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Sample records for in-situ gamma spectroscopy

  1. Innovative Applications of In Situ Gamma Spectroscopy for Non-destructive Assay of Transuranic Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watters, D.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Duke, S.J.; Nicosia, W.C.

    2009-01-01

    Cabrera Services (CABRERA), under contract to National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), supported the transuranic (TRU) waste reduction initiative at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CABRERA developed advanced NDA techniques for oversized boxes (OSB) and drums using in situ gamma spectroscopy during several phases of the project. A more thorough characterization method was employed during the planning phase of the project to better understand the TRU content and distribution within each container, while a comprehensive NDA program was designed and implemented during the intrusive phase that guided waste segregation and re-packaging of both TRU and low-level wastes (LLW). NSTec took receipt of 58 oversized boxes of suspect TRU waste from Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). TRU waste is defined as greater than 3.7 kilobecquerels per gram [kBq/g] (100 nanocuries (nCi)/g) activity from alpha-emitting radionuclides with atomic number greater than 92 having a half-life greater than 20 years. Each box was custom-made to house a variety of suspect TRU wastes resulting from years of weapons program research, development, and testing. Since their arrival at NTS, the boxes have undergone several iterations of non-destructive assay (NDA) in preparation for the comprehensive repackaging effort. NDA has included two rounds of in situ gamma spectroscopy and real-time radiography (RTR) scans that were videotaped. Contents have been confirmed to include glove boxes, HEPA filters and their housings, and assorted process equipment and piping. TRU content was determined via directly measuring plutonium-239 (Pu-239), americium-241 (Am-241), and other radionuclides, while adding calculated results for non-measurable nuclides using reliable scaling factors developed from acceptable knowledge (AK). Advantages of CABRERA's NDA methods included: - More NDA information is available in the same amount of counting time, allowing NSTec to make more

  2. Gamma Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Butz, Tilman; Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.

    2008-01-01

    No abstract. The sections in this article are 1 Introduction 2 Mössbauer Spectroscopy 3 Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) 4 Conclusions and Outlook Keywords: Mössbauer spectroscopy; gamma spectroscopy; perturbed angular correlation; TDPAC

  3. Comparison on in situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectroscopy of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In situ - ray spectroscopic method of measeruments, using the calibration factor by Zombori et al, and laboratory method for soil samples were carried out in Ibadan, SW Nigeria. The average specific activities of 40K, 238U and 232Th in the soil were 299.0 16.5 Bqkg-1, 40.0 5.8 Bqkg-1 and 95.0 7.8 Bqkg-1, respectively, by in ...

  4. Environmental monitoring with in-situ gamma spectrometer; Umweltueberwachung mit in-situ-Gamma-Spektrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, S. [ENVINET GmbH, Haar (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    The in-situ gamma spectroscopy allows large area and continuous monitoring of the radio nuclides and there composition in the environment. In comparison to the gamma dose rate measurement the additional spectral information gives the possibility for a quick and effective action in the case of a man-made radiation exposition in the environment. The knowledge respectively localization of the possible nuclides, which a responsible for the increased dose rate, supports responsible organization in the quick identification of the situation, definition of the actions and tracking of the temporal and local process of the radiation exposition. Due to dedicate actions the risk for people and environment is reduced.

  5. Optimum method to determine radioactivity in large tracts of land. In-situ gamma spectroscopy or sampling followed by laboratory measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, Frazier

    2008-01-01

    In the process of decommissioning contaminated facilities, and in the conduct of normal operations involving radioactive material, it is frequently required to show that large areas of land are not contaminated, or if contaminated that the amount is below an acceptable level. However, it is quite rare for the radioactivity in the soil to be uniformly distributed. Rather it is generally in a few isolated and probably unknown locations. One way to ascertain the status of the land concentration is to take soil samples for subsequent measurement in the laboratory. Another way is to use in-situ gamma spectroscopy. In both cases, the non-uniform distribution of radioactivity can greatly compromise the accuracy of the assay, and makes uncertainty estimates much more complicated than simple propagation of counting statistics. This paper examines the process of determining the best way to estimate the activity on the tract of land, and gives quantitative estimates of measurement uncertainty for various conditions of radioactivity. When the distribution of radioactivity in the soil is not homogeneous, the sampling uncertainty is likely to be larger than the in-situ measurement uncertainty. (author)

  6. The efficiency calibration and development of environmental correction factors for an in situ high-resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. Absolute efficiency calibration of the GSLS was performed using simple cylindrical borehole geometry. The calibration source incorporated naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) that emitted photons ranging from 186-keV to 2,614-keV. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software. A linear relationship was found between increasing source thickness and relative photon fluence rates at the detector. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, relative photon fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Attenuation effects due to iron, water, PVC, and concrete cylindrical shields were found to agree with previous studies. Regression analyses produced energy-dependent equations for efficiency corrections applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs collected under non-standard borehole conditions

  7. In-situ gamma-analysis support for Phase I, Middlesex cleanup project, Middlesex, New Jersey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiman, R.T.

    1983-07-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy, the Energy Measurements Group of EG and G participated in the Remedial Action program for the former Middlesex Sampling Plant and associated properties at Middlesex, New Jersey from July to November 1980. EG and G provided real time analysis of the radiological character of the soil of each property included in the Phase I cleanup before, during, and after decontamination. The method used for the analysis was in situ gamma spectroscopy employing a high purity germanium detector. This report describes the in situ system and displays the results of the in situ measurements before and after decontamination of the properties surveyed during Phase I

  8. Detector calibration for in-situ gamma ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Balea, G

    2002-01-01

    The power in the technique of in-situ spectrometry lies in the fact that a detector placed on ground measures gamma radiation from sources situated over an area of several hundred square meters. The 'field of view' for the detector would be larger for high energy radiation sources and for sources closer to the soil surface. In contrast, a soil sample would represent an area of a few tens of hundreds of square centimeters. In practice, an effective characterization of a site would involve in-situ gamma ray spectrometry in conjunction with soil sampling. As part of an overall program, in-situ gamma ray spectrometry provides a means to assess the degree of contamination in areas during the course of operations in the field, thus guiding the investigator on where to collect samples. It can also substantially reduce the number of samples need to be collected and subsequently analyzed. (author)

  9. In situ Raman spectroscopy studies of bulk and surface metal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk V-P-O and model supported vanadia catalysts were investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy during n-butane oxidation to maleic anhydride in order to determine the fundamental molecular structure-reactivity/selectivity insights that can be obtained from such experiments. The in situ Raman

  10. Portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Dong Binjiang; Zeng Liping; Shen Tingyun

    2000-01-01

    The author describes a portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system, which consists of a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector, an integrative spectroscopy card, a notebook computer and spectroscopy software. The spectrometer addresses applications in environmental or nuclear accident in situ γ spectroscopy measurements, and gives valid quantitative results of radionuclide concentrations per unit volume (Bq/kg) or unit area (Bq/cm 2 ) in the soil and absorbed dose rate in air at 1 m above ground (Gy/h)

  11. In situ evaluation of radwaste gamma activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulama, Cristian; Toma, Al.; Dobrin, R.; Pavelescu, Margarit

    2003-01-01

    There are certain limitations concerning the usage of standard source method for efficiency calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers measuring in extended geometry conditions. These limitations arise from the great diversity of forms and sizes of the objects which are to be measured during decommissioning and radioactive waste management activities. The INR - Pitesti operates a radioactive waste management facilities for both its own necessities and for providing external services. This facility is able to perform conditioning of liquid and solid wastes for interim storage disposal. During the conditioning operations there are certain stages when the radioactive measurement of the storage drums is demanded. We developed a gamma ray spectrometry equipment using a portable MCA Canberra INSPECTOR, a HPGe detector and an INR manufactured collimator. We are using a semiempirical method to calibrate the gamma ray spectrometer for such measurements. A program was written in Visual Basic language and includes a graphical interface for parameters input and data output. The input parameters are stored in text files, which can be loaded, modified or saved on disk as desired. The program was tested to establish the stability of MC simulation and the sensitivity to the input parameters. During the programming process it was possible to verify some code sequences and the results obtained showed that the model used was appropriate. To find out the optimal number of MC histories, which have to be modelled to obtain results of sufficient accuracy, the program was repeatedly run by changing only the number of histories. The relative deviation to the mean of the effective solid angle was calculated. The density of the source material as well as its composition can be changed by input. For comparison the efficiency calibration curves for sources materials having the same elemental composition but different densities ranging from 10 to 1000 kg/m 3 are drawn. The activities of the

  12. In situ lake pollutant survey using prompt-gamma probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiunnhsing Chao; Chien Chung

    1991-01-01

    An aluminium-made neutron-gamma probe, consisting of a 1.5 μg 252 Cf neutron source and a high purity germanium detector, was mounted on a mobile floating platform to survey chlorine pollutant concentration in lake water in situ. Laboratory tests for determining the probe operating depth and in situ field trials of a polluted lake were conducted; evaluation of radiation exposure to workers on board was carried out. The polluted chlorine concentration in lake water was found to be 86 ppm, with minimal radiation exposure for the operating crew on board. (author)

  13. A gamma-spectrometer determining equilibrium factor in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Weiheng

    1992-01-01

    The author expounds main function, scientific value and practical significance of Model SY500 gamma-spectrometer, which can determine radioactive factor equilibrium (k p ) in-situ. Accuracy, steadiness and differential of the technology has been proved on the models of Radiometric Measurement Station of China Nuclear Industry Corporation. The author enumerates several examples such as k p survey at gold-bearing glebe, at uranium-bearing glebe, at the ground above ground water and 21 stations of Beijing subway

  14. In situ measurements of dose rates from terrestrial gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, M.C.; Jiang, S.H.

    2002-01-01

    A portable, high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was employed for the performance of in situ measurements of radionuclide activity concentrations in the ground in Taiwan, at altitudes ranging from sea level to 3900 m. The absolute peak efficiency of the HPGe detector for a gamma-ray source uniformly distributed in the semi-infinite ground was determined using a semi-empirical method. The gamma-ray dose rates from terrestrial radionuclides were calculated from the measured activity levels using recently published dose rate conversion factors. The absorbed dose rate in air due to cosmic rays was derived by subtracting the terrestrial gamma-ray dose rate from the overall absorbed dose rate in air measured using a high-pressure ionization chamber. The cosmic-ray dose rate calculated as a function of altitude, was found to be in good agreement with the data reported by UNSCEAR. (orig.)

  15. Simultaneous beta and gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsoni, Abdollah T.; Hamby, David M.

    2010-03-23

    A phoswich radiation detector for simultaneous spectroscopy of beta rays and gamma rays includes three scintillators with different decay time characteristics. Two of the three scintillators are used for beta detection and the third scintillator is used for gamma detection. A pulse induced by an interaction of radiation with the detector is digitally analyzed to classify the type of event as beta, gamma, or unknown. A pulse is classified as a beta event if the pulse originated from just the first scintillator alone or from just the first and the second scintillator. A pulse from just the third scintillator is recorded as gamma event. Other pulses are rejected as unknown events.

  16. In situ measurement of some gamma-emitting radionuclides in plant communities of the South Carolina coastal plain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragsdale, H.L.; Tanner, B.K.; Coleman, R.N.; Palms, J.M.; Wood, R.E.

    1978-01-01

    In situ and laboratory gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements were taken in nine scrub oak forests and nine old fields to determine the applicability of in situ analysis in the coastal plain. Data collected at each of the 18 sites included a 2-hr count, soil density and moisture estimates, and vegetation measurements. Samples returned to the laboratory for radiometric analysis included litter and herbaceous vegetation and soil cores. Analysis of the gamma-emitter detection frequencies, concentrations, and burdens showed good to excellent agreement between laboratory and in situ methods. Generally, forests were determined to be superior in situ sampling systems. Laboratory analysis of collected samples may be a superior technique for gamma emitters with low energies, low concentrations, or nonuniform distributions in the soil. Three potential uses of in situ Ge(Li) spectrometers were identified and discussed in terms of their limits and of the replicate ecosystems appropriate for in situ analyses. Although the variety and the biogeochemical cycling regimes of southeastern coastal plain ecosystems complicate in situ analyses, it was concluded that comparable and probably accurate results can be achieved using in situ technology

  17. Evaluation of gamma ray fields by HPGE spectrometry in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnac, S; Slugen, V [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Ragan, P; Fueloep, M [Inst. of Preventive and Clinical Medicine, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper the in situ spectrometric measurement for application in gamma radiation dosimetry with portability and flexibility in use was studied. In order to allow operation of the detector in any orientation without liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) spillage, a multi-attitude cryostat (MAC) has been used which consists of a Dewar with LN{sub 2} capacity of 7.0 litres and a holding time of 5 days. This allows the Dewar to be operated in the horizontal position, pointing vertically upward or vertically downward, without loss of LN{sub 2}. The MAC detector has been positioned in a 4{sup p}i{sup -}goniometer and, therefore is movable to any measurable angle. Pulses from the detector have been fed into a portable multichannel analyzer (Canberra 35+) with connection to a PC/AT compatible computer system. The main results and findings of present contribution may be summarized as follows: 1. A technique called the scaling confirmatory factor analysis (SCFA) presented else can be advantageously employed for determination of the response operator characterizing an influence of measuring device on physical gamma-spectra obtained. The in situ response operator has been reproduced only from the internal factors of appropriate latent structure that do not depend upon materials surrounding the detector. 2. The photon fluence rate response operator for in situ application has been obtained from the reduced response operator by a correction according to the geometric factor 4{sup p}i{sup (}r{sub 0}+r){sup 2}.The effective distance r{sub 0} has been determined via a performance of the radial calibration which yields a condition of, minimally, 10 cm distance of the detector cover from the potential sources. 3. The real incident gamma ray spectra achieved by application of the SCFA response allow direct evaluation of spectral distributions of the fundamental photon dosimetric quantities. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Extreme Spectroscopy: In situ nuclear materials behavior from optical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimbretiere, G.; Canizares, A.; Raimboux, N.; Omnee, R.; Duval, F.; Ammar, M.R.; Simon, P. [CNRS - UPR3079 CEMHTI, Universite d' Orleans, 45071Orleans cedex 2 (France); Desgranges, L.; Mohun, R. [CEA, DEN, DEC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Jegou, C.; Magnin, M. [CEA/DTCD/SECM/LMPA, Marcoule 30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N. [ICSM-UMR5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, Marcoule, BP17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, materials are regularly exposed to high temperature or/and irradiation and a better knowledge and understanding of their behavior under such extreme conditions is a key-point for improvements and further developments. Nowadays, Raman spectroscopy begins to be well known as a promising technique in the post mortem and remote characterization of nuclear materials exposed to extreme conditions. On this topic, at ANIMMA 2013 conference, we have presented some results about its implementation in the study of model or real nuclear fuel. However, the strength of Raman spectroscopy as in situ characterization tool is mainly its ability to be implemented remotely through optical fibers. Aware of this, implementation of other optical techniques can be considered in order to gain information not only on the structural dynamics of materials but also on the electronic charge carrier populations. In this paper, we propose to present our last advances in Raman characterization of nuclear materials and enlarge to the in situ use of complementary optical spectroscopies. Emphasis will be made on the information that can be gained to the behavior of the model fuel depleted UO{sub 2} under extreme conditions of high temperature and ionic irradiation: - In Situ Raman identification of the radiolysis alteration products of UO{sub 2} in contact with water under ionic irradiation. - In Situ Raman recording of the damaged dynamic of UO{sub 2} under inert atmosphere. - In Situ Raman and photo-luminescence study of virgin and damaged UO2 at high temperature. - In Situ study of electronic charge carriers' behavior in U{sub x}Th{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} solid solutions by mean of Iono- and Thermo- luminescence under and post- ionic irradiation. (authors)

  19. Demonstration of a collimated in situ method for determining depth distributions using gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Benke, R R

    2002-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry uses a portable detector to quantify radionuclides in materials. The main shortcoming of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry has been its inability to determine radionuclide depth distributions. Novel collimator designs were paired with a commercial in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to overcome this limitation for large area sources. Positioned with their axes normal to the material surface, the cylindrically symmetric collimators limited the detection of un attenuated gamma-rays from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis). Although this approach does not alleviate the need for some knowledge of the gamma-ray attenuation characteristics of the materials being measured, the collimation method presented in this paper represents an absolute method that determines the depth distribution as a histogram, while other in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method d...

  20. Factors influencing in situ gamma-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loonstra, E. H.; van Egmond, F. M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction In situ passive gamma-ray sensors are very well suitable for mapping physical soil properties. In order to make a qualitative sound soil map, high quality input parameters for calibration are required. This paper will focus on the factors that affect the output of in situ passive gamma-ray sensors, the primary source, soil, not taken into account. Factors The gamma-ray spectrum contains information of naturally occurring nuclides 40K, 238U and 232Th and man-made nuclides like 137Cs, as well as the total count rate. Factors that influence the concentration of these nuclides and the count rate can be classified in 3 categories. These are sensor design, environmental conditions and operational circumstances. Sensor design The main elements of an in situ gamma-ray sensor that influence the outcome and quality of the output are the crystal and the spectrum analysis method. Material and size of the crystal determine the energy resolution. Though widely used, NaI crystals are not the most efficient capturer of gamma radiation. Alternatives are BGO and CsI. BGO has a low peak resolution, which prohibits use in cases where man-made nuclides are subject of interest. The material is expensive and prone to temperature instability. CsI is robust compared to NaI and BGO. The density of CsI is higher than NaI, yielding better efficiency, especially for smaller crystal sizes. More volume results in higher energy efficiency. The reduction of the measured spectral information into concentration of radionuclides is mostly done using the Windows analysis method. In Windows, the activities of the nuclides are found by summing the intensities of the spectrum found in a certain interval surrounding a peak. A major flaw of the Windows method is the limited amount of spectral information that is incorporated into the analysis. Another weakness is the inherent use of ‘stripping factors' to account for contributions of radiation from nuclide A into the peak of nuclide B. This

  1. Technology information profile: RL321103 -- In situ gamma spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilk, A.J.

    1993-11-01

    Past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments, and areas surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailing, and slag heaps. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the DOE, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of the uranium contaminants must be adequately characterized. Unfortunately, traditional means of obtaining soil activities (e.g., grab sampling followed by laboratory analyses) are notoriously cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often non-representative when very large areas are being surveyed. Hence, new technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow for the cheaper, better, faster (i.e., real-time) and safer characterization of uranium concentrations at these critical sites. The primary objective for this program is to develop, construct, and field/pilot test the in situ gamma spectrometer for the rapid measurement of uranium in surface and shallow subsurface soils at the Fernald site in Ohio

  2. In situ gamma spectrometry development for site mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panza, F.

    2012-01-01

    The high-resolution gamma spectrometry currently provides a powerful analytical tool for performing environmental measurements. In the context of radiological characterization of a site (natural or artificial radioactivity) and for the dismantling of nuclear installations, mapping of radionuclides is an important asset. The idea is to move a HPGe spectrometer to study the site and from nuclear and position data, to identify, to locate and to quantify the radionuclides present in the soil. The development of this tool follows an intercomparison (ISIS 2007) where an intervention/crisis exercise showed the limits of current tools. The main part of this research project has focused on mapping of nuclear data. Knowledge of the parameters of an in situ spectrum helped to create a simulator, modeling the response of a spectrometer moving over contaminated soil. The simulator itself helped to develop algorithms for mapping and to test them in extreme situations and not realizable. A large part of this research leads to the creation of a viable prototype providing real-time information concerning the identity and locality as possible radionuclides. The work performed on the deconvolution of data can make in post processing a map of the activity of radionuclide soil but also an indication of the depth distribution of the source. The prototype named OSCAR was tested on contaminated sites (Switzerland and Japan) and the results are in agreement with reference measurements. (author)

  3. In-situ gamma spectrometry method for determination of environmental gamma dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conti, Claudio de Carvalho

    1995-07-01

    This work tries to establish a methodology for germanium detectors calibration, normally used for in situ gamma ray spectrometry, for determining the environmental exposure rate in function of the energy of the incident photons. For this purpose a computer code has been developed, based on the stripping method, for the computational spectra analysis to calculate the contribution of the partial absorption of the gamma rays (Compton effect) in the active and nonactive parts of the detector. The resulting total absorption spectrum is then converted to fluence distribution in function of the energy for the photons reaching the detector, which is then used to calculate the exposure rate or kerma in air. The unfolding and fluency convention parameters are determined by detector calibration using point gamma sources. The method is validated by comparison of the results against the calculated exposure rate at a point of interest for the standards. This method is used for the direct measurement of the exposure rate distribution in function of the energy at the site, in situ measurement technic, leading to rapid results during an emergency situation and also used for indoor measurements. (author)

  4. In-situ gamma spectrometry method for determination of environmental gamma dose; Metodo de espectrometria gamma in situ para determinacao de dose gama ambiental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, Claudio de Carvalho

    1995-07-15

    This work tries to establish a methodology for germanium detectors calibration, normally used for in situ gamma ray spectrometry, for determining the environmental exposure rate in function of the energy of the incident photons. For this purpose a computer code has been developed, based on the stripping method, for the computational spectra analysis to calculate the contribution of the partial absorption of the gamma rays (Compton effect) in the active and nonactive parts of the detector. The resulting total absorption spectrum is then converted to fluence distribution in function of the energy for the photons reaching the detector, which is then used to calculate the exposure rate or kerma in air. The unfolding and fluency convention parameters are determined by detector calibration using point gamma sources. The method is validated by comparison of the results against the calculated exposure rate at a point of interest for the standards. This method is used for the direct measurement of the exposure rate distribution in function of the energy at the site, in situ measurement technic, leading to rapid results during an emergency situation and also used for indoor measurements. (author)

  5. An improved in situ method for determining depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benke, R.R.; Kearfott, K.J.

    2001-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry determines the quantities of radionuclides in some medium with a portable detector. The main limitation of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry lies in determining the depth distribution of radionuclides. This limitation is addressed by developing an improved in situ method for determining the depth distributions of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in large area sources. This paper implements a unique collimator design with conventional radiation detection equipment. Cylindrically symmetric collimators were fabricated to allow only those gamma-rays emitted from a selected range of polar angles (measured off the detector axis) to be detected. Positioned with its axis normal to surface of the media, each collimator enables the detection of gamma-rays emitted from a different range of polar angles and preferential depths. Previous in situ methods require a priori knowledge of the depth distribution shape. However, the absolute method presented in this paper determines the depth distribution as a histogram and does not rely on such assumptions. Other advantages over previous in situ methods are that this method only requires a single gamma-ray emission, provides more detailed depth information, and offers a superior ability for characterizing complex depth distributions. Collimated spectrometer measurements of buried area sources demonstrated the ability of the method to yield accurate depth information. Based on the results of actual measurements, this method increases the potential of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry as an independent characterization tool in situations with unknown radionuclide depth distributions

  6. A new FSA approach for in situ γ ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caciolli, A.; Baldoncini, M.; Bezzon, G.P.; Broggini, C.; Buso, G.P.; Callegari, I.; Colonna, T.; Fiorentini, G.; Guastaldi, E.; Mantovani, F.; Massa, G.; Menegazzo, R.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2012-01-01

    An increasing demand of environmental radioactivity monitoring comes both from the scientific community and from the society. This requires accurate, reliable and fast response preferably from portable radiation detectors. Thanks to recent improvements in the technology, γ spectroscopy with sodium iodide scintillators has been proved to be an excellent tool for in-situ measurements for the identification and quantitative determination of γ ray emitting radioisotopes, reducing time and costs. Both for geological and civil purposes not only 40 K, 238 U, and 232 Th have to be measured, but there is also a growing interest to determine the abundances of anthropic elements, like 137 Cs and 131 I, which are used to monitor the effect of nuclear accidents or other human activities. The Full Spectrum Analysis (FSA) approach has been chosen to analyze the γ spectra. The Non Negative Least Square (NNLS) and the energy calibration adjustment have been implemented in this method for the first time in order to correct the intrinsic problem related with the χ 2 minimization which could lead to artifacts and non physical results in the analysis. A new calibration procedure has been developed for the FSA method by using in situ γ spectra instead of calibration pad spectra. Finally, the new method has been validated by acquiring γ spectra with a 10.16 cm × 10.16 cm sodium iodide detector in 80 different sites in the Ombrone basin, in Tuscany. The results from the FSA method have been compared with the laboratory measurements by using HPGe detectors on soil samples collected particular, the 137 Cs isotopes has been implemented in the analysis since it has been found not negligible during the in-situ measurements. - Highlights: ► The Full Spectrum Analysis technique is investigated with sodium iodide scintillator. ► Artifacts due to the free chi 2 minimization in standard FSA are solved applying the NNLS. ► New calibration approach has been developed without using

  7. Dose response of alanine and methyl alanine towards gamma and in-situ alpha irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, M.; Rajeswari, B.; Bhide, M.K.; Rane, Vinayak; Kadam, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    In situ alpha and external gamma dose response of two ESR (electron spin resonance) dosimetric materials namely alanine and methyl alanine were investigated. It was observed that alanine dosimeter had a better dose response in comparison to methyl alanine for the in-situ alpha irradiation by using 239 Pu powder. On the other hand, in case of gamma radiation, methyl alanine was found to have the sensitivity as twice that of alanine. (author)

  8. Results from the first national in-situ gamma spectrometry survey of the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, A.

    2004-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry was introduced for the first time as part of a national soil and herbage pollution survey of the United Kingdom (UK) in 2002. The aim of introducing the in-situ approach was to evaluate its potential for replacing the conventional soil sampling approach in environmental monitoring. A total of 138 points were measured across the whole of the UK on a 50 km grid, encompassing a complete spectrum of soil types, geology (providing a range of natural radioactive backgrounds) and anthropogenic radioactivity (primarily derived from atmospheric weapons testing and Chernobyl fallout). Ten calibration sites were set up to derive an in-situ calibration from spatially distributed sampling points, designed to match the spatial response of the in-situ detector at 1 m above the ground. The importance of variations in the vertical activity distributions of 137 Cs on the in-situ detector calibration was verified and the advantages and disadvantages of implementing a forward scattering type approach for real time in-situ correction was evaluated. The accuracy of the in-situ calibrations was evaluated for the remaining 128 sites by independent comparison with soil core derived estimates of specific activity concentrations and inventories of a range of natural and anthropogenic gamma emitting radionuclides. Air kerma measurements were also derived from the in-situ gamma spectrometry measurements and compared with conventional GM tube derived estimates. (authors)

  9. Elementary Steps of Faujasite Formation Followed by in Situ Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prodinger, Sebastian [Institute; Vjunov, Aleksei [Institute; Hu, Jian Zhi [Institute; Fulton, John L. [Institute; Camaioni, Donald M. [Institute; Derewinski, Miroslaw A. [Institute; Lercher, Johannes A. [Institute; Department

    2018-01-24

    Ex situ and in situ spectroscopy was used to identify the kinetics of processes during the formation of the faujasite (FAU) zeolite lattice from a hydrous gel. Using solid-state 27Al MAS NMR, the autocatalytic transformation from the amorphous gel into the crystalline material was monitored. Al-XANES shows that most Al already adopts a tetrahedral coordination in the X-ray-amorphous aluminosilicate at the beginning of the induction period, which hardly changes throughout the rest of the synthesis. Using 23Na NMR spectroscopy, environments in the growing zeolite crystal were identified and used to define the processes in the stepwise formation of the zeolite lattice. The end of the induction period was accompanied by a narrowing of the 27Al and 23Na MAS NMR peak widths, indicating the increased long-range order. The experiments show conclusively that the formation of faujasite occurs via the continuous formation and subsequent condensation of intermediary sodalite-like units that constitute the key building block of the zeolite. Acknowledgement The authors thank T. Huthwelker for assistance with XAFS experiment setup at the Swiss Light Source (PSI, Switzerland). Further, we would like to acknowledge V. Shutthanandan and B.W. Arey for performing Helium ion microscopy as well as Z. Zhao, N.R. Jaeger, M. Weng, C. Wan and M. Hu for aiding in the NMR experimental procedure. T. Varga is acknowledged for his help with the capillary XRD. A.V., D.M.C., J.H., J.L.F and J.A.L. were supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. S.P. and M.A.D. acknowledge support by the Materials Synthesis and Simulation Across Scales (MS3 Initiative) conducted under Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program at PNNL. The in situ NMR experiments were supported by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Biosciences and Geosciences. Part of the research

  10. In-situ Moessbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, Iris, E-mail: fleischi@uni-mainz.de; Klingelhoefer, Goestar [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Morris, Richard V. [NASA Johnson Space Center (United States); Schroeder, Christian [University of Bayreuth and University of Tuebingen (Germany); Rodionov, Daniel [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz (Germany); Souza, Paulo A. de [Tasmanian ICT Centre (Australia); Collaboration: MIMOS II Team

    2012-03-15

    The miniaturized Moessbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Moessbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  11. In-situ Mössbauer spectroscopy with MIMOS II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Iris; Klingelhöfer, Göstar; Morris, Richard V.; Schröder, Christian; Rodionov, Daniel; Souza, Paulo A. de

    2012-01-01

    The miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometer MIMOS II was developed for the exploration of planetary surfaces. Two MIMOS II instruments were successfully deployed on the martian surface as payload elements of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission and have returned data since landing in January 2004. Mössbauer spectroscopy has made significant contributions to the success of the MER mission, in particular identification of iron-bearing minerals formed through aqueous weathering processes. As a field-portable instrument and with backscattering geometry, MIMOS II provides an opportunity for non-destructive in-situ investigations for a range of applications. For example, the instrument has been used for analyses of archaeological artifacts, for air pollution studies and for in-field monitoring of green rust formation. A MER-type MIMOS II instrument is part of the payload of the Russian Phobos-Grunt mission, scheduled for launch in November 2011, with the aim of exploring the composition of the martian moon Phobos. An advanced version of the instrument, MIMOS IIA, that incorporates capability for elemental analyses, is currently under development.

  12. In situ observation of lithium hydride hydrolysis by DRIFT spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awbery, Roy P.; Broughton, Duncan A.; Tsang, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    Polycrystalline LiH was studied in situ using diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy to investigate the effect water vapour has on the rate of production of the corrosion products, particularly LiOH. The reaction rate of the formation of surface LiOH was monitored by measurement of the hydroxyl (OH) band at 3676 cm -1 . The initial hydrolysis rate of LiH exposed to water vapour at 50% relative humidity was found to be almost two times faster than LiH exposed to water vapour at 2% relative humidity. The hydrolysis rate was shown to be initially very rapid followed by a much slower, almost linear rate. The change in hydrolysis rate was attributed to the formation of a coherent layer of LiOH on the LiH surface. Exposure to lower levels of water vapour appeared to result in the formation of a more coherent corrosion product, resulting in effective passivation of the surface to further attack from water

  13. Complete system for portable gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuess, D.A.

    1978-01-01

    The report described a system built around the Computing Gamma Spectrometer (PSA) LEA 74-008. The software primarily supports high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy using either a high-purity intrinsic germanium detector (HPGe) or a lithium-drifted germanium detector [Ge(Li)

  14. Theory of in situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balea, G.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of in situ spectrometry had its origin during the time of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing when is was found to provide quick, reliable information on the components of the outdoor environment. It provided a means to separate natural background from man-made sources and gave quantitative results. Over the years, it has been employed by various groups for assessing radiation sources in the environment not only via ground based detectors, but with aircraft systems as well. It proved particularly useful after the Chernobyl accident and was employed by a number of European laboratories. It should prove adaptable to site assessment in the current era of environmental rescue. (author)

  15. In-situ gamma spectroscopic measurement of natural waters in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manushev, B.; Mandzhukov, I.; Tsankov, L.; Boshkova, T.; Gurev, V.; Mandzhukova, B.; Kozhukharov, I.; Grozev, G.

    1983-01-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometric measurements are carried out to record differences higher than the errors of measurement in the gamma-field spectra in various basins in Bulgaria - two high mountain lakes, dam and the Black sea. A standard scintillation gamma spectrometer, consisting of a scintillation detector ND-424 type, a channel analyzer NP-424 and a 128 channel Al-128 type analyzer, has been used. The sensitivity of the procedure used is sufficient to detect the transfer of nuclides by dissolution from rocks, forming the bottom and the water-collecting region of the water basin. The advancement of the experimental techniques defines the future use of the procedure. In-situ gamma spectrometric determination may be used in cases of continuous and automated control of the radiation purity of the cooling water in atomic power plants or the water basins located close to such plants and of radioactive contamination of the sea and ocean water

  16. Fast optical in situ spectroscopy in III-V MOVPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspari, C.

    2007-09-29

    This work describes the application of optical in situ measurement techniques (reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy, RAS, and spectroscopic ellipsometry, SE) to processes that are important for the growth of III-V semiconductors like GaAs, InP, InAs and GaP in metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Special emphasis is placed on the determination of the free carrier concentration (doping level) and the study of the thermal desorption properties of III-V oxides. A large part of this work is concerned with the development and the construction of a multichannel RAS setup that allows the recording of RAS spectra within fractions of a second. On the basis of benchmark measurements it was shown that the spectral resolution is sufficiently accurate for application in epitaxy. To demonstrate the recording of spectra with high temporal resolution, RAS monolayer oscillations during growth of GaAs were studied and it was shown that the surface changes periodically between a relatively smooth morphology with adsorbed methyl groups (type III) and a stepped, gallium-rich surface (type II). Furthermore the non-reversible process of growing InAs quantum dots on GaAs was studied. It was shown that the multichannel RAS is capable of detecting the 2D-3D transition as well as the following morphological change of the surface at high temporal resolution. For the measurement of the doping level, the relationship between the doping-induced internal electric field and the anisotropy of the sample was studied. To understand the effect of the so-called doping oscillations, a theoretical model was developed. For the investigation of the thermal desorption of the III-V oxides in MOVPE, a number of test series were realised. It was also found that the formation of the reconstructed surface is finished a considerable time after the SE transient indicates stable conditions (no further reduction of the oxide layer). The activation energy for oxide desorption from InAs, GaAs and InP was

  17. A portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Dong Binjiang; Zeng Liping

    1999-01-01

    The author describes a portable in situ NaI(Tl) γ spectroscopy system, which consists of a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, an integrative spectroscopy card, a notebook computer and the spectroscopy software. The spectrometer addresses applications in environmental or nuclear accident in situ γ spectroscopy measurements, and gives valid quantitative results of radionuclide concentrations per unit volume (Bq/kg) or per unit area (Bq/cm 2 ) in the soil and absorbed dose rate in air 1 m above ground (Gy/h)

  18. Optimization of in situ prompt gamma-ray analysis using a HPGe-252Cf probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien Chung; Jiunnhsing Chao

    1991-01-01

    Application of in situ measurements by the neutron-induced prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA) technique to geochemical analysis and mineral survey have been investigated. An in situ survey of water pollutants by PGAA techniques was first proposed in the authors' previous study, where a 2.7-μg 252 Cf neutron source used in connection with a gamma-ray detecting system to determine water pollutants was described. In this paper the authors describe a modified detection probe designed and constructed to look for the optimum conditions of various-intensity 252 Cf neutron sources in measurement of some elements in lake water. Detecting efficiencies at high-energy regions and detection limits for elements commonly found in polluted lakes were evaluated and predicted to investigate the potential application of the probe for in situ measurements

  19. Gamma spectroscopy of the isotope 253No

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalaninova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The first part deals with the evaluation of the relative and absolute efficiency of detectors for the registration of gamma radiation to separator SHIP at GSI Darmstadt (Germany). In the second part we discussed the decay alpha-gamma coincidence spectroscopy of isotope 253 No. In conclusion, the basic characteristics of deexcitation of K-isomeric state in isotope 253 No are evaluated. Only sort abstract is published.

  20. Method Validation Procedure in Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Samad, O.; Baydoun, R.

    2008-01-01

    The present work describes the methodology followed for the application of ISO 17025 standards in gamma spectroscopy laboratory at the Lebanese Atomic Energy Commission including the management and technical requirements. A set of documents, written procedures and records were prepared to achieve the management part. The technical requirements, internal method validation was applied through the estimation of trueness, repeatability , minimum detectable activity and combined uncertainty, participation in IAEA proficiency tests assure the external method validation, specially that the gamma spectroscopy lab is a member of ALMERA network (Analytical Laboratories for the Measurements of Environmental Radioactivity). Some of these results are presented in this paper. (author)

  1. Gamma and Xray spectroscopy at high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borchert, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    The author determines that for many interesting problems in gamma and Xray spectroscopy it is necessary to use crystal diffractometers. The basic features of such instruments are discussed and the special performance of crystal spectrometers is demonstrated by means of typical examples of various applications

  2. Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy for process monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoller, W.H.; Holmes, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    Prompt Gamma Ray Spectroscopy (PGRS) is a very powerful analytical technique able to measure many metallic, contamination problem elements. The technique involves measurement of gamma rays that are emitted by nuclei upon capturing a neutron. This method is sensitive not only to the target element but also to the particular isotope of that element. PGRS is capable of measuring dissolved metal ions in a flowing system. In the field, isotopic neutron sources are used to produce the desired neutron flux ( 252 Cf can produce neutron flux of the order of 10 8 neutrons/cm 2 --sec.). Due to high penetrating power of gamma radiation, high efficiency gamma ray detectors can be placed in an appropriate geometry to maximize sensitivity, providing real-time monitoring with low detection level capabilities

  3. High resolution gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giles, J.R.; Dooley, K.J.

    1997-01-01

    A Gamma Spectroscopy Logging System (GSLS) has been developed to study sub-surface radionuclide contamination. The absolute counting efficiencies of the GSLS detectors were determined using cylindrical reference sources. More complex borehole geometries were modeled using commercially available shielding software and correction factors were developed based on relative gamma-ray fluence rates. Examination of varying porosity and moisture content showed that as porosity increases, and as the formation saturation ratio decreases, relative gamma-ray fluence rates increase linearly for all energies. Correction factors for iron and water cylindrical shields were found to agree well with correction factors determined during previous studies allowing for the development of correction factors for type-304 stainless steel and low-carbon steel casings. Regression analyses of correction factor data produced equations for determining correction factors applicable to spectral gamma-ray well logs acquired under non-standard borehole conditions

  4. New insights on electrochemical hydrogen storage in nanoporous carbons by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Leyva García, Sarai; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Béguin, François; Lozano Castelló, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was exploited to analyze the interaction between carbon and hydrogen during electrochemical hydrogen storage at cathodic conditions. Two different activated carbons were used and characterized by different electrochemical techniques in two electrolytes (6 M KOH and 0.5 M Na2SO4). The in situ Raman spectra collected showed that, in addition to the D and G bands associated to the graphitic carbons, two bands appear simultaneously at about 1110 and 1500 cm−1 under cath...

  5. In situ gamma ray measurements of radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezuidenhout, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    High levels of uranium and its radioactive progeny like radium is normally associated with phosphate mining. In Situ gamma ray spectroscopy as a survey tool has been successfully applied to assess radionuclide concentrations in various geographical environments. A transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (GISPI) was therefore employed to determine the concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides at a disused phosphate mine on the West Coast of South Africa. The concentrations of radium, thorium and potassium were measured and plotted. The measurements showed fairly high concentrations with medians of 320 Bq/kg for "2"2"6Ra, 64 Bq/kg for "2"3"2Th and 390 Bq/kg for "4"0K. The highest concentrations were however confined to specific areas of the mine. The effective dose due to gamma irradiation for the various areas of the mine was also estimated and the highest estimated level was 0.45 mSv/y. The article finally draws conclusions as to the origins and impact of the radiation. - Highlights: • A self-developed transportable and robust gamma ray detection system (the GISPI) was employed in the measurements. • A different mathematical analysis method was used. • QGIS was used extensively. • The results is important for current developments in infrastructure and mining.

  6. Determination of Th and U by neutron activation for gamma spectrometry calibration in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nava M, F.; Rios M, C.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L.; Landsberger, S.

    2012-10-01

    Using the analysis by neutron activation to determine the profile of the thorium and uranium concentration calibration factors were obtained for their use in the gamma spectrometry in situ. Three sites were selected (San Ramon, Villa de Cos y la Zacatecana) and the analysis by activation was development in the Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering Teaching of the Texas University in Austin with the nuclear reactor Ut-TRIGA. Starting from the gamma spectra in situ, the areas of normalized photo-pick of the radioisotopes were: 208 Tl and 228 Ac for the thorium series and 214 Pb and 214 Bi for the uranium series. The averages of the factors found in units of (cpm/Bq/Kg) are of 105.63±8.32 and 75.87±4.61 for the thorium and uranium, respectively. (Author)

  7. Catalogue of response spectra for unfolding in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymke, N.

    1982-01-01

    To unfold in situ gamma-ray pulse-height distributions by means of a response matrix technique, the matrix must be in keeping with the measurement geometry, detector size, and energy range to be covered by the measurements. A methodology has been described for determination of standard gamma-ray spectra needed in deriving response matrices and a spectrum catalogue compiled containing graphs and data for the 0-3 MeV (4 x 4 in. NaI(Tl)) and 0-8 MeV (1.5 x 1.5 in. NaI(Tl)) ranges. (author)

  8. Thermodynamics of Silica Dissolution From In-situ Raman +Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. K.; Fumagalli, P.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly effect both the physical and thermodynamical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In-situ Raman experiments of the silica-water system were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples (from Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming) were loaded in the sample chamber with de-ionized or spectrographic water. All experiments used doubly polished rhenium gaskets with a thickness of 200 μ m, diameter of 1.0 mm, and a 500 μ m drillhole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples wrapped around both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman mode of quartz. In-situ Raman spectra were collected from 250-1200 cm-1, focusing on the vibrational modes of aqueous silica species at temperatures up to 700 ° C and pressures up to 14 kbar. We observed Si-O stretching modes attributable to dimer (H6Si2O7, 965 cm-1) and monomer (H4SiO4, 771 cm-1) aqueous silica species. The relative intensities of these two bands as a function of isochoric heating place constraints on the energetics of the polymerization reaction, if we assume that the intensity ratio is linearly related to concentration ratio. We have been able to perform experiments along two different isochores (0.9 and 0.75 g/cm3, respectively) from which we are able to derive the enthalpy of reaction.

  9. Gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, William R; Policke, Timothy A

    2017-05-16

    The present invention relates generally to the field of gamma ray spectroscopy monitoring and a system for accomplishing same to monitor one or more aspects of various isotope production processes. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a monitoring system, and method of utilizing same, for monitoring one or more aspects of an isotope production process where the monitoring system comprises: (A) at least one sample cell; (B) at least one measuring port; (C) at least one adjustable collimator device; (D) at least one shutter; and (E) at least one high resolution gamma ray spectrometer.

  10. Gamma ray spectroscopy with Arduino UNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, C. M.

    2018-05-01

    We review a simple gamma ray spectrometer constructed on a solderless breadboard. The spectrometer's detector consists of a CsI(Tl) scintillator and silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and its readout is facilitated by an Arduino UNO. The system is low cost and utilizes a minimum of components while still achieving satisfactory charge linearity and noise levels. This instrument can be used in instructional laboratories to introduce both radiation detection and analog signal processing concepts. We also expect it will be of interest to those seeking to introduce gamma spectroscopy to the expanding ecosystem of Arduino hardware.

  11. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  12. In situ anodization of aluminum surfaces studied by x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, F.; Evertsson, J.; Messing, M. E.; Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Zhang, F.; Pan, J.; Carlà, F.; Nilsson, J.-O.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the anodization of an aluminum single crystal [Al(111)] and an aluminum alloy [Al 6060] studied by in situ x-ray reflectivity, in situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and ex situ scanning electron microscopy. For both samples, a linear increase of oxide film thickness with increasing anodization voltage was found. However, the slope is much higher in the single crystal case, and the break-up of the oxide film grown on the alloy occurs at a lower anodization potential than on the single crystal. The reasons for these observations are discussed as are the measured differences observed for x-ray reflectivity and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  13. [Application of in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy to analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Lin, Cheng-yan; Yu, Wen-quan; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ai-guo

    2010-01-01

    Identification of salts is a principal problem for analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. The fluid inclusions from deep natural gas reservoirs in Minfeng sub-sag were analyzed by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The type of fluid inclusions was identified by Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The Raman spectra show that the inclusions contain methane-bearing brine aqueous liquids. The fluid inclusions were analyzed at -180 degrees C by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy. The spectra show that inclusions contain three salts, namely NaCl2, CaCl2 and MgCl2. Sodium chloride is most salt component, coexisting with small calcium chloride and little magnesium chloride. The origin of fluids in inclusions was explained by analysis of the process of sedimentation and diagenesis. The mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs was also given in this paper. The results of this study indicate that in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy is an available method to get the composition of fluid inclusions in reservoirs. Based on the analysis of fluid inclusions in reservoirs by in situ cryogenic Raman spectroscopy with combination of the history of sedimentation and diagenesis, the authors can give important evidence for the type and mechanism of diagenesis in reservoirs.

  14. Gamma spectroscopy in water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persault, M.

    1977-10-01

    Gamma spectroscopy analysis of spent fuels in power reactors; study of two typical cases: determination of the power distribution by the mean of the activity of a low periodic element (Lanthanum 140) and determination of the burnup absolute rate by examining the ratio of Cesium 134 and Cesium 137 activities. Measures were realized on fuel solutions and on fuel assemblies. Development of a power distribution map of the assemblies and comparison with the results of a three dimensional calculation of core evolution [fr

  15. Fast amplification system for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, E.F.O.; Lopes, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    An amplification system for gamma spectroscopy with high counting rates was developed. The system was constructed with operational amplifiers, and tested and compared with ORTEC conventional system, using Iridium-192 as source of 9,25 x 10 1 0 Bq of activity and NaI (Tl) detector. The constructed system showed a better performance in relation to efficiency and resolution parameters, tested before. (C.G.C.)

  16. In situ scanning probe spectroscopy at nanoscale solid/liquid interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, W.; Hugelmann, M.; Hugelmann, Ph.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemistry provides unique features for the preparation of low-dimensional structures, but in situ spectroscopy with atomic/molecular resolution at such structures is at present not well established yet. This paper shows that in situ scanning probe spectroscopy at solid/liquid interfaces can be utilized to study electronic properties at nanoscale, if appropriate conditions are applied. Tunneling spectroscopy provides information about tunneling barrier heights and electronic states in the tunneling gap, as shown on Au(1 1 1) substrates, contact spectroscopy allows for transport measurements at single nanostructures, as shown at Au/n-Si(1 1 1) nanodiodes. The influence of the electrolytic environment on spectroscopic investigations is not a principal limitation, but offers additional degrees of freedom, which allow, for example, spectroscopic studies of potential dependent surface phenomena at solid/liquid interfaces

  17. In situ Raman spectroscopy for growth monitoring of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes in plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbaye, T.; Gaillard, M.; Lecas, T.; Kovacevic, E.; Boulmer-Leborgne, Ch.; Guimbretière, G. [GREMI, Université-CNRS, BP6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Canizarès, A.; Raimboux, N.; Simon, P.; Ammar, M. R., E-mail: mohamed-ramzi.ammar@cnrs-orleans.fr [CNRS, CEMHTI UPR3079, Univ. Orléans, F-45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Strunskus, T. [Institute of Material Science, Chritian-Albrechts-University of Kiel, D-24143 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-11-24

    Portable and highly sensitive Raman setup was associated with a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition reactor enabling in situ growth monitoring of multi-wall carbon nanotubes despite the combination of huge working distance, high growth speed and process temperature and reactive plasma condition. Near Edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy was used for ex situ sample analysis as a complementary method to in situ Raman spectroscopy. The results confirmed the fact that the “alternating” method developed here can accurately be used for in situ Raman monitoring under reactive plasma condition. The original analytic tool can be of great importance to monitor the characteristics of these nanostructured materials and readily define the ultimate conditions for targeted results.

  18. Determination of redox-active centers in praseodymium doped ceria by in situ-XANES spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiebach, Wolff-Ragnar; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Praseodymium doped ceria, a material of interest for electrochemical flue gas purification, was investigated with in situ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy between room temperature and 500°C in air and diluted nitrogen(II) oxide (NO/Ar) (1% NO in Ar). For temperatures above 400°C...

  19. Photoswitchable Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonds in 5-Phenylazopyrimidines Revealed By In Situ Irradiation NMR Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Eliška; Čechová, Lucie; Kind, J.; Janeba, Zlatko; Thiele, C. M.; Dračínský, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2018), s. 492-498 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : azopyrimidines * heterocycles * hydrogen bonds * NMR spectroscopy * UV/Vis in situ irradiation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  20. Solid Acid-Catalyzed Cellulose Hydrolysis Monitored by In Situ ATR-IR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.; Grisel, R.J.H.; Smit, A.T.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    The solid acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of cellulose was studied under elevated temperatures and autogenous pressures using in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy. Standards of cellulose and pure reaction products, which include glucose, fructose, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), levulinic acid (LA), formic acid, and

  1. In situ monitoring of cocrystals in formulation development using low-frequency Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Takashi; Tanabe, Yuta; Kojima, Takashi; Miura, Masaru; Ikeda, Yukihiro; Koide, Tatsuo; Fukami, Toshiro

    2018-05-05

    In recent years, to guarantee a quality-by-design approach to the development of pharmaceutical products, it is important to identify properties of raw materials and excipients in order to determine critical process parameters and critical quality attributes. Feedback obtained from real-time analyses using various process analytical technology (PAT) tools has been actively investigated. In this study, in situ monitoring using low-frequency (LF) Raman spectroscopy (10-200 cm -1 ), which may have higher discriminative ability among polymorphs than near-infrared spectroscopy and conventional Raman spectroscopy (200-1800 cm -1 ), was investigated as a possible application to PAT. This is because LF-Raman spectroscopy obtains information about intermolecular and/or lattice vibrations in the solid state. The monitoring results obtained from Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystal indicate that LF-Raman spectroscopy is applicable to in situ monitoring of suspension and fluidized bed granulation processes, and is an effective technique as a PAT tool to detect the conversion risk of cocrystals. LF-Raman spectroscopy is also used as a PAT tool to monitor reactions, crystallizations, and manufacturing processes of drug substances and products. In addition, a sequence of conversion behaviors of Furosemide/Nicotinamide cocrystals was determined by performing in situ monitoring for the first time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Gamma-ray spectrometry laboratory and in situ: developments and environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasser, Estelle

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometry enables determining all γ-ray emitters in a sample with a single measurement. Self-absorption of γ-rays in samples is manifest by a loss or a gain of pulses that results in a poor estimation of the counting efficiency. To characterize a new counting geometry improvements of the existing set-up were made with MCNPX simulations. With the new geometry we could specify absorbed and annual effective doses as well as dose conversion factors for the natural radioisotopes of several building materials and soil samples. Simulations show the influence of detection limits of γ-radiation on dose conversion factors and the need for updating these factors. γ-ray measurements of soil in situ require different counting efficiencies simulated by MCNPX for a semi-infinite source. Two in-situ soil analyses were made, one around a nuclear power and the other for a private company. (author)

  3. In-situ Multimodal Imaging and Spectroscopy of Mg Electrodeposition at Electrode-Electrolyte Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yimin A.; Yin, Zuwei; Farmand, Maryam; Yu, Young-Sang; Shapiro, David A.; Liao, Hong-Gang; Liang, Wen-I.; Chu, Ying-Hao; Zheng, Haimei

    2017-02-01

    We report the study of Mg cathodic electrochemical deposition on Ti and Au electrode using a multimodal approach by examining the sample area in-situ using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Magnesium Aluminum Chloride Complex was synthesized and utilized as electrolyte, where non-reversible features during in situ charging-discharging cycles were observed. During charging, a uniform Mg film was deposited on the electrode, which is consistent with the intrinsic non-dendritic nature of Mg deposition in Mg ion batteries. The Mg thin film was not dissolvable during the following discharge process. We found that such Mg thin film is hexacoordinated Mg compounds by in-situ STXM and XAS. This study provides insights on the non-reversibility issue and failure mechanism of Mg ion batteries. Also, our method provides a novel generic method to understand the in situ battery chemistry without any further sample processing, which can preserve the original nature of battery materials or electrodeposited materials. This multimodal in situ imaging and spectroscopy provides many opportunities to attack complex problems that span orders of magnitude in length and time scale, which can be applied to a broad range of the energy storage systems.

  4. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.I., E-mail: fiallen@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kim, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Andresen, N.C. [Engineering Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Grigoropoulos, C.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Minor, A.M., E-mail: aminor@lbl.gov [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS{sub 2} are performed in situ.

  5. In situ TEM Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, F.I.; Kim, E.; Andresen, N.C.; Grigoropoulos, C.P.; Minor, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    We present a modular assembly that enables both in situ Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing to be performed in a transmission electron microscope. The system comprises a lensed Raman probe mounted inside the microscope column in the specimen plane and a custom specimen holder with a vacuum feedthrough for a tapered optical fiber. The Raman probe incorporates both excitation and collection optics, and localized laser processing is performed using pulsed laser light delivered to the specimen via the tapered optical fiber. Precise positioning of the fiber is achieved using a nanomanipulation stage in combination with simultaneous electron-beam imaging of the tip-to-sample distance. Materials modification is monitored in real time by transmission electron microscopy. First results obtained using the assembly are presented for in situ pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 combined with Raman spectroscopy, complimented by electron-beam diffraction and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Raman spectroscopy and laser-based materials processing in a TEM are demonstrated. • A lensed Raman probe is mounted in the sample chamber for close approach. • Localized laser processing is achieved using a tapered optical fiber. • Raman spectroscopy and pulsed laser ablation of MoS_2 are performed in situ.

  6. In situ spectroscopy and spectroelectrochemistry of uranium in high-temperature alkali chloride molten salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovov, Ilya B; Volkovich, Vladimir A; Charnock, John M; Kralj, Brett; Lewin, Robert G; Kinoshita, Hajime; May, Iain; Sharrad, Clint A

    2008-09-01

    Soluble uranium chloride species, in the oxidation states of III+, IV+, V+, and VI+, have been chemically generated in high-temperature alkali chloride melts. These reactions were monitored by in situ electronic absorption spectroscopy. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium(VI) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was used to determine the immediate coordination environment about the uranium. The dominant species in the melt was [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). Further analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure data and Raman spectroscopy of the melts quenched back to room temperature indicated the possibility of ordering beyond the first coordination sphere of [UO 2Cl 4] (2-). The electrolytic generation of uranium(III) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was also investigated. Anodic dissolution of uranium metal was found to be more efficient at producing uranium(III) in high-temperature melts than the cathodic reduction of uranium(IV). These high-temperature electrolytic processes were studied by in situ electronic absorption spectroelectrochemistry, and we have also developed in situ X-ray absorption spectroelectrochemistry techniques to probe both the uranium oxidation state and the uranium coordination environment in these melts.

