-fold improved by addition of 20% (v/v) hexane, NAD(+), expression engineering, cell permeabilization and pH optimization. Reduction of 300 mM substrate was accomplished in 97% yield and use of the co-solvent hexane in subsequent extraction steps led to 88% recovery. Product loss due to high catalyst loading was minimized by using the same extractant in bioreduction and product isolation.

  17. In situ measurement of the particle size distribution of the fragmentation product of laser-shock-melted aluminum using in-line picosecond holography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hua Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic fragmentation of shock-melted metal is a topic of increasing interest in shock physics. However, high-quality experimental studies of the phenomenon are limited, and data that are essential for developing predictive models of the phenomenon, such as the mass and particle sizes distributions, are quite sparse. In-line holography is an effective non-contact technique for measuring particle size distribution, but critical technical requirements, in particular, particle density limits, complicate its application to the subject phenomenon. These challenges have been reasonably overcome in the present study, allowing for successful in situ measurements of the size distribution of the fragmentation product from laser-shock-melted aluminum. In this letter, we report on our experiments and present the measured data.

  18. Production and in-situ characterisation of sputtered catalyst films and their electrochemical performance in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells; Herstellung und in-situ Charakterisierung von Katalysator-Sputterschichten sowie deren elektrochemische Leistungsfaehigkeit in Polymer-Elektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasic, Stanislav

    2013-05-01

    The dissertation discusses the synthesis and chemical, structural, and electrochemical characterisation of nanoparticular, platinum-based films produced by gas flow sputtering. The films contained different platinum and platinum-cobalt concentrations and were sputtered directly on carbon fibre substrates. The catalytic properties of the films were proved without former contact with their environment by a gas-catalytic reaction (platinum-catalyzed hydrogen oxidation with preset educt ratios) and a time-resolved qualitative measurement of the reactand concentrations (in-situ characterisation). In an exemplary application, the sputtered films were used in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), with current/voltage curves providing information on their electrochemical performance. CFD simulation was to provide information on special characteristics, if any, that might influence film synthesis and in-situ characterisation. A combination of all investigations enables an assessment of gas flow sputtering with regard to the reduction of platinum concentrations in PEMFC. (orig./AKB) [German] Diese Dissertation behandelt die Synthese sowie die chemische, strukturelle und elektrochemische Charakterisierung von durch das Gasfluss- Sputtern hergestellten nano-partikulaeren platinbasierten Schichten. Die mit verschiedenen Platin- und Platin-Kobalt-Beladungen hergestellten Sputterschichten werden zunaechst direkt auf kohlenstoffbasierten Fasersubstraten abgeschieden. Ohne vorigen Umgebungskontakt stellen die Schichten im Anschluss an ihre Synthese ihre katalytische Eignung mittels einer gaskatalytischen Reaktion (Platinkatalysierte Wasserstoff-Oxidation bei vorgegebenen Eduktverhaeltnissen) und einer zeitaufgeloesten quantitativen Messung der Reaktandenkonzentrationen (in-situ Charakterisierung) unter Beweis. In einem Anwendungsbeispiel werden die gesputterten Schichten in Polymer-Elektrolytmembran-Brennstoffzellen (PEMFCs) eingesetzt und durch die Aufnahme von Strom

  19. 14 CFR 21.500 - Approval of engines and propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Approval of Engines, Propellers, Materials, Parts.... type certificate for an aircraft engine or propeller manufactured in a foreign country with which the... with each such aircraft engine or propeller imported into this country, a certificate of...

  20. On the identification of representative in situ soil moisture monitoring stations for the validation of SMAP soil moisture products in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Monerris, Alessandra; Rüdiger, Christoph; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2016-06-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture complicates the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture products using in situ monitoring stations. Therefore, a standard methodology for selecting the most representative stations for the purpose of validating satellites and land surface models is essential. Based on temporal stability and geostatistical studies using long-term soil moisture records, intensive ground measurements and airborne soil moisture products, this study investigates the representativeness of soil moisture monitoring stations within the Yanco study area for the validation of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) products at 3 km for radar, 9 km for radar-radiometer and 36 km for radiometer pixels. This resulted in the identification of a number of representative stations according to the different scales. Although the temporal stability method was found to be suitable for identifying representative stations, stations based on the mean relative difference (MRD) were not necessarily the most representative of the areal average. Moreover, those identified from standard deviation of the relative difference (SDRD) may be dry-biased. It was also found that in the presence of heterogeneous land use, stations should be weighted based on proportions of agricultural land. Airborne soil moisture products were also shown to provide useful a priori information for identifying representative locations. Finally, recommendations are made regarding the design of future networks for satellite validation, and specifically the most representative stations for the Yanco area.

  1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin and in situ product separation in thermally induced reversible phase-separation of ionic liquids/water mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ngoc Lan; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2014-09-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G to produce 6-aminopenicillanic acid, key intermediate for the production of semisynthetic β-lactam antibiotics, is one of the most relevant example of industrial implementation of biocatalysts. The hydrolysis reaction is traditionally carried out in aqueous buffer at pH 7.5-8. However, the aqueous rout exhibits several drawbacks in enzyme stability and product recovery. In this study, several ionic liquids (ILs) have been used as media for enzymatic hydrolysis of penicillin G. The results indicated that hydrophobic ILs/water two-phase system were good media for the reaction. In addition, a novel aqueous two-phase system based on the lower critical solution temperature type phase changes of amino acid based ILs/water mixture was developed for in situ penicillin G hydrolysis and product separation. For instance, hydrolysis yield of 87.13% was obtained in system containing 30 wt% [TBP][Tf-ILe] with pH control (pH 7.6). Since the phase-separation of this medium system can be reversible switched from single to two phases by slightly changing the solution temperature, enzymatic hydrolytic reaction and product recovery were more efficient than those of aqueous system. In addition, the ILs could be reused for at least 5 cycles without significant loss in hydrolysis efficiency.

  2. Viral and bacterial production in the North Water: in situ measurements, batch-culture experiments and characterization and distribution of a virus host system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Nielsen, Torkel G.; Bjørnsen, Peter K.

    Growth and viral lysis of bacterioplankton at subzero temperatures were measured in the North Water polynya in July 1998. In situ measurements of bacterial carbon consumption in surface waters ranged from 15 to 63 μg C l -1 d -1 in the eastern and 6 to 7 μg C l -1 d -1 in the northern part of the polynya. Both bacterial abundance and activity appeared to increase in response to the decay of the phytoplankton bloom that developed in the North Water. Organic carbon was the limiting substrate for bacteria in the polynya since addition of glucose, but not inorganic nutrients, to batch cultures increased both the carrying capacity of the substrate and the growth rate of the bacteria. Bacterial growth rates ranged from 0.11 to 0.40 d -1, corresponding to bacterial generation times of 1.7-6.3 d. The in situ viral production rate was estimated both from the frequency of visibly infected cells and from the rate of viral production in batch cultures; it ranged from 0.04 to 0.52 d -1 and from 0.25 to 0.47 d -1, respectively. From 6% to 28% of bacterial production was found to be lost due to viral lysis. The average virus-bacteria ratio was 5.1±3.1, with the abundance of viruses being correlated positively with bacterial production. A Pseudoalteromonas sp. bacterial host and an infective virus were isolated from the polynya; characteristics and distribution of the virus-host system were examined. The Pseudoalteromonas sp. showed psychrotolerant growth and sustained significant production of viruses at 0°C. The virus-host system was found throughout the polynya. Overall the results suggested that a large amount of organic carbon released during the development and breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom was consumed by planktonic bacteria and that the microbial food web was an important and dynamic component of the planktonic food web in the North Water.

  3. Biomass Steam Gasification with In-Situ CO2 Capture for Enriched Hydrogen Gas Production: A Reaction Kinetics Modelling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Abdul Mutalib

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to energy and environmental issues, hydrogen has become a more attractive clean fuel. Furthermore, there is high interest in producing hydrogen from biomass with a view to sustainability. The thermochemical process for hydrogen production, i.e. gasification, is the focus of this work. This paper discusses the mathematical modeling of hydrogen production process via biomass steam gasification with calcium oxide as sorbent in a gasifier. A modelling framework consisting of kinetics models for char gasification, methanation, Boudouard, methane reforming, water gas shift and carbonation reactions to represent the gasification and CO2 adsorption in the gasifier, is developed and implemented in MATLAB. The scope of the work includes an investigation of the influence of the temperature, steam/biomass ratio and sorbent/biomass ratio on the amount of hydrogen produced, product gas compositions and carbon conversion. The importance of different reactions involved in the process is also discussed. It is observed that hydrogen production and carbon conversion increase with increasing temperature and steam/biomass ratio. The model predicts a maximum hydrogen mole fraction in the product gas of 0.81 occurring at 950 K, steam/biomass ratio of 3.0 and sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.0. In addition, at sorbent/biomass ratio of 1.52, purity of H2 can be increased to 0.98 mole fraction with all CO2 present in the system adsorbed.

  4. Rye bran as fermentation matrix boosts in situ dextran production by Weissella confusa compared to wheat bran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajala, Ilkka; Mäkelä, Jari; Coda, Rossana; Shukla, Shraddha; Shi, Qiao; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Juvonen, Riikka; Ekholm, Päivi; Goyal, Arun; Tenkanen, Maija; Katina, Kati

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fiber-rich foods such as cereal bran is highly recommended due to its beneficial health effects. Pre-fermentation of bran with lactic acid bacteria can be used to improve the otherwise impaired flavor and textural qualities of bran-rich products. These positive effects are attributed to enzymatic modification of bran components and the production of functional metabolites like organic acids and exopolysaccharides such as dextrans. The aim of this study was to investigate dextran production in wheat and rye bran by fermentation with two Weissella confusa strains. Bran raw materials were analyzed for their chemical compositions and mineral content. Microbial growth and acidification kinetics were determined from the fermentations. Both strains produced more dextran in rye bran in which the fermentation-induced acidification was slower and the acidification lag phase longer than in wheat bran. Higher dextran production in rye bran is expected to be due to the longer period of optimal pH for dextran synthesis during fermentation. The starch content of wheat bran was higher, which may promote isomaltooligosaccharide formation at the expense of dextran production. W. confusa Cab3 produced slightly higher amounts of dextran than W. confusa VTT E-90392 in all raw materials. Fermentation with W. confusa Cab3 also resulted in lower residual fructose content which has technological relevance. The results indicate that wheat and particularly rye bran are promising matrices for producing technologically significant amounts of dextran, which facilitates the use of nutritionally valuable raw bran in food applications.

  5. Erosive burning of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Merrill K.

    1993-01-01

    Presented here is a review of the experimental and modeling work concerning erosive burning of solid propellants (augmentation of burning rate by flow of product gases across a burning surface). A brief introduction describes the motor design problems caused by this phenomenon, particularly for low port/throat area ratio motors and nozzleless motors. Various experimental techniques for measuring crossflow sensitivity of solid propellant burning rates are described, with the conclusion that accurate simulation of the flow, including upstream flow development, in actual motors is important since the degree of erosive burning depends not only on local mean crossflow velocity and propellant nature, but also upon this upstream development. In the modeling area, a brief review of simplified models and correlating equations is presented, followed by a description of more complex numerical analysis models. Both composite and double-base propellant models are reviewed. A second generation composite model is shown to give good agreement with data obtained in a series of tests in which composite propellant composition and heterogeneity (particle size distribution) were systematically varied. Finally, the use of numerical models for the development of erosive burning correlations is described, and a brief discussion of scaling is presented.

  6. Neural network-based estimates of Southern Ocean net community production from in-situ O2 / Ar and satellite observation: a methodological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Southern Ocean organic carbon export plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet its basin-scale climatology and variability are uncertain due to limited coverage of in situ observations. In this study, a neural network approach based on the self-organizing map (SOM is adopted to construct weekly gridded (1° × 1° maps of organic carbon export for the Southern Ocean from 1998 to 2009. The SOM is trained with in situ measurements of O2 / Ar-derived net community production (NCP that are tightly linked to the carbon export in the mixed layer on timescales of 1–2 weeks, and six potential NCP predictors: photosynthetically available radiation (PAR, particulate organic carbon (POC, chlorophyll (Chl, sea surface temperature (SST, sea surface height (SSH, and mixed layer depth (MLD. This non-parametric approach is based entirely on the observed statistical relationships between NCP and the predictors, and therefore is strongly constrained by observations. A thorough cross-validation yields three retained NCP predictors, Chl, PAR, and MLD. Our constructed NCP is further validated by good agreement with previously published independent in situ derived NCP of weekly or longer temporal resolution through real-time and climatological comparisons at various sampling sites. The resulting November–March NCP climatology reveals a pronounced zonal band of high NCP roughly following the subtropical front in the Atlantic, Indian and western Pacific sectors, and turns southeastward shortly after the dateline. Other regions of elevated NCP include the upwelling zones off Chile and Namibia, Patagonian Shelf, Antarctic coast, and areas surrounding the Islands of Kerguelen, South Georgia, and Crozet. This basin-scale NCP climatology closely resembles that of the satellite POC field and observed air-sea CO2 flux. The long-term mean area-integrated NCP south of 50° S from our dataset, 14 mmol C m–2 d–1, falls within the range of 8.3–24 mmol C m

  7. Observing and modeling dynamics in terrestrial gross primary productivity and phenology from remote sensing: An assessment using in-situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Manish K.

    Terrestrial gross primary productivity (GPP) is the largest and most variable component of the carbon cycle and is strongly influenced by phenology. Realistic characterization of spatio-temporal variation in GPP and phenology is therefore crucial for understanding dynamics in the global carbon cycle. In the last two decades, remote sensing has become a widely-used tool for this purpose. However, no study has comprehensively examined how well remote sensing models capture spatiotemporal patterns in GPP, and validation of remote sensing-based phenology models is limited. Using in-situ data from 144 eddy covariance towers located in all major biomes, I assessed the ability of 10 remote sensing-based methods to capture spatio-temporal variation in GPP at annual and seasonal scales. The models are based on different hypotheses regarding ecophysiological controls on GPP and span a range of structural and computational complexity. The results lead to four main conclusions: (i) at annual time scale, models were more successful capturing spatial variability than temporal variability; (ii) at seasonal scale, models were more successful in capturing average seasonal variability than interannual variability; (iii) simpler models performed as well or better than complex models; and (iv) models that were best at explaining seasonal variability in GPP were different from those that were best able to explain variability in annual scale GPP. Seasonal phenology of vegetation follows bounded growth and decay, and is widely modeled using growth functions. However, the specific form of the growth function affects how phenological dynamics are represented in ecosystem and remote sensing-base models. To examine this, four different growth functions (the logistic, Gompertz, Mirror-Gompertz and Richards function) were assessed using remotely sensed and in-situ data collected at several deciduous forest sites. All of the growth functions provided good statistical representation of in-situ

  8. Carbon Dioxide Production Responsibility on the Basis of comparing in Situ and mean CO2 Atmosphere Concentration Data

    CERN Document Server

    Mavrodiev, S Cht; Vachev, B

    2008-01-01

    The method is proposed for estimation of regional CO2 and other greenhouses and pollutants production responcibility. The comparison of CO2 local emissions reduction data with world CO2 atmosphere data will permit easy to judge for overall effect in curbing not only global warming but also chemical polution.

  9. An analysis of snow cover changes in the Himalayan region using MODIS snow products and in-situ temperature data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Ojha, S.

    2011-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns over the melting of the Himalayas’ snow and glaciers, we strive to answer some of the questions related to snow cover changes in the Himalayan region covering Nepal and its vicinity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products from 2000 to

  10. In vitro and in situ growth characteristics and behaviour of spoilage organisms associated with anaerobically stored cooked meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeiren, L; Devlieghere, F; De Graef, V; Debevere, J

    2005-01-01

    Understanding spoilage caused by different types of spoilage organisms, associated with vacuum-packaged sliced cooked meat products (CMP). First, strains were characterized in a broth at 7 degrees C under anaerobic conditions to compare their growth rate, acidifying character and metabolite production under conditions simulating refrigerated vacuum-packaged conditions. Brochotrix thermosphacta grew faster than the lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Within the group of the LAB, all strains grew fast except Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum and Leuconostoc carnosum. Secondly, the organisms were inoculated on a model cooked ham to better understand the relationship between spoilage, microbial growth, pH, metabolite production and accompanying sensory changes. Most rapidly growing strains were Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides followed by B. thermosphacta, while Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum and Leuc. carnosum grew very slowly compared with the other LAB. Brochotrix thermosphacta caused sensory deviations at a lower cell number compared with the LAB. The related pH changes, metabolite production and sensory perception are presented. In this pure culture study, B. thermosphacta and Leuc. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides had the highest potential to cause rapid spoilage on CMP. A systematic study on the behaviour of spoilage organisms on a model cooked ham to establish the relationship between microbial growth, pH, metabolite formation and organoleptic deviations.

  11. An analysis of snow cover changes in the Himalayan region using MODIS snow products and in-situ temperature data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maskey, S.; Uhlenbrook, S.; Ojha, S.

    2011-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns over the melting of the Himalayas’ snow and glaciers, we strive to answer some of the questions related to snow cover changes in the Himalayan region covering Nepal and its vicinity using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow cover products from 2000 to 2

  12. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  13. Sea-surface temperature and salinity product comparison against external in situ data in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, J. N.; Panteleev, Gleb; Kirillov, Sergey; Makhotin, Mikhail; Shakhova, Natalia

    2015-11-01

    Sea-surface temperature and salinity (SST/S) in the Arctic Ocean (AO) are largely governed by sea-ice and continental runoff rather than evaporation and precipitation as in lower latitude oceans, and global satellite analyses and models which incorporate remotely observed SST/S may be inaccurate in the AO due to lack of direct measurements for calibrating satellite data. For this reason, we are motivated to validate several satellite sea-surface temperature (SST) data products and SST/S models by comparing gridded data in the AO with oceanographic records from 2006 to 2013. Statistical analysis of product-minus-observation differences reveals that the satellite SST products considered have a temperature bias magnitude of less than 0.5°C compared to ship-based CTD measurements, and most of these biases are negative in sign. SST/S models also show an overall negative temperature bias, but no common sign or magnitude of salinity bias against CTD data. Ice tethered profiler (ITP) near-surface data span the seasons of several years, and these measurements reflect a sea-ice dominated region where the ocean surface cannot be remotely observed. Against this data, many of the considered models and products show large errors with detectable seasonal differences in SST bias. Possible sources of these errors are discussed, and two adjustments of product SST on the basis of sea-ice concentration are suggested for reducing bias to within less than 0.01°C of ITP near-surface temperatures.

  14. Process design of in situ esterification-transesterifica tion for biodiesel production from residual oil of spent bleaching earth (SBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, A.; Mubarok, Z.; Suprihatin; Romli, M.; Yunira, E. N.

    2017-05-01

    Indonesia is the largest producer of Crude Palm Oil (CPO) in the world. CPO refining process produces spent bleaching earth (SBE), which still contains 20-30% oil. This residual oil is very potential to be developed as a biodiesel feedstock. The purpose of this research was to develop an in situbiodiesel production process of residual oil of SBE, which covered stirring speed of esterification and transesterification and also transesterification time to produce biodiesel with the best characteristics. The production was conducted in a 100 L reactor. The stirring speeds applied were 650 rpm and 730 rpm, and the transesterification time varied at 60, 90 and 120 minutes. The combination of 730 rpm stirring speed for 90 minutes transesterification resulted in the best biodiesel characteristics with the yield of 85%, the specific energy of 6,738 kJ/kg and the heater efficiency of 48%. The physico-chemical properties of biodiesel was in conformity with the SNI of Biodiesel.

  15. In situ self-catalyzed reactive extraction of germinated oilseed with short-chained dialkyl carbonates for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Li, Dan; Li, Yang; Gao, Jing; Zhou, Liya; He, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In order to eliminate the expense associated with solvent extraction and oil cleanup, and reduce the processing steps in biodiesel production, reactive extraction has become a focus of research in recent years. In this study, germinated castor seed was used as substrate and catalyst, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used as acyl acceptor and oil extractant to produce biodiesel. The optimum conditions were as follows: the germination time of castor seed was 72 h, DMC/germinated seed ratio was 12.5 ml/g, reaction temperature was 35°C, and water content was 2.11%. The biodiesel yield could reach as much as 87.41% under the optimized conditions. This germinated oilseed self-catalyzed reactive extraction can be a promising route for biodiesel production.

  16. High Purity Hydrogen Production with In-Situ Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Capture in a Single Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nihar Phalak; Shwetha Ramkumar; Daniel Connell; Zhenchao Sun; Fu-Chen Yu; Niranjani Deshpande; Robert Statnick; Liang-Shih Fan

    2011-07-31

    Enhancement in the production of high purity hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from fuel gas, obtained from coal gasification, is limited by thermodynamics of the water gas shift (WGS) reaction. However, this constraint can be overcome by conducting the WGS in the presence of a CO{sub 2}-acceptor. The continuous removal of CO{sub 2} from the reaction mixture helps to drive the equilibrium-limited WGS reaction forward. Since calcium oxide (CaO) exhibits high CO{sub 2} capture capacity as compared to other sorbents, it is an ideal candidate for such a technique. The Calcium Looping Process (CLP) developed at The Ohio State University (OSU) utilizes the above concept to enable high purity H{sub 2} production from synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification. The CLP integrates the WGS reaction with insitu CO{sub 2}, sulfur and halide removal at high temperatures while eliminating the need for a WGS catalyst, thus reducing the overall footprint of the hydrogen production process. The CLP comprises three reactors - the carbonator, where the thermodynamic constraint of the WGS reaction is overcome by the constant removal of CO{sub 2} product and high purity H{sub 2} is produced with contaminant removal; the calciner, where the calcium sorbent is regenerated and a sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} stream is produced; and the hydrator, where the calcined sorbent is reactivated to improve its recyclability. As a part of this project, the CLP was extensively investigated by performing experiments at lab-, bench- and subpilot-scale setups. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis was also conducted to determine the feasibility of the CLP at commercial scale. This report provides a detailed account of all the results obtained during the project period.

  17. Solid propellant motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, J. I.; Marsh, H. E., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A case bonded end burning solid propellant rocket motor is described. A propellant with sufficiently low modulus to avoid chamber buckling on cooling from cure and sufficiently high elongation to sustain the stresses induced without cracking is used. The propellant is zone cured within the motor case at high pressures equal to or approaching the pressure at which the motor will operate during combustion. A solid propellant motor with a burning time long enough that its spacecraft would be limited to a maximum acceleration of less than 1 g is provided by one version of the case bonded end burning solid propellant motor of the invention.

  18. Continuous fermentation and in-situ reed separation of butyric acid for higher sugar consumption rate and productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Skiadas, Ioannis; Westermann, Peter;

    fermentation coupled with Reverse Enhanced Electro-Dialysis (REED) at D=0.0417 h-1 (1 day HRT) in experiments with a mixture of glucose and xylose in synthetic growth medium as well as with increasing concentrations of PHWS (up to 100%). Data obtained from experiments with synthetic medium showed......) and resulted in a butyric acid productivity and yield of 1.31g/L/h and 0.44 g/g, respectively at 1 day HRT. Acknowledgements: This work is a part of EU-7th Framework programme supported project SUPRABIO (FP7-cooperationproject no 241640)....

  19. High burn rate solid composite propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manship, Timothy D.

    High burn rate propellants help maintain high levels of thrust without requiring complex, high surface area grain geometries. Utilizing high burn rate propellants allows for simplified grain geometries that not only make production of the grains easier, but the simplified grains tend to have better mechanical strength, which is important in missiles undergoing high-g accelerations. Additionally, high burn rate propellants allow for a higher volumetric loading which reduces the overall missile's size and weight. The purpose of this study is to present methods of achieving a high burn rate propellant and to develop a composite propellant formulation that burns at 1.5 inches per second at 1000 psia. In this study, several means of achieving a high burn rate propellant were presented. In addition, several candidate approaches were evaluated using the Kepner-Tregoe method with hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB)-based propellants using burn rate modifiers and dicyclopentadiene (DCPD)-based propellants being selected for further evaluation. Propellants with varying levels of nano-aluminum, nano-iron oxide, FeBTA, and overall solids loading were produced using the HTPB binder and evaluated in order to determine the effect the various ingredients have on the burn rate and to find a formulation that provides the burn rate desired. Experiments were conducted to compare the burn rates of propellants using the binders HTPB and DCPD. The DCPD formulation matched that of the baseline HTPB mix. Finally, GAP-plasticized DCPD gumstock dogbones were attempted to be made for mechanical evaluation. Results from the study show that nano-additives have a substantial effect on propellant burn rate with nano-iron oxide having the largest influence. Of the formulations tested, the highest burn rate was a 84% solids loading mix using nano-aluminum nano-iron oxide, and ammonium perchlorate in a 3:1(20 micron: 200 micron) ratio which achieved a burn rate of 1.2 inches per second at 1000

  20. In situ growth of CdS nanoparticles on UiO-66 metal-organic framework octahedrons for enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jian-Jian; Wang, Rong; Liu, Xin-Ling; Peng, Fu-Min [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Innovation Lab for Clean Energy & Green Catalysis, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Li, Chuan-Hao, E-mail: chuanhao.li@yale.edu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Innovation Lab for Clean Energy & Green Catalysis, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, Yale University, New Haven 06511 (United States); Teng, Fei [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, School of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Yuan, Yu-Peng, E-mail: yupengyuan@ahu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and Innovation Lab for Clean Energy & Green Catalysis, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Environment Monitoring and Pollution Control, School of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation was achieved though constructing the CdS/UiO-66 MOF hybrids. In addition, the resultant hybrids show excellent photostability for hydrogen generation. - Highlights: • CdS nanoparticles were hydrothermally grown on UiO-66 octahedrons. • The resultant CdS/UiO-66 hybrids show enhanced photocatalytic H{sub 2} generation under visible light irradiation. • CdS/UiO-66 hybrids possess excellent photostability for long-term hydrogen generation. - Abstract: CdS nanoparticles acting as photosensitizer was grown in situ upon UiO-66 metal-organic framework octahedrons through a hydrothermal process. The resultant CdS/UiO-66 hybrid photocatalysts show remarkably active hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation as compared to CdS and UiO-66 alone. The optimum hybrid with 16 wt% CdS loading shows a hydrogen production rate of 235 μmol h{sup −1}, corresponding to 1.2% quantum efficiency at 420 nm. The improved photocatalytic hydrogen production over hybrid CdS/UiO-66 is ascribed to the efficient interfacial charge transfer from CdS to UiO-66, which effectively suppresses the recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs and thereby enhancing the photocatalytic efficiency.