  7. Source term estimation based on in-situ gamma spectrometry using a high purity germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauly, J.; Rojas-Palma, C.; Sohier, A.

    1997-06-01

    An alternative method to reconstruct the source term of a nuclear accident is proposed. The technique discussed here involves the use of in-situ gamma spectrometry. The validation of the applied methodology has been possible through the monitoring of routine releases of Ar-41 originating at a Belgian site from an air cooled graphite research reactor. This technique provides a quick nuclide specific decomposition of the source term and therefore will be have an enormous potential if implemented in nuclear emergency preparedness and radiological assessments of nuclear accidents during the early phase

  8. Air kerma rate estimation by means of in-situ gamma spectrometry: A Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabal, Gonzalo; Kluson, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Bayesian inference is used to determine the Air Kerma Rate based on a set of in situ environmental gamma spectra measurements performed with a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. A natural advantage of such approach is the possibility to quantify uncertainty not only in the Air Kerma Rate estimation but also for the gamma spectra which is unfolded within the procedure. The measurements were performed using a 3'' x 3'' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The response matrices of such detection system were calculated using a Monte Carlo code. For the calculations of the spectra as well as the Air Kerma Rate the WinBugs program was used. WinBugs is a dedicated software for Bayesian inference using Monte Carlo Markov chain methods (MCMC). The results of such calculations are shown and compared with other non-Bayesian approachs such as the Scofield-Gold iterative method and the Maximum Entropy Method

  9. Setup for in situ deep level transient spectroscopy of semiconductors during swift heavy ion irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Sugam; Katharria, Y S; Safvan, C P; Kanjilal, D

    2008-05-01

    A computerized system for in situ deep level characterization during irradiation in semiconductors has been set up and tested in the beam line for materials science studies of the 15 MV Pelletron accelerator at the Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. This is a new facility for in situ irradiation-induced deep level studies, available in the beam line of an accelerator laboratory. It is based on the well-known deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) technique. High versatility for data manipulation is achieved through multifunction data acquisition card and LABVIEW. In situ DLTS studies of deep levels produced by impact of 100 MeV Si ions on Aun-Si(100) Schottky barrier diode are presented to illustrate performance of the automated DLTS facility in the beam line.

  10. In-situ high-resolution gamma-spectrometric survey of burial ground-monitoring wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, W.W.

    1981-09-01

    In situ high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry with an intrinsic germanium detector assembly of special design surveyed the burial ground monitoring wells to locate and identify gamma emitters that may have migrated from the burial trenches toward the water table. Gamma-ray spectra were acquired as a function of depth in each well and recorded on magnetic tape. These spectra were reduced by a series of computer programs to produce count rate versus depth profiles for natural and man-made activities. The original spectra and the profiles have been archived on magnetic tape for comparison with similar future surveys. Large amounts of man-made activities were observed in some of the burial trenches; however, below the trench bottoms, only very low but detectable amounts of 60 Co and 137 Cs were observed in eleven wells. The highest level of man-made gamma activity observed below the trench bottoms has a count rate roughly equal to that observed for uranium daughter activities which are natural to the subsoil

  11. Rapid in situ gamma spectrometric determination of fallout radioactivity in the environment. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, Peter

    1995-01-01

    The main aim of the present CRP is to identify the existing analytical methods and develop new ones, if possible, which provide rapid, reliable, and detailed information on the radioactive contamination of the environment after a major nuclear accident. Gamma spectrometry has long been regarded as one of the most applicable radioanalytical techniques but its use for environmental studies requires some further considerations. There are two possible approaches to measure environmental radioactivity: (a) taking samples of the different environmental media and measuring them in a laboratory or (b) taking the spectrometer to the place of interest and making in situ measurements. In the former case sampling is a crucial factor hindering the rapid analysis while the latter case is not always reliable due to the problems and uncertainties of the measurement interpretation. The application of in situ gamma spectrometry for the determination of environmental radioactivity has become increasingly attractive since the advent of the high resolution semiconductor gamma detectors, especially, more recently, portable high purity Ge diodes (HpGe). The applicability of this technique was very well proved after the Chernobyl reactor accident when in situ spectrometry played an important role in the rapid evaluation of the fall-out situation. Our measurements provided information on the amount and composition of the radioactive contamination of the ground surface already in the first hours. These measurements enabled us to predict the time variation of the environmental radioactivity after the stabilization of the situation. The portability of the system was an important factor in performing a rapid and efficient survey in different parts of the country. A serious disadvantage of this method is, however, that it requires some knowledge about the radionuclide distribution in the soil, which is normally determined by tedious and time consuming sample analysis of the different soil

  12. Examination of human brain tumors in situ with image-localized H-1 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyten, P.R.; Segebarth, C.; Baleriaux, D.; Den Hollander, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Human brain tumors were examined in situ by combined imaging and H-1 MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Water-suppressed localized H-1 MR spectra obtained from the brains of normal volunteers show resonances from lactate, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, and choline. Several patients suffering from different brain tumors were examined, showing spectral changes in the region of 0.5-1.5 ppm; spectral editing showed that these changes were not due to lactic acid, but to lipid signals. The NAA signal was decreased in the tumors as compared with normal brain. This study shows that H-1 MR spectroscopy can monitor submillimolar changes in chemical composition of human brain tumors in situ

  13. An intercomparison of Monte Carlo codes used for in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, S.; Villa, M.

    2010-01-01

    In-situ gamma-ray spectrometry is widely used for monitoring of natural as well as man-made radionuclides and corresponding gamma fields in the environment or working places. It finds effective application in the operational and accidental monitoring of nuclear facilities and their vicinity, waste depositories, radioactive contamination measurements and environmental mapping or geological prospecting. In order to determine accurate radionuclide concentrations in these research fields, Monte Carlo codes have recently been used to obtain the efficiency calibration of in-situ gamma-ray detectors. This work presents an inter-comparison between two Monte Carlo codes applied to in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry. On the commercial market, Canberra has its LABSOCS/ISOCS software which is relatively inexpensive. The ISOCS mathematical efficiency calibration software uses a combination of Monte Carlo calculations and discrete ordinate attenuation computations. Efficiencies can be generated in a few minutes in the field and can be modified easily if needed. However, it has been reported in the literature that ISOCS computation method is accurate on average only within 5%, and additionally in order to use LABSOCS/ISOCS it is necessary a previous characterization of the detector by Canberra, which is an expensive process. On the other hand, the multipurpose and open source GEANT4 takes significant computer time and presents a non-friendly but powerful toolkit, independent of the manufacturer of the detector. Different experimental measurements of calibrated sources were performed with a Canberra portable HPGe detector and compared to the results obtained using both Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, a variety of efficiency calibrations for different radioactive source distributions were calculated and tested, like plane shapes or containers filled with different materials such as soil, water, etc. LabSOCS simulated efficiencies for medium and high energies were given within an

  14. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of Supported Chromium Oxide Catalysts: Reactivity Studies with Methanol and Butane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions of methanol and butane with supported chromium oxide catalysts under oxidizing and reducing conditions were studied by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of the specific oxide support (Al2O3, ZrO2, TiO2, SiO2, Nb2O5, 3% SiO2/TiO2, 3% TiO2/SiO2, and a physical mixture of SiO2

  15. In situ Raman Spectroscopy of Oxide Films on Zirconium Alloy in Simulated PWR Primary Water Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Kyoung Joon; Yoo, Seung Chang; Kim, Ji Hyun [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The two layered oxide structure is formed in pre-transition oxide for the zirconium alloy in high temperature water environment. It is known that the corrosion rate is related to the volume fraction of zirconium oxide and the pores in the oxides; therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the oxidation behavior in the pretransition zirconium oxide in high-temperature water chemistry. In this work, Raman spectroscopy was used for in situ investigations for characterizing the phase of zirconium oxide. In situ Raman spectroscopy is a well-suited technique for investigating in detail the characteristics of oxide films in a high-temperature corrosion environment. In previous studies, an in situ Raman system was developed for investigating the oxides on nickel-based alloys and low alloy steels in high-temperature water environment. Also, the early stage oxidation behavior of zirconium alloy with different dissolved hydrogen concentration environments in high temperature water was treated in the authors' previous study. In this study, a specific zirconium alloy was oxidized and investigated with in situ Raman spectroscopy for 100 d oxidation, which is close to the first transition time of the zirconium alloy oxidation. The ex situ investigation methods such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to further characterize the zirconium oxide structure. As oxidation time increased, the Raman peaks of tetragonal zirconium oxide were merged or became weaker. However, the monoclinic zirconium oxide peaks became distinct. The tetragonal zirconium oxide was just found near the O/M interface and this could explain the Raman spectra difference between the 30 d result and others.

  16. Observation of methanol behavior in fuel cells in situ by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Oc Hee; Han, Kee Sung; Shin, Chang Woo; Lee, Juhee; Kim, Seong-Soo; Um, Myung Sup; Joh, Han-Ik; Kim, Soo-Kil; Ha, Heung Yong

    2012-04-16

    The chemical conversion of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells was followed in situ by NMR spectroscopy. Comparing data of the methanol oxidation on Pt and PtRu anode catalysts allowed the role of Ru in both Faradaic and non-Faradaic reactions to be investigated. The spatial distributions of chemicals could also be determined. (Picture: T1-T4=inlet and outlet tubes.). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. In-situ investigation of the calcination process of mixed oxide xerogels with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J C [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The controlled calcination of materials derived by sol-gel reactions is important for the evolution of the final structure. Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool for the identification of surface species under in-situ conditions, as demonstrated in the following for the example of a molybdenum oxide-silica xerogel. Raman spectra of this particular sample were recorded at temperatures as high as 1173 K, and compared with those of a reference material.(author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  18. Insights into reaction mechanisms in heterogeneous catalysis revealed by in situ NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, Teresa

    2010-12-01

    This tutorial review intends to show the possibilities of in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms and the nature of the active sites in heterogeneous catalysis. After a brief overview of the more usual experimental devices used for in situ solid state NMR spectroscopy measurements, some examples of applications taken from the recent literature will be presented. It will be shown that in situ NMR spectroscopy allows: (i) the identification of stable intermediates and transient species using indirect methods, (ii) to prove shape selectivity in zeolites, (iii) the study of reaction kinetics, and (iv) the determination of the nature and the role played by the active sites in a catalytic reaction. The approaches and methodology used to get this information will be illustrated here summarizing the most relevant contributions on the investigation of the mechanisms of a series of reactions of industrial interest: aromatization of alkanes on bifunctional catalysts, carbonylation reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide, ethylbenzene disproportionation, and the Beckmann rearrangement reaction. Special attention is paid to the research carried out on the role played by carbenium ions and alkoxy as intermediate species in the transformation of hydrocarbon molecules on solid acid catalysts.

  19. New portability for in situ gamma-ray spectrometry from commercially available equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, N.; Laurenzo, E.L.; McCurdy, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    In situ gamma-ray spectrometry has been employed by the staff of the Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory on a routine basis for more than five years. The original in situ gamma-ray spectrometry methodology was adopted from the techniques developed at the DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory (Beck, DeCampo, and Gogolak 1972). The system consisted of a 110 cm 3 Ge(Li) detector in the vertical configuration in conjunction with typical laboratory nuclear instrumentation, as well as a medium-sized desktop computer, printer and disk drive. The equipment was transported in a small van having a shock-mounted cabinet and gasoline generator as an electrical power source. Recent availability of miniaturized spectrometry systems and powerful portable computers has enabled the upgrading of the 1977 vintage equipment to a system which is truly portable, light weight, compact and more reliable. The system to be described utilizes a portable intrinsic germanium detector, a small, 4096 channel pulse height analyzer (MCA) with anscillary components and a 24K, Hewlett Packard HP-75 computer with a small tape drive. When the equipment is used in the field, the system has enough capability to acquire and store a full 4096 channel gamma-ray spectrum and calculate the soil concentrations (pCi/g) and/or external radiation exposure rates for the commonly found naturally occurring, long-lived atmospheric nuclear weapons testing and nuclear power plant radionuclides. Subsequent data transfer to a larger desktop computer via available interfacing at the laboratory enables a full peak search and a more extensive evaluation of the data in order to calculate the soil concentrations and/or external radiation exposure rates for a selected 25 radionuclides. Experiences from the first season of operation are discussed

  20. Volatiles emitted from flowers by gamma-radiated and nonradiated Jasminum polyanthum Franch. in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, L.P.; Jakobsen, H.B.; Kristiansen, K.; Moller, J.

    1997-01-01

    Volatile compounds emitted from flowers of Jasminum polyanthum Pepita in situ were collected by dynamic headspace technique and analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. A total of 32 compounds were identified. The flower scent was dominated by benzyl acetate (57.8%), p-cresol (12.2%), (E)-isoeugenol (9.7%), eugenol (3.5%), 2-methoxy-p-cresol (3.1%), linalool (3.0%), phenethyl acetate (2.1%), and (Z)3-hexenyl butyrate (1.9%). The strong scent of Pepita reduces its production potentialities as a pot plant, thus the possibility to reduce or modify the emission of volatiles from Pepita by mutagenesis was investigated. The average total yields of volatiles in Pepita were approximately 2800 ng flower-1 h-1, and in one gamma-radiated clone a significantly lower yield of 1050 ng flower-1 h-1 was found. The volatile profiles of the gamma-radiated plants were made up of the same 32 compounds found in Pepita. Significant differences in the headspace composition between Pepita and gamma-radiated plants were found for some of the major volatiles

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac

    2009-01-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  2. In-situ-gamma ray spectrometry for measurements of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, I

    1994-12-31

    A detailed description of the method is presented. The range of application is shown. The calibration of the in-situ gamma ray spectrometer with a HPGe semiconductor detector and the evaluation of the spectra are described. A measuring time of about 15-30 min is sufficient to determine the specific natural and man-made radioactivity of the soil of some ten Bq/m{sup 2}. The results of soil contamination measurements in Germany after the Chernobyl accident are reported. A total of 22 nuclides are detected. The measured contamination for the first days after the accident was as follows: {sup 132}Te/{sup 132}I - 100 kBq/m{sup 2}, and {sup 131}I - 70 kBq/m{sup 2}. 6 figs., 4 tabs. (orig.).

  3. In situ 119Sn Moessbauer spectroscopy used to study lithium insertion in c-Mg2Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldon, L.; Ionica, C. M.; Lippens, P. E.; Larcher, D.; Tarascon, J.-M.; Olivier-Fourcade, J.; Jumas, J.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The electrochemical reactions of Li with c-Mg 2 Sn have been investigated by in situ Moessbauer spectroscopy of 119 Sn and X-ray diffraction. The lithiation transforms initially c-Mg 2 Sn part into Li x Mg 2 Sn alloy (x 2 MgSn ternary alloy. In situ Moessbauer spectroscopy provides valuable information on local environment of tin and swelling behavior and cracking of the particles during discharge and charge processes.

  4. Ion scattering spectroscopy studies of zirconium dioxide thin films prepared in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.J.; Netterfield, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    Low energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy has been used to investigate, in situ, thin films of zirconium dioxide deposited by evaporation and ion-assisted deposition. It is shown that when a film is deposited to an average thickness of 0.3 nm +- 0.03, as measured by in situ ellipsometry, complete coverage of the substrate occurs. 'Ion-assisted films have detectably higher Zr surface concentrations and reduced low-energy sputter peaks. Inelastic tailing effects in the Zr scattering peak for 2 keV 4 He + are found to come from particles scattered from approximately the first 7 nm of the oxide surface. The influence of primary ion energy on the Zr/O ratio is also examined. (author)

  5. Medium-resolution autonomous in situ gamma detection system for marine and coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, J.M.; Addleman, R.S.; Davidson, J.D.; Douglas, M.; Meier, D.; Mullen, O.D.; Myjak, M.; Jones, M.E.; Woodring, M.L.; Johnson, B.; Santschi, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing a medium-resolution autonomous in situ gamma detection system for marine and coastal waters. The system is designed to extract and preconcentrate isotopes of interest from natural waters prior to detection in order to eliminate signal attenuation of the gamma rays traveling through water and lower the overall background from the presence of naturally occurring radioactive isotopes ( 40 K and U-Th series radionuclides). Filtration is used to preconcentrate target isotopes residing on suspended particles, while chemosorption is employed to preferentially extract truly dissolved components from the water column. Used filter and chemosorbent media will be counted autonomously using two LaBr 3 detectors in a near 4-π configuration around the samples. A compact digital pulse processing system, developed in-house and capable of running in coincidence mode, is used to process the signal from the detectors to a small on-board computer. The entire system is extremely compact (9' dia. x 30' len.) and platform independent, but designed for initial deployment on a research buoy. A variety of commercial and in-house nano-porous chemosorbents have been selected, procured or produced, and these and filter and detector components have been tested. (author)

  6. In-situ-gamma-spectrometry intercomparison exercise in Salzburg, Austria, September 26-30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.; Lettner, H.; Andrasi, A.

    1996-06-01

    In-situ gamma spectrometry has become a useful method to assess the nuclide concentration of artificial and natural gamma-emitters in the soil. With such measurements it is possible to calculate the activity concentration in soil and also the nuclide specific exposure rates 1 m above ground. For the quality assurance of the measurements periodically intercomparison exercises are essential. To meet this requirement exercises were organised in different European countries since 1989. The last exercise in September 1994 was organised in Salzburg / Austria. The participation of 24 measurement teams from all over Europe emphasises the importance of the intercomparison. Salzburg was selected because the Province of Salzburg / Austria was among the heaviest contaminated region outside the former USSR by the Chernobyl fallout. Two different typical sites were selected for the measurements: Site 1 was inside the urban area of Salzburg on intensively used agricultural land which had not been disturbed since the fallout. This site is representative for intensively used agricultural regions in the Province of Salzburg. Site 2 was in the mountainous region of the Tauern on elevated altitude of approx. 1700 m. This site represents the soil and contamination conditions of the Alpine region. Both sites differ significantly in terms of different soil distribution and contents of natural and artificial radionuclides. Results of the intercomparison exercise are presented. (author)

  7. In-situ Raman spectroscopy as a characterization tool for carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J -C; Joho, F B; Novak, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Lithium intercalation and de-intercalation into/from graphite electrodes in a nonaqueous electrolyte has been studied using in-situ Raman spectroscopy. Our experiments give information on the electrode-electrolyte interface with improved spatial resolution. The spectra taken from the electrode surface change with electrode potential. In this way, information on the nature of the chemical species present during charging and discharging half cycles is gained. For the first time, mapping techniques were applied to investigate if lithium intercalation proceeds homogeneously on the carbon electrode. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 4 refs.

  8. In Situ Planetary Mineralogy Using Simultaneous Time Resolved Fluorescence and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman , G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is one of the primary methods of mineralogical analysis in the laboratory, and more recently in the field. Because of its versatility and ability to interrogate rocks in their natural form it is one of the front runners for the next generation of in situ instruments designed to explore adverse set of solar system bodies (e.g. Mars, Venus, the Moon, and other primitive bodies such as asteroids and the Martian moons Phobos and Deimos), as well as for pre-selection of rock and soil samples for potential cache and return missions.

  9. Raman spectroscopy for in-situ characterisation of steam generator deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochefort, P.A.; Guzonas, D.A.; Turner, C.W.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the effort to develop in-situ characterisation of steam generator deposits using remote raman spectroscopy to determine the chemical composition and semi-quantitative measurement of their concentrations. Information on the composition of the deposits is necessary in order to establish the optimal cleaning conditions and procedures. Furthermore, the composition of the deposits also provides information on the conditions that exist within the steam generator and the feedtrain. The raman spectra of the three most common iron oxide phases found in the CANDU deposits (hematite, magnetite and nickel ferrite) are shown

  10. Validating the Melusine Gamma Spectroscopy Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikson, Luke E.; Keillor, Martin E.; Stavenger, Timothy J.

    2013-11-26

    This technical report describes testing to evaluate the gamma spectroscopy tool, Melusine, under development by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The goal was to verify that the software can successfully be used to provide accurate results and statistical uncertainties for the detection of isotopes of interest and their activities. Of special interest were spectra similar to those produced by radionuclide stations that contribute to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization’s International Monitoring System. Two data sets were used to test Melusine’s capabilities. The first was the result of a multi-lab calibration effort based on neutron activations produced at the University of California at Davis. The second was taken from the Proficiency Test Exercises conducted by the CTBTO directly in 2005. In 37 of 42 cases, Melusine produced results in agreement with the best answer presently available, in most cases with calculated uncertainties comparable to or better than competing analyses. In fact, Melusine technically provided one more result than CTBTO’s PTE analyses that agreed with the “book answer” (Monte Carlo simulation). Despite these promising results, the Melusine software is still under development. Effort is especially needed to simplify its analysis process, improve stability, and provide user documentation. Some significant analysis tasks require further vetting, such as those to address summing effects. However, our test results indicate that Melusine’s calculations as presently implemented are sound and can be used to reliably analyze spectra from the CTBTO’s radionuclide stations.

  11. In Situ Spectroscopy and Mechanistic Insights into CO Oxidation on Transition-Metal-Substituted Ceria Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Joseph S.; Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Hong, Wesley T.; Risch, Marcel; Giordano, Livia [Dipartimento; Mansour, Azzam N. [Naval; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2017-09-12

    Herein we investigate the reaction intermediates formed during CO oxidation on copper-substituted ceria nanoparticles (Cu0.1Ce0.9O2–x) by means of in situ spectroscopic techniques and identify an activity descriptor that rationalizes a trend with other metal substitutes (M0.1Ce0.9O2–x, M = Mn, Fe, Co, Ni). In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) performed under catalytic conditions demonstrates that O2– transfer occurs at dispersed copper centers, which are redox active during catalysis. In situ XAS reveals a dramatic reduction at the copper centers that is fully reversible under catalytic conditions, which rationalizes the high catalytic activity of Cu0.1Ce0.9O2–x. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) show that CO can be oxidized to CO32– in the absence of O2. We find that CO32– desorbs as CO2 only under oxygen-rich conditions when the oxygen vacancy is filled by the dissociative adsorption of O2. These data, along with kinetic analyses, lend support to a mechanism in which the breaking of copper–oxygen bonds is rate-determining under oxygen-rich conditions, while refilling the resulting oxygen vacancy is rate-determining under oxygen-lean conditions. On the basis of these observations and density functional calculations, we introduce the computed oxygen vacancy formation energy (Evac) as an activity descriptor for substituted ceria materials and demonstrate that Evac successfully rationalizes the trend in the activities of M0.1Ce0.9O2–x catalysts that spans three orders of magnitude. The applicability of Evac as a useful design descriptor is demonstrated by the catalytic performance of the ternary oxide Cu0.1La0.1Ce0.8O2–x, which has an apparent activation energy rivaling those of state-of-the-art Au/TiO2 materials. Thus, we suggest that cost-effective catalysts for CO oxidation can be rationally designed by judicious choice of substituting

  12. A flexible gas flow reaction cell for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, Anna B., E-mail: anna.kroner@diamond.ac.uk; Gilbert, Martin; Duller, Graham; Cahill, Leo; Leicester, Peter; Woolliscroft, Richard; Shotton, Elizabeth J. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Diamond House, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110DE (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Khaled M. H. [UK Catalysis Hub, Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX110FA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A capillary-based sample environment with hot air blower and integrated gas system was developed at Diamond to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of materials under time-resolved, in situ conditions. The use of a hot air blower, operating in the temperature range of 298-1173 K, allows introduction of other techniques e.g. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy for combined techniques studies. The flexibility to use either quartz or Kapton capillaries allows users to perform XAS measurement at energies as low as 5600 eV. To demonstrate performance, time-resolved, in situ XAS results of Rh catalysts during the process of activation (Rh K-edge, Ce L{sub 3}-edge and Cr K-edge) and the study of mixed oxide membrane (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3−δ}) under various partial oxygen pressure conditions are described.

  13. In situ semi-quantitative analysis of polluted soils by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismaël, Amina; Bousquet, Bruno; Michel-Le Pierrès, Karine; Travaillé, Grégoire; Canioni, Lionel; Roy, Stéphane

    2011-05-01

    Time-saving, low-cost analyses of soil contamination are required to ensure fast and efficient pollution removal and remedial operations. In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been successfully applied to in situ analyses of polluted soils, providing direct semi-quantitative information about the extent of pollution. A field campaign has been carried out in Brittany (France) on a site presenting high levels of heavy metal concentrations. Results on iron as a major component as well as on lead and copper as minor components are reported. Soil samples were dried and prepared as pressed pellets to minimize the effects of moisture and density on the results. LIBS analyses were performed with a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm, 60 mJ per 10 ns pulse, at a repetition rate of 10 Hz with a diameter of 500 μm on the sample surface. Good correlations were obtained between the LIBS signals and the values of concentrations deduced from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This result proves that LIBS is an efficient method for optimizing sampling operations. Indeed, "LIBS maps" were established directly on-site, providing valuable assistance in optimizing the selection of the most relevant samples for future expensive and time-consuming laboratory analysis and avoiding useless analyses of very similar samples. Finally, it is emphasized that in situ LIBS is not described here as an alternative quantitative analytical method to the usual laboratory measurements but simply as an efficient time-saving tool to optimize sampling operations and to drastically reduce the number of soil samples to be analyzed, thus reducing costs. The detection limits of 200 ppm for lead and 80 ppm for copper reported here are compatible with the thresholds of toxicity; thus, this in situ LIBS campaign was fully validated for these two elements. Consequently, further experiments are planned to extend this study to other chemical elements and other

  14. Ex-situ and in-situ observations of the effects of gamma radiation on lithium ion battery performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; Bashian, Nicholas H.; Hemmelgarn, Chase W.; Thio, Wesley J.; Lyons, Daniel J.; Zheng, Yuan F.; Cao, Lei R.; Co, Anne C.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation effects induced by gamma rays on battery performance were investigated by measuring the capacity and resistance of a series of battery coin cells in-situ directly under gamma radiation and ex-situ. An experimental setup was developed to charge and discharge batteries directly under gamma radiation, equipped with precise temperature control, at The Ohio State University Nuclear Reactor Lab. Latent effects induced by gamma radiation on battery components directly influence their performance. Charge and discharge capacity and overall resistance throughout a time span of several weeks post irradiation were monitored and compared to control groups. It was found that exposure to gamma radiation does not significantly alter the available capacity and the overall cell resistance immediately, however, battery performance significantly decreases with time post irradiation. Also, batteries exposed to a higher cumulative dose showed close-to-zero capacity at two-week post irradiation.

  15. Gamma-ray spectroscopy with relativistic exotic heavy-ions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Feasibility of gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies with exotic heavy-ions and new generation of germanium detectors (segmented Clover) is discussed. An experiment with such detector array and radioactive is discussed.

  16. Gamma ray fluorescence for in situ evaluation of ore in Witwatersrand gold mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolle, R.

    1979-01-01

    A system for quantitative in situ evaluation of ore in Witwatersrand gold mines was researched and subsequently developed. The principle of measurement is based on the excitation of gold K X-rays in rock face samples by the 88 keV gamma radiation from a Cadmium-109 radioisotope source. The X-rays and scattered radiation from the rock matrix are detected by a hyperpure germanium detector cooled by liquid nitrogen in a portable probe. In the fluorescence spectrum the intensity ratio of the gold Kβ peaks to their immediate scattered background is evaluated and quantitatively converted in the portable analyser to area concentration units. All aspects of the physical and instrumental measurement had to be investigated to arrive at a system capable of quantitative evaluation of trace concentrations in stope face ore samples. The parameters of spectrum evaluation were investigated from fundamental principles to allow quantitative assessment of different methods of peak evaluation for optimization of the method as a whole. The basic concepts of random signal processing times were developed together with new concepts of pileup parameters to allow a quantitative description of the data acquisition rate of a complete analog pulse processing system. With this foundation a practical measuring geometry and optimum values for signal processing time parameters, for detector size and for discriminator positions for spectrum evaluation could be determined. Parallel with the derivation of optimum measurement parameters went the development of instruments, their field testing and appraisal of the method. The development of the gamma ray fluorescence method has shown the potential of the method to serve as an ore valuation tool and to assist in the geological identification of strata in Witwatersrand gold mines

  17. Prompt gamma-ray activation technique for in-situ analysis of mercury pollution in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khouri, M.C.; Jayanthi, K.A.; Pascholati, P.R.

    1995-01-01

    Industrial and mining pollutants discharged into water are in general distributed homogeneously and we investigated a prompt neutron activation technique for the in-situ analysis, to start with of Hg content in water. The laboratory test employed a 252 Cf neutron source (of ∼ 3 x 10 6 n/s fluence) submerged in a test tank of water of ∼ 500 litres, and to monitor the gamma-ray emission a 4 x 4 NaI (Tl) detector system was employed. In 3000 is time interval trials, for a 46 ppm contamination level of Hg, we observed an excess of counts of ∼ 9.2 σ significance in the energy range of 4000-6500 keV, which can be attributed to the presence of mercury. This test system for a 10 hour monitoring can provide a minimum detectable sensitivity at 4.78 ppm. In the future experiments, we propose to replace the NaI(Tl) detector by a HPGe detector to facilitate simultaneous analyses of pollutants such as cadmium, chlorine, chromium etc for detection at few tenths to tens of ppm levels or better. (author). 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Polymerization in situ by means of radiation gamma for the production of conducting polymeric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblete Pulgar, Victor; Pilleux Cepeda, Mauricio; Fuenzalida Escobar, Victor; Alvarez Vargas, Mariela

    2002-01-01

    The nanocomposites synthesis of copper-methyl metacritate is made using copper spheres from 80 to 120 diameter nm, suspended in a methyl metacrilato (MMA) matrix, for different concentrations (5% to 30% of copper-v/v). The polymerization is carried out by means of gamma radiation, with 16 kGy dose applied 'in situ'. A high homogenous samples were obtained. The morphology and formation of the composite was studied by means of scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The observed electric resistance is analyzed in function of the distance among electric contacts, meeting a strong dependence of the resistance with the homogeneous distribution of the metal in the composite. The obtained specific resistivities, in function of the concentration of the conductive metal, they are in the order of 42 Ωm for 10% v/v, being this critical concentration, the percolation threshold of the system. The obtained results show a material that is able to conserve principally the mechanical properties of the polymer and the electric properties of the conductive metal (author)

  19. Determination of Th and U by neutron activation for gamma spectrometry calibration in situ; Determinacion de Th y U por activacion neutronica para calibracion de espectrometria gamma in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava M, F.; Rios M, C.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Landsberger, S., E-mail: iqnava@hotmail.com [University of Texas at Austin, Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, Pickle Research Campus, R9000 Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Using the analysis by neutron activation to determine the profile of the thorium and uranium concentration calibration factors were obtained for their use in the gamma spectrometry in situ. Three sites were selected (San Ramon, Villa de Cos y la Zacatecana) and the analysis by activation was development in the Laboratory of Nuclear Engineering Teaching of the Texas University in Austin with the nuclear reactor Ut-TRIGA. Starting from the gamma spectra in situ, the areas of normalized photo-pick of the radioisotopes were: {sup 208}Tl and {sup 228}Ac for the thorium series and {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi for the uranium series. The averages of the factors found in units of (cpm/Bq/Kg) are of 105.63{+-}8.32 and 75.87{+-}4.61 for the thorium and uranium, respectively. (Author)

  20. Better understanding of dissolution behaviour of amorphous drugs by in situ solid-state analysis using Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savolainen, M; Kogermann, K; Heinz, A

    2009-01-01

    of two amorphous drugs, indomethacin (IMC) and carbamazepine (CBZ). The dissolution rate was higher from amorphous IMC compared to the crystalline alpha- and gamma-forms. However, the dissolution rate started to slow down during the experiment. In situ Raman analysis verified that at that time point...

  1. In-Situ Compositional Analysis and Provenance Study of the Historic Terengganu Stone (“Batu Bersurat Piagam Terengganu”) Using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, J.; Yahya, R.; Dahing, N. S.; Shaari, M. R.; Mahmood, A. A.; Hassan, H.; Jamaluddin, T. A.; Abdullah, M. Y.; Mahmud, N. A.; Mosorov, V.

    2018-01-01

    Terengganu inscribed stone is the oldest artifact with Jawi writing on it. It is a most treasured heritage for the history of Malaysian civilisation. The artifact proves that the Kingdom of Terengganu exist earlier than 1326 or 1386. It was accidentally discovered near Tersat River at Kampong Buluh, Kuala Berang, Terengganu, Malaysia by a gold & tin trader after a flash flood hit Kuala Berang in 1902.The inscription turned out to be a proclamation issued by the ''Sri Paduka Tuan'' of Terengganu. The significant is the date on the first face of the inscription, which is given as the year 1303 AD. This project focuses on the development of in-situ compositional analysis and provenance study of the Inscribed Terengganu Stone using Neutron-Induced Prompt Gamma-Ray Techniques (NIPGAT). To date, a lot of studies have been carried out by historians and archaeologists about the content of the inscription, but no scientific investigation about the material composition and its provenance has been performed. In this project, an instrumental analysis NIPGAT was designed as a portable non-destructive investigation tool employing an isotopic neutron source (Cf-252) and a gamma-ray spectroscopy system for in-situ investigation of the Inscribed Stone. (author)

  2. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  3. In situ differential reflectance spectroscopy of thin crystalline films of PTCDA on different substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, Holger; Nitsche, Robert; Dienel, Thomas; Leo, Karl; Fritz, Torsten

    2005-01-01

    We report an investigation of the excitonic properties of thin crystalline films of the archetypal organic semiconductor PTCDA (3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) grown on poly- and single crystalline surfaces. A sensitive setup capable of measuring the optical properties of ultrathin organic molecular crystals via differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is presented. This tool allows to carry out measurements in situ, i.e., during the actual film growth, and over a wide spectral range, even on single crystalline surfaces with high symmetry or metallic surfaces, where widely used techniques like reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) or fluorescence excitation spectroscopy fail. The spectra obtained by DRS resemble mainly the absorption of the films if transparent substrates are used, which simplifies the analysis. In the case of mono- to multilayer films of PTCDA on single crystalline muscovite mica(0001) and Au(111) substrates, the formation of the solid state absorption from monomer to dimer and further to crystal-like absorption spectra can be monitored

  4. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics.

  5. Portable fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system for in-situ interrogation of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Teixeira Rosa, Ramon Gabriel; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; Pratavieira, Sebastião; Kurachi, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime techniques are potential methods for optical diagnosis and characterization of biological tissues with an in-situ, fast, and noninvasive interrogation. Several diseases may be diagnosed due to differences in the fluorescence spectra of targeted fluorophores, when, these spectra are similar, considering steady-state fluorescence, others may be detected by monitoring their fluorescence lifetime. Despite this complementarity, most of the current fluorescence lifetime systems are not robust and portable, and not being feasible for clinical applications. We describe the assembly of a fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy system in a suitcase, its characterization, and validation with clinical measurements of skin lesions. The assembled system is all encased and robust, maintaining its mechanical, electrical, and optical stability during transportation, and is feasible for clinical measurements. The instrument response function measured was about 300 ps, and the system is properly calibrated. At the clinical study, the system showed to be reliable, and the achieved spectroscopy results support its potential use as an auxiliary tool for skin diagnostics. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  6. Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi [Richland, WA; Sears, Jr., Jesse A.; Hoyt, David W [Richland, WA; Wind, Robert A [Kennewick, WA

    2009-05-19

    Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

  7. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  8. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements of zirconium alloy oxide conductivity: Relationship to hydrogen pickup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couet, Adrien; Motta, Arthur T.; Ambard, Antoine; Livigni, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • In-situ electrochemistry on zirconium alloys in 360 °C pure water show oxide layer resistivity changes during corrosion. • A linear relationship is observed between oxide resistivity and instantaneous hydrogen pickup fraction. • The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 (and thus its hydrogen pickup fraction) is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb. - Abstract: Hydrogen pickup during nuclear fuel cladding corrosion is a critical life-limiting degradation mechanism for nuclear fuel. Following a program dedicated to zirconium alloys, corrosion, it has been hypothesized that oxide electronic resistivity determines hydrogen pickup. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 and Zr-2.5Nb alloys in 360 °C water. The oxide resistivity was measured as function of time. The results show that as the oxide resistivity increases so does the hydrogen pickup fraction. The resistivity of the oxide layer formed on Zircaloy-4 is higher than on Zr-2.5Nb, resulting in a higher hydrogen pickup fraction of Zircaloy-4, compared to Zr-2.5Nb.

  9. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-07-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short.

  10. In situ biosensing of the nanomechanical property and electrochemical spectroscopy of Streptococcus mutans-containing biofilms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bernard Haochih; Li, Kun-Lin; Kang, Kai-Li; Huang, Wen-Ke; Liao, Jiunn-Der

    2013-01-01

    This work presents in situ biosensing approaches to study the nanomechanical and electrochemical behaviour of Streptococcus mutans biofilms under different cultivation conditions and microenvironments. The surface characteristics and sub-surface electrochemistry of the cell wall of S. mutans were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based techniques to monitor the in situ biophysical status of biofilms under common anti-pathogenic procedures such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation and alcohol treatment. The AFM nanoindentation suggested a positive correlation between nanomechanical strength and the level of UV radiation of S. mutans; scanning impedance spectroscopy of dehydrated biofilms revealed reduced electrical resistance that is distinctive from that of living biofilms, which can be explained by the discharge of cytoplasm after alcohol treatment. Furthermore, the localized elastic moduli of four regions of the biofilm were studied: septum (Z-ring), cell wall, the interconnecting area between two cells and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) area. The results indicated that cell walls exhibit the highest elastic modulus, followed by Z-ring, interconnect and EPS. Our approach provides an effective alternative for the characterization of the viability of living cells without the use of biochemical labelling tools such as fluorescence dyeing, and does not rely on surface binding or immobilization for detection. These AFM-based techniques can be very promising approaches when the conventional methods fall short. (paper)

  11. Instrument for x-ray absorption spectroscopy with in situ electrical control characterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun-Chao; Chang, Shu-Jui; Yang, Chao-Yao; Tseng, Yuan-Chieh; Chou, Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    We report a synchrotron-based setup capable of performing x-ray absorption spectroscopy and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism with simultaneous electrical control characterizations. The setup can enable research concerning electrical transport, element- and orbital-selective magnetization with an in situ fashion. It is a unique approach to the real-time change of spin-polarized electronic state of a material/device exhibiting magneto-electric responses. The performance of the setup was tested by probing the spin-polarized states of cobalt and oxygen of Zn 1-x Co x O dilute magnetic semiconductor under applied voltages, both at low (∼20 K) and room temperatures, and signal variations upon the change of applied voltage were clearly detected

  12. In situ measurements of fuel retention by laser induced desorption spectroscopy in TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobinski, M.; Philipps, V.; Schweer, B.; Huber, A.; Stoschus, H.; Brezinsek, S.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR Team

    2011-12-01

    In future fusion devices such as ITER tritium retention due to tritium co-deposition in mixed material layers can be a serious safety problem. Laser induced desorption spectroscopy (LIDS) can measure the hydrogen content of hydrogenic carbon layers locally on plasma-facing components, while hydrogen is used as a tritium substitute. For several years, this method has been applied in the TEXTOR tokamak in situ during plasma operation to monitor the hydrogen content in space and time. This work shows the LIDS signal reproducibility and studies the effects of different plasma conditions, desorption distances from the plasma and different laser energies using a dedicated sample with constant hydrogen amount. Also the LIDS signal evaluation procedure is described in detail and the detection limits for different conditions in the TEXTOR tokamak are estimated.

  13. In situ light spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Langhammer, C.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    the LSPR signal coming from the whole specimen, providing information complementary to the TEM analysis. During any ETEM experiment the electron beam effect on the sample is a difficult issue to address and rule out. In addition, if a reaction has to be followed in situ in the ETEM, the information...... is often recorded on a limited portion of the sample. Being able to probe the sample with INPS and ETEM at the same time allows parallel investigation at the local and macro scale, as well as aids the assessment of beam effects. A dedicated custom TEM specimen holder containing two optical fibers, five...... electrical contacts, a fixed miniaturized optical bench for light handling and a heating element (Fig. 1) has been designed. A system of pre-aligned mirrors and a MEMS heater are implemented in the holder. The system is primarily designed for use in combination with LSPR spectroscopy, but it is flexible...

  14. Reactive molecular beam epitaxial growth and in situ photoemission spectroscopy study of iridate superlattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Fan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available High-quality (001-oriented perovskite [(SrIrO3m/(SrTiO3] superlattices (m=1/2, 1, 2, 3 and ∞ films have been grown on SrTiO3(001 epitaxially using reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Compared to previously reported superlattices synthesized by pulsed laser deposition, our superlattices exhibit superior crystalline, interface and surface structure, which have been confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The transport measurements confirm a novel insulator-metal transition with the change of dimensionality in these superlattices, and our first systematic in situ photoemission spectroscopy study indicates that the increasing strength of effective correlations induced by reducing dimensionality would be the dominating origin of this transition.

  15. Survey of the 137Cs contamination in Belgium by in-situ gamma spectrometry, a decade after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyttenhove, J; Pommé, S; Van Waeyenberge, B; Hardeman, F; Buysse, J; Culot, J P

    1997-10-01

    The residual radiocesium concentration, nearly 10 y after the Chernobyl accident, is measured at different sites on the Belgian territory by means of in-situ gamma-spectrometry. A possible link between the rainfall at the beginning of May 1986 and the actual cesium concentration is investigated. The radiological impact of this contamination, even in the most affected regions in the Ardennes, is very small (<6 microSv y(-1)).

  16. Real-time monitoring of high-gravity corn mash fermentation using in situ raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Steven R; Peretti, Steven W; Lamb, H Henry

    2013-06-01

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was employed for real-time monitoring of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of corn mash by an industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An accurate univariate calibration model for ethanol was developed based on the very strong 883 cm(-1) C-C stretching band. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) calibration models for total starch, dextrins, maltotriose, maltose, glucose, and ethanol were developed using data from eight batch fermentations and validated using predictions for a separate batch. The starch, ethanol, and dextrins models showed significant prediction improvement when the calibration data were divided into separate high- and low-concentration sets. Collinearity between the ethanol and starch models was avoided by excluding regions containing strong ethanol peaks from the starch model and, conversely, excluding regions containing strong saccharide peaks from the ethanol model. The two-set calibration models for starch (R(2)  = 0.998, percent error = 2.5%) and ethanol (R(2)  = 0.999, percent error = 2.1%) provide more accurate predictions than any previously published spectroscopic models. Glucose, maltose, and maltotriose are modeled to accuracy comparable to previous work on less complex fermentation processes. Our results demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy is capable of real time in situ monitoring of a complex industrial biomass fermentation. To our knowledge, this is the first PLS-based chemometric modeling of corn mash fermentation under typical industrial conditions, and the first Raman-based monitoring of a fermentation process with glucose, oligosaccharides and polysaccharides present. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of potassium for in-situ geochronology on Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipe, Christopher B., E-mail: stipec@seattleu.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Guevara, Edward; Brown, Jonathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seattle University, Seattle, WA 98122 (United States); Rossman, George R. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is explored for the development of an in-situ K-Ar geochronology instrument for Mars. Potassium concentrations in standard basaltic glasses and equivalent rock samples in their natural form are quantified using the potassium doublet at 766.49 and 769.90 nm. Measurement precision varies from 0.5 to 5.5 (% RSD) over the 3.63% to 0.025% potassium by weight for the standard samples, and little additional precision is achieved above 20 laser shots at 5 locations. For the glass standards, the quantification limits are 920 and 66 ppm for non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. For the basaltic rocks, the quantification limits are 2650 and 328 ppm for the non-weighted and weighted calibration methods, respectively. The heterogeneity of the rock samples leads to larger variations in potassium signal; however, normalizing the potassium peak by base area at 25 locations on the rock improved calibration accuracy. Including only errors in LIBS measurements, estimated age errors for the glasses range from approximately {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma samples to {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma samples. For the basaltic rocks, the age errors are approximately {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma samples and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement of basaltic glasses and rocks by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantification of potassium for K-Ar dating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of an instrument for in-situ geochronology on Mars. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection limit is 35 ppm, relative standard deviations range from 0.5% to 5.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated errors for the glass standards range from {+-} 30 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 2 Ma for 100 Ma; estimated errors for the basaltic rocks range from {+-} 120 Ma for 3000 Ma and {+-} 8 Ma for 100 Ma.

  18. Spectrum-to-dose conversion operator value function of a Ge(Li) in-situ environmental gamma-ray spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Hiromi; Sakai, Eiji; Katagiri, Masaki

    1976-05-01

    A spectrum-to-dose conversion operator value function was obtained for a 73cm 3 closed-end coaxial Ge(Li) in-situ environmental gamma-ray spectrometer; factors influencing the function are considered. (auth.)

  19. An in situ Raman spectroscopy study of stress transfer between carbon nanotubes and polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Minfang; Winey, Karen I; Osswald, Sebastian; Gogotsi, Yury

    2009-01-01

    The transfer mechanism of applied stress in single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposites was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy on composite fibers. These SWCNT/PMMA nanocomposite fibers have no specific SWCNT-polymer interactions and the high degree of nanotube alignment minimizes the contributions from nanotube-nanotube interactions. Although tensile testing found significantly improved overall mechanical properties of the fibers, effective stress transfer to SWCNTs is limited to a small strain regime (ε<0.2%). At higher strains, the stress on the SWCNTs decreases due to the slippage at the nanotube-polymer interface. Slippage was also evident in scanning electron micrographs of fracture surfaces produced by tensile testing of the composite fibers. Above ε = 0.2%, the strain-induced slippage was accompanied by irreversible responses in stress and Raman peak shifts. This paper shows that efficient stress transfer to nanotubes as monitored by Raman spectroscopy is crucial to improving the mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites and to detecting internal damage in nanocomposites.

  20. Remote in-situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Brian James

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) using optical fibers. Studies were performed to determine the optimal excitation and collection parameters for remote LIBS measurements of glasses, soils and paint. A number of fiber-optic LIBS probes were developed and used to characterize various samples by plasma emission spectroscopy. A novel method for launching high-power laser pulses into optical fibers without causing catastrophic failure is introduced. A systematic study of a number of commercially available optical fibers was performed to determine which optical fibers were best suited for delivering high-power laser pulses. The general design of an all fiber-optic LIBS probe is described and applied to the determination of Pb in soil. A fiber-optic probe was developed for the microanalysis of solid samples remotely by LIBS, Raman spectroscopy and Raman imaging. The design of the probe allows for real-time sample imaging in-situ using coherent imaging fibers. This allows for precise atomic emission and Raman measurements to be performed remotely on samples in hostile or inaccessible environments. A novel technique was developed for collecting spectral plasma images using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The spatial and temporal characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of delay time. From the plasma images the distribution of Pb emission could be determined and fiber-optic designs could be optimized for signal collection. The performance of a two fiber LIBS probe is demonstrated for the determination of the amount of lead in samples of dry paint. It is shown that dry paint samples can be analyzed for their Pb content in-situ using a fiber-optic LIBS probe with detection limits well below the levels currently regulated by the Consumer Products Safety Commission. It is also shown that these measurements can be performed on both latex and enamel paints, and

  1. Charge transfer in carbon nanotube actuators investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Hughes, M.; Windle, A.H.; Robertson, J.

    2004-01-01

    Charge transfer dynamics on the surface of single-wall carbon nanotube sheets is investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy in order to understand the actuation mechanism of an electrochemical actuator and to determine associated parameters. We built an actuator from single-wall carbon nanotube mat and studied its actuation in several alkali metal (Li, Na, and K) and alkaline earth (Ca) halide and sulfate solutions in order to clarify the role of counterion as mobile ions in the film. The variation of bonding with applied potential was monitored using in situ Raman spectroscopy. This is because Raman can detect changes in C-C bond length: the radial breathing mode at ∼190 cm-1 varies inversely with the nanotube diameter, and the G band at ∼1590 cm-1 varies with the axial bond length. In addition, the intensities of both the modes vary with the emptying/depleting or filling of the bonding and antibonding states due to electrochemical charge injection. We discussed the variation of peak height and wave numbers of these modes providing valuable information concerning electrochemical charge injection on the carbon nanotube mat surface. We found in-plane microscopic compressive strain (∼-0.25%) and the equivalent charge transfer per carbon atom (f c ∼-0.005) as an upper bound for the actuators studied hereby. It is demonstrated that though the present analysis does comply with the proposition for the actuation principle made earlier, the quantitative estimates are significantly lower if compared with those of reported values. Furthermore, the extent of variation, i.e., coupled electro-chemo-mechanical response of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) mat depended upon the type of counterion used (Group I versus Group II). The cyclic voltammetry and ac electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results were described briefly, which help to demonstrate well-developed capacitive behavior of SWNT mat and to estimate the specific capacitances as well. Summarizing, the

  2. In situ gamma-ray spectrometric measurements of uranium in phosphates soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavi, N.; Ne'eman, E.; Brenner, S.; Haquin, G.; Nir-El, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Radioactivity concentration of 238 U in a phosphate ores quarry was measured in situ. Independently, soil samples collected in the site were measured in the laboratory. It was disclosed that radon emanation from the soil lowers in situ results that are derived from radon daughters. Uranium concentration was found to be 121.6±1.9 mg kg -1 (authors)

  3. Preferential adsorption of NH3 gas molecules on MWCNT defect sites probed using in situ Raman spectroscopy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chimowa, George

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The preferential adsorption of NH(sub3) gas molecules on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was studied using in situ Raman spectroscopy. It was observed that the full widths at half maximum of the G band and the intensity ratio I(sub2D...

  4. Kinetics of Hydrolysis of Acetic Anhydride by In-Situ FTIR Spectroscopy: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji, Shaker; Erkey, Can

    2005-01-01

    A reaction kinetics experiment for the chemical engineering undergraduate laboratory course was developed in which in-situ Fourier Transfer Infrared spectroscopy was used to measure reactant and product concentrations. The kinetics of the hydrolysis of acetic anhydride was determined by experiments carried out in a batch reactor. The results…

  5. Gamma Spectroscopy with Pixellated CdZnTe Gamma Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shor, A.; Mardor, I.; Eisen, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Pixellated CdZnTe detectors are good candidates for room temperature gamma detection requiring spectroscopic performance with imaging capabilities. The CdZnTe materials possess high resistivity and good electron charge transport properties. The poor charge transport for the holes inherent in the CdZnTe material can be circumvented by fabricating the electrodes in any one of a number of structures designed for unipolar charge detection[1]. Recent interest in efficient gamma detection at relatively higher gamma energies has imposed more stringent demands on the CdZnTe material and on detector design and optimization. We developed at Soreq a technique where signals from all pixels and from the common electrode are processed, and then a correction is applied for improving the energy resolution and the photopeak efficiency. For illumination with an un-collimated 133 Ba source , we obtain a combined detector energy resolution of 5.0 % FWHM for the 81 keV peak, and 1.5 % FWHM for the 356 keV peak. We discuss the importance of detector material with high electron (μτ) e for thick Pixellated detectors

  6. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy to monitor microbial metabolism in situ under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Although high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) biotopes are ubiquitous on Earth, little is known about the metabolism of piezophile organisms. Cell culture under HHP can be technically challenging, and equipment- dependent. In addition, the depressurization step required for analysis can lead to erroneous data. Therefore, to understand how piezophile organisms react to pressure, it is crucial to be able to monitor their activity in situ under HHP. We developed the use of Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy (QRS, 1) to monitor in situ the metabolism of organic molecules. This technique is based on the specific spectral signature of an analyte from which its concentration can be deduced. An application of this technique to the monitoring of alcoholic fermentation by the piezotolerant micro-eucaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. Ethanol fermentation from glucose was monitored during 24h from ambient P up to 100 MPa in the low- pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (lpDAC, 2). The experimental compression chamber consisted in a 300 μm-thick Ni gasket in which a 500 μm-diameter hole was drilled. Early-stationnary yeast cells were inoculated into fresh low-fluorescence medium containing 0.15 M of glucose. Ethanol concentration was determined in situ by QRS using the symmetric C-C stretching mode of ethanol at 878 cm-1 normalizing the data to the intensity of the sulfate S-O stretching mode at 980 cm-1. In our setup, the detection limit of ethanol is lower than 0.05 mM with a precision below 1%. At ambient P, ethanol production in the lpDAC and in control experiments proceeds with the same kinetics. Thus, yeast is not affected by its confinement. This is further confirmed by its ability to bud with a generation time similar to control experiments performed in glass tubes at ambient pressure inside the lpDAC. Ethanol production by yeast occurs to at least 65 MPa (3). At 10 MPa, fermentation proceeds 3 times faster than at ambient P. Fermentation rates decrease linearly from 20 to

  7. Support Effects in Catalysis Studied by in-situ Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy and in-situ X-Ray Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Griffin John

    Kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst. In order to establish a paradigm for metal-support interactions using colloidally synthesized Pt nanoparticles the ability of the organic capping agent to inhibit reactivity and interaction with the support must first be assessed. Pt nanoparticles capped by poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), and those from which the PVP is removed by UV light exposure, are investigated for two reactions, the hydrogenation of ethylene and the oxidation of methanol. It is shown that prior to PVP removal the particles are moderately active for both reactions. Following removal, the activity for the two reactions diverges, the ethylene hydrogenation rate increases 10-fold, while the methanol oxidation rate decreases 3-fold. To better understand this effect the capping agent prior to, and the residual carbon remaining after UV treatment are probed by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy. Prior to removal no major differences are observed when the particles are exposed to alternating H2 and O2 environments. When the PVP is removed, carbonaceous fragments remain on the surface that dynamically restructure in H2 and O2. These fragments create a tightly bound shell in an oxygen environment and a porous coating of hydrogenated carbon in the hydrogen environment. Reaction rate measurements of thermally cleaned PVP and oleic acid capped particles show this effect to be independent of cleaning method or capping agent. In all this demonstrates the ability of the capping agent to mediate nanoparticle catalysis

  8. Possibility of applying the gamma-gamma method to the in situ determination of uranium-ore densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czubek, J.; Guitton, J.

    1965-01-01

    The principles of the gamma-gamma method are reviewed. It is shown in particular that, under certain conditions, the method makes it possible to obtain a representative measurement of the electronic density. Chemical analyses have been carried out on samples obtained from uranium deposits. The results show that an exact correlation exists between the massive and electronic densities. It is possible to consider the possibility of measuring the density of uranium-containing rocks by the gamma-gamma method. (authors) [fr

  9. Physiologically active hydrogel (in situ gel of sparfloxacin and its evaluation for ocular retention using gamma scintigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the structure and physiological barrier of eye, only 1% of instilled dose is available for action on the corneal surface. In this work, we developed and evaluated chitosan (pH sensitive and gellan gum (ion sensitive in situ gel of sparfloxacin to improve precorneal residence time. Materials and Methods: A protocol for radiolabeling of sparfloxacin with Tc-99m was optimized to study the ocular retention using gamma scintigraphy technique. Results: The clear formulation was developed. In vitro release showed a sustained and prolonged release compared to plain eye drop solution. Dynamic and static gamma scintigraphy showed better retention than plain eye drops. The ocular tolerance test (hen′s egg test-chorioallantoic membrane test and infra-red study showed that the formulation is nonirritant and can be used as ocular vehicle. Conclusion: Radiolabel protocol for sparfloxacin was successfully developed and evaluated on ocular retention studies of developed in situ gel. The developed in situ gel is non irritant and can go further with clinical evaluation.

  10. Comparison of in-situ gamma ray spectrometry measurements with conventional methods in determination natural and artificial nuclides in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Doubal, A. W.

    2010-12-01

    Two nuclear analytical techniques (In-Situ Gamma ray spectrometry and laboratory gamma ray spectrometry) for determination of natural and artificial radionuclides in soil have been validated. The first technique depends on determination of radioactivity content of representative samples of the studied soil after laboratory preparation, while the second technique is based on direct determination of radioactivity content of soil using in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer. Analytical validation parameter such as detection limits, repeatability, reproducibility in addition to measurement uncertainties were estimated and compared for both techniques. Comparison results have shown that the determination of radioactivity in soil should apply the two techniques together where each of techniques is characterized by its low detection limit and uncertainty suitable for defined application of measurement. Radioactive isotopes in various locations were determined using the two methods by measuring 40 k, 238 U,and 137 Cs. The results showed that there are differences in attenuation factors due to soil moisture content differences; wet weight corrections should be applied when the two techniques are compared. (author)

  11. Using Deep UV Raman Spectroscopy to Identify In Situ Microbial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapers, H. M.; Wanger, G.; Amend, J.; Orphan, V. J.; Bhartia, R.

    2017-12-01

    labels will allow in situ detection of metabolically-targeted active community members on complex natural substrates providing a crucial link between microbial activity and environmental context.

  12. Electrochromic characteristics of a nickel borate thin film investigated by in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaaki; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Mineo, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    The electrochromic transition of a nickel borate thin film between colorless and brown was examined by means of in situ XAFS and UV/vis spectroscopy. The XAFS spectra showed that the average valence state of the nickel species in the film changed from +2.1 to +3.8 following the application of an electrode potential. Additionally, a broad peak at 700 nm was observed during in situ UV/vis absorption measurements on the application of a positive potential. These results suggest that the nickel borate film reversibly forms a NiOOH structure with a domain size of several nanometers during the electrochromic reaction. (author)

  13. Ultrahigh-vacuum in situ electrochemistry with solid polymer electrolyte and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of polypyrrole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skotheim, T.A.; Florit, M.I.; Melo, A.; O'Grady, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    A new in situ combined electrochemistry and x-ray-photoelectron-spectroscopy (XPS) technique using solid polymer electrolytes has been used to characterize electrically conducting films of polypyrrole perchlorate. The technique allows in situ electrochemical oxidation and reduction (doping and undoping) in ultrahigh vacuum and the simultaneous study of the polymer with XPS as a function of its electrochemical potential. We demonstrate that some anion species interact strongly electrostatically with the nitrogen heteroatoms. We also show conclusively that the electrochemistry of polypyrrole is highly irreversible

  14. Design of a facility for the in situ measurement of catalytic reaction by neutron scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shuai; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke L.; Lutterman, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Catalysis is a critical enabling science for future energy needs. The next frontier of catalysis is to evolve from catalyst discovery to catalyst design, and for this next step to be realized, we must develop new techniques to better understand reaction mechanisms. To do this, we must connect catalytic reaction rates and selectivities to the kinetics, energetics, and dynamics of individual elementary steps and relate these to the structure and dynamics of the catalytic sites involved. Neutron scattering spectroscopies offer unique capabilities that are difficult or impossible to match by other techniques. The current study presents the development of a compact and portable instrumental design that enables the in situ investigation of catalytic samples by neutron scattering techniques. The developed apparatus was tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory and includes a gas handling panel that allows for computer hookups to control the panel externally and online measurement equipment such as coupled GC-FID/TCD (Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector/Thermal Conductivity Detector) and MS (Mass Spectrometry) to characterize offgassing while the sample is in the neutron scattering spectrometer. This system is flexible, modular, compact, and portable enabling its use for many types of gas-solid and liquid-solid reactions at the various beamlines housed at the SNS.

  15. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples.

  16. In situ analysis of dynamic laminar flow extraction using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hua-Lin; Qiu, Yang; Chang, Yu-Long; Long, Yi-Tao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we performed micro-scale dynamic laminar flow extraction and site-specific in situ chloride concentration measurements. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy was utilized to investigate the diffusion process of chloride ions from an oil phase to a water phase under laminar flow. In contrast to common logic, we used SERS intensity gradients of Rhodamine 6G to quantitatively calculate the concentration of chloride ions at specific positions on a microfluidic chip. By varying the fluid flow rates, we achieved different extraction times and therefore different chloride concentrations at specific positions along the microchannel. SERS spectra from the water phase were recorded at these different positions, and the spatial distribution of the SERS signals was used to map the degree of nanoparticle aggregation. The concentration of chloride ions in the channel could therefore be obtained. We conclude that this method can be used to explore the extraction behaviour and efficiency of some ions or molecules that enhance the SERS intensity in water or oil by inducing nanoparticle aggregation.

  17. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopy of Oligoaniline Intermediates Created under Alkaline Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šeděnková, Ivana; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Trchová, Miroslava

    2014-12-26

    The progress of the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an alkaline aqueous medium has been monitored in situ by attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The growth of the microspheres and of the film at the ATR crystal surface, as well as the changes proceeding in the surrounding aqueous medium, are reflected in the spectra. The evolution of the spectra and the changes in the molecular structure occurring during aniline oxidation in alkaline medium are discussed with the help of differential spectra. Several processes connected with the various stages of aniline oxidation were distinguished. The progress of hydrolysis of the aniline in water and further an oxidation of aminophenol to benzoquinone imines in the presence of peroxydisulfate in alkaline medium have been detected in the spectra in real time. The precipitated solid oxidation product was analyzed by mass spectrometry. It is composed of oligomers, mainly trimers to octamers, of various molecular structures incorporating in addition to aniline constitutional units also p-benzoquinone or p-benzoquinoneimine moieties.

  18. Monitoring the in-situ oxide growth on uranium by ultraviolet-visible reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweke, Danielle; Maimon, Chen; Chernia, Zelig; Livneh, Tsachi

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate the in-situ monitoring of oxide growth on U-0.1 wt. % Cr by means of UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy in the thickness range of ˜20-150 nm. Two different approaches are presented: In the "modeling approach," we employ a model for a metallic substrate covered by a dielectric layer, while taking into account the buildup of oxygen gradient and surface roughness. Then, we fit the simulated spectra to the experimental one. In the "extrema analysis," we derive an approximated analytical expression, which relates the oxide thickness to the position of the extrema in the reflectance spectra based on the condition for optical interference of the reflected light. Good agreement is found between the values extracted by the two procedures. Activation energy of ˜21 kcal/mole was obtained by monitoring the oxide growth in the temperature range of 22-90 °C. The upper bound for the thickness determination is argued to be mostly dictated by cracking and detachment processes in the formed oxide.

  19. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of Zr-1%Nb under VVER primary circuit conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Gabor; Kerner, Zsolt; Pajkossy, Tamas

    2002-01-01

    Oxide layers were grown on tubular samples of Zr-1%Nb under conditions simulating those in VVER-type pressurised water reactors, viz. in near-neutral borate solutions in an autoclave at 290 deg. C. These samples were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy which was found to be suitable to follow in situ the corrosion process. A -CPE ox parallel R ox - element was used to characterise the oxide layer on Zr-1%Nb. Both the CPE ox coefficient, σ ox , and the parallel resistance, R ox , were found to be thickness dependent. The layer thickness, however, can only be calculated after a calibration procedure. The temperature dependence of the CPE ox element was also found to be anomalous while the temperature dependence of R ox indicates that the oxide layer has semiconductor properties. The relaxation time - defined as (R ox σ ox ) 1/α - was found to be quasi-independent of oxidation time and temperature; thus it is characteristic to the oxide layer on Zr-1%Nb

  20. Confined methane-water interfacial layers and thickness measurements using in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Bruno; Liu, Yukun; Rizkin, Benjamin; Hartman, Ryan L

    2017-11-07

    Gas-liquid interfaces broadly impact our planet, yet confined interfaces behave differently than unconfined ones. We report the role of tangential fluid motion in confined methane-water interfaces. The interfaces are created using microfluidics and investigated by in situ 1D, 2D and 3D Raman spectroscopy. The apparent CH 4 and H 2 O concentrations are reported for Reynolds numbers (Re), ranging from 0.17 to 8.55. Remarkably, the interfaces are comprised of distinct layers of thicknesses varying from 23 to 57 μm. We found that rarefaction, mixture, thin film, and shockwave layers together form the interfaces. The results indicate that the mixture layer thickness (δ) increases with Re (δ ∝ Re), and traditional transport theory for unconfined interfaces does not explain the confined interfaces. A comparison of our results with thin film theory of air-water interfaces (from mass transfer experiments in capillary microfluidics) supports that the hydrophobicity of CH 4 could decrease the strength of water-water interactions, resulting in larger interfacial thicknesses. Our findings help explain molecular transport in confined gas-liquid interfaces, which are common in a broad range of societal applications.

  1. Local detection of X-ray spectroscopies with an in-situ Atomic Force Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, M S; Dhez, O; Denmat, S Le; Felici, R; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2008-01-01

    The in situ combination of Scanning Probe Microscopies with X-ray microbeams adds a variety of new possibilities to the panoply of synchrotron radiation techniques. This paper describes an optics-free Atomic Force Microscope that can be directly installed on most of the synchrotron radiation end-stations for combined X-ray and atomic force microscopy experiments. The instrument can be used for atomic force imaging of the investigated sample or to locally measure the X-ray absorption or diffraction, or it can also be used to mechanically interact with the sample while simultaneously taking spectroscopy or diffraction measurements. The local character of these measurements is intrinsically linked with the use of the Atomic Force Microscope tip. It is the sharp tip that gives the opportunity to measure the photons flux impinging on it, or to locally measure the absorption coefficient or the shape of the diffraction pattern. At the end an estimation of the limits of the various techniques presented is also discussed.

  2. Growth of pentacene on α -Al2O3 (0001) studied by in situ optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Fu, X.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Sun, L. D.

    2017-09-01

    The growth of pentacene thin films on a sapphire α -Al2O3 (0001) surface was investigated in situ using differential reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Two different film structures are observed depending on the substrate temperature. If pentacene is deposited at room temperature, a wetting layer consisting of flat-lying molecules is formed after which upright-standing molecular layers with a herringbone structure start to grow. At low substrate temperature of 100 K, the long molecular axis of the pentacene molecules remains parallel to the surface plane throughout the entire growth regime up to rather large thicknesses. Heating thin films deposited at 100 K to room temperature causes the pentacene molecules beyond the wetting layer to stand up and assemble into a herringbone structure. Another interesting observation is the dewetting of the first flat-lying monolayer upon exposure to air, leading to the condensation of islands consisting of upright-standing molecules. Our results emphasize the interplay between growth kinetics and thermodynamics and its influence on the molecular orientation in organic thin films.

  3. Support effects in catalysis studied by in-situ sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ x-ray spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Griffin John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-04-14

    Here, kinetic measurements are paired with in-situ spectroscopic characterization tools to investigate colloidally based, supported Pt catalytic model systems in order to elucidate the mechanisms by which metal and support work in tandem to dictate activity and selectivity. The results demonstrate oxide support materials, while inactive in absence of Pt nanoparticles, possess unique active sites for the selective conversion of gas phase molecules when paired with an active metal catalyst.

  4. Determination of 228Th, 226Ra and 40K in Soil Using In-Situ GammaSpectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunawas; Wahyudi; Syarbaini; Untara

    2000-01-01

    Determination of natural radionuclide in latosol soil at six locationsaround PPTN Serpong by using Inspector portable gamma spectrometer with highpurity Germanium detector (HPGe) which has 26% relative efficiency had beenobtained. Radionuclides data of 228 Th, 226 Ra and 40 K were obtained in4 hours, shorter than laboratories analysis which needed 3 weeks. Thedifferences between in-situ measurement and laboratory were 3.6% to 56.2% forsix conditions of soil measured. According to the specific activity dataanalysis using statistic hypothesis, the result shows that the activity of 228 Th and 226 Ra are independent on location, but 40 K is dependent onlocation. (author)

  5. Impurities in radioactive solutions for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, J.U.

    1990-01-01

    The absolute and relative methods for radioactive sources calibration, like 4 Πβ-γ and 4Πγ ionization chamber respectively, allows to reach 0,1% of exactiness in activity measurement, but cannot distinguish radioactive impurities that interfere in the activity. Then, one of the problems associated to a quality control of calibrated sources furnished to users is the identification and quantification of the impurities. In this work, a routine technical procedure, using the facilities of gamma spectrometry method that allows to identify and to determine the impurities relative contribution to the source main radionuclide activity, is described. (author) [pt

  6. Medium-term experiences with in-situ gamma-spectrometry of the primary loop transport processes at Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raics, P.; Sztaricskai, T.; Szabo, J.; Szegedi, S.

    2001-01-01

    Surface activity of 15 corrosion/erosion and fission products was determined by in-situ gamma-spectrometry for 2-2 locations on the hot and cold legs of each loop, respectively. Gamma-dosimetry in the assay points was performed. Activity profiles of ion exchange columns were analyzed. Combined measurements along the steam generators completed the characterization of the primary circuits. Most of this technique was regularly included into all maintenance periods. Data evaluation was performed for the surface contaminations as well as coolant activities and reactor operation features for years 1985-2001. Trends and tendencies were investigated in the time behavior of the specific activities. Asymmetry in the surface contamination at the primary loop points, cold-leg activity inversion, water chemistry effects, isotope selectivity were observed. Correlations in different parameters have been calculated and analyzed. (R.P.)

  7. Calibration and application of a HPGe gamma spectrometer for in-situ measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Xuefu; Yue Qingyu

    1992-02-01

    The principle and methods of the calibration for an in-situ γ spectrometer are introduced. The calibration for a portable HPGe γ spectrometer has been completed. The N f /A(peak count rate per unit activity in soil) and N f /D(peak count rate per unit absorbed dose rate in the air) are listed. The uncertainties of the calibration factors are estimated. The in-situ measurements have been carried out in surroundings near the nuclear facilities and the data are compared with those measured by other methods

  8. In situ measurement of some soil properties in paddy soil using visible and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wenjun

    Full Text Available In situ measurements with visible and near-infrared spectroscopy (vis-NIR provide an efficient way for acquiring soil information of paddy soils in the short time gap between the harvest and following rotation. The aim of this study was to evaluate its feasibility to predict a series of soil properties including organic matter (OM, organic carbon (OC, total nitrogen (TN, available nitrogen (AN, available phosphorus (AP, available potassium (AK and pH of paddy soils in Zhejiang province, China. Firstly, the linear partial least squares regression (PLSR was performed on the in situ spectra and the predictions were compared to those with laboratory-based recorded spectra. Then, the non-linear least-square support vector machine (LS-SVM algorithm was carried out aiming to extract more useful information from the in situ spectra and improve predictions. Results show that in terms of OC, OM, TN, AN and pH, (i the predictions were worse using in situ spectra compared to laboratory-based spectra with PLSR algorithm (ii the prediction accuracy using LS-SVM (R2>0.75, RPD>1.90 was obviously improved with in situ vis-NIR spectra compared to PLSR algorithm, and comparable or even better than results generated using laboratory-based spectra with PLSR; (iii in terms of AP and AK, poor predictions were obtained with in situ spectra (R2<0.5, RPD<1.50 either using PLSR or LS-SVM. The results highlight the use of LS-SVM for in situ vis-NIR spectroscopic estimation of soil properties of paddy soils.

  9. Exploring laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for nuclear materials analysis and in-situ applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Madhavi Z.; Allman, Steve; Brice, Deanne J.; Martin, Rodger C.; Andre, Nicolas O.

    2012-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to determine the limits of detection of strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs), common nuclear fission products. Additionally, detection limits were determined for cerium (Ce), often used as a surrogate for radioactive plutonium in laboratory studies. Results were obtained using a laboratory instrument with a Nd:YAG laser at fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm, frequency doubled to 532 nm with energy of 50 mJ/pulse. The data was compared for different concentrations of Sr and Ce dispersed in a CaCO 3 (white) and carbon (black) matrix. We have addressed the sampling errors, limits of detection, reproducibility, and accuracy of measurements as they relate to multivariate analysis in pellets that were doped with the different elements at various concentrations. These results demonstrate that LIBS technique is inherently well suited for in situ analysis of nuclear materials in hot cells. Three key advantages are evident: (1) small samples (mg) can be evaluated; (2) nuclear materials can be analyzed with minimal sample preparation; and (3) samples can be remotely analyzed very rapidly (ms-seconds). Our studies also show that the methods can be made quantitative. Very robust multivariate models have been used to provide quantitative measurement and statistical evaluation of complex materials derived from our previous research on wood and soil samples. - Highlights: ► Did the detection of strontium, cerium, and cesium in CaCO 3 and graphite matrices. ► The detection of these elements was performed in a systematic manner. ► Univariate calibration curves were used to determine strontium detection. ► Univariate and multivariate statistical analysis built improved statistical models. ► Limits of detection are comparable or better in case of cerium and cesium.

  10. Conductivity percolation in loosely compacted microcrystalline cellulose: An in situ study by dielectric spectroscopy during densification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Martin; Frenning, Göran; Gråsjö, Johan; Alderborn, Göran; Strømme, Maria

    2006-10-19

    The present study aims at contributing to a complete understanding of the water-induced ionic charge transport in cellulose. The behavior of this transport in loosely compacted microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) powder was investigated as a function of density utilizing a new type of measurement setup, allowing for dielectric spectroscopy measurement in situ during compaction. The ionic conductivity in MCC was found to increase with increasing density until a leveling-out was observed for densities above approximately 0.7 g/cm3. Further, it was shown that the ionic conductivity vs density followed a percolation type behavior signifying the percolation of conductive paths in a 3D conducting network. The density percolation threshold was found to be between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 g/cm3, depending strongly on the cellulose moisture content. The observed percolation behavior was attributed to the forming of interparticulate bonds in the MCC and the percolation threshold dependence on moisture was linked to the moisture dependence of particle rearrangement and plastic deformation in MCC during compaction. The obtained results add to the understanding of the density-dependent water-induced ionic transport in cellulose showing that, at given moisture content, the two major parameters determining the magnitude of the conductivity are the connectedness of the interparticluate bonds and the connectedness of pores with a diameter in the 5-20 nm size range. At densities between approximately 0.7 and 1.2 g/cm3 both the bond and the pore networks have percolated, facilitating charge transport through the MCC compact.

  11. In-situ characterization of meat aging with diode-laser Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Heinar; Blum, Jenny; Sowoidnich, Kay; Sumpf, Bernd; Schwägele, Fredi; Kronfeldt, Heinz-Detlef

    2009-05-01

    Due to the narrow linewidth signals and its fingerprinting nature, Raman spectra provide information about the molecular structure and composition of the samples. In this paper, the applicability of Raman spectroscopy is shown for the in-situ characterization of the aging of meat. Miniaturized diode lasers are utilized as light sources with excitation wavelengths of 671 nm and 785 nm with a view to the development of a portable field device for meat. As test sample, musculus longissimus dorsi from pork was taken. The chops were stored refrigerated at 5 °C and Raman spectra were measured daily from slaughter up to three weeks. Throughout the entire period of one month, the Raman spectra preserve the basic spectral features identifying the samples as meat. More specific, the spectra exhibit gradual changes of the Raman signals and they show a time-dependent modification of the background signal which arises from a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). To analyze the time-correlation of the complex spectra, multivariate statistical methods are employed. By means of principal components analysis (PCA) a distinction of spectra is found on the time scale between day 8 and 10. This corresponds to the transition from ripened meat to meat at and beyond the limit of inedibility. After ca. 10 days of storage at 5 °C the microbial load is overwhelming and LIF increases. The results of the Raman measurements depending on the storage time of meat are discussed in the context of reference analyses which have been performed in parallel.

  12. Development of high sensitivity gamma and beta sensors for in situ diffusion tests in the mudstone in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Zhenhua

    2017-01-01

    The precise monitoring of radiotracers, for example used for medical imaging, for the storage of ultimate waste, or for certain industrial applications can be a very complex subject. The development of low-noise sensors with long-term stability and high geometric flexibility were engaged by the AXINT company. (Hautefeuille, et al., 2006). My PhD thesis was focused on experiments in the diffusion of radiotracers, typically to monitor the possible leakage of radioactive products from the geological repositories. We focuses on the study of the "2"2Na and "3"6Cl ion diffusion, which is one of the highest cation and anions diffusion rate in geological medium, as well as actinides, which represent the majority of the radioactive elements of Stored nuclear waste. This thesis is in continuity with the research carried out by ANDRA (National Agency for Radioactive Waste), under contract with the laboratory ILM (Institute Light Matter), of which AXINT is the main subcontractor. The present project describes the research work that foreseen the radiation impact on the environment for the coming years during the deep disposal of nuclear waste. Our work focus on the investigation and quantification of the radionuclide diffusion through the geological clay barriers. A new in situ experiment was considered by Andra for the study of the radionuclide migration. Compared to previous experiments, this new in situ diffusion test required longer distance (hundreds of mm), longer time-scale (over 10 years), and real time in situ monitoring of radionuclides migration. To fulfill these conditions, the work was organized as following: 1: Conception and dimensional design of the Diffusion of Radio Nuclide (DRN) experiments in solving emission of beta and gamma radiations 2: Development of corresponding beta and gamma monitoring systems by means of sensors located in peripheral boreholes. (author) [fr

  13. Portable gamma spectrometry: measuring soil erosion in-situ at four Critical Zone Observatories in P. R. China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, N. K.; Green, S. M.; Chen, Z.; Wang, J.; Wang, Y.; Wang, R.; Yu, K.; Tu, C.; Jia, X.; Li, G.; Peng, X.; Quine, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    Detecting patterns of soil erosion, redistribution, and/soil nutrient loss is important for long-term soil conservation and agricultural sustainability. Caesium-137 (137Cs) and other fallout radionuclide inventories have been used over the the last 50 years to track soil erosion, transport and deposition on a catchment scale, and have been shown to be useful for informing models of temporal/spatial soil redistribution. Traditional sampling methods usually involves coring, grinding, sieving, sub-sampling and laboratory analysis using HPGe detectors, all of which can be costly and time consuming. In-situ measurements can provide a mechanism for assessment of 137Cs over larger areas that integrate the spatial variability, and expand turnover of analyses. Here, we assess the applicability of an in-situ approach based on radionuclide principles, and provide a comparison of the two approaches: laboratory vs. in-situ. The UK-China Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) programme provides an ideal research platform to assess the in-situ approach to measuring soil erosion: using a portable gamma spectrometer to determine 137Cs inventories. Four extensive field slope surveys were conducted in the CZO's, which covers four ecosystem types in China: karst, red soil, peri-urban, and loess plateau. In each CZO, 3-6 plots were measured along 2 slope transects, with 3 replicated 1 hour counts of 137Cs in each plot. In addition, 137Cs soil depth and bulk density profiles were also sampled for each plot, and lab-derived inventories calculated using traditional methods for comparison. Accurately and rapidly measuring 137Cs inventories using a portable field detector allows for a greater coverage of sampling locations and the potential for small-scale spatial integration, as well as the ability to re-visit sites over time and continually adapt and improve soil erosion/redistribution models, thus more effectively targeting areas of interest with reduced cost and time constraints.

  14. Reflectance-difference spectroscopy as an optical probe for in situ determination of doping levels in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martinez, A.; Lara-Velazquez, I.; Balderas-Navarro, R.E.; Ortega-Gallegos, J.; Guel-Sandoval, S.; Lastras-Martinez, L.F. [Instituto de Investigacion en Comunicacion Optica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi, SLP 78000 (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    We report on in situ Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy measurements carried out on GaAs(001). Measurements were performed at temperatures of 580 C and 430 C, in both n and p-type doped films and for both (2 x 4) and c(4 x 4) reconstructions. Samples employed were grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy with doping levels in the range from 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. We demonstrate the potential of Reflectance Difference Spectroscopy for impurity level determinations under growth conditions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Electrospray deposition of fullerenes in ultra-high vacuum: in situ scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satterley, Christopher J; Perdigao, LuIs M A; Saywell, Alex; Magnano, Graziano; Rienzo, Anna; Mayor, Louise C; Dhanak, Vinod R; Beton, Peter H; O'Shea, James N

    2007-01-01

    Electrospray deposition of fullerenes on gold has been successfully observed by in situ room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and photoemission spectroscopy. Step-edge decoration and hexagonal close-packed islands with a periodicity of 1 nm are observed at low and multilayer coverages respectively, in agreement with thermal evaporation studies. Photoemission spectroscopy shows that fullerenes are being deposited in high purity and are coupling to the gold surface as for thermal evaporation. These results open a new route for the deposition of thermally labile molecules under ultra-high vacuum conditions for a range of high resolution surface science techniques

  16. In-situ, real-time, studies of film growth processes using ion scattering and direct recoil spectroscopy techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smentkowski, V. S.

    1999-04-22

    Time-of-flight ion scattering and recoil spectroscopy (TOF-ISARS) enables the characterization of the composition and structure of surfaces with 1-2 monolayer specificity. It will be shown that surface analysis is possible at ambient pressures greater than 3 mTorr using TOF-ISARS techniques; allowing for real-time, in situ studies of film growth processes. TOF-ISARS comprises three analytical techniques: ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS), which detects the backscattered primary ion beam; direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS), which detects the surface species recoiled into the forward scattering direction; and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI), which is 3 variant of DRS capable of isotopic resolution for all surface species--including H and He. The advantages and limitations of each of these techniques will be discussed. The use of the three TOF-ISARS methods for real-time, in situ film growth studies at high ambient pressures will be illustrated. It will be shown that MSRI analysis is possible during sputter deposition. It will be also be demonstrated that the analyzer used for MSRI can also be used for time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOF-SIMS) under high vacuum conditions. The use of a single analyzer to perform the complimentary surface analytical techniques of MSRI and SIMS is unique. The dwd functionality of the MSRI analyzer provides surface information not obtained when either MSRI or SIMS is used independently.

  17. Gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejiri, H.

    1989-01-01

    This book is devoted to the role of gamma-ray and conversion-electron (γ-e) spectroscopy in developing our understanding of nuclear structure and nuclear reaction-mechanisms. The book was written because of the spectacular development in the last decade of new γ-e spectroscopic methods, and their application to various kinds of nuclear reactions and the need to present γ-e spectroscopy from the point of view of nuclear structure as well as of reaction mechanism. The importance of γ-e spectroscopy is due to the simplicity and familiarity of the electromagnetic interaction, which gives accurate values for many nuclear quantities and reveals special nuclear properties. γ-e spectroscopy is applied to investigate static as well as dynamic nuclear properties over a wide range of excitation energies from the ground state to states of extreme temperatures and angular momentum, including some new degrees of freedom. (author)

  18. Application of neutron-induced gamma ray spectrometry for in situ assessment of coal quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, E.; Leutsoa Makhabane, J.

    1990-01-01

    The physical principles of the spectrometric neutron capture borehole logging method and spectrometric neutron activation borehole logging method are presented. Nuclear parameters of major elemental constituents of coal are given. Statistical multiple correlation results of coal core samples assessment are presented for coal quality parameters. The results of in situ spectrometric measurements in a coal field are also given. 7 figs., 11 tabs., 15 refs. (author)

  19. Environmental gamma-ray measurements using in situ and core sampling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, H.W.; Kerr, G.D.; Perdue, P.T.; Abdullah, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Dose rates from natural radionuclides and 137 Cs in soils of the Oak Ridge area have been determined from in situ and core sample measurements. In situ γ-ray measurements were made with a transportable spectrometer. A tape of spectral data and a soil core sample from each site were returned to ORNL for further analysis. Information on soil composition, density and moisture content and on the distribution of cesium in the soil was obtained from the core samples. In situ spectra were analyzed by a computer program which identified and assigned energies to peaks, integrated the areas under the peaks, and calculated radionuclide concentrations based on a uniform distribution in the soil. The assumption of a uniform distribution was adequate only for natural radionuclides, but simple corrections can be made to the computer calculations for man-made radionuclides distributed on the surface or exponentially in the soil. For 137 Cs a correction was used based on an exponential function fitted to the distribution measured in core samples. At typical sites in Oak Ridge, the dose rate determined from these measurements was about 5 μrad/hr. (author)

  20. Gamma spectroscopy: from steady beams to radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stezowski, O.

    2008-06-01

    The author gives an overview of his research works in the field of gamma spectroscopy. First, he recalls some results of experiments performed for the study of peculiar structures associated with different modes of nucleus rotation, and notably in the case of collective rotation of deformed and even super-deformed nuclei. Then, he details tools and methods used to experimentally determine the level scheme. The main characteristics of steady and radioactive beams are briefly presented, and their complementarities and differences are highlighted. Specific spectrometers and sensors are described. In a last chapter, the author discusses several research projects he is involved in, and more particularly the 'gamma tracking' which is the fundamental principle for gamma multi-sensors of the next generations

  1. Gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements and simulations for uranium mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchais, T.; Pérot, B.; Carasco, C.; Allinei, P.-G.; Chaussonnet, P.; Ma, J.-L.; Toubon, H.

    2018-01-01

    AREVA Mines and the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache are collaborating to improve the sensitivity and precision of uranium concentration evaluation by means of gamma measurements. This paper reports gamma-ray spectra, recorded with a high-purity coaxial germanium detector, on standard cement blocks with increasing uranium content, and the corresponding MCNP simulations. The detailed MCNP model of the detector and experimental setup has been validated by calculation vs. experiment comparisons. An optimization of the detector MCNP model is presented in this paper, as well as a comparison of different nuclear data libraries to explain missing or exceeding peaks in the simulation. Energy shifts observed between the fluorescence X-rays produced by MCNP and atomic data are also investigated. The qualified numerical model will be used in further studies to develop new gamma spectroscopy approaches aiming at reducing acquisition times, especially for ore samples with low uranium content.

  2. Application of gamma-ray spectroscopy in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobbs, B.B.; Kanipe, L.G.; Clayton, W.R.; Belvin, E.A.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is used as the primary analytical method in the Tennessee Valley Authority's environmental radiation monitoring program. Routine sample screening is done by means of least-squares analysis of spectra from NaI(Tl) detectors. Nonroutine or suspicious samples are analyzed by means of Ge(Li) spectral analysis. A laboratory quality control program provides internal and external checks on the reliability of analyses

  3. In-beam gamma spectroscopy of /sup 82/Sr

    CERN Document Server

    Dewald, A; Gelberg, A; Kaup, U; Von Brentano, P; Zell, K O

    1981-01-01

    The excited levels of /sup 82/Sr have been investigated by means of in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy via the reactions /sup 72/Ge(/sup 12/C, 2n), /sup 66/Zn(/sup 19/F, p2n), and /sup 79/Br(/sup 6/Li, 3n). Lifetimes of excited states were measured by the recoil distance method. Excitation energies and B(E2) values have been compared with calculations using the Interacting Boson Model. (19 refs).

  4. Applicability study of using in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry technique for 137Cs and 210Pbex inventories measurement in grassland environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Junjie; Li Yong; Wang Yanglin; Wu Jiansheng

    2010-01-01

    In-situ measurement of fallout radionuclides 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex has the potential to assess soil erosion and sedimentation rapidly. In this study, inventories of 137 Cs and 210 Pb ex in the soil of Inner Mongolia grassland were measured using an In-situ Object Counting System (ISOCS). The results from the field study indicate that in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry has the following advantages over traditional laboratory measurements: no extra time is required for sample collection, no reference inventories are required, more economic, prompt availability of the results, the ability to average radionuclide inventory over a large area, and high precision.

  5. Preliminary results of in situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the first wall diagnostics on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Li, Cong; Xiao, Qingmei; Liu, Ping; Fang, Ding; Mao, Hongmin; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Dongye; Ding, Hongbin; Luo, Guang-Nan; EAST Team

    2017-02-01

    Post-mortem methods cannot fulfill the requirement of monitoring the lifetime of the plasma facing components (PFC) and measuring the tritium inventory for the safety evaluation. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is proposed as a promising method for the in situ study of fuel retention and impurity deposition in a tokamak. In this study, an in situ LIBS system was successfully established on EAST to investigate fuel retention and impurity deposition on the first wall without the need of removal tiles between plasma discharges. Spectral lines of D, H and impurities (Mo, Li, Si, … ) in laser-induced plasma were observed and identified within the wavelength range of 500-700 nm. Qualitative measurements such as thickness of the deposition layers, element depth profile and fuel retention on the wall are obtained by means of in situ LIBS. The results demonstrated the potential applications of LIBS for in situ characterization of fuel retention and co-deposition on the first wall of EAST. Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB105002, 2015GB109001, and 2013GB109005), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575243, 11605238, 11605023), Chinesisch-Deutsches Forschungs Project (GZ765), and Korea Research Council of Fundamental Science and Technology (KRCF) under the international collaboration & research in Asian countries (PG1314).

  6. In Situ SIMS and IR Spectroscopy of Well-Defined Surfaces Prepared by Soft Landing of Mass-Selected Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Gunaratne, Kalupathirannehelage Don D.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-06-16

    Soft landing of mass-selected ions onto surfaces is a powerful approach for the highly-controlled preparation of materials that are inaccessible using conventional synthesis techniques. Coupling soft landing with in situ characterization using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) enables analysis of well-defined surfaces under clean vacuum conditions. The capabilities of three soft-landing instruments constructed in our laboratory are illustrated for the representative system of surface-bound organometallics prepared by soft landing of mass-selected ruthenium tris(bipyridine) dications, [Ru(bpy)3]2+, onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayer surfaces on gold (COOH-SAMs). In situ time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS provides insight into the reactivity of the soft-landed ions. In addition, the kinetics of charge reduction, neutralization and desorption occurring on the COOH-SAM both during and after ion soft landing are studied using in situ Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)-SIMS measurements. In situ IRRAS experiments provide insight into how the structure of organic ligands surrounding metal centers is perturbed through immobilization of organometallic ions on COOH-SAM surfaces by soft landing. Collectively, the three instruments provide complementary information about the chemical composition, reactivity and structure of well-defined species supported on surfaces.

  7. Comparison of in situ gamma soil analysis and soil sampling data for mapping 241Am and 239Pu soil concentrations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, J.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Phelps, P.L.; Huckabay, G.W.; Markwell, F.; Barnes, M.

    1976-01-01

    Soil sampling and in situ 241 Am-gamma counting with an array of four high purity, planar, Ge detectors are compared as means of determining soil concentration contours of plutonium and their associated uncertainties. Results of this survey, which covered an area of approximately 300,000 m 2 , indicate that with one-third the number of sampling locations, the in situ gamma survey provided soil concentration contours with confidence intervals that were about one-third as wide as those obtained with soil sampling. The methods of the survey are described and a discussion of advantages and limitations of both methods is given

  8. Comparison of in situ gamma soil analysis and soil sampling data for mapping 241Am and 239Pu soil concentrations at the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, J.A.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Phelps, P.L.; Huckabay, G.W.; Markwell, F.R.; Barnes, M.G.

    1977-01-01

    Soil sampling and in situ 241 Am-gamma counting with an array of four high-purity, planar, Ge detectors are compared as means of determining soil concentration contours of plutonium and their associated uncertainties. Results of this survey, which covered an area of approximately 300,000 m 2 , indicate that with one-third the number of sampling locations, the in situ gamma survey provided soil concentration contours with confidence intervals that were about one-third as wide as those obtained with soil sampling. The methods of the survey are described and a discussion of advantages and limitations of both methods is given

  9. In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In situ analyses of Ag speciation in tissues of cucumber and wheat using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy showing spectral fitting and linear...

  10. Growth of block copolymer stabilized metal nanoparticles probed simultaneously by in situ XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, D; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-01-01

    The growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles from their respective chloride precursors using block copolymer-based reducers has been studied by simultaneous in situ measurement of XAS and UV-Vis spectroscopy at the energy-dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS at RRCAT, Indore, India. While the XANES spectra of the precursor give real-time information on the reduction process, the EXAFS spectra reveal the structure of the clusters formed at the intermediate stages of growth. The growth kinetics of both types of nanoparticles are found to be almost similar and are found to follow three stages, though the first stage of nucleation takes place earlier in the case of Au than in the case of Pt nanoparticles due to the difference in the reduction potential of the respective precursors. The first two stages of the growth of Au and Pt nanoparticles as obtained by in situ XAS measurements could be corroborated by simultaneous in situ measurement of UV-Vis spectroscopy also.

  11. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

  12. In situ Raman spectroscopy of LiFePO4: size and morphology dependence during charge and self-discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Sun, Chunwen; Theivanayagam, Murali G; Applestone, Danielle; Dylla, Anthony G; Manthiram, Arumugam; Henkelman, Graeme; Goodenough, John B; Stevenson, Keith J

    2013-10-25

    Previous studies of the size dependent properties of LiFePO4 have focused on the diffusion rate or phase transformation pathways by bulk analysis techniques such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), neutron diffraction and electrochemistry. In this work, in situ Raman spectroscopy was used to study the surface phase change during charge and self-discharge on a more localized scale for three morphologies of LiFePO4: (1) 25 ± 6 nm width nanorods, (2) 225 ± 6 nm width nanorods and (3) ∼2 μm porous microspheres. Both the large nanorod and microsphere geometries showed incomplete delithiation at the end of charge, which was most likely caused by anti-site defects along the 1D diffusion channels in the bulk of the larger particles. Based on the in situ Raman measurements, all of the morphologies studied exhibited self-discharge with time. Among them, the smallest FePO4 particles self-discharged (lithiated) the fastest. While nanostructuring LiFePO4 can offer advantages in terms of lowering anti-site defects within particles, it also creates new problems due to high surface energies that allow self-discharge. The in situ Raman spectroscopy also showed that carbon coating did not provide significant improvement to the stability of the lithiated particles.

  13. Detection of rhodopsin dimerization in situ by PIE-FCCS, a time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam W

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopsin self-associates in the plasma membrane. At low concentrations, the interactions are consistent with a monomer-dimer equilibrium (Comar et al., J Am Chem Soc 136(23):8342-8349, 2014). At high concentrations in native tissue, higher-order clusters have been observed (Fotiadis et al., Nature 421:127-128, 2003). The physiological role of rhodopsin dimerization is still being investigated, but it is clear that a quantitative assessment is essential to determining the function of rhodopsin clusters in vision. To quantify rhodopsin interactions, I will outline the theory and methodology of a specialized time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for measuring membrane protein-protein interactions called pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). The strength of this technique is its ability to quantify rhodopsin interactions in situ (i.e., a live cell plasma membrane). There are two reasons for restricting the scope to live cell membranes. First, the compositional heterogeneity of the plasma membrane creates a complex milieu with thousands of lipid, protein, and carbohydrate species. This makes it difficult to infer quaternary interactions from detergent solubilized samples or construct a model phospholipid bilayer that recapitulates all of the interactions present in native membranes. Second, organizational structure and dynamics is a key feature of the plasma membrane, and fixation techniques like formaldehyde cross-linking and vitrification will modulate the interactions. PIE-FCCS is based on two-color fluorescence imaging with time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) (Becker et al., Rev Sci Instrum 70:1835-1841, 1999). By time-tagging every detected photon, the data can be analyzed as a fluorescence intensity distribution, fluorescence lifetime histogram, or fluorescence (cross-)correlation spectra (FCS/FCCS) (Becker, Advanced time-correlated single-photon counting techniques, Springer, Berlin, 2005). These

  14. In situ analysis of coal by scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry in deep boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrusciel, E.; Kopec, M.; Niewodniczanski, J.; Palka, K.W.; Kaczmarski, S.M.; Wojda, F.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron-gamma and gamma-gamma spectrometric loggings have been used for evaluation of coal seams. Interpretation of the logging curves was based on the method of spectrometric parameters i.e. the ratios of gamma-ray intensities recorded within two energy intervals, which depended strongly on a given parameter of coal, while the influence of other parameters is reduced. The boundaries of energy intervals were chosen by multiple correlation analysis of the results of point measurements and results of coal samples assessments. These energy intervals are later used in continuous borehole logging. Some of the coal parameters can be determined by both logging methods, other by one method only. The logging tools are described and examples of the determination of carbon, sulphur, iron, calcium, ash content, calorific value, density and moisture of coal are given. The agreement with the results of laboratory analyses seems quite satisfactory, especially when the calibration procedure was made for the same part of a coal basin. 13 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs. (author)

  15. In situ gamma-ray spectrometric analysis of radionuclide distributions at a commercial shallow land burial site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, L.J.; Campbell, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometric analysis conducted at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky (USA) shallow land burial site confirmed that the waste radionuclides have been retained largely within the restricted area of the burial site. Concentrations of 137 Cs and 60 Co were comparable with those originating from global fallout and lower than concentrations measured in several other areas having similar rainfall. In-situ spectrometric analyses, corroborated by soil sample and vegetation analyses, indicate that the site has influenced 60 Co levels slightly in the west drainage channel, but 137 Cs did not originate from the site. Concentrations of 60 Co, 90 Sr and 137 Cs determined in subsurface soils by well logging techniques confirmed that subsurface migration of waste-derived radionuclides to points outside the restricted area has not been a significant source of contamination of the environs adjacent to the site. 8 references, 8 figures

  16. Multivariate statistical approximation of the in situ gamma-ray spectrometry of the State of Zacatecas, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez I, J. F.; Rios M, C.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J.L.

    2017-09-01

    The environmental radioactivity evaluation is a key point in the assessment of the environmental quality. Through this, it can be found possible radioactive contamination, locate possible Uranium and Thorium deposits and evaluate the primordial isotopes concentration due to human activities. A radioactive map of the Zacatecas State, Mexico is under construction based on in situ gamma-ray spectrometry. The present work reports the results of the multivariate statistical approximation of the measured activity data. Based on Pearson correlation, the 228 Ac and 208 Tl activities are statistically significant, while the 214 Bi and 214 Pb activities are not statistically significant. These can be due to the existence or not of secular equilibrium in the Thorium and Uranium series. (Author)

  17. Multivariate statistical approximation of the in situ gamma-ray spectrometry of the State of Zacatecas, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez I, J. F.; Rios M, C.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J.L., E-mail: fernandolf498@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-09-15

    The environmental radioactivity evaluation is a key point in the assessment of the environmental quality. Through this, it can be found possible radioactive contamination, locate possible Uranium and Thorium deposits and evaluate the primordial isotopes concentration due to human activities. A radioactive map of the Zacatecas State, Mexico is under construction based on in situ gamma-ray spectrometry. The present work reports the results of the multivariate statistical approximation of the measured activity data. Based on Pearson correlation, the {sup 228}Ac and {sup 208}Tl activities are statistically significant, while the {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb activities are not statistically significant. These can be due to the existence or not of secular equilibrium in the Thorium and Uranium series. (Author)

  18. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  19. In situ Spectroscopy of Solid-State Chemical Reaction in PbBr2-Deposited CsBr Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Matsunaga, Toshihiro; Saito, Tadaaki; Asada, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    It is possible to measure the fundamental optical absorption spectra of CsPbBr3 and Cs4PbBr6, whose stability is predicted by the study of phase diagram in the binary system CsBr-PbBr2, by means of in situ optical absorption and reflection spectroscopy of thermally induced solid-state chemical reaction in PbBr2-deposited CsBr crystals. On heavy annealing of the crystals, the Pb2+ ions are uniformly dispersed in the crystal matrix. The present experiment provides a novel method for measuring intrinsic optical absorption of ternary metal halides and also for in situ monitoring of doping metal halide crystal with impurities (metal ions or halogen ions).

  20. Radiological Mapping of the Alkaline Intrusive Complex of Jombo, South Coastal Kenya by In-Situ Gamma-Ray Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaniu, Ian; Darby, Iain G.; Kalambuka Angeyo, Hudson

    2016-04-01

    Carbonatites and alkaline intrusive complexes are rich in a variety of mineral deposits such as rare earth elements (REEs), including Nb, Zr and Mn. These are often associated with U and Th bearing minerals, including monazite, samarskite and pyrochlore. Mining waste resulting from mineral processing activities can be highly radioactive and therefore poses a risk to human health and environment. The Jombo complex located in Kenya's south coastal region is potentially one of the richest sources of Nb and REEs in the world. It consists of the main intrusion at Jombo hill, three associated satellite intrusions at Mrima, Kiruku and Nguluku hills, and several dykes. The complex is highly heterogeneous with regard to its geological formation as it is characterized by alkaline igneous rocks and carbonatites which also influence its radio-ecological dynamics. In-situ gamma spectrometry offers a low-cost, rapid and spatially representative radioactivity estimate across a range of landscapes compared to conventional radiometric techniques. In this work, a wide ranging radiological survey was conducted in the Jombo complex as follow up on previous studies[1,2], to determine radiation exposure levels and source distributions, and perform radiological risk assessments. The in-situ measurements were carried out using a 2.0 l NaI(Tl) PGIS-2 portable detector from Pico Envirotec Inc integrated with GPS, deployed for ground (back-pack) and vehicular gamma-ray spectrometry. Preliminary results of radiological distribution and mapping will be presented. [1] Patel, J. P. (1991). Discovery and Innovation, 3(3): 31-35. [2] Kebwaro, J. M. et. al. (2011). J. Phys. Sci., 6(13): 3105-3110.

  1. In situ gamma-ray spectrometry: A tutorial for environmental radiation scientists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, K.M.; Shebell, P.

    1993-10-01

    This tutorial is intended for those in the environmental field who perform assessments in areas where there is radioactive contamination in the surface soil. Techniques will be introduced for performing on-site quantitative measurements of gamma radiation in the environment using high resolution germanium detectors. A basic understanding of ionizing radiation principles is assumed; however, a detailed knowledge of gamma spectrometry systems is not required. Emphasized is the practical end of operations in the field and the conversion of measured full absorption peak count rates in a collected spectrum to meaningful radiological quantities, such as the concentration of a radionuclide in the soil, activity per unit area, and dose rate in the air. The theory of operation and calibration procedures will be covered in detail to provide the necessary knowledge to adapt the technique to site-specific problems. Example calculations for detector calibration are also provided

  2. Interface Energy Alignment of Atomic-Layer-Deposited VOx on Pentacene: an in Situ Photoelectron Spectroscopy Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Gao, Yuanhong; Guo, Zheng; Su, Yantao; Wang, Xinwei

    2017-01-18

    Ultrathin atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) vanadium oxide (VO x ) interlayer has recently been demonstrated for remarkably reducing the contact resistance in organic electronic devices (Adv. Funct. Mater. 2016, 26, 4456). Herein, we present an in situ photoelectron spectroscopy investigation (including X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies) of ALD VO x grown on pentacene to understand the role of the ALD VO x interlayer for the improved contact resistance. The in situ photoelectron spectroscopy characterizations allow us to monitor the ALD growth process of VO x and trace the evolutions of the work function, pentacene HOMO level, and VO x defect states during the growth. The initial VO x growth is found to be partially delayed on pentacene in the first ∼20 ALD cycles. The underneath pentacene layer is largely intact after ALD. The ALD VO x is found to contain a high density of defect states starting from 0.67 eV below the Fermi level, and the energy level of these defect states is in excellent alignment with the HOMO level of pentacene, which therefore allows these VO x defect states to provide an efficient hole-injection pathway at the contact interface.

  3. In situ measurements in an immerged environment of ambient gamma radiation activity and associated spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metivier, J.

    1993-01-01

    A set of site measurement devices composed of an ictometer, an air ionization chamber and a gamma ray spectrometry chain was modified so that the type of measurements could be carried out in an immerged environment with the equipment lying on the sediments of the prospected area. The different detectors can be controlled-and the data stored in a portable and autonomous 'PC' microcomputer from a light craft

  4. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  5. Practical in-situ determination of ortho-para hydrogen ratios via fiber-optic based Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, Liese-Marie; Knudson, James N.; Mocko, Michal; Renneke, Richard M.

    2016-02-21

    An experiment was designed and developed to prototype a fiber-optic-based laser system, which measures the ratio of ortho-hydrogen to para-hydrogen in an operating neutron moderator system at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source. Preliminary measurements resulted in an ortho to para ratio of 3.06:1, which is within acceptable agreement with the previously published ratio. The successful demonstration of Raman Spectroscopy for this measurement is expected to lead to a practical method that can be applied for similar in-situ measurements at operating neutron spallation sources.

  6. Measurement of ZnO/Al2O3 Heterojunction Band Offsets by in situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei Hong-Wen; Zhang Hong; Wang Xue-Min; Zhao Yan; Yan Da-Wei; Jiang Zhong-Qian; Yao Gang; Zeng Ti-Xian; Wu Wei-Dong

    2013-01-01

    ZnO films are grown on c-sapphire substrates by laser molecular beam epitaxy. The band offsets of the ZnO/Al 2 O 3 heterojunction are studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band of Al 2 O 3 is found to be 3.59±0.05eV below that of ZnO. Together with the resulting conduction band offset of 2.04±0.05eV, this indicates that a type-I staggered band line exists at the ZnO/Al 2 O 3 heterojunction

  7. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.X.; Lemming, J.F.

    1976-01-01

    A nondestructive technique is described for calculating plutonium-238, plutonium-240, plutonium-241 and americium-241 relative to plutonium-239 from measured peak areas in the high resolution gamma-ray spectra of solid plutonium samples. Gamma-ray attenuation effects were minimized by selecting sets of neighboring peaks in the spectrum whose components are due to the different isotopes. Since the detector efficiencies are approximately the same for adjacent peaks, the accuracy of the isotopic ratios is dependent on the half-lives, branching intensities, and measured peak areas. The data presented describe the results obtained by analyzing gamma-ray spectra in the energy region from 120 to 700 keV. Most of the data analyzed were obtained from plutonium material containing 6 percent plutonium-240. Sample weights varied from 0.25 g to approximately 1.2 kg. The methods were also applied to plutonium samples containing up to 23 percent plutonium-240 with weights of 0.25 to 200 g. Results obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy are compared to chemical analyses of aliquots taken from the bulk samples

  8. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-11-15

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how “fit for use” this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil.

  9. Spatially-Dependent Measurements of Surface and Near-Surface Radioactive Material Using In situ Gamma Ray Spectrometry (ISGRS) For Final Status Surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. A. Chapman, A. J. Boerner, E. W. Abelquist

    2006-01-01

    In-situ, high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry (ISGRS) measurements were conducted at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education ORISE field laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The purpose of these tests was to provide analytical data for assessing how 'fit for use' this technology is for detecting discrete particles in soil

  10. In situ quantitative determination of transuranic elements in areas of high-level gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Wogman, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described for passive neutron monitoring of transuranic elements. The method provides quantitative determinations of transuranic element concentrations in a variety of field situations where no other measurement method is possible. The technique can measure concentrations of transuranic oxides as low as 8 nCi/cmsup 3 and is capable of operating in gamma radiation fields up to megarads per hour. Information on chemical and isotopic composition can also be obtained from the data. Several successful applications of the technique are discussed. 1 ref

  11. In situ quantitative determination of transuranic elements in areas of high-level gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodzinski, R.L.; Wogman, N.A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique is described for passive neutron monitoring of transuranic elements. The method provides quantitative determinations of transuranic element concentrations in a variety of field situations where no other measurement method is possible. The technique can measure concentrations of transuranic oxides as low as 8 nCi/cm 3 and is capable of operating in gamma radiation fields up to megarads per hour. Information on chemical and isotopic composition can also be obtained from the data. Several successful applications of the technique are discussed

  12. In situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy exploring molecular changes of drug-treated cancer cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lijia; Huang, Dianshuai; Wang, Hailong; Li, Haibo; Xu, Shuping; Chang, Yixin; Li, Hui; Yang, Ying-Wei; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2015-02-17

    Investigating the molecular changes of cancer cell nucleus with drugs treatment is crucial for the design of new anticancer drugs, the development of novel diagnostic strategies, and the advancement of cancer therapy efficiency. In order to better understand the action effects of drugs, accurate location and in situ acquisition of the molecular information of the cell nuclei are necessary. In this work, we report a microspectroscopic technique called dark-field and fluorescence coimaging assisted surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy, combined with nuclear targeting nanoprobes, to in situ study Soma Gastric Cancer (SGC-7901) cell nuclei treated with two model drugs, e.g., DNA binder (Hoechst33342) and anticancer drug (doxorubicin, Dox) via spectral analysis at the molecular level. Nuclear targeting nanoprobes with an assembly structure of thiol-modified polyethylene glycol polymers (PEG) and nuclear localizing signal peptides (NLS) around gold nanorods (AuNRs) were prepared to achieve the amplified SERS signals of biomolecules in the cell nuclei. With the assistance of dark field/fluorescence imaging with simultaneous location, in situ SERS spectra in one cell nucleus were measured and analyzed to disclose the effects of Hoechst33342 and Dox on main biomolecules in the cell nuclei. The experimental results show that this method possesses great potential to investigate the targets of new anticancer drugs and the real-time monitoring of the dynamic changes of cells caused by exogenous molecules.

  13. In situ fluorescence spectroscopy correlates ionomer degradation to reactive oxygen species generation in an operating fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Venkateshkumar; Arges, Christopher G; Ramani, Vijay

    2013-11-21

    The rate of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of an operating proton exchange member fuel cell (PEMFC) was monitored using in situ fluorescence spectroscopy. A modified barrier layer was introduced between the PEM and the electrocatalyst layer to eliminate metal-dye interactions and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) effects during measurements. Standard fuel cell operating parameters (temperature, relative humidity, and electrode potential) were systematically varied to evaluate their influence on the rate of ROS generation during PEMFC operation. Independently, the macroscopic rate of PEM degradation was measured by monitoring the fluoride ion emission rate (FER) in the effluent stream at each operating condition. The ROS generation reaction rate constant (estimated from the in situ fluorescence experiments) correlated perfectly with the measured FER across all conditions, demonstrating unequivocally for the first time that a direct correlation exists between in situ ROS generation and PEM macroscopic degradation. The activation energy for ROS generation within the PEM was estimated to be 12.5 kJ mol(-1).