  1. Evidence for the Active Phase of Heterogeneous Catalysts through In Situ Reaction Product Imaging and Multiscale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, S.; Blomberg, S.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Zetterberg, J.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Reuter, K.

    2015-06-17

    We use multiscale modeling to analyze laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the CO oxidation reaction over Pd(100) at near-ambient reaction conditions. Integrating density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the active catalyst into fluid-dynamical simulations of the mass transport inside the reactor chamber, we calculate the reaction product concentration directly above the catalyst surface. Comparing corresponding data calculated for different surface models against the measured LIF signals, we can discriminate the one that predominantly actuates the experimentally measured catalytic activity. For the probed CO oxidation reaction conditions, the experimental activity is due to pristine Pd(100) possibly coexisting with other (oxidic) domains on the surface.

  2. Evaluation of Potential Probiotic Properties of Enterococcus mundtii, Its Survival in Boza and in situ Bacteriocin Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslav D. Todorov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Boza is a low-pH and low-alcohol cereal-based beverage produced in the Balkan Peninsula. Barley was cooked and prepared according to a traditional recipe and inoculated with Enterococcus mundtii ST4V (a potential probiotic and bacteriocin-producing strain, commercially produced boza, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and a combination of strain E. mundtii ST4V and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fermentation was carried out at 37 °C for 3 h. The organoleptic properties of fermented products were evaluated by a qualified taste panel. No significant differences in rheological properties were observed, suggesting that E. mundtii ST4V had no effect on the quality of the final product. Microbial cell numbers remained relatively unchanged during one week of storage. The preservative properties of bacteriocin ST4V were evaluated by contaminating boza with Lactobacillus sakei DSM 20017. Changes in microbial populations were monitored by using classical microbiological methods, PCR with species-specific primers and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. Adsorption of bacteriocin ST4V to target cells is pH-dependent, with the highest adsorption (88 % recorded at pH=8.0 and pH=10.0. Maximum adsorption of bacteriocin ST4V (75 % to Enterococcus faecalis and Listeria innocua was recorded at 25 to 37 °C. Growth of E. mundtii ST4V was inhibited only by a few antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medicaments, suggesting that the strain may be used as a probiotic by individuals receiving medical treatment.

  3. The use of high pressure CO2 -facilitated pH swings to enhance in situ product recovery of butyric acid in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric C; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Through the use of high partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2 ) to facilitate temporary pH reductions in two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs), improved pH dependent partitioning of butyric acid was observed which achieved in situ product recovery (ISPR), alleviating end-product inhibition (EPI) during the production of butyric acid by Clostridium tyrobutyricum (ATCC 25755). Through high pressure pCO2 studies, media buffering effects were shown to be substantially overcome at 60 bar pCO2 , resulting in effective extraction of the organic acid by the absorptive polymer Pebax® 2533, yielding a distribution coefficient (D) of 2.4 ± 0.1 after 1 h of contact at this pressure. Importantly, it was also found that C. tyrobutyricum cultures were able to withstand 60 bar pCO2 for 1 h with no decrease in growth ability when returned to atmospheric pressure in batch reactors after several extraction cycles. A fed-batch reactor with cyclic high pCO2 polymer extraction recovered 92 g of butyric acid to produce a total of 213 g compared to 121 g generated in a control reactor. This recovery reduced EPI in the TPPB, resulting in both higher productivity (0.65 vs. 0.33 g L(-1)  h(-1) ) and yield (0.54 vs. 0.40). Fortuitously, it was also found that repeated high pCO2 -facilitated polymer extractions of butyric acid during batch growth of C. tyrobutyricum lessened the need for pH control, and reduced base requirements by approximately 50%. Thus, high pCO2 -mediated absorptive polymer extraction presents a novel method for improving process performance in butyric acid fermentation, and this technique could be applied to the bioproduction of other organic acids as well.

  4. Prediction of Root Zone Soil Moisture using Remote Sensing Products and In-Situ Observation under Climate Change Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Panda, R. K.; Mohanty, B.

    2015-12-01

    Prediction of root zone soil moisture status at field level is vital for developing efficient agricultural water management schemes. In this study, root zone soil moisture was estimated across the Rana watershed in Eastern India, by assimilation of near-surface soil moisture estimate from SMOS satellite into a physically-based Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plant (SWAP) model. An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique coupled with SWAP model was used for assimilating the satellite soil moisture observation at different spatial scales. The universal triangle concept and artificial intelligence techniques were applied to disaggregate the SMOS satellite monitored near-surface soil moisture at a 40 km resolution to finer scale (1 km resolution), using higher spatial resolution of MODIS derived vegetation indices (NDVI) and land surface temperature (Ts). The disaggregated surface soil moisture were compared to ground-based measurements in diverse landscape using portable impedance probe and gravimetric samples. Simulated root zone soil moisture were compared with continuous soil moisture profile measurements at three monitoring stations. In addition, the impact of projected climate change on root zone soil moisture were also evaluated. The climate change projections of rainfall were analyzed for the Rana watershed from statistically downscaled Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The long-term root zone soil moisture dynamics were estimated by including a rainfall generator of likely scenarios. The predicted long term root zone soil moisture status at finer scale can help in developing efficient agricultural water management schemes to increase crop production, which lead to enhance the water use efficiency.

  5. In-Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Anders Thais; Slot, Susanne; Paltved, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In situ simulation offers on-site training to healthcare professionals. It refers to a training strategy where simulation technology is integrated into the clinical encounter. Training in the simulation laboratory does not easily tap into situational resources, e.g. individual, team......, and organisational characteristic. Therefore, it might fail to fully mimic real clinical team processes. Though research on in situ simulation in healthcare is in its infancy, literature is abundant on patient safety and team training1. Patient safety reporting systems that identify risks to patients can improve...... offered in situ simulation faculty with a model for integrating reported critical incidents and adverse events with contextual needs analysis and short-term observations. Furthermore the research group is working on detailing the barriers of in situ simulation such as resources for team training despite...

  6. Enhancing hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells by in situ hydrogen oxidation for self-buffering pH through periodic polarity reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuli; Qin, Mohan; Yang, Xiaoli; He, Zhen

    2017-04-01

    Successful pH control plays a key role in hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). Herein, periodic polarity reversal (PPR) is applied to a dual-cathode MEC and achieves the enhanced hydrogen production. The MEC with PPR produces 1.3 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 with 50-mM NaCl as the catholyte, much higher than 0.9 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with dual-working cathodes or 0.8 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3d-1 from the MEC with one working cathode. Such enhancement benefits from a slower increase in the catholyte pH, for example, it takes 15.3 h to increase the 10-mM NaCl pH from 7.00 to 12.00 in the MEC with PPR, 1.7-3.6 times that of the MECs without PPR, which is due to the decrease in the catholyte pH of the reversed cathode during PPR. The potential of the reversed electrode is more positive than the anode, suggesting that the reversed electrode acts as a second anode electrode using residue hydrogen gas as an electron source. Thus, a mechanism of in situ oxidation of hydrogen gas for pH buffering is proposed and discussed. These findings have provided a simple but effective pH control strategy for enhancing hydrogen production in MECs.

  7. Disparities between Phaeocystis in situ and optically-derived carbon biomass and growth rates: potential effect on remote-sensing primary production estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Peperzak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The oceans play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycle. Unfortunately, the daily production of organic carbon, the product of phytoplankton standing stock and growth rate cannot be measured globally by discrete oceanographic methods. Instead, optical proxies from Earth-orbiting satellites must be used. To test the accuracy of optically-derived proxies of phytoplankton physiology and growth rate, standard ex situ data from the wax and wane of a Phaeocystis bloom in laboratory mesocosms were compared with hyperspectral reflectance data. Chlorophyll biomass could be estimated accurately from reflectance using specific chlorophyll absorption algorithms. However, the conversion of chlorophyll (Chl to carbon (C was obscured by the observed increase in C : Chl under nutrient-limited growth. C : Chl was inversely correlated (r2 = 0.88 with Photosystem II quantum efficiency (Fv/Fm, the in situ fluorometric oceanographic proxy for growth rate. In addition, the optical proxy for growth rate, the quantum efficiency of fluorescence ϕ was linearly correlated to Fv/Fm (r2 = 0.84, but not – as by definition – by using total phytoplankton absorption, because during nutrient-limited growth the concentrations of non-fluorescent light-absorbing pigments increased. As a consequence, none of the three proxies (C : Chl, Fv/Fm, φ was correlated to carbon or cellular phytoplankton growth rates. Therefore, it is concluded that although satellite derived estimates of chlorophyll biomass may be accurate, physiologically-induced non-linear shifts in growth rate proxies may obscure accurate phytoplankton growth rates and hence global carbon production estimates.

  8. Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products: Description of sampling and analysis methods for rocket exhaust characterization studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, R.A.

    1990-06-07

    A systematic approach has been developed and experimentally validated for the sampling and chemical characterization of the rocket motor exhaust generated from the firing of scaled down test motors at the US Army's Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The overall strategy was to sample and analyze major exhaust constituents in near real time, while performing off-site analyses of samples collected for the determination of trace constituents of the particulate and vapor phases. Initial interference studies were performed using atmospheric pressure burns of 1 g quantities of propellants in small chambers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were determined using non-dispersive infrared instrumentation. Hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen chloride, and ammonia determinations were made using ion selective electrode technology. Oxides of nitrogen were determined using chemiluminescence instrumentation. Airborne particulate mass concentration was determined using infrared forward scattering measurements and a tapered element oscillating microbalance, as well as conventional gravimetry. Particulate phase metals were determined by collection on Teflon membrane filters, followed by inductively coupled plasma and atomic absorption analysis. Particulate phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-PAH were collected using high volume sampling on a two stage filter. Target species were extracted, and quantified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Vapor phase species were collected on multi-sorbent resin traps, and subjected to thermal desorption GC/MS for analysis. 11 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. In situ FTIR spectroscopic assessment of methylbutynol catalytic conversion products in relation to the surface acid-base properties of systematically modified aluminas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemer, Gamal A. H.; Zaki, Mohamed I.

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation was designed to assess the credibility of methylbutynol (MBOH) as an infrared (IR) reactive probe molecule for surface acid-base properties of metal oxides. Accordingly, pure alumina was systematically modified with varied amounts (0.5-10 wt.%) of K+ or SO42 - additives. Then, the influence of nature and amount of the additive on the following alumina properties were examined: (i) bulk composition and structure by X-ray powder diffractometry and ex-situ IR spectroscopy, (ii) surface area and net charge by N2 sorptiometry and pH-metry, respectively, and (iii) nature and strength of exposed surface acid sites by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine at ambient and higher temperatures. Results obtained were correlated with IR-identified product distribution of MBOH catalytic decomposition/conversion at 200 °C. It is thereby concluded that MBOH is superior to conventional IR inactive probe molecules in gauging sensitively the prevailing acid or base character, availability of base sites, relative population of Bronsted to Lewis acid sites, and strength and reactivity of the sites exposed on metal oxide surfaces. Hence, all that is needed to get this information is to handle IR spectra taken from the gas phase, a task that is experimentally much more accessible than taking spectra from adsorbed species of irreactive probe molecules.

  10. Where do we need additional in situ aerosol and sun photometer data?: a critical examination of spatial biases between MODIS and MISR aerosol products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Shi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET data are the primary benchmark for evaluating satellite retrieved aerosol properties. However, despite its extensive coverage, the representativeness of the AERONET data is rarely discussed. Indeed, many studies have shown that satellite retrieval biases have a significant degree of spatial correlation that may be problematic for higher-level processes or inverse-emissions-modeling studies. To consider these issues and evaluate relative performance in regions of few surface observations, cross-comparisons between the aerosol optical depth (AOD products of operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Dark Target (DT and operational MODIS Collection 5.1 Deep Blue (DB with MISR version 22 were conducted. Through such comparisons, we can observe coherent spatial features of the AOD bias while sidestepping the full analysis required for determining when or where either retrieval is more correct. We identify regions where MODIS to MISR AOD ratios were found to be above 1.3 or below 0.75. Regions where lower boundary condition uncertainty is likely to be a dominant factor include portions of Western North America, the Andes Mountains, Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Central Asia. Similarly, microphysical biases may be an issue in greater South America, and specific parts of Southern Africa, India Asia, East Asia, and Indonesia. These results help identify high-priority locations for possible future deployments of both in situ and ground-based remote sensing measurements. Supplement include GeoTIFF and kml files.

  11. Characterisation and quantification of medium chain and long chain triglycerides and their in vitro digestion products, by HPTLC coupled with in situ densitometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sek, L; Porter, C J; Charman, W N

    2001-06-01

    The development of new and simple high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) assays for the quantification of medium chain triglycerides (MCT, tricaprylin) and long chain triglycerides (LCT, triolein) and their lipolytic products, bile salts (BS) and phospholipids (PL) are described. Different classes of lipids (PL, BS, fatty acids, monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides) were separated on a single silica gel 60 HPTLC plate by Automated Multiple Development (AMD) methods using a Camag AMD 2. Post-chromatographic staining of long chain lipids (triolein, diolein, monoolein, and oleic acid), PL and BS with a solution of copper sulphate-phosphoric acid and medium chain lipids (tricaprylin, dicaprylin, monocaprylin, and caprylic acid) with a solution of ammonium molybdate-perchloric acid allowed visualisation of the lipids. Lipids were quantified by in situ spectrodensitometric measurements using a Camag TLC scanner 3. The intra- and inter-assay accuracy was between 83 and 115% and the assay was precise to within a CV of less than 20% over a range of 0.1-1 and 5-50 microg for long chain lipids and medium chain lipids, respectively. The methods have been employed to study the kinetics of triolein and tricaprylin lipolysis in an in vitro lipid digestion model commonly used to assess the digestibility of novel oral lipid-based formulations.

  12. Guanidinium ionic liquid-based surfactants as low cytotoxic extractants: Analytical performance in an in-situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for determining personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Fernández, Idaira; Pino, Verónica; Ayala, Juan H; Afonso, Ana M

    2017-05-01

    The IL-based surfactant octylguanidinium chloride (C8Gu-Cl) was designed and synthetized with the purpose of obtaining a less harmful surfactant: containing guanidinium as core cation and a relatively short alkyl chain. Its interfacial and aggregation behavior was evaluated through conductivity and fluorescence measurements, presenting a critical micelle concentration value of 42.5 and 44.6mmolL(-1), respectively. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out with C8Gu-Cl and other IL-based and conventional surfactants, specifically the analogue 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (C8MIm-Cl), and other imidazolium- (C16MIm-Br) and pyridinium- (C16Py-Cl) based surfactants, together with the conventional cationic CTAB and the conventional anionic SDS. From these studies, C8Gu-Cl was the only one to achieve the classification of low cytotoxicity. An in situ dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) method based on transforming the water-soluble C8Gu-Cl IL-based surfactant into a water-insoluble IL microdroplet via a simple metathesis reaction was then selected as the extraction/preconcentration method for a group of 6 personal care products (PCPs) present in cosmetic samples. The method was carried out in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and diode array detection (DAD). The method was properly optimized, requiring the use of only 30μL of C8Gu-Cl for 10mL of aqueous sample with a NaCl content of 8% (w/v) to adjust the ionic strength and pH value of 5. The metathesis reaction required the addition of the anion exchange reagent (bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide - 1:1 molar ratio), followed by vortex and centrifugation, and dilution of the final microdroplet up to 60μL with acetonitrile before the injection in the HPLC-DAD system. The optimum in situ DLLME-HPLC-DAD method takes ∼10min for the extraction step and ∼22min for the chromatographic separation, with analytical features of low detection limits: down to 0.4μgL(-1); high

  13. Mars Ascent Vehicle-Propellant Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John; Rousseau, Jeremy; Williams, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This project is to develop and test a new propellant formulation specifically for the Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) for the robotic Mars Sample Return mission. The project was initiated under the Planetary Sciences Division In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) program and is continuing under the Mars Exploration Program. The two-stage, solid motor-based MAV has been the leading MAV solution for more than a decade. Additional studies show promise for alternative technologies including hybrid and bipropellant options, but the solid motor design has significant propellant density advantages well suited for physical constraints imposed while using the SkyCrane descent stage. The solid motor concept has lower specific impulse (Isp) than alternatives, but if the first stage and payload remain sufficiently small, the two-stage solid MAV represents a potential low risk approach to meet the mission needs. As the need date for the MAV slips, opportunities exist to advance technology with high on-ramp potential. The baseline propellant for the MAV is currently the carboxyl terminated polybutadiene (CTPB) based formulation TP-H-3062 due to its advantageous low temperature mechanical properties and flight heritage. However, the flight heritage is limited and outside the environments, the MAV must endure. The ISPT program competed a propellant formulation project with industry and selected ATK to develop a new propellant formulation specifically for the MAV application. Working with ATK, a large number of propellant formulations were assessed to either increase performance of a CTPB propellant or improve the low temperature mechanical properties of a hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant. Both propellants demonstrated potential to increase performance over heritage options, but an HTPB propellant formulation, TP-H-3544, was selected for production and testing. The test plan includes propellant aging first at high vacuum conditions, representative of the Mars transit

  14. In situ vadose zone bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhener, Patrick; Ponsin, Violaine

    2014-06-01

    Contamination of the vadose zone with various pollutants is a world-wide problem, and often technical or economic constraints impose remediation without excavation. In situ bioremediation in the vadose zone by bioventing has become a standard remediation technology for light spilled petroleum products. In this review, focus is given on new in situ bioremediation strategies in the vadose zone targeting a variety of other pollutants such as perchlorate, nitrate, uranium, chromium, halogenated solvents, explosives and pesticides. The techniques for biostimulation of either oxidative or reductive degradation pathways are presented, and biotransformations to immobile pollutants are discussed in cases of non-degradable pollutants. Furthermore, research on natural attenuation in the vadose zone is presented.

  15. New Propellant Formulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    initiators, JA2 19-Perf Hex propellants and Hagedorn-Plastic manufactured Nitrocellulose with Alkohol - German manufacturer. STAR-ATO goal is to develop... propellants in the U.S. Army’s small, medium and large caliber munitions are all nitrocellulose -based. As the Army drives continuous improvement in both...understanding the influence of nitrocellulose properties on propellant performance. Projectiles are getting heavier, ammunition is being exposed to

  16. 78 FR 41283 - Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... Engineer, Boston Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England... Engineer, Boston Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England... Ganley, Acting Assistant Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service....

  17. Electronic tera-order stabilization of photoinduced metastable species: structure of the photochromic product of spiropyran determined with in situ single crystal X-ray photodiffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, Pance; Yu, Pei; Sakurai, Kenji

    2008-07-03

    The extraordinary stability of the photoinduced red form of a cationic spiropyran ( k approximately 10 (-6) s (-1) in water and approximately 10 (-6) to less than 10 (-8) s (-1) in the solid state) was employed to obtain in situ X-ray diffraction evidence of its molecular structure. By UV excitation under selected experimental conditions, on average, approximately one third of the cations in a single crystal of spiropyran iodide salt was converted and retained as the red form during the experiment. According to the structure of the mixed crystal, the ring opening, which is due to increased distance between the spiro oxygen and carbon atoms, is associated with slight molecular flattening caused by concurrent out-of-plane shift (11.2(5) degrees ) of the pyranopyridinium half and in-plane shift (4.8(7) degrees ) of the indoline half. The overall geometry change of the cation fits the steric requirements imposed by the ion packing in the crystal and can be viewed as molecular flattening caused by breaking of the spiroconjugation. The structure of the cation confirms that (at least in the case of cationic spiropyrans) the product is confined in the crystal mainly as a zwitterionic resonance structure in cis configuration similar to the (early) transition state. Although the positive charge of the closed form facilitates the ring-opening reaction by moving the reactant closer to the transition state, neither the weakening of the spiropyran C-O bond nor the space provided by the iodide alone can account for the stability of the product. Instead, the density functional theory calculations indicate that the stabilization of the red form of the cationic relative to the neutral spiropyran is thermodynamically controlled, probably through compensation of the charge within the zwitterion by the methylpyridinium group.

  18. Demonstration of in situ product recovery of butyric acid via CO2 -facilitated pH swings and medium development in two-phase partitioning bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric C; Daugulis, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Production of organic acids in solid-liquid two-phase partitioning bioreactors (TPPBs) is challenging, and highly pH-dependent, as cell growth occurs near neutral pH, while acid sorption occurs only at low pH conditions. CO2 sparging was used to achieve acidic pH swings, facilitating undissociated organic acid uptake without generating osmotic stress inherent in traditional acid/base pH control. A modified cultivation medium was formulated to permit greater pH reduction by CO2 sparging (pH 4.8) compared to typical media (pH 5.3), while still possessing adequate nutrients for extensive cell growth. In situ product recovery (ISPR) of butyric acid (pKa = 4.8) produced by Clostridium tyrobutyricum was achieved through intermittent CO2 sparging while recycling reactor contents through a column packed with absorptive polymer Hytrel® 3078. This polymer was selected on the basis of its composition as a polyether copolymer, and the use of solubility parameters for predicting solute polymer affinity, and was found to have a partition coefficient for butyric acid of 3. Total polymeric extraction of 3.2 g butyric acid with no CO2 mediated pH swings was increased to 4.5 g via CO2 -facilitated pH shifting, despite the buffering capacity of butyric acid, which resists pH shifting. This work shows that CO2 -mediated pH swings have an observable positive effect on organic acid extraction, with improvements well over 150% under optimal conditions in early stage fermentation compared to CO2 -free controls, and this technique can be applied other organic acid fermentations to achieve or improve ISPR.

  19. Structures of three dehydration products of bischofite from in situ synchrotron powder diffraction data (MgCl2.nH2O; n = 1, 2, 4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Dinnebier, Robert E; Hanson, Jonathan C

    2007-04-01

    High-quality in situ synchrotron powder diffraction data have been used to investigate the decomposition products of bischofite in the temperature range 298 production. The same phases were recently found to be of key importance in the understanding of cracks in certain magnesia concrete floors.

  20. Azido-based propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sayles, D.C.

    1987-04-07

    This patent describes an azido-based solid propellant composition having an improved burning rate comprising: a high energy plasticizer of tris-1,2,3(bis(1,2-difluoroamino)ethoxy)propane in an amount from about 24 to about 30 weight percent of the propellant composition; a curative and crosslinking agent of 4,5-epoxycyclohexylmethyl 4'5'-epoxycyclohexylcarboxylate in an amount from about 0.75 to about 1.5 weight percent of the propellant composition; a carboranyl burning rate catalyst of carboranyl-methyl propionate in an amount from about 2 to about 6 weight percent of the propellant composition; graphite linters of about 100 micrometers lengths in an amount from about 1 to about 3 weight percent of the propellant composition; aluminum powder in an amount from about 10 to about 12 weight percent of the propellant composition; aluminum flake in an amount from about 0.5 to about 2 weight percent of the propellant composition; ammonium perchlorate of about 0.9 micrometer diameter in an amount from about 46 to about 52 weight percent of the composition; a processing aid of lecithin in an amount from about 0.1 to about 0.2 weight percent of the propellant composition; and a binder of 2-azidoethyl acrylateacrylic acid copolymer in an amount from about 3 to about 8 weight percent of the propellant composition.