  14. In situ laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements of chemical compositions in stainless steels during tungsten inert gas welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taparli, Ugur Alp; Jacobsen, Lars; Griesche, Axel; Michalik, Katarzyna; Mory, David; Kannengiesser, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system was combined with a bead-on-plate Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process for the in situ measurement of chemical compositions in austenitic stainless steels during welding. Monitoring the weld pool's chemical composition allows governing the weld pool solidification behavior, and thus enables the reduction of susceptibility to weld defects. Conventional inspection methods for weld seams (e.g. ultrasonic inspection) cannot be performed during the welding process. The analysis system also allows in situ study of the correlation between the occurrence of weld defects and changes in the chemical composition in the weld pool or in the two-phase region where solid and liquid phase coexist. First experiments showed that both the shielding Ar gas and the welding arc plasma have a significant effect on the selected Cr II, Ni II and Mn II characteristic emissions, namely an artificial increase of intensity values via unspecific emission in the spectra. In situ investigations showed that this artificial intensity increase reached a maximum in presence of weld plume. Moreover, an explicit decay has been observed with the termination of the welding plume due to infrared radiation during sample cooling. Furthermore, LIBS can be used after welding to map element distribution. For austenitic stainless steels, Mn accumulations on both sides of the weld could be detected between the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base material.

  15. In-situ virtual metrology for the silicon-dioxide etch rate by using optical emission spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Boomsoo; Hong, Sangjeen

    2014-01-01

    As a useful tool for process control in a high volume semiconductor manufacturing environment, virtual metrology for the etch rate in a plasma etch process is investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) data. Virtual metrology is a surrogate measurement taken from the process instead of from direct measurement, and it can provide in-situ metrology of a wafer's geometry from a predictive model. A statistical regression model that correlates the selected wavelengths of the optical emission spectra to the etch rate is established using the OES data collected over 20 experimental runs. In addition, an argon actinometry study is employed to quantify the OES data, and it provides valuable insight into the analysis of the OES data. The established virtual metrology model is further verified with an additional 20 runs of data. As a result, the virtual metrology model with both process recipe tool data and in-situ data shows higher prediction accuracy by as much as 56% compared with either the process recipe tool data or the in-situ data alone.

  16. Elastic properties of gamma-Pu by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trugman, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mitchell, J N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramos, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stroe, I [WORXESTER, MA

    2009-01-01

    Despite intense experimental and theoretical work on Pu, there is still little understanding of the strange properties of this metal. We used resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method to investigate the elastic properties of pure polycrystalline Pu at high temperatures. Shear and longitudinal elastic moduli of the {gamma}-phase of Pu were determined simultaneously and the bulk modulus was computed from them. A smooth linear and large decrease of all elastic moduli with increasing temperature was observed. We calculated the Poisson ratio and found that it increases from 0.242 at 519K to 0.252 at 571K.

  17. In situ spectroscopy of ligand exchange reactions at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, Rebecca; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Gold and silver nanoparticles with their tunable optical and electronic properties are of great interest for a wide range of applications. Often the ligands at the surface of the nanoparticles have to be exchanged in a second step after particle formation in order to obtain a desired surface functionalization. For many techniques, this process is not accessible in situ . In this review, we present second-harmonic scattering (SHS) as an inherently surface sensitive and label-free optical technique to probe the ligand exchange at the surface of colloidal gold and silver nanoparticles in situ and in real time. First, a brief introduction to SHS and basic features of the SHS of nanoparticles are given. After that, we demonstrate how the SHS intensity decrease can be correlated to the thiol coverage which allows for the determination of the Gibbs free energy of adsorption and the surface coverage. (topical review)

  18. In-SITU Raman Spectroscopy of Single Microparticle Li-Intercalation Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokko, Kaoru; Shi, Qing-Fang; Stefan, Ionel C.; Scherson, Daniel A.

    2003-01-01

    Modifications in the vibrational properties of a single microparticle of LiMn2O4 induced by extraction and subsequent injection of Li(+) into the lattice have been monitored in situ via simultaneous acquisition of Raman scattering spectra and cyclic voltammetry data in 1M LiC1O4 solutions in ethylene carbonate (EC):diethyl carbonate (DEC) mixtures (1:1 by volume). Statistical analyses of the spectra in the range 15 < SOD < 45%, where SOD represents the state of discharge (in percent) of the nominally fully charged material, i.e. lambda-MnO2, were found to be consistent with the coexistence of two distinct phases of lithiated metal oxide in agreement with information derived from in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements involving more conventional battery-type electrodes.

  19. In situ Raman spectroscopy of topological insulator BiTe films with varying thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, C.; Zhu, X.; Nilsson, Louis

    2013-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs) are a new state of quantum matter with a band gap in bulk and conducting surface states. In this work, the Raman spectra of topological insulator Bi2Te3 films prepared by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) have been measured by an in situ ultrahigh vacuum (UHV...... effects and symmetry breaking. In addition, an obvious change was observed at 3 QL when a Dirac cone formed. These results offer some new information about the novel quantum states of TIs....

  20. Insight into the structure of Pd/ZrO2 during the total oxidation of methane using combined in situ XRD, X.-ray absorption and Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; van Vegten, Niels; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-01-01

    The structure of palladium during the total combustion of methane has been studied by a combination of the complementary in situ techniques X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The study demonstrates that finely dispersed and oxidized palladium is most active f...

  1. Results from the RESUME-95 exercise. In-situ gamma spectrometry performed at Vesivehmaa Airport, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Univ. Hospital MAS, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    The Department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe has an agreement with the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, in which we are obliged to perform instantaneous field measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in case of a major release of radionuclides in the environment. The department possesses a High Purity Germanium detector system (35 % commercial at 1.33 MeV) with a PC software spectrum analyser that was purchased and calibrated for this reason. The aim of our participation in the RESUME-95{sup 1} exercise, which took place in Vaeaexsy, Finland, in August 1995, was both to obtain efficiency values for different source geometries (both artificial and natural radionuclides) in field and to compare our results with those of other groups. Furthermore, this exercise was an ideal opportunity to test the full equipment under field conditions. (au).

  2. Results from the RESUME-95 exercise. In-situ gamma spectrometry performed at Vesivehmaa Airport, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C L [Univ. Hospital MAS, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The Department of Radiation Physics in Malmoe has an agreement with the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute, in which we are obliged to perform instantaneous field measurements of gamma-emitting radionuclides in case of a major release of radionuclides in the environment. The department possesses a High Purity Germanium detector system (35 % commercial at 1.33 MeV) with a PC software spectrum analyser that was purchased and calibrated for this reason. The aim of our participation in the RESUME-95{sup 1} exercise, which took place in Vaeaexsy, Finland, in August 1995, was both to obtain efficiency values for different source geometries (both artificial and natural radionuclides) in field and to compare our results with those of other groups. Furthermore, this exercise was an ideal opportunity to test the full equipment under field conditions. (au).

  3. In situ deuterium inventory measurements of a-C:D layers on tungsten in TEXTOR by laser induced ablation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, N; Brezinsek, S; Coenen, J W; Huber, A; Laengner, M; Möller, S; Nonhoff, M; Philipps, V; Pospieszczyk, A; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Xiao, Q; Zlobinski, M; Samm, U; Giesen, T F

    2014-01-01

    Laser induced ablation spectroscopy (LIAS) is a diagnostic to provide temporally and spatially resolved in situ measurements of tritium retention and material migration in order to characterize the status of the first wall in future fusion devices. In LIAS, a ns-laser pulse ablates the first nanometres of the first wall plasma-facing components into the plasma edge. The resulting line radiation by plasma excitation is observed by spectroscopy. In the case of the full ionizing plasma and with knowledge of appropriate photon efficiencies for the corresponding line emission the amount of ablated material can be measured in situ. We present the photon efficiency for the deuterium Balmer α-line resulting from ablation in TEXTOR by performing LIAS on amorphous hydrocarbon (a-C:D) layers deposited on tungsten substrate of thicknesses between 0.1 and 1.1 μm. An experimental inverse photon efficiency of [(D/(XB))] D α (EXP) a-C:D→ LIAS D =75.9±23.4 was determined. This value is a factor 5 larger than predicted values from the ADAS database for atomic injection of deuterium under TEXTOR plasma edge conditions and about twice as high, assuming normal wall recycling and release of molecular deuterium and break-up of D 2 via the molecular ion which is usually observed at the high temperature tokamak edge (T e  > 30 eV). (paper)

  4. In situ oxidation state profiling of nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes using line-imaging Raman spectroscopy and multivariate calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, S.M.; Schwartz, D.T.

    1999-01-01

    Metal hexacyanoferrate compounds show promise as electrochemically switchable ion exchange materials for use in the cleanup of radioactive wastes such as those found in storage basins and underground tanks at the Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Reported is the use of line-imaging Raman spectroscopy for the in situ determination of oxidation state profiles in nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrodes under potential control in an electrochemical cell. Line-imaging Raman spectroscopy is used to collect 256 contiguous Raman spectra every ∼5 microm from thin films (ca. 80 nm) formed by electrochemical derivatization of nickel electrodes. The cyanide stretching region of the Raman spectrum of the film is shown to be sensitive to iron oxidation state and is modeled by both univariate and multivariate correlations. Although both correlations fit the calibration set well, the multivariate (principle component regression or PCR) model's predictions of oxidation state are less sensitive to noise in the spectrum, yielding a much smoother oxidation state profile than the univariate model. Oxidation state profiles with spatial resolution of approximately 5 microm are shown for a nickel hexacyanoferrate derivatized electrode in reduced, intermediate, and oxidized states. In situ oxidation state profiles indicate that the 647.1 nm laser illumination photo-oxidizes the derivatized electrodes. This observation is confirmed using photoelectrochemical methods

  5. A new method for the determination of radionuclide distribution in the soil by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, P.; Andrasi, A.; Nemeth, I.

    1995-01-01

    In case of major nuclear accidents when larger amount of radioactive material is released into the atmosphere vast areas can become contaminated by the nuclear fallout. The deposited radioactivity penetrates the soil in a complex manner: dry and wet deposition lead to different initial distribution patterns which are further modified by the later transport processes in the upper layers of the soil. The distribution is influenced by various factors (physico-chemical characteristics of the radioisotopes, soil type, weather conditions, environment etc.), the resulting soil profile is hardly predictable. An important lesson we learned from the Chernobyl reactor accident is the great variability of the contamination both in the extent of the deposition and in the penetration features. In recent years - following the reactor accident in Chernobyl - an increased interest for rapid methods of monitoring environmental radioactivity was expressed. The International Atomic Energy Agency initiated a research project to co-ordinate the activities carried out in various laboratories aiming at the development of rapid monitoring procedures. The Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) G6 10 01 under the title Rapid Instrumental and Separation Methods for Monitoring Radionuclides in Food and the Environment has given a frame for 11 research programs. The Health Physics Department of the KFKI Institute for Atomic Energy Research (the former Central Research Institute for Physics) has taken a part in this CRP with a project titled: Rapid In Situ Gamma Spectrometric Determination of Fallout Radioactivity in the Environment. The main objective of our study was to find a method to estimate the penetration characteristics of the fallout radioactivity by using only spectral information obtained by the in situ spectrometric measurement thus avoiding the need for a long and tiresome sampling and sample analysis procedure

  6. In situ UV-Vis spectroscopy in gas-liquid-solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemmet, C.P.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the use of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) spectroscopy in a slurry of particles, a packed bubble column, and a trickle bed to assess the changes in the state of an active component on the surface of the solid support. As a model system, insoluble pH indicators

  7. A phoswich detector for simultaneous alpha–gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghadam, S. Rajabi [Department of Radiation Application, Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Feghhi, S.A.H., E-mail: A_feghhi@sbu.ac.ir [Department of Radiation Application, Shahid Beheshti University G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safari, M.J. [Amirkabir University of Technology, Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Phoswich detectors are of value for radiation spectroscopy, especially in cases where a low-cost solution for a mixed radiation field is desired. Meanwhile, simultaneous spectroscopy of alpha particles and gamma-rays has many applications in quantification and distinguishing the alpha-emitting radionuclides which usually occur in the analysis of environmental solid samples. Here, we have developed a system for detection of radioactive actinides (e.g., {sup 241}Am) based on the alpha–gamma coincidence technique. The underlying concept, is to assemble two appropriately selected scintillators (i.e., a fast and a slow one) together with a discriminating unit for analysis of their data. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation procedure has been developed using the GEANT4 toolkit to design and find enough knowledge about the response of the system in the studied radiation field. Various comparisons were made between experimental and simulation data which showed appropriate agreement between them. The calibration was performed and the MDA was estimated as 60 mBq for the phoswich system.

  8. A phoswich detector for simultaneous alpha–gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghadam, S. Rajabi; Feghhi, S.A.H.; Safari, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Phoswich detectors are of value for radiation spectroscopy, especially in cases where a low-cost solution for a mixed radiation field is desired. Meanwhile, simultaneous spectroscopy of alpha particles and gamma-rays has many applications in quantification and distinguishing the alpha-emitting radionuclides which usually occur in the analysis of environmental solid samples. Here, we have developed a system for detection of radioactive actinides (e.g., 241 Am) based on the alpha–gamma coincidence technique. The underlying concept, is to assemble two appropriately selected scintillators (i.e., a fast and a slow one) together with a discriminating unit for analysis of their data. Detailed Monte Carlo simulation procedure has been developed using the GEANT4 toolkit to design and find enough knowledge about the response of the system in the studied radiation field. Various comparisons were made between experimental and simulation data which showed appropriate agreement between them. The calibration was performed and the MDA was estimated as 60 mBq for the phoswich system

  9. Gamma ray spectroscopy and timing using LSO and PIN photodiodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    The high density, high light output, and short decay time of LSO (lutetium orthosilicate, Lu 2 SiO 5 :Ce) make it an attractive scintillator for gamma ray spectroscopy. The low cost, small size, high quantum efficiency, and ruggedness of silicon photodiodes make them attractive photodetectors for this same application, although their high noise (Compared to a photomultiplier tube) reduces their appeal. In this work the authors measure the gamma ray energy resolution, timing accuracy, and conversion factor from gamma energy to number of electron-hole pairs produced with a 3 x 3 x 22 mm 3 LSO scintillator crystal read out with a 3 x 3 mm 2 silicon PIN photodiode. When the detector is excited with 511 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 1,940 e - with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 35 ns fwhm jitter is produced. When the detector is excited with 1,275 keV photons, a photopeak centered at 4,910 e - with 149 keV fwhm is observed and a timing signal with 25 ns fwhm jitter is produced. While these performance measures are inferior to those obtained with photomultiplier tubes, they are acceptable for some applications

  10. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy with MIMOS II at Rio Tinto, Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischer, I; Klingelhoefer, G; Wehrheim, S; Ebert, S; Panthoefer, M; Blumers, M; Schmanke, D; Maul, J; Schroeder, C [Institut fuer Anorganische und analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Rull, F, E-mail: fleischi@uni-mainz.d [Unidad Asociada UVA-CSIC, al Centro de AstrobiologIa, Universidad de Valladolid, 47006-Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-03-01

    The Rio Tinto, located in southwest Spain, exhibits a nearly constant, acidic pH-value along its course. Due to the formation of sulfate minerals, Rio Tinto is considered a potential analogue site for sulfate-rich regions on Mars, in particular at the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, where the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite was identified with Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer. Primary and secondary mineralogy was investigated in situ with portable Raman and Moessbauer spectrometers at four different Rio Tinto sampling sites. The two techniques analyse different sample portions due to their specific field of view and sampling depth and provide complementary mineralogical information.

  11. In-situ Moessbauer Spectroscopy with MIMOS II at Rio Tinto, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, I; Klingelhoefer, G; Wehrheim, S; Ebert, S; Panthoefer, M; Blumers, M; Schmanke, D; Maul, J; Schroeder, C; Rull, F

    2010-01-01

    The Rio Tinto, located in southwest Spain, exhibits a nearly constant, acidic pH-value along its course. Due to the formation of sulfate minerals, Rio Tinto is considered a potential analogue site for sulfate-rich regions on Mars, in particular at the landing site of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, where the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite was identified with Opportunity's Moessbauer spectrometer. Primary and secondary mineralogy was investigated in situ with portable Raman and Moessbauer spectrometers at four different Rio Tinto sampling sites. The two techniques analyse different sample portions due to their specific field of view and sampling depth and provide complementary mineralogical information.

  12. In-Situ Measurement of Chirality of Molecules and Molecular Assemblies with Surface Nonlinear Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongfei

    2012-01-01

    Developments in quantitative measurement and analysis in nonlinear surface spectroscopy, namely, second harmonic generation linear dichroism (SHG-LD) and sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy linear dichroism (SFG-VS-LD), provide new opportunities for probing the surface chirality of monolayers and thin films. In this book chapter, the up-to-date theoretical background and experimental methodology, as well as examples and future perspectives on the developments with surface nonlinear spectroscopy in surface chirality studies are to be summarized and outlined for general readers.

  13. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1969-11-15

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally.

  14. Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Neutron Capture Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Experimental capabilities in the field of neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy have expanded greatly in the last few years; this has been due in large part to the advent of high-quality Ge(Li) detectors, improvements in electronic data processing, and improvements in bent-crystal spectrometers. Previously unsuspected phenomena, such as the '5. 5-MeV1 anomaly, have appeared and new research tools, such as neutron guide tubes, have been brought into use. Equally exciting developments have occurred in the theory of neutron capture. Complex spectra have yielded to analysis after account had been taken of such effects as vibration, rotation and Coriolis forces, and the theoretical prediction of capture spectra seems to be a future possibility. In view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's close interest in this subject and the need for an international exchange of ideas to analyse and study the latest developments, the organizers of the Symposium felt that work on neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy had achieved such valuable and significant results that the time had come for this information to be presented, examined and discussed internationally

  15. Electric properties of polymeric nanocomposites filler with copper particles polymerized in situ by means of gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblete, V.H; Alvarez, M; Pilleux, M.E

    2002-01-01

    Different concentrations of copper metallic nanoparticles (80-120 diameter nm) were distributed in a methyl metacrilate (MMA) matrix. The polymerization of the mixture was carried out by means of gamma radiation using 16 kGy (2 kGy/hour) dose, applied in situ, obtaining an homogeneous and resistant mechanically samples. For comparison the same experience was carried out using 3,25-4,5 um of copper particles diameter. The morphology and the composite formation was studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electronic microscopy for the different concentrations of the conductive metal into the polymeric matrix (5-30 vol. copper%). The electric resistance observed was analyzed in function of the distance between electric contacts. The strong lineal dependence show a homogeneous distribution of the metal in the composite. The specific resistivities obtained in function of the concentration of the conductive metal is in the range from the 12 to 42 Ωm for 10 vol.% concentrations. This results is in agreement with the threshold limit of the system. Also, the dependence of the resistivity with the particle size is showed (author)

  16. Cation Exchange Efficiency Of Modified Bentonite Using In-Situ GAMMA Radiation Polymerization Of Acrylic Acid Or Acrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ISMAIL, S.A.; FALAZI, B.

    2009-01-01

    Modified bentonites as cation exchangers were prepared by treating raw bentonite with 3N NaOH at 95 0 C followed by in-situ polymerization using gamma irradiation as well as hydrogen peroxide initiation of acrylic acid or acrylamide in the matrix.Water swelling and acid capacity were determined and cation exchange capacity for Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Co 2+ was evaluated. It has been found that catiexchange capacity of treated bentonite was increased as result of formed polyacrylic acid and polyacrylamide in the matrix. In case of acrylic acid, the maximum cation exchange capacities of 3.5, 3.1 and 2.5 mg equivalent/g were determined for Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ and Co 2+ , respectively, and for acrylamide, the corresponding capacities were 2.9, 2.8 and 2.6 mg equivalent/g, respectively. Water swelling was found to be associated with holding large amounts of water, for instance, 49 g of water was sorbed per one gram of the sodium salt form of polyacrylic acid in bentonite matrix, in other words the degree of swelling in water achieved 4500%.

  17. Spectroelectrochemical study of polyphenylene by in situ external reflection FT-IR spectroscopy. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvarnstroem, C.; Ivaska, A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ external reflection FT-IR measurements are performed during cyclic voltammetric scans on electrochemically polymerized polyphenylene films. The films are polymerized either in 0.1 or 0.8 M biphenyl in 0.1 M TBABF 4 in acetonitrile. Changes in the IR spectrum of films of different thicknesses are studied when the films are potentially cycled from the neutral to the oxidized states of the polymer. No differences between films made in high or low dimer concentration can be observed in the spectra. The potential-dependent insertion and expulsion of solvent, residual water, anions and cations in and out of the film have different behaviour in films of different thicknesses. Changes in the structure of the segments in the film, from the benzenoid form into the quinoid form, can be followed. Differences between the first and subsequent cyclic potential scans are observed. (orig.)

  18. An in situ Raman spectroscopy system for long-term corrosion experiments in high temperature water up to 673 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Tani, Jun-ichi; Fujiwara, Kazutoshi; Katsumura, Yosuke

    2006-01-01

    A Raman spectroscopy system has been developed, in order to identify oxides formed on the surfaces of metals and steels in high temperature water up to 673 K. A supercritical water loop system including a Raman cell was installed. The design of the loop system is up to 673 K and 40 MPa. The Raman cell has a diamond window without window-to-metal packing. Raman spectrum of alumina plate was measured at room temperature, at 523 and at 673 K under pressure of 25 MPa. A long-term measurement was also performed at 523 K and 25 MPa for 117.5 h. In all cases intense Raman peaks attributed to alumina were observed. Raman spectrum of anatase particles in suspension was measured at 673 K and 25 MPa. The results show that the Raman spectroscopy system developed in the present study works well not only for plate sample but also for suspension. Raman spectra observed for titanium plate in high temperature water of 673 K and 25 MPa show growth of several Raman peaks with time up to 257 h. The peaks disappeared after cooled down to room temperature. The experimental results have demonstrated importance of in situ Raman spectroscopy. (author)

  19. Use of in situ FT-Raman spectroscopy to study the kinetics of the transformation of carbamazepine polymorphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Laura E; Timmins, Peter; Williams, Adrian C; York, Peter

    2004-10-29

    The solid-state transformation of carbamazepine from form III to form I was examined by Fourier Transform Raman spectroscopy. Using a novel environmental chamber, the isothermal conversion was monitored in situ at 130 degrees C, 138 degrees C, 140 degrees C and 150 degrees C. The rate of transformation was monitored by taking the relative intensities of peaks arising from two CH bending modes; this approach minimised errors due to thermal artefacts and variations in power intensities or scattering efficiencies from the samples in which crystal habit changed from a characteristic prism morphology (form III) to whiskers (form I). The solid-state transformation at the different temperatures was fitted to various solid-state kinetic models of which four gave good fits, thus indicating the complexity of the process which is known to occur via a solid-gas-solid mechanism. Arrhenius plots from the kinetic models yielded activation energies from 344 kJ mol(-1) to 368 kJ mol(-1) for the transformation. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of drug polymorphic type which can be of value for at-line in-process control.

  20. Pressure-induced amorphization and reactivity of solid dimethyl acetylene probed by in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jiwen; Daljeet, Roshan; Kieran, Arielle; Song, Yang

    2018-06-01

    Conjugated polymers are prominent semiconductors that have unique electric conductivity and photoluminescence. Synthesis of conjugated polymers under high pressure is extremely appealing because it does not require a catalyst or solvent used in conventional chemical methods. Transformation of acetylene and many of its derivatives to conjugated polymers using high pressure has been successfully achieved, but not with dimethyl acetylene (DMA). In this work, we present a high-pressure study on solid DMA using a diamond anvil cell up to 24.4 GPa at room temperature characterized by in situ Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Our results show that solid DMA exists in a phase II crystal structure and is stable up to 12 GPa. Above this pressure, amorphization was initiated and the process was completed at 24.4 GPa. The expected polymeric transformation was not evident upon compression, but only observed upon decompression from a threshold compression pressure (e.g. 14.4 GPa). In situ florescence measurements suggest excimer formation via crystal defects, which induces the chemical reactions. The vibrational spectral analysis suggests the products contain the amorphous poly(DMA) and possibly additional amorphous hydrogenated carbon material.

  1. In situ time-resolved X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy of selenite reduction by siderite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badaut, V.; Schlegel, M.L.; Descostes, M.; Moutiers, G.

    2012-01-01

    The reduction oxidation-reaction between aqueous selenite (SeO 3 2- ) and siderite (FeCO 3 (s)) was monitored by in situ, time-resolved X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the selenium K edge in a controlled electrochemical environment. Spectral evolutions showed that more than 60% of selenite was reduced at the siderite surface after 20 h of experiment, at which time the reaction was still incomplete. Fitting of XANES spectra by linear combination of reference spectra showed that selenite reaction with siderite is essentially a two-step process, selenite ions being immobilized on siderite surface prior to their reduction. A kinetic model of the reduction step is proposed, allowing to identify the specific contribution of surface reduction. These results have strong implications for the retention of selenite by corrosion products in nuclear waste repositories and in a larger extent for the fate of selenium in the environment. (authors)

  2. Precise in situ etch depth control of multilayered III−V semiconductor samples with reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kathrin Kleinschmidt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS equipment is applied to monitor dry-etch processes (here specifically reactive ion etching (RIE of monocrystalline multilayered III–V semiconductors in situ. The related accuracy of etch depth control is better than 16 nm. Comparison with results of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS reveals a deviation of only about 4 nm in optimal cases. To illustrate the applicability of the reported method in every day settings for the first time the highly etch depth sensitive lithographic process to form a film lens on the waveguide ridge of a broad area laser (BAL is presented. This example elucidates the benefits of the method in semiconductor device fabrication and also suggests how to fulfill design requirements for the sample in order to make RAS control possible.

  3. In-situ annotation of carbohydrate diversity, abundance, and degradability in highly complex mixtures using NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Many functions of carbohydrates depend on the detection of short structural motifs, approximately up to hexasaccharide length, by receptors or catalysts. This study investigates the usefulness of state-of-the-art 1H–13C nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for characterizing the diversity......, abundance, and degradability of such short structural motifs in plant-derived carbohydrates. Assignments of carbohydrate signals for 1H–13C NMR spectra of beer, wine, and fruit juice yield up to >130 assignments in situ, i.e. in individual samples without separation or derivatization. More than 500...... structural motifs can be resolved over a concentration range of ~103 in experiments of a few hours duration. The diversity of carbohydrate units increases according to power laws at lower concentrations for both cereal and fruit-derived samples. Simple graphs resolve the smaller overall contribution of more...

  4. In-situ UV-Visible and Raman spectroscopy for gas-liquid-solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemmet, C.P.; Schouten, J.C.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the use of UV-vis and Raman spectroscopy to measure the state of a solid in a multiphase reactor. A slurry of particles and a packed bubble column were used. As this study is a proof of principle a model for an active catalyst system, insoluble pH indicators deposited on the

  5. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Isotopically Engineered Graphene Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015

  6. Using Raman spectroscopy and SERS for in situ studies of rhizosphere bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohseni, Hooman; Agahi, Massoud H.; Razeghi, Manijeh; Polisetti, Sneha; Baig, Nameera; Bible, Amber; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer; Doktycz, Mitchel; Bohn, Paul W.

    2015-08-21

    Bacteria colonize plant roots to form a symbiotic relationship with the plant and can play in important role in promoting plant growth. Raman spectroscopy is a useful technique to study these bacterial systems and the chemical signals they utilize to interact with the plant. We present a Raman study of Pantoea YR343 that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Populus deltoides (Eastern Cottonwood). Pantoea sp. YR343 produce yellowish carotenoid pigment that play a role in protection against UV radiation, in the anti-oxidative pathways and in membrane fluidity. Raman spectroscopy is used to non-invasively characterize the membrane bound carotenoids. The spectra collected from a mutant strain created by knocking out the crtB gene that encodes a phytoene synthase responsible for early stage of carotenoid biosynthesis, lack the carotenoid peaks. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is being employed to detect the plant phytoharmone indoleacetic acid that is synthesized by the bacteria. This work describes our recent progress towards utilizing Raman spectroscopy as a label free, non-destructive method of studying plant-bacteria interactions in the rhizosphere.

  7. Measurement of plutonium isotopic composition by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. S.; Shin, J. S.; Ahn, J. S.

    1998-01-01

    The technology of the analysis of plutonium isotopic ratio is independent of the measurement geometry and applicable to samples of physical and chemical composition. Three standard plutonium samples were measured in the HPGe system. The results showed that CRM 136 and CRM 137 containing 238 Pu(0.223%) and 238 Pu(0.268%) were 18.4% and 14.2% error and CRM 138 of 238 Pu(0.01%) was 76% error. However the analysis represented less than 1.6% and 9% error in the three standard samples of highly involved 239 Pu and 240 Pu. Therefore, gamma-ray spectroscopy is very effective in the plutonium isotope analysis, having greater than 10% in content

  8. Digital gamma-ray spectroscopy based on FPGA technology

    CERN Document Server

    Bolic, M

    2002-01-01

    A digital pulse processing system convenient for high rate gamma-ray spectroscopy with NaI(Tl) detectors has been designed. The new programmable logic device has been used for implementation of dedicated high-speed pulse processor, as the central part of the system. The processor is capable to operate at the speed of fast ADC, preserving maximum throughput of the system. Special care has been taken to reduce the distortion of energy spectrum caused by pile-up at high-count rates. The developed system is highly flexible, and the parameters of its operation can be changed in software. The performance of the system was tested for high counting rate of 400000 s sup - sup 1.

  9. Blue- and red-shifts of V2O5 phonons in NH3 environment by in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeleke Akande, Amos; Machatine, Augusto Goncalo Jose; Masina, Bathusile; Chimowa, George; Matsoso, Boitumelo; Roro, Kittessa; Duvenhage, Mart-Mari; Swart, Hendrik; Bandyopadhyay, Jayita; Sinha Ray, Suprakas; Wakufwa Mwakikunga, Bonex

    2018-01-01

    A layer of ~30 nm V2O5/100 nm-SiO2 on Si was employed in the in situ Raman spectroscopy in the presence of NH3 effluent from a thermal decomposition of ammonium acetate salt with the salt heated at 100 °C. When the layer is placed at 25 °C, we observe a reversible red-shift of 194 cm-1 V2O5 phonon by 2 cm-1 upon NH3 gas injection to saturation, as well as a reversible blue-shift of the 996 cm-1 by 4 cm-1 upon NH3 injection. However when the sensing layer is placed at 100 °C, the 194 cm-1 remains un-shifted while the 996 cm-1 phonon is red-shifted. There is a decrease/increase in intensity of the 145 cm-1 phonon at 25 °C/100 °C when NH3 interacts with V2O5 surface. Using the traditional and quantitative gas sensor tester system, we find that the V2O5 sensor at 25 °C responds faster than at 100 °C up to 20 ppm of NH3 beyond which it responds faster at 100 °C than at 25 °C. Overall rankings of the NH3 gas sensing features between the two techniques showed that the in situ Raman spectroscopy is faster in response compared with the traditional chemi-resistive tester. Hooke’s law, phonon confinement in ~51 nm globular particles with ~20 nm pore size and physisorption/chemisorption principles have been employed in the explanation of the data presented.

  10. Low temperature hydrogen plasma-assisted atomic layer deposition of copper studied using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaukulkar, Rohan P.; Rai, Vikrant R.; Agarwal, Sumit; Thissen, Nick F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is an ideal technique to deposit ultrathin, conformal, and continuous metal thin films. However, compared to the ALD of binary materials such as metal oxides and metal nitrides, the surface reaction mechanisms during metal ALD are not well understood. In this study, the authors have designed and implemented an in situ reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (IRAS) setup to study the surface reactions during the ALD of Cu on Al 2 O 3 using Cu hexafluoroacetylacetonate [Cu(hfac) 2 ] and a remote H 2 plasma. Our infrared data show that complete ligand-exchange reactions occur at a substrate temperature of 80 °C in the absence of surface hydroxyl groups. Based on infrared data and previous studies, the authors propose that Cu(hfac) 2 dissociatively chemisorbs on the Al 2 O 3 surface, where the Al-O-Al bridge acts as the surface reactive site, leading to surface O-Cu-hfac and O-Al-hfac species. Surface saturation during the Cu(hfac) 2 half-cycle occurs through blocking of the available chemisorption sites. In the next half-reaction cycle, H radicals from an H 2 plasma completely remove these surface hfac ligands. Through this study, the authors have demonstrated the capability of in situ IRAS as a tool to study surface reactions during ALD of metals. While transmission and internal reflection infrared spectroscopy are limited to the first few ALD cycles, IRAS can be used to probe all stages of metal ALD starting from initial nucleation to the formation of a continuous film

  11. Application of neuro-fuzzy methods to gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelle, Austin L.

    Nuclear non-proliferation activities are an essential part of national security activities both domestic and abroad. The safety of the public in densely populated environments such as urban areas or large events can be compromised if devices using special nuclear materials are present. Therefore, the prompt and accurate detection of these materials is an important topic of research, in which the identification of normal conditions is also of importance. With gamma-ray spectroscopy, these conditions are identified as the radiation background, which though being affected by a multitude of factors is ever present. Therefore, in nuclear non-proliferation activities the accurate identification of background is important. With this in mind, a method has been developed to utilize aggregate background data to predict the background of a location through the use of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN). After being trained on background data, the ANN is presented with nearby relevant gamma-ray spectroscopy data---as identified by a Fuzzy Inference System - to create a predicted background spectra to compare to a measured spectra. If a significant deviation exists between the predicted and measured data, the method alerts the user such that a more thorough investigation can take place. Research herein focused on data from an urban setting in which the number of false positives was observed to be 28 out of a total of 987, representing 2.94% error. The method therefore currently shows a high rate of false positives given the current configuration, however there are promising steps that can be taken to further minimize this error. With this in mind, the method stands as a potentially significant tool in urban nuclear nonproliferation activities.

  12. In-situ infrared study of CO{sub 2} adsorption on SBA-15 grafted with {gamma}-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alex C.C. Chang; Steven S.C. Chuang; McMahan Gray; Yee Soong [University of Akron, Akron, OH (United States). Chemical Engineering Department

    2003-04-01

    CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption on SBA-15 grafted with {gamma}-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTS) has been studied by infrared spectroscopy coupled with temperature-programmed desorption. SBA-15, a mesoporous silica material with a uniform pore size of 21 nm and a surface area of 200-230 m{sup 2}/g, provides an OH functional group for grafting of {gamma}-(aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. The amine-grafted SBA-15 adsorbed CO{sub 2} as carbonates and bicarbonates with a total capacity of 200-400 {mu}mol/g. The heat of CO{sub 2} desorption was determined to be 3.2-4.5 kJ/mol in the presence of H{sub 2}O and 6.6-11.0 kJ/mol in the absence of H{sub 2}O during temperature-programmed desorption. Repeated CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption CO{sub 2} cycles shifted the desorption peak temperature downward and decreased the heat of CO{sub 2} adsorption. 22 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Mechanistic studies of chemical looping desulfurization of Mn-based oxides using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, C.F.J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Seemann, M.; Clemens, F.; Garderen, N. van; Biollaz, S.M.A.; Schildhauer, T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mn sorbents remove H 2 S from hot syngas in chemical looping desulfurization process. • State of Mn followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. • Two-step mechanism explains the formation of SO 2 under reducing conditions. - Abstract: Cleaning of producer gas from biomass gasification is required for further processing, e.g. to avoid catalyst poisoning in subsequent conversion steps. High-temperature gas cleaning, of which sulfur removal is an important part, is a promising way to improve the overall efficiency of biomass conversion. In a high temperature “chemical looping desulfurization” process, a sorbent material, here manganese oxide, is cycled between producer gas from the gasifier to remove sulfur species, and an oxidizing atmosphere, in which the sulfur species are released as SO 2 . Alternatively, the use of such material as reactive bed material could be integrated into an allothermal dual fluidized bed gasifier. In a laboratory reactor, we subjected manganese-based materials to a periodically changing gas atmosphere, simulating a “chemical looping desulfurization” reactor. The “fuel reactor” gas contained H 2 , CO, CH 4 and H 2 S, similar as in the producer gas, and the “oxidizing reactor” contained diluted O 2 . Mass spectrometry showed that most of the H 2 S is taken up by the sample in the “fuel reactor” part, while also some unwanted SO 2 is generated in the “fuel reactor” part. Most of the sulfur is released in the oxidizing reactor. Simultaneous in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Mn materials during different stages of the chemical looping desulfurization process showed that the initial Mn 3 O 4 is transformed in the presence of H 2 S to MnS via a MnO intermediate in the fuel reactor. Oxygen from the reduction of Mn 3 O 4 oxidizes some H 2 S to the undesired SO 2 in the fuel reactor. Upon exposure to O 2 , MnS is again oxidized to Mn 3 O 4 via MnO, releasing SO

  14. Phthalocyanine identification in paintings by reflectance spectroscopy. A laboratory and in situ study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poldi, G.; Caglio, S.

    2013-06-01

    The importance of identifying pigments using non invasive (n.i.) analyses has gained increasing importance in the field of spectroscopy applied to art conservation and art studies. Among the large set of pigments synthesized and marketed during 20th century, surely phthalocyanine blue and green pigments occupy an important role in the field of painting (including restoration) and printing, thanks to their characteristics like brightness and fastness. This research focused on the most used phthalocyanine blue (PB15:1 and PB15:3) and green pigments (PG7), and on the possibility to identify these organic compounds using a methodology like reflectance spectroscopy in the UV, visible and near IR range (UV-vis-NIR RS), performed easily through portable instruments. Laboratory tests and three examples carried out on real paintings are discussed.

  15. Interaction of nanodiamond with in situ generated sp-carbon chains probed by Raman spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Kalbáč, Martin; Osawa, E.; Dunsch, L.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 14 (2006), s. 3113-3116 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040306; GA MŠk LC510 Grant - others:NEDO International Grant(XE) 20041T081 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : carbyne * diamond * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.884, year: 2006

  16. Reduction Dynamics of Doped Ceria, Nickel Oxide, and Cermet Composites Probed Using In Situ Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Robert C; Shearing, Paul R; Brightman, Edward; Brett, Dan J L; Brandon, Nigel P; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    The redox properties of gadolinium doped ceria (CGO) and nickel oxide (NiO) composite cermets underpin the operation of solid oxide electrochemical cells. Although these systems have been widely studied, a full comprehension of the reaction dynamics at the interface of these materials is lacking. Here, in situ Raman spectroscopic monitoring of the redox cycle is used to investigate the interplay between the dynamic and competing processes of hydrogen spillover and water dissociation on the doped ceria surface. In order to elucidate these mechanisms, the redox process in pure CGO and NiO is studied when exposed to wet and dry hydrogen and is compared to the cermet behavior. In dry hydrogen, CGO reduces relatively rapidly via a series of intermediate phases, while NiO reduces via a single-step process. In wet reducing atmospheres, however, the oxidation state of pure CGO is initially stabilized due to the dissociation of water by reduced Ce(III) and subsequent incorporation of oxygen into the structure. In the reduction process involving the composite cermet, the close proximity of the NiO improves the efficiency and speed of the composite reduction process. Although NiO is already incorporated into working cells, these observations suggest direct routes to further improve cell performance.

  17. In situ NMR spectroscopy of supercapacitors: insight into the charge storage mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Forse, Alexander C; Griffin, John M; Trease, Nicole M; Trognko, Lorie; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Grey, Clare P

    2013-12-18

    Electrochemical capacitors, commonly known as supercapacitors, are important energy storage devices with high power capabilities and long cycle lives. Here we report the development and application of in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methodologies to study changes at the electrode-electrolyte interface in working devices as they charge and discharge. For a supercapacitor comprising activated carbon electrodes and an organic electrolyte, NMR experiments carried out at different charge states allow quantification of the number of charge storing species and show that there are at least two distinct charge storage regimes. At cell voltages below 0.75 V, electrolyte anions are increasingly desorbed from the carbon micropores at the negative electrode, while at the positive electrode there is little change in the number of anions that are adsorbed as the voltage is increased. However, above a cell voltage of 0.75 V, dramatic increases in the amount of adsorbed anions in the positive electrode are observed while anions continue to be desorbed at the negative electrode. NMR experiments with simultaneous cyclic voltammetry show that supercapacitor charging causes marked changes to the local environments of charge storing species, with periodic changes of their chemical shift observed. NMR calculations on a model carbon fragment show that the addition and removal of electrons from a delocalized system should lead to considerable increases in the nucleus-independent chemical shift of nearby species, in agreement with our experimental observations.

  18. Raman spectroscopy of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, M.J.M. de; Somintac, A.; Estacio, E.; Salvador, A.

    2004-01-01

    Nonresonant Raman scattering measurements were performed on a three-layered sample of in situ annealed InAs/GaAs self-assembled quantum dots. The thermal annealing step was done during the growth of each GaAs spacer layer, where the substrate temperature was raised from 530 deg. C to 580 deg. C as measured by a pyrometer. Three Raman signals are clearly seen at 264 cm -1 , 268 cm -1 , and 271.5 cm -1 which can be attributed to the longitudinal optic (LO) phonons of the dots. These three different signals are attributed to different degrees of In/Ga alloying or intermixing in each dot layer as a consequence of the different thermal treatments that each layer was subjected to. The Raman signal of the wetting layer (WL) is remarkably weak and suggests erosion of the wetting layer. In contrast, Raman scattering measurements on an unannealed sample show two overlapping features at 259.5 cm -1 and 261.5 cm -1 , which are attributed to the LO phonons of the dots. The WL signal is clearly observed at 251.5 cm -1 . To support our Raman observations, the appearance of a strong higher-energy peak in photoluminescence measurements suggests that alloying did occur in the annealed sample

  19. Spectroelectrochemical study of polyphenylene by in situ external reflection FT-IR spectroscopy. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvarnstroem, C.; Ivaska, A.

    1994-01-01

    In situ spectroelectrochemical measurements with external reflection FT-IR are performed at different stages of polymerization of 0.05, 0.1 and 0.8 M biphenyl in 0.1 M TBABF 4 in acetonitrile. The biphenyl concentration is not found to have any effect on the structure of the polymer formed. Formation of oligomers and the ratio of ortho/para-substituted polymer chains during film growth are studied. The first coupling of dimers to oligomers is found to take place in the vicinity of the electrode surface and at a later stage of polymerization the oligomers start to form polymer film on the electrode. A mixed para and ortho coupling resulting in crosslinking between chains is observed already at the early stage of polymerization. However, when a lower current density is used a more ordered polymer structure is obtained. A breakdown of the polymer film due to overoxidation can be seen when the potential is increased to 2.0 V. (orig.)

  20. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Bilayer 12C/13C Graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Farhat, H.; Kong, J.; Janda, Pavel; Kavan, Ladislav; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2011), s. 1957-1963 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : graphene * bilayer * Raman Spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 13.198, year: 2011

  1. The Bone Black Pigment Identification by Noninvasive, In Situ Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Daveri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Two real case studies, an oil painting on woven paper and a cycle of mural paintings, have been presented to validate the use of infrared reflection spectroscopy as suitable technique for the identification of bone black pigment. By the use of the sharp weak band at 2013 cm−1, it has been possible to distinguish animal carbon-based blacks by a noninvasive method. Finally, an attempt for an eventual assignment for the widely used sharp band at 2013 cm−1 is discussed.

  2. In situ Raman spectroscopy of phase transformation in CrOx-Y2O3 system at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Liqiong; Lu Jiqing; Bi Qingyuan; Pu Zhiying; Guo Ming; Wang Yuejuan; Luo Mengfei

    2010-01-01

    A CrO x -Y 2 O 3 sample was prepared by a deposition-precipitation method and phase transformation of the sample under N 2 and air atmospheres was characterized by in situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. It was found that when the CrO x -Y 2 O 3 sample was heated, CrO 3 transformed to YCrO 4 and then to YCrO 3 and Cr 2 O 3 . Also, the transformation started from the surface region of the sample and then extended to the bulk, due to the fact that the phase transformation was detected by Raman spectroscopy at lower temperature compared to that by XRD. In addition, both atmosphere and temperature had influence on the phase transformation in the surface region, while the phase transformation in the bulk was merely dependent on the temperature. It was also found that low oxidation state Cr(III) species on the surface could be re-oxidized to high oxidation state Cr(V) or Cr(VI) species when the thermal treated sample was exposed to ambient air.

  3. Sensing local pH and ion concentration at graphene electrode surfaces using in situ Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haotian; Poudel, Nirakar; Hou, Bingya; Shen, Lang; Chen, Jihan; Benderskii, Alexander V; Cronin, Stephen B

    2018-02-01

    We report a novel approach to probe the local ion concentration at graphene/water interfaces using in situ Raman spectroscopy. Here, the upshifts observed in the G band Raman mode under applied electrochemical potentials are used to determine the charge density in the graphene sheet. For voltages up to ±0.8 V vs. NHE, we observe substantial upshifts in the G band Raman mode by as much as 19 cm -1 , which corresponds to electron and hole carrier densities of 1.4 × 10 13 cm -2 and Fermi energy shifts of ±430 meV. The charge density in the graphene electrode is also measured independently using the capacitance-voltage characteristics (i.e., Q = CV), and is found to be consistent with those measured by Raman spectroscopy. From charge neutrality requirements, the ion concentration in solution per unit area must be equal and opposite to the charge density in the graphene electrode. Based on these charge densities, we estimate the local ion concentration as a function of electrochemical potential in both pure DI water and 1 M KCl solutions, which span a pH range from 3.8 to 10.4 for pure DI water and net ion concentrations of ±0.7 mol L -1 for KCl under these applied voltages.

  4. Use of gamma spectroscopy in activation analysis; Utilisation de la spectrographie gamma dans l'analyse par activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    Brief review of the principles of activation analysis: calculation of activities, decay curves, {beta} absorption curves, examples of application. - Principle and description of the {gamma} spectrograph. - Practical utilisation of the {gamma} spectrograph: analysis by activation, analysis by {beta} - x fluorescence. - Sensitivity limit of the method and precision of the measurements. - Possible improvements to the method: {gamma} spectroscopy with elimination of the Compton effect. (author) [French] Bref rappel des principes de l'analyse par activation: calcul des activites, courbes de decroissance, courbes d'absorption {beta}, exemples d'utilisation. - Principe et description du spectrographe {gamma}. - Utilisation pratique de la spectrographie {gamma}: analyse par activation, analyse par fluorescence {beta} - x. - Limite de sensibilite de la methode et precision des mesures. - Ameliorations possibles de la methode: spectrographe {gamma} avec elimination de l'effet Compton. (auteur)

  5. New insight in the template decomposition process of large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals: an in situ UV-Vis/fluorescence micro-spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karwacki, L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824283; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2011-01-01

    A combination of in situ UV-Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy was used to study the template decomposition process in large zeolite ZSM-5 crystals. Correlation of polarized light dependent UV-Vis absorption spectra with confocal fluorescence emission spectra in the 400–750 nm region

  6. The effect of water on the stability of iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles in hydrogen and syngas followed by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thuene, P.C.; Moodley - Gengan, P.; Scheijen, F.J.E.; Fredriksson, H.O.A.; Lancee, R.J.; Kropf, J.; Miller, J.T.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water on iron-based nanoparticles under hydrogen and syngas was investigated by in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The iron oxide (¿-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, dispersed as a monolayer on flat silica surfaces, were readily converted into metallic iron in dry hydrogen at 350 °C and into

  7. In-situ investigation of crack propagation in {gamma}-TiAl alloys using atomic force, focus ion beam and scanning electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iqbal, Farasat; Goeken, Mathias [Lehrstuhl Allgemeine Werkstoffeigenschaften, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Pyczak, Florian [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The present study is focused on crack propagation mechanism in Ti-45Al-1Cr and Ti-45Al-5Nb alloys with lamellar microstructure. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile technique to study the crack propagation in-situ. AFM was employed to investigate the local deformations near the crack tip. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) supplements the in-situ observations and was used to get a basic understanding of the crack propagation path over larger distances.A focused ion beam (FIB) was used to investigate the structures and deformation traces underneath the surface. It is concluded that the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interfaces act as favorable sites for new interfacial crack nucleation and also for interlamellar crack propagation. Nucleation of new cracks was often preceded by the interaction of deformation twins with interfaces and also by strong shear band activity in the {gamma}-TiAl lamellae visible as significant surface topography in AFM.Mostly the underneath crack path follows the {gamma}/{alpha}2 interface similar to the situation observed at the surface. The local misorientation measured with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) shows {gamma}-lamellae as the region of high deformation as compare to neighboring {alpha}2 -lamellae around the crack tip and its surroundings.

  8. In Situ Raman Spectroscopy of COOH-Functionalized SWCNTs Trapped with Optoelectronic Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optoelectronic tweezers (OETs were used to trap and deposit aqueous dispersions of carboxylic-acid-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. Dark-field video microscopy was used to visualize the dynamics of the bundles both with and without virtual electrodes, showing rapid accumulation of carbon nanotubes when optical virtual electrodes are actuated. Raman microscopy was used to probe SWCNT materials following deposition onto metallic fiducial markers as well as during trapping. The local carbon nanotube concentration was observed to increase rapidly during trapping by more than an order of magnitude in less than one second due to localized optical dielectrophoresis forces. This combination of enrichment and spectroscopy with a single laser spot suggests a broad range of applications in physical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  9. Acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization: in situ, real-time monitoring using nir spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. E. Colmán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the ability of on-line NIR spectroscopy for the prediction of the evolution of monomer concentration, conversion and average particle diameter in acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerization was evaluated. The spectral ranges were chosen as those representing the decrease in concentration of monomer. An increase in the baseline shift indicated that the NIR spectra were affected by particle size. Multivariate partial least squares calibration models were developed to relate NIR spectra collected by the immersion probe with off-line conversion and polymer particle size data. The results showed good agreement between off-line data and values predicted by the NIR calibration models and these latter were also able to detect different types of operational disturbances. These results indicate that it is possible to monitor variables of interest during acrylamide inverse miniemulsion polymerizations.

  10. In Situ X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Model Catalysts: At the Edge of the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, S.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Gustafson, J.; Martin, N. M.; Fernandes, V. R.; Borg, A.; Liu, Z.; Chang, R.; Matera, S.; Reuter, K.; Lundgren, E.

    2013-03-01

    We present high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HP-XPS) and first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo study addressing the nature of the active surface in CO oxidation over Pd(100). Simultaneously measuring the chemical composition at the surface and in the near-surface gas phase, we reveal both O-covered pristine Pd(100) and a surface oxide as stable, highly active phases in the near-ambient regime accessible to HP-XPS. Surprisingly, no adsorbed CO can be detected during high CO2 production rates, which can be explained by a combination of a remarkably short residence time of the CO molecule on the surface and mass-transfer limitations in the present setup.

  11. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  12. Coral Reef Color: Remote and In-Situ Imaging Spectroscopy of Reef Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, E. J.

    2016-02-01

    Coral reefs are threatened at local to global scales by a litany of anthropogenic impacts, including overfishing, coastal development, marine and watershed pollution, rising ocean temperatures, and ocean acidification. However, available data for the primary indicator of coral reef condition — proportional cover of living coral — are surprisingly sparse and show patterns that contradict the prevailing understanding of how environment impacts reef condition. Remote sensing is the only available tool for acquiring synoptic, uniform data on reef condition at regional to global scales. Discrimination between coral and other reef benthos relies on narrow wavebands afforded by imaging spectroscopy. The same spectral information allows non-invasive quantification of photosynthetic pigment composition, which shows unexpected phenological trends. There is also potential to link biodiversity with optical diversity, though there has been no effort in that direction. Imaging spectroscopy underlies the light-use efficiency model for reef primary production by quantifying light capture, which in turn indicates biochemical capacity for CO2 assimilation. Reef calcification is strongly correlated with primary production, suggesting the possibility for an optics-based model of that aspect of reef function, as well. By scaling these spectral models for use with remote sensing, we can vastly improve our understanding of reef structure, function, and overall condition across regional to global scales. By analyzing those remote sensing products against ancillary environmental data, we can construct secondary models to predict reef futures in the era of global change. This final point is the objective of CORAL (COral Reef Airborne Laboratory), a three-year project funded under NASA's Earth Venture Suborbital-2 program to investigate the relationship between coral reef condition at the ecosystem scale and various nominal biogeophysical forcing parameters.