  1. In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part I—Bench-scale microcosm study to assess methylmercury production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States); Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Ave., Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Bench-scale microcosm experiments were designed to provide a better understanding of the potential for Hg methylation in sediments from an aquatic environment. Experiments were conducted to examine the function of sulfate concentration, lactate concentration, the presence/absence of an aqueous inorganic Hg spike, and the presence/absence of inoculums of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, a strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) commonly found in the natural sediments of aquatic environments. Incubations were analyzed for both the rate and extent of (methylmercury) MeHg production. Methylation rates were estimated by analyzing MeHg and Hg after 2, 7, 14, 28, and 42 days. The production of metabolic byproducts, including dissolved gases as a proxy for metabolic utilization of carbon substrate, was also monitored. In all treatments amended with lactate, sulfate, Hg, and SRB, MeHg was produced (37 ng/g-sediment dry weight) after only 48 h of incubation and reached a maximum sediment concentration of 127 ng/g-sediment dry weight after the 42 day incubation period. Aqueous phase production of MeHg was observed to be 10 ng/L after 2 day, reaching a maximum observed concentration of 32.8 ng/L after 14 days, and declining to 10.8 ng/L at the end of the incubation period (42 day). The results of this study further demonstrates that, in the presence of an organic carbon substrate, sulfate, and the appropriate consortia of microorganisms, sedimentary Hg will be transformed into MeHg through bacterial metabolism. Further, this study provided the basis for evaluation of an in-situ subaqueous capping strategy that may limit (or potentially enhance) MeHg production. -- Highlights: • Hg methylation by SRB is limited by the depletion of sulfate and carbon. • Hg methylation is sensitive to competition by methanogens for carbon substrate. • In high lactate environment, all lactate was utilized in the microcosms within seven days. • In the absence of adequate metabolic fuel, Me

  2. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  3. ASRM propellant and igniter propellant development and process scale-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, L. C.; Booth, D. W.; Stanley, C. B.; Ricks, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    A program of formulation and process development for ANB-3652 motor propellant was conducted to validate design concepts and screen critical propellant composition and process parameters. Design experiments resulted in the selection of a less active grade of ferric oxide to provide better burning rate control, the establishment of AP fluidization conditions that minimized the adverse effects of particle attrition, and the selection of a higher mix temperature to improve mechanical properties. It is shown that the propellant can be formulated with AP and aluminum powder from various producers. An extended duration pilot plant run demonstrated stable equipment operation and excellent reproducibility of propellant properties. A similar program of formulation and process optimization culminating in large batch scaleup was conducted for ANB-3672 igniter propellant. The results for both ANB-3652 and ANB 37672 confirmed that their processing characteristics are compatible with full-scale production.

  4. In-situ databases and comparison of ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) products with precursor data, towards an integrated approach for ocean colour validation and climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotas, Vanda; Valente, André; Couto, André B.; Grant, Mike; Chuprin, Andrei; Jackson, Thomas; Groom, Steve; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    2014-05-01

    Ocean colour (OC) is an Oceanic Essential Climate Variable, which is used by climate modellers and researchers. The European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative project, is the ESA response for the need of climate-quality satellite data, with the goal of providing stable, long-term, satellite-based ECV data products. The ESA Ocean Colour CCI focuses on the production of Ocean Colour ECV uses remote sensing reflectances to derive inherent optical properties and chlorophyll a concentration from ESA's MERIS (2002-2012) and NASA's SeaWiFS (1997 - 2010) and MODIS (2002-2012) sensor archives. This work presents an integrated approach by setting up a global database of in situ measurements and by inter-comparing OC-CCI products with pre-cursor datasets. The availability of in situ databases is fundamental for the validation of satellite derived ocean colour products. A global distribution in situ database was assembled, from several pre-existing datasets, with data spanning between 1997 and 2012. It includes in-situ measurements of remote sensing reflectances, concentration of chlorophyll-a, inherent optical properties and diffuse attenuation coefficient. The database is composed from observations of the following datasets: NOMAD, SeaBASS, MERMAID, AERONET-OC, BOUSSOLE and HOTS. The result was a merged dataset tuned for the validation of satellite-derived ocean colour products. This was an attempt to gather, homogenize and merge, a large high-quality bio-optical marine in situ data, as using all datasets in a single validation exercise increases the number of matchups and enhances the representativeness of different marine regimes. An inter-comparison analysis between OC-CCI chlorophyll-a product and satellite pre-cursor datasets was done with single missions and merged single mission products. Single mission datasets considered were SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua and MERIS; merged mission datasets were obtained from the GlobColour (GC) as well as the Making Earth Science

  5. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  6. Understanding in-situ ozone production in the summertime through radical observations and modelling studies during the Clean air for London project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Lisa; Stone, Daniel; Sharp, Thomas; Garraway, Shani; Bannan, Thomas; Percival, Carl; Hopkins, James; Holmes, Rachel; Hamilton, Jacqui; Lee, James; Laufs, Sebastian; Kleffmann, Jörg; Heard, Dwayne

    2014-05-01

    -oxidation products was considered in addition to the measured primary OH reactants. Carbonyl species such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone have been identified as the VOC class dominating organic OH reactivity. As such, together with the direct radical source contribution by photolysis, these species dominate local ozone production in London. Modelling studies comparing the observed carbonyl concentrations with model predictions suggest that over 50% of the total concentration may be directly emitted and, hence, London's in-situ chemistry may be considered to contribute significantly to the ozone levels observed.

  7. In-situ preparation of N-TiO2/graphene nanocomposite and its enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production by H2S splitting under solar light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhirud, Ashwini P.; Sathaye, Shivaram D.; Waichal, Rupali P.; Ambekar, Jalindar D.; Park, Chan-J.; Kale, Bharat B.

    2015-03-01

    Highly monodispersed nitrogen doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully deposited on graphene (N-TiO2/Gr) by a facile in-situ wet chemical method for the first time. N-TiO2/Gr has been further used for photocatalytic hydrogen production using a naturally occurring abundant source of energy i.e. solar light. The N-TiO2/Gr nanocomposite composition was optimized by varying the concentrations of dopant nitrogen and graphene (using various concentrations of graphene) for utmost hydrogen production. The structural, optical and morphological aspects of nanocomposites were studied using XRD, UV-DRS, Raman, XPS, FESEM, and TEM. The structural study of the nanocomposite shows existence of anatase N-TiO2. Further, the details of the components present in the composition were confirmed with Raman and XPS. The morphological study shows that very tiny, 7-10 nm sized, N-TiO2 nanoparticles are deposited on the graphene sheet. The optical study reveals a drastic change in absorption edge and consequent total absorption due to nitrogen doping and presence of graphene. Considering the extended absorption edge to the visible region, these nanocomposites were further used as a photocatalyst to transform hazardous H2S waste into eco-friendly hydrogen using solar light. The N-TiO2/Gr nanocomposite with 2% graphene exhibits enhanced photocatalytic stable hydrogen production i.e. ~5941 μmol h-1 under solar light irradiation using just 0.2 gm nanocomposite, which is much higher as compared to P25, undoped TiO2 and TiO2/Gr nanocomposite. The enhancement in the photocatalytic activity is attributed to `N' doping as well as high specific surface area and charge carrier ability of graphene. The recycling of the photocatalyst shows a good stability of the nanocomposites. This work may provide new insights to design other semiconductor deposited graphene novel nanocomposites as a visible light active photocatalyst.Highly monodispersed nitrogen doped TiO2 nanoparticles were successfully

  8. A review of research in low earth orbit propellant collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lake A.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2015-05-01

    This comprehensive review examines the efforts of previous researchers to develop concepts for propellant-collecting spacecraft, estimate the performance of these systems, and understand the physics involved. Rocket propulsion requires the spacecraft to expend two fundamental quantities: energy and propellant mass. A growing number of spacecraft collect the energy they need to execute propulsive maneuvers in-situ with solar panels. In contrast, every spacecraft using rocket propulsion has carried all of the propellant mass needed for the mission from the ground, which limits the range and mission capabilities. Numerous researchers have explored the concept of collecting propellant mass while in space. These concepts have varied in scale and complexity from chemical ramjets to fusion-driven interstellar vessels. Research into propellant-collecting concepts occurred in distinct eras. During the Cold War, concepts tended to be large, complex, and nuclear powered. After the Cold War, concepts transitioned to solar power sources and more effort has been devoted to detailed analysis of specific components of the propellant-collecting architecture. By detailing the major contributions and limitations of previous work, this review concisely presents the state-of-the-art and outlines five areas for continued research. These areas include air-compatible cathode technology, techniques to improve propellant utilization on atmospheric species, in-space compressor and liquefaction technology, improved hypersonic and hyperthermal free molecular flow inlet designs, and improved understanding of how design parameters affect system performance.

  9. In situ spectral measurements improve the efficiency of light use efficiency models to estimate gross primary productivity in Mediterranean cork oak woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerasoli, S.; Silva, J. M.; Carvalhais, N.; Correia, A.; Costa e Silva, F.; Pereira, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    The Light Use Efficiency (LUE) concept is usually applied to retrieve Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) estimates in models integrating spectral indexes, namely Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), considered proxies of biophysical properties of vegetation. The integration of spectral measurements into LUE models can increase the robustness of GPP estimates by optimizing particular parameters of the model. NDVI and PRI are frequently obtained by broad band sensors on remote platforms at low spatial resolution (e.g. MODIS). In highly heterogeneous ecosystems such spectral information may not be representative of the dynamic response of the ecosystem to climate variables. In Mediterranean oak woodlands different plant functional types (PFT): trees canopy, shrubs and herbaceous layer, contribute to the overall Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). In situ spectral measurements can provide useful information on each PFT and its temporal variability. The objectives of this study were: i) to analyze the temporal variability of NDVI, PRI and others spectral indices for the three PFT, their response to climate variables and their relationship with biophysical properties of vegetation; ii) to optimize a LUE model integrating selected spectral indexes in which the contribution of each PFT to the overall GPP is estimated individually; iii) to compare the performance of disaggregated GPP estimates and lumped GPP estimates, evaluated against eddy covariance measurements. Ground measurements of vegetation reflectance were performed in a cork oak woodland located in Coruche, Portugal (39°8'N, 8°19'W) where carbon and water fluxes are continuously measured by eddy covariance. Between April 2011 and June 2013 reflectance measurements of the herbaceous layer, shrubs and trees canopy were acquired with a FieldSpec3 spectroradiometer (ASD Inc.) which provided data in the range of 350-2500nm. Measurements were repeated approximately on

  10. A Pd-Catalyzed in situ domino process for mild and quantitative production of 2,5-dimethylfuran directly from carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hu; Zhao, Wenfeng; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    An in situ domino process has been developed to be highly efficient for direct and mild conversion of various hexose sugars to the biofuel 2,5-dimethylfuran in almost quantitative yields, without separation of unstable intermediates at 120 °C in n-butanol, by using polymethylhydrosiloxane and hyd...

  11. A whole life assessment of extruded double base propellants

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, J.

    2013-01-01

    The manufacturing process for solventless extruded double base propellants involves a number of rolling and reworking stages. Throughout these processes a decrease in weight average molecular weight was observed, this was attributed to denitration. Differential scanning calorimetery data indicated that the reworking stages of extruded double base propellant manufacture were crucial to the homogenisation of the propellant mixture. To determine the homogeneity of the final extruded product, a s...

  12. Solid Propellant Flame Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    400 jm to reach the maximum flame temperature, a distance that can be reduced by replacing the HTPB binder with a polyester or CMDB binder. The...the dark zone for propellants similar to HIX2 is 2-2.5 mm at 1.8 MPa (18 atm, 265 psia) (Ref. 22,187). In contrast, the dark zone for HMX CMDB ...propellants eliminates the dark zone is not surprising, since TMETN is a nitrate ester as was the double-base matrix of Kubota’s HMX CMDB propellant. A

  13. High temperature propellant development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, F. A.

    1981-01-01

    It is reported that the neccessary technology has been developed and demonstrated for the manufacture of heat-sterilizable solid propellants which meet specific ballistic goals. It is shown that: (1) phosphate doping of ammonium perchlorate significantly enhances the thermal stability of the substance; (2) grinding the ammonium perchlorate to reduce particle size further increases thermal stability; and (3) unsaturated polymers such as the polybutadienes can be successfully used in a heat-sterilizable propellant system. Among the topics considered by the study are oxidizers, dopants, binders, and the thermal cycling of 70 lb and 600 lb propellant grains.

  14. Propeller TAP flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Bille, Camilla; Wamberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if a propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator (TAP) flap can be used for breast reconstruction. Fifteen women were reconstructed using a propeller TAP flap, an implant, and an ADM. Preoperative colour Doppler ultrasonography was used for patient selection...... major complications needing additional surgery. One flap was lost due to a vascular problem. Breast reconstruction can be performed by a propeller TAP flap without cutting the descending branch of the thoracodorsal vessels. However, the authors would recommend that a small cuff of muscle is left around...

  15. Performance optimization of marine propellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sup Lee

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, a design method for increasing performance of the marine propellers including the WCT propeller is suggested. It is described to maximize the performance of the propeller by adjusting expanded areas of the propeller blade. Results show that efficiency can be increased up to over 2% through the suggested design method.

  16. Mercury in the mix: An in situ mesocosm approach to assess relative contributions of mercury sources to methylmercury production and bioaccumulation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Ackerman, J.; Stumpner, E. B.; DeWild, J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Tate, M.; Ogorek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered one of the greatest threats to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Estuary ecosystems. This threat is driven by the transformation of Hg, deposited in the Delta from erosion of upstream historic mining debris and atmospheric deposition, by native bacteria into the more toxic and biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), in the wetlands and sediment of the Delta. To effectively manage this threat, a quantitative understanding of the relative contribution of the different Hg sources to MeHg formation is needed. Mass balance estimates indicate as much as 99% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives via tributary inputs. Of the tributary Hg load, approximately 90% is adsorbed to suspended particles from tributary discharge and 10% is in the dissolved fraction, potentially of atmospheric origin. In comparison, the remaining 1-2% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives through direct atmospheric deposition (wet and dry). The relative importance of these sources to MeHg production within the Delta is not linearly related to the mass inputs because atmospherically-derived Hg is believed to be more reactive than sediment-bound Hg with respect to MeHg formation. We conducted an in situ mesocosm dosing experiment where different Hg sources to the Delta (direct atmospheric, dissolved riverine and suspended sediment) were "labeled" with different stable Hg isotopes and added to mesocosms within four different wetlands. Mercury isotopes added with the streambed sediments were equilibrated in sealed containers for six months; while the Hg isotopes associated with the precipitation and river water were equilibrated for 24 hours prior to use. After adding the isotopes, we sampled the water column, overlying air, bottom sediments and fish (Gambusia) at time intervals up to 30 days. Preliminary results from this experiment suggest that aqueous Hg sources (Hg introduced with precipitation and filtered river water) are 10

  17. Hydrodynamics of Ship Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslin, John P.; Andersen, Poul

    This book deals with flows over propellers operating behind ships, and the hydrodynamic forces and moments which the propeller generates on the shaft and on the ship hull.The first part of the text is devoted to fundamentals of the flow about hydrofoil sections (with and without cavitation......) and about wings. It then treats propellers in uniform flow, first via advanced actuator disc modelling, and then using lifting-line theory. Pragmatic guidance is given for design and evaluation of performance, including the use of computer modelling.The second part covers the development of unsteady forces...... arising from operation in non-uniform hull wakes. First, by a number of simplifications, various aspects of the problem are dealt with separately until the full problem of a non-cavitating, wide-bladed propeller in a wake is treated by a new and completely developed theory. Next, the complicated problem...

  18. In Situ Mass Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The In Situ Mass Spectrometer projects focuses on a specific subsystem to leverage advanced research for laser-based in situ mass spectrometer development...

  19. Is There Any Difference between the In Situ and Systemic IL-10 and IFN-γ Production when Clinical Forms of Cutaneous Sporotrichosis Are Compared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Fernanda N.; Schubach, Armando O.; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Lyra, Marcelo R.; Vasconcellos, Érica C. F.; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia M.; Conceição-Silva, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex can produce skin lesions in humans, commonly lymphocutaneous (LC) and fixed (F) forms of sporotrichosis. Some authors have suggested that clinical forms are influenced by differences in virulence and genetic profile of isolates. But little is known about the role of immune response in determining the clinical outcome of sporotrichosis. To verify the profile of systemic and in situ IFN-γ and IL-10 expression in sporotrichosis patients, and consequently to detect any difference between the two compartments and/or clinical presentation, we quantified the number of IFN-γ and IL-10 producer peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with S. schenckii antigen (Ss-Ag) by Elispot, and quantified cytokines expression by in situ immunohistochemistry in the same patient. Three groups were formed: 1- LC (n = 9); 2- F (n = 10); 3- healthy individuals (n = 14). All sporotrichosis patients produced high amounts of systemic IFN- γ when compared to uninfected individuals. No differences were observed between LC and F groups. Regarding in situ IL-10 expression, a difference between LC and F groups was observed: LC lesions presented higher amounts of IL-10 than F lesions differently from systemic IL-10 which showed similarities. Our data suggests that LC lesions present higher IL-10 expression which could be related to regulatory mechanisms for compensating the tissue injury, however favoring fungal persistence in the lesions. Surprisingly, there were no differences in systemic and in situ IFN- γ expression between CL and F patients, although it was significantly higher expressed in these patients than in healthy individuals. PMID:27622513

  20. Is There Any Difference between the In Situ and Systemic IL-10 and IFN-γ Production when Clinical Forms of Cutaneous Sporotrichosis Are Compared?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Fernanda N; Schubach, Armando O; Pimentel, Maria Inês; Lyra, Marcelo R; Vasconcellos, Érica C F; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia M; Conceição-Silva, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Fungus of the Sporothrix schenckii complex can produce skin lesions in humans, commonly lymphocutaneous (LC) and fixed (F) forms of sporotrichosis. Some authors have suggested that clinical forms are influenced by differences in virulence and genetic profile of isolates. But little is known about the role of immune response in determining the clinical outcome of sporotrichosis. To verify the profile of systemic and in situ IFN-γ and IL-10 expression in sporotrichosis patients, and consequently to detect any difference between the two compartments and/or clinical presentation, we quantified the number of IFN-γ and IL-10 producer peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with S. schenckii antigen (Ss-Ag) by Elispot, and quantified cytokines expression by in situ immunohistochemistry in the same patient. Three groups were formed: 1- LC (n = 9); 2- F (n = 10); 3- healthy individuals (n = 14). All sporotrichosis patients produced high amounts of systemic IFN- γ when compared to uninfected individuals. No differences were observed between LC and F groups. Regarding in situ IL-10 expression, a difference between LC and F groups was observed: LC lesions presented higher amounts of IL-10 than F lesions differently from systemic IL-10 which showed similarities. Our data suggests that LC lesions present higher IL-10 expression which could be related to regulatory mechanisms for compensating the tissue injury, however favoring fungal persistence in the lesions. Surprisingly, there were no differences in systemic and in situ IFN- γ expression between CL and F patients, although it was significantly higher expressed in these patients than in healthy individuals.

  1. Solid propellant processing factor in rocket motor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The ways are described by which propellant processing is affected by choices made in designing rocket engines. Tradeoff studies, design proof or scaleup studies, and special design features are presented that are required to obtain high product quality, and optimum processing costs. Processing is considered to include the operational steps involved with the lining and preparation of the motor case for the grain; the procurement of propellant raw materials; and propellant mixing, casting or extrusion, curing, machining, and finishing. The design criteria, recommended practices, and propellant formulations are included.

  2. Environmental impact evaluation of static tests of solid propellant propellers; Evaluation de l`impact sur l`environnement des essais statiques de propulseurs a propergol solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguesse, T.; Moreau, S. [DGA, Direction des Missiles et de l`Espace, Centre d`Achevement et d`Essais des Propulseurs et Engins, 33 - Saint Medard en Jalles (France)

    1996-12-31

    The CAEPE, the French Centre of Propellers and Engines Completion and Testing is in charge of the static tests of solid propellant fuelled propellers. In order to determine the schedule of firing permissions, predictive means are used to predict the environmental impact of propellers firing. Calculation and simulation codes are used to build maps of acoustic nuisance and acid fallout. These codes, which use in-situ meteorological radio sounding data, were progressively adjusted during testing of engines with different sizes (up to the Ariane 5 P230 auxiliary propeller). In this presentation, the authors focus on a model derived from the G.A. Briggs` model for the ascension of high temperature effluents. The correct simulation of acid rains requires a good description of this phenomenon. Concerning the other aspects of the codes, the main references are given. (J.S.) 15 refs.

  3. In Situ Manufacturing of Plastics and Composites to Support H&R Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Susana; Makel, Darby B.; Blizman, Brandon

    2006-01-01

    With the new direction of NASA to emphasize the exploration of the Moon, Mars and beyond, quick development and demonstration of efficient systems for In Situ Resources Utilization (ISRU) is more critical and timely than ever before. Beyond the production of life support consumables or propellants, long term missions will require much greater levels of utilization of indigenous resources, including fabrication of habitats, radiation shielding, and replacement parts and tools. This paper reports the development of a reactor system for the synthesis of polyethylene from carbon dioxide and water. One technology commonly found in most NASA In Situ Resources Utilization scenarios is the use of the Sabatier reaction and water electrolysis to produce methane and oxygen. The system presented uses methane and oxygen to produce ethylene, and subsequently ethylene is polymerized to produce polyethylene. The process selected enables the synthesis of high-density polyethylene suitable for the fabrication of many products for space exploration, including sheets, films, channels, etc, which can be used to construct extraterrestrial habitats, tools, replacement parts, etc. Conventional fabrication processes, such as extrusion and injection molding, which are used in the fabrication of polyethylene parts, can be adapted for space operation, making polyethylene a versatile feedstock for future in-situ manufacturing plants. Studies show that polyethylene is a very good radiation shield material, making it very suitable for construction of habitats, as well as incorporation in space suits. For the fabrication of massive structures, polyethylene can be combined with indigenous soil to maximize the use of unprocessed resources, either enclosed in channels, bags, etc., or compounded in varying proportions. The focus of this paper is to present current progress in the development of manufacturing systems and processes for the production of plastics and composites utilizing indigenous

  4. SURFEX modeling of soil moisture fields over the Valencia Anchor Station and their comparison to different SMOS products and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Fernandez-Moran, Roberto; Samiro Khodayar-Pardo, D.

    2016-07-01

    (resolution 15 km) and level-3 (resolution 25 km) soil moisture maps and high resolution SMOS pixel-disaggregated soil moisture products, obtained by combining SMOS level-2 with MODIS NDVI and LST data (resolution 1 km) (Piles et al., 2011). In situ measurements from the Valencia Anchor Station network of soil moisture stations are also available as reference covering a reduced number of different vegetation cover and soil types, as well as estimations from the ESA ELBARA-II L-band radiometer installed over a vineyard crop to monitor SMOS validation conditions. Different interpolation methods have been applied to all significant atmospheric forcing parameters from the two met stations available in the area (pressure, temperature, relative humidity and precipitation) in order to obtain a good representation of soil conditions. The period of investigation covers the complete year 2012 of which we will particularly focus on selected periods.

  5. In situ macromolecular crystallography using microbeams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Danny; Owen, Robin L; Aishima, Jun; Foadi, James; Morgan, Ann W; Robinson, James I; Nettleship, Joanne E; Owens, Raymond J; Moraes, Isabel; Fry, Elizabeth E; Grimes, Jonathan M; Harlos, Karl; Kotecha, Abhay; Ren, Jingshan; Sutton, Geoff; Walter, Thomas S; Stuart, David I; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2012-05-01

    Despite significant progress in high-throughput methods in macromolecular crystallography, the production of diffraction-quality crystals remains a major bottleneck. By recording diffraction in situ from crystals in their crystallization plates at room temperature, a number of problems associated with crystal handling and cryoprotection can be side-stepped. Using a dedicated goniometer installed on the microfocus macromolecular crystallography beamline I24 at Diamond Light Source, crystals have been studied in situ with an intense and flexible microfocus beam, allowing weakly diffracting samples to be assessed without a manual crystal-handling step but with good signal to noise, despite the background scatter from the plate. A number of case studies are reported: the structure solution of bovine enterovirus 2, crystallization screening of membrane proteins and complexes, and structure solution from crystallization hits produced via a high-throughput pipeline. These demonstrate the potential for in situ data collection and structure solution with microbeams.

  6. Propellers in yaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribner, Herbert S

    1945-01-01

    It was realized as early as 1909 that a propeller in yaw develops a side force like that of a fin. In 1917, R. G. Harris expressed this force in terms of the torque coefficient for the unyawed propeller. Of several attempts to express the side force directly in terms of the shape of the blades, however, none has been completely satisfactory. An analysis that incorporates induction effects not adequately covered in previous work and that gives good agreement with experiment over a wide range of operating conditions is presented. The present analysis shows that the fin analogy may be extended to the form of the side-force expression and that the effective fin area may be taken as the projected side area of the propeller.

  7. Self-propelled droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Maass, Corinna C.

    2016-11-01

    Self-propelled droplets are a special kind of self-propelled matter that are easily fabricated by standard microfluidic tools and locomote for a certain time without external sources of energy. The typical driving mechanism is a Marangoni flow due to gradients in the interfacial energy on the droplet interface. In this article we review the hydrodynamic prerequisites for self-sustained locomotion and present two examples to realize those conditions for emulsion droplets, i.e. droplets stabilized by a surfactant layer in a surrounding immiscible liquid. One possibility to achieve self-propelled motion relies on chemical reactions affecting the surface active properties of the surfactant molecules. The other relies on micellar solubilization of the droplet phase into the surrounding liquid phase. Remarkable cruising ranges can be achieved in both cases and the relative insensitivity to their own `exhausts' allows to additionally study collective phenomena.

  8. Kinetic evaluation of propellants decomposition via Kissinger and Flynn-Wall-Ozawa method (Poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guns, S.; Krabbendam-La Haye, E.L.M.; Klerk, W.P.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Nitrocellulose (NC) based propellants are intrinsically unstable due to degradation of NC as a function of time and temperature. A propellant that decomposes, dissipates heat to the surrounding. Self-heating of the propellants starts when this heat production becomes larger than its dissipation to t

  9. 78 FR 45052 - Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Propeller, Inc. Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Manager, Engine & Propeller Directorate, Aircraft Certification Service. BILLING CODE 4910-13-P ...-07-AD; Amendment 39-17520; AD 2013-15-04] RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Hartzell Propeller, Inc. Propellers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY:...

  10. Specific Impulses Losses in Solid Propellant Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-17

    to use the collision function form proposed by Golovin to simplify this production term: 4C><=) <P- .: Accordingly: m hence, by integration: Now, we...November 21, 1940 in Paris, Seine. VFirst Thesis. "Contribution to the Study of Specific i Impulse Loss in Solid Propellant Rockets." Second Thesis

  11. A suitable for large scale production, flexible and transparent surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for in situ ultrasensitive analysis of chemistry reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P. X.; Shang, S. B.; Hu, L. T.; Liu, X. Y.; Qiu, H. W.; Li, C. H.; Huo, Y. Y.; Jiang, S. Z.; Yang, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a high cost-performance surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) flexible substrate is demonstrated, which endowed with excellent optical transparency, high SERS activity and large scale. This SERS flexible substrate of Ag/Cu/Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) was prepared by replacing Cu atoms with Ag atoms in situ on Cu nano-film. The Ag/Cu/PET flexible substrate shows high sensitivity in SERS detection and the minimum detected concentration of R6G can reach 10-10 M. In addition, the residual methylene blue (MB) on a fish surface was selected as the analyte, the results no doubt shows the potential of SERS technology application in food detection.

  12. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  13. Disposal of Liquid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-13

    SYNTHESIS OF LIQUID PROPELLANT Hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN), prepared via the electrolysis of nitric acid, is commercially available as a high-purity...stack gases, and brine solution from the wet scrubber (82). 5 Applicability/Limitation Most types of solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes or

  14. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  15. In-situ transesterification of seeds of invasive Chinese tallow trees (Triadica sebifera L.) in a microwave batch system (GREEN(3)) using hexane as co-solvent: Biodiesel production and process optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekati-Goudarzi, Mohamad; Boldor, Dorin; Nde, Divine B

    2016-02-01

    In-situ transesterification (simultaneous extraction and transesterification) of Chinese tallow tree seeds into methyl esters using a batch microwave system was investigated in this study. A high degree of oil extraction and efficient conversion of oil to biodiesel were found in the proposed range. The process was further optimized in terms of product yields and conversion rates using Doehlert optimization methodology. Based on the experimental results and statistical analysis, the optimal production yield conditions for this process were determined as: catalyst concentration of 1.74wt.%, solvent ratio about 3 (v/w), reaction time of 20min and temperature of 58.1°C. H(+)NMR was used to calculate reaction conversion. All methyl esters produced using this method met ASTM biodiesel quality specifications.

  16. Ammonium nitrate: a promising rocket propellant oxidizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oommen; Jain

    1999-06-30

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is extensively used in the area of fertilizers and explosives. It is present as the major component in most industrial explosives. Its use as an oxidizer in the area of propellants, however, is not as extensive as in explosive compositions or gas generators. With the growing demand for environmental friendly chlorine free propellants, many attempts have been made of late to investigate oxidizers producing innocuous combustion products. AN, unlike the widely used ammonium perchlorate, produces completely ecofriendly smokeless products. Besides, it is one of the cheapest and easily available compounds. However, its use in large rocket motors is restricted due to some of its adverse characteristics like hygroscopicity, near room temperature phase transformation involving a volume change, and low burning rate (BR) and energetics. The review is an attempt to consolidate the information available on the various issues pertaining to its use as a solid propellant oxidizer. Detailed discussions on the aspects relating to phase modifications, decomposition chemistry, and BR and energetics of AN-based propellants, are presented. To make the review more comprehensive brief descriptions of the history, manufacture, safety, physical and chemical properties and various other applications of the salt are also included. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Microwave assisted biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas L. seed by two-step in situ process: optimization using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaliliannosrati, Hamidreza; Amin, Nor Aishah Saidina; Talebian-Kiakalaieh, Amin; Noshadi, Iman

    2013-05-01

    The synthesis of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) by a two-step in situ (reactive) esterification/transesterification from Jatropha curcas L. (JCL) seeds using microwave system has been investigated. Free fatty acid was reduced from 14% to less than 1% in the first step using H2SO4 as acid catalyst after 35 min of microwave irradiation heating. The organic phase in the first step was subjected to a second reaction by adding 5 N KOH in ethanol as the basic catalyst. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was utilized to design the experiments and analyze the influence of process variables (particles seed size, time of irradiation, agitation speed and catalyst loading) on conversion of triglycerides (TGs) in the second step. The highest triglycerides conversion to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) was 97.29% at the optimum conditions:seed size, 12.21 min irradiation time, 8.15 ml KOH catalyst loading and 331.52 rpm agitation speed in the 110 W microwave power system.

  18. An Efficient Heat Exchanger for In Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  19. In situ amplification of DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome in cellular nuclei by PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锡元; 姜海波; 李立家; 马琦; 杨建琪; 刘汀

    1996-01-01

    Using single primer pairs Y3 and Y4, in siru polymerase chain reaction (in situ PCR) was successfully performed on the specimen slides of peripheral leukocytes. By both of the direct digpxiginin-11-dUTP incorporation into PCR products with in situ PCR (direct in situ PCR) and in situ PCR followed by detection of in situ hybridization (indirect in siru PCR), DNA fragments specific for human Y chromosome were obviously amplified in cellular nuclei of specimens on the slides. The results were verified by Southern analysis. The methodology of in situ PCR and its application were discussed.

  20. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  1. Simulating the Composite Propellant Manufacturing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Suzanne; Love, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    There is a strategic interest in understanding how the propellant manufacturing process contributes to military capabilities outside the United States. The paper will discuss how system dynamics (SD) has been applied to rapidly assess the capabilities and vulnerabilities of a specific composite propellant production complex. These facilities produce a commonly used solid propellant with military applications. The authors will explain how an SD model can be configured to match a specific production facility followed by a series of scenarios designed to analyze operational vulnerabilities. By using the simulation model to rapidly analyze operational risks, the analyst gains a better understanding of production complexities. There are several benefits of developing SD models to simulate chemical production. SD is an effective tool for characterizing complex problems, especially the production process where the cascading effect of outages quickly taxes common understanding. By programming expert knowledge into an SD application, these tools are transformed into a knowledge management resource that facilitates rapid learning without requiring years of experience in production operations. It also permits the analyst to rapidly respond to crisis situations and other time-sensitive missions. Most importantly, the quantitative understanding gained from applying the SD model lends itself to strategic analysis and planning.

  2. A novel flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph for early melanoma detection, skin analysis, testing of anti-age products, and in situ nanoparticle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution 3D microscopy based on multiphoton induced autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been introduced in 1990. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have first been launched by JenLab company with the tomography DermaInspect®. This year, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel multiphoton tomograph MPTflex, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. Improved image quality and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are achieved by a very short source-drain spacing, by larger active areas of the detectors and by single photon counting (SPC) technology. Shorter image acquisition time due to improved image quality reduces artifacts and simplifies the operation of the system. The compact folded optical design and the light-weight structure of the optical head eases the handling. Dual channel detectors enable to distinguish between intratissue elastic fibers and collagenous structures simultaneously. Through the use of piezo-driven optics a stack of optical cross-sections (optical sectioning) can be acquired and 3D imaging can be performed. The multiphoton excitation of biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin is done by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key femtosescond near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid high-quality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research.

  3. In-situ X-Ray Analysis of Rapid Thermal Processing for Thin-Film Solar Cells: Closing the Gap between Production and Laboratory Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, Michael F. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); van Hest, Maikel F. A. M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-21

    For materials synthesis, it is well known that the material final state may not reach equilibrium and depends on the synthetic process. In particular, processes that quickly remove the available energy from the material may leave it in a metastable state and the metastability may actually impart desirable functional properties. By its very nature, Rapid thermal processing (RTP) is ideally suited to produce such metastable materials. However, metastability and the dynamics of reaching a metastable state are poorly understood, since this is best accomplished through in situ monitoring. In this regard, RTP is particularly challenging as the processing time are very short (seconds to minutes). As a result, there is only poor understanding, and hence use, of RTP in industry. This is potentially a cost-increasing limitation, because RTP can decrease cost by decreasing processing time, and as such, increase throughput and decrease the total thermal budget of processing - a significant cost. RTP is already being used for key processing steps in PV technologies. With silicon wafer PV, it is used for establishing electrical contact between the Ag metal grid and the silicon (known as firing). In this process, a silicon wafer with deposited metal/frit in a grid pattern is heated rapidly to temperatures between 750 and 800 ºC. The processing time when the temperature is held above 600ºC is short (<5 seconds). This process has historically been optimized empirically and it is unclear how the thermal processing affects formation of the final contact between the metal and the silicon. In the case of thin-film PV, RTP has been demonstrated in the process of making absorber layers, i.e. CIGS and CZTS. Use of RTP can reduce the processing time from 10s of minutes to seconds, reducing the thermal budget and increasing the throughput significantly. The conversion from precursor material to final PV material is not well understood, and most of the process optimization is done

  4. Robust Exploration and Commercial Missions to the Moon Using NTR LANTR Propulsion and Lunar-Derived Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowski, Stanley K.; Ryan, Stephen W.; Burke, Laura M.; McCurdy, David R.; Fittje, James E.; Joyner, Claude R.

    2017-01-01

    The nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) has frequently been identified as a key space asset required for the human exploration of Mars. This proven technology can also provide the affordable access through cislunar space necessary for commercial development and sustained human presence on the Moon. In his post-Apollo Integrated Space Program Plan (1970-1990), Wernher von Braun, proposed a reusable nuclear thermal propulsion stage (NTPS) to deliver cargo and crew to the Moon to establish a lunar base before undertaking human missions to Mars. The NTR option was selected by von Braun because it was a demonstrated technology capable of generating both high thrust and high specific impulse (Isp 900 s) twice that of todays best chemical rockets. In NASAs Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 study, the crewed Mars transfer vehicle used three 25 klbf Pewee engines the smallest and highest performing engine tested in the Rover program along with graphite composite fuel. Smaller, lunar transfer vehicles consisting of a NTPS using three approximately 16.5 klbf Small Nuclear Rocket Engines (SNREs), an in-line propellant tank, plus the payload can enable a variety of reusable lunar missions. These include cargo delivery and crewed lunar landing missions. Even weeklong tourism missions carrying passengers into lunar orbit for a day of sightseeing and picture taking are possible. The NTR can play an important role in the next phase of lunar exploration and development by providing an affordable in-space lunar transportation system (LTS) that can allow initial outposts to evolve into settlements supported by a variety of commercial activities such as in-situ propellant production used to supply strategically located propellant depots and transportation nodes. The utilization of iron-rich volcanic glass or lunar polar ice (LPI) deposits (each estimated at billions of metric tons) for propellant production can significantly reduce the launch mass requirements from Earth and can

  5. In situ vitrification: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, L.L.; Fields, D.E.

    1989-11-01

    The in situ vitrification process (ISV) converts contaminated soils and sludges to a glass and crystalline product. The process appears to be ideally suited for on site treatment of both wet and dry wastes. Basically, the system requires four molybdenum electrodes, an electrical power system for vitrifying the soil, a hood to trap gaseous effluents, an off-gas treatment system, an off-gas cooling system, and a process control station. Mounted in three transportable trailers, the ISV process can be moved from site to site. The process has the potential for treating contaminated soils at most 13 m deep. The ISV project has won a number of outstanding achievement awards. The process has also been patented with exclusive worldwide rights being granted to Battelle Memorial Institute for nonradioactive applications. While federal applications still belong to the Department of Energy, Battelle transferred the rights of ISV for non-federal government, chemical hazardous wastes to a separate corporation in 1989 called Geosafe. This report gives a review of the process including current operational behavior and applications.

  6. Chemically enhanced in situ recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, T. [CH2M Hill, Denver, CO (United States); Pitts, M.; Wyatt, K. [Surtek, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Chemically enhanced recovery is a promising alternative to current technologies for management of subsurface releases of organic liquids. Through the inclusion of surfactants, solvents, polymers, and/or alkaline agents to a waterflood, the transport of targeted organic compounds can be increased and rates of recovery enhanced. By far, the vast majority of work done in the field of chemically enhanced recovery has been at a laboratory scale. The following text focuses on chemically enhanced recovery from a field application perspective with emphasis given to chlorinated solvents in a low permeability setting. While chlorinated solvents are emphasized, issues discussed are also relevant to organic liquids less dense than water such as petroleum products. Topics reviewed include: (1) Description of technology; (2) General technology considerations; (3) Low permeability media considerations; (4) Cost and reliability considerations; (5) Commercial availability; and (6) Case histories. Through this paper an appreciation is developed of both the potential and limitations of chemically enhanced recovery. Excluded from the scope of this paper is the in situ destruction of organic compounds through processes such as chemical or biological oxidation, chemically enhanced recovery of inorganic compounds, and ex situ soil treatment processes. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. New Delivery Systems and Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Dolovich

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC propellants from industrial and household products has been agreed to by over 165 countires of which more than 135 are developing countries. The timetable for this process is outlined in the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer document and in several subsequent amendments. Pressured metered dose inhalers (pMDIs for medical use have been granted temporary exemptions until replacement formulations, providing the same medication via the same route, and with the same efficacy and safety profiles, are approved for human use. Hydrofluoroalkanes (HFAs are the alternative propellants for CFCs-12 and -114. Their potential for damage to the ozone layer is nonexistent, and while they are greenhouse gases, their global warming potential is a fraction (one-tenth of that of CFCs. Replacement formulations for almost all inhalant respiratory medications have been or are being produced and tested; in Canada, it is anticipated that the transition to these HFA or CFC-free pMDIs will be complete by the year 2005. Initially, an HFA pMDI was to be equivalent to the CFC pMDI being replaced, in terms of aerosol properties and effective clinical dose. However, this will not necessarily be the situation, particularly for some corticosteroid products. Currently, only one CFC-free formulation is available in Canada – Airomir, a HFA salbutamol pMDI. This paper discusses the in vitro aerosol characteristics, in vivo deposition and clinical data for several HFA pMDIs for which there are data available in the literature. Alternative delivery systems to the pMDI, namely, dry powder inhalers and nebulizers, are briefly reviewed.

  8. Waste reduction at a propellant manufacturing site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, L.A. [Science Applications International Corp., Hackensack, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    It is the US Army policy to reduce the volume and toxicity of hazardous waste generated by its operations and activities. The Army established a goal to reduce 1985 waste generation levels by 50% by the year 1992, with additional reductions proposed through 1999 per Army guidance. To assist in accomplishing this goal, the Production Base Modernization Activity under a program sponsored by the US Army Materiel Command contracted Science Applications International Corporation to conduct a waste minimization audit at Radford Army Ammunition Plant. This study addressed hazardous wastes as well as non-hazardous oily wastes. The investigation was conducted in three phases to document how hazardous and oily wastes are produced and to recommend waste reduction alternatives. Radford Army Ammunition Plant (RAAP) produces in-process materials such as nitric and sulfuric acids, and propellant components including nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin. In addition, to propellants, the explosives trinitrotoluene and diethylene glycol dinitrate can be produced. The manufacture of military propellants generates the majority of waste at the facility. This paper will present the results of the RAAP Hazmin study, focusing on the major waste generating processes involved with propellant manufacture, Hazmin options suggested to minimize waste generation, and lessons learned.

  9. In Situ Aerosol Detector Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is developing new platform systems that have the potential to benefit Earth science research activities, which include in situ instruments for atmospheric...

  10. Optimum Disposition of Metal Particles in the Propellant Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid L. Minkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the dispersed metal in solid propellants to increase the temperature of combustion products leads to such a problem as the specific impulse loss due to the incomplete combustion of metal particles in the exhaust products. A redistribution of metal loaded into the propellant grain is one of the methods to decrease the specific impulse loss. This paper reports on the ways to obtain the optimum metal particle disposition for the case-bounded propellant grain of tube cross-sectional type. Three different approaches to analyze the metal combustion efficiency are discussed. The influence of the dynamic nonequilibrium of two-phase flow on the optimum metal particles disposition in the propellant grain of tube cross-sectional type is investigated.

  11. Some Observations on the Ignition of Composite Solid Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kishore

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat-up times derived from studies on the ignition characteristics of a few model composite solid propellants, containing polystyrene, carboxy-terminated polybutadiene, plasticised polyvinyl chloride and polyphenol formaldehyde as binders, show that they are directly proportional to the mass of the sample and inversely proportional to the heat flux. Propellant weight-loss prior to ignition and high pressure ignition temperature data on the propellants, ammonium per chlorate, and binders show that the ignition is governed by the gasification of the binder pyrolysis products. The activation energy for the gasification of the pyrolysed polymer products corresponds to their ignition behaviour suggesting that propellant ignition is controlled by the binder.

  12. LAI, FAPAR and FCOVER ground-truth map creation from FASat-C satellite imagery and in-situ measurements in Chimbarongo, Chile, for satellite products validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Latorre-Sánchez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El proceso de validación es fundamental en teledetección para garantizar la calidad de los productos obtenidos a partir de las observaciones de satélite. En el caso concreto de productos de vegetación, es necesario disponer de datos verdad-terreno de diferentes tipos de ecosistemas, y desarrollar estrategias de muestreo y escalado que permitan la caracterización de la superficie y la correcta relación del tamaño de pixel que se desea validar. En este caso práctico, se presenta la metodología aplicada en el contexto del proyecto FP7 ImagineS (Implementing Multi-scale Agricultural Indicators Exploiting Sentinels para la validación a partir de datos in-situ de los productos globales de LAI, FAPAR y cobertura vegetal. Estos productos se generan de forma operativa a 1 km de resolución espacial y 10 días de frecuencia temporal a partir de las observaciones de PROBA-V en la componente global del servicio europeo Copernicus de superficie terrestre (Copernicus Global Land Service. En particular, se presentan los resultados de la campaña de campo realizada en enero de 2015 en la zona agrícola de Chimbarongo, Chile, donde se aplica la metodología de escalado de datos de campo y generación de mapas verdad-terreno a partir de las observaciones del satélite chileno FASat-C de 5,8 m de resolución espacial, y utilizando técnicas de regresión multivariada por mínimos cuadrados. Finalmente, se ha aplicado el método a una imagen Landsat-8 de 30 m de resolución para analizar la influencia de la imagen en los mapas verdad-terreno utilizados para validar. Los resultados demuestran la fiabilidad de la metodología empleada, y la consistencia del método respecto a la imagen de alta resolución utilizada, obteniéndose un menor RMSE en los mapas generados a partir de FASat-C de mayor resolución espacial. Los mapas verdad-terreno se han comparado con los productos generados a partir de PROBA-V a 1 km en Copernicus Global Land y con el producto de

  13. Understanding evolution of product composition and volatility distribution through in-situ GC × GC analysis: a case study of longifolene ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting volatility and polarity based on chromatographic information was developed and applied to the smog chamber ozonolysis of the sesquiterpene longifolene. The products were collected and analyzed using a GC × GC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG and a quadrupole Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. All the secondary organic aerosol (SOA was produced within the first half hour of the experiment. However, the oxidation level of the organic aerosol, as inferred from the fraction of ion m/z 44, suggested continued evolution of the SOA over the subsequent hours. Measurements of speciated organic compounds using 2D-TAG confirm that the composition of the particles changed over the course of the experiment. Nearly 200 oxidation products (thought to be mostly ketones and acids were observed with 2D-TAG, but most could not be identified definitively due to a lack of standards and the absence of likely sesquiterpene oxidation products in available mass spectral databases. To categorize the observed products, the vapor pressure and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C of observed compounds were estimated based on their two-dimensional chromatographic retention times relative to those of known standards, establishing a retention time correlation (RTC method for using 2D-TAG to better constrain important modelling parameters. The product distribution continuously evolved in volatility and oxygenation during 5 h of oxidation. Using peak area as the best available proxy for mass, we conclude that the product mixture includes many non-negligible products; the most abundant 3 compounds accounted for only half of the total observed peak area and 80 % of peak area was spread across 15 compounds. The data provide evidence for three conclusions: (1 2D-TAG provides valuable volatility and oxygenation information even in the absence of definitive species identification, (2 complex particle-phase chemistry causes

  14. Understanding evolution of product composition and volatility distribution through in situ GC × GC analysis: a case study of longifolene ozonolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Donahue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting volatility and polarity based on chromatographic information was developed and applied to the smog chamber ozonolysis of the sesquiterpene longifolene. The products were collected and analyzed using a GC × GC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG and a quadrupole Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS. All the secondary organic aerosol (SOA was produced within the first half hour of the experiment. However, the oxidation level of the organic aerosol, as inferred from the fraction of ion m/z 44, suggested continued evolution of the SOA over the subsequent hours. Measurements of speciated organic compounds using 2D-TAG confirm that the composition of the particles changed over the course of the experiment. Nearly 200 oxidation products (thought to be mostly ketones and acids were observed with 2D-TAG, but most could not be identified definitively due to a lack of standards and the absence of likely sesquiterpene oxidation products in available mass spectral databases. To categorize the observed products, the vapor pressure and oxygen-to-carbon ratio (O/C of observed compounds were estimated based on their multi-dimensional chromatographic retention times relative to those of known standards, establishing a retention time correlation (RTC method for using 2D-TAG to better constrain important modelling parameters. The product distribution continuously evolved in volatility and oxygenation during 5 h of oxidation. Using peak area as the best available proxy for mass, we conclude that the product mixture includes many non-negligible products; the most abundant 3 compounds accounted for only half of the total observed peak area and 80% of peak area was spread across 15 compounds. The data provide evidence for three conclusions: (1 2D-TAG can provide valuable volatility and oxygenation information even in the absence of definitive species identification, (2 complex particle-phase chemistry

  15. Modelling of composite propellant properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizers, H.L.J.; Hordijk, A.C.; Vliet, L.D. van; Bouquet, F.

    2000-01-01

    State-of-the-art composite propellants are based on solid particles (AP, Aluminium) in a polymeric HTPB based binder system. The usability of a propellant for a particular application is dependent on a large number of properties. These different properties sometimes result in contradictory requireme

  16. State of the Science Review: Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste By-Products for In-situ Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil and Sediment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal and metalloid contamination of soil and sediment is a widespread problem both in urban and rural areas throughout the United States (U.S. EPA, 2014). Beneficial use of waste by-products as amendments to remediate metal-contaminated soils and sediments can provide major eco...

  17. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer project will demonstrate the capability to safely and efficiently store, transfer and measure cryogenic propellants,...

  18. Enhancement of n-butanol production by in situ butanol removal using permeating-heating-gas stripping in acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Ren, Hengfei; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ting; Shi, Xinchi; Cheng, Hao; Zhao, Nan; Li, Zhenjian; Li, Bingbing; Niu, Huanqing; Zhuang, Wei; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Ying, Hanjie

    2014-07-01

    Butanol recovery from acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fed-batch fermentation using permeating-heating-gas was determined in this study. Fermentation was performed with Clostridium acetobutylicum B3 in a fibrous bed bioreactor and permeating-heating-gas stripping was used to eliminate substrate and product inhibition, which normally restrict ABE production and sugar utilization to below 20 g/L and 60 g/L, respectively. In batch fermentation (without permeating-heating-gas stripping), C. acetobutylicum B3 utilized 60 g/L glucose and produced 19.9 g/L ABE and 12 g/L butanol, while in the integrated process 290 g/L glucose was utilized and 106.27 g/L ABE and 66.09 g/L butanol were produced. The intermittent gas stripping process generated a highly concentrated condensate containing approximately 15% (w/v) butanol, 4% (w/v) acetone, a small amount of ethanol (butanol solution [∼ 70% (w/v)] after phase separation. Butanol removal by permeating-heating-gas stripping has potential for commercial ABE production. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. In situ microbial filter used for bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, M. Leslie; Taylor, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    An improved method for in situ microbial filter bioremediation having increasingly operational longevity of an in situ microbial filter emplaced into an aquifer. A method for generating a microbial filter of sufficient catalytic density and thickness, which has increased replenishment interval, improved bacteria attachment and detachment characteristics and the endogenous stability under in situ conditions. A system for in situ field water remediation.