  13. Mechanism for microwave heating of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane characterized by in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasei, Yugo; Yamakami, Takuya; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Ushida, Kiminori; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-05-01

    Microwave heating is widely used to accelerate organic reactions and enhance the activity of enzymes. However, the detailed molecular mechanism for the effect of microwave on chemical reactions is not yet fully understood. To investigate the effects of microwave heating on organic compounds, we have developed an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy. (1)H NMR spectra of 1-(4'-cyanophenyl)-4-propylcyclohexane (PCH3) in the liquid crystalline and isotropic phases were observed under microwave irradiation. When the temperature was regulated at slightly higher than the phase transition temperature (Tc=45 °C) under a gas flow temperature control system, liquid crystalline phase mostly changed to the isotropic phase. Under microwave irradiation and with the gas flow temperature maintained at 20 °C, which is 25 °C below the Tc, the isotropic phase appeared stationary as an approximately 2% fraction in the liquid crystalline phase. The temperature of the liquid crystalline state was estimated to be 38 °C according to the line width, which is at least 7 °C lower than the Tc. The temperature of this isotropic phase should be higher than 45 °C, which is considered to be a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by microwave irradiation. Microwaves at a power of 195 W were irradiated to the isotropic phase of PCH3 at 50 °C and after 2 min, the temperature reached 220 °C. The temperature of PCH3 under microwave irradiation was estimated by measurement of the chemical shift changes of individual protons in the molecule. These results demonstrate that microwave heating generates very high temperature within a short time using an in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectrometer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of 120-130Te nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhoy, J.R.; Champine, B.R.; Coleman, R.T.; Crandell, K.A.; Tanyi, J.A.; Hicks, S.F.; Alexander, G.K.; Burkett, P.G.; Burns, M.C.; Collard, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Structure of the even 120-130 Te nuclei have been investigated with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy following the 122-126,nat Te(n,n'γ) reactions and the (α,2nγ) 120,124,126 Te reactions. Gamma-ray excitation functions, angular distributions, γγ-coincidences, and Doppler shifts have been measured. Level schemes have been constructed to approximately 3.3 MeV excitation energy, and spectroscopic information including level spins and parities, branching and multipole-mixing ratios, and lifetimes have been extracted. Three different types of structure are thought to play an important role in these low-lying excitations. These are: collective, two-particle, and 4p-2h intruder excitations. Because there are seven stable even-even Te nuclei, the evolution of these excitation modes over this wide range in neutron number is investigated. Level sequences and transition rates obtained from these measurements are compared to IBM-2 model calculations both with and without intruder-state mixing by Rikovska et al. (1), and to particle-vibrational coupling model calculations by Lopac (2). The IBM-2 model calculations with intruder mixing well reproduce the level energies in the low-mass Te; however, examination of the electromagnetic transition rates reveals that there is no clear improvement in the description of these nuclei by adding the intruder configurations. Additionally, no evidence of the 2 + mixed-symmetry strength is observed in the 2 3 + and 2 4 + levels in these nuclei. The particle-vibration model calculations appear to do a good job describing both the level scheme and the transition rates in the heavier nuclei investigated. (author)

  15. 2015 In-Situ Gamma-Ray Assay of the West Cell Line in the 235-F Plutonium Fuel Form Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    In November and December 2015, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements through the windows in front of Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using a shielded, 120% high-purity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Where possible, the distribution of the Pu-238 in the cells was determined using the Germanium Gamma-ray Imager (GeGI). This distribution was then fed into the MCNP model to quantify the Pu-238 in each cell. Data analysis was performed using three gamma rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells.

  16. XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR Spectroscopy of In Situ Crystallization of Lithium Disilicate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, T.; Mogus-Milankovic, A.; Ray, C. S.; Lesher, C. E.; Youngman, R.; Day, D. E.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a Li2O-2SiO2 (LS2) glass was investigated as a function of pressure and temperature up to 6 GPa and 750 C respectively, using XRD, TEM, IR, Raman and NMR spectroscopy. Glass densified at 6 GPa has an average Si-O-Si bond angle approx.7deg lower than that found in glass processed at 4.5 GPa. At 4.5 GPa, lithium disilicate crystallizes from the glass, while at 6 GPa a new high pressure form of lithium metasilicate crystallizes. The new phase, while having lithium metasilicate crystal symmetry, contains at least 4 different Si sites. NMR results for 6 GPa sample indicate the presence of Q4 species with (Q(sup 4))Si-O-Si(Q(sup 4)) bond angles of approx.157deg. This is the first reported occurrence of Q(sup 4) species with such large bond angles in alumina free alkali silicate glass. No five- or six- coordinated Si are found.

  17. In-situ Raman spectroscopy and high-speed photography of a shocked triaminotrinitrobenzene based explosive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saint-Amans, C.; Hébert, P., E-mail: philippe.hebert@cea.fr; Doucet, M. [CEA, DAM, Le RIPAULT, F-37620 Monts (France); Resseguier, T. de [Institut P' , UPR CNRS 3346, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, F-86961 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-01-14

    We have developed a single-shot Raman spectroscopy experiment to study at the molecular level the initiation mechanisms that can lead to sustained detonation of a triaminotrinitrobenzene-based explosive. Shocks up to 30 GPa were generated using a two-stage laser-driven flyer plate generator. The samples were confined by an optical window and shock pressure was maintained for at least 30 ns. Photon Doppler Velocimetry measurements were performed at the explosive/window interface to determine the shock pressure profile. Raman spectra were recorded as a function of shock pressure and the shifts of the principal modes were compared to static high-pressure measurements performed in a diamond anvil cell. Our shock data indicate the role of temperature effects. Our Raman spectra also show a progressive extinction of the signal which disappears around 9 GPa. High-speed photography images reveal a simultaneous progressive darkening of the sample surface up to total opacity at 9 GPa. Reflectivity measurements under shock compression show that this opacity is due to a broadening of the absorption spectrum over the entire visible region.

  18. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patridge, Christopher J. [NRC/NRL Cooperative Research Associate, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Love, Corey T., E-mail: corey.love@nrl.navy.mil [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Swider-Lyons, Karen E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6113, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Twigg, Mark E. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, Code 6812, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ramaker, David E. [Chemistry Division, Code 6189, U.S. Naval Research laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    The local structure of nanoscale (∼10–40 nm) LiCoO{sub 2} is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO{sub 2} nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (Δμ) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a Δμ EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO{sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO{sub 2} to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO{sub 2}. • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO{sub 2} and difference spectra. • Full multiple

  19. In-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis of capacity fade in nanoscale-LiCoO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patridge, Christopher J.; Love, Corey T.; Swider-Lyons, Karen E.; Twigg, Mark E.; Ramaker, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The local structure of nanoscale (∼10–40 nm) LiCoO 2 is monitored during electrochemical cycling utilizing in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The high surface area of the LiCoO 2 nanoparticles not only enhances capacity fade, but also provides a large signal from the particle surface relative to the bulk. Changes in the nanoscale LiCoO 2 metal-oxide bond lengths, structural disorder, and chemical state are tracked during cycling by adapting the delta mu (Δμ) technique in complement with comprehensive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) modeling. For the first time, we use a Δμ EXAFS method, and by comparison of the difference EXAFS spectra, extrapolate significant coordination changes and reduction of cobalt species with cycling. This combined approach suggests Li–Co site exchange at the surface of the nanoscale LiCoO 2 as a likely factor in the capacity fade and irreversible losses in practical, microscale LiCoO 2 . - Graphical abstract: Electrochemical cycling of Li-ion batteries has strong impact on the structure and integrity of the cathode active material particularly near the surface/electrolyte interface. In developing a new method, we have used in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy during electrochemical cycling of nanoscale LiCoO 2 to track changes during charge and discharge and between subsequent cycles. Using difference spectra, several small changes in Co-O bond length, Co-O and Co-Co coordination, and site exchange between Co and Li sites can be tracked. These methods show promise as a new technique to better understand processes which lead to capacity fade and loss in Li-ion batteries. - Highlights: • A new method is developed to understand capacity fade in Li-ion battery cathodes. • Structural changes are tracked during Li intercalation/deintercalation of LiCoO 2 . • Surface structural changes are emphasized using nanoscale-LiCoO 2 and difference spectra. • Full multiple scattering calculations are used to

  20. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pořízka, P.; Demidov, A.; Kaiser, J.; Keivanian, J.; Gornushkin, I.; Panne, U.; Riedel, J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of mineral ores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pořízka, P. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Demidov, A. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Kaiser, J. [Institute of Physical Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Brno University of Technology, Technická 2896/2, 61669 Brno (Czech Republic); Keivanian, J. [Institute for Mining, Technical University Clausthal, Erzstraße 18, 38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Gornushkin, I. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panne, U. [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Chemistry Department, Humboldt Univerisät zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Straße 2, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Riedel, J., E-mail: jens.riedel@bam.de [BAM, Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Richard Willstätter-Straße 11, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the potential of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for discrimination and analysis of geological materials was examined. The research was focused on classification of mineral ores using their LIBS spectra prior to quantitative determination of copper. Quantitative analysis is not a trivial task in LIBS measurement because intensities of emission lines in laser-induced plasmas (LIP) are strongly affected by the sample matrix (matrix effect). To circumvent this effect, typically matrix-matched standards are used to obtain matrix-dependent calibration curves. If the sample set consists of a mixture of different matrices, even in this approach, the corresponding matrix has to be known prior to the downstream data analysis. For this categorization, the multielemental character of LIBS spectra can be of help. In this contribution, a principal component analysis (PCA) was employed on the measured data set to discriminate individual rocks as individual matrices against each other according to their overall elemental composition. Twenty-seven igneous rock samples were analyzed in the form of fine dust, classified and subsequently quantitatively analyzed. Two different LIBS setups in two laboratories were used to prove the reproducibility of classification and quantification. A superposition of partial calibration plots constructed from the individual clustered data displayed a large improvement in precision and accuracy compared to the calibration plot constructed from all ore samples. The classification of mineral samples with complex matrices can thus be recommended prior to LIBS system calibration and quantitative analysis. - Highlights: • Twenty seven igneous rocks were measured on different LIBS systems. • Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed for classification. • The necessity of the classification of the rock (ore) samples prior to the quantification analysis is stressed. • Classification based on the whole LIP spectra and

  2. In situ detection of cancerous kidney tissue by means of fiber ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablinskas, Valdas; Velicka, Martynas; Pucetaite, Milda; Urboniene, Vidita; Ceponkus, Justinas; Bandzeviciute, Rimante; Jankevicius, Feliksas; Sakharova, Tatiana; Bibikova, Olga; Steiner, Gerald

    2018-02-01

    The crucial goal of kidney-sparing surgical resection of a malignant tumor is complete removal of the cancerous tissue. The exact border between the cancerous and normal tissues is not always possible to identify by naked eye, therefore, a supplementary intraoperative diagnosis is needed. Unfortunately, intraoperative pathology methods used nowadays are time consuming and of inadequate quality rendering not definitive diagnosis. It has recently been shown that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy can be used for fast discrimination between cancerous and normal kidney tissues by analyzing the collected spectra of the tissue touch imprint smears. Most prominent differences are obtained in the wavenumber region from 950 cm-1 to 1250 cm-1, where the spectral bands due to the molecular vibrations of glycogen arise in the spectra of cancerous tissue smears. Such method of detection of cancerous tissue is limited by requirement to transfer the suspected tissue from the body to the FTIR instrument and stamp it on an ATR crystal of the spectrometer. We propose a spectroscopic tool which exploits the same principle of detection of cancerous cells as mentioned above, but does not require the tissue to be transferred from the body to the spectrometer. The portable spectrometer used in this design is equipped with fiber ATR probe and a sensitive liquid nitrogen cooled MCT detector. The design of the fiber probe allows the ATR tip to be changed easily in order to use only new sterilized tips for each measurement point of the tissue. It also enables sampling multiple areas of the suspected tissue with high lateral resolution which, in turn, increases accuracy with which the marginal regions between normal and cancerous tissues can be identified. Due to the loss of optical signal in the fiber probe the spectra have lower signal-to-noise ratio than in the case of standard ATR sampling setup. However, software for the spectral analysis used with the fiber probe design is still able to distinguish

  3. Efficient in situ synthetic routes of polyaniline/poly(vinyl alcohol)/TiO2 nanocomposites using gamma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, T. A.; Ghazy, O. A.; Saleh, H. H.; Ali, Z. I.

    2018-02-01

    Gamma radiation was used to prepare nanocomposites based on polyaniline/titanium dioxide (PANI/TiO2) or polyaniline/poly (vinyl alcohol)/titanium dioxide (PANI/PVA/TiO2). It was found that PANI/TiO2 in the form of nanocomposite as shown by the UV/vis spectroscopy. This was through the appearance and shift of two absorption peaks at 340 and 598 nm. The SEM micrographs of the PANI/TiO2 nanocomposites showed a fibrous morphology before the treatment with HCl. The TiO2 nanoparticles are clearly seen to be precipitated on the PANI fibers and the morphology changed towards the sheets shape with highly distribution on PANI surface. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image confirms the fibrous shape of the PANI and spherical shape of TiO2 nanoparticles. The XRD study showed a several diffraction patterns of TiO2 nanoparticles confirming the PANI/TiO2 and PANI/PVA/TiO2 nanocomposites. The FT-IR analysis indicated that there is an interfacial interaction existed between the PANI and its inorganic counterpart of TiO2 nanoparticles. The dielectric constant of the PANI/PVA showed the lowest values and was increased by either doping with TiO2 or increasing irradiation dose.

  4. Exploring atmospheric radon with airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldoncini, Marica; Albéri, Matteo; Bottardi, Carlo; Minty, Brian; Raptis, Kassandra G. C.; Strati, Virginia; Mantovani, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    222Rn is a noble radioactive gas produced along the 238U decay chain, which is present in the majority of soils and rocks. As 222Rn is the most relevant source of natural background radiation, understanding its distribution in the environment is of great concern for investigating the health impacts of low-level radioactivity and for supporting regulation of human exposure to ionizing radiation in modern society. At the same time, 222Rn is a widespread atmospheric tracer whose spatial distribution is generally used as a proxy for climate and pollution studies. Airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy (AGRS) always treated 222Rn as a source of background since it affects the indirect estimate of equivalent 238U concentration. In this work the AGRS method is used for the first time for quantifying the presence of 222Rn in the atmosphere and assessing its vertical profile. High statistics radiometric data acquired during an offshore survey are fitted as a superposition of a constant component due to the experimental setup background radioactivity plus a height dependent contribution due to cosmic radiation and atmospheric 222Rn. The refined statistical analysis provides not only a conclusive evidence of AGRS 222Rn detection but also a (0.96 ± 0.07) Bq/m3 222Rn concentration and a (1318 ± 22) m atmospheric layer depth fully compatible with literature data.

  5. Principles of resonance-averaged gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The unambiguous determination of excitation energies, spins, parities, and other properties of nuclear levels is the paramount goal of the nuclear spectroscopist. All developments of nuclear models depend upon the availability of a reliable data base on which to build. In this regard, slow neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy has proved to be a valuable tool. The observation of primary radiative transitions connecting initial and final states can provide definite level positions. In particular the use of the resonance-averaged capture technique has received much recent attention because of the claims advanced for this technique (Chrien 1980a, Casten 1980); that it is able to identify all states in a given spin-parity range and to provide definite spin parity information for these states. In view of the importance of this method, it is perhaps surprising that until now no firm analytical basis has been provided which delineates its capabilities and limitations. Such an analysis is necessary to establish the spin-parity assignments derived from this method on a quantitative basis; in other words a quantitative statement of the limits of error must be provided. It is the principal aim of the present paper to present such an analysis. To do this, a historical description of the technique and its applications is presented and the principles of the method are stated. Finally a method of statistical analysis is described, and the results are applied to recent measurements carried out at the filtered beam facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

  6. Optimal digital filtering in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messai, A.; Nour, A.; Abdellani, I.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we address the subject of the digital nuclear spectroscopy as seen as a counterpart of the classic analogue approach. Consequently, we will present the design as well as the implementation on a DSP (Digital Signal Processor) board, of the various necessary digital pulse processing techniques via digital filtering in order to provide the principal tasks which often take place in a generic 'Gamma' digital spectroscopic setup. The first part will be devoted to the design of the digital IIR filter used for the charge preamplifier's slow-pole compensation. This will be followed by the practical estimation of the power spectral density relating to the electrical noise components present at the spectrometer's input. Thereafter, a very detailed attention will be given to the design of the digital optimal filter to be used for the charge measurements. We follow by another FIR filter that deals with the digital estimation of the reference line of measurements. Finally, we give a hardware implementation of the designed filters on the board: 'TMS320C6713-DSK', a DSP KIT developed by 'DIGITAL Spectrum'. (authors)

  7. Latent transforming growth factor beta1 activation in situ: quantitative and functional evidence after low-dose gamma-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrhart, E. J.; Segarini, P.; Tsang, M. L.; Carroll, A. G.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    reciprocal shift in immunoreactivity as evidence of activation, and implicate TGF-beta as a mediator of tissue response to ionizing radiation. The sensitivity of activation to low radiation doses points to a potential role for TGF-beta in orchestrating tissue response to oxidative stress. As such, radiation may be useful as a probe to delineate the consequences of latent TGF-beta activation in situ.

  8. Non-invasive in situ identification and band assignments of diazepam, flunitrazepam and methadone hydrochloride with FT-near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H

    2011-03-20

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) has evolved into an important rapid, direct and non-invasive technique in drugs analysis. In this study, the suitability of NIR spectroscopy to identify two benzodiazepine derivatives, diazepam and flunitrazepam, and a synthetic opiate, methadone hydrochloride, inside USP vials and probe the solid-state form of diazepam presents in tablets has been explored. The results show the potential of NIR spectroscopy for rapid, in situ and non-destructive identification of drugs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Structural investigations of LiFePO4 electrodes and in situ studies by Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, Aniruddha; Bergmann, Uwe; Cramer, S.P.; Cairns, Elton J.

    2005-01-01

    Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) have been performed on electrodes containing LiFePO 4 to determine the local atomic and electronic structure and their stability with electrochemical cycling. A versatile electrochemical in situ cell has been constructed for long-term soft and hard X-ray experiments for the structural investigation on battery electrodes during the lithium-insertion/extraction processes. The device is used here for an X-ray absorption spectroscopic study of lithium insertion/extraction in a LiFePO 4 electrode, where the electrode contained about 7.7 mg of LiFePO 4 on a 20 μm thick Al-foil. Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) have been performed on this electrode to determine the local atomic and electronic structure and their stability with electrochemical cycling. The initial state (LiFePO 4 ) showed iron to be in the Fe 2+ state corresponding to the initial state (0.0 mAh) of the cell, whereas in the delithiated state (FePO 4 ) iron was found to be in the Fe 3+ state corresponding to the final charged state (3 mAh). XANES region of the XAS spectra revealed a high spin configuration for the two states (Fe (II), d 6 and Fe (III), d 5 ). The results confirm that the olivine structure of the LiFePO 4 and FePO 4 is retained by the electrodes in agreement with the XRD observations reported previously. These results confirm that LiFePO 4 cathode material retains good structural short-range order leading to superior cycling capability

  10. In situ prompt gamma-ray measurement of river water salinity in northern Taiwan using HPGe-252Cf probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiunnhsing Chao; Chien Chung

    1991-01-01

    A portable HPGe- 252 Cf probe dedicated to in situ survey of river water salinity was placed on board a fishing boat to survey the Tamsui River in northern Taiwan. The variation of water salinity is surveyed by measuring the 6111 keV chlorine prompt photopeak along the river. Results indicate that the probe can be used as a salinometer for rapid, in situ measurement in polluted rivers or sea. (author)

  11. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cobalt Perovskite Surfaces under Cathodic Polarization at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.; Mutoro, Eva; Hong, Wesley T.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Christen, Hans M.; Liu, Zhi; Bluhm, Hendrik; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Heterostructured oxide interfaces have demonstrated enhanced oxygen reduction reaction rates at elevated temperatures (∼500-800 C); however, the physical origin underlying this enhancement is not well understood. By using synchrotron-based in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we focus on understanding the surface electronic structure, elemental composition, and chemical nature of epitaxial La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113), (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 (LSC 113/214) thin films as a function of applied electrical potentials (0 to -800 mV) at 520 C and p(O2) of 1 × 10-3 atm. Shifts in the top of the valence band binding energy and changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s spectral components under applied bias reveal key differences among the film chemistries, most notably in the degree of Sr segregation to the surface and quantity of active oxygen sites in the perovskite termination layer. These differences help to identify important factors governing the enhanced activity of oxygen electrocatalysis observed for the LSC113/214 heterostructured surface. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  12. Sol-to-Gel Transition in Fast Evaporating Systems Observed by in Situ Time-Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Plinio; Malfatti, Luca; Carboni, Davide; Takahashi, Masahide

    2015-06-22

    The in situ observation of a sol-to-gel transition in fast evaporating systems is a challenging task and the lack of a suitable experimental design, which includes the chemistry and the analytical method, has limited the observations. We synthesise an acidic sol, employing only tetraethylorthosilicate, SiCl4 as catalyst and deuterated water; the absence of water added to the sol allows us to follow the absorption from the external environment and the evaporation of deuterated water. The time-resolved data, obtained by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy on an evaporating droplet, enables us to identify four different stages during evaporation. They are linked to specific hydrolysis and condensation rates that affect the uptake of water from external environment. The second stage is characterized by a decrease in hydroxyl content, a fast rise of condensation rate and an almost stationary absorption of water. This stage has been associated with the sol-to-gel transition. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Determination of surface concentrations of individual molecule-layers used in nanoscale biosensors by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Punzet, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    For the development of nanowire sensors for chemical and medical detection purposes, the optimal functionalization of the surface is a mandatory component. Quantitative ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used in situ to investigate the step-by-step layer formation of typical functionalization protocols and to determine the respective molecule surface concentrations. BSA, anti-TNF-α and anti-PSA antibodies were bound via 3-(trimethoxy)butylsilyl aldehyde linkers to silicon-oxide surfaces in order to investigate surface functionalization of nanowires. Maximum determined surface concentrations were 7.17 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for BSA, 1.7 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-TNF-α antibody, 6.1 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for anti-PSA antibody, 3.88 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for TNF-α and 7.0 × 10 -13 mol cm -2 for PSA. Furthermore we performed antibody-antigen binding experiments and determined the specific binding ratios. The maximum possible ratio of 2 was obtained at bulk concentrations of the antigen in the μg ml -1 range for TNF-α and PSA. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag_2Se quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E.; Cortez-Valadez, M.; Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S.; Román-Zamorano, J. F.; Flores-Valenzuela, J.; Flores-Acosta, M.

    2017-01-01

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag_2Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H_8Si_8Al_8O_1_2 represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag_2Se)_n represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  15. In situ chemical state analysis of buried polymer/metal adhesive interface by hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Kenichi; Kakubo, Takashi; Shimizu, Katsunori; Amino, Naoya; Mase, Kazuhiko; Ikenaga, Eiji; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toyohiko; Oji, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chemical state analysis of the buried rubber/brass interface is conducted by HAXPES. • Ultrathin rubber films are prepared on the brass surface by two methods. • A high density of Cu 2 S is found on the rubber side of the buried adhesive layer. • The chemical states of the buried and exposed interfaces are compared. - Abstract: Chemical state analysis of adhesive interfaces is important to understand an adhesion mechanism between two different materials. Although photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) is an ideal tool for such an analysis, the adhesive interfaces must be exposed to the surface because PES is essentially a surface sensitive technique. However, an in situ observation is possible by hard X-ray PES (HAXPES) owing to its large probing depth. In the present study, HAXPES is applied to investigate the adhesive interface between rubber and brass without exposing the interface. It is demonstrated that copper sulfides formed at the buried rubber/brass interface are distinguished from S-containing species in the rubber overlayer. The chemical state of the buried interface is compared with that of the “exposed” interface prepared by so-called a filter-paper method

  16. In Situ Nondestructive Analysis of Kalanchoe pinnata Leaf Surface Structure by Polarization-Modulation Infrared Reflection-Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Enami, Shinichi; Shimoaka, Takafumi; Hasegawa, Takeshi

    2017-12-14

    The outermost surface of the leaves of land plants is covered with a lipid membrane called the cuticle that protects against various stress factors. Probing the molecular-level structure of the intact cuticle is highly desirable for understanding its multifunctional properties. We report the in situ characterization of the surface structure of Kalanchoe pinnata leaves using polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). Without sample pretreatment, PM-IRRAS measures the IR spectra of the leaf cuticle of a potted K. pinnata plant. The peak position of the CH 2 -related modes shows that the cuticular waxes on the leaf surface are mainly crystalline, and the alkyl chains are highly packed in an all-trans zigzag conformation. The surface selection rule of PM-IRRAS revealed the average orientation of the cuticular molecules, as indicated by the positive and negative signals of the IR peaks. This unique property of PM-IRRAS revealed that the alkyl chains of the waxes and the main chains of polysaccharides are oriented almost perpendicular to the leaf surface. The nondestructive, background-free, and environmental gas-free nature of PM-IRRAS allows the structure and chemistry of the leaf cuticle to be studied directly in its native environment.

  17. In Situ Ambient Pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cobalt Perovskite Surfaces under Cathodic Polarization at High Temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Crumlin, Ethan J.

    2013-08-08

    Heterostructured oxide interfaces have demonstrated enhanced oxygen reduction reaction rates at elevated temperatures (∼500-800 C); however, the physical origin underlying this enhancement is not well understood. By using synchrotron-based in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS), we focus on understanding the surface electronic structure, elemental composition, and chemical nature of epitaxial La0.8Sr 0.2CoO3-δ (LSC113), (La 0.5Sr0.5)2CoO4±δ (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 (LSC 113/214) thin films as a function of applied electrical potentials (0 to -800 mV) at 520 C and p(O2) of 1 × 10-3 atm. Shifts in the top of the valence band binding energy and changes in the Sr 3d and O 1s spectral components under applied bias reveal key differences among the film chemistries, most notably in the degree of Sr segregation to the surface and quantity of active oxygen sites in the perovskite termination layer. These differences help to identify important factors governing the enhanced activity of oxygen electrocatalysis observed for the LSC113/214 heterostructured surface. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  18. In situ Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy as a tool to discriminate volcanic rocks and magmatic series, Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, C.P.M., E-mail: clement.roux@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Rakovský, J.; Musset, O. [Laboratoire interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Monna, F. [Laboratoire ARTéHIS, UMR 6298 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France); Buoncristiani, J.-F.; Pellenard, P.; Thomazo, C. [Laboratoire Biogéosciences, UMR 6282 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 6 Boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon (France)

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the potentialities of a lab-made pLIBS (portable Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) to sort volcanic rocks belonging to various magmatic series. An in-situ chemical analysis of 19 atomic lines, including Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Si, Sr and Ti, from 21 sampled rocks was performed during a field exploration in Iceland. Iceland was chosen both for the various typologies of volcanic rocks and the rugged conditions in the field in order to test the sturdiness of the pLIPS. Elemental compositions were also measured using laboratory ICP-AES measurements on the same samples. Based on these latter results, which can be used to identify three different groups of volcanic rocks, a classification model was built in order to sort pLIBS data and to categorize unknown samples. Using a reliable statistical scheme applied to LIBS compositional data, the classification capability of the pLIBS system is clearly demonstrated (90–100% success rate). Although this prototype does not provide quantitative measurements, its use should be of particular interest for future geological field investigations. - Highlights: • Portable LIBS applied to field geology • Fast semi-quantitative geochemical analysis of volcanic rocks and magmatic series • Discriminant analysis and statistical treatments for LIBS compositional data.

  19. Study on in-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurement of anodic reaction in SO_2 depolarized electrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Lulu; Zhang Ping; Chen Songzhe; Wang Laijun

    2014-01-01

    SO_2 depolarized electrolysis (SDE) is the pivotal reaction in hybrid sulfur process, one of the most promising approaches for mass hydrogen production without CO_2 emission. The net result of hybrid sulfur process is to split water into hydrogen and oxygen at a relatively low voltage, which will dramatically decrease the energy consumption for the production of hydrogen. The potential loss of SDE process could be separated into four components, i.e. reversible cell potential, anode overpotential, cathode overpotential and ohmic loss. So far, it has been identified that the total cell potential for the SO_2 depolarized electrolyzer is dominantly controlled by sulfuric acid concentration of the anolyte and electrolysis temperature of the electrolysis process. In this work, an in-situ Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) measurement of the anodic SDE reaction was conducted. Results show that anodic overpotential is mainly resulted from the SO_2 oxidation reaction other than ohmic resistance or mass transfer limitation. This study extends the understanding to SDE process and gives suggestions for the further improvement of the SDE performance. (author)

  20. In situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy effect in zeolite due to Ag{sub 2}Se quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Nuñez, C. E. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Cortez-Valadez, M., E-mail: jose.cortez@unison.mx, E-mail: manuelcortez@live.com [Universidad de Sonora, CONACYT-Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Delgado-Beleño, Y.; Flores-López, N. S. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico); Román-Zamorano, J. F. [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo Tecnológico en Electroquímica (Mexico); Flores-Valenzuela, J. [Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (Mexico); Flores-Acosta, M. [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigación en Física (Mexico)

    2017-02-15

    This study shows the presence of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) effect caused by Ag{sub 2}Se quantum dots embedded in the zeolite matrix. The quantum dots that were synthesised and stabilised in the matrix of F9-NaX zeolite show a size of 5 nm and a quasi-spherical morphology. The calculated interplanar distances confirm the presence of quantum dots in cubic phase Im-m. We suppose that the in situ SERS effect in the material is caused by chemical-enhancement mechanism (CEM). The density functional theory (DFT) is undertaken to corroborate our hypothesis. The structure H{sub 8}Si{sub 8}Al{sub 8}O{sub 12} represents the zeolite cavity unit, and small clusters of (Ag{sub 2}Se){sub n} represent the quantum dots. Both structures interact in the cavity to obtain the local minimum of the potential energy surface, leading to new molecular orbitals. After the analysis of the predicted Raman spectrum, the Raman bands increase significantly, agreeing with the experimental results at low wavenumbers in F9-NaX zeolite.

  1. Detection and Identification of potentially toxic elements in urban soil using in situ spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Kopel, Daniella; Wittenberg, Lea

    2017-04-01

    Anthropogenic urban soils are the foundation of the urban green infrastructure, the green net quality is as good as each of its patches. In early days of pedology urban soil has been recognized with respect to contamination and the risks for human health but in study performed since the 70s, the importance of urban soil for the urban ecology became increasingly significant. Urban soils are highly disturbed land that was created by the process of urbanization. The dominant agent in the creation of urban soils is human activity which modifies the natural soil through mixing, filling or by contamination of land surfaces so as to create a layer of urban soil which can be more than 50 cm thick. The objective of this study is to determine the extent to which field spectroscopy methods can be used to extend the knowledge of toxic elements in urban soils. The majority of the studies on urban soils concentrate on identifying and mapping of known pollution mostly certain heavy metals, we are focusing on almost non disturbed soils where no direct disturbance occurred but the urban matrix inflicted on it. The elements in those soils where an-knowns features. In this study a top-down analysis is applied for detecting the presence of minerals, organic matter and pollutants in mixed soil samples. Results of the proposed top-down unmixing method suggest that the analysis is made very fast due to the simplified hierarchy which avoids the high-learning curve associated with unmixing algorithms showed that the most abundant components were coarse organic matter 12% followed by concrete dust, plastic crumbs, other man made materials, clay and other minerals. The results of the soils pH, measured electrometrically and the particle size distribution, measured by Laser diffraction, indicate there is no big different between the samples particle size distribution and the pH values of the samples but they are not significantly different from the expected, except for the OM percentage which

  2. CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Fioretto, E; Viesti, G; Cinausero, M; Zuin, L; Fabris, D; Lunardon, M; Nebbia, G; Prete, G

    2000-01-01

    We report on the performances of CsI(Tl)-photodiode detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications. Light output yield and energy resolution have been measured for different crystals and read-out configurations.

  3. Gamma-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy and application to radiation-damaged alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, D.P.; Hunt, A.W.; Tchelidze, L.; Kumar, J.; Smith, K.; Thompson, S.; Selim, F.; Williams, J.; Harmon, J.F.; Maloy, S.; Roy, A.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation damage and other defect studies of materials are limited to thin samples because of inherent limitations of well-established techniques such as diffraction methods and traditional positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) [P. Hautojarvi, et al., Positrons in Solids, Springer, Berlin, 1979, K.G. Lynn, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 47 (1985) 239]. This limitation has greatly hampered industrial and in-situ applications. ISU has developed new methods that use pair-production to produce positrons throughout the volume of thick samples [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B. 241 (2005) 262]. Unlike prior work at other laboratories that use bremsstrahlung beams to create positron beams (via pair-production) that are then directed at a sample of interest, we produce electron-positron pairs directly in samples of interest, and eliminate the intermediate step of a positron beam and its attendant penetrability limitations. Our methods include accelerator-based bremsstrahlung-induced pair-production in the sample for positron annihilation energy spectroscopy measurements (PAES), coincident proton-capture gamma-rays (where one of the gammas is used for pair-production in the sample) for positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS), or photo-nuclear activation of samples for either type of measurement. The positrons subsequently annihilate with sample electrons, emitting coincident 511 keV gamma-rays [F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 192 (2002) 197, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instru. Meth. A 495 (2002) 154, F.A. Selim, et al., J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 68 (2004) 427, F.A. Selim, D.P. Wells, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 241 (2005) 253, A.W. Hunt, D

  4. S100A7 (Psoriasin), highly expressed in Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS), is regulated by IFN-gamma in mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersson, Stina; Bylander, Anna; Yhr, Maria; Enerbäck, Charlotta

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to explore signal transduction pathways used in the regulation of S100A7 (psoriasin). Members of the S100 gene family participate in many important cellular functions. Psoriasin, S100A8 (calgranulin A) and S100A9 (calgranulin B) are expressed in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), as well as in the hyperproliferative skin disease, psoriasis. In the latter condition, a disturbance in the STAT pathway has recently been reported. This pathway is implicated in the regulation of IFN-gamma, widely recognized as a key cytokine in psoriasis. IFN-gamma also exerts anti-tumor action in a number of tumor cell types, including breast cancer. We therefore examined the effect of IFN-gamma and STAT-signaling on the psoriasin expression. We established a TAC2 mouse mammary epithelial cell line with tetracycline-inducible psoriasin expression (Tet-Off). Viability in cell culture was estimated using MTS assay. Protein and gene expression were evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Statistical analyses were assessed using a one-tailed, paired t-test. We report the downregulation of psoriasin by IFN-gamma in the MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell line, as well as the downregulation of psoriasin induced by anoikis in cell lines derived from different epithelial tissues. In contrast, IFN-gamma had no suppressive effect on calgranulin A or calgranulin B. IFN-gamma is an important activator of the STAT1 pathway and we confirmed an active signaling pathway in the cell lines that responded to IFN-gamma treatment. In contrast, in the SUM190 breast carcinoma cell line, IFN-gamma did not suppress the expression of endogenous psoriasin. Moreover, a reduced phosphorylation of the STAT1 protein was observed. We showed that IFN-gamma treatment and the inhibition of the transcription factor NFkappaB had a synergistic effect on psoriasin levels. Finally, in TAC2 cells with tetracycline-induced psoriasin expression, we observed the increased viability of

  5. Sulfur X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Living Mammalian Cells: An Enabling Tool for Sulfur Metabolomics. in Situ Observation of Uptake of Taurine Into MDCK Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnida, M.; Sneeden, E.Yu; Whitin, J.C.; Prince, R.C.; Pickering, I.J.; Korbas, M.; George, G.N.

    2009-06-01

    Sulfur is essential for life, with important roles in biological structure and function. However, because of a lack of suitable biophysical techniques, in situ information about sulfur biochemistry is generally difficult to obtain. Here, we present an in situ sulfur X-ray absorption spectroscopy (S-XAS) study of living cell cultures of the mammalian renal epithelial MDCK cell line. A great deal of information is retrieved from a characteristic sulfonate feature in the X-ray absorption spectrum of the cell cultures, which can be related to the amino acid taurine. We followed the time and dose dependence of uptake of taurine into MDCK cell monolayers. The corresponding uptake curves showed a typical saturation behavior with considerable levels of taurine accumulation inside the cells (as much as 40% of total cellular sulfur). We also investigated the polarity of uptake of taurine into MDCK cells, and our results confirmed that uptake in situ is predominantly a function of the basolateral cell surface.

  6. Planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy: the effects of hydrogen absorption cross-section of the gamma-ray spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapides, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy of planet surfaces is one of several possible methods that are useful in determining the elemental composition of planet surfaces from orbiting spacecraft. This has been demonstrated on the Apollos 15 and 16 missions as well as the Soviet Mars-5 mission. Planetary gamma-ray emission is primarily the result of natural radioactive decay and cosmic-ray and solar-flare-induced nuclear reactions. Secondary neutron reactions play a large role in the more intense gamma-ray emission. The technique provides information on the elemental composition of the top few tens of centimeters of the planet surface. Varying concentrations of hydrogen and compositional variations that alter the macroscopic thermal-neutron absorption cross section have a significant effect on the neutron flux in the planet surface and therefore also on the gamma-ray emission from the surface. These effects have been systematically studied for a wide range of possible planetary compositions that include Mercury, the moon, Mars, the comets, and the asteroids. The problem of the Martian atmosphere was also investigated. The results of these calculations, in which both surface neutron fluxes and gamma-ray emission fluxes were determined, were used to develop general procedures for obtaining planet compositions from the gamma-ray spectrum. Several changes have been suggested for reanalyzing the Apollos 15 and 16 gamma-ray results. In addition, procedures have been suggested that can be applied to neutron-gamma techniques in mineral and oil exploration

  7. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dan, E-mail: dany@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Jia, Shaojie [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Fodjo, Essy Kouadio [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, University Felix Houphouet Boigny, 22 BP 582, Abidjan 22, Cote d’Ivoire (Cote d' Ivoire); Xu, Hu [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Wang, Yuhong, E-mail: yuhong_wang502@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Deng, Wei [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China)

    2016-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The orientation of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) has been investigated by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) on silver surface. - Highlights: • The adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on Ag electrode is influenced by the pH. • The pH-dependant adsorption of AQ-2-COOH has been confirmed by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (in situ SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS). • The results can provide insights into electron transfer reactions of AQ-2-COOH in biological systems. - Abstract: In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from −0.3 to −0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  8. In situ-observation of the vertical motion of soil waters by means of deuterated water using the gamma/neutron method: Laboratory and field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutonnet, P.; Couchat, P.; Brissaud, F.; Puard, M.; Pappalardo, A.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study water movements in the field, the gamma/neutron method for measuring deuterated water was investigated. A laboratory device is presented which supplies measurements on 5 ml soil solution samples. A probe for in situ experiments is studied in all its performances: Background, calibration (count rate versus volumetric deuterated water content) and resolution. A dispersive transport of D 2 O pulses on soil column is presented and checked with a numerical simulation model. Then simultaneous measurement of soil water content and D 2 O concentration by neutron moisture gauge and gamma/neutron probe enable us to interpret the evolution of D 2 O pulse with an experimental field irrigation. (orig.) [de

  9. The development of in situ photon-in/photon-out soft X-ray spectroscopy on beamline 7.0.1 at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Development of various cells for in-situ electronic structure study. ► Gas cell for study of gas molecules and catalytic reactions. ► Liquid cell for study of molecular liquids and ion salvation. ► In-situ cell for study of electrochemical reactions. -- Abstract: This is a mini-review about the development of various cells built over the years for in situ electronic structure study of gas molecules, molecular liquids, gas/solid and liquid/solid interfaces. In the study of gas molecules, the role of the parity selection rule in the case of homonuclear diatomic molecules (N 2 and O 2 ) is revealed and illustrated by the resonant X-ray emission spectra, while the occurrence of forbidden transitions in CO 2 is explained in terms of dynamical symmetry breaking due to vibronic coupling. X-ray emission spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the molecular structure of liquid water, liquid methanol, methanol–water mixtures, as well as cation–water solutions, and to reveal the influence of the intermolecular interaction on the local electronic structure of water molecules. The in situ soft X-ray spectroscopy experimental studies of electrochemical reactions were also performed under ambient conditions

  10. Characterization of TiAlN thin film annealed under O2 by in situ time of flight direct recoil spectroscopy/mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempez, A.; Bensaoula, A.; Schultz, A.

    2002-01-01

    The oxidation of an amorphous TiAlN coating has been studied by in situ direct recoil spectroscopy (DRS) and mass spectroscopy of recoiled ions (MSRI) and ex situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). DRS and MSRI monitored the changes in surface composition as the sample was heated to 460 deg. C under an 18 O 2 pressure of 10 -6 Torr. Angular resolved XPS data were acquired for thickness-dependence information. The initial surface was partially oxidized from air exposure. Both DRS and XPS showed the Al-rich near surface and the presence of N in the subsurface. As shown by DRS and MSRI, oxidation at elevated temperatures yielded surface nitrogen loss and Ti enrichment. XPS confirmed the preferential formation of TiO 2 on the surface. This study also provides a comparison between the direct recoil (neutrals and ions) and the ionic recoil signals. In our conditions, the negative ionic fraction of all elements except H tracks their true surface content variations given by DRS. The results were compared with early work performed on identical samples. In this case the TiAlN film was oxidized with an O 2 pressure in the mTorr range and the surface changes are followed in situ by positive MSRI and XPS. This experiment also indicates that Al and N are buried under TiO 2 but from 600 deg. C

  11. Design and implementation of a laser-based absorption spectroscopy sensor for in situ monitoring of biomass gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveros Salazar, David; Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert J.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2017-12-01

    Research to demonstrate in situ laser-absorption-based sensing of H2O, CH4, CO2, and CO mole fraction is reported for the product gas line of a biomass gasifier. Spectral simulations were used to select candidate sensor wavelengths that optimize sensitive monitoring of the target species while minimizing interference from other species in the gas stream. A prototype sensor was constructed and measurements performed in the laboratory at Stanford to validate performance. Field measurements then were demonstrated in a pilot scale biomass gasifier at West Biofuels in Woodland, CA. The performance of a prototype sensor was compared for two sensor strategies: wavelength-scanned direct absorption (DA) and wavelength-scanned wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lasers used had markedly different wavelength tuning response to injection current, and modern distributed feedback lasers (DFB) with nearly linear tuning response to injection current were shown to be superior, leading to guidelines for laser selection for sensor fabrication. Non-absorption loss in the transmitted laser intensity from particulate scattering and window fouling encouraged the use of normalized WMS measurement schemes. The complications of using normalized WMS for relatively large values of absorbance and its mitigation are discussed. A method for reducing adverse sensor performance effects of a time-varying WMS background signal is also presented. The laser absorption sensor provided measurements with the sub-second time resolution needed for gasifier control and more importantly provided precise measurements of H2O in the gasification products, which can be problematic for the typical gas chromatography sensors used by industry.

  12. [In situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy study of CO adsorption on Ni2P/mesoporous molecule sieve catalysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian-qian; Ji, Sheng-fu; Wu, Ping-yi; Hu, Lin-hua; Huang, Xiao-fan; Zhu, Ji-qin; Li, Cheng-yue

    2009-05-01

    Abstract The supported nickel phosphate precursors were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation using nickel nitrate as nickel source, diammonium hydrogen phosphate as phosphorus source, and MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15 and SBA-16 as supports, respectively. Then, the supported Ni2 P catalysts were prepared by temperature-programmed reduction in flowing Hz from their nickel phosphate precursors. The in situ diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis with the probe molecule CO was carried out to characterize the surface properties. The results indicated that there were significant differences in the spectral features of the samples. The upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on mesoporous molecule sieve was attributed to weak physical adsorption. There are four different kinds of upsilon(CO) absorbances observed for adsorbed CO on Ni2 P/MCM-41 catalyst with the following assignments: (1) the formation of Ni(CO)4 at 2055 cm(-1). (2) CO terminally bonded to cus Ni(delta+) (0

  13. Interface electronic properties of co-evaporated MAPbI3 on ZnO(0001): In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Li, Xiaoli; Huang, Feng; Zhong, Dingyong; Liu, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the interface electronic properties of ZnO(0001)/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 were investigated by both X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 thin films were grown on single crystalline ZnO(0001) substrate in situ by co-evaporation of PbI 2 and CH 3 NH 3 I at room temperature with various thickness from 1.5 nm to 190 nm. It was found that the conduction band minimum of ZnO lies 0.3 eV below that of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , while the valence band maximum of ZnO lies 2.1 eV below that of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 , implying that the electrons can be effectively transported from CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 to ZnO, and the holes can be blocked in the same time. A PbI 2 rich layer was initially formed at the interface of ZnO(0001)/CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 during the growth. As a consequence, an interface barrier was built up which may prevent the electron transport at the interface.

  14. Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  15. In situ analysis of the Zn(S,O) buffer layer preparation for chalcopyrite solar cells by Zn L-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauermann, Iver; Kropp, Timo; Vottier, Damien; Ennaoui, Ahmed; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Aziz, Emad F

    2009-02-23

    Bridging the gap between high-vacuum soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and real systems under ambient conditions probes chemical reactions in situ during deposition and annealing processes. The origin of highly efficient buffer layers in Zn(S,O) is the complex formation between Zn(2+) and the S=C group of thiourea (see schematic), which allows ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge transfer (LMCT and MLCT).

  16. Transcription factor AP-2gamma is a developmentally regulated marker of testicular carcinoma in situ and germ cell tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Nielsen, John E; Almstrup, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    and protein level in normal human tissues and a panel of tumors and tumor-derived cell lines. In the gonads, we established the ontogeny of expression of AP-2gamma in normal and dysgenetic samples. We also investigated the regulation of AP-2gamma by steroids and retinoic acid. RESULTS: We detected abundant AP...

  17. In-situ Optical Spectroscopy Investigation of Water and Its influence on Forsterite Transformation in Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Thompson, C. J.; Joly, A. G.; Sklarew, D. S.; Poindexter, L.; Rosso, K. M.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) from coal/gas-burning power plants is currently viewed as one of the most promising technologies for mitigating green house gas emissions. This strategy involves injection of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) into deep geological formations such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs and deep saline aquifers. The feasibility of this approach and the ultimate fate of the stored CO2 are determined by the interactions between scCO2, various minerals in the rock formations, and the host fluids. Currently, there is only limited knowledge about both the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the physical and chemical processes that occur between scCO2 and relevant minerals, such as metal silicates and metal aluminosilicates, and the role of water activity for catalyzing mineral transformation reactions. In this work, we have developed a modular in situ optical spectroscopic platform that integrates a scCO2 generation and manipulation system with an array of optical and laser spectroscopies including UV-visible, IR, Raman and laser fluorescence spectroscopy. We have used the system to study i) the dissolution and quantification of H2O/D2O in scCO2 and ii) interaction between scCO2 and a model metal silicate, forsterite (Mg2SiO4), and the effects of the presence of water under variable pressure, temperature and water content. Our results showed that H2O and D2O have unique IR spectral features over a broad spectral range from 700 cm-1 to ~ 2900 cm-1 in scCO2 and their concentrations are directly proportional to the characteristic IR bands that correspond to their stretching (D2O) and bending frequencies (both D2O and H2O). These bands offer a unique spectroscopic signature useful for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the properties and reactivity of small amounts of H2O in scCO2. metal carbonation reactions relevant to sequestration.

  18. The goals of gamma-ray spectroscopy in high energy astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.; Higdon, James C.; Leventhal, Marvin; Ramaty, Reuven; Woosley, Stanford E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in astrophysics is discussed with specific attention given to the application of the Nuclear Astrophysics Explorer (NAE). The gamma-ray lines from nuclear transitions in radionucleic decay and positron annihilation permits the study of current sites, rates and models of nucleosynthesis, and galactic structure. Diffuse galactic emission is discussed, and the high-resolution observations of gamma-ray lines from discrete sites are also described. Interstellar mixing and elemental abundances can also be inferred from high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy of nucleosynthetic products. Compact objects can also be examined by means of gamma-ray emissions, allowing better understanding of neutron stars and the accreting black hole near the galactic center. Solar physics can also be investigated by examining such features as solar-flare particle acceleration and atmospheric abundances.

  19. Role of Bi promotion and solvent in platinum-catalyzed alcohol oxidation probed by in situ X-ray absorption and ATR-IR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, C.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Ferri, D.

    2010-01-01

    the catalysts under working conditions using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), aiming at uncovering the roles of the metal promoter and the reaction medium. XAS confirms that Bi is oxidized more easily than Pt, maintaining the catalytic...... surfaces than on step or kink sites. Side products, CO and benzoate species, appearing during the reaction reveal that the geometric suppression of undesired reactions does not occur to the same extent on Pt-based catalysts as on Pd, suggesting that decarbonylation of the produced aldehyde on Pt may occur...

  20. Silver in geological fluids from in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Roux, Jacques; Ferlat, Guillaume; Jonchiere, Romain; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2013-04-01

    The molecular structure and stability of species formed by silver in aqueous saline solutions typical of hydrothermal settings were quantified using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, quantum-chemical modeling of near-edge absorption spectra (XANES) and extended fine structure spectra (EXAFS), and first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD). Results show that in nitrate-bearing acidic solutions to at least 200 °C, silver speciation is dominated by the hydrated Ag+ cation surrounded by 4-6 water molecules in its nearest coordination shell with mean Ag-O distances of 2.32 ± 0.02 Å. In NaCl-bearing acidic aqueous solutions of total Cl concentration from 0.7 to 5.9 mol/kg H2O (m) at temperatures from 200 to 450 °C and pressures to 750 bar, the dominant species are the di-chloride complex AgCl2- with Ag-Cl distances of 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and Cl-Ag-Cl angle of 160 ± 10°, and the tri-chloride complex AgCl32- of a triangular structure and mean Ag-Cl distances of 2.60 ± 0.05 Å. With increasing temperature, the contribution of the tri-chloride species decreases from ˜50% of total dissolved Ag in the most concentrated solution (5.9m Cl) at 200 °C to less than 10-20% at supercritical temperatures for all investigated solutions, so that AgCl2- becomes by far the dominant Ag-bearing species at conditions typical of hydrothermal-magmatic fluids. Both di- and tri-chloride species exhibit outer-sphere interactions with the solvent as shown by the detection, using FPMD modeling, of H2O, Cl-, and Na+ at distances of 3-4 Å from the silver atom. The species fractions derived from XAS and FPMD analyses, and total AgCl(s) solubilities, measured in situ in this work from the absorption edge height of XAS spectra, are in accord with thermodynamic predictions using the stability constants of AgCl2- and AgCl32- from Akinfiev and Zotov (2001) and Zotov et al. (1995), respectively, which are based on extensive previous AgCl(s) solubility measurements. These data

  1. Gamma-Ray Instrument for Polarimetry, Spectroscopy and Imaging (GIPSI)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kroeger, R. A; Johnson, W. N; Kinzer, R. L; Kurfess, J. D; Inderhees, S. E; Phlips, B. F; Graham, B. L

    1996-01-01

    .... Gamma-ray polarimetry in the energy band around 60-300 keV is an interesting area of high energy astrophysics where observations have not been possible with the technologies employed in current and past space missions...

  2. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kehl, S.R.; Mount, M.E.; Robison, W.L.

    1995-09-01

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of 90 Sr, 137 Cs, 241 Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA's radiochemistry department were accepted

  3. Corrosion behaviour of selected high-level waste packaging materials under gamma irradiation and in-situ disposal conditions in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smailos, E.; Schwarzkopf, W.; Koester, R.

    1988-07-01

    Corrosion studies performed until now on a number of materials have shown that unalloyed steels, Hastelloy C4 and Ti 99.8-Pd are the most promising materials for a long-term resistant packaging to be used in high-level waste (HLW) canister disposal in rock salt formations. To characterize their corrosion behaviour in more detail, additional studies have been performed. The influence has been examined which is exerted by the gamma dose rate (1 Gy/h to 100 Gy/h) on the corrosion of three preselected steels and Hastelloy C4 at 90 0 C in a salt brine (Q-brine) rich in MgCl 2 , i.e., conditions relevant to accident scenarios in a repository. In addition, in-situ corrosion experiments have been carried out in the Asse salt mine at elevated temperatures (120 0 C to 210 0 C) in the absence and in the presence of a gamma radiation field of 3 x 10 2 Gy/h, within the framework of the German/US Brine Migration Test. Under the test conditions the gamma radiation did not exert a significant influence on the corrosion of the steels investigated, whereas Hastelloy C4, exposed to dose rates of 10 Gy/h and 100 Gy/h, underwent pitting and crevice corrosion (20 μm/a at the maximum).The low amounts of migrated salt brine (140 ml after 900 days) in the in-situ- experiment did not produce noticeable corrosion of the materials. (orig./RB) [de

  4. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  5. VAT-69, a software system for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furr, A.K.; Roscoe, B.A.; Parkinson, T.F.

    1979-01-01

    The software system was originally developed solely for neutron activation analysis. Its usefulness has been enhanced by adding modules that allow processing of gamma spectra from natural radioisotopes and from fission products. It allows: (1) separation of overlapping peaks, allowing retrieval of a peak of interest in the presence of an interfering peak, (2) calibration of each gamma spectrum for energy and peak width, using criteria based on gamma peak data internal to the individual spectrum, (3) correction for errors due to rapidly changing dead times during the counting interval, permitting accurate count data for samples containing mixed short-, medium-, and long-lived isotopes. One disadvantage of the original software was that it produced more output information than desired. The modifications that have been implemented to produce final concentration values include: (1) computation of a weighted-average concentration of the ith element where two or more gamma peaks are available, (2) rejection of gamma peaks when the difference in energies of the located peak and library peak exceeds a preset value, (3) rejection of concentration values based on gamma peaks which do not satisfy preselected criteria for irradiation time and wait time, (4) computation of the error in concentration of the ith element, and (5) correction of sample concentration for trace elements in the irradiation vials. Overall performance of the software system is checked periodically by analyzing standards. Several thousand spectra are processed each year with VAT-69, with typically 25 to 40 elements quantitatively determined

  6. In-situ Raman spectroscopy. A method to study and control the growth of microcrystalline silicon for thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthmann, Stefan

    2012-08-22

    This work deals with the design and application of a novel experiment, which enables in-situ Raman measurements during the parallel plate plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of {mu}cSi:H. Measurements of the crystalline volume fraction (I{sub C}{sup RS}) and the temperature of a growing film are carried out using the novel setup. To enable in-situ Raman measurement of central regions of the coated substrate in a PECVD system, optical access under normal incidence is necessary. An experimental setup in which an optical feed-through was integrated into a PECVD electrode was developed. This setup introduces a disturbance to the electrical field which sustains the plasma. By designing metallic shields the impact of the feed through was reduced considerably at low optical losses. The homogeneity of films deposited with the novel setup in different growth regimes was studied. A correlation between the magnitude of the inhomogeneity caused by the feed-through and the characteristics of the deposition regimes is found. Raman spectroscopy demands the illumination of a sample with a laser and the collection of the scattered radiation. Due to absorption of the laser light the temperature of the illuminated film is increased. Since the temperature determines the properties of a growing film the laser-induced temperature increase was studied. By pulsing the laser radiation of minimal temperature increase at maximal signal intensity was obtained. The crystalline volume fraction of a growing {mu}cSi:H layer was determined in-situ with the novel setup. A minimal temporal resolution of less than 17.5 s at sufficient signal-to-noise-ratio was achieved, which corresponds to less than 9 nm of deposited material during one measurement interval at the industrial standard growth rate of 0.5 nm/s. The obtained results were compared to depth resolved measurements which were carried out after the deposition. An excellent agreement between both methods validates the reliability

  7. Neutron counting and gamma spectroscopy with PVT detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation portals normally incorporate a dedicated neutron counter and a gamma-ray detector with at least some spectroscopic capability. This paper describes the design and presents characterization data for a detection system called PVT-NG, which uses large polyvinyl toluene (PVT) detectors to monitor both types of radiation. The detector material is surrounded by polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which emits high-energy gamma rays following neutron capture reactions. Assessments based on high-energy gamma rays are well suited for the detection of neutron sources, particularly in border security applications, because few isotopes in the normal stream of commerce have significant gamma ray yields above 3 MeV. Therefore, an increased count rate for high-energy gamma rays is a strong indicator for the presence of a neutron source. The sensitivity of the PVT-NG sensor to bare 252 Cf is 1.9 counts per second per nanogram (cps/ng) and the sensitivity for 252 Cf surrounded by 2.5 cm of polyethylene is 2.3 cps/ng. The PVT-NG sensor is a proof-of-principal sensor that was not fully optimized. The neutron detector sensitivity could be improved, for instance, by using additional moderator. The PVT-NG detectors and associated electronics are designed to provide improved resolution, gain stability, and performance at high-count rates relative to PVT detectors in typical radiation portals. As well as addressing the needs for neutron detection, these characteristics are also desirable for analysis of the gamma-ray spectra. Accurate isotope identification results were obtained despite the common impression that the absence of photopeaks makes data collected by PVT detectors unsuitable for spectroscopic analysis. The PVT detectors in the PVT-NG unit are used for both gamma-ray and neutron detection, so the sensitive volume exceeds the volume of the detection elements in portals that use dedicated components to detect each type of radiation.