  20. Feasibility Study and Demonstration of an Aluminum and Ice Solid Propellant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothee L. Pourpoint

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-water reactions have been proposed and studied for several decades for underwater propulsion systems and applications requiring hydrogen generation. Aluminum and water have also been proposed as a frozen propellant, and there have been proposals for other refrigerated propellants that could be mixed, frozen in situ, and used as solid propellants. However, little work has been done to determine the feasibility of these concepts. With the recent availability of nanoscale aluminum, a simple binary formulation with water is now feasible. Nanosized aluminum has a lower ignition temperature than micron-sized aluminum particles, partly due to its high surface area, and burning times are much faster than micron aluminum. Frozen nanoscale aluminum and water mixtures are stable, as well as insensitive to electrostatic discharge, impact, and shock. Here we report a study of the feasibility of an nAl-ice propellant in small-scale rocket experiments. The focus here is not to develop an optimized propellant; however improved formulations are possible. Several static motor experiments have been conducted, including using a flight-weight casing. The flight weight casing was used in the first sounding rocket test of an aluminum-ice propellant, establishing a proof of concept for simple propellant mixtures making use of nanoscale particles.

  1. Dynamic characterization and analysis of space shuttle SRM solid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufferd, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of the space shuttle solid rocket moter (TP-H1148) propellant were characterized and the expected limits of propellant variability were established. Dynamic shear modulus tests conducted on six production batches of TP-H1148 at various static and dynamic strain levels over the temperature range from 40 F to 90 F. A heat conduction analysis and dynamic response analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) were also conducted. The dynamic test results show significant dependence on static and dynamic strain levels and considerable batch-to-batch and within-batch variability. However, the results of the SRM dynamic response analyses clearly demonstrate that the stiffness of the propellant has no consequential on the overall SRM dynamic response. Only the mass of the propellant needs to be considered in the dynamic analysis of the space shuttle SRM.

  2. A novel in situ gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol fermentation for hyper n-butanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chuang; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Jingbo; Chen, Lijie; Ren, Jiangang; Bai, Fengwu; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Butanol is considered as an advanced biofuel, the development of which is restricted by the intensive energy consumption of product recovery. A novel two-stage gas stripping-pervaporation process integrated with acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation was developed for butanol recovery, with gas stripping as the first-stage and pervaporation as the second-stage using the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) filled polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membrane (MMM). Compared to batch fermentation without butanol recovery, more ABE (27.5 g/L acetone, 75.5 g/L butanol, 7.0 g/L ethanol vs. 7.9 g/L acetone, 16.2 g/L butanol, 1.4 g/L ethanol) were produced in the fed-batch fermentation, with a higher butanol productivity (0.34 g/L · h vs. 0.30 g/L · h) due to reduced butanol inhibition by butanol recovery. The first-stage gas stripping produced a condensate containing 155.6 g/L butanol (199.9 g/L ABE), which after phase separation formed an organic phase containing 610.8 g/L butanol (656.1 g/L ABE) and an aqueous phase containing 85.6 g/L butanol (129.7 g/L ABE). Fed with the aqueous phase of the condensate from first-stage gas stripping, the second-stage pervaporation using the CNTs-PDMS MMM produced a condensate containing 441.7 g/L butanol (593.2 g/L ABE), which after mixing with the organic phase from gas stripping gave a highly concentrated product containing 521.3 g/L butanol (622.9 g/L ABE). The outstanding performance of CNTs-PDMS MMM can be attributed to the hydrophobic CNTs giving an alternative route for mass transport through the inner tubes or along the smooth surface of CNTs. This gas stripping-pervaporation process with less contaminated risk is thus effective in increasing butanol production and reducing energy consumption. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In-Situ Groundwater Treatment Technology Using Biodegradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    metals (Weston, 1983). Explosives and propellant contaminated soil has resulted from munitions production. Another major source of subsurface...NJ. 45 Brunner, W., Staub , D. and Leisinger, T. (1980). Bacterial Degradation of Dichloromethane. Appl. Environ. Microbiol., 40(5): 950-958. Canter

  4. Characterization of VPO ammoxidation catalysts by in situ methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Luecke, B.; Brueckner, A.; Steinike, U. [Institut fuer Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany); Brzezinka, K.W. [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany); Meisel, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    1998-12-31

    In-situ methods are well known as powerful tools in studying catalyst formation processes, their solid state properties under working conditions and the interaction with the feed, intermediates and products to reveal reaction mechanisms. This paper gives a short overview on results of intense studies using in-situ techniques to reveal VPO catalyst generation processes, interaction of educts, intermediates and products with VPO catalyst surfaces and mechanistic insights. Catalytic data of the ammoxidation of toluene on different VPOs complete these findings. The precursor-catalyst transformation processes were preferently investigated by in-situ XRD, in-situ Raman and in-situ ESR spectroscopy. The interaction of aromatic molecules and intermediates, resp., and VPO solid surfaces was followed by in-situ ESR and in-situ FTIR spectroscopy. Mechanistic information was mainly obtained using in-situ FTIR spectroscopy and the temporal-analysis-of-products (TAP) technique. Catalytic studies were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor on pure (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO){sub 3}(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}, generated [(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(VO{sub 3})(P{sub 2}O{sub 7}){sub 2}+V{sub x}O{sub y}] catalysts, having different V{sub x}O{sub y} proportions by use of VOHPO{sub 4} x 1/2H{sub 2}O (V/P=1) and recently studied (VO){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} x 7 H{sub 2}O (V/P=1.5) precursors; the well-known (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} was used for comparison. (orig.)

  5. In-situ immobilization of lead using different source of phosphate amendments for the organic production of misai kucing (Orthosiphon stamineus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairun Naim Mulana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable organic herbal production requires utilization of bio-waste materials as plant nutrient sources due to its economical aspect and would ensure continuous productivity. The usage of organic wastes in organic farming system (OFS as fertilizers and soil amendments should be monitored as the accumulation of heavy metals has been reported in several studies. Glasshouse study has been conducted to assess the effectiveness of Pb immobilization due to chicken manure application using different sources of phosphate materials; bone meal (BM, Egyptian rock phosphate (ERP and triple super phosphate (TSP. From the fractionation of glasshouse study, the percentage of exchangeable fraction of Pb was reduced with application of P-amendments with the highest of 20.2% of reduction recorded for 2 t/ha application of TSP. This is followed by reduction in exchangeable fraction for others treatments: 2 t/ha of BM (4.1%, 4 t/ha of BM (5.1%, 1 t/ha of ERP (8.1% and 2 t/ha of ERP at 17.6%. These treatments were recorded as being able to stabilize the Pb as indicated in the percentage reduction of phytoavailable pools into a more stable form of residual pool.

  6. On the Vicarious Calibration Methodologies in DIMITRI: Application on Sentinel-2 and Landsat-8 Products and Comparison with In-Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhammoud, Bahjat; Bouvet, Marc; Jackson, Jan; Arias, Manuel; Thepaut, Olivier; Lafrance, Bruno; Gascon, Ferran; Cadau, Enrico; Berthelot, Beatrice; Francesconi, Benjamin

    2016-08-01

    In the frame of the Sentinel-2 Mission Performance Centre (MPC) activities, in order to assess the S2A/MSI data quality and to monitor its evolution, DIMITRI is used to perform the vicarious validation of the Level-1C products. DIMITRI consists on several vicarious calibration methodologies for EO optical sensors: Rayleigh scattering, Sun-Glint, PICS and sensor-to- sensor inter-calibration.The first results of S2A/MSI from both Rayleigh and PICS methodologies are consistent and show an excellent quality of the L1C products. The cross- mission Intercomparison with LANDSAT-8/OLI over PICS shows good agreement within the ±5% mission requirements. The Intercomparison with concomitant ground-based TOA-reflectance over the Railroad Valley site shows a good agreement with a relative difference of 5%-10%. The uncertainties over the estimated calibration coefficients overall the results are found to be less than 5% for most of the S2A/MSI spectral bands.

  7. The behavior of 14C and 13C in estuarine water: Effects of In situ CO2 production and atmospheric exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Elliott C.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of nonconservative sources (inputs) and sinks (outputs) of carbon are indicated by the behavior of Δ14C and δ13C of the total dissolved inorganic carbon (ΣCO2) in San Francisco Bay and Chesapeake Bay. Isotopic distributions and model calculations indicate that in North San Francisco Bay the net CO2 flux to the atmosphere and carbon utilization in the water column are balanced by benthic production. Municipal waste appears to be a dominant source in South San Francisco Bav. In Chesapeake Bay, atmospheric exchange has increased the Δ14C and δ13C in the surface water. Decomposition of organic matter in the water column is indicated to be the dominant source of excess ΣCO2 in the deep water.

  8. Implementation of subsea system to monitor in-situ temperature and formation pressure in methane hydrates sediments for the production test in 2017, offshore Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, K.

    2016-12-01

    The methane hydrates phase changes, from solid to fluid, is governed by pressure drop and heat transportation through a geological formation. For the world's first offshore production test of methane hydrates conducted in 2013, the MH21 research team installed distributed temperature sensing (DTS) cables and array type resistance temperature devices (RTD) behind the casings of the monitoring wells. The temperature monitoring was continued over the period of 18 months. As a result, the thermal response of the methane hydrate-bearing sediment during depressurization was observed, and the obtained data was used to evaluate the methane dissociation behavior and to estimate the dissociation front radius from a producer well. The second offshore production test is planned in the same area in 2017 with the extended period up to one month. Two sets of a pair of monitoring and producer well were drilled in 2016. A pair of monitoring and producer wells is only 20m apart. An improved monitoring system is prepared for the second test with additional pressure measurement capability with new features of subsea system. The planed formation pressure measurement is expected to contribute not only for the evaluation of methane hydrate phase changes and estimation of its areal distribution but also the analyzing the interference in the vicinity of the producer wells from the geo-mechanical point of view. The DTS resolution was improved with longer averaging time than the previously utilized system. To accomplish the continuous acquisition up running over longer than 18 months to cover pre-flow and post-flow periods, the subsea acquisition system was equipped with an exchangeable subsea batteries by ROV. As for the surface communication method, the acoustic transponder was added in the subsea system. In this technical presentation, the improvements on the monitoring system are discussed and the scientific objectives for new measurements such as formation pressure are presented.

  9. Ignition Studies on Aluminised Propellant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Bhaskaran

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation on the ignition of metallised propellants (APIHTPB/AI has been carried out 10 determine the ignition delay, minimum ignition energy and corresponding heat flux,threshold heat flux for ignition and minimum ignition temperature, Ignition experiments were conductedusing a shock tube under convectiveheating conditions similar to those prevailingin a rocket motor. Heat flux at propellant location was measured by thin film heat flux gauge and also calculated from a ribbon thermocouple output under similar test conditions. The igntion delay was measured as the time lag between the arrival of hot gas at the propellant and the light emission due to actual ignition of the propellant. The experimental results indicate that the ignition delay characteristics are independent of pressure. The minimum energy for ignition obtained for the propellant is 1100J/m2 corresponding to the heat flux range of 80·120 WIcm2 for a gas velocity of 110 mls. The threshold heat flux required to ignite the propellant was 40 W/cm2 at a velocity of 110 mls. Heat flux corresponding to minimum ignition energy and the threshold heat flux increase with gas velocity. The threshold ignition temperature of the propellant was found to be 600 ± 20 K.

  10. Environmentally compatible solid rocket propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacox, James L.; Bradford, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Hercules' clean propellant development research is exploring three major types of clean propellant: (1) chloride-free formulations (no chlorine containing ingredients), being developed on the Clean Propellant Development and Demonstration (CPDD) contract sponsored by Phillips Laboratory, Edwards Air Force Base, CA; (2) low HCl scavenged formulations (HCl-scavenger added to propellant oxidized with ammonium perchlorate (AP)); and (3) low HCl formulations oxidized with a combination of AN and AP (with or without an HCl scavenger) to provide a significant reduction (relative to current solid rocket boosters) in exhaust HCl. These propellants provide performance approaching that of current systems, with less than 2 percent HCl in the exhaust, a significant reduction (greater than or equal to 70 percent) in exhaust HCl levels. Excellent processing, safety, and mechanical properties were achieved using only readily available, low cost ingredients. Two formulations, a sodium nitrate (NaNO3) scavenged HTPB and a chloride-free hydroxy terminated polyether (HTPE) propellant, were characterized for ballistic, mechanical, and rheological properties. In addition, the hazards properties were demonstrated to provide two families of class 1.3, 'zero-card' propellants. Further characterization is planned which includes demonstration of ballistic tailorability in subscale (one to 70 pound) motors over the range of burn rates required for retrofit into current Hercules space booster designs (Titan 4 SRMU and Delta 2 GEM).

  11. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon: Moessbauer Spectroscopy as a Process Monitor for Oxygen Production. Results from a Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R.V.; Schroder, C.; Graff, T.G.; Sanders, G.B.; Lee, K.A.; Simon, T.M.; Larson, W.E.; Quinn, J.W.; Clark, L.D.; Caruso, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential consumables like oxygen must to be produced from materials on the lunar surface to enable a sustained, long-term presence of humans on the Moon. The Outpost Precursor for ISRU and Modular Architecture (OPTIMA) field test on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, facilitated by the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, was designed to test the implementation of three hardware concepts to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith: Precursor ISRU Lunar Oxygen Testbed (PILOT) developed by Lockheed Martin in Littleton, CO; Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL; and ROxygen developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. The three concepts differ in design, but all rely on the same general principle: hydrogen reduction of metal cations (primarily Fe2+) bonded to oxygen to metal (e.g., Fe0) with the production of water. The hydrogen source is residual hydrogen in the fuel tanks of lunar landers. Electrolysis of the water produces oxygen and hydrogen (which is recycled). We used the miniaturized M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II to quantify the yield of this process on the basis of the quantity of Fe0 produced. Iron M ssbauer spectroscopy identifies iron-bearing phases, determines iron oxidation states, and quantifies the distribution of iron between mineral phases and oxidation states. The oxygen yield can be calculated by quantitative measurements of the distribution of Fe among oxidation states in the regolith before and after hydrogen reduction. A M ssbauer spectrometer can also be used as a prospecting tool to select the optimum feedstock for the oxygen production plants (e.g., high total Fe content and easily reduced phases). As a demonstration, a MIMOS II backscatter spectrometer (SPESI, Germany) was mounted on the Cratos rover (NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH), which is one of

  12. Rapid On-Site Environmental Sampling and Analysis of Propellant Stabilizers and their Decomposition Products by Portable Sampling and Thin-Layer Chromotography Kits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, J S; Gonzalez, M A

    2003-08-04

    Sustainable future use of land containing unexploded ordnance requires extensive field assessments, cleanup, and restoration. The ordnance is generally semi-exposed or buried in pits and, because of aging, needs to be handled with caution. Being able to characterize the ordnance in the field to minimize handling, as well as to distinguish it from inert mock material, greatly facilitates assessments and clean-up. We have developed unique sample preparation methodologies and a portable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) kit technology for rapid field screening and quantitative assessment of stabilizer content in propellants and, energetic materials (explosives) in environmental scenarios. Major advantages of this technology include simultaneous chromatography of multiple samples and standards for high sample throughput, high resolution, very low detection limits, and ease of operation. The TLC kit technology, sponsored by the Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) of the U.S. Army, is now patented and has been completely transitioned to our commercial partners, Ho'olana Technologies, located in Hilo, Hawaii. Once fully deployed in the field, the new technology will demonstrate a cost-effective and efficient means for determining the percent of effective stabilizer that is remaining on-site and at munitions clean-up sites, as well as munitions storage facilities. The TLC kit technology is also readily applicable for analysis at military or commercial facilities, for a variety of emergency and non-emergency scenarios, and for situations where public concern is high.

  13. Pseudo-in-situ stir casting:a new method for production of aluminum matrix composites with bimodal-sized B4C reinforcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Raei; Masoud Panjepour; Mahmood Meratian

    2016-01-01

    A new method was applied to produce an Al-0.5wt%Ti-0.3wt%Zr/5vol%B4C composite via stir casting with the aim of charac-terizing the microstructure of the resulting composite. For the production of the composite, large B4C particles (larger than 75 µm) with no pre-heating were added to the stirred melt. Reflected-light microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, field-emission scan-ning electron microscopy, laser particle size analysis, and image analysis using the Clemex software were performed on the cast samples for microstructural analysis and phase detection. The results revealed that as a consequence of thermal shock, B4C particle breakage occurred in the melt. The mechanism proposed for this phenomenon is that the exerted thermal shock in combination with the low thermal shock resis-tance of B4C and large size of the added B4C particles were the three key parameters responsible for B4C particle breakage. This breakage in-troduced small particles with sizes less than 10 µm and with no contamination on their surfaces into the melt. The mean particle distance measured via image analysis was approximately 60 µm. The coefficient of variation index, which was used as a measure of particle distribu-tion homogeneity, showed some variations, indicating a relatively homogeneous distribution.

  14. In situ detoxification of dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by co-culture of xylose-utilizing and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Li, Hui-Ze; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-10-01

    Co-culture of xylose-utilizing and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae was developed for bioethanol production from undetoxified pretreated biomass in simultaneously saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) process. Glucose accumulation during late fermentation phase in SSCF using xylose-utilizing strain can be eliminated by the introduction of inhibitor-tolerant strain. Effect of different ratios of two strains was investigated and xylose-utilizing strain to inhibitor-tolerant strain ratio of 10:1 (w/w) showed the best xylose consumption and the highest ethanol yield. Inoculating of xylose-utilizing strain at the later stage of SSCF (24-48h) exhibited lower ethanol yield than inoculating at early stage (the beginning 0-12h), probably due to the reduced enzymatic efficiency caused by the unconsumed xylose and oligomeric sugars. Co-culture SSCF increased ethanol concentration by 21.2% and 41.0% comparing to SSCF using individual inhibitor-tolerant and xylose-utilizing strain (increased from 48.5 and 41.7g/L to 58.8g/L), respectively, which suggest this co-culture system was very promising.

  15. Pseudo- in-situ stir casting: a new method for production of aluminum matrix composites with bimodal-sized B4C reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raei, Mohammad; Panjepour, Masoud; Meratian, Mahmood

    2016-08-01

    A new method was applied to produce an Al-0.5wt%Ti-0.3wt%Zr/5vol%B4C composite via stir casting with the aim of characterizing the microstructure of the resulting composite. For the production of the composite, large B4C particles (larger than 75 μm) with no pre-heating were added to the stirred melt. Reflected-light microscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, laser particle size analysis, and image analysis using the Clemex software were performed on the cast samples for microstructural analysis and phase detection. The results revealed that as a consequence of thermal shock, B4C particle breakage occurred in the melt. The mechanism proposed for this phenomenon is that the exerted thermal shock in combination with the low thermal shock resistance of B4C and large size of the added B4C particles were the three key parameters responsible for B4C particle breakage. This breakage introduced small particles with sizes less than 10 μm and with no contamination on their surfaces into the melt. The mean particle distance measured via image analysis was approximately 60 μm. The coefficient of variation index, which was used as a measure of particle distribution homogeneity, showed some variations, indicating a relatively homogeneous distribution.

  16. Design of Propellers for Motorsoarers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabee, E. E.

    1979-01-01

    A method was developed for the design of propellers of minimum induced loss matched to an arbitrary operating point characterized by disc loading (thrust or power), air density, shaft speed, flight speed, and number of blades. A consistent procedure is outlined to predict the performance of these propellers under off design conditions, or to predict the performance of propellers of general geometry. The examples discussed include a man powered airplane, a hang glider with a 7.5 kW (10 hp) 8,000 rpm engine, and an airplane-like motorsoarer.

  17. Magnetic propeller in symbiotic stars

    OpenAIRE

    Panferov, Alexander; Mikolajewski, Maciej

    2000-01-01

    Rapidly spinning magnetic white dwarfs in symbiotic stars may pass through the propeller stage. It is believed that a magnetic propeller acts in two such stars CH Cyg and MWC 560. We review a diversity of manifestations of the propeller there. In these systems in a quiescent state the accretion onto a white dwarf from the strong enough wind of a companion star is suppressed by the magnetic field, and the hot component luminosity is low. Since the gas stored in the envelope eventually settles ...

  18. In Situ Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, H

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, the feasibility of in situ TE for vascular and valvular purposes were tested with the use of different materials, and animal models. First, the feasibility of a decellularized biological scaffold (pSIS-ECM) as pulmonary heart valve prosthesis is examined in sheep (Chapter 2). Next,

  19. In situ bypass og diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V; Lorentzen, J E

    1993-01-01

    From 1986 through to 1990 a total of 483 in situ bypass procedures were performed in 444 patients. Preoperative risk-factors were equally distributed among diabetic (DM) and non-diabetic (NDM) patients, except for smoking habits (DM:48%, NDM:64%, p = 0.002) and cardiac disease (DM:45%, NDM:29%, p...

  20. In situ dehydration of yugawaralite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artioli, G.; Ståhl, Kenny; Cruciani, G.;

    2001-01-01

    The structural response of the natural zeolite yugawaralite (CaAl2Si6O16. 4H(2)O) upon thermally induced dehydration has been studied by Rietveld analysis of temperature-resolved powder diffraction data collected in situ in the temperature range 315-791 K using synchrotron radiation. The room-tem...

  1. Liquid Propellants for Advanced Gun Ammunitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Rao

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available With constant improvements, the conventional solid propellants for guns have almost reached their limit in performance. Liquid gun propellants are promising new comers capable of surpassing these performance limits and have numerous advantages over solid propellants. A method has been worked out to predict the internal ballistics of a liquid propellant gun and illustrated in a typical application.

  2. 14 CFR 35.22 - Feathering propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Feathering propellers. 35.22 Section 35.22 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS Design and Construction § 35.22 Feathering propellers. (a) Feathering propellers...

  3. 14 CFR 23.905 - Propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propellers. 23.905 Section 23.905 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... Propellers. (a) Each propeller must have a type certificate. (b) Engine power and propeller shaft...

  4. Near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll- a concentration in optically complex turbid productive waters: From in situ measurements to aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlin, Daniela

    Today the water quality of many inland and coastal waters is compromised by cultural eutrophication in consequence of increased human agricultural and industrial activities and remote sensing is widely applied to monitor the trophic state of these waters. This study explores near infrared-red models for the remote estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration in turbid productive waters and compares several near infrared-red models developed within the last 35 years. Three of these near infrared-red models were calibrated for a dataset with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m -3 and validated for independent and statistically significantly different datasets with chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 95.5 mg m-3 and 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3 for the spectral bands of the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The developed MERIS two-band algorithm estimated chlorophyll-a concentrations from 4.0 to 24.2 mg m-3, which are typical for many inland and coastal waters, very accurately with a mean absolute error 1.2 mg m-3. These results indicate a high potential of the simple MERIS two-band algorithm for the reliable estimation of chlorophyll-a concentration without any reduction in accuracy compared to more complex algorithms, even though more research seems required to analyze the sensitivity of this algorithm to differences in the chlorophyll-a specific absorption coefficient of phytoplankton. Three near infrared-red models were calibrated and validated for a smaller dataset of atmospherically corrected multi-temporal aerial imagery collected by the hyperspectral airborne imaging spectrometer for applications (AisaEAGLE). The developed algorithms successfully captured the spatial and temporal variability of the chlorophyll-a concentrations and estimated chlorophyll- a concentrations from 2.3 to 81.2 mg m-3 with mean absolute errors from 4.4 mg m-3 for the AISA two band algorithm to 5.2 mg m-3

  5. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  6. Propeller aircraft interior noise model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, L. D.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the interior noise of propeller-driven aircraft. The fuselage model is that of a cylinder with a structurally-integral floor. The cabin sidewall is stiffened by stringers and ring frames, and the floor by longitudinal beams. The cabin interior is covered with a sidewall treatments consisting of layers of porous material and an impervious trim septum. Representation of the propeller pressure field is utilized as input data in the form of the propeller noise signature at a series of locations on a grid over the fuselage structure. Results obtained from the analytical model are compared with test data measured by NASA in a scale model cylindrical fuselage excited by a model propeller.

  7. Contra rotative propeller performance estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Coca Casanueva, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Due to the continuous increase in the fuel price, the propeller engine solution (the most efficient in fuel saving terms) becomes very attractive to airlines and thus, to aircraft manufacturers. However, airlines aren’t ready to fly an aircraft at lower cruise Mach number than the traditional Mach 0,84, which jeopardizes the fuel efficiency of propellers. At this stage is where the contra-rotative concept appears, which let us to increase the cruise speed while reducing fuel consumption...

  8. DESIGN EKONOMIS UNTUK PROPELLER KAPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartono Hartono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Increase of the price of world oil pushs liner to conduct action is economic from every operational unit in it’sship armada. One other most dominant in usage of fuel is Main engine is working to turn around propeller asship actuator. On that account ship owner wants design propeller which is economic for it’s ship to canreduce usage of fuel of 20% when sailing.

  9. A three-season field study on the in-situ remediation of Cd-contaminated paddy soil using lime, two industrial by-products, and a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Bing, He; Dao-You, Huang; Qi-Hong, Zhu; Shuai, Wang; Shou-Long, Liu; Hai-Bo, He; Han-Hua, Zhu; Chao, Xu

    2017-02-01

    To mitigate the serious problem of Cd-contaminated paddy soil, we investigated the remediation potential of combining in-situ immobilization with a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar. A three-season field experiment compared the soil pH, available Cd and absorption of Cd by three rice cultivars with different Cd accumulation abilities grown in Cd-contaminated paddy soil amended with lime (L), slag (S), and bagasse (B) alone or in combination. The three amendments applied alone and in combination significantly increased soil pH, reduced available Cd and absorption of Cd by rice with no effect on grain yield. Among these, the LS and LSB treatments reduced the brown rice Cd content by 38.3-69.1% and 58.3-70.9%, respectively, during the three seasons. Combined with planting of a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar (Xiang Zaoxian 32) resulted in a Cd content in brown rice that met the contaminant limit (≤0.2mgkg(-1)). However, the grain yield of the low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar was approximately 30% lower than the other two rice cultivars. Applying LS or LSB as amendments combined with planting a low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivar is recommended for the remediation of Cd-contaminated paddy soil. The selection and breeding of low-Cd-accumulation rice cultivars with high grain production requires further research.

  10. Aircraft Propeller Hub Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Thomas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peter, William H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-02-13

    The team performed a literature review, conducted residual stress measurements, performed failure analysis, and demonstrated a solid state additive manufacturing repair technique on samples removed from a scrapped propeller hub. The team evaluated multiple options for hub repair that included existing metal buildup technologies that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has already embraced, such as cold spray, high velocity oxy-fuel deposition (HVOF), and plasma spray. In addition the team helped Piedmont Propulsion Systems, LLC (PPS) evaluate three potential solutions that could be deployed at different stages in the life cycle of aluminum alloy hubs, in addition to the conventional spray coating method for repair. For new hubs, a machining practice to prevent fretting with the steel drive shaft was recommended. For hubs that were refurbished with some material remaining above the minimal material condition (MMC), a silver interface applied by an electromagnetic pulse additive manufacturing method was recommended. For hubs that were at or below the MMC, a solid state additive manufacturing technique using ultrasonic welding (UW) of thin layers of 7075 aluminum to the hub interface was recommended. A cladding demonstration using the UW technique achieved mechanical bonding of the layers showing promise as a viable repair method.

  11. New high energetic composite propellants for space applications: refrigerated solid propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, C.; Orlandi, O.; Perut, C.; Fouin, G.; Chauveau, C.; Gökalp, I.; Calabro, M.

    2009-09-01

    Cryogenic solid propellants (CSP) are a new kind of chemical propellants that use frozen products to ensure the mechanical resistance of the grain. The objective is to combine the high performances of liquid propulsion and the simplicity of solid propulsion. The CSP concept has few disadvantages. Storability is limited by the need of permanent cooling between motor loading and firing. It needs insulations that increase the dry mass. It is possible to limit significantly these drawbacks by using a cooling temperature near the ambient one. It will permit not to change the motor materials and to minimize the supplementary dry mass due to insulator. The designation "Refrigerated Solid Propellant" (RPS) is in that case more appropriate as "Cryogenic Solid Propellant." SNPE Matériaux Energétiques is developing new concept of composition e e with cooling temperature as near the ambient temperature as possible. They are homogeneous and the main ingredients are hydrogen peroxide, polymer and metal or metal hydride, they are called "HydroxalaneTM." This concept allows reaching a high energy level. The expected specific impulse is between 355 and 375 s against 315 s for hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) / ammonium perchlorate (AP) / Al composition. However, the density is lower than for current propellants, between 1377 and 1462 kg/m3 compared to around 1800 kg/m3 . This is an handicap only for volume-limited application. Works have been carried out at laboratory scale to define the quality of the raw materials and the manufacturing process to realize sample and small grain in a safer manner. To assess the process, a small grain with an internal bore had been realized with a composition based on aluminum and water. This grain had shown very good quality, without any defect, and good bonding properties on the insulator.

  12. In Situ TEM Electrical Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canepa, Silvia; Alam, Sardar Bilal; Ngo, Duc-The

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) offers high spatial and temporal resolution that provides unique information for understanding the function and properties of nanostructures on their characteristic length scales. Under controlled environmental conditions and with the ability to dynamically...... influence the sample by external stimuli, e.g. through electrical connections, the TEM becomes a powerful laboratory for performing quantitative real time in situ experiments. Such TEM setups enable the characterization of nanostructures and nanodevices under working conditions, thereby providing a deeper...... materials and devices with the specimen being contacted by electrical, mechanical or other means, with emphasis on in situ electrical measurements performed in a gaseous or liquid environment. We will describe the challenges and prospects of electrical characterization of devices and processes induced...

  13. Triphenylamine - a 'new' stabilizer for nitrocellulose based propellants. Pt. 1: chemical stability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilker, Stephan; Heeb, Gerhard [WIWEB ASt Heimerzheim, Grosses Cent, 53913 Swisttal (Germany); Vogelsanger, Beat [Nitrochemie Wimmis AG, Niesenstr. 44, 3752 Wimmis (Switzerland); Petrzilek, Jan; Skladal, Jan [Explosia a.s. - Research Institute of Industrial Chemistry (VUPCH), 532 17 Pardubice (Czech Republic)

    2007-04-15

    Triphenylamine (TPA) was used for the first time in France in 1937 as a stabilizer for propellants. The stability of those samples was described as 'good'. Around 1950 an American group produced TPA stabilized propellants and investigated the decomposition mechanism. Apart from one single experiment in the 1970s no further attempts were made to take TPA as a stabilizer for propellants. With the background of an increasingly critical discussion about nitrosamines in propellants and their declaration of being carcinogenic, TPA revealed a renaissance since the year 2000. To achieve the goal of nitrosamine free propellants several TPA stabilized propellants were produced. Their processability, stability and ballistic properties were investigated. This publication summarizes the most important results of stability tests on more than 30 different TPA stabilized propellants including the decomposition mechanism, the synthesis of the consecutive products and their stabilizing properties. In addition, the internal compatibility of TPA with the most important propellant ingredients is discussed and its relative decomposition rate is compared with that of other stabilizers. In summary TPA is a suitable stabilizer for propellants. It has nevertheless two disadvantages. It is relatively rapidly consumed in double base formulations (which makes it difficult to pass the criteria of AOP-48, Ed. 2) and the stabilizing activity of the two major consecutive products 4-NO{sub 2}-TPA and especially 4,4{sup '}-di-NO{sub 2}-TPA is low. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2015-02-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O composite is in the form of ∼10 nm Au nanoparticles grown on ∼475 nm Cu2O octahedral nanocrystals with (111) facets by partial galvanic replacement. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Cu2p and Auger L3M4,5M4,5 lines indicate that the surface of Cu2O is mainly composed of Cu+. The rate for H2 production (from 95 water/5 ethylene glycol; vol.%) over 2 wt.% (Au/Cu2O)-TiO2 is found to be ∼10 times faster than that on 2 wt.% Au-TiO2 alone. Raman spectroscopy before and after reaction showed the disappearance of Cu+ lines (2Eu) at 220 cm-1. These observations coupled with the induction time observed for the reaction rate suggest that in situ reduction from Cu+ to Cu0 occurs upon photo-excitation. The reduction requires the presence of TiO2 (electron transfer). The prolonged activity of the reaction (with no signs of deactivation) despite the reduction to Cu0 indicates that the latter takes part in the reaction by providing additional sites for the reaction, most likely as recombination centers for hydrogen atoms to form molecular hydrogen. This phenomenon provides an additional route for enhancing the efficiency and lifetime of Cu2O-TiO2 photocatalytic systems, beyond the usually ascribed pn-junction effect.

  15. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  16. Aspects of Propeller Developements for a Submarine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul; kappel, Jens Julius; Spangenberg, Eugen

    2009-01-01

    Design and development of propellers for submarines are in some ways different from propellers for surface vessels. The most important demand is low acoustic signature that has priority over propeller efficiency, and the submarine propeller must be optimized with respect to acoustics rather than...... efficiency. Moreover the operating conditions of a submarine propeller are quite different. These aspects are discussed as well as the weighing of the various propeller parameters against the design objectives. The noise generated by the propeller can be characterized as thrust noise due to the inhomogeneous...... wake field of the submarine, trailing-edge noise and noise caused by turbulence in the inflow. The items discussed are demonstrated in a case study where a propeller of the Kappel type was developed. Three stages of the development are presented, including a design of an 8-bladed propeller where...

  17. The University of Arizona program in solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    The University of Arizona program is aimed at introducing scientific rigor to the predictability and quality assurance of composite solid propellants. Two separate approaches are followed: to use the modern analytical techniques to experimentally study carefully controlled propellant batches to discern trends in mixing, casting, and cure; and to examine a vast bank of data, that has fairly detailed information on the ingredients, processing, and rocket firing results. The experimental and analytical work is described briefly. The principle findings were that: (1) pre- (dry) blending of the coarse and fine ammonium perchlorate can significantly improve the uniformity of mixing; (2) the Fourier transformed IR spectra of the uncured and cured polymer have valuable data on the state of the fuel; (3) there are considerable non-uniformities in the propellant slurry composition near the solid surfaces (blades, walls) compared to the bulk slurry; and (4) in situ measurements of slurry viscosity continuously during mixing can give a good indication of the state of the slurry. Several important observations in the study of the data bank are discussed.

  18. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  19. IN SITU URANIUM STABILIZATION BY MICROBIAL METABOLITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Anna Knox, A; Chad L Leverette,C; Yianne Kritzas, Y

    2006-11-29

    Soil contaminated with U was the focus of this study in order to develop in-situ, U bio-immobilization technology. We have demonstrated microbial production of a metal chelating biopolymer, pyomelanin, in U contaminated soil from the Tims Branch area of the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of tyrosine amendments. Bacterial densities of pyomelanin producers were >106 cells/g wet soil. Pyomelanin demonstrated U chelating and mineral binding capacities at pH 4 and 7. In laboratory studies, in the presence of goethite or illite, pyomelanin enhanced U sequestration by these minerals. Tyrosine amended soils in field tests demonstrated increased U sequestration capacity following pyomelanin production up to 13 months after tyrosine treatments.

  20. Effect of Nitrate Ester on the Combustion Characteristics of PET/HMX -based Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlan Sun

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nitrate ester NG/TEGDN on the combustion characteristics of PET/HMX-based propellants has been experimentally investigated using of high-speed photography technique and scanning electron microscopy. It is indicated that the increase of NG/TEGDN content has little impact on the propellant burning rates at the same pressure. Furthermore, propellant can not be self-sustaining combustion at low pressure (£1 MPa. The increase of NG/TEGDN content does not affect the flame structure of propellant, but it plays an important role in condensed phase reaction zone. The flame structure of propellant is estimated. The thermal decomposition products in different combustion zones are also discussed. Scanning electron microscopy examination of quenched sample indicates that a liquified layer forms during combustion of these propellants. Numerous gas bubbles are present. Especially, the burning surface of propellant with low NG/TEGDN content shows signs of crystallization. The thickness of condensed phase reaction zone, by cross-section examination of propellant burning surface, has also been investigated. The results show that the thickness of condensed phase reaction zone increases with NG/TEGDN content increasing. These observations suggest that the condensed phase zone plays significant role in propellant combustion.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.206-213, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.567

  1. Hierarchical 3D ZnIn2S4/graphene nano-heterostructures: their in situ fabrication with dual functionality in solar hydrogen production and as anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Sayali B; Kalubarme, Ramchandra S; Mahadadalkar, Manjiri A; Jadhav, Harsharaj S; Bhirud, Ashwini P; Ambekar, Jalinder D; Park, Chan-Jin; Kale, Bharat B

    2015-12-21

    Hierarchical 3D ZnIn2S4/graphene (ZnIn2S4/Gr) nano-heterostructures were successfully synthesized using an in-situ hydrothermal method. The dual functionality of these nano-heterostructures i.e. for solar hydrogen production and lithium ion batteries has been demonstrated for the first time. The ZnIn2S4/Gr nano-heterostructures were optimized by varying the concentrations of graphene for utmost hydrogen production. An inspection of the structure shows the existence of layered hexagonal ZnIn2S4 wrapped in graphene. The reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to graphene was confirmed by Raman and XPS analyses. The morphological analysis demonstrated that ultrathin ZnIn2S4 nanopetals are dispersed on graphene sheets. The optical study reveals the extended absorption edge to the visible region due to the presence of graphene and hence is used as a photocatalyst to transform H2S into eco-friendly hydrogen using solar light. The ZnIn2S4/Gr nano-heterostructure that is comprised of graphene and ZnIn2S4 in a weight ratio of 1 : 99 exhibits enhanced photocatalytically stable hydrogen production i.e. ∼6365 μmole h(-1) under visible light irradiation using just 0.2 g of nano-heterostructure, which is much higher as compared to bare hierarchical 3D ZnIn2S4. The heightened photocatalytic activity is attributed to the enhanced charge carrier separation due to graphene which acts as an excellent electron collector and transporter. Furthermore, the usage of nano-heterostructures and pristine ZnIn2S4 as anodes in lithium ion batteries confers the charge capacities of 590 and 320 mA h g(-1) after 220 cycles as compared to their initial reversible capacities of 645 and 523 mA h g(-1), respectively. These nano-heterostructures show high reversible capacity, excellent cycling stability, and high-rate capability indicating their potential as promising anode materials for LIBs. The excellent performance is due to the nanostructuring of ZnIn2S4 and the presence of a graphene layer, which

  2. Chaotic dynamics of propeller singing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dapeng; ZHAO Deyou; WANG Yu

    2012-01-01

    The system of propeller singing is proved for the first time to have the character of chaotic dynamics through the study of the signal time series. The estimation of the topolog- ical dimension, the confirmation of the number of independent variable and the description of the character of attractor trajectory in reconstructed phase space are implemented during the analysis of the system. The result indicates that the system of propeller singing can be recon- structed by the optional delay time tD = 1, the minimal embedding dimension dE = 8, and the reconstructed topological parameter with the fractional correlation dimension D2 = 5.1579 and the positive maximum Lyapunov exponent λtD=0.0771. The results provide a new approach to the further study of the propeller singing phenomenon.

  3. Cavitation simulation on marine propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo

    is reproduced in the simulation. The overall results suggest the possibility of the cavitation model in the RANS solver to be used for practical applications in propeller design process as a complementary tool to the cavitation tunnel test and the other numerical methods. The outstanding issue for cloudy...... developed in the last decade. They show the potential for the simulation of propeller cavitation with robustness, but they are still to be more proved for practical applications. In the present work, hydrodynamic and numerical characteristics of several cavitation models developed for a viscous flow solver...... are investigated, and one of the cavitation models is verified for the cavitation simulation on marine propellers. Three cavitation models with a vapor transport equation and a cavitation model with a barotropic state law are implemented in the in-house RANS solver, EllipSys. The numerical results for cavitating...

  4. Combustion chemistry of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, A. D.; Ryan, N. W.

    1974-01-01

    Several studies are described of the chemistry of solid propellant combustion which employed a fast-scanning optical spectrometer. Expanded abstracts are presented for four of the studies which were previously reported. One study of the ignition of composite propellants yielded data which suggested early ammonium perchlorate decomposition and reaction. The results of a study of the spatial distribution of molecular species in flames from uncatalyzed and copper or lead catalyzed double-based propellants support previously published conclusions concerning the site of action of these metal catalysts. A study of the ammonium-perchlorate-polymeric-fuel-binder reaction in thin films, made by use of infrared absorption spectrometry, yielded a characterization of a rapid condensed-phase reaction which is likely important during the ignition transient and the burning process.

  5. Fuel-Cell Power Source Based on Onboard Rocket Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani; Narayan, Sri

    2010-01-01

    The use of onboard rocket propellants (dense liquids at room temperature) in place of conventional cryogenic fuel-cell reactants (hydrogen and oxygen) eliminates the mass penalties associated with cryocooling and boil-off. The high energy content and density of the rocket propellants will also require no additional chemical processing. For a 30-day mission on the Moon that requires a continuous 100 watts of power, the reactant mass and volume would be reduced by 15 and 50 percent, respectively, even without accounting for boiloff losses. The savings increase further with increasing transit times. A high-temperature, solid oxide, electrolyte-based fuel-cell configuration, that can rapidly combine rocket propellants - both monopropellant system with hydrazine and bi-propellant systems such as monomethyl hydrazine/ unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (MMH/UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) to produce electrical energy - overcomes the severe drawbacks of earlier attempts in 1963-1967 of using fuel reforming and aqueous media. The electrical energy available from such a fuel cell operating at 60-percent efficiency is estimated to be 1,500 Wh/kg of reactants. The proposed use of zirconia-based oxide electrolyte at 800-1,000 C will permit continuous operation, very high power densities, and substantially increased efficiency of conversion over any of the earlier attempts. The solid oxide fuel cell is also tolerant to a wide range of environmental temperatures. Such a system is built for easy refueling for exploration missions and for the ability to turn on after several years of transit. Specific examples of future missions are in-situ landers on Europa and Titan that will face extreme radiation and temperature environments, flyby missions to Saturn, and landed missions on the Moon with 14 day/night cycles.

  6. In situ vitrification: application analysis for stabilization of transuranic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oma, K.H.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Rusin, J.M.

    1982-09-01

    The in situ vitrification process builds upon the electric melter technology previously developed for high-level waste immobilization. In situ vitrification converts buried wastes and contaminated soil to an extremely durable glass and crystalline waste form by melting the materials, in place, using joule heating. Once the waste materials have been solidified, the high integrity waste form should not cause future ground subsidence. Environmental transport of the waste due to water or wind erosion, and plant or animal intrusion, is minimized. Environmental studies are currently being conducted to determine whether additional stabilization is required for certain in-ground transuranic waste sites. An applications analysis has been performed to identify several in situ vitrification process limitations which may exist at transuranic waste sites. Based on the process limit analysis, in situ vitrification is well suited for solidification of most in-ground transuranic wastes. The process is best suited for liquid disposal sites. A site-specific performance analysis, based on safety, health, environmental, and economic assessments, will be required to determine for which sites in situ vitrification is an acceptable disposal technique. Process economics of in situ vitrification compare favorably with other in-situ solidification processes and are an order of magnitude less than the costs for exhumation and disposal in a repository. Leachability of the vitrified product compares closely with that of Pyrex glass and is significantly better than granite, marble, or bottle glass. Total release to the environment from a vitrified waste site is estimated to be less than 10/sup -5/ parts per year. 32 figures, 30 tables.

  7. Laser-propelled ram accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasoh, A. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science

    2000-11-01

    The concept of 'laser-propelled ram accelerator (L-RAMAC)' is proposed. Theoretically it is capable of achieving a higher launch speed than that by a chemical ram accelerator because a higher specific energy can be input to the propellant gas. The laser beam is supplied through the muzzle, focused as an annulus behind the base of the projectile. The performance of L-RAMAC is analized based on generalized Rankine-Hugoniot relations, suggesting that a superorbital muzzle speed is achievable out of this device. (orig.)

  8. Characteristics of Five Propellers in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J W , Jr; Mixson, R E

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was made for the purpose of determining the characteristics of five full-scale propellers in flight. The equipment consisted of five propellers in conjunction with a VE-7 airplane and a Wright E-2 engine. The propellers were of the same diameter and aspect ratio. Four of them differed uniformly in thickness and pitch and the fifth propeller was identical with one of the other four with exception of a change of the airfoil section. The propeller efficiencies measured in flight are found to be consistently lower than those obtained in model tests. It is probable that this is mainly a result of the higher tip speeds used in the full-scale tests. The results show also that because of differences in propeller deflections it is difficult to obtain accurate comparisons of propeller characteristics. From this it is concluded that for accurate comparisons it is necessary to know the propeller pitch angles under actual operating conditions. (author)

  9. Solid propellants for rockets. Rocket suishin yaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, N. (Defense Agency, Tokyo (Japan). Technical Research and Development Inst.)

    1991-12-31

    Physical and chemical ProPerties and combustion characteristics of propellants differ according to the combination of oxidizers and fuel components. Composite smoke propellant, having crystalline ammonium perchlorate as an oxidizer and hydrocarbon Polymer as a fuel, has higher specific impulse and improved mechanical properties compared to smokeless double base propellant consisting of nitroglycerin and nirocellulose. Double base propellants with low specific impulse are combined with nitramines( RDX or HMX ) to make composite modified double based( CMDB ) propellants, as a result the smokeless property of double base propellant is preserved and the combustion efficiency is increased. With the combination of oxidizing agents and fuels, formation of various high functional propellants has been possible and energetic azide polymers have provided possibilities for fuels of propellants. 3 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Solid Propellant Grain Structural Integrity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The structural properties of solid propellant rocket grains were studied to determine the propellant resistance to stresses. Grain geometry, thermal properties, mechanical properties, and failure modes are discussed along with design criteria and recommended practices.

  11. 78 FR 78290 - Airworthiness Directives; Dowty Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ..., Boston Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park... Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine & Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Dowty...

  12. In situ study on the formation of FeTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude; Wulff, Anders Christian; Yue, Zhao;

    2011-01-01

    The formation of the FeTe compound from a mixture of Fe and Te powders was studied in situ by means of high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. FeTe does not form directly from the starting elements; instead, FeTe2 forms as an intermediate product. During a 2 °C/min heating ramp, Te first reacts...

  13. 76 FR 7101 - Airworthiness Directives; Hamilton Sundstrand Propellers Model 247F Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Aircraft Certification Office, FAA, Engine and Propeller Directorate, 12 New England Executive Park... Propellers Model 247F Propellers AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule... requires removing affected propeller blades from service. This AD was prompted by reports of blades...

  14. An investigation on thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Wei; Wang, Jiangning; Ren, Xiaoning; Zhang, Laying; Zhou, Yanshui [Xi' an Modern Chemistry Research Institute, Xi' an 710065 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The thermal decomposition of DNTF-CMDB propellants was investigated by pressure differential scanning calorimetry (PDSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The results show that there is only one decomposition peak on DSC curves, because the decomposition peak of DNTF cannot be separated from that of the NC/NG binder. The decomposition of DNTF can be obviously accelerated by the decomposition products of the NC/NG binder. The kinetic parameters of thermal decompositions for four DNTF-CMDB propellants at 6 MPa were obtained by the Kissinger method. It is found that the reaction rate decreases with increasing content of DNTF. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Unconventional Propeller Tip Design - Hydrodynamic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ommundsen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Winglets have been successful in the aircraft industry, but have not yet seen widespread use on marine propellers. Three different propellers (one conventional and two equipped with winglets) have been modelled and analysed with the CFD software STAR-CCM+. The winglet propellers achieved up to 40 % greater thrust than the conventional propeller at the operational propulsion point, but the torque increased even more - meaning that the overall open water efficiency was reduced by as much as...

  16. Soybean seedlings tolerate abrasion from air-propelled grit

    Science.gov (United States)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean production in organic systems. Air-propelled abrasive grit is one such tool that performs well for in-row weed control in corn, but crop safety in soybean is unknown. We examined responses to abrasion by corn-cob grit of soybean seedlings a...

  17. Laboratory test methods for combustion stability properties of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, L. D.; Brown, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of experimental methods for determining the combustion-stability properties of solid propellants. The methods are generally based on either the temporal response to an initial disturbance or on external methods for generating the required oscillations. The size distribution of condensed-phase combustion products are characterized by means of the experimental approaches. The 'T-burner' approach is shown to assist in the derivation of pressure-coupled driving contributions and particle damping in solid-propellant rocket motors. Other techniques examined include the rotating-valve apparatus, the impedance tube, the modulated throat-acoustic damping burner, and the magnetic flowmeter. The paper shows that experimental methods do not exist for measuring the interactions between acoustic velocity oscillations and burning propellant.

  18. Combustion of HMX-CMDB propellants. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y.; Kubota, N.

    1985-12-01

    The combustion wave structure of HMX-CMDB (composite modified double-base) propellants was studied in order to elucidate the gas phase reaction mechanism and to understand the burning rate characteristics. Experiments were conducted to determine the thickness of the reaction zone, gaseous products in the dark zone, and the temperature profile in the combustion waves. The reaction rate in the dark zone is increased by the addition of HMX. This is caused by the equivalence ratio of the oxidizer/fuel in the dark zone shifting towards a stoichiometric ratio when HMX is added. However, the reaction rate in the fizz zone and the heat feedback from the gas phase to the burning surface is decreased by the addition of HMX. Thus, the burning rate of HMX-CMDB propellants decreases when HMX is mixed within double-base propellants.

  19. Composite propellant tank study for very low cost space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. J.; Keith, E. L.