  8. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, Korea) (Korea, Republic of); Won, Byeongho [Heesong Geotek Co., Ltd (146-8 Sangdaewon-dong, Jungwon-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea) (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  9. Assessment of Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) as a method for quantitative in situ surface diagnostic in plasma environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gierse, Niels Hannes Gustav

    2014-01-01

    In this work Laser Induced Ablation Spectroscopy (LIAS) is investigated as an in situ plasma surface interaction diagnostic for fusion reactors and fusion experiments. In LIAS an intensive laser pulse is used to ablate the material under investigation during plasma operation. Ablation products penetrate into the edge region of the plasma and are excited and ionized. In case of molecules and clusters additionally dissociation occurs. The emitted line radiation is observed by radiometric calibrated spectroscopy. Results from LIAS of W/C/Al/D-mixed layers and amorphous hydrocarbon layers are presented. Using a fast camera system time resolved measurements of the LIAS.process could be performed, allowing investigation of the temporal behavior of excitation, dissociation and ionization processes. For Tungsten, 90% of the LIAS light is observed within 10±3 μs after the laser pulse. In case of carbon within 20±3 μs. Additionally separation in time of LIAS emission and the LIBS emission caused by the laser pulse at the surface within single measurements was demonstrated. This allows the separate analysis of both processes in a coaxial setup which is foreseen for future experiments. The inverse photon efficiency of the Balmer D_α-emission from LIAS of a-C:D-layers was found to be [(D)/(XB)]"a"-"C":"D""L""I""A""S"_→"D_D__α=71±7. The plasma perturbation due to LIAS was investigated by laser energy density variation when ablating W/C/Al/D.mixed layers. Local plasma perturbation is found to increase with laser energy density. Balmer H_γ/H_δ - line intensity ratio measurements only show for ohmic discharges and the case of the lowest central density signs of local plasma perturbation in LIAS of graphite samples. A simple analytical model for local plasma perturbation during LIAS is introduced and evaluated. Qualitative agreement between the model and the above reported experimental observations is found; a stronger influence on local conditions is found by tungsten

  10. In situ speciation of the functional groups at mineral/electrolyte interfaces by sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floersheimer, M.; Kruse, K.; Klenze, R.; Kim, J.I. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Fanghaenel, Th. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, D-69120, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In order to describe surface reactivity and adsorption/desorption processes on the molecular level, a large number of functional groups has been postulated. In most cases, however, a direct proof for the existence of these species in real aquatic environment is lacking because it is difficult to obtain chemical analytical information in situ under electrolyte with interface selectivity. Here we apply interface selective sum frequency (SF) vibrational spectroscopy to study the (001) and (110) surfaces of sapphire ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) under water between pH 4 and 12. This work is part of an ongoing fundamental study of the sorption mechanism of actinides on single crystals faces of sapphire by various experimental and theoretical techniques. Sapphire is used as a simple model for natural clay minerals and related iron phases. In the O-H stretch region of the infrared spectrum between 2800 and 4000 cm{sup -1}, we observe a surprisingly large number of 8 SF bands in total. Two of them are due to the polar ordered water film near the mineral surface which is well known from various aquatic interfaces. The other bands originate from up to 6 different aluminol species or from specifically [1] bound water molecules. The prominent peak of the (001) surface (SF intensity maximum at 3690 cm{sup -1}), we attribute to an OH species bridging two [1-4] aluminium atoms. At the (110) surface, the concentration of this species is considerably smaller. Another aluminol species that can be detected at the (001) and the (110) surface (signal maximum near 3450 cm{sup -1}) exhibits O-H bonds which are almost parallel to the interface plane. This species is probably the in-plane aluminol group predicted in recent molecular dynamics calculations [4]. SF spectroscopy allows us also to measure the absolute polar orientation of the water molecules adjacent to the mineral surface. The inversion of the molecules polar orientation upon alteration of the p

  11. Feasibility study of plutonium isotopic analysis of resin beads by nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, T.K.

    1985-01-01

    We have initiated a feasibility study on the use of nondestructive low-energy gamma-ray spectroscopy for plutonium isotopic analysis on resin beads. Seven resin bead samples were measured, with each sample containing an average of 9 μg of plutonium; the isotopic compositions of the samples varied over a wide range. The gamma-ray spectroscopy results, obtained from 4-h counting-time measurements, were compared with mass spectrometry results. The average ratios of gamma-ray spectroscopy to mass spectrometry were 1.014 +- 0.025 for 238 Pu/ 239 Pu, 0.996 +- 0.018 for 240 Pu/ 239 Pu, and 0.980 +- 0.038 for 241 Pu/ 239 Pu. The rapid, automated, and accurate nondestructive isotopic analysis of resin beads may be very useful to process technicians and International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors. 3 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  12. In situ analysis of coal from single electrode resistance, self-potential and gamma-ray logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayal, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Single electrode resistance, self-potential and gamma-ray logging have been carried out in North Karanpura, West Bokaro and Jharia coalfields of Gondwana basin in Eastern India. Correlation of these geophysical logs is found to be very useful in locating the coal beds, determining their accurate depths and thickness and approximate quality. Coal seams have been detected as very high resistive formations compared to sandstone/shale which are interbedded in the coal basin. High or low self-potential values are obtained against the coal beds depending on the borehole fluid conditions. Burnt coals (Jhama) are characterised as highly conductive beds. Gamma ray logs have been effectively used alongwith electrical logs for correlation and identification of coal seams. Further analysis of gamma-ray log data determines a linear relationship with ash content of coal. (author)

  13. A subfertile patient diagnosed with testicular carcinoma in situ by immunocytological staining for AP-2gamma in semen samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Carlsen, E

    2005-01-01

    patients, including patients with testicular cancer and subfertility. Cells positive for AP-2gamma were found only in semen samples from patients diagnosed a priori with testicular neoplasms and, surprisingly, in a 23 year old control subject with oligozoospermia and no symptoms of a germ cell tumour......, simple method based on immunocytological staining of a semen sample for AP-2gamma, a novel marker for CIS. The value of this method for diagnostic use in the clinic requires further careful validation in a large series of patients and controls, but the preliminary results are promising....

  14. A new method for the determination of radionuclide distribution in the soil by in situ gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zombori, P.; Andrasi, A.; Nemeth, I.

    1992-06-01

    A method was searched for to estimate the penetration characteristics of fallout radioactivity, using only spectral information obtained by in situ spectrometric measurements, and avoiding the need for long and tiresome sampling and sample analysis procedures. To speed up the analysis for depth distribution determination of fallout radioactivity in soil, an instrumental method based on the shape of spectra was developed. The ratio of peak to valley (the region between the photopeak and Compton edge) depends on the penetration of radionuclides in soil, providing an estimation of depth profile. These ratios were calculated and the method was tested by actual measurements. (R.P.) 7 refs.; 14 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Positron Annihilation Induced Auger and Gamma Spectroscopy of Catalytically Important Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A. H.; Nadesalingam, M. P.; Sundaramoorthy, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Fazleev, N. G.

    2006-10-01

    The annihilation of positrons with core electrons results in unique signatures in the spectra of Auger-electron and annihilation-gamma rays that can be used to make clear chemical identification of atoms at the surface. Because positrons implanted at low energies are trapped with high efficiency in the image-correlation well where they are localized just outside the surface it is possible to use annihilation induced Auger and Gamma signals to probe the surfaces of solids with single atomic layer depth resolution. In this talk we will report recent applications of Positron Annihilation Induced Auger Electron Spectroscopy (PAES) and Auger-Gamma Coincidence Spectroscopy (AGCS) to the study of surface structure and surface chemistry. Our research has demonstrated that PAES spectra can provide new information regarding the composition of the top-most atomic layer. Applications of PAES to the study of catalytically important surfaces of oxides and wide band-gap semiconductors including TiO2, SiO2,Cu2O, and SiC will be presented. We conclude with a discussion of the use of Auger-Gamma and Gamma-Gamma coincidence spectroscopy for the study of surfaces at pressures closer to those found in practical chemical reactors. Research supported by the Welch Foundation Grant Number Y-1100.

  16. Quantitative portable gamma-spectroscopy sample analysis for non-standard sample geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebara, S.B.

    1998-01-01

    Utilizing a portable spectroscopy system, a quantitative method for analysis of samples containing a mixture of fission and activation products in nonstandard geometries was developed. This method was not developed to replace other methods such as Monte Carlo or Discrete Ordinates but rather to offer an alternative rapid solution. The method can be used with various sample and shielding configurations where analysis on a laboratory based gamma-spectroscopy system is impractical. The portable gamma-spectroscopy method involves calibration of the detector and modeling of the sample and shielding to identify and quantify the radionuclides present in the sample. The method utilizes the intrinsic efficiency of the detector and the unattenuated gamma fluence rate at the detector surface per unit activity from the sample to calculate the nuclide activity and Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). For a complex geometry, a computer code written for shielding applications (MICROSHIELD) is utilized to determine the unattenuated gamma fluence rate per unit activity at the detector surface. Lastly, the method is only applicable to nuclides which emit gamma-rays and cannot be used for pure beta or alpha emitters. In addition, if sample self absorption and shielding is significant, the attenuation will result in high MDA's for nuclides which solely emit low energy gamma-rays. The following presents the analysis technique and presents verification results using actual experimental data, rather than comparisons to other approximations such as Monte Carlo techniques, to demonstrate the accuracy of the method given a known geometry and source term. (author)

  17. Quantitative portable gamma spectroscopy sample analysis for non-standard sample geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enghauser, M.W.; Ebara, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Utilizing a portable spectroscopy system, a quantitative method for analysis of samples containing a mixture of fission and activation products in nonstandard geometries was developed. The method can be used with various sample and shielding configurations where analysis on a laboratory based gamma spectroscopy system is impractical. The portable gamma spectroscopy method involves calibration of the detector and modeling of the sample and shielding to identify and quantify the radionuclides present in the sample. The method utilizes the intrinsic efficiency of the detector and the unattenuated gamma fluence rate at the detector surface per unit activity from the sample to calculate the nuclide activity and Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA). For a complex geometry, a computer code written for shielding applications (MICROSHIELD) is utilized to determine the unattenuated gamma fluence rate per unit activity at the detector surface. Lastly, the method is only applicable to nuclides which emit gamma rays and cannot be used for pure beta emitters. In addition, if sample self absorption and shielding is significant, the attenuation will result in high MDA's for nuclides which solely emit low energy gamma rays. The following presents the analysis technique and presents verification results demonstrating the accuracy of the method

  18. Multiple Gamma-Ray Detection Capability of a CeBr3 Detector for Gamma Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Naqvi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed cerium tribromide (CeBr3 detector has reduced intrinsic gamma-ray activity with gamma energy restricted to 1400–2200 keV energy range. This narrower region of background gamma rays allows the CeBr3 detector to detect more than one gamma ray to analyze the gamma-ray spectrum. Use of multiple gamma-ray intensities in elemental analysis instead of a single one improves the accuracy of the estimated results. Multigamma-ray detection capability of a cylindrical 75 mm × 75 mm (diameter × height CeBr3 detector has been tested by analyzing the chlorine concentration in water samples using eight chlorine prompt gamma rays over 517 to 8578 keV energies utilizing a D-D portable neutron generator-based PGNAA setup and measuring the corresponding minimum detection limit (MDC of chlorine. The measured MDC of chlorine for gamma rays with 517–8578 keV energies varies from 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% to 0.80 ± 0.24. The best value of MDC was measured to be 0.07 ± 0.02 wt% for 788 keV gamma rays. The experimental results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations. The study has shown excellent detection capabilities of the CeBr3 detector for eight prompt gamma rays over 517–8578 keV energy range without significant background interference.

  19. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  20. In Situ Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Analyte-Specific Monitoring of Glucose and Ammonium in Streptomyces coelicolor Fermentations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nanna; Ödman, Peter; Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili

    2010-01-01

    was used as a model process. Partial least squares (PLS) regression models were calibrated for glucose and ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ. To ensure that the models were calibrated based on analyte-specific information, semisynthetic samples were used for model calibration in addition...... resulting in a RMSEP of 1.1 g/L. The prediction of ammonium based on NIR spectra collected in situ was not satisfactory. A comparison with models calibrated based on NIR spectra collected off line suggested that this is caused by signal attenuation in the optical fibers in the region above 2,000 nm...

  1. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Imaging, Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Greiner, J.; Mannheim, K.; Hudec, René; Mészáros, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2012), s. 551-582 ISSN 0922-6435 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : compton and pair creation telescope * gamma-ray bursts * nucleosynthesis Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2012

  2. In situ gamma spectrometry aspects of an European intercomparison of national networks used to provide early warning of a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurriaran, R.; Lemercier, M.; Bouisset, P.; Cagnat, X.; Saez-Vergara, J. C.; Tyler, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    In 2002, the EURADOS Working Group on Environmental Monitoring organised the second European intercomparison exercise of national network systems used to provide early warning in case of a nuclear accident. The aim of the exercise is to ensure consistent and comparable results reported by different countries during a nuclear accident, hence avoiding that the dose rate measurements reported present steps at national borders due to different calibrations or different measurement quantities being used. The exercise studied the response of the detectors to different situations: Free field site, a flat area covered with grass. The detectors where in presence of environmental radiation and point sources. Radioactive plume simulator. An incident was simulated by gradually increasing the ambient dose rate by values up to 50% of the normal value. Cosmic radiation site. A platform installed in the middle of a lake permitted to study the response of detectors to cosmic rays in the absence of other components. Ultra low background laboratory (UDO). Situated at 925 m in a salt mine this unique facility has a very low ambient dose (<1 nSv/h) and permitted the study of the response of detectors to collimated beams, in the absence of other components. The exercise was focused on the systems that continuously monitor the ambient dose rate but a novelty in the 2002 intercomparison was the participation of in situ gamma spectrometry teams. This presentation will focus on the in situ gamma spectrometry aspects: The interest of having the energy spectra information in order to discriminate the different contributors to the ambient dose, and the work that has been done in order to ensure an agreement between the dosimetry aspects and the spectrometry results

  3. In Situ Visible to Short Wavelength Imaging Spectroscopy with the Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS): Case Studies from the Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaney, D.; Mouroulis, P.; Green, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Sellar, G.; Van Gorp, B.; Wilson, D.

    2011-01-01

    In Situ imaging spectroscopy provides a way to address complex questions of geological evolution for both aqueous and igneous processes by mapping mineral composition at the spatial scale of rocks and outcrops. Examination of locations studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity can provide examples of the potential utility and define the needed measurement requirements. A compact instrument is needed to be able to adequately address these science questions from a rover platform. The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is an instrument designed to address the science need and implementation constraints.

  4. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of nuclei near {sup 100}Sn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seweryniak, D; Nyberg, J; Fahlander, C [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Cederwall, B; Norline, L; Johnson, A; Kerek, A [Manne Siegbahn Inst. of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden); Adamides, E [National Centre for Scientific Research, Ag. Paraskevi, Attiki (Greece); Atac, A; Piiparinen, M; Sletten, G [Niels Bohr Inst., Copenhagen (Denmark); Angelis, G de [Laboratori Nazionali di legnaro (Italy); Grawe, H; Schubart, R [Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin GmbH (Germany); Ideguchi, E; Mitarai, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Julin, R; Juutinen, S; Tormanen, S; Virtanen, A [Jyvaeskylae Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physics; Karczmarczyk, W; Kownacki, J [Warsaw Univ. (Poland)

    1992-08-01

    Proton rich nuclei close to {sup 100}Sn have been investigated in an in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic study using the NORDBALL detector array, including arrays of charged particle and neutron detectors. Excited states were identified for the first time in {sup 102}In, {sup 106,107,108}Sb and tentatively in {sup 108,109}Te. The nucleus {sup 110}Te was also populated and studied for the first time in an in-beam experiment. (author). 4 figs.

  5. In situ prompt gamma-ray activation analysis of water pollutants using a shallow 252Cf-HPGe probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung Chien; Tseng Tzucheng

    1988-01-01

    A shallow 252 Cf-HPGe probe used for in situ prompt γ-ray activation of water pollutants is described. A 2.7 μg 252 Cf neutron source and a 10% HPGe detector are inserted into a waterproof stainless steel probe, which is designed to be submerged and recovered in field operation. A laboratory test is performed to obtain the neutron flux distribution and prompt γ-ray contribution to the HPGe detector counts from around the submerged probe. The concentrations of toxic cadmium and chlorine in water are determined in the prompt γ-ray spectrum. The detection limit of industrial pollutants and some improvements of the current design are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of gamma spectroscopy gauge for uranium-plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notea, A.; Segal, Y.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure is presented for the characterization of a gamma passive method for nondestructive analysis of nuclear fuel. The approach provides an organized and systematic way for optimizing the assay system. The key function is the relative resolving power defined as the smallest relative change in the Quantity of radionuclide measured, that may be detected within a certain confidence level. This function is derived for nuclear fuel employing a model based on empirical parameters. The ability to detect changes in fuels of binary and trinary compositions with a 50 cc Ge(Li) at a 1 min counting period is discussed. As an example to a binary composition, an enriched uranium fuel was considered. The 185 keV and 1001 keV gamma lines are used for the assay of 235 U and 238 U respectively. As a trinary composition a plutonium-containing gamma line. The interference of the high energy lines is carefully analyzed, and numerical results are presented. For both cases the range of measurement under specific accuracy demands is determined. The approach described is suitable also for evaluation of other passive as well as active assay methods. (author)

  7. Quantification of 235 U and 226 Ra in soil samples by means of Gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero P, E.; Rojas M, V.P.; Montes M, F.R.; Gaso P, M.I.; Cervantes N, M.L.

    2000-01-01

    In this work it is presented the Gamma Spectroscopy method which is realized in the Environmental Radiological Surveillance Laboratory using the option of deconvolution of a commercial software for the quantification of 235 U and 226 Ra; also is presented the method for the 226 Ra correction activity. (Author)

  8. Execution of a cooperative test by means of 'in-situ-gamma spectrometry' using HP-germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, F.; Lovranich, E.; Urbanich, E.; Streit, S.

    1995-06-01

    A cooperative test was carried out in Salzburg, Austria, in order to determine the activity of Cs-137 and other radio nuclides from the Tschernobyl fallout 1986 and from tests of nuclear weapons in the 1960s. 24 groups from 9 countries of Europe took part. The measurements were performed by means of gamma spectrometry using HP-germanium detectors. Most of the groups had excellent results. The groups became acquainted with each other. The personal contact makes it possible to get information quickly in case of accidents of nuclear power stations in the neighbourhood of Austria

  9. Development of a gamma ray spectroscopy capability at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.O.; Strottman, D.D.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to explore an upgrade to the GEANIE high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to help build additional experimental capabilities. The improvements identified have significantly added to the capabilities of GEANIE and made the facility more attractive for studies supporting the core national security mission as well as for use by outside collaborators. These benefits apply to both basic and applied studies

  10. Low-temperature, ultrahigh-vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy combined with molecular beam epitaxy for in situ two-dimensional materials' studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shaoxiang; Li, Wenbin; Gou, Jian; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2018-05-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), which combines scanning probe microscopy with the Raman spectroscopy, is capable to access the local structure and chemical information simultaneously. However, the application of ambient TERS is limited by the unstable and poorly controllable experimental conditions. Here, we designed a high performance TERS system based on a low-temperature ultrahigh-vacuum scanning tunneling microscope (LT-UHV-STM) and combined with a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. It can be used for growing two-dimensional (2D) materials and for in situ STM and TERS characterization. Using a 2D silicene sheet on the Ag(111) surface as a model system, we achieved an unprecedented 109 Raman single enhancement factor in combination with a TERS spatial resolution down to 0.5 nm. The results show that TERS combined with a MBE system can be a powerful tool to study low dimensional materials and surface science.

  11. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water.

  12. Studies on electrochemical hydrodebromination mechanism of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid on Ag electrode by in situ FTIR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Meichao; Bao Dandan; Ma Chunan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Silver is a good catalyst for the hydrodebromination of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid. → 3-Bromobenzoic acid as main intermediate product. → The finally product is benzoic acid. → In situ FTIR is useful to study the electrochemical hydrodebromination mechanism. - Abstract: Cyclic voltammetry and in situ FTIR were employed to study the electrochemical hydrodebromination (EHB) mechanism of 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (2,5-DBBA) in NaOH solution. Compared with titanium and graphite electrodes, silver electrode exhibited a high electrocatalytic activity for the hydrodebromination reaction of 2,5-DBBA. On the basis of in situ FTIR data, EHB reaction of 2,5-DBBA on Ag cathode might be represented as a sequence of electron additions and bromine expulsions. Firstly, from potential at approximately -1100 mV, 2,5-DBBA received an electron to form 2,5-DBBA radical anion, which lost a bromine ion in the 2-position to form 3-bromobenzoic acid (3-BBA) free radical. Then the free radical received a proton to give 3-BBA. Finally, 3-BBA further took off another bromine ion to produce benzoic acid free radical and the end product benzoic acid was obtained by receiving another electron and a proton with the potential shifting to more negative values.

  13. Dynamical observation of lithium insertion/extraction reaction during charge-discharge processes in Li-ion batteries by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyamada, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Yoshida, Ryuji; Kato, Takehisa; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Hirayama, Tsukasa

    2015-12-01

    All-solid-state Li-ion batteries (LIBs) with solid electrolytes are expected to be the next generation devices to overcome serious issues facing conventional LIBs with liquid electrolytes. However, the large Li-ion transfer resistance at the electrode/solid-electrolyte interfaces causes low power density and prevents practical use. In-situ-formed negative electrodes prepared by decomposing the solid electrolyte Li(1+x+3z)Alx(Ti,Ge)(2-x)Si(3z)P(3-z)O12 (LASGTP) with an excess Li-ion insertion reaction are effective electrodes providing low Li-ion transfer resistance at the interfaces. Prior to our work, however, it had still been unclear how the negative electrodes were formed in the parent solid electrolytes. Here, we succeeded in dynamically visualizing the formation by in situ spatially resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope mode (SR-TEM-EELS). The Li-ions were gradually inserted into the solid electrolyte region around 400 nm from the negative current-collector/solid-electrolyte interface in the charge process. Some of the ions were then extracted in the discharge process, and the rest were diffused such that the distribution was almost flat, resulting in the negative electrodes. The redox reaction of Ti(4+)/Ti(3+) in the solid electrolyte was also observed in situ during the Li insertion/extraction processes. The in situ SR-TEM-EELS revealed the mechanism of the electrochemical reaction in solid-state batteries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. {gamma} ray spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei around N=20; Spectroscopie {gamma} des noyaux riches en neutrons autour de N=20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, M

    2007-09-15

    There is an island of inversion around {sup 32}Mg (12 protons, 20 neutrons) in contradiction with a shell closure N=20. It means a coexistence of spherical and deformed shapes. This work is devoted to the study of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy for nuclei in this region, based on an experiment done at GANIL with a composite secondary beam produced by fragmentation. The originality of the method used here lies in the possibility to study simultaneously several nuclei, and for each of them to explore several reaction channels. The VAMOS spectrometer was used for the identification of the ejectiles. The {gamma}-rays were detected with EXOGAM, a germanium clover array. The detectors used before and after the target allowed for a unique identification and a selection of the reaction channel: inelastic scattering, transfer and fragmentation reaction. In this thesis the following nuclei were studied: {sup 28}Ne, {sup 30-32}Mg {sup 31-34}Al, {sup 33-35}Si, {sup 35}P. New {gamma}-rays have been observed. The {gamma}-ray angular distributions and {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlations have been measured for some transitions. Assignment of spins and parities has been proposed for some states. In particular, in {sup 34}Si, the 3{sup -} assignment is confirmed and a new candidate for the second 0{sup +} has been proposed. In {sup 32}Mg, the state at 2.321 MeV, for which conflicting assignment existed, is deduced from the present data as a 4{sup +}, and a 6{sup +} state is proposed. (author)

  15. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C., E-mail: g.burgada@caen.it [Costruzioni Apparecchiature Elettroniche Nucleari S.p.A. (CAEN), Viareggio (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G., E-mail: malvarez@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Baldoncini, M.; Xhixha, G.; Strati, V., E-mail: gerti.xhixha@unife.it [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Ferrara (Italy); Mantovani, F., E-mail: mantovani@fe.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Garosi, P.; Mou, L., E-mail: li.mou@libero.it [University of Siena (Italy); Alvarez, C. Rossi, E-mail: rossialvarez@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  16. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C.; Alvarez, M.A.G.; Mantovani, F.; Garosi, P.; Mou, L.; Alvarez, C. Rossi

    2014-01-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  17. Probing the influence of X-rays on aqueous copper solutions using time-resolved in situ combined video/X-ray absorption near-edge/ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesu, J. Gerbrand; Beale, Andrew M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved in situ video monitoring and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) have been used for the first time in a combined manner to study the effect of synchrotron radiation on a series of homogeneous aqueous copper solutions in a

  18. Quantification of hydrolysis of toxic organophosphates and organophosphonates by diisopropyl fluorophosphatase from Loligo vulgaris by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäb, Jürgen; Melzer, Marco; Kehe, Kai; Richardt, André; Blum, Marc-Michael

    2009-02-15

    The enzyme diisopropyl fluorophosphatase (DFPase) from the squid Loligo vulgaris effectively catalyzes the hydrolysis of diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and a number of organophosphorus nerve agents, including sarin, soman, cyclosarin, and tabun. Up to now, the determination of kinetic data has been achieved by techniques such as pH-stat titration, ion-selective electrodes, and fluorogenic substrate analogs. We report a new assaying method using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with attenuated total reflection (ATR) for the real-time determination of reaction rates. The method employs changes in the P-O-R stretching vibration of DFP and nerve agent substrates when hydrolyzed to their corresponding phosphoric and phosphonic acids. It is shown that the Lambert-Beer law holds and that changes in absorbance can be directly related to changes in concentration. Compared with other methods, the use of in situ FTIR spectroscopy results in a substantially reduced reaction volume that adds extra work safety when handling highly toxic substrates. In addition, the new method allows the noninvasive measurement of buffered solutions with varying ionic strengths complementing existing methods. Because the assay is independent of the used enzyme, it should also be applicable to other phosphotriesterase enzymes such as organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH), organophosphorus acid anhydrolase (OPAA), and paraoxonase (PON).

  19. Thermally Stable TiO2 - and SiO2 -Shell-Isolated Au Nanoparticles for In Situ Plasmon-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Hydrogenation Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-03-12

    Raman spectroscopy is known as a powerful technique for solid catalyst characterization as it provides vibrational fingerprints of (metal) oxides, reactants, and products. It can even become a strong surface-sensitive technique by implementing shell-isolated surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SHINERS). Au@TiO 2 and Au@SiO 2 shell-isolated nanoparticles (SHINs) of various sizes were therefore prepared for the purpose of studying heterogeneous catalysis and the effect of metal oxide coating. Both SiO 2 - and TiO 2 -SHINs are effective SHINERS substrates and thermally stable up to 400 °C. Nano-sized Ru and Rh hydrogenation catalysts were assembled over the SHINs by wet impregnation of aqueous RuCl 3 and RhCl 3 . The substrates were implemented to study CO adsorption and hydrogenation under in situ conditions at various temperatures to illustrate the differences between catalysts and shell materials with SHINERS. This work demonstrates the potential of SHINS for in situ characterization studies in a wide range of catalytic reactions. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Currie detection limits in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geer, L.-E. de

    2004-01-01

    Currie Hypothesis testing is applied to gamma-ray spectral data, where an optimum part of the peak is used and the background is considered well known from nearby channels. With this, the risk of making Type I errors is about 100 times lower than commonly assumed. A programme, PeakMaker, produces random peaks with given characteristics on the screen and calculations are done to facilitate a full use of Poisson statistics in spectrum analyses. Short technical note summary: The Currie decision limit concept applied to spectral data is reinterpreted, which gives better consistency between the selected error risk and the observed error rates. A PeakMaker program is described and the few count problem is analyzed

  1. Standard methods for sampling and sample preparation for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaeva, M.; Taskaev, E.; Nikolov, P.

    1993-01-01

    The strategy for sampling and sample preparation is outlined: necessary number of samples; analysis and treatment of the results received; quantity of the analysed material according to the radionuclide concentrations and analytical methods; the minimal quantity and kind of the data needed for making final conclusions and decisions on the base of the results received. This strategy was tested in gamma spectroscopic analysis of radionuclide contamination of the region of Eleshnitsa Uranium Mines. The water samples was taken and stored according to the ASTM D 3370-82. The general sampling procedures were in conformity with the recommendations of ISO 5667. The radionuclides was concentrated by coprecipitation with iron hydroxide and ion exchange. The sampling of soil samples complied with the rules of ASTM C 998, and their sample preparation - with ASTM C 999. After preparation the samples were sealed hermetically and measured. (author)

  2. Plutonium isotopic measurements by gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnink, R.

    1973-11-01

    A method is reported for analysis of isotopic and total plutonium by detecting and analyzing gamma rays emitted by the sample. A computerized prototype-system was developed and is now being routinely used at the Savannah River Plant for the nondestructive assay of solution samples. The analyses for 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, and for 241 Am, when it is present, can be made in counting times as short as 10 to 15 minutes under optimum conditions. Comparison of isotopic ratio values with mass spectrometry generally shows agreement within 0.1 percent for 239 Pu and about 1 percent for 240 Pu and 241 Pu. Some preliminary isotopic measurements on solids are also discussed. (U.S.)

  3. Gamma spectroscopy analysis of archived Marshall Island soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, S.; Hoffman, K.; Lavelle, K.; Trauth, A.; Glover, S.E.; Connick, W.; Spitz, H.; LaMont, S.P.; Hamilton, T.

    2016-01-01

    Four samples of archival Marshall Islands soil were subjected to non-destructive, broad energy (17 keV-2.61 MeV) gamma-ray spectrometry analysis using a series of different high-resolution germanium detectors. These archival samples were collected in 1967 from different locations on Bikini Atoll and were contaminated with a range of fission and activation products, and other nuclear material from multiple weapons tests. Unlike samples collected recently, these samples have been stored in sealed containers and have been unaffected by approximately 50 years of weathering. Initial results show that the samples contained measurable but proportionally different concentrations of plutonium, 241 Am, and 137 Cs, and 60 Co. (author)

  4. Quantification of 235U and 238U activity concentrations for undeclared nuclear materials by a digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Yi, Jing; Mekarski, Pawel; Ungar, Kurt; Hauck, Barry; Kramer, Gary H

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of verifying depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NU), low enriched uranium (LEU) and high enriched uranium (HEU) by a developed digital gamma-gamma coincidence spectroscopy. The spectroscopy consists of two NaI(Tl) scintillators and XIA LLC Digital Gamma Finder (DGF)/Pixie-4 software and card package. The results demonstrate that the spectroscopy provides an effective method of (235)U and (238)U quantification based on the count rate of their gamma-gamma coincidence counting signatures. The main advantages of this approach over the conventional gamma spectrometry include the facts of low background continuum near coincident signatures of (235)U and (238)U, less interference from other radionuclides by the gamma-gamma coincidence counting, and region-of-interest (ROI) imagine analysis for uranium enrichment determination. Compared to conventional gamma spectrometry, the method offers additional advantage of requiring minimal calibrations for (235)U and (238)U quantification at different sample geometries. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experience gained in gamma spectroscopy; Experience acquise dans la spectrometrie gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeanmaire, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    There are two types of method which make it possible to estimate the internal contamination of individuals. On the one hand these are the indirect techniques based on measurements of the excreted products, on the other there are the direct techniques in which attempts are made to measure directly the radio-activity existing in the organism. We propose to give a few of the results obtained by the direct method using equipment built by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The apparatus consists of a {gamma} spectrometer. It includes: 1) A crystal of sodium iodide 20 cm in diameter and 10 cm high. The large size of this crystal ensures a good sensitivity and makes it possible to carry out rapid measurements. 2) A 25 channel type SAE 25 selector which classifies the pulses according to their amplitude. It is therefore possible to distinguish between {gamma} rays of varying energy. 3) A comparatively very light radiation protection, consisting of only 5 cm thickness of lead which diminishes the ambient {gamma} ray intensity to a sufficient level for the majority of the measurements. A certain collimation is thus obtained which makes it possible to localise the source approximately and to reduce the undesirable effects of external contamination. (author) [French] Deux types de methodes permettent d'apprecier la contamination interne d'un individu. D'une part, les techniques indirectes basees sur la mesure des produits excretes, d'autre part, les techniques directes au moyen desquelles on essaie de mesurer directement la radioactivite existant dans l'organisme. Nous nous proposons d'indiquer quelques resultats obtenus par la methode directe, au moyen d'ensembles realises par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. L'appareillage est un spectrometre {gamma}. II comprend: 1) Un cristal d'iodure de sodium de 20 cm de diametre et 10 cm de hauteur. La grande taille de ce cristal assure une bonne sensibilite et permet d'effectuer des mesures rapides. 2) Un selecteur a 25 canaux

  6. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' G. Occhialini' ' and CNISM, Universita Degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Roma (Italy); Grazzi, F. [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via Madonna del Piano n.10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Schooneveld, E. M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  7. Combined in-beam gamma-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy with radioactive ion beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konki J.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In-beam gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy have been widely used as tools to study the broad variety of phenomena in nuclear structure. The SPEDE spectrometer is a new device to be used in conjunction with the MINIBALL germanium detector array to enable the detection of internal conversion electrons in coincidence with gamma rays from de-exciting nuclei in radioactive ion beam experiments at the upcoming HIE-ISOLDE facility at CERN, Switzerland. Geant4 simulations were carried out in order to optimise the design and segmentation of the silicon detector to achieve good energy resolution and performance.

  8. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of Λ11B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Yusuke

    2004-01-01

    Numbers of bound states have been predicted for the hypernucleus Λ 11 B. Experiment KEK-PS E518 was performed to investigate the spin dependence of the effective ΛN interaction of p-shell hypernucleus as well as the magnetic moment of Λ particle inside nucleus by measuring B(M1) of the Λ spin-flip transition. Experiment was carried out by using Hyperball detector which consists of fourteen germanium detectors to detect γ-rays from Λ 11 B produced by 11 B(π + , K + ) Λ 11 B reaction. Six gamma ray peaks were observed from the bound state of Λ 11 B at 262, 454, 500, 564, 1482, and 2479 keV. The 2479 keV peak was revealed by applying Doppler correction. The 1482 keV peak was identified as the Λ 11 B (E2;1/2 + → 5/2 + ) due to the short γ-transition life, good yield and the closeness of the γ-ray emission level to the ground state. Statistics were too poor for the rest five peaks to identify their origin without γ-γ coincidence measurement. The result shows that discrepancy between the experiment and theoretical prediction is large compared with other hypernuclei. Upgrading of the Hyperball and the γ-γ coincidence are considered for the future experiment. (S. Funahashi)

  9. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksieva, K.I.; Dimov, K.G.; Yordanov, N.D.

    2014-01-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to “cellulose-like” EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical “sugar-like“ spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation. - Highlights: • The EPR analysis of juices, nectars and syrups proves that the sample has been irradiated. • Two sample preparation procedures were used. • The stability of the radiation induced EPR signals was studied over 2 months. • Application of European standards can be extended for irradiated juices and syrups

  10. Identification of gamma-irradiated fruit juices by EPR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksieva, K. I.; Dimov, K. G.; Yordanov, N. D.

    2014-10-01

    The results of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on commercially available juices from various fruits and different fruit contents: 25%, 40%, 50%, and 100%, homemade juices, nectars and concentrated fruit syrups, before and after gamma-irradiation are reported. In order to remove water from non- and irradiated samples all juices and nectars were filtered; the solid residue was washed with alcohol and dried at room temperature. Only concentrated fruit syrups were dried for 60 min at 40 °C in a standard laboratory oven. All samples under study show a singlet EPR line with g=2.0025 before irradiation with exception of concentrated fruit syrups, which are EPR silent. Irradiation of juice samples gives rise to complex EPR spectra which gradually transferred to "cellulose-like" EPR spectrum from 25% to 100% fruit content. Concentrated fruit syrups show typical "sugar-like" spectra due to added saccharides. All EPR spectra are characteristic and can prove radiation treatment. The fading kinetics of radiation-induced EPR signals were studied for a period of 60 days after irradiation.

  11. Neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy: simulations for chemical mapping of planetary surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, J.; Waenke, H.; Reedy, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmic rays interact with the surface of a planetary body and produce a cascade of secondary particles, such as neutrons. Neutron-induced scattering and capture reactions play an important role in the production of discrete gamma-ray lines that can be measured by a gamma-ray spectrometer on board of an orbiting spacecraft. These data can be used to determine the concentration of many elements in the surface of a planetary body, which provides clues to its bulk composition and in turn to its origin and evolution. To investigate the gamma rays made by neutron interactions, thin targets were irradiated with neutrons having energies from 14 MeV to 0.025 eV. By means of foil activation technique the ratio of epithermal to thermal neutrons was determined to be similar to that in the Moon. Gamma rays emitted by the targets and the surrounding material were detected by a high-resolution germanium detector in the energy range of 0.1 to 8 MeV. Most of the gamma-ray lines that are expected to be used for planetary gamma-ray spectroscopy were found in the recorded spectra and the principal lines in these spectra are presented. 58 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  12. Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Norbert Pietralla

    2006-01-01

    The research project ''Nuclear Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limit of Particle Stability'' with sponsor ID ''DE-FG02-04ER41334'' started late-summer 2004 and aims at the investigation of highly excited low-spin states of selected key-nuclei in the vicinity of the particle separation threshold by means of high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy in electromagnetic excitation reactions. This work addresses nuclear structures with excitation energies close to the binding energy or highly excited off-yrast states in accordance with the NSAC milestones. In 2005 the program was extended towards additional use of virtual photons and theoretical description of the low-lying collective excitations in the well deformed nuclei

  13. Time dependent deadtime and pile-up corrections for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roscoe, B A; Furr, A K [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA)

    1977-01-15

    The losses of pulses in gamma spectroscopy due to the analog-to-digital (ADC) conversion process and due to pulse pile-up is a major problem in quantitative gamma ray spectroscopy. It is especially serious if the count rate varies significantly during the counting interval and if the nuclear events of interest are associated with an isotope with a half-life shorter than or comparable to the counting interval as is often the case for isotopes with half-lives of the order of 10 min or less. The count rates at which dead time losses become a problem depend upon the available equipment but, in the present work, the problem became acute at count rates in excess of 25000 cps. A technique developed at VPI and SU is discussed in the present work which very satisfactorily corrects for both ADC and pile-up losses and is dependent upon the half-life of the decaying radioisotope.

  14. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather A. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Modeling capabilities were added to an existing framework and codes were adapted as needed for analyzing experiments and assessing application-specific assay concepts including simulation of measurements over many short irradiation/spectroscopy cycles. The code package was benchmarked against the data collected at the IAC for small targets and assembly-scale data collected at LANL. A study of delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy for nuclear safeguards was performed for a variety of assemblies in the extensive NGSI spent fuel library. The modeling results indicate that delayed gamma-ray responses can be collected from spent fuel assemblies with statistical quality sufficient for analyzing their isotopic composition using a 1011 n/s neutron generator and COTS detector instrumentation.

  15. Homogeneity of Gd-based garnet transparent ceramic scintillators for gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Z. M.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    Transparent polycrystalline ceramic scintillators based on the composition Gd1.49Y1.49Ce0.02Ga2.2Al2.8O12 are being developed for gamma spectroscopy detectors. Scintillator light yield and energy resolution depend on the details of various processing steps, including powder calcination, green body formation, and sintering atmosphere. We have found that gallium sublimation during vacuum sintering creates compositional gradients in the ceramic and can degrade the energy resolution. While sintering in oxygen produces ceramics with uniform composition and little afterglow, light yields are reduced, compared to vacuum sintering. By controlling the atmosphere during the various process steps, we were able to minimize the gallium sublimation, resulting in a more homogeneous composition and improved gamma spectroscopy performance.

  16. Investigation of electric quadrupole interaction in TiO2 by means of perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, Thiago; Ramos, Juliana Marques; Carbonari, Artur Wilson; Silva, Andreia S.; Saxena, Rajendra Narain

    2011-01-01

    TiO 2 has called attention in both basic research and technological applications as an energy converter in solar cells, photo catalyst for water purification, sunscreen material, drug detection, and other applications. In addition TiO 2 is a candidate for use in medical devices, food preparation surfaces, air conditioning filters and sanitary ware surfaces.TiO 2 has two crystalline phases: anatase and rutile. The structural properties and hyperfine interactions in TiO 2 were investigated by perturbed gamma-gamma angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using 111 In and 181 Hf as probe nuclei. The PAC spectroscopy provides information on crystalline and electronic structure at an atomic scale. In the present work, PAC measurements on TiO 2 were focused on the development of a methodology to prepare bulk samples, which have been characterized by conventional techniques such as x-ray diffraction, (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The samples were prepared by the sol gel Pechini method. The resulting powders were annealed at different temperatures in a tubular furnace under nitrogen atmosphere. The PAC measurements were carried out at room temperature in air. The occupation fraction of the probe nuclei reached 50% when the sample was annealed at 1373K and after measured at room temperature.In this case the frequency measured in site 1 is in agreement with that found in literature for substitutional titanium site in rutile structure when 111 In were used as probe nuclei. It was measured a frequency more closely to that was found in literature[7] for the case in which 181 Hf were used as probe nuclei when the sample annealed at 1373 K and measured at 973 K. (author)

  17. Random pulsing of neutron source for inelastic neutron scattering gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzog, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus are described for use in the detection of inelastic neutron scattering gamma ray spectroscopy. Data acquisition efficiency is enhanced by operating a neutron generator such that a resulting output burst of fast neutrons is maintained for as long as practicably possible until a gamma ray is detected. Upon the detection of a gamma ray the generator burst output is terminated. Pulsing of the generator may be accomplished either by controlling the burst period relative to the burst interval to achieve a constant duty cycle for the operation of the generator or by maintaining the burst period constant and controlling the burst interval such that the resulting mean burst interval corresponds to a burst time interval which reduces contributions to the detected radiation of radiation occasioned by other than the fast neutrons

  18. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom); Edwards, Howell G.M. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.G.M.Edwards@bradford.ac.uk; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J.; Telford, Richard J. [Chemical and Forensic Sciences/University Analytical Centre, School of Life Sciences, University of Bradford, Richmond Road, Bradford BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-14

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting {beta}-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control.

  19. Evaluation of a compact spectrograph for in-situ and stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy analyses of geological samples on Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salle, Beatrice; Cremers, David A.; Maurice, Sylvestre; Wiens, Roger C.; Fichet, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is actively under development for future use on surface probes to Mars. The analytical method can be deployed for in-situ and/or stand-off analysis with the latter embodiment providing the greatest advantages compared to previous and current elemental analysis methods used for planetary surface analysis. For this application, LIBS must be thoroughly investigated in terms of analytical capabilities and flight-rated instruments must be developed. Because of the low pressure of the predominantly CO 2 atmosphere on Mars, studies are needed to understand analytical requirements and to determine performance under these conditions. Stand-off analysis demands the most stringent requirements on instrumentation. Therefore, it must be determined if the high performance components that are normally used in a typical LIBS laboratory setup, which are generally not optimized for small size and weight, are essential to obtain the maximum scientific return from a mission. A key component of a LIBS apparatus is the detection system consisting of a spectrograph and a detector. Here we present an evaluation of one design of a compact spectrograph (Ocean Optics HR2000) for in-situ and stand-off LIBS analyses of geological samples under Mars atmospheric conditions

  20. In-situ investigation of the order-disorder transition in Cu2ZnSnSe4 by optical transmission spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Stroth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of disorder is one possible reason for the limited performance of kesterite solar cells. Therefore further knowledge of the order-disorder phase transition, of factors which influence the degree of order and of methods to determine this material property is still required. In this study we investigated the order-disorder transition in the kesterite material Cu2ZnSnSe4 by in-situ optical transmission spectroscopy during heat treatments. We show in-situ results for the temperature dependence of the band gap and its tailing properties. The influence of cooling rates on the phase transition was analyzed as well as the ordering kinetics during annealing at a constant temperature. The critical temperature of the phase transition was determined and the existence of a control temperature range is shown, which allows for controlling the degree of order by the cooling rate within this range. Additionally we performed Raman analysis to link Raman spectra to the degree of order in Cu2ZnSnSe4. A correlation between the intensity ratio of A-modes as well as B-/ E- Raman modes and the degree of order was found.

  1. In-Situ Probing Plasmonic Energy Transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells by Ultrabroadband Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Li, Jia-Xing; Yabushita, Atsushi; Tang, Shih-Han; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-12-18

    In this work, we demonstrated a viable experimental scheme for in-situ probing the effects of Au nanoparticles (NPs) incorporation on plasmonic energy transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells by elaborately analyzing the lifetimes and zero moment for hot carrier relaxation with ultrabroadband femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The signals of enhanced photobleach (PB) and waned photoinduced absorption (PIA) attributable to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au NPs were in-situ probed in transient differential absorption spectra. The results suggested that substantial carriers can be excited from ground state to lower excitation energy levels, which can reach thermalization much faster with the existence of SPR. Thus, direct electron transfer (DET) could be implemented to enhance the photocurrent of CIGS solar cells. Furthermore, based on the extracted hot carrier lifetimes, it was confirmed that the improved electrical transport might have been resulted primarily from the reduction in the surface recombination of photoinduced carriers through enhanced local electromagnetic field (LEMF). Finally, theoretical calculation for resonant energy transfer (RET)-induced enhancement in the probability of exciting electron-hole pairs was conducted and the results agreed well with the enhanced PB peak of transient differential absorption in plasmonic CIGS film. These results indicate that plasmonic energy transfer is a viable approach to boost high-efficiency CIGS solar cells.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs and a preliminary investigation of their transformation using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Hassan Refat H.; Edwards, Howell G.M.; Hargreaves, Michael D.; Munshi, Tasnim; Scowen, Ian J.; Telford, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge and control of the polymorphic phases of chemical compounds are important aspects of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry. Salmeterol xinafoate, a long acting β-adrenergic receptor agonist, exists in two polymorphic Forms, I and II. Raman and near infrared spectra were obtained of these polymorphs at selected wavelengths in the range of 488-1064 nm; significant differences in the Raman and near-infrared spectra were apparent and key spectral marker bands have been identified for the vibrational spectroscopic characterisation of the individual polymorphs which were also characterised with X ray diffractometry. The solid-state transition of salmeterol xinafoate polymorphs was studied using simultaneous in situ portable Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry isothermally between transitions. This method assisted in the unambiguous characterisation of the two polymorphic forms by providing a simultaneous probe of both the thermal and vibrational data. The study demonstrates the value of a rapid in situ analysis of a drug polymorph which can be of potential value for at-line in-process control

  3. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry study of the NH3BH3 oxidation reaction on gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belén Molina Concha, M.; Chatenet, Marian; Lima, Fabio H.B.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2013-01-01

    The ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) oxidation reaction (ABOR) was studied on gold electrodes using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) setup and coupled physical techniques: on-line differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Non-negligible heterogeneous hydrolysis in the low-potential region was asserted via molecular H 2 detection. As a consequence, the number of electron exchanged per BH 3 OH − species is ca. 3 at low potential, and only reaches ca. 6 above 0.6 V vs. RHE. These figures were confirmed by Levich and Koutecki–Levich calculations using the RDE experiments data. The nature of the ABOR intermediates and products was determined using in situ FTIR. While BH 2 species were detected during the ABOR, it seems that its adsorption onto the Au electrode proceeds via the O atom, in opposition to what happens during the borohydride oxidation reaction (BOR). Therefore, it is likely that the mechanism of the ABOR differs from that of the BOR. From the whole set of data (RDE, DEMS, FTIR), a relevant reaction pathway was proposed, including competition between the BH 3 OH − heterogeneous hydrolysis and oxidation at low potential, and preponderant oxidation at higher potential. Finally, a simplified kinetic modeling accounting with this reaction pathway was proposed, which nicely fits the stationary (i vs. E) ABOR plot

  5. In situ loading of well-dispersed silver nanoparticles on nanocrystalline magnesium oxide for real-time monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaige; Li, Gongke; Hu, Yuling

    2015-10-28

    The surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique is of great importance for insight into the transient reaction intermediates and mechanistic pathways involved in heterogeneously catalyzed chemical reactions under actual reaction conditions, especially in water. Herein, we demonstrate a facile method for in situ synthesis of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide-Ag(0) (nano MgO-Ag(0)) hybrid nanomaterials with dispersed Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on the surface of nanocrystalline magnesium oxide (nano MgO) via Sn(2+) linkage and reduction. As a benefit from the synergy effect of nano MgO and Ag NPs, the nano MgO-Ag(0) exhibited both excellent SERS and catalytic activities for the reduction of 4-nitrothiophenol in the presence of NaBH4. The nano MgO-Ag(0) was used for real-time monitoring of the catalytic reaction process of 4-nitrothiophenol to 4-aminothiophenol in an aqueous medium by observing the SERS signals of the reactant, intermediate and final products. The intrinsic reaction kinetics and reaction mechanism of this reaction were also investigated. This SERS-based synergy technique provides a novel approach for quantitative in situ monitoring of catalytic chemical reaction processes.

  6. Non-invasive in vivo evaluation of in situ forming PLGA implants by benchtop magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Sabine; Metz, Hendrik; Pereira, Priscila G C; Mäder, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we used benchtop magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) for non-invasive and continuous in vivo studies of in situ forming poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) implants without the use of contrast agents. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was used as an alternative solvent to the clinically used NMP. In addition to BT-MRI, we applied electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to characterize implant formation and drug delivery processes in vitro and in vivo. We were able to follow key processes of implant formation by EPR and MRI. Because EPR spectra are sensitive to polarity and mobility, we were able to follow the kinetics of the solvent/non-solvent exchange and the PLGA precipitation. Due to the high water affinity of PEG 400, we observed a transient accumulation of water in the implant neighbourhood. Furthermore, we detected the encapsulation by BT-MRI of the implant as a response of the biological system to the polymer, followed by degradation over a period of two months. We could show that MRI in general has the potential to get new insights in the in vivo fate of in situ forming implants. The study also clearly shows that BT-MRI is a new viable and much less expensive alternative for superconducting MRI machines to monitor drug delivery processes in vivo in small mammals. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Length-Scale-Dependent Phase Transformation of LiFePO4 : An In situ and Operando Study Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy and XRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, N A; Salehi, Amir; Wei, Zi; Liu, Dong; Sajjad, Syed D; Liu, Fuqiang

    2015-08-03

    The charge and discharge of lithium ion batteries are often accompanied by electrochemically driven phase-transformation processes. In this work, two in situ and operando methods, that is, micro-Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), have been combined to study the phase-transformation process in LiFePO4 at two distinct length scales, namely, particle-level scale (∼1 μm) and macroscopic scale (∼several cm). In situ Raman studies revealed a discrete mode of phase transformation at the particle level. Besides, the preferred electrochemical transport network, particularly the carbon content, was found to govern the sequence of phase transformation among particles. In contrast, at the macroscopic level, studies conducted at four different discharge rates showed a continuous but delayed phase transformation. These findings uncovered the intricate phase transformation in LiFePO4 and potentially offer valuable insights into optimizing the length-scale-dependent properties of battery materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Design and construction of prompt-gamma spectroscopy facility applied to the boron determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poblete, Victor; Henriquez, Carlos; Klein, Juan; Navarro, Gustavo

    1996-01-01

    A prompt-gamma spectroscopy facility was developed using the south tangential neutron beam of the RECH-1 research reactor for boron determination. The implementation of a thermal neutron beam was performed considering different aspects such as biological protection of working area and the beam collimation for a Ge detector, design and sample holder selection, standards and sample preparation. One ppm of Boron in different samples with counting-rate of 20 minutes and a good accuracy were determined. (author)

  9. Depth probing of the hydride formation process in thin Pd films by combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Björn; Fredriksson, Mattias; Feng, Ligang; Lindahl, Niklas; Hagberg, Johan; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-07-15

    We demonstrate a flexible combined electrochemistry and fiber optics-based in situ UV/vis spectroscopy setup to gain insight into the depth evolution of electrochemical hydride and oxide formation in Pd films with thicknesses of 20 and 100 nm. The thicknesses of our model systems are chosen such that the films are thinner or significantly thicker than the optical skin depth of Pd to create two distinctly different situations. Low power white light is irradiated on the sample and analyzed in three different configurations; transmittance through, and, reflectance from the front and the back side of the film. The obtained optical sensitivities correspond to fractions of a monolayer of adsorbed or absorbed hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) on Pd. Moreover, a combined simultaneous readout obtained from the different optical measurement configurations provides mechanistic insights into the depth-evolution of the studied hydrogenation and oxidation processes.

  10. Gas sensing properties and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy study of trichloroethylene adsorption and reactions on SnO2 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxin; Huang, Kaijin; Yuan, Fangli; Xie, Changsheng

    2014-05-01

    The detection of trichloroethylene has attracted much attention because it has an important effect on human health. The sensitivity of the SnO2 flat-type coplanar gas sensor arrays to 100 ppm trichloroethylene in air was investigated. The adsorption and surface reactions of trichloroethylene were investigated at 100-200 °C by in-situ diffuse reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DIRFTS) on SnO2 films. Molecularly adsorbed trichloroethylene, dichloroacetyl chloride (DCAC), phosgene, HCl, CO, H2O, CHCl3, Cl2 and CO2 surface species are formed during trichloroethylene adsorption at 100-200 °C. A possible mechanism of the reaction process is discussed.