    1992-01-01

    A study of life-cycle cost is conducted to determine acceptable options for composite propellant tanks at low cost and weight and for use at moderate pressures. The review examines all cost issues relevant to the production, mass, applications, and reliability of the tanks for pressure-fed rockets. Specific attention is given to the manufacturing and life-cycle issues relevant to the use of composite materials in this application since composites are effective materials for liquid propellant tanks. Specific costs and parametric considerations are given for several tank candidates with 62,303-lb capacities. The mass sensitivity of the fourth stage for the concept vehicle is shown to be high, and the use of a 325-psi fourth-stage tank is shown to yield the minimum cost/lb for the stage. Wound S-glass/epoxy composites can be employed as cost-effective replacements for steel in the design of liquid-propellant tanks.

  20. Review on Fabrication Methods of in situ Metal Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper deals with a series of novel processing techniques based on the in situ production of metal matrix composites (MMCs). In situ techniques involve a chemical reaction resulting in the formation of a very fine and thermodynamically stable reinforcing ceramic phase within a metal matrix. As a result, this provides thermodynamic compatibility at the matrix-reinforcement interface. The reinforcement surfaces are also likely to be free of contamination and, therefore, a stronger matrix-dispersion bond can be achieved. Some of these technologies including DIMOXTM, XD, PRIMEXTM, reactive gas infiltration, high-temperature self-propagating synthesis (SHS), and liquid-solid, or solid-gas-liquid reactions as well as plasma in situ MMCs are expressed in this paper.

  1. 14 CFR 25.925 - Propeller clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller clearance. 25.925 Section 25.925... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.925 Propeller clearance. Unless smaller clearances are substantiated, propeller clearances with the airplane at maximum weight, with the most...

  2. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thelma Manning

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P. Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  3. Innovative boron nitride-doped propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thelma MANNING; Henry GRAU; Paul MATTER; Michael BEACHY; Christopher HOLT; Samuel SOPOK; Richard FIELD; Kenneth KLINGAMAN; Michael FAIR; John BOLOGNINI; Robin CROWNOVER; Carlton P. ADAM; Viral PANCHAL; Eugene ROZUMOV

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. military has a need for more powerful propellants with balanced/stoichiometric amounts of fuel and oxidants. However, balanced and more powerful propellants lead to accelerated gun barrel erosion and markedly shortened useful barrel life. Boron nitride (BN) is an interesting potential additive for propellants that could reduce gun wear effects in advanced propellants (US patent pending 2015-026P). Hexagonal boron nitride is a good lubricant that can provide wear resistance and lower flame temperatures for gun barrels. Further, boron can dope steel, which drastically improves its strength and wear resistance, and can block the formation of softer carbides. A scalable synthesis method for producing boron nitride nano-particles that can be readily dispersed into propellants has been developed. Even dispersion of the nano-particles in a double-base propellant has been demonstrated using a solvent-based processing approach. Stability of a composite propellant with the BN additive was verified. In this paper, results from propellant testing of boron nitride nano-composite propellants are presented, including closed bomb and wear and erosion testing. Detailed characterization of the erosion tester substrates before and after firing was obtained by electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This promising boron nitride additive shows the ability to improve gun wear and erosion resistance without any destabilizing effects to the propellant. Potential applications could include less erosive propellants in propellant ammunition for large, medium and small diameter fire arms.

  4. 14 CFR 25.929 - Propeller deicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller deicing. 25.929 Section 25.929... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.929 Propeller deicing. (a) For airplanes... combustible fluid is used for propeller deicing, §§ 25.1181 through 25.1185 and 25.1189 apply....

  5. 14 CFR 25.905 - Propellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propellers. 25.905 Section 25.905 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.905 Propellers. (a) Each propeller must...

  6. 14 CFR 35.2 - Propeller configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Propeller configuration. 35.2 Section 35.2 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: PROPELLERS General § 35.2 Propeller configuration. The applicant must provide a list of all...

  7. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet igni

  8. Novel sequences propel familiar folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Zahra; Paoli, Massimo

    2002-04-01

    Recent structure determinations have made new additions to a set of strikingly different sequences that give rise to the same topology. Proteins with a beta propeller fold are characterized by extreme sequence diversity despite the similarity in their three-dimensional structures. Several fold predictions, based in part on sequence repeats thought to match modular beta sheets, have been proved correct.

  9. Plasma ignition of LOVA propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driel, C.A. van; Boluijt, A.G.; Schilt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Ignition experiments were performed using a gun simulator which is equipped with a burst disk. This equipment facilitates the application of propellant loading densities which are comparable to those applied in regular ammunitions. For this study the gun simulator was equipped with a plasma jet

  10. The propeller and the frog

    CERN Document Server

    Pan, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    "Propellers" in planetary rings are disturbances in ring material excited by moonlets that open only partial gaps. We describe a new type of co-orbital resonance that can explain the observed non-Keplerian motions of propellers. The resonance is between the moonlet underlying the propeller, and co-orbiting ring particles downstream of the moonlet where the gap closes. The moonlet librates within the gap about an equilibrium point established by co-orbiting material and stabilized by the Coriolis force. In the limit of small libration amplitude, the libration period scales linearly with the gap azimuthal width and inversely as the square root of the co-orbital mass. The new resonance recalls but is distinct from conventional horseshoe and tadpole orbits; we call it the "frog" resonance, after the relevant term in equine hoof anatomy. For a ring surface density and gap geometry appropriate for the propeller Bl\\'eriot in Saturn's A ring, our theory predicts a libration period of ~4 years, similar to the ~3.7 yea...

  11. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  12. Detection of soil microorganism in situ by combined gas chromatography mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M.; Duxbury, J. M.; Francis, A. J.; Adamson, J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were made to determine whether analysis of volatile metabolic products, formed in situ, is a viable procedure for an extraterrestrial life detection system. Laboratory experiments, carried out under anaerobic conditions with addition of carbon source, extended to include a variety of soils and additional substrates. In situ experiments were conducted without amendment using a vacuum sampling system.

  13. Modeling of in-situ combustion as thermal recovery method for heavy (medium) oil (poster)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoshnevis Gargar, N.; Achterbergh, N.; Rudolph, E.S.J.; Bruining, J.

    2010-01-01

    In-situ combustion (ISC), as a well known process for secondary and tertiary oil recovery, is an important alternative approach to achieve higher production efficiency for light and heavy oil reservoirs. The in-situ combustion process is a complex combination of a number of processes which occur in

  14. In-situ combustion with solvent injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Silva, J.; Kakade, G. [Society of Petroleum Engineers, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)]|[Maharashtra Inst. of Technology, Pune (India)

    2008-10-15

    The effects of combining in situ combustion and heavy hydrocarbon naphtha vapor injection techniques in a heavy oil reservoir were investigated. Oil production rates and steam injection efficiencies were considered. The technique was also combined with toe-to-heel air injection (THAI) processes. The study showed that the modified THAI process achieved high rates of recovery for both primary production and as a follow-up technique in partially depleted reservoirs after cyclic steam and cold production. Oil produced using the modified THAI technique was also partially upgraded by the process. Results of the vapour chamber pressure calculations showed that the volume of oil produced by naphtha assisted gravity drainage was between 1 to 3 times higher than amounts of oil produced by SAGD processes during the same amount of time. The naphtha injection process produced more oil than the steam only process. However, high amounts of naphtha were needed to produce oil. Injection and production rates during the naphtha injection process were higher. Naphtha vapor was injected near the heel of a horizontal producer well. The vapor acted as a thermal and diluent mechanism in order to reduce the viscosity of the heavy oil . 9 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  15. Drag and Torque on Locked Screw Propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Tabaczek

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Few data on drag and torque on locked propeller towed in water are available in literature. Those data refer to propellers of specific geometry (number of blades, blade area, pitch and skew of blades. The estimation of drag and torque of an arbitrary propeller considered in analysis of ship resistance or propulsion is laborious. The authors collected and reviewed test data available in the literature. Based on collected data there were developed the empirical formulae for estimation of hydrodynamic drag and torque acting on locked screw propeller. Supplementary CFD computations were carried out in order to prove the applicability of the formulae to modern moderately skewed screw propellers.

  16. High-Speed Propeller for Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Gatzen, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    Engine efficiency increased. Propeller blades required to be quite thin and highly swept to minimize compressibility losses and propeller noise during high-speed cruise. Use of 8 or 10 blades with highpropeller-power loading allows overall propeller diameter to be kept relatively small. Area-ruled spinner and integrated nacelle shape reduce compressibility losses in propeller hub region. Finally, large modern turboshaft engine and gearbox provide power to advanced propeller. Fuel savings of 30 to 50 percent over present systems anticipated. Propfan system adaptable to number of applications, such as highspeed (subsonic) business and general-aviation aircraft, and military aircraft including V/STOL.

  17. Training for teamwork through in situ simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Asta; Poehlman, Jon; Bollenbacher, John; Riggan, Scott; Davis, Stan; Miller, Kristi; Ivester, Thomas; Kahwati, Leila

    2015-01-01

    In situ simulations allow healthcare teams to practice teamwork and communication as well as clinical management skills in a team's usual work setting with typically available resources and equipment. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate how to plan and conduct in situ simulation training sessions, with particular emphasis on how such training can be used to improve communication and teamwork. The video features an in situ simulation conducted at a labour and delivery unit in response to postpartum hemorrhage. PMID:26294962

  18. The Tensions of In Situ Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    In situ visualization is the coupling of visualization software with a simulation or other data producer to process the data "in memory" before the data are offloaded to a storage system. Although in situ visualization provides superior analysis, it has implementation tradeoffs resulting from conflicts with some traditional expected requirements. Numerous conflicting requirements create tensions that lead to difficult implementation tradeoffs. This article takes a look at the most prevailing tensions of in situ visualization.

  19. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayachit, Utkarsh [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Whitlock, Brad [Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States); Wolf, Matthew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Loring, Burlen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Geveci, Berk [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Lonie, David [Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States); Bethel, E. Wes [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-11

    The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

  20. Cyanobacteria to Link Closed Ecological Systems and In-Situ Resources Utilization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor

    Introduction: A major goal for the Vision of Space Exploration is to extend human presence across the solar sys-tem. With current technology, however, all required consumables for these missions (propellant, air, food, water) as well as habitable volume and shielding to support human explorers will need to be brought from Earth. In-situ pro-duction of consumables (In-Situ Resource Utilization-ISRU) will significantly facilitate current plans for human ex-ploration and colonization of the solar system, especially by reducing the logistical overhead such as recurring launch mass. The production of oxygen from lunar materials is generally recognized as the highest priority process for lunar ISRU, for both human metabolic and fuel oxidation needs. The most challenging technology developments for future lunar settlements may lie in the extraction of elements (O, Fe, Mn, Ti, Si, etc) from local rocks and soils for life support, industrial feedstock and the production of propellants. With few exceptions (e.g., Johannson, 1992), nearly all technology development to date has employed an ap-proach based on inorganic chemistry (e.g. Allen et al., 1996). None of these technologies include concepts for inte-grating the ISRU system with a bioregenerative life support system and a food production systems. Bioregenerative life support efforts have recently been added to the Constellation ISRU development program (Sanders et al, 2007). Methods and Concerns: The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an ad-vanced concept for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). However the MELiSSA system is a net consumer of ISRU products without a net return to in-situ technologies, e.g.. to extract elements as a result of complete closure of MELiSSA. On the other hand, the physical-chemical processes for ISRU are typically massive (relative to the rate of oxygen

  1. Ariane-5 solid-propellant stage development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigou, Jacques

    1992-03-01

    The development status of the solid propellant engine (P230) of the Ariane-5 launcher is described. Large new industrial plants were built in Europe and Guiana for the development and manufacture of the solid-booster stage and are now operational. A product assurance policy, specific and common to the companies that are involved in the engine's development, was defined and will be implemented. The paper describes the production cycles for the charged segments, the igniter, and the nozzle for P230 engine, as well as the process of engine integration and testing. Consideration is also given to the engine thrust capability, the launcher flight control, and the interfaces. The the major engine development tests are described.

  2. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  3. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; Roelofs, Helene; Huijs, Tonnie; Siebers-Vermeulen, Kim G C; Raymakers, Reinier A; Kögler, Gesine; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2009-12-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord blood an immature MSC population was identified. Remarkably, these immature stem cells modulated DCs in a different way. Marker expression was unchanged during the differentiation of monocytes towards immature DCs (iDCs) when cocultured with cord blood MSC [unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs)]. The maturation to mature DCs (mDCs) was enhanced when DCs were co-cultured with USSC, as evidenced by the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules. Endocytosis of dextran by iDCs was hampered in the presence of USSCs, which is indicative for the maturation of iDCs. Despite this maturation, the migration of iDCs cocultured with USSCs appeared to be identical to iDCs cultured alone. However, USSCs increased the migration of mDCs towards CCL21 and boosted interleukin-12 production. So, USSCs mature iDCs, thereby redirecting the antigen-uptake phenotype towards a mature phenotype. Furthermore, DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or USSCs reflects two distinct pathways because migration was unaffected when iDCs were matured by coculture with USSCs, while it was strongly enhanced in the presence of LPS. DCs are able to discriminate the different MSC subtypes, resulting in diverse differentiation programmes.

  4. Preliminary System Analysis of In Situ Resource Utilization for Mars Human Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Donald; Andringa, Jason; Easter, Robert; Smith, Jeffrey H .; Wilson, Thomas; Clark, D. Larry; Payne, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a system analysis of processes for utilization of Mars resources to support human exploration of Mars by production of propellants from indigenous resources. Seven ISRU processes were analyzed to determine mass. power and propellant storage volume requirements. The major elements of each process include C02 acquisition, chemical conversion, and storage of propellants. Based on a figure of merit (the ratio of the mass of propellants that must be brought from Earth in a non-ISRU mission to the mass of the ISRU system. tanks and feedstocks that must be brought from Earth for a ISRU mission) the most attractive process (by far); is one where indigenous Mars water is accessible and this is processed via Sabatier/Electrolysis to methane and oxygen. These processes are technically relatively mature. Other processes with positive leverage involve reverse water gas shift and solid oxide electrolysis.

  5. Liquid propellant gas generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The design of gas generators intended to provide hot gases for turbine drive is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the design and operation of bipropellant gas generators because of their wider use. Problems and limitations involved in turbine operation due to temperature effects are analyzed. Methods of temperature control of gas turbines and combustion products are examined. Drawings of critical sections of gas turbines to show their operation and areas of stress are included.

  6. Multi-propeller drive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenger, Robert V.

    1995-05-01

    A multipropeller drive system having a single input shaft for connection to an engine system, a differential gear assembly for dividing the driving force from the input drive shaft between a pair of output shafts, and a pair of laterally spaced propellers driven by the output shafts of the differential gear assembly is disclosed. The differential gear assembly operates in a manner wherein one output shaft, if required, is permitted to revolve at a different rate than the other output shaft. A pair of brake mechanisms acting on the output shafts of the differential gear assembly enable an operator to control the rotational speed of the respective propellers without modifying the engine speed or transmission settings.

  7. Processing solid propellants for recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, L.L.; Griffiths, S.K.; Handrock, J.L.; Lipkin, J.

    1994-05-01

    Rapid evolution in the structure of military forces worldwide is resulting in the retirement of numerous weapon systems. Many of these systems include rocket motors containing highly energetic propellants based on hazardous nitrocellulose/nitroglycerin (NC/NG) mixtures. Even as the surplus quantities of such material increases, however, current disposal methods -- principally open burning and open detonation (OB/OD) -- are coming under close scrutiny from environmental regulators. Environmentally conscious alternatives to disposal of propellant and explosives are thus receiving renewed interest. Recycle and reuse alternatives to OB/OD appear particularly attractive because some of the energetic materials in the inventories of surplus weapon systems represent potentially valuable resources to the commercial explosives and chemical industries. The ability to reclaim such resources is therefore likely to be a key requirement of any successful technology of the future in rocket motor demilitarization. This document consists of view graphs from the poster session.

  8. Kinetics Modeling of Hypergolic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    reaction OH + NO + M −−→ HONO + M as a function of temperature and pressure in the presence of argon, sf6 , and n2 bath gas . Chemical physics, 171(1-2...understand fundamental processes such as gas phase ignition, vaporization and liquid phase chemistry for characterizing ignition. Such understanding will be...critical for future design efforts targeting rapidly repeatable cyclic ignition of these propellants. Three test cases are considered: gas and liquid

  9. Self-Propelled Leidenfrost Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, H.; Alemán, B. J.; Melling, L. D.; Taormina, M. J.; Francis, M. J.; Dow-Hygelund, C. C.; Narayanan, V.; Taylor, R. P.; Stout, A.

    2006-04-01

    We report that liquids perform self-propelled motion when they are placed in contact with hot surfaces with asymmetric (ratchetlike) topology. The pumping effect is observed when the liquid is in the Leidenfrost regime (the film-boiling regime), for many liquids and over a wide temperature range. We propose that liquid motion is driven by a viscous force exerted by vapor flow between the solid and the liquid.

  10. Combustion characteristics of SMX and SMX based propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, David A.

    density and performance, smokeless combustion products, and stable combustion, SMX appears to be a viable replacement for existing energetic ingredients in a wide variety of propellant, explosive, and pyrotechnic applications.

  11. Four Models of In Situ Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musaeus, Peter; Krogh, Kristian; Paltved, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    that there are four fruitful approaches to in situ simulation: (1) In situ simulation informed by reported critical incidents and adverse events from emergency departments (ED) in which team training is about to be conducted to write scenarios. (2) In situ simulation through ethnographic studies at the ED. (3) Using...... prewritten scenarios from the simulation lab and transferring them to in situ simulation. (4) Action research – insider or participant action research to obtain in-depth understanding of team processes to guide scenario design. We evaluate the approach relying on Marks’ et al. taxonomy that posits...... the following processes: Transition processes, Action processes and Interpersonal processes. Design and purpose This abstract suggests four approaches to in situ simulation. A pilot study will evaluate the different approaches in two emergency departments in the Central Region of Denmark. Methods The typology...

  12. Fabrication and Performance of Zirconia Electrolysis Cells for Cabon Dioxide Reduction for Mars In Situ Resource Utilization Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, N. Q.; Chung, B. W.; Doshi, R.; Lear, G. R.; Montgomery, K.; Ong, E. T.

    1999-01-01

    Use of the Martian atmosphere (95% CO2) to produce oxygen (for propellant and life support) can significantly lower the required launch mass and dramatically reduce the total cost for Mars missions. Zirconia electrolysis cells are one of the technologies being considered for oxygen generation from carbon dioxide in Mars In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) production plants. The attractive features of the zirconia cell for this application include simple operation and lightweight, low volume system. A zirconia electrolysis cell is an all-solid state device, based on oxygen-ion conducting zirconia electrolytes, that electrochemically reduces carbon dioxide to oxygen and carbon monoxide. The cell consists of two porous electrodes (the anode and cathode) separated by a dense zirconia electrolyte. Typical zirconia cells contain an electrolyte layer which is 200 to 400 micrometer thick. The electrical conductivity requirement for the electrolyte necessitates an operating temperature of 9000 to 10000C. Recently, the fabrication of zirconia cells by the tape calendering has been evaluated. This fabrication process provides a simple means of making cells having very thin electrolytes (5 to 30 micrometers). Thin zirconia electrolytes reduce cell ohmic losses, permitting efficient operation at lower temperatures (8000C or below). Thus, tape-calendered cells provides not only the potential of low temperature operation but also the flexibility in operating temperatures. This paper describes the fabrication of zirconia cells by the tape calendering method and discusses the performance results obtained to date.

  13. A Cis-Lunar Propellant Infrastructure for Flexible Path Exploration and Space Commerce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a space infrastructure concept that exploits lunar water for propellant production and delivers it to users in cis-lunar space. The goal is to provide responsive economical space transportation to destinations beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) and enable in-space commerce. This is a game changing concept that could fundamentally affect future space operations, provide greater access to space beyond LEO, and broaden participation in space exploration. The challenge is to minimize infrastructure development cost while achieving a low operational cost. This study discusses the evolutionary development of the infrastructure from a very modest robotic operation to one that is capable of supporting human operations. The cis-lunar infrastructure involves a mix of technologies including cryogenic propellant production, reusable lunar landers, propellant tankers, orbital transfer vehicles, aerobraking technologies, and electric propulsion. This cislunar propellant infrastructure replaces Earth-launched propellants for missions beyond LEO. It enables users to reach destinations with smaller launchers or effectively multiplies the user s existing payload capacity. Users can exploit the expanded capacity to launch logistics material that can then be traded with the infrastructure for propellants. This mutually beneficial trade between the cis-lunar infrastructure and propellant users forms the basis of in-space commerce.

  14. In situ sensor techniques in modern bioprocess monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Sascha; Henkel, Steffen

    2011-09-01

    New reactor concepts as multi-parallel screening systems or disposable bioreactor systems for decentralized and reproducible production increase the need for new and easy applicable sensor technologies to access data for process control. These sophisticated reactor systems require sensors to work with the lowest sampling volumes or, even better, to measure directly in situ, but in situ sensors are directly incorporated into a reactor or fermenter within the sterility barrier and have therefore to stand the sterilization procedures. Consequently, these in situ sensor technologies should enable the measurement of multi-analytes simultaneously online and in real-time at a low price for the robust sensing element. Current research therefore focuses on the implementation of noninvasive spectroscopic and optical technologies, and tries to employ them through fiber optics attached to disposable sensing connectors. Spectroscopic methods reach from ultraviolet to infrared and further comprising fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. Also, optic techniques like microscopy are adapted for the direct use in bioreactor systems (Ulber et al. in Anal Bioanal Chem 376:342-348, 2003) as well as various electrochemical methods (Joo and Brown in Chem Rev 108:638-651, 2008). This review shows the variety of modern in situ sensing principles in bioprocess monitoring with emphasis on spectroscopic and optical techniques and the progress in the adaption to latest reactor concepts.

  15. Primary helium heater for propellant pressurization systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmuth, D. M.; Nguyen, T. V.; Pieper, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    The primary helium heater is a unique design that provides direct heating of pressurant gas for large pressure fed propulsion systems. It has been conceptually designed to supply a heated (800-1000 R) pressurization gas to both a liquid oxygen and an RP-1 propellant tank. This pressurization gas is generated within the heater by mixing super critical helium (40-300 R and 3000-1600 psi) with an appropriate amount of combustion products from a 4:1 throttling stoichiometric LO2/LH2 combustor. This simple, low cost and reliable mixer utilizes the large quantity of helium to provide stoichiometric combustor cooling, extend the throttling limits and enhance the combustion stability margin. Preliminary combustion, thermal, and CFD analyses confirm that this low-pressure-drop direct helium heater can provide the constant-temperature pressurant suitable for tank pressurization of both fuel and oxidizer tanks of large pressure fed vehicles.

  16. Pneumatic Planetary Regolith Feed System for In-Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, James G.; Mueller, Robert P.; Townsend, Ivan I.; Craft, Jack; Zacny, Kris

    2010-01-01

    The NASA In-situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project requires a regolith feed system that can transfer lunar regolith several meters vertically into a chemical reactor for oxygen production on the moon.

  17. Dimethylamine as the key intermediate generated in situ from dimethylformamide (DMF) for the synthesis of thioamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weibing; Chen, Cui; Liu, Hailing

    2015-01-01

    An improved and efficient method for the synthesis of thioamides is presented. For this transformation, dimethylamine as the key intermediate is generated in situ from dimethylformamide (DMF). All the tested substrates produced the desired products with excellent isolated yields.

  18. Miniature Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer for In-Situ Resource Utilization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In situ resource utilization (ISRU) is essential for several of NASA's future flagship missions. Currently envisioned ISRU plants include production of oxygen from...

  19. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus and process for high-resolution in situ investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-11-24

    A continuous-flow (CF) magic angle sample spinning (CF-MAS) NMR rotor and probe are described for investigating reaction dynamics, stable intermediates/transition states, and mechanisms of catalytic reactions in situ. The rotor includes a sample chamber of a flow-through design with a large sample volume that delivers a flow of reactants through a catalyst bed contained within the sample cell allowing in-situ investigations of reactants and products. Flow through the sample chamber improves diffusion of reactants and products through the catalyst. The large volume of the sample chamber enhances sensitivity permitting in situ .sup.13C CF-MAS studies at natural abundance.

  20. Design of Multi-Propellant Star Grains for Solid Propellant Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krishnan

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to solve the geometry-problem of solid propellant star is presented. The basis of the approach is to take the web-thickness (a ballistic as well as a geometrical property as the characteristic length. The nondimensional characteristic parameters representing diameter, length, slenderness-ratio, and ignitor accommodation of the grain are all identified. Many particular cases of star configurations (from the configurations of single propellant to those of four different propellants can be analysed through the identified characteristic parameters. A better way of representing the single-propellant-star-performance in a design graph is explained. Two types of dual propellant grains are analysed in detail. The first type is characterised by its two distinct stages of burning (initially by single propellant burning and then by dual propellant burning; the second type has the dual propellant burning throughout. Suitability of the identified characteristic parameters to an optimisation study is demonstrated through examples.