  11. Interfacial Chemistry-Induced Modulation of Schottky Barrier Heights: In Situ Measurements of the Pt-Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Interface Using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brendan T; Oleksak, Richard P; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S

    2018-01-31

    A method to understand the role of interfacial chemistry on the modulation of Schottky barrier heights for platinum and amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) interfaces is demonstrated through thermal processing and background ambient pressure control. In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the interfacial chemistries that modulate barrier heights in this system. The primary changes were a significant chemical reduction of indium, from In 3+ to In 0 , that occurs during deposition of Pt on to the a-IGZO surface in ultrahigh vacuum. Postannealing and controlling the background ambient O 2 pressure allows further tuning of the reduction of indium and the corresponding Schottky barrier heights from 0.17 to 0.77 eV. Understanding the detailed interfacial chemistries at Pt/a-IGZO interfaces may allow for improved electronic device performance, including Schottky diodes, memristors, and metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  12. Growth and structure of water on SiO2 films on Si investigated byKelvin probe microscopy and in situ X-ray Spectroscopies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdaguer, A.; Weis, C.; Oncins, G.; Ketteler, G.; Bluhm, H.; Salmeron, M.

    2007-06-14

    The growth of water on thin SiO{sub 2} films on Si wafers at vapor pressures between 1.5 and 4 torr and temperatures between -10 and 21 C has been studied in situ using Kelvin Probe Microscopy and X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies. From 0 to 75% relative humidity (RH) water adsorbs forming a uniform film 4-5 layers thick. The surface potential increases in that RH range by about 400 mV and remains constant upon further increase of the RH. Above 75% RH the water film grows rapidly, reaching 6-7 monolayers at around 90% RH and forming a macroscopic drop near 100%. The O K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption spectrum around 75% RH is similar to that of liquid water (imperfect H-bonding coordination) at temperatures above 0 C and ice-like below 0 C.

  13. Development of a mobile system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and dedicated to in situ analysis of polluted soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousquet, B.; Travaille, G.; Ismael, A.; Canioni, L.; Michel-Le Pierres, K.; Brasseur, E.; Roy, S.; Le Hecho, I.; Larregieu, M.; Tellier, S.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Boriachon, T.; Wazen, P.; Diard, A.; Belbeze, S.

    2008-01-01

    Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is successfully applied to the full laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of soil samples, defining classes according to the concentrations of the major elements. The large variability of the LIBS data is related to the heterogeneity of the samples and the representativeness of the data is finally discussed. Then, the development of a mobile LIBS system dedicated to the in-situ analysis of soils polluted by heavy metals is described. Based on the use of ten-meter long optical fibers, the mobile system allows deported measurements. Finally, the laser-assisted drying process studied by the use of a customized laser has not been retained to overcome the problem of moisture

  14. Development of a mobile system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and dedicated to in situ analysis of polluted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, B.; Travaillé, G.; Ismaël, A.; Canioni, L.; Michel-Le Pierrès, K.; Brasseur, E.; Roy, S.; le Hecho, I.; Larregieu, M.; Tellier, S.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Boriachon, T.; Wazen, P.; Diard, A.; Belbèze, S.

    2008-10-01

    Principal Components Analysis (PCA) is successfully applied to the full laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of soil samples, defining classes according to the concentrations of the major elements. The large variability of the LIBS data is related to the heterogeneity of the samples and the representativeness of the data is finally discussed. Then, the development of a mobile LIBS system dedicated to the in-situ analysis of soils polluted by heavy metals is described. Based on the use of ten-meter long optical fibers, the mobile system allows deported measurements. Finally, the laser-assisted drying process studied by the use of a customized laser has not been retained to overcome the problem of moisture.

  15. Investigation on H-containing shallow trap of hydrogenated TiO2 with in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Hang Hu, Yun

    2017-07-28

    A novel technique, high temperature high pressure in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy, was successfully used to investigate the formation and stability of shallow trap states in P25 TiO 2 nanoparticles. Two types of shallow traps (with and without H atoms) were identified. The H-containing shallow trap can be easily generated by heating in H 2 atmosphere. However, the trap is unstable in vacuum at 600 °C. In contrast, the H-free shallow trap, which can be formed by heating in vacuum, is stable even at 600 °C. The energy gaps between shallow trap states and the conduction band are 0.09 eV for H-containing shallow trap and 0.13 eV for H-free shallow trap, indicating that the H-containing shallow trap state is closer to the conduction band than that without H.

  16. In-situ gamma-ray survey of rare-earth tailings dams – A case study in Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Baochuan; Wang, Nanping; Wan, Jianhua; Xiong, Shengqing; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Shijun; Zhao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) (Φ75 mm × 75 mm) was carried out in the Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts in order to estimate the levels of natural radionuclides near rare-earth (RE) tailings dams. In the RE tailings dam of Baotou, the mean concentrations of "2"3"8U and "2"3"2Th were 3.0 ± 1.0 mg/kg (range: 1.9–4.6 mg/kg) and 321 ± 31 mg/kg (range: 294–355 mg/kg), respectively. In the Bayan Obo tailings dam, the mean concentrations of "2"3"8U and "2"3"2Th were 5.7 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 5.3–6.1 mg/kg) and 276 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 275.5–276.3 mg/kg), respectively. The average "2"3"2Th concentrations in the mining areas of the Bayan Obo Mine and the living areas of the Bayan Obo Town were 18.7 ± 7.5 and 26.2 ± 9.1 mg/kg, respectively. The "2"3"2Th concentration recorded in the tailings dams was much higher than the global average (7.44 mg/kg). Our investigation shows that the "2"3"2Th concentration in the tailings in the Baotou dam was 34.6 times greater than that in the local soil (in Guyang County); the average concentrations of "2"3"2Th in the soil in the Baotou District and Bayan Obo Districts were about 1.35 and 2.82 times greater, respectively, than that in the soil in Guyang County. Based on our results, the highest estimated effective dose due to gamma irradiation was 1.15 mSv per year, estimated from the data observed in the Baotou tailings dams. The results of this preliminary study indicate the potential importance of radioactivity in RE tailings dams and that remedial measures may be required. - Highlights: • In-situ gamma-ray spectrometry to measure natural radionuclides in rare-earth tailings dam. • Comparisons were among the tailings dam, mining area and living areas in Baotou and Bayan Obo. • "2"3"2Th concentrations in tailings dams in Baotou and Bayan Obo were much higher than global average. • Results provide a baseline useful to assess the radiation

  17. In situ NAP-XPS spectroscopy during methane dry reforming on ZrO2/Pt(1 1 1) inverse model catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameshan, C.; Li, H.; Anic, K.; Roiaz, M.; Pramhaas, V.; Rameshan, R.; Blume, R.; Hävecker, M.; Knudsen, J.; Knop-Gericke, A.; Rupprechter, G.

    2018-07-01

    Due to the need of sustainable energy sources, methane dry reforming is a useful reaction for conversion of the greenhouse gases CH4 and CO2 to synthesis gas (CO  +  H2). Syngas is the basis for a wide range of commodity chemicals and can be utilized for fuel production via Fischer–Tropsch synthesis. The current study focuses on spectroscopic investigations of the surface and reaction properties of a ZrO2/Pt inverse model catalyst, i.e. ZrO2 particles (islands) grown on a Pt(1 1 1) single crystal, with emphasis on in situ near ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) during MDR reaction. In comparison to technological systems, model catalysts facilitate characterization of the surface (oxidation) state, surface adsorbates, and the role of the metal-support interface. Using XPS and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy we demonstrated that under reducing conditions (UHV or CH4) the ZrO2 particles transformed to an ultrathin ZrO2 film that started to cover (wet) the Pt surface in an SMSI-like fashion, paralleled by a decrease in surface/interface oxygen. In contrast, (more oxidizing) dry reforming conditions with a 1:1 ratio of CH4 and CO2 were stabilizing the ZrO2 particles on the model catalyst surface (or were even reversing the strong metal support interaction (SMSI) effect), as revealed by in situ XPS. Carbon deposits resulting from CH4 dissociation were easily removed by CO2 or by switching to dry reforming conditions (673–873 K). Thus, at these temperatures the active Pt surface remained free of carbon deposits, also preserving the ZrO2/Pt interface.

  18. Monitoramento in situ e em tempo real de variáveis morfológicas do poli(cloreto de vinila usando espectroscopia NIR Monitoring in situ and in real time the morphological variables of pvc using NIR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. de Faria Jr.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho ilustra o uso de espectroscopia do infravermelho próximo (NIRS para fins de monitoramento da polimerização em suspensão de cloreto de vinila em tempo real. Resultados inéditos mostraram que é possível acompanhar a evolução de importantes propriedades morfológicas de resinas de PVC [poli(cloreto de vinila], como por exemplo, BD (densidade aparente, CPA (absorção de plastificante a frio, DTP (distribuição de tamanho de partículas e Dp (diâmetro de partícula. Mostrou-se também, pela primeira vez, que é possível analisar quantitativamente, com o auxílio da sonda NIRS in situ, a estrutura morfológica da partícula de PVC. Com a possibilidade de predizer a evolução dinâmica dos parâmetros morfológicos em tempo real, mostrou-se que é possível injetar dispersantes e variar a velocidade de agitação durante a reação para fins de controle das variáveis BD, CPA e DTP do PVC, até que o ponto de identificação da partícula seja atingido. Por meio do monitoramento e da estratégia de controle proposta, é possível antecipar fugas de temperatura no reator, aumentar a segurança do processo, diminuir o tempo de desenvolvimento de resinas com características morfológicas diferenciadas, evitando perdas de margem oriundas da venda de produtos fora de especificação, e otimizar os recursos para o desenvolvimento de novos produtos.This work illustrates the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS for monitoring of the suspension polymerization of vinyl chloride in real time. Obtained results showed that it is possible to track in situ and in real time important morphological properties of PVC resins, such as BD (bulk density, CPA (cold plasticizer absorption, PSD (particle size distribution and Dp (average particle diameter. It was also shown for the first time that it is possible to analyze quantitatively, with the help of in situ NIRS probe, the morphological structure of the PVC particles. As a consequence, it

  19. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  20. Determination of planetary surfaces elemental composition by gamma and neutron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, B.

    2009-06-01

    Measuring the neutron and gamma ray fluxes produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with planetary surfaces allow constraining the chemical composition of the upper tens of centimeters of material. Two different angles are proposed to study neutron and gamma spectroscopy: data processing and data interpretation. The present work is in line with two experiments, the Mars Odyssey Neutron Spectrometer (MONS) and the Selene Gamma Ray Spectrometer. A review of the processing operations applied to the MONS dataset is proposed. The resulting dataset is used to determine the depth of the hydrogen deposits below the Martian surface. In water depleted regions, neutron data allow constraining the concentration in elements likely to interact with neutrons. The confrontation of these results to those issued from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer onboard Mars Odyssey provides interesting insight on the geologic context of the Central Elysium Planitia region. These martian questions are followed by the study of the Selene gamma ray data. Although only preliminary processing has been done to date, qualitative lunar maps of major elements (Fe, Ca, Si, Ti, Mg, K, Th, U) have already been realized. (author)

  1. Rapid in situ detection of street samples of drugs of abuse on textile substrates using microRaman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Esam M. A.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Scowen, Ian J.

    2011-10-01

    Trace amounts of street samples of cocaine hydrochloride and N-methyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-amphetamine (MDMA) on natural and synthetic textiles were successfully detected in situ using confocal Raman microscopy. The presence of some excipient bands in the spectra of the drugs did not prevent the unambiguous identification of the drugs. Raman spectra of the drugs were readily obtained without significant interference from the fibre substrates. Interfering bands arising from the fibre natural or synthetic polymer structure and/or dye molecules did not overlap with the characteristic Raman bands of the drugs. If needed, interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. Also, Raman spectra could be acquired from drug particles trapped between the fibres of highly fluorescent textile specimens. The total acquisition time of the spectra of the drug particles was 90 s accomplished non-destructively and without detachment from their substrates. Sample preparation was not required and spectra of the drugs could be obtained non-invasively preserving the integrity of the evidential material for further analysis.

  2. In Situ Water Vapor Measurements Using Coupled UV Fragment Fluorescence/Absorption Spectroscopy in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding the coupling of dynamics, chemistry, and radiation within the context of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) and the national Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) requires, as a first-order priority, high spatial resolution, high-accuracy observations of water in its various phases. Given the powerful diagnostic importance of the condensed phases of water for dynamics and the impact of phase changes in water on the radiation field, the accurate, in situ observation of water vapor is of central importance to CRYSTAL FACE (CF). This is clear both from the defined scientific objectives of the NRA and from developments in the coupled fields of stratosphere/troposphere exchange, cirrus cloud formation/removal and mechanisms for the distribution of water vapor in the middle/upper troposphere. Accordingly, we were funded under NASA Grant NAG5-11548 to perform the following tasks for the CF mission: 1. Prepare the water vapor instrument for integration into the WB57F and test flights scheduled for Spring 2002. 2. Calibrate and prepare the water vapor instrument for the Summer 2002 CF science flights based in Jacksonville, Florida. 3. Provide both science and engineering support for the above-mentioned efforts. 4. Analyze and interpret the CF data in collaboration with other mission scientists. 5. Attend the science workshop in Spring 2003. 6. Publish the data and analysis in peer-reviewed journals.

  3. Developments in laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative in situ measurements of free radicals in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Dwayne

    2015-04-01

    Photo-oxidation in the troposphere is highly complex, being initiated by short lived free radical species, in the daytime dominated by the hydroxyl radical, OH. Chemical oxidation cycles, which also involve peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2), remove natural or anthropogenic emissions (for example methane) and generate a range of secondary products, for example ozone, nitrogen dioxide, acidic and multifunctional organic species, and secondary organic aerosol, which impact on human health and climate. Owing to their short lifetime in the atmosphere, the abundance of radicals is determined solely by their rate of chemical production and loss, and not by transport. Field measurements of the concentrations of radicals and comparison with calculations using a numerical model therefore constitutes one of the very best ways to test whether the chemistry in each of these locations is understood and accurately represented in the model. Validation of the chemistry is important, as the predictions of climate and air quality models containing this chemistry are used to drive the formulation of policy and legislation. However, in situ measurements of radical species, owing to their very low abundance (often sub part per trillion) and short lifetimes (pulse repetition rate tunable laser systems, will be discussed, together with calibration methods to make signals absolute, and identification of potential interferences. LIF instruments have been operated on ground, ship and aircraft platforms at a number of locations worldwide, and examples from recent fieldwork involving the Leeds instruments will be presented.

  4. Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) at a superconducting electron linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterling, Maik; Anwand, Wolfgang; Cowan, Thomas E.; Hartmann, Andreas; Jungmann, Marco; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard; Krille, Arnold; Wagner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A new and unique setup for Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy has been established and optimized at the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). The intense, pulsed (26 MHz) photon source (bremsstrahlung with energies up to 16 MeV) is used to generate positrons by means of pair production throughout the entire sample volume. Due to the very short gamma bunches (< 5 ps temporal length), the facility for Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) is suitable for positron lifetime spectroscopy using the accelerator's radiofrequency as time reference. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening Spectroscopy are employed by a coincident measurement (Age-Momentum Correlation) of the time-of-arrival and energy of the annihilation photons which in turn significantly reduces the background of scattered photons resulting in spectra with high signal to background ratios. Simulations of the setup using the GEANT4 framework have been performed to yield optimum positron generation rates for various sample materials and improved background conditions.

  5. Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) at a superconducting electron linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterling, Maik, E-mail: maik.butterling@googlemail.com [Martin-Luther University, Dept. of Physics, 06099 Halle (Germany); Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum, Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Anwand, Wolfgang; Cowan, Thomas E.; Hartmann, Andreas [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum, Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Jungmann, Marco; Krause-Rehberg, Reinhard [Martin-Luther University, Dept. of Physics, 06099 Halle (Germany); Krille, Arnold; Wagner, Andreas [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum, Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    A new and unique setup for Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy has been established and optimized at the superconducting linear electron accelerator ELBE at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany). The intense, pulsed (26 MHz) photon source (bremsstrahlung with energies up to 16 MeV) is used to generate positrons by means of pair production throughout the entire sample volume. Due to the very short gamma bunches (< 5 ps temporal length), the facility for Gamma-induced Positron Spectroscopy (GiPS) is suitable for positron lifetime spectroscopy using the accelerator's radiofrequency as time reference. Positron lifetime and Doppler broadening Spectroscopy are employed by a coincident measurement (Age-Momentum Correlation) of the time-of-arrival and energy of the annihilation photons which in turn significantly reduces the background of scattered photons resulting in spectra with high signal to background ratios. Simulations of the setup using the GEANT4 framework have been performed to yield optimum positron generation rates for various sample materials and improved background conditions.

  6. Xe isotope detection and discrimination using beta spectroscopy with coincident gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, P. L.; Bowyer, T. W.

    1998-02-01

    Beta spectroscopic techniques show promise of significant improvements for a beta-gamma coincidence counter that is part of a system for analyzing Xe automatically separated from air. The previously developed counting system for 131mXe, 133mXe, 133gXe, and 135gXe can be enhanced to give additional discrimination between these Xe isotopes by using the plastic scintillation sample cell as a beta spectrometer to resolve the conversion electron peaks. The automated system will be a key factor in monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

  7. Mechanism of Phenol Alkylation in Zeolite H-BEA Using In Situ Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhenchao [Institute; Shi, Hui [Institute; Wan, Chuan [Institute; Hu, Mary Y. [Institute; Liu, Yuanshuai [Department; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Camaioni, Donald M. [Institute; Hu, Jian Zhi [Institute; Lercher, Johannes A. [Institute; Department

    2017-06-27

    Alkylation of phenolic compounds in the liquid phase is of fundamental and practical importance to the conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks into fuels and chemicals. In this work, the reaction mechanism for phenol alkylation with cyclohexanol and cyclohexene has been investigated on a commercial HBEA zeolite by in situ 13C MAS NMR, using decalin as the solvent. From the variable temperature 13C MAS NMR measurements of phenol and cyclohexanol adsorption on HBEA from decalin solutions, it is shown that the two molecules have similar adsorption strength in the HBEA pore. Phenol alkylation with cyclohexanol, however, becomes significantly measurable only after cyclohexanol is largely converted to cyclohexene via dehydration. This is in contrast to the initially rapid alkylation of phenol when using cyclohexene as the co-reactant. 13C isotope scrambling results demonstrate that the electrophile, presumably cyclohexyl carbenium ion, is directly formed in a protonation step when cyclohexene is the co-reactant, but requires re-adsorption of the alcohol dehydration product, cyclohexene, when cyclohexanol dimer is the dominant surface species (e.g., at 0.5 M cyclohexanol concentration) that is unable to generate carbenium ion. At the initial reaction stage of phenol-cyclohexanol alkylation on HBEA, the presence of the cyclohexanol dimer species hinders the adsorption of cyclohexene at the Brønsted acid site and the subsequent activation of the more potent electrophile (carbenium ion). Isotope scrambling data also show that intramolecular rearrangement of cyclohexyl phenyl ether, the O-alkylation product, does not significantly contribute to the formation of C-alkylation products.

  8. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  9. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  10. In-situ gamma-ray survey of rare-earth tailings dams--A case study in Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baochuan; Wang, Nanping; Wan, Jianhua; Xiong, Shengqing; Liu, Hongtao; Li, Shijun; Zhao, Rong

    2016-01-01

    An in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer survey with a scintillation detector of NaI(Tl) (Φ75 mm × 75 mm) was carried out in the Baotou and Bayan Obo Districts in order to estimate the levels of natural radionuclides near rare-earth (RE) tailings dams. In the RE tailings dam of Baotou, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 3.0 ± 1.0 mg/kg (range: 1.9-4.6 mg/kg) and 321 ± 31 mg/kg (range: 294-355 mg/kg), respectively. In the Bayan Obo tailings dam, the mean concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th were 5.7 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 5.3-6.1 mg/kg) and 276 ± 0.5 mg/kg (range: 275.5-276.3 mg/kg), respectively. The average (232)Th concentrations in the mining areas of the Bayan Obo Mine and the living areas of the Bayan Obo Town were 18.7 ± 7.5 and 26.2 ± 9.1 mg/kg, respectively. The (232)Th concentration recorded in the tailings dams was much higher than the global average (7.44 mg/kg). Our investigation shows that the (232)Th concentration in the tailings in the Baotou dam was 34.6 times greater than that in the local soil (in Guyang County); the average concentrations of (232)Th in the soil in the Baotou District and Bayan Obo Districts were about 1.35 and 2.82 times greater, respectively, than that in the soil in Guyang County. Based on our results, the highest estimated effective dose due to gamma irradiation was 1.15 mSv per year, estimated from the data observed in the Baotou tailings dams. The results of this preliminary study indicate the potential importance of radioactivity in RE tailings dams and that remedial measures may be required. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for in situ analysis of an imiquimod pharmaceutical preparation presented as cream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2014-01-01

    In the present work the homogeneity of a pharmaceutical formulation presented as a cream was studied using infrared imaging spectroscopy and chemometric methodologies such as principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate curve resolution with alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). A cream formulation, presented as an emulsion, was prepared using imiquimod as the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the excipients: water, vaseline, an emulsifier and a carboxylic acid in order to dissolve the API. After exposure at 45 °C during 3 months to perform accelerated stability test, the presence of some crystals was observed, indicating homogeneity problems in the formulation. PCA exploratory analysis showed that the crystal composition was different from the composition of the emulsion, since the score maps presented crystal structures in the emulsion. MCR-ALS estimated the spectra of the crystals and the emulsion. The crystals presented amine and C-H bands, suggesting that the precipitate was a salt formed by carboxylic acid and imiquimod. These results indicate the potential of infrared imaging spectroscopy in conjunction with chemometric methodologies as an analytical tool to ensure the quality of cream formulations in the pharmaceutical industry.

  12. In-situ analysis of microwave conductivity and impedance spectroscopy for evaluation of charge carrier dynamics at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wookjin; Inoue, Junichi; Tsutsui, Yusuke; Sakurai, Tsuneaki; Seki, Shu

    2017-11-01

    A unique concerted analysis comprising non-contact microwave conductivity measurements and impedance spectroscopy was developed to simultaneously assess the charge carrier mobility and injection barriers. The frequency dependence of the microwave conductivity as well as the electrical current was analyzed by applying sinusoidal voltage to determine the equivalent circuit parameters. Based on the temperature dependence of the circuit parameters, the energy of the injection barrier was estimated to be 0.4 eV with the Richardson-Schottky model, and the band-like transport was confirmed with the negative temperature coefficient with the β value of 1.4 in the intra-layer conduction of C8-BTBT. In contrast, the increase in the resistance of the C8-BTBT layer with decreasing temperature implied the occurrence of hopping-like transport in the inter-layer conduction of C8-BTBT.

  13. In Situ Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy Study of the Electrocatalytic Effect of PtFe/C Nanocatalyst on Ethanol Electro-Oxidation in Alkaline Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Gómez-Monsiváis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction has attracted considerable attention in fuel cells because of new green ethanol synthetic methods based on biomass processes that have emerged. In this study, PtFe/C and Pt/C nanoparticles were synthesized by a chemical reduction method and tested in the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic effect of the PtFe bimetallic catalyst was analyzed by in situ surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS coupled to an electrochemical cell. X-ray diffractograms showed typical face-centered cubic structures with crystallite sizes of 3.31 and 3.94 for Pt/C and PtFe/C, respectively. TEM micrographs revealed nanoparticle sizes of 2 ± 0.4 nm and 3 ± 0.6 nm for Pt/C and PtFe/C respectively. PtFe/C exhibited a Pt90Fe10 composition by both X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A better electrocatalytic activity as function of concentration was obtained through the incorporation of a small amount of Fe into the Pt lattice and the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ (observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. According to SERS experiments, the presence of these iron species promotes the chemisorption of ethanol, the formation of formic acid as main product and renewal of the catalytic sites, resulting in current densities that were at least three fold higher than the values obtained for the Pt/C nanocatalyst.

  14. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, N A; El-Somany, I; Mansour, A; Maghraby, A M; Eissa, H; Wieser, A

    2018-03-01

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH pp ) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry.

  15. Determination of moisture content and natural radioactivity in soils using gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Hady, E E [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Qater University (Qatar); El-Sayed, A M.A.; Alaa, H B [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, El-Minia University, Minia (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The gamma-ray transmission method has been used to study the soil-water properties in the laboratory as well as in the field. The present measurements were performed using gamma-ray spectroscopy system based on a 5 x 5 cm Nal (T 1) scintillation detector and combined sources ({sup 137} Cs and {sup 241} Am). The two sources are placed in a suitable lead collimator to obtain a pin beam of 1 mm diameter. Suitable samples of clay and sandy soils obtained from the local field were prepared to determine the water content and the soil bulk densities by the combined method for different moisture stages. From the results obtained, it is clear that the soil density at both stages (saturated and after drainage) remains the same. this is because the soil particles do not rearrange during the wetting and drying process. The full results will be presented in the text. Natural radioactivity of the investigated samples was also studied using gamma-ray spectrometer having HPGe detector. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of natural gamma radiations revealed the presence of {sup 40} K, {sup 214} Bi, {sup 208} TI and {sup 228} Ac in meaningful concentrations. 3 figs.

  16. Camel molar tooth enamel response to gamma rays using EPR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Faramawy, N.A.; El-Somany, I. [Ain Shams University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt); Mansour, A. [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Maghraby, A.M.; Eissa, H. [National Institute of Standards (NIS), Ionizing Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Giza (Egypt); Wieser, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen-German Research Center for Environmental Health, Department of Radiation Sciences, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Tooth enamel samples from molar teeth of camel were prepared using a combined procedure of mechanical and chemical tooth treatment. Based on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the dose response of tooth enamel samples was examined and compared to that of human enamel. The EPR dose response of the tooth enamel samples was obtained through irradiation to gamma doses from 1 Gy up to 100 kGy. It was found that the radiation-induced EPR signal increased linearly with gamma dose for all studied tooth enamel samples, up to about 15 kGy. At higher doses, the dose response curve leveled off. The results revealed that the location of the native signal of camel tooth enamel was similar to that of enamel from human molars at 2.00644, but different from that of enamel from cows and goats. In addition, the peak-to-peak width (ΔH{sub pp}) for human and camel molar teeth was similar. It was also found that the response of camel enamel to gamma radiation was 36% lower than that of human enamel. In conclusion, the results indicate the suitability of camel teeth for retrospective gamma dosimetry. (orig.)

  17. Quantitative Potassium Measurements with Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using Low-Energy Lasers: Application to In Situ K-Ar Geochronology for Planetary Exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yuichiro; Horiuchi, Misa; Shibasaki, Kazuo; Kameda, Shingo; Sugita, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    In situ radiogenic isotope measurements to obtain the absolute age of geologic events on planets are of great scientific value. In particular, K-Ar isochrons are useful because of their relatively high technical readiness and high accuracy. Because this isochron method involves spot-by-spot K measurements using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and simultaneous Ar measurements with mass spectrometry, LIBS measurements are conducted under a high vacuum condition in which emission intensity decreases significantly. Furthermore, using a laser power used in previous planetary missions is preferable to examine the technical feasibility of this approach. However, there have been few LIBS measurements for K under such conditions. In this study, we measured K contents in rock samples using 30 mJ and 15 mJ energy lasers under a vacuum condition (10 -3  Pa) to assess the feasibility of in situ K-Ar dating with lasers comparable to those used in NASA's Curiosity and Mars 2020 missions. We obtained various calibration curves for K using internal normalization with the oxygen line at 777 nm and continuum emission from the laser-induced plasma. Experimental results indicate that when K 2 O laser energy, with a detection limit of 88 ppm and 20% of error at 2400 ppm of K 2 O. Futhermore, the calibration curve based on the K 769 nm line intensity normalized with continuum emission yielded the best result for the 15 mJ laser, giving a detection limit of 140 ppm and 20% error at 3400 ppm K 2 O. Error assessments using obtained calibration models indicate that a 4 Ga rock with 3000 ppm K 2 O would be measured with 8% (30 mJ) and 10% (15 mJ) of precision in age when combined with mass spectrometry of 40 Ar with 10% of uncertainty. These results strongly suggest that high precision in situ isochron K-Ar dating is feasible with a laser used in previous and upcoming Mars rover missions.

  18. Gamma-ray tracking - A new detector concept for nuclear spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gast, W.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of an European collaboration the nest generation of large efficiency, high resolution spectrometers for nuclear spectroscopy is under development. The new spectrometers are large volume, segmented Ge-detectors featuring 3D position sensitivity in order to allow Gamma-Ray Tracking. That is, knowing the interaction positions and the energies released at each interaction, the track each gamma-ray follows during its scattering process inside the detector volume can be reconstructed on basis of the Compton-scattering formula. The resulting high add-back efficiency an effective granularity significantly improves peak-to-total ratio, efficiency, and Doppler-broadening of the spectrometer. In this contribution the states of the project concerning detector design and development of digital signal processing techniques to achieve an optimal 3D position sensitivity is presented. (authors)

  19. Determination of nuclear fuel burnup by non-destructive gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of nuclear fuel burnup by the non-destructive gamma spectroscopy method is studied. A MTR (Materials Testing Reactor) -type fuel element is used in the measurement. The fuel element was removed from the reactor core in 1958 and, because of the long decay time, show only one peak in is gamma spectrum at 661.6 Kev. Corresponding to 137 Cs. Measurements are made at 330 points of the element using a Nal detector and the final result revealed that the quantity of 235 U consumed was 3.3 +- 0,8 milligram in the entire element. The effect of the migration of 137 Cs in the element is neglected in view of the fact that it occurs only when the temperature is above 1000 0 C, which is not the case in IEAR-1. (Author)

  20. Testing FLUKA on neutron activation of Si and Ge at nuclear research reactor using gamma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazo, J.; Rojas, J. M.; Best, S.; Bruna, R.; Endress, E.; Mendoza, P.; Poma, V.; Gago, A. M.

    2018-03-01

    Samples of two characteristic semiconductor sensor materials, silicon and germanium, have been irradiated with neutrons produced at the RP-10 Nuclear Research Reactor at 4.5 MW. Their radionuclides photon spectra have been measured with high resolution gamma spectroscopy, quantifying four radioisotopes (28Al, 29Al for Si and 75Ge and 77Ge for Ge). We have compared the radionuclides production and their emission spectrum data with Monte Carlo simulation results from FLUKA. Thus we have tested FLUKA's low energy neutron library (ENDF/B-VIIR) and decay photon scoring with respect to the activation of these semiconductors. We conclude that FLUKA is capable of predicting relative photon peak amplitudes, with gamma intensities greater than 1%, of produced radionuclides with an average uncertainty of 13%. This work allows us to estimate the corresponding systematic error on neutron activation simulation studies of these sensor materials.

  1. Line and continuum spectroscopy as diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, E.P.

    1990-12-01

    We review the theoretical framework of both line and continuum spectra formation in gamma ray bursts. These include the cyclotron features at 10's of keV, redshifted annihilation features at ∼400 keV, as well as other potentially detectable nuclear transition lines, atomic x-ray lines, proton cyclotron lines and plasma oscillation lines. By combining the parameters derived from line and continuum modeling we can try to reconstruct the location, geometry and physical conditions of the burst emission region, thereby constraining and discriminating the astrophysical models. Hence spectroscopy with current and future generations of detectors should provide powerful diagnostic tools for gamma ray bursters. 48 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation on microhardness and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of bovine bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Derly Augusto; Pereira, Daisa L.; Gomes, Gabriela V.; Sugahara, Vanessa M.L.; Mathor, Monica B.; Zezell, Denise Maria, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro para Lasers e Aplicacoes

    2017-07-01

    The skeletal systems with the structural arrangement of the bone are very important for load distribution, mechanical resistance and vital organs protection. The bone structure is multiphase and composed of organic, inorganic (mineral) compounds and water. Gamma radiation is an ionizing radiation that comes from gamma radiation sources or X-ray generator is commonly used in health establishments such as radio diagnostic exams, radiotherapy and sterilization of allograft. The characterization of the irradiated bone tissue can be is an important tool to study of the components that are affected and how much each dose of ionizing radiation can alter its mechanical properties. This information will be very important in in vitro and ex vivo studies where sterilization of the bone material is necessary and may still be useful in understanding the effects on the bone tissue of patients undergoing short-term radiotherapy. For this, 110 samples of bovine femur diaphysis were randomized into 11 groups: G1 untreated (control); G2 to G11 were submitted to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co Gammacel). Samples were polished before irradiation and submitted to a Knoop Microhardness Test to determine the hardness of bovine bone and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to biochemical characterization. Spectra were collected in the mid-infrared range in Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) sampling mode associated whit PCA multivariate technique to evaluate the molecular changes in bone matrix. It was observed that hardness was not altered by gamma irradiation and FTIR spectroscopy associated with PCA is a good method to analyze the changes in bone tissue submitted to ionizing radiation. (author)

  3. Effects of gamma irradiation on microhardness and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of bovine bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Derly Augusto; Pereira, Daisa L.; Gomes, Gabriela V.; Sugahara, Vanessa M.L.; Mathor, Monica B.; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2017-01-01

    The skeletal systems with the structural arrangement of the bone are very important for load distribution, mechanical resistance and vital organs protection. The bone structure is multiphase and composed of organic, inorganic (mineral) compounds and water. Gamma radiation is an ionizing radiation that comes from gamma radiation sources or X-ray generator is commonly used in health establishments such as radio diagnostic exams, radiotherapy and sterilization of allograft. The characterization of the irradiated bone tissue can be is an important tool to study of the components that are affected and how much each dose of ionizing radiation can alter its mechanical properties. This information will be very important in in vitro and ex vivo studies where sterilization of the bone material is necessary and may still be useful in understanding the effects on the bone tissue of patients undergoing short-term radiotherapy. For this, 110 samples of bovine femur diaphysis were randomized into 11 groups: G1 untreated (control); G2 to G11 were submitted to gamma irradiation ("6"0Co Gammacel). Samples were polished before irradiation and submitted to a Knoop Microhardness Test to determine the hardness of bovine bone and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to biochemical characterization. Spectra were collected in the mid-infrared range in Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) sampling mode associated whit PCA multivariate technique to evaluate the molecular changes in bone matrix. It was observed that hardness was not altered by gamma irradiation and FTIR spectroscopy associated with PCA is a good method to analyze the changes in bone tissue submitted to ionizing radiation. (author)

  4. In-situ observation of oxidation of Ti(0001) surface by real-time photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Takakuwa, Y; Yoshigoe, A; Teraoka, Y; Mizuno, Y; Tonda, H; Homma, T

    2003-01-01

    Temperature dependence of the initial oxidation kinetics of Ti(0001) surface was investigated by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and real-time photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation of surface- and bulk-sensitive photon energies. LEED observation revealed that oxide layers grow epitaxially with different surface structures depending on temperature: 1x1 at 200degC and sq root 3 x sq root 3 at 400degC. From the oxygen uptake curve measured by O 1s photo-electron intensity, it was clarified that oxygen diffusion through the epitaxially grown oxide layer is significantly enhanced with raising temperature, making the oxide layer thicker than 70A at 400degC. The chemical shift components observed for Ti 2p showed that TiO sub 2 becomes predominant at the subsurface with O sub 2 dose, while the stoichiometry of oxide near the interface is maintained as TiO and Ti sub 2 O sub 3 , for both cases at 200degC and 400degC. Thus it is concluded that the epitaxial growth of a very thin oxide on the Ti...

  5. In-situ monitoring of blood glucose level for dialysis machine by AAA-battery-size ATR Fourier spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Sato, Shun; Ishida, Akane; Suzuki, Yo; Inohara, Daichi; Nogo, Kosuke; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    For blood glucose level measurement of dialysis machines, we proposed AAA-battery-size ATR (Attenuated total reflection) Fourier spectroscopy in middle infrared light region. The proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is a near-common path and spatial phase-shift interferometer with high time resolution. Because numerous number of spectral data that is 60 (= camera frame rare e.g. 60[Hz]) multiplied by pixel number could be obtained in 1[sec.], statistical-averaging improvement realize high-accurate spectral measurement. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of our proposed method for measuring glucose concentration in near-infrared light region with liquid cells. We confirmed that absorbance at 1600[nm] had high correlations with glucose concentrations (correlation coefficient: 0.92). But to measure whole-blood, complex light phenomenon caused from red blood cells, that is scattering and multiple reflection or so, deteriorate spectral data. Thus, we also proposed the ultrasound-assisted spectroscopic imaging that traps particles at standing-wave node. Thus, if ATR prism is oscillated mechanically, anti-node area is generated around evanescent light field on prism surface. By elimination complex light phenomenon of red blood cells, glucose concentration in whole-blood will be quantify with high accuracy. In this report, we successfully trapped red blood cells in normal saline solution with ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]).

  6. In situ characterization of organo-modified and unmodified montmorillonite aqueous suspensions by UV-visible spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alin, Jonas; Rubino, Maria; Auras, Rafael

    2015-10-15

    UV-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy (Tyndall spectra) was applied and tested for its ability to measure organo-modified and unmodified montmorillonite (MMT) clays in aqueous suspensions. A full factorial design of experiments was used to study the influence of pH, NaCl and clay concentrations on the average particle size of the clay agglomerates. The methodology was evaluated by observing results that were consistent with previous research about the unmodified clay's behavior in aqueous suspensions. The results from this evaluation corresponded to accepted theories about the unmodified clay's behavior, indicating that the methodology is precise enough to distinguish the effects of the studied factors on these clay suspensions. The effect of clay concentration was related to the amount of ions per clay particle for the unmodified clay, but was not significant for the organo-modified MMT. The average particle size of the organo-modified MMT in suspension was significantly larger than that of the unmodified clay. Size of the organo-modified MMT agglomerates in suspension decreased in the presence of NaCl and at both high and low pH; this behavior was opposite to that of the unmodified clay. These results demonstrate that the UV-Vis methodology is well-suited for characterizing clay particle size in aqueous suspensions. The technique also is simple, rapid, and low-cost. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  8. In Situ Structure-Function Studies of Oxide Supported Rhodium Catalysts by Combined Energy Dispersive XAFS and DRIFTS Spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, John; Dent, Andrew J.; Diaz-Moreno, Sofia; Fiddy, Steven G.; Jyoti, Bhrat; Tromp, Moniek; Newton, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    The techniques of energy dispersive EXAFS (EDE), diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and mass spectrometry (MS) have been combined to study the structure and function of an oxide supported metal catalyst, namely 5 wt% Rh/Al2O3. Using a FreLoN camera as the EDE detector and a rapid-scanning IR spectrometer, experiments could be performed with a repetition rate of 50 ms. The results show that the nature of the rhodium centers is a function of the partial pressures of the reacting gases (CO and NO) and also temperature. This combination of gases oxidizes metallic rhodium particles to Rh(CO)2 at room temperature. The proportion of the rhodium adopting this site increases as the temperature is raised (up to 450 K). Above that temperature the dicarbonyl decomposes and the metal reclusters. Once this condition is met, catalysis ensues. Gas switching techniques show that at 573 K with NO in excess, the clusters can be oxidized rapidly to afford a linear nitrosyl complex; re-exposure to CO also promotes reclustering and the CO adopts terminal (atop) and bridging (2-fold) sites

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the LixFePO4 cathode during cycling using a novel electrochemical in situ reaction cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, A.; Bergmann, U.; Cairns, E.L.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Cramer, S.P.; California Univ., Davis, CA

    2004-01-01

    The extraction and insertion of lithium in LiFePO 4 has been investigated in practical Li-ion intercalation electrodes for Li-ion batteries using Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). A versatile electrochemical in situ reaction cell was utilized, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments on battery electrodes during the lithium-extraction/insertion process in electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. The electrode contained about 7.7 mg of LiFePO 4 on a 20 μm-thick Al foil. In order to determine the charge compensation mechanism and structural perturbations occurring in the system during cycling, in situ X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) measurements were conducted on the cell at a moderate rate using typical Li-ion battery operating voltages (3.0-4.1 V versus Li/Li + ).XAS studies of the LiFePO 4 electrode measured at the initial state (LiFePO 4 ) showed iron to be in the Fe(II) state corresponding to the initial state (0.0 mAh) of the battery, whereas in the delithiated state (FePO 4 ) iron was found to be in the FE(III) state corresponding to the final charged state (3 m Ah) of the battery. The X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) region of the XAS spectra revealed a high-spin configuration for the two states [Fe(II), d 6 and Fe(III), d 5 ]. The XAFS data analysis confirmed that the olivine structure of the LeFePO 4 and FePO 4 is retained by the electrodes, which is in agreement with the X-ray diffraction observations on these compounds. The XAFS data that were collected continuously during cycling revealed details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction. These measurements on the LiFePO 4 cathode show that the material retains good structural short-range order leading to superior cycling

  10. Detection of gamma-irradiated peanuts by ESR spectroscopy and GC analysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Mingli; An Li [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Yi Mingha, E-mail: wangyilwm@163.co [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Feng Wang [Institute of Agro-food Science and Technology, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 100193 Beijing (China); Yan Lizhang [Division of Metrology in Ionizing Radiation and Medicine, National Institute of Metrology, 100013 Beijing (China)

    2011-03-15

    Peanuts were analyzed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography (GC) before and after gamma irradiation. Using European protocols, the validity and effectiveness of these two techniques were compared with regard to sample preparation, sample and solvent consumption and dose-response curves after irradiation. The results showed the possibility of using ESR and GC for distinguishing between irradiated and unirradiated peanuts. A radiation dose of 0.1 kGy could be detected by ESR but not by GC. The results also indicated that GC is an effective method for qualitative analysis of irradiated peanut, while ESR is suitable for the rapid detection of irradiated peanuts.

  11. Heavy ion deep inelastic collisions studied by discrete gamma ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolas, W.

    1996-05-01

    The discrete gamma ray spectroscopy has been used as a tool to investigate the heavy ion collision. It has been shown that such experimental information supplemented by results of additional of-line radioactivity measurements is complete enough to reconstruct distributions of products of very complex nuclear reactions. Three experiments have been performed in which the 208 Pb + 64 Ni, 130 Te + 64 Ni and 208 Pb + 58 Ni systems have been created. The production cross sections of fragment isotopes have been determined and compared with existing model predictions

  12. Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy at TRIUMF-ISAC: the New Frontier of Radioactive Ion Beam Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, G. C.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Becker, J. A.; Bricault, P.; Brown, N.; Chan, S.; Churchman, R.; Colosimo, S.; Coombes, H.; Cross, D.; Demand, G.; Drake, T. E.; Dombsky, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Finlay, P.; Furse, D.; Garnsworthy, A.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Hackman, G.; Kanungo, R.; Kulp, W. D.; Lassen, J.; Leach, K. G.; Leslie, J. R.; Mattoon, C.; Melconian, D.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E.; Sarazin, F.; Svensson, C. E.; Sumithrarachchi, S.; Schumaker, M. A.; Triambak, S.; Waddington, J. C.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S. J.; Wood, J. L.; Wong, J.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2009-03-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is essential to fully exploit the unique scientific opportunities at the next generation radioactive ion beam facilities such as the TRIUMF Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC). At ISAC the 8π spectrometer and its associated auxiliary detectors is optimize for β-decay studies while TIGRESS an array of segmented clover HPGe detectors has been designed for studies with accelerated beams. This paper gives a brief overview of these facilities and also presents recent examples of the diverse experimental program carried out at the 8π spectrometer.

  13. Heavy ion deep inelastic collisions studied by discrete gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolas, W. [The H. Niewodniczanski Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1996-05-01

    The discrete gamma ray spectroscopy has been used as a tool to investigate the heavy ion collision. It has been shown that such experimental information supplemented by results of additional of-line radioactivity measurements is complete enough to reconstruct distributions of products of very complex nuclear reactions. Three experiments have been performed in which the {sup 208}Pb + {sup 64}Ni, {sup 130}Te + {sup 64}Ni and {sup 208}Pb + {sup 58}Ni systems have been created. The production cross sections of fragment isotopes have been determined and compared with existing model predictions 64 refs, 59 figs, 19 tabs

  14. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  15. A large-capacity sample-changer for automated gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andeweg, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    An automatic sample-changer has been developed at the National Institute for Metallurgy for use in gamma-ray spectroscopy with a lithium-drifted germanium detector. The sample-changer features remote storage, which prevents cross-talk and reduces background. It has a capacity for 200 samples and a sample container that takes liquid or solid samples. The rotation and vibration of samples during counting ensure that powdered samples are compacted, and improve the precision and reproducibility of the counting geometry [af

  16. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed

  17. Development of a Reference Database for Particle Induced Gamma Ray Emission (PIGE) Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis techniques are non-destructive analytical techniques used to identify the composition and structure of surface layers of materials. The applications of these techniques span environmental control, cultural heritage and conservation, materials and fusion technologies. The particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) spectroscopy technique in particular, is a powerful tool for detecting light elements in certain depths of surface layers. This publication describes the coordinated effort to measure and compile cross section data relevant to PIGE analysis and make these data available to the community of practice through a comprehensive online database.

  18. Quantification by Raman spectroscopy of the gamma radiation effects in water purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez C, V.M.; Santiago J, P.; Castano, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    The world problem about water pollution has been confronted by traditional methods such as: chlorination, filtration, etc. In this work is presented an alternative method, which consists in to radiate different concentrations of simulated polluted water (purified water + thinner) at different gamma radiation doses. The structural changes were analysed by Raman spectroscopy. Using a 52.5 Krad dose it was possible to eliminate all the thinner chemical linkages, which appear in the Raman spectra corresponding to the 87.5/12.5 water/thinner mixture. (Author)

  19. Bismuth germanate's role in the new revolution in gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.R.; Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the considerations on how to effectively incorporate bismuth germanate into complex detection systems are covered, and some of these new systems now in operation or under construction are discussed. Significant achievements in gamma ray spectroscopy are reviewed as well as some recent results based on data taken with coincidence arrays of germanium detectors and Compton-suppression spectrometers. Then the first impact of bismuth germanate detectors on our understanding of the properties of nuclei that have high energy and very high angular momentum states are addressed

  20. Quantification of water and silanol species on various silicas by coupling IR spectroscopy and in-situ thermogravimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallas, Jean-Paul; Goupil, Jean-Michel; Vimont, Alexandre; Lavalley, Jean-Claude; Gil, Barbara; Gilson, Jean-Pierre; Miserque, Olivier

    2009-05-19

    Five silica samples (four precipitated silicas provided by commercial suppliers and one with the MCM-41 structure) have been studied by infrared spectroscopy and by a homemade thermogravimetry-infrared spectrum (TG-IR) setup. The silanol amount, accessibility to water, and different alcohols, and the affinity to water of these various silicas were compared and quantified. TG-IR measurements allowed the precise determination of the integrated molar absorption coefficient of the (nu+delta)OH band, epsilon(nu+delta)OH=(0.16+/-0.01) cm micromol(-1). It is independent of the sample origin and the concentration of silanol groups on silicas. For the precipitated dried samples evacuated at room temperature, the silanol concentration COH varies between 3.6 and 7.0 mmol g(-1). It is 5.3 mmol g(-1) in the case of the MCM-41 sample. Exchange experiments with D2O, followed by back-exchanges with different alcohols (methanol, propan-2-ol, 2-methyl-propan-2-ol, and 3-ethyl-pentan-3-ol) have been followed by infrared spectroscopy. All of the silanols of the MCM-41 sample are accessible to water and alcohol molecules. By contrast, about 20% of the silanols in precipitated samples are not exchanged by D2O (internal silanols). Accessibility decreases with alcohol size; the main effect is relative to methanol. Taking into account the sample specific surface areas and the silanol accessibility to D2O, the surface silanol density of precipitated silicas is close to 8 OH per nm2, at maximum coverage. At variance, the silanol surface density of the MCM silica is much lower, 4 OH per nm2. The TG-IR setup has also been used to determine the amount of water adsorbed on silicas through the intensity of the deltaH2O band. It varies linearly with the concentration of adsorbed water, whatever the silica sample. The integrated molar absorption coefficient of two bands, epsilondeltaH2O=(1.53+/-0.03) cm micromol(-1) and epsilon(nu+delta)H2O=(0.22+/-0.01) cm micromol(-1), have been determined. The

  1. Strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violation, anti-hydrogen spectroscopy and gamma-ray burst polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, Graham M.

    2005-01-01

    The strong equivalence principle, local Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry are fundamental ingredients of the quantum field theories used to describe elementary particle physics. Nevertheless, each may be violated by simple modifications to the dynamics while apparently preserving the essential fundamental structure of quantum field theory itself. In this paper, we analyse the construction of strong equivalence, Lorentz and CPT violating Lagrangians for QED and review and propose some experimental tests in the fields of astrophysical polarimetry and precision atomic spectroscopy. In particular, modifications of the Maxwell action predict a birefringent rotation of the direction of linearly polarised radiation from synchrotron emission which may be studied using radio galaxies or, potentially, gamma-ray bursts. In the Dirac sector, changes in atomic energy levels are predicted which may be probed in precision spectroscopy of hydrogen and anti-hydrogen atoms, notably in the Doppler-free, two-photon 1s-2s and 2s-nd (n∼10) transitions

  2. A Catalytic Path for Electrolyte Reduction in Lithium-Ion Cells Revealed by in Situ Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei; Ross, Philip N.; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Gao; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Although controlling the interfacial chemistry of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is crucial for maintaining the reversibility, electrolyte decomposition has not been fully understood. In this study, electrolyte decomposition on model electrode surfaces (Au and Sn) was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Simultaneously obtained ATR-FTIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry measurements show that lithium ethylene dicarbonate and lithium propionate form on the Au electrode at 0.6 V, whereas diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate and lithium propionate form on the Sn electrode surface at 1.25 V. A noncatalytic reduction path on the Au surface and a catalytic reduction path on the Sn surface are introduced to explain the surface dependence of the overpotential and product selectivity. This represents a new concept for explaining electrolyte reactions on the anode of LIBs. The present investigation shows that catalysis plays a dominant role in the electrolyte decomposition process and has important implications in electrode surface modification and electrolyte recipe selection, which are critical factors for enhancing the efficiency, durability, and reliability of LIBs.

  3. A Catalytic Path for Electrolyte Reduction in Lithium-Ion Cells Revealed by in Situ Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Feifei

    2015-03-11

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Although controlling the interfacial chemistry of electrodes in Li-ion batteries (LIBs) is crucial for maintaining the reversibility, electrolyte decomposition has not been fully understood. In this study, electrolyte decomposition on model electrode surfaces (Au and Sn) was investigated by in situ attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Simultaneously obtained ATR-FTIR spectra and cyclic voltammetry measurements show that lithium ethylene dicarbonate and lithium propionate form on the Au electrode at 0.6 V, whereas diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate and lithium propionate form on the Sn electrode surface at 1.25 V. A noncatalytic reduction path on the Au surface and a catalytic reduction path on the Sn surface are introduced to explain the surface dependence of the overpotential and product selectivity. This represents a new concept for explaining electrolyte reactions on the anode of LIBs. The present investigation shows that catalysis plays a dominant role in the electrolyte decomposition process and has important implications in electrode surface modification and electrolyte recipe selection, which are critical factors for enhancing the efficiency, durability, and reliability of LIBs.

  4. The influence of reactive side products on the electrooxidation of methanol--a combined in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, R; Schnaidt, J; Jusys, Z; Behm, R J

    2014-07-21

    Aiming at a better understanding of the impact of reaction intermediates and reactive side products on electrocatalytic reactions under conditions characteristic for technical applications, i.e., at high reactant conversions, we have investigated the electrooxidation of methanol on a Pt film electrode in mixtures containing defined concentrations of the reaction intermediates formaldehyde or formic acid. Employing simultaneous in situ infrared spectroscopy and online mass spectrometry in parallel to voltammetric measurements, we examined the effects of the latter molecules on the adlayer build-up and composition and on the formation of volatile reaction products CO2 and methylformate, as well as on the overall reaction rate. To assess the individual contributions of each component, we used isotope labeling techniques, where one of the two C1 components in the mixtures of methanol with either formaldehyde or formic acid was (13)C-labeled. The data reveal pronounced effects of the additional components formaldehyde and formic acid on the reaction, although their concentration was much lower (10%) than that of the main reactant methanol. Most important, the overall Faradaic current responses and the amounts of CO2 formed upon oxidation of the mixtures are always lower than the sums of the contributions from the individual components, indicative of a non-additive behavior of both Faradaic current and CO2 formation in the mixtures. Mechanistic reasons and consequences for reactions in a technical reactor, with high reactant conversion, are discussed.

  5. Adsorption of water and butanol in silicalite-1 film studied with in situ attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, Amirfarrokh; Zhou, Ming; Potapova, Elisaveta; Bacsik, Zoltán; Ohlin, Lindsay; Holmgren, Allan; Hedlund, Jonas; Grahn, Mattias

    2015-05-05

    Biobutanol produced by, e.g., acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation is a promising alternative to petroleum-based chemicals as, e.g., solvent and fuel. Recovery of butanol from dilute fermentation broths by hydrophobic membranes and adsorbents has been identified as a promising route. In this work, the adsorption of water and butanol vapor in a silicalite-1 film was studied using in situ attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy to better understand the adsorption properties of silicalite-1 membranes and adsorbents. Single-component adsorption isotherms were determined in the temperature range of 35-120 °C, and the Langmuir model was successfully fitted to the experimental data. The adsorption of butanol is very favorable compared to that of water. When the silicalite-1 film was exposed to a butanol/water vapor mixture with 15 mol % butanol (which is the vapor composition of an aqueous solution containing 2 wt % butanol, a typical concentration in an ABE fermentation broth, i.e., the composition of the gas obtained from gas stripping of an ABE broth) at 35 °C, the adsorption selectivity toward butanol was as high as 107. These results confirm that silicalite-1 quite selectively adsorbs hydrocarbons from vapor mixtures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study on the adsorption of water and butanol in silicalite-1 from vapor phase.

  6. Diffusion processes in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys studied by mechanical spectroscopy and in situ transmission electron microscopy at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, M.L.; Ibarra, A.; Lopez-Echarri, A.; Bocanegra, E.H.; San Juan, J.

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the mobility of defects in the frozen β phase of the Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys by mechanical spectroscopy as a function of temperature. In parallel, we have characterized the microstructure and their evolution with over-heating treatments. Thermal treatments have been performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope by using a heating stage. Internal friction and modulus defect measurements have been correlated with the microstructural observations by transmission electron microscopy. We discuss the behavior of the internal friction spectra, corresponding to over-heating in the β-phase, and propose microscopic mechanisms responsible for the evolution when the material is not in thermal equilibrium. In particular, the dislocations became mobile in the temperature range between 750 and 800 K where the L2 1 atomic order changes to the B2 order. A relaxation peak has been observed in the equilibrium β phase domain, which has been examined in detail by isothermal measurements as a function of frequency. The activation enthalpy of the peak has been determined to be 3.05 ± 0.1 eV, and possible microscopic mechanisms responsible for the peak are discussed

  7. Evolution of the SrTiO3/MoO3 interface electronic structure: An in situ photoelectron spectroscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Yuanmin

    2015-05-12

    Modifying the surface energetics, particularly the work function, of advanced materials is of critical importance for a wide range of surface- and interface-based devices. In this work, using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, we investigated the evolution of electronic structure at the SrTiO3 surface during the growth of ultrathin MoO3 layers. Thanks to the large work function difference between SrTiO3 and MoO3, the energy band alignment on the SrTiO3 surface is significantly modified. The charge transfer and dipole formation at the SrTiO3/MoO3 interface leads to a large modulation of work function and an apparent doping in SrTiO3. The measured evolution of electronic structure and upward band bending suggest that the growth of ultrathin MoO3 layers is a powerful tool to modulate the surface energetics of SrTiO3, and this surface-engineering approach could be generalized to other functional oxides.

  8. Real time and in situ determination of lead in road sediments using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunat, J.; Fortes, F.J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Laserna, J.J. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: laserna@uma.es

    2009-02-02

    In situ, real time levels of lead in road sediments have been measured using a man-portable laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analyzer. The instrument consists of a backpack and a probe housing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser head delivering 50 mJ per pulse at 1064 nm. Plasma emission was collected and transmitted via fiber optic to a compact cross Czerny-Turner spectrometer equipped with a linear CCD array allocated in the backpack together with a personal computer. The limit of detection (LOD) for lead and the precision measured in the laboratory were 190 {mu}g g{sup -1} (calculated by the 3{sigma} method) and 9% R.S.D. (relative standard deviation), respectively. During the field campaign, averaged Pb concentration in the sediments were ranging from 480 {mu}g g{sup -1} to 660 {mu}g g{sup -1} depending on the inspected area, i.e. the entrance, the central part and the exit of the tunnel. These results were compared with those obtained with flame-atomic absorption spectrometry (flame-AAS). The relative error, expressed as [100(LIBS result - flame AAS result)/(LIBS result)], was approximately 14%.

  9. Evolution of the SrTiO3/MoO3 interface electronic structure: An in situ photoelectron spectroscopy study

    KAUST Repository

    Du, Yuanmin; Peng, Haiyang; Mao, Hongying; Jin, Kexin; Wang, Hong; Li, Feng; Gao, Xingyu; Chen, Wei; Wu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Modifying the surface energetics, particularly the work function, of advanced materials is of critical importance for a wide range of surface- and interface-based devices. In this work, using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, we investigated the evolution of electronic structure at the SrTiO3 surface during the growth of ultrathin MoO3 layers. Thanks to the large work function difference between SrTiO3 and MoO3, the energy band alignment on the SrTiO3 surface is significantly modified. The charge transfer and dipole formation at the SrTiO3/MoO3 interface leads to a large modulation of work function and an apparent doping in SrTiO3. The measured evolution of electronic structure and upward band bending suggest that the growth of ultrathin MoO3 layers is a powerful tool to modulate the surface energetics of SrTiO3, and this surface-engineering approach could be generalized to other functional oxides.

  10. In-Field, In Situ, and In Vivo 3-Dimensional Elemental Mapping for Plant Tissue and Soil Analysis Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensing and mapping element distributions in plant tissues and its growth environment has great significance for understanding the uptake, transport, and accumulation of nutrients and harmful elements in plants, as well as for understanding interactions between plants and the environment. In this study, we developed a 3-dimensional elemental mapping system based on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy that can be deployed in- field to directly measure the distribution of multiple elements in living plants as well as in the soil. Mapping is performed by a fast scanning laser, which ablates a micro volume of a sample to form a plasma. The presence and concentration of specific elements are calculated using the atomic, ionic, and molecular spectral characteristics of the plasma emission spectra. Furthermore, we mapped the pesticide residues in maize leaves after spraying to demonstrate the capacity of this method for trace elemental mapping. We also used the system to quantitatively detect the element concentrations in soil, which can be used to further understand the element transport between plants and soil. We demonstrate that this method has great potential for elemental mapping in plant tissues and soil with the advantages of 3-dimensional and multi-elemental mapping, in situ and in vivo measurement, flexible use, and low cost.

  11. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization of Si interlayer based surface passivation process for AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akazawa, Masamichi; Hasegawa, Hideki; Jia, Rui [Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics and Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Detailed properties of the Si interface control layer (Si ICL)-based surface passivation structure are characterized by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in an ultra-high vacuum multi-chamber system. Si ICLs were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs and AlGaAs(001) and (111)B surfaces, and were partially converted to SiN{sub x} by nitrogen radical beam. Freshly MBE-grown clean GaAs and AlGaAs surfaces showed strong Fermi level pinning. Large shifts of the surface Fermi level position corresponding to reduction of pinning took place after Si ICL growth, particularly on (111)B surface (around 500 meV). However, subsequent surface nitridation increased pinning again. Then, a significant reduction of pinning was obtained by changing SiN{sub x} to silicon oxynitride by intentional air-exposure and subsequent annealing. This has led to realization of a stable passivation structure with an ultrathin oxynitride/Si ICL structure which prevented subcutaneous oxidation during further device processing under air-exposure. The Si-ICL-based passivation process was applied to surface passivation of quantum wire (QWR) transistors where anomalously large side-gating phenomenon was completely eliminated. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Adsorption and oxidation of acetaldehyde on carbon supported Pt, PtSn and PtSn-based trimetallic catalysts by in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyhan, Seden; Léger, Jean-Michel; Kadırgan, Figen

    2013-11-01

    The adsorption and oxidation of acetaldehyde on carbon supported Pt, Pt90Sn10 and Pt80Sn10M10 (M = Ni, Co, Rh, Pd) catalysts have been investigated by using in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The result revealed that Pt90Sn10/C catalyst is not very efficient for the conversion of acetaldehyde to CO2 due to the weak adsorption of acetaldehyde in the presence of Sn. However, the addition of a third metal to Pt--Sn facilitates the C-C bond cleavage of acetaldehyde. It seems that acetaldehyde is adsorbed dissociatively on the surface of Pt80Sn10Ni10/C, Pt80Sn10Co10/C, Pt80Sn10Rh10/C catalysts, producing CH3 and CHO adsorbate species, which can be further oxidized to CO2. However, the pathway forming CO2 for Pt80Sn10Pd10/C catalyst mainly originates from the oxidation of CH3CO species. Thus, the presence of third metal in the PtSn catalyst has a strong impact upon the acetaldehyde adsorption behaviour and its reaction products.

  13. In-Situ Studies of Structure Transformation and Al Coordination of KAl(MoO42 during Heating by High Temperature Raman and 27Al NMR Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest in optimizing composition and synthesis conditions of functional crystals, and the further exploration of new possible candidates for tunable solid-state lasers, has led to significant research on compounds in this family MIMIII(MVIO42 (MI = alkali metal, MIII = Al, In, Sc, Fe, Bi, lanthanide; MVI = Mo, W. The vibrational modes, structure transformation, and Al coordination of crystalline, glassy, and molten states of KAl(MoO42 have been investigated by in-situ high temperature Raman scattering and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR spectroscopy, together with first principles density functional simulation of room temperature Raman spectrum. The results showed that, under the present fast quenching conditions, Al is present predominantly in [AlO6] octahedra in both KAl(MoO42 glass and melt, with the tetrahedrally coordinated Al being minor at approximately 2.7%. The effect of K+, from ordered arrangement in the crystal to random distribution in the melt, on the local chemical environment of Al, was also revealed. The distribution and quantitative analysis of different Al coordination subspecies are final discussed and found to be dependent on the thermal history of the glass samples.

  14. In Situ Detection of Trace Furfural in Aqueous Solution Based on Au Nanoparticle/Au Film Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Furfural is an important chemical solvent and intermediate. Sensitive detection of this compound has attracted great interest in various fields. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS is a highly sensitive method for material detection because of its optical enhancement effect of plasmonic nanostructures. This study presents a simple and versatile method to synthesize a SERS substrate, where polyaminothiophenol (PATP was used to realize the stable combination of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs and Au film via self-assembly. The near-field electric field distribution was calculated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD simulation to determine the parameters responsible for electric field enhancement. The simulation results show that SERS enhanced factors are sensitive to interparticle spacing and materials for solid support but insensitive to particle size. Moreover, the experimental results show that the optimized substrates with the highest Raman activity were formed by six layers of 60 nm AuNPs decorated on a 30 nm thick Au film, thereby validating the simulation results. The SERS factor of the optimal substrates is approximately 5.57 × 103, and the in situ detection limit is 4.8 ppm. The 3D Raman spectra, relative standard deviation values for major peaks, and changes in signal intensity with time show the good reproducibility and stability of the substrates.

  15. In situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy investigation of the state of charge of all-vanadium redox flow batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuankun; Liu, Qi; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Yang, Fan; Ren, Yang; Heald, Steve M; Liu, Yadong; Li, Zhe-Fei; Lu, Wenquan; Xie, Jian

    2014-10-22

    Synchrotron-based in situ X-ray near-edge absorption spectroscopy (XANES) has been used to study the valence state evolution of the vanadium ion for both the catholyte and anolyte in all-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRB) under realistic cycling conditions. The results indicate that, when using the widely used charge-discharge profile during the first charge process (charging the VRB cell to 1.65 V under a constant current mode), the vanadium ion valence did not reach V(V) in the catholyte and did not reach V(II) in the anolyte. Consequently, the state of charge (SOC) for the VRB cell was only 82%, far below the desired 100% SOC. Thus, such incompletely charged mix electrolytes results in not only wasting the electrolytes but also decreasing the cell performance in the following cycles. On the basis of our study, we proposed a new charge-discharge profile (first charged at a constant current mode up to 1.65 V and then continuously charged at a constant voltage mode until the capacity was close to the theoretical value) for the first charge process that achieved 100% SOC after the initial charge process. Utilizing this new charge-discharge profile, the theoretical charge capacity and the full utilization of electrolytes has been achieved, thus having a significant impact on the cost reduction of the electrolytes in VRB.

  16. In situ SERS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on the pH-dependant adsorption of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid on silver electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Jia, Shaojie; Fodjo, Essy Kouadio; Xu, Hu; Wang, Yuhong; Deng, Wei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroelectrochemistry and angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AR-XPS) are used to investigate the redox reaction and adsorption behavior of anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (AQ-2-COOH) on an Ag electrode at different pH values. The obtained results indicate that AQ-2-COOH is adsorbed tilted on the Ag electrode through O-atom of ring carbonyl in a potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE, but the orientation turns to more tilted orientation with both O-atom of the ring carbonyl and carboxylate group in positive potential region for pH 6.0 and 7.4. However, at pH 10.0, the orientation adopts tilted conformation constantly on the Ag electrode with both O-atom of the anthraquinone ring and carboxylate group in the potential range from -0.3 to -0.5 V vs. SCE or at positive potentials. Moreover, the adsorption behavior of AQ-2-COOH has been further confirmed by AR-XPS on the Ag surface. Proposed reasons for the observed changes in orientation are presented.

  17. An in situ near-ambient pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy study of Mn polarised anodically in a cell with solid oxide electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Amati, Matteo; Bocchetta, Patrizia; Dal Zilio, Simone; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Vesselli, Erik; Kiskinova, Maya

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an in situ study of the anodic behavior of a model solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) by means of near-ambient pressure X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) combined with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) measurements. The focus is on the anodic surface chemistry of MnO x , a model anodic material already considered in cognate SOFC-related studies, during electrochemical operation in CO 2 , CO 2 /H 2 O and H 2 O ambients. The XPS and NEXAFS results we obtained, complemented by electrochemical measurements and SEM characterisation, reveal the chemical evolution of Mn under electrochemical control. MnO is the stable chemical form at open-circuit potential (OCP), while Mn 3 O 4 forms under anodic polarisation in all the investigated gas ambients. Carbon deposits are present on the Mn electrode at OCP, but they are readily oxidised under anodic conditions. Prolonged operation of the MnO x anode leads to pitting of the Mn films, damaging of the triple-phase boundary region and also to formation of discontinuities in the Mn patch. This is accompanied by chemical transformations of the electrolyte and formation of ZrC without impact on the surface chemistry of the Mn-based anode

  18. In situ characterization of the decomposition behavior of Mg(BH4)2 by X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahle, Christoph J; Kujawski, Simon; Remhof, Arndt; Yan, Yigang; Stadie, Nicholas P; Al-Zein, Ali; Tolan, Metin; Huotari, Simo; Krisch, Michael; Sternemann, Christian

    2016-02-21

    We present an in situ study of the thermal decomposition of Mg(BH4)2 in a hydrogen atmosphere of up to 4 bar and up to 500 °C using X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy at the boron K-edge and the magnesium L2,3-edges. The combination of the fingerprinting analysis of both edges yields detailed quantitative information on the reaction products during decomposition, an issue of crucial importance in determining whether Mg(BH4)2 can be used as a next-generation hydrogen storage material. This work reveals the formation of reaction intermediate(s) at 300 °C, accompanied by a significant hydrogen release without the occurrence of stable boron compounds such as amorphous boron or MgB12H12. At temperatures between 300 °C and 400 °C, further hydrogen release proceeds via the formation of higher boranes and crystalline MgH2. Above 400 °C, decomposition into the constituting elements takes place. Therefore, at moderate temperatures, Mg(BH4)2 is shown to be a promising high-density hydrogen storage material with great potential for reversible energy storage applications.

  19. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Marco, Roland [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.demarco@exchange.curtin.edu.au; Jiang, Z.-T. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Martizano, Jay [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Lowe, Alex [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Pejcic, Bobby [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Riessen, Arie van [Materials Research Group, Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2006-08-15

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater.

  20. Effect of Cl2- and HBr-based inductively coupled plasma etching on InP surface composition analyzed using in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchoule, S.; Vallier, L.; Patriarche, G.; Chevolleau, T.; Cardinaud, C.

    2012-01-01

    A Cl 2 -HBr-O 2 /Ar inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etching process has been adapted for the processing of InP-based heterostructures in a 300-mm diameter CMOS etching tool. Smooth and anisotropic InP etching is obtained at moderate etch rate (∼600 nm/min). Ex situ x-ray energy dispersive analysis of the etched sidewalls shows that the etching anisotropy is obtained through a SiO x passivation mechanism. The stoichiometry of the etched surface is analyzed in situ using angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is observed that Cl 2 -based ICP etching results in a significantly P-rich surface. The phosphorous layer identified on the top surface is estimated to be ∼1-1.3-nm thick. On the other hand InP etching in HBr/Ar plasma results in a more stoichiometric surface. In contrast to the etched sidewalls, the etched surface is free from oxides with negligible traces of silicon. Exposure to ambient air of the samples submitted to Cl 2 -based chemistry results in the complete oxidation of the P-rich top layer. It is concluded that a post-etch treatment or a pure HBr plasma step may be necessary after Cl 2 -based ICP etching for the recovery of the InP material.

  1. Ad-hoc surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy methodologies for the detection of artist dyestuffs: thin layer chromatography-surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy and in situ on the fiber analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Christa L; Gambardella, Alessa; Casadio, Francesca; Grzywacz, Cecily M; Wouters, Jan; Van Duyne, Richard P

    2009-04-15

    Tailored ad-hoc methods must be developed for successful identification of minute amounts of natural dyes on works of art using Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). This article details two of these successful approaches using silver film over nanosphere (AgFON) substrates and silica gel coupled with citrate-reduced Ag colloids. The latter substrate functions as the test system for the coupling of thin-layer chromatography and SERS (TLC-SERS), which has been used in the current research to separate and characterize a mixture of several artists' dyes. The poor limit of detection of TLC is overcome by coupling with SERS, and dyes which co-elute to nearly the same spot can be distinguished from each other. In addition, in situ extractionless non-hydrolysis SERS was used to analyze dyed reference fibers, as well as historical textile fibers. Colorants such as alizarin, purpurin, carminic acid, lac dye, crocin, and Cape jasmine were thus successfully identified.

  2. Detection and evaluation of uranium in different minerals by gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergani, F.M.; Khedr, M.A.; Harith, M.A.; El Mongy, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Analysis, detection and evaluation of source nuclear materials (e.g. uranium) in different minerals by sensitive techniques are a vital objective for uranium exploration, nuclear materials extraction, processing and verification. In this work, uranium in different geological formations was determined using gamma spectrometry and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). The investigated samples were collected from different regions distributed all over Egypt. The samples were then prepared for non-destructive analysis. A hyper pure germanium detector was used to measure the emitted gamma rays of uranium and its daughters in the samples. The concentrations of uranium in ppm (μg/g) in the investigated samples are given and discussed in this work. The highest uranium concentration (4354.9 ppm) was found in uranophane samples of Gattar rocks. In Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique, plasma was formed by irradiating the rock surface with focused Q-switched Nd:Yag laser pulses of 7 ns pulse duration at the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm). Atoms and ions originating from the rock surface are excited and ionized in the laser produced hot plasma (∝10 000 K). The plasma emission spectral line is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma and allows identification of the uranium in the uranophane mineral. The strong atomic line at 424.2 nm is used for the qualitative identification of uranium. It can be mentioned that the elevated levels of uranium in some of the investigated uranophane samples are of great economic feasibility to be extracted. (orig.)

  3. Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission Spectroscopy Over a Broad Range of Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, Hannah; Wilkinson, John; Tighe, Meghanne; McLallen, Walter; McGuire, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Ion beam analysis is a common application of nuclear physics that allows elemental and isotopic information about materials to be determined from accelerated light ion beams One of the best know ion beam analysis techniques is Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission (PIGE) spectroscopy, which can be used ex vacuo to identify the elements of interest in almost any solid target. The energies of the gamma-rays emitted by excited nuclei will be unique to each element and depend on its nuclear structure. For the most sensitivity, the accelerated ions should exceed the Coulomb barrier of the target, but many isotopes are known to be accessible to PIGE even below the Coulomb barrier. To explore the sensitivity of PIGE across the periodic table, PIGE measurements were made on elements with Z = 5, 9, 11-15, 17, 19-35, 37, 42, 44-48, 53, 56, 60, 62, 73, and 74 using 3.4 MeV protons. These measurements will be compared with literature values and be used as a basis for comparison with higher-energy proton beams available at the University of Notre Dame's St. Andre accelerator when it comes online this Fall. The beam normalization technique of using atmospheric argon and its 1459 keV gamma-ray to better estimate the integrated beam on target will also be discussed. Funded by the NSF REU program and the University of Notre Dame.

  4. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Campbell, Luke; Favalli, Andrea; Hunt, Alan W.; Reedy, Edward T.E.; Seipel, Heather

    2015-01-01

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-energy delayed gamma rays from 235 U, 239 Pu, and 241 Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241 Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239 Pu. The 241 Pu/ 239 Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235 U data set. De-convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-rate LaBr 3 detectors was investigated as a potential alternative to HPGe detectors. Modeling capabilities were added to an

  5. Delayed Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy for Non-Destructive Assay of Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mozin, Vladimir [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Campbell, Luke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hunt, Alan W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Reedy, Edward T.E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Seipel, Heather [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    High-­energy, beta-delayed gamma-­ray spectroscopy is a potential, non-­destructive assay techniques for the independent verification of declared quantities of special nuclear materials at key stages of the fuel cycle and for directly assaying nuclear material inventories for spent fuel handling, interim storage, reprocessing facilities, repository sites, and final disposal. Other potential applications include determination of MOX fuel composition, characterization of nuclear waste packages, and challenges in homeland security and arms control verification. Experimental measurements were performed to evaluate fission fragment yields, to test methods for determining isotopic fractions, and to benchmark the modeling code package. Experimental measurement campaigns were carried out at the IAC using a photo-­neutron source and at OSU using a thermal neutron beam from the TRIGA reactor to characterize the emission of high-­energy delayed gamma rays from 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu targets following neutron induced fission. Data were collected for pure and combined targets for several irradiation/spectroscopy cycle times ranging from 10/10 seconds to 15/30 minutes.The delayed gamma-ray signature of 241Pu, a significant fissile constituent in spent fuel, was measured and compared to 239Pu. The 241Pu/239Pu ratios varied between 0.5 and 1.2 for ten prominent lines in the 2700-­3600 keV energy range. Such significant differences in relative peak intensities make it possible to determine relative fractions of these isotopes in a mixed sample. A method for determining fission product yields by fitting the energy and time dependence of the delayed gamma-­ray emission was developed and demonstrated on a limited 235U data set. De-­convolution methods for determining fissile fractions were developed and tested on the experimental data. The use of high count-­rate LaBr3 detectors

  6. Experimental investigation of silicon photomultipliers as compact light readout systems for gamma-ray spectroscopy applications in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocente, M., E-mail: massimo.nocente@mib.infn.it; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Fazzi, A.; Lorenzoli, M.; Pirovano, C. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma “P. Caldirola,” EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica “G. Occhialini,” Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Uboldi, C.; Varoli, V. [Dipartimento di Energia, CeSNEF, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    A matrix of Silicon Photo Multipliers has been developed for light readout from a large area 1 in. × 1 in. LaBr{sub 3} crystal. The system has been characterized in the laboratory and its performance compared to that of a conventional photo multiplier tube. A pulse duration of 100 ns was achieved, which opens up to spectroscopy applications at high counting rates. The energy resolution measured using radioactive sources extrapolates to 3%–4% in the energy range E{sub γ} = 3–5 MeV, enabling gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements at good energy resolution. The results reported here are of relevance in view of the development of compact gamma-ray detectors with spectroscopy capabilities, such as an enhanced gamma-ray camera for high power fusion plasmas, where the use of photomultiplier is impeded by space limitation and sensitivity to magnetic fields.

  7. The Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron-induced prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of the CW abandoned by Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bairong; Yang Zhongping; Zhan Wenzhong

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduced the principle of identifying the chemical weapon abandoned by Japan by neutron-induced prompt gamma ray. Using the MCNP-4C Monte Carlo program, this paper simulated and analyzed the neutron-induced prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of chemical weapon abandoned by Japan, whereby supply important datum and reference for the aftertime deeper research and disposal of Japan-abandoned chemical weapon. (authors)

  8. Feasibility Study on Fiber-optic Radiation Sensor for Remote Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hyesu; Jang, Kyoung Won; Shin, Sang Hun and others

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors. As a result, the BGO was suitable for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor due to its high scintillation output and exact photoelectric peak for the gamma-ray energy. The basic principle of radiation detection is to detect the signals caused by interactions between radiations and materials. There are various types of radiation detectors depending on types of radiation to be detected and physical quantities to be measured. As one of the radiation detectors, a fiber-optic radiation sensor using a scintillator and an optical fiber has two advantages such as no space restraint and remote sensing. Moreover, in nuclear environments, this kind of sensor has immunities for electromagnetic field, temperature, and pressure. Thus, the fiber-optic radiation sensor can be used in various fields including nondestructive inspection, radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy. As a fundamental study of the fiber-optic radiation sensor for remote gamma-ray spectroscopy, in this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors

  9. Single molecule force spectroscopy for in-situ probing oridonin inhibited ROS-mediated EGF-EGFR interactions in living KYSE-150 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Jiang, Jinhuan; Yang, Fen; Cai, Huaihong; Yang, Peihui; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2017-05-01

    As the active anticancer component of Rabdosia Rubescens, oridonin has been proved to show strong anticancer activity in cancer cells, which is also found to be closely related to its specific inhibition effects on the EGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In this study, atomic force microscopy based single molecule force spectroscopy (AFM-SMFS) was used for real-time and in-situ detection of EGF-EGFR interactions in living esophageal cancer KYSE-150 cells to evaluate the anticancer activity of oridonin for the first time. Oridonin was found to induce apoptosis and also reduce EGFR expression in KYSE-150 cells. AFM-SMFS results demonstrated that oridonin could inhibit the binding between EGF and EGFR in KYSE-150 cells by decreasing the unbinding force and binding probability for EGF-EGFR complexes, which was further proved to be closely associated with the intracellular ROS level. More precise mechanism studies based on AFM-SMFS demonstrated that oridonin treatment could decrease the energy barrier width, increase the dissociation off rate constant and decrease the activation energy of EGF-EGFR complexes in ROS dependent way, suggesting oridonin as a strong anticancer agent targeting EGF-EGFR interactions in cancer cells through ROS dependent mechanism. Our results not only suggested oridonin as a strong anticancer agent targeting EGF-EGFR interactions in ROS dependent mechanism, but also highlighted AFM-SMFS as a powerful technique for pharmacodynamic studies by detecting ligand-receptor interactions, which was also expected to be developed into a promising tool for the screening and mechanism studies of drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. New insights into the mechanism of interaction between CO2 and polymers from thermodynamic parameters obtained by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrienko, Anton A; Ewing, Andrew V; Chibiryaev, Andrey M; Agafontsev, Alexander M; Dubkov, Konstantin A; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-07

    This work reports new physical insights of the thermodynamic parameters and mechanisms of possible interactions occurring in polymers subjected to high-pressure CO2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy has been used in situ to determine the thermodynamic parameters of the intermolecular interactions between CO2 and different functional groups of the polymers capable of specific interactions with sorbed CO2 molecules. Based on the measured ATR-FTIR spectra of the polymer samples subjected to high-pressure CO2 (30 bar) at different temperatures (300-340 K), it was possible to characterize polymer-polymer and CO2-polymer interactions. Particularly, the enthalpy and entropy of the formation of the specific non-covalent complexes between CO2 and the hydroxy (-OH), carbonyl (C[double bond, length as m-dash]O) and hydroxyimino ([double bond, length as m-dash]N-OH) functional groups of the polymer samples have been measured. Furthermore, the obtained spectroscopic results have provided an opportunity for the structure of these complexes to be proposed. An interesting phenomenon regarding the behavior of CO2/polymer systems has also been observed. It has been found that only for the polyketone, the value of enthalpy was negative indicating an exothermic process during the formation of the CO2-polymer non-covalent complexes. Conversely, for the polyoxime and polyalcohol samples there is a positive enthalpy determined. This is a result of the initial polymer-polymer interactions requiring more energy to break than is released during the formation of the CO2-polymer complex. The effect of increasing temperature to facilitate the breaking of the polymer-polymer interactions has also been observed. Hence, a mechanism for the formation of CO2-polymer complexes was suggested based on these results, which occurs via a two-step process: (1) the breaking of the existing polymer-polymer interactions followed by (2) the formation of new CO2-polymer non-covalent interactions.

  11. Structure Sensitivity in Pt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene: In Situ Study of Reaction Intermediates Using SFG Vibrational Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2013-01-31

    The product selectivity during 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation on monodisperse, colloidally synthesized, Pt nanoparticles was studied under reaction conditions with kinetic measurements and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG was performed with the capping ligands intact in order to maintain nanoparticle size by reduced sintering. Four products are formed at 75 C: 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and n-butane. Ensembles of Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 0.9 and 1.8 nm exhibit a ∼30% and ∼20% increase in the full hydrogenation products, respectively, as compared to Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.6 and 6.7 nm. Methyl and methylene vibrational stretches of reaction intermediates observed under working conditions using SFG were used to correlate the stable reaction intermediates with the product distribution. Kinetic and SFG results correlate with previous DFT predictions for two parallel reaction pathways of 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene can initiate with H-addition at internal or terminal carbons leading to the formation of 1-buten-4-yl radical (metallocycle) and 2-buten-1-yl radical intermediates, respectively. Small (0.9 and 1.8 nm) nanoparticles exhibited vibrational resonances originating from both intermediates, while the large (4.6 and 6.7 nm) particles exhibited vibrational resonances originating predominately from the 2-buten-1-yl radical. This suggests each reaction pathway competes for partial and full hydrogenation and the nanoparticle size affects the kinetic preference for the two pathways. The reaction pathway through the metallocycle intermediate on the small nanoparticles is likely due to the presence of low-coordinated sites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Tuning excitation laser wavelength for secondary resonance in low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for in-situ analytical measurement of nanoaerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Gang; Li, Shuiqing; Tse, Stephen D.

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, a novel low-intensity phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (PS-LIBS) technique has been developed for unique elemental-composition identification of aerosolized nanoparticles, where only the solid-phase nanoparticles break down, forming nanoplasmas, without any surrounding gas-phase breakdown. Additional work has demonstrated that PS-LIBS emissions can be greatly enhanced with secondary resonant excitation by matching the excitation laser wavelength with an atomic transition line in the formed nanoplasma, thereby achieving low limits of detection. In this work, a tunable dye laser is employed to investigate the effects of excitation wavelength and irradiance on in-situ PS-LIBS measurements of TiO2 nanoaerosols. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation can be 220 times greater than that for non-resonant cases under similar conditions. Moreover, the emitted spectra are unique for the selected resonant transition lines for a given element, suggesting the potential to make precise phase-selective and analyte-selective measurements of nanoparticles in a multicomponent multiphase system. The enhancement factor by resonant excitation is highly sensitive to excitation laser wavelength, with narrow excitation spectral windows, i.e., 0.012 to 0.023 nm (FWHM, full width at half maximum) for Ti (I) neutral atomic lines, and 0.051 to 0.139 nm (FWHM) for Ti (II) single-ionized atomic lines. Boltzmann analysis of the emission intensities, temporal response of emissions, and emission dependence on excitation irradiance are investigated to understand aspects of the generated nanoplasmas such as temperature, local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), and excitation mechanism.

  13. The microwave heating mechanism of N-(4-methoxybenzyliden)-4-butylaniline in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases as determined using in situ microwave irradiation NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasei, Yugo; Tanigawa, Fumikazu; Kawamura, Izuru; Fujito, Teruaki; Sato, Motoyasu; Naito, Akira

    2015-04-14

    Microwave heating effects are widely used in the acceleration of organic, polymerization and enzymatic reactions. These effects are primarily caused by the local heating induced by microwave irradiation. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms associated with microwave heating effects on the chemical reactions are not yet well understood. This study investigated the microwave heating effect of N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline (MBBA) in liquid crystalline and isotropic phases using in situ microwave irradiation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, by obtaining (1)H NMR spectra of MBBA under microwave irradiation. When heated simply using the temperature control unit of the NMR instrument, the liquid crystalline MBBA was converted to the isotropic phase exactly at its phase transition temperature (Tc) of 41 °C. The application of microwave irradiation at 130 W for 90 s while maintaining the instrument temperature at 20 °C generated a small amount of isotropic phase within the bulk liquid crystal. The sample temperature of the liquid crystalline state obtained during microwave irradiation was estimated to be 35 °C by assessing the linewidths of the (1)H NMR spectrum. This partial transition to the isotropic phase can be attributed to a non-equilibrium local heating state induced by the microwave irradiation. The application of microwave at 195 W for 5 min to isotropic MBBA while maintaining an instrument temperature of 50 °C raised the sample temperature to 160 °C. In this study, the MBBA temperature during microwave irradiation was estimated by measuring the temperature dependent chemical shifts of individual protons in the sample, and the different protons were found to indicate significantly different temperatures in the molecule. These results suggest that microwave heating polarizes bonds in polar functional groups, and this effect may partly explain the attendant acceleration of organic reactions.

  14. Characterization of as-grown and adsorbate-covered N-polar InN surfaces using in situ photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenhardt, Anja; Himmerlich, Marcel; Krischok, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The surface electronic properties and adsorption behaviour of as-grown and oxidized N-polar InN films are characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UPS). The epitaxial growth of the InN layers was performed by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on GaN/6H-SiC(000-1). After growth and in situ characterization the InN surfaces were exposed to molecular oxygen to evaluate the adsorption behaviour of O 2 on N-polar InN and to study its impact on the surface electronic properties of the III-nitride material. The results are compared with studies on In-polar InN on GaN/sapphire templates. The as-grown N-polar InN surface exhibits a pronounced surface state at a binding energy of ∝1.6 eV. The valence band minimum lies about 0.8-1.0 eV below the surface Fermi level. Additionally, the XPS core level binding energies for InN(000-1) are reduced compared to InN(0001) films, indicating different surface band bending for clean N-polar and In-polar InN, respectively. The interaction of molecular oxygen with the InN(000-1) surface leads to a downward band bending by 0.1 eV compared to the initial state. Additional adsorption of species from the residual gas of the UHV chamber increases the surface downward band bending. Furthermore two pronounced oxygen related states with an energy distance of ∝5 eV could be detected in the valence band region. The adsorbed oxygen results in an additional component in the N1s core level spectra, which is interpreted as formation of NO x bonds. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. In-Situ Assay Of Transuranic Radionuclides In The Vadose Zone Using High-Resolution Spectral Gamma Logging - A Hanford Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohay, V.J.; Henwood, P.; McCain, R.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution spectral gamma logging in steel-cased boreholes is used to detect and quantify transuranic radionuclides in the subsurface. Pu-239, Pu-241, Am-241, and Np-237 are identified based on characteristic decay gammas. Typical minimum detectable levels are on the order of 20 to 40 nCi/g. In intervals of high transuranic concentrations, gamma rays from other sources may complicate analysis and interpretation. Gamma rays detected in the borehole may originate from three sources: decay of the parent transuranic radionuclide or a daughter; alpha interactions; and interactions with neutrons resulting from either spontaneous fission or alpha particle interactions.

  16. Landscape Erosion Assessment using the {sup 137}Cs-based Method through Laboratory and in-situ Gamma Spectrometry: An Update of On-going Research and Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, B. C.; Toloza, A.; Augustin, F.; Dercon, G.; Mabit, L. [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory (SWMCNL), Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria); Darby, I. G.; Kaiser, R. B. [Nuclear Science and Instrumentation Laboratory (NSIL), Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Seibersdorf (Austria)

    2014-07-15

    The objective of this research is to compare in-situ {sup 137}Cs measurements using an on-site lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3} (Ce)) scintillation detector with those from a conventional laboratory-based HPGe detector to assess soil erosion. We aimed to establish (i) the strength of the relationship between in-situ and laboratory based measurements, and (ii) to develop improved tools for landscape-based soil erosion assessments in our continuing research, reported in the January 2013 Soils Newsletter.

  17. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies treated with Gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, V Uvalu 84, 150 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Liscak, Roman; Vymazal, Josef; Vladyka, Vilibald [Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Hospital Na Homolce, 151 19, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2003-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy was used to observe long-term post-irradiation metabolic changes in epileptogenic tissue and in the contralateral parts of the brain which are not available with conventional imaging methods. We studied these changes in the temporal lobe in six patients, following radiosurgery on the amygdala and hippocampus. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T with short and long echo times (TE=10 and 135 ms) were used together with standard MR imaging sequences (T1-, T2-weighted). The treatment was performed by Leksell Gamma Knife with a dose of 50 Gy to the center and a 50% isodose to the margin of the target, represented by the mean volume of approximately 7.5 ml. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR spectroscopy examinations were performed at least once per year for 3 years. The most significant changes in spectra were observed approximately 1 year after the irradiation when edema in irradiated area was observed and strong signal of lipids was identified. Later, edema and lipid signals disappeared and follow-up was characterized by a decrease of NAA, Cr, and Cho concentrations in the ipsilateral region of the brain to the irradiation (LCModel calculation from voxel of interest 3.8-4.5 ml positioned into the centrum of target volume). The concentration of NAA, Cr, and Cho after radiosurgery was significantly different from control values (p<0.05) and also from concentrations in the contralateral part of the brain (p<0.05). In the contralateral part, the concentration of NAA was significantly increased (p<0.05) (NAA: before treatment 8.81, after treatment 11.33 mM). No radiotoxic changes were observed in the contralateral part of the brain or behind the area of target volume. The MR spectroscopy findings precluded MRI observation and MRS results completed data about the development of radiotoxic changes in the target volume. (orig.)

  18. Modeling a gamma spectroscopy system and predicting spectra with Geant-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, D.; Uenlue, K.

    2009-01-01

    An activity predictor software was previously developed to foresee activities, exposure rates and gamma spectra of activated samples for Radiation Science and Engineering Center (RSEC), Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements. With Activity Predictor it has been demonstrated that the predicted spectra were less than satisfactory. In order to obtain better predicted spectra, a new detailed model for the RSEC NAA spectroscopy system with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector is developed using Geant-4. The model was validated with a National Bureau of Standards certified 60 Co source and tree activated high purity samples at PSBR. The predicted spectra agreed well with measured spectra. Error in net photo peak area values were 8.6-33.6%. Along with the previously developed activity predictor software, this new model in Geant-4 provided realistic spectra prediction for NAA experiments at RSEC PSBR. (author)

  19. Experimental study of the burned of nuclear fuel by the gamma spectroscopy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador V, P.

    2009-01-01

    Accurate information on nuclear fuel burnup is of vital importance in reactor operation, fuel management and fuel-characteristics studies. Conventionally fuel management of the TRIGA III Reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) is done through the thermal balance method (management) of the power generated during reactor operation, since it is known that with 1.24 grams of 235 U is possible to generate a power or 1 MW per day during the reactor operation. On the other hand, it is possible to calculate the operation time in days during a power of 1 MW with the help of the data registered in logs. With the information just mentioned one can calculate the quantity of 235 U consumed in the fuel during a complete period of irradiation. In order to compare and prove that the burnup values, calculated through the thermal balance method, are correct, the ININ implemented, for the first time, the gamma-ray spectroscopy method as an experimental technique to calculate the burnup of several fuel elements. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a nondestructive method, so that the integrity of the fuel element is not affected which is of great importance. Since there is a direct relation between the activity of 137 Cs contained in the fuel elements and a series of constants which are unique for the radioisotope and for the high resolution system, the problem just simplifies in measuring the 137 Cs activities. Furthermore the 137 Cs concentration equation was developed theoretically and I wrote a computer program (AMAVAL) in Fortran. The task of this program is to calculate the concentrations and the activity through the use of the equation just mentioned and the history of each fuel element. The purpose of this is to compare and validate the experimental activities with the theoretical ones for each fuel element. (Author)

  20. The recent developments in the technology of scintillator detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdebout, J.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this report is to review the recent developments in the use of high stopping power materials and solid state readout for scintillation gamma -ray spectroscopy as these techniques may give rise to a new generation of low powered portable instruments. The report is a bibliographical study based on papers published mainly these last five years. The main subject is preceded by a general introduction in which the principal characteristics of a scintillator gamma-ray spectrometer are discussed. The properties of some scintillator materials (NaI(T1), CsI(T1), CsI(Na), BGO, GSO(Ce) and CdWO 4 ) are then briefly presented. In this section, a special emphasis has been given to BGO as this material has recently received much attention and is now well documented. Finally, the results obtained by measuring the intensity of the light generated in the crystal with three types of solid-state photodetectors (Si photodiodes, HgI 2 photodetectors and avalanche Si photodiodes) are summarized

  1. Raman spectroscopy of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-acrylamide copolymer using gamma irradiation for crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goheen, Steven C.; Saunders, Rachel M.; Davis, Rachel M.; Harvey, Scott D.; Olsen, Peter C.

    2006-01-01

    A copolymer hydrogel was made by mixing acrylamide and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate monomers in water and polymerizing with gamma irradiation. The progress of polymerization and the vibrational structure of the hydrogel was examined using Raman spectroscopy. Raman spectra indicated that the co-polymer has a molecular structure different from polyacrylamide or the individual monomers. The Raman data also indicate the presence of crosslinking at the C=O, NH2 and OH side chains. The spectra further suggest the continuous lengthening of the backbone of the polymers with increasing gamma dose. This is shown as the increase in C-C modes as C=C vibrations decrease. Raman spectra changed most dramatically as the monomer mixture became a gel at a dose of approximately 320 Gy. Spectral differences were subtler with doses exceeding 640 Gy, although chain lengthening continued beyond 1500 Gy. Potential applications of the copolymer hydrogel include reconstructive tissue as well as a standard material for radiation protection dosimetry. Results are discussed in relation to other potential applications of this polymer and dose-dependent changes in the Raman spectrum

  2. Statistical methods applied to gamma-ray spectroscopy algorithms in nuclear security missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Deborah K; Robinson, Sean M; Runkle, Robert C

    2012-10-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy is a critical research and development priority to a range of nuclear security missions, specifically the interdiction of special nuclear material involving the detection and identification of gamma-ray sources. We categorize existing methods by the statistical methods on which they rely and identify methods that have yet to be considered. Current methods estimate the effect of counting uncertainty but in many cases do not address larger sources of decision uncertainty, which may be significantly more complex. Thus, significantly improving algorithm performance may require greater coupling between the problem physics that drives data acquisition and statistical methods that analyze such data. Untapped statistical methods, such as Bayes Modeling Averaging and hierarchical and empirical Bayes methods, could reduce decision uncertainty by rigorously and comprehensively incorporating all sources of uncertainty. Application of such methods should further meet the needs of nuclear security missions by improving upon the existing numerical infrastructure for which these analyses have not been conducted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of LaBr3:Ce probe for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghraby, Ahmed M.; Alzimami, K. S.; Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alsafi, K. G.; Ma, A.; Alfuraih, A. A.; Alghamdi, A. A.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2014-02-01

    The main thrust of this work is the investigation of performance of relatively new commercial LaBr3:Ce probe (Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce crystal) for gamma-ray spectroscopy and dosimetry measurements in comparison to LaCl3:Ce and NaI:Tl scintillators. The crystals were irradiated by a wide range of energies (57Co, 22Na, 18F, 137Cs and 60Co). The study involved recording of detected spectra and measurement of energy resolution, photopeak efficiency, internal radioactivity measurements as well as dose rate. The Monte Carlo package, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) was used to validate the experiments. Overall results showed very good agreement between the measurements and the simulations. The LaBr3:Ce crystal has excellent energy resolution, energy resolutions of (3.37±0.05)% and (2.98±0.07)% for a 137Cs 662 keV and a 60Co 1332 keV gamma-ray point sources respectively, were recorded. The disadvantage of the lanthanum halide scintillators is their internal radioactivity. Inspector 1000™ with LaBr3:Ce scintillator has shown an accurate and quick dose measurements at Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Units which allows accurate assessment of the radiation dose received by staff members compared to the use of electronic personal dosimeters (EPD).

  4. Implementation of neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy in industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abernethy, D. A.; Lim, C. S.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Neutron based analytical techniques are commonly used in a wide variety of industrial applications, with new applications continually being found. As a result, despite popular concerns about the harmful health effects of radiation the number of these analysers is increasing. This is because neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have the capability of combining elemental sensitivity with significant penetrating power, enabling non-intrusive and non-destructive bulk elemental measurements to be averaged over a large volume of material. Neutron induced gamma ray spectroscopy has been developed by several groups, including CSIRO Minerals, for on-line measurement of elemental composition in a range of industrial applications in vessels, pipes and on conveyor belts. Compared to those typically found in a scientific laboratory, conditions in industrial plants differ substantially in a number of ways, such as environmental variability, operator skill and training, and shielding requirements. As a result of these differences, equipment and techniques which are used as a matter of course in a laboratory often have to undergo major modification to render them suitable for use in an industrial context. This paper will discuss some of the factors that have to be considered when deciding such matters with particular emphasis on the implications of radiation safety requirements

  5. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  6. Evaluation of Multi-Channel ADCs for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Hennig, Wolfgang; Walby, Mark D.; Breus, Dimitry; Harris, Jackson

    2013-04-01

    As nuclear physicists increasingly design large scale experiments with hundreds or thousands of detector channels, there are growing needs for high density readout electronics with good timing and energy resolution that at the same time offer lower cost per channel compared to existing commercial solutions. Recent improvements in the design of commercial analog to digital converters (ADCs) have resulted in a variety of multi-channel ADCs that are natural choice for designing such high density readout modules. However, multi-channel ADCs typically are designed for medical imaging/ultrasound applications and therefore are not rated for their spectroscopic characteristics. In this work, we evaluated the gamma-ray spectroscopic performance of several multi-channel ADCs, including their energy resolution, nonlinearity, and timing resolution. Some of these ADCs demonstrated excellent energy resolution, 2.66% FWHM at 662 keV with a LaBr3 or 1.78 keV FWHM at 1332.5 keV with a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and sub-nanosecond timing resolution with LaBr 3. We present results from these measurements to illustrate their suitability for gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  7. Multielement CdZnTe detectors for high-efficiency, ambient-temperature gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Moss, C.E.; Sweet, M.R.; Ianakiev, K.; Reedy, R.C.; Li, J.; Valentine, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    CdZnTe is an attractive alternative to scintillator-based technology for ambient-temperature, gamma-ray spectroscopy. Large, single-element devices up to 3500 mm 3 have been developed for gamma-ray spectroscopy and are now available commercially. Because CdZnTe is a wide band-gap semiconductor, it can operate over a wide range of ambient temperatures with minimal power consumption. Over this range, CdZnTe detectors routinely yield better overall performance for gamma-ray spectroscopy than scintillator detectors. Manufacturing issues and material electronic properties limit the maximum size of single-element CdZnTe detectors. The authors are investigating methods to combine CdZnTe detectors together to improve detection efficiency and overall performance of gamma-ray spectroscopy. The applications include the assay and identification of radioisotopes for nuclear material safeguards and nonproliferation (over the energy range 50 keV to 1 MeV), and the analysis of elemental composition for planetary science (over the energy range 1 MeV to 10 MeV). Design issues for the two energy ranges are summarized

  8. Determination of natural radioactive elements in building materials by gamma spectroscopy, trace dosimetry and neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, G.; Desdin, L.F.; Hernandez, A.T.; Gonzalez, D.; Labrada, A.; Tenreiro, J.J.; Capote, G.; Perelyguin, V.P.; Herrera, H.; Tellez, E.

    1993-01-01

    Five types of Cuban concretes and their main components (minerals aggregates and cement) were investigated in order to analyze the content of uranium, thorium, radium, potassium and radon 220,222, using gamma spectroscopy, trace dosimetry and neutron activation analysis. The comparative evaluation of different concretes, aggregates and two types of cements according to natural radioactivity is shown

  9. Design and fabrication of 4π Clover Detector Array Assembly for gamma-spectroscopy studies using thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Manish; Kamble, S.R.; Chaudhari, A.T.; Sabharwal, T.P.; Pathak, Kavindra; Prasad, N.K.; Kinage, L.A.; Biswas, D.C.; Bhagwat, P.V.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear spectroscopy has been studied earlier from the measurement of prompt gamma rays produced in reactions with thermal neutrons from CIRUS reactor. For studying the prompt γ-spectroscopy using thermal neutrons from Dhruva Reactor, BARC, the development of a dedicated beam line (R-3001) is in progress. In this beam line a detector assembly consisting of Clover Ge detectors will be used. This experimental setup will be utilized to investigate nuclear structure using prompt (n,γ) reactions and also to study the spectroscopy of neutron-rich fission-fragment nuclei

  10. Investigations of 131I concentration in indoor air using charcoal filters and gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H.W.; Pittauerova, D.; Foschepoth, S.; Poppe, B.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radiation protection standards require the recording of staff radiation dose in nuclear medicine thyroid radiotherapy. A commonly used method measures the 131 I thyroid activity externally with a gamma detector, followed by calculation of the committed equivalent thyroid dose. The main disadvantages are the low sensitivity and the uncertainty of the time of uptake, which can only be compensated by long measurement times and short measurement intervals. The measurements have to be applied to all staff members. An alternative can be provided by the measurement of the cumulated concentration of 131 I in indoor air using charcoal filters. The filters are placed in patient rooms at representative locations, exposed for several days and then investigated for absorbed 131 I activity. Both above mentioned disadvantages can be overcome: the measurement records the cumulated concentration history of the room and the obtained value can be used for dose calculation for all staff members knowing their working history. Standard charcoal filters (PicoRad vials, Accustar Labs, normally used for indoor radon measurements) were placed into patient rooms in a thyroid therapy department and exposed to room air for 72 hours. The vials were then subjected to high resolution low level gamma spectroscopy using a high purity germanium (hpGe) detector (50% relative efficiency, 10 cm lead shielding). Absolute activity determination was based on the net count rate in the 364 keV gamma peak and absolute counting efficiency obtained mathematically from detector and vial geometry using the commercial Labsocs (Canberra Inc.) program. Using the mean air activity/vial activity calibration factor obtained in a similar study pioneering this application, but using liquid scintillation spectroscopy as detection method (F. Jimenez et al, 2nd. European IRPA Congress, Paris 2006), mean air concentrations between 0.09 and 2.01 Bq/m 3 were found. The data correlated well with patient administered

  11. A miniature modular multichannel analyzer system for automated, low- resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Russo, P.A.; Smith, S.E.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the nuclear complex, the demand for measurements of nuclear materials holdup is increasing. Plant-wide campaigns to quantify holdup in ventilation ducts and holdup measurements in support of duct remediation are in progress at most DOE sites. Plans to satisfy more stringent requirements for holdup measurements are being developed. Facility decommissioning that accompanies downsizing the complex will require extensive holdup measurement efforts. In the early phases of planning for the modem complex, holdup measurements for new facilities are being specified at the facility design stage. Beyond the DOE, international inspection activities are relying, increasingly, on holdup measurements for verification. Developments in nondestructive assay technologies in the past decade have provided some support for measurements of this Mx. The user's requirements of ruggedness and reliability have been satisfied with compact gamma-ray detectors and spectroscopy instrumentation, but improvements are still needed in simplicity, portability, and speed. Current portable spectroscopy instruments require user sophistication as well as more than one person for transport between measurement locations. However, it is becoming clear that the real measurement need is the simultaneous operation of dozens of units, each by a single relatively unsophisticated user, to perform thousands of measurements per inventory period. The rapid and reliable conversion of measurement data to holdup quantities is essential

  12. Quasi-optimum gamma and X spectroscopy based on real-time digital techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Pullia, Antonio; Ripamonti, G

    2000-01-01

    An adaptive, self-calibrated instrument for gamma- and X-ray digital spectroscopy is proposed and demonstrated. Most of the typical processing features (pole-zero cancellation, baseline restoration, and shaping) are digitally implemented and optimized. Initialization is performed through a software procedure, which makes the system particularly flexible and allows periodical adaptivity. It is shown that spectroscopy performances are achieved even while using low-cost, low-frequency (5 Ms/s), and relatively low-resolution (12-bit) AD converters. The ADC differential nonlinearity (DNL), for example, is improved of two orders of magnitude, as estimated over the Compton shoulder of a sup 6 sup 0 Co spectrum, owing to an equivalent built-in sliding-scale effect. Using the system with an high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector a resolution of 1.9 keV FWHM (1.6 per mille) is obtained on the 1.17 MeV spectral line of a sup 6 sup 0 Co source. An Integral Nonlinearity (INL) of 0.3 per mille is measured in the range from ...

  13. The sorption of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) onto surfaces of selected metal oxides and alumosilicates studied by in situ vibrational spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Katharina

    2010-05-01

    (VI). For both actinides, the formation of similar species is suggested at pH ≤ 4, whereas at higher pH, the infrared spectra evidence structurally different species. At pH 5, the formation of a carbonate-containing dimeric complex, that is (NpO 2 ) 2 CO 3 (OH) 3 - , is strongly suggested, whereas carbonate complexation occurs only under more alkaline conditions in the U(VI) system. The results from the experiments of the sorption processes clearly demonstrate the formation of stable U(VI) surface complexes at all investigated mineral phases. This includes several metal oxides, namely TiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , and SiO 2 , serving as model systems for the elucidation of more complex mineral systems, and several alumosilicates, such as kaolinite, muscovite and biotite. From a multiplicity of in situ experiments, the impact of sorbent characteristics and variations in the aqueous U(VI) system on the sorption processes was considered. A preferential formation of an inner-sphere complex is derived from the spectra of the TiO 2 and SiO 2 phases. In addition, since the in situ FT-IR experiments provide an online monitoring of the absorption changes of the sorption processes, the course of the formation of the U(VI) surface complexes can be observed spectroscopically. It is shown that after prolonged sorption time on TiO 2 , resulting in a highly covered surface, outer-sphere complexation predominates the sorption processes. The prevailing crystallographic modification, namely anatase and rutile, does not significantly contribute to the spectra, whereas surface specific parameters, e.g. surface area or porosity are important. A significant different surface complexation is observed for Al 2 O 3 . The formation of innerspheric species is assumed at low U(VI) surface coverage which is fostered at low pH, high ionic strength and short contact times. At proceeded sorption the surface complexation changes. From the spectra, an outer-spheric coordination followed by surface precipitation or

  14. Oxide ion diffusion mechanism related to Co and Fe ions in (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Co0.8Fe0.2)O3-δ using in-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takanori; Imai, Hideto

    2018-03-01

    The time changes of the white line and pre-edge intensities of Co and Fe K-edge in (Ba0.5Sr0.5)(Co0.8Fe0.2)O3-δ (BSCF) were observed to estimate the oxide ion diffusion related to Co and Fe ions by using in - situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) during oxidation. The 20 μm self-standing BSCF film was prepared for in - situ XAS measurements. The time changes of absorption were fitted to the exponential decay function with two terms. The longer relaxation time (τ), related to the oxide ion diffusion during the oxidation of BSCF, is dependent on temperature. The oxide ion diffusion coefficients (D) were calculated from the τ s estimated by in - situ XAS. The values of the activation energy (Ea) for D related to Co K-edge white line, Co pre-edge, and Fe pre-edge were 1.8-2.0 eV. The value of Ea for D related to Fe K-edge white line, however, was higher than other absorption values at approximately 2.3 eV. We discussed the oxide ion diffusion mechanism related to Co and Fe ions in BSCF using in - situ XAS.

  15. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO₂ cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Seong-Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-12-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygen release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3̅m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3̅m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. This systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.

  16. Proceeding of the workshop on gamma-ray spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, photon and RI beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Masumi; Sugita, Michiaki; Hayakawa, Takehito [eds.

    1998-03-01

    Three time since 1992, we have held the symposia entitled `Joint Spectroscopy Experiments Utilizing JAERI Tandem-Booster Accelerator` at the Tokai Research Establishment. In the symposia, we have mainly discussed the plans of experiments to be done in this joint program. The joint program started in 1994. Several experiments have been made since and some new results have already come up. This symposium `Gamma-ray Spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, Photon and RI beams` was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. Because this symposium