  1. High Performance Binder for EMCDB Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Bhat

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel block polymer has been synthesised from caprolactone using hydroxy terminated polybutadiene as ring opening initiator. Usefulness of this polymer as propellant binder has been studied by generating data on physico-chemical properties of the polymer. The polymer exhibited high miscibility with nitrate ester and high solid loading capability. Preliminary data generated on typical propellant formulation indicated higher performance as compared to composite propellant.

  2. Measuring Combustion Advance in Solid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    Set of gauges on solid-propellant rocket motor with electrically insulating case measures advance of combustion front and local erosion rates of propellant and insulation. Data furnished by gauges aid in motor design, failure analysis, and performance prediction. Technique useful in determining propellant uniformity and electrical properties of exhaust plum. Gauges used both in flight and on ground. Foilgauge technique also useful in basic research on pulsed plasmas or combustion of solids.

  3. Propeller Test Facilities Â

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: Three electrically driven whirl test stands are used to determine propeller (or other rotating device) performance at various rotational speeds. These...

  4. High Seed Compressor for Propellant Densification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Propellant densification systems particularly for H2 require compression systems developing very large amounts of head. Development of this head requires multiple...

  5. Pneumatic Regolith Transfer Systems for In Situ Resource Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, R. P.; Townsend, I. I.; Mantovani, J. G.; Zacny, Kris A.; Craft, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the testing of a pneumatic system for transfering regolith, to be used for In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). Using both the simulated microgravity of parabolic flight and ground testing, the tests demonstrated that lunar regolith can be conveyed pneumatically into a simulated ISRU oxygen production plant reactor. The ground testing also demonstrated that the regolith can be expelled from the ISRU reactor for disposal or for other resource processing.

  6. In Situ TEM Creation of Nanowire Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alam, Sardar Bilal

    Integration of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) as active components in devices requires that desired mechanical, thermal and electrical interfaces can be established between the nanoscale geometry of the SiNW and the microscale architecture of the device. In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM...... of SiNW were also investigated in situ. SiNWs were grown on silicon microcantilever heaters using the VLS mechanism. When grown across a gap between adjacent cantilevers, contact was formed when the SiNW impinged on the sidewall of an adjacent cantilever. Using in situ TEM, SiNW contact formation...

  7. Cavitation simulation on marine propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo

    flows on a 2D hydrofoil are compared with the experimental results. In the current implementation, three models with a vapor transport equation show numerical stability and equivalently good accuracy in simulating steady and unsteady sheet cavitation. More validations for cavitating flows on 3D...... hydrofoils and conventional/highly-skewed propellers are performed with one of three cavitation models proven in 2D analysis. 3D cases also show accuracy and robustness of numerical method in simulating steady and unsteady sheet cavitation on complicated geometries. Hydrodynamic characteristics of cavitation...

  8. Cars Spectroscopy of Propellant Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Harris, K. Aron, and J. Fendell "N2 and 00 Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational CARS Spectroscopy of CHI/N20 Flames," Proceedings of the Nineteenth...JANNAF Combustion Meeting, CIIA Publication No. 366, 1982, p 123. 21. K. Aron, L. E. Harris, and J. Fendell , "N and CO Vibrational CARS and H2 Rotational...9 6 5 . p 3 8 4 . . . . . 23. J. Fendell , L. E, Harris, and K. Aron, "Theoretical Calculation of 11 CARS S-Branches for Propellant Flames

  9. Investigation on the foaming behaviors of NC-based gun propellants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-xiang LI; Wei-tao YANG; San-jiu YING

    2014-01-01

    To prepare the porous NC-based (nitrocellulose-based) gun propellants, the batch foaming process of using supercritical CO2 as the physical blowing agent is used. The solubilities of CO2 in the single-base propellants and TEGDN (trimethyleneglycol dinitrate) propellants are measured by the gravimetric method, and SEM (scanning electron microscope) is used to observe the morphology of foamed propellants. The result shows that a large amount of CO2 could be dissolved in NC-based propellants. The experimental results also reveal that the energetic plasticizer TEGDN exerts an important influence on the pore structure. The triaxial tensile failure mechanism for solid-state nucleation is used to explain the nucleation of NC-based propellants in the solid state. Since some specific foaming behaviors of NC-based propellants can not be explained by the failure mechanism, a solid-state nucleation mechanism which revises the triaxial tensile failure mechanism is proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2014, China Ordnance Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The History of Solid-Propellant Rocketry: What We Do and Do Not Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Contributions to the evolution of solid-propellant rocketry have come from a variety of sources. World War II research on large solids enabled one company to capitalize on work in the area of castable double-base propellants. Separate development of castable composite propellants led to production of Polaris and Minuteman powerplants. Pivotal to the development of these missiles were Edward Hall's advocacy of the Minuteman missile within the Air Force and contract funding to resolve problems. The discovery that adding large amounts of aluminum significantly increased the specific impulse of a castable composite propellant further aided large-missile technology. These separate lines of research led to the development of large solid-propellant motors and boosters. Many more discoveries went into the development of large solid-propellant motors. Ammonium perchlorate replaced potassium perchlorate as an oxidizer in the late 1940's, and binders were developed. Discoveries important in the evolution of large solid-propellant motors appear to have resulted from innovators' education and skills, an exposure to contemporary problems, an awareness of theory but a willingness not to let it dictate empirical investigations, and proper empirical techniques. Other important contributions are the adequate funding and exchange of information. However, many questions remain about these and other innovations.

  11. Development of a solenoid pumped in situ zinc analyzer for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, T.P.; Wanty, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A battery powered submersible chemical analyzer, the Zn-DigiScan (Zn Digital Submersible Chemical Analyzer), has been developed for near real-time, in situ monitoring of zinc in aquatic systems. Microprocessor controlled solenoid pumps propel sample and carrier through an anion exchange column to separate zinc from interferences, add colorimetric reagents, and propel the reaction complex through a simple photometric detector. The Zn-DigiScan is capable of self-calibration with periodic injections of standards and blanks. The detection limit with this approach was 30 ??g L-1. Precision was 5-10% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) below 100 ??g L-1, improving to 1% R.S.D. at 1000 ??g L-1. The linear range extended from 30 to 3000 ??g L-1. In situ field results were in agreement with samples analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). This pump technology is quite versatile and colorimetric methods with complex online manipulations such as column reduction, preconcentration, and dilution can be performed with the DigiScan. However, long-term field deployments in shallow high altitude streams were hampered by air bubble formation in the photometric detector. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Supplier's Status for Critical Solid Propellants, Explosive, and Pyrotechnic Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, B. L.; Painter, C. R.; Nauflett, G. W.; Cramer, R. J.; Mulder, E. J.

    2000-01-01

    task. This paper is designed to emphasize the necessity of maintaining a JANNAF community supported database, which monitors PEP critical ingredient suppliers' status. The final product of this task is a user friendly, searchable database that provides a quick-view summary of critical ingredient supplier's information. This database must be designed to serve the needs of JANNAF and the propellant and energetic commercial manufacturing community as well. This paper provides a summary of the type of information to archive each critical ingredient.

  13. Scientific rationale of Saturn's in situ exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, O; Lebreton, J -P; Wurz, P; Cavalié, T; Coustenis, A; Courtin, R; Gautier, D; Helled, R; Irwin, P G J; Morse, A D; Nettelmann, N; Marty, B; Rousselot, P; Venot, O; Atkinson, D H; Waite, J H; Reh, K R; Simon-Miller, A; Atreya, S; André, N; Blanc, M; Daglis, I A; Fischer, G; Geppert, W D; Guillot, T; Hedman, M M; Hueso, R; Lellouch, E; Lunine, J I; Murray, C D; O'Donoghue, J; Rengel, M; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Schmider, F -X; Spiga, A; Spilker, T; Petit, J -M; Tiscareno, M S; Ali-Dib, M; Altwegg, K; Bouquet, A; Briois, C; Fouchet, T; Guerlet, S; Kostiuk, T; Lebleu, D; Moreno, R; Orton, G S; Poncy, J

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing observations meet some limitations when used to study the bulk atmospheric composition of the giant planets of our solar system. A remarkable example of the superiority of in situ probe measurements is illustrated by the exploration of Jupiter, where key measurements such as the determination of the noble gases abundances and the precise measurement of the helium mixing ratio have only been made available through in situ measurements by the Galileo probe. This paper describes the main scientific goals to be addressed by the future in situ exploration of Saturn placing the Galileo probe exploration of Jupiter in a broader context and before the future probe exploration of the more remote ice giants. In situ exploration of Saturn's atmosphere addresses two broad themes that are discussed throughout this paper: first, the formation history of our solar system and second, the processes at play in planetary atmospheres. In this context, we detail the reasons why measurements of Saturn's bulk element...

  14. Method of injecting fluid propellants into a rocket combustion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A rocket injector is provided with multiple sets of manifolds for supplying propellants to injector elements. Sensors transmit the temperatures of the propellants to a suitable controller which is operably connected to valves between these manifolds and propellant storage tanks. Additional valves are opened to furnish propellants to more of the manifolds when cryogenic propellant temperatures are sensed. Only a portion of the valves are opened to furnish propellants to some of the manifolds when lower temperatures are sensed.

  15. Effects of propellant composition variables on acceleration-induced burning-rate augmentation of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    This work was conducted to define further the effects of propellant composition variables on the acceleration-induced burning rate augmentation of solid propellants. The rate augmentation at a given acceleration was found to be a nonlinear inverse function of the reference burning rate and not controlled by binder or catalyst type at a given reference rate. A nonaluminized propellant and a low rate double-base propellant exhibited strong transient rate augmentation due to surface pitting resulting from the retention of hot particles on the propellant surface.

  16. Observatory Magnetometer In-Situ Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marusenkov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental validation of the in-situ calibration procedure, which allows estimating parameters of observatory magnetometers (scale factors, sensor misalignment without its operation interruption, is presented. In order to control the validity of the procedure, the records provided by two magnetometers calibrated independently in a coil system have been processed. The in-situ estimations of the parameters are in very good agreement with the values provided by the coil system calibration.

  17. Green plasticizers for multibase gun propellants (Lecture)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, C.; Driel, C.A. van; Zebregs, M.

    2007-01-01

    TNO Defence, Security and Safety has a long history of research on gun propellants. Areas investigated are formulating (new ingredients, optimization), manufacturing, charge design and lifetime assessment [1,2,3,4,5]. In conventional propellants inert plasticizers are used to alter performance,

  18. Design Procedure of 4-Bladed Propeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-09-01

    Sep 1, 2013 ... experiments with small–scale propeller mode were made in ... experiments were used to verify the design calculations like ... extent, in their aim to satisfy a particular set of .... 5.5knots. 2. = Brake power B. P from equation 2 is calculated as follow: ..... A step by step design procedure for a 4-bladed propeller ...

  19. Development of hydrazinium nitroformate based solid propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schöyer, H.F.R.; Schnorhk, A.J.; Korting, P.A.O.G.; Lit, P.J. van; Mul, J.M.; Gadiot, G.; Meulenbrugge, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    The development of new high-performance propellant combinations requires the establishment of safety and handling characteristics and thermodynamic decomposition and explosive properties. This paper addresses the early development phases of a new composite solid propellant based on HNF as oxidizer a

  20. Composite Solid Propellant Predictability and Quality Assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1989-01-01

    Reports are presented at the meeting at the University of Arizona on the study of predictable and reliable solid rocket motors. The following subject areas were covered: present state and trends in the research of solid propellants; the University of Arizona program in solid propellants, particularly in mixing (experimental and analytical results are presented).

  1. Green plasticizers for multibase gun propellants (Lecture)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, C.; Driel, C.A. van; Zebregs, M.

    2007-01-01

    TNO Defence, Security and Safety has a long history of research on gun propellants. Areas investigated are formulating (new ingredients, optimization), manufacturing, charge design and lifetime assessment [1,2,3,4,5]. In conventional propellants inert plasticizers are used to alter performance, proc

  2. MAST Propellant and Delivery System Design Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Uzair; Mc Cleskey, Carey M.

    2015-01-01

    A Mars Aerospace Taxi (MAST) concept and propellant storage and delivery case study is undergoing investigation by NASA's Element Design and Architectural Impact (EDAI) design and analysis forum. The MAST lander concept envisions landing with its ascent propellant storage tanks empty and supplying these reusable Mars landers with propellant that is generated and transferred while on the Mars surface. The report provides an overview of the data derived from modeling between different methods of propellant line routing (or "lining") and differentiate the resulting design and operations complexity of fluid and gaseous paths based on a given set of fluid sources and destinations. The EDAI team desires a rough-order-magnitude algorithm for estimating the lining characteristics (i.e., the plumbing mass and complexity) associated different numbers of vehicle propellant sources and destinations. This paper explored the feasibility of preparing a mathematically sound algorithm for this purpose, and offers a method for the EDAI team to implement.

  3. Burning rate characteristics of CMDB propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, V.; Soosai Marian, M. (Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre, Trivandrum (India). Propellant Engineering Div.)

    1979-10-01

    The object of this paper is to obtain expressions for the burning rate pressure exponent and the temperature sensitivity of AP-based and HMX-based CMDB propellants in terms of the respective physical constants on the basis of a recently developed model of combustion for CMDB propellants and to examine the effects, if any, on these two parameters, of the changes in propellant composition, AP particle size and pressure. Computer programs were developed for this purpose and the results obtained for typical sets of input data presented in the paper. While the results of the calculation indicate a markedly strong dependence of the pressure exponent and the temperature sensitivity on pressure and composition for both AP-based and HMX-based CMDB propellants, the parameters are characterized by far lesser dependence on AP particle size for the AP-based propellant.

  4. Storage of solid propellants in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udlock, D. E.

    1977-01-01

    A test program is described which determines the extent of physical property changes that result from extended space exposure. Primary emphasis was placed on determining the effects of space vacuum. Solid propellants were stored and their physical properties tested in a vacuum and in a dry environment. The storage caused significantly greater increases in the propellants' modulus and maximum tensile strength than occurred in parallel ambient stored samples. The data indicate that the loss of trace amounts of residual moisture from cured propellant is the apparent cause of the observed propellant property changes. Therefore, initial screening tests were carried out under dry storage conditions. Upon completion of the dry storage tests, appropriate propellant samples are exposed to an actual space environment using the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  5. In Situ Formation of Carbon Nanomaterials on Bulk Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials were synthesized in situ on bulk 316L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel by hybrid surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the treated samples and the resulted carbon nanomaterials were investigated by SEM and TEM characterizations. Different substrates resulted in different morphologies of products. The diameter of carbon nanomaterials is related to the size of the nanograins on the surface layer of substrates. The possible growth mechanism was discussed. Effects of the main parameters of the synthesis, including the carbon source and gas reactant composition, hydrogen, and the reaction temperature, were studied. Using hybrid SMAT is proved to be an effective way to synthesize carbon nanomaterials in situ on surfaces of metallic materials.

  6. In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

    2002-09-20

    The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

  7. In situ microcosms in aquifer bioremediation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, R T; Shati, M R; Ronen, D

    1997-07-01

    The extent to which aquifer microbiota can be studied under laboratory or simulated conditions is limited by our inability to authentically duplicate natural conditions in the laboratory. Therefore, extrapolation of laboratory results to real aquifer situations is often criticized, unless validation of the data is performed in situ. Reliable data acquisition is critical for the estimation of chemical and biological reaction rates of biodegradation processes in groundwater and as input data for mathematical models. Typically, in situ geobiochemical studies relied on the injection of groundwater spiked with compounds or bacteria of interest into the aquifer, followed by monitoring the changes over time and space. In situ microcosms provide a more confined study site for measurements of microbial reactions, yet closer to natural conditions than laboratory microcosms. Two basic types of in situ aquifer microcosm have been described in recent years, and both originated from in situ instruments initially designed for geochemical measurements. Gillham et al. [Ground Water 28 (1990) 858-862] constructed an instrument that isolates a portion of an aquifer for in situ biochemical rate measurements. More recently Shati et al. [Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2646-2653] modified a multilayer sampler for studying the activity of inoculated bacteria in a contaminated aquifer Keeping in mind recent advances in environmental microbiology methodologies such as immunofluorescence direct counts, oligonucleotide and PCR probes, fatty acid methyl esther analysis for the detection and characterization of bacterial communities, measurement of mRNA and expression of proteins, it is evident that much new information can now be gained from in situ work. Using in situ microcosms to study bioremediation efficiencies, the fate of introduced microorganisms and general geobiochemical aquifer processes can shed more realistic light on the microbial underworld. The aim of this paper is to

  8. Contaminant Robust System for Oxygen Production from Lunar and Martian Resources Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Extended duration missions to the Moon and Mars will require the use of In-situ resources to generate propellants and life support consumables. Many of the processes...

  9. 原位氮饥饿发酵工艺中梯度补氮对谷氨酰胺合成酶的调控%REGULATION OF GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE IN GLUTAMINE PRODUCTION BY FERMENTATION OF Corynebacterium glutamicum WITH in-situ NITROGEN STARVATION AND GRADIENT FED NITROGEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春; 刘雨磊; 陈奎发; 杨艳; 曹竹安

    2004-01-01

    The effects of uniform and gradient fed nitrogen on glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate dehydrogenase(GDH) and glutamate synthase ((K)GAT)were investigated in glutamine production by fermentation of Corynebacterium glutamicum NS611 after 3 h of in-situ nitrogen starvation. It was shown that the strain in the later growth phase entered naturally into in-situ nitrogen starvation by controlling the initial concentration of urea and the biomass was slightly decreased. The pH value reached 6.5 again in the culture system, which confirmed the beginning of nitrogen starvation in the culture system. After 3 h nitrogen starvation the activity of GS was increased over two folds and the time of high activity of GS persisted three folds longer in the gradient fed nitrogen system than that in the normal fed batch. The higher activity of GDH was also maintained. The glutamine production increased by 72 % than the original technology of nitrogen starvation and the time of fermentation was shortened by above 12 h.

  10. Photovoltaics Using In Situ Resource Utilization for HEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, David R.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1998-01-01

    One of the most important elements of a human planetary base is power production. Lunar data make it clear that several types of solar-to-electric converters can be manufactured on the Moon. Materials research and processing demonstrations are suggested that can be carried out on Earth, the Space Transportation System (STS), the International Space Station (ISS), and on the Moon to advance the in situ production of solar-to-electric power systems on the Moon. Many of the technologies will be applicable to Mars, the silicate moons, and asteroids.

  11. The use of electrical discharge for ignition and control of combustion of solid propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Tsuruo; Matsuda, Takashi; Kimura, Itsuro

    1987-01-01

    As the first step of the study of the combustion control of solid propellants by electrical discharges, the effects of an arc discharge, which flows along the burning surface, on the burning rate and on the increase of enthalpy of the combustion product were investigated. For specially devised composite propellants, which are composed of Al and Teflon powders, it was shown that the combination can be controlled by an arc discharge; the combustion continues when the arc discharge is applied and is interrupted when the arc discharge breaks. In the present investigation, it was also shown that an arc discharge coupled with a high-frequency electrical discharge has potential as an effective ignition method for solid propellants. For the application of this type of combustion control to an ignitor for a solid propellant rocket motor or to a control rocket motor, this method lacks flexibility in the configuration scale and needs relatively high electric power at the present stage.

  12. Runtime and Pressurization Analyses of Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Robert E.; Ryan, Harry M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Lee, Chung P.

    2007-01-01

    Multi-element unstructured CFD has been utilized at NASA SSC to carry out analyses of propellant tank systems in different modes of operation. The three regimes of interest at SSC include (a) tank chill down (b) tank pressurization and (c) runtime propellant draw-down and purge. While tank chill down is an important event that is best addressed with long time-scale heat transfer calculations, CFD can play a critical role in the tank pressurization and runtime modes of operation. In these situations, problems with contamination of the propellant by inclusion of the pressurant gas from the ullage causes a deterioration of the quality of the propellant delivered to the test article. CFD can be used to help quantify the mixing and propellant degradation. During tank pressurization under some circumstances, rapid mixing of relatively warm pressurant gas with cryogenic propellant can lead to rapid densification of the gas and loss of pressure in the tank. This phenomenon can cause serious problems during testing because of the resulting decrease in propellant flow rate. With proper physical models implemented, CFD can model the coupling between the propellant and pressurant including heat transfer and phase change effects and accurately capture the complex physics in the evolving flowfields. This holds the promise of allowing the specification of operational conditions and procedures that could minimize the undesirable mixing and heat transfer inherent in propellant tank operation. It should be noted that traditional CFD modeling is inadequate for such simulations because the fluids in the tank are in a range of different sub-critical and supercritical states and elaborate phase change and mixing rules have to be developed to accurately model the interaction between the ullage gas and the propellant. We show a typical run-time simulation of a spherical propellant tank, containing RP-1 in this case, being pressurized with room-temperature nitrogen at 540 R. Nitrogen

  13. Reactivities of Precision Cleaning Solvents with Hypergolic Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Dennis D.; Delgado, Rafael H.; Williams, James H.

    1999-01-01

    The reactivities of several selected halogenated precision cleaning solvents with hypergolic propellants has been determined by analysis of the rates of formation of halide ion decomposition products. The solvents were Asahiklin AK 225, Asahiklin AK 225 AES, HFE 7100, HFE 7100 DE, Vertrel XF, Vertrel MCA, Vertrel MCA Plus, 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113), and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE). The propellants were hydrazine (HZ), monomethylhydrazine (MMH), and mixed oxides of nitrogen (MON-3). The Vertrel solvents showed significant reactivity with HZ. All of the solvents except DCE exhibited significant reactivity with MMH, particularly HFE 7100 DE and CFC-113. HFE 7100 DE, Vertrel MCA, and Vertrel MCA Plus also showed significant reactivity with MON-3 oxidizer.

  14. CONTROLLED RELEASE IN SITU FORMING GATIFLOXACIN HCl HYDROGEL FOR OPHTHALMIC DRUG DELIVERY

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar Sagar D; Pawar Ravi.G.; Gadhave M. V.; Jadhav S.L.; Gaikwad D. D.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, controlled drug delivery has become the standard in modern Pharmaceutical design and an intensive research have been undertaken in achieving much better drug product effectiveness, reliability and safety. This interest has been sparked by the advantages shown by in situ forming polymeric delivery systems such as ease of administration and reduced frequency of administration, improved patient compliance and comfort. In situ hydrogels are instilled as drops into the eye and undergoes...

  15. Propellant isolation shutoff valve program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis and design effort directed to advancing the state-of-the-art of space storable isolation valves for control of flow of the propellants liquid fluorine/hydrazine and Flox/monomethylhydrazine is discussed. Emphasis is on achieving zero liquid leakage and capability of withstanding missions up to 10 years in interplanetary space. Included is a study of all-metal poppet sealing theory, an evaluation of candidate seal configurations, a valve actuator trade-off study and design description of a pneumo-thermally actuated soft metal poppet seal valve. The concepts and analysis leading to the soft seal approach are documented. A theoretical evaluation of seal leakage versus seal loading, related finishes and yield strengths of various materials is provided. Application of a confined soft aluminum seal loaded to 2 to 3 times yield strength is recommended. Use of either an electro-mechanical or pneumatic actuator appears to be feasible for the application.

  16. Preparation of Bacterial Cellulose/Inorganic Gel of Bentonite Composite by In Situ Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Qi, Gao-Xiang; Huang, Chao; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Hai-Rong; Luo, Jun; Chen, Xue-Fang; Xiong, Lian; Chen, Xin-De

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the possibility of Bacterial cellulose/Inorganic Gel of Bentonite (BC/IGB) composite production using in situ method, the BC/IGB composite was successfully produced by in situ modification of BC in both HS medium and corncob hydrolysate. The results showed that the BC/IGB composite obtained in HS medium (one classical medium for BC production) had a higher water holding capacity, but the water retention capacity of the BC/IGB composite obtained in corncob hydrolysate was better. The performance of BC/IGB composite depended on the environment of in situ modification. Using different media showed significant influence on the sugar utilization and BC yield. In addition, BC/IGB composite produced by in situ method was compared with that produced by ex situ method, and the results shows that water holding capacity of BC/IGB composite obtained through in situ method was better. XRD results showed the crystallinity of BC/IGB composite related little to its performance as water absorbent. Overall, in situ modification is appropriate for further production of BC composite and other clay materials.

  17. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eGieg

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contibuting to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more benefical technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  18. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments.

  19. Design Games for In-Situ Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    on a design problem where an in-situ design practice may further the early design process: the case of designing a pervasive game. Pervasive games are computer games, played using the city as a game board and often using mobile phones with GPS. Some contextual design methods exist, but we propose an approach...... that calls for the designer to conceptualise and perform ideas in-situ, that is on the site, where the game is supposed to be played. The problem was to design a creativity method that incorporated in-situ design work and which generated game concepts for pervasive games. The proposed design method, called...... sitestorming, is based on a game using Situationistic individual exploration of the site and different types of game cards, followed by a joint evaluation of the generated ideas. A series of evaluations showed that the designers found the method enjoyable to use, that the method motivated idea generation...

  20. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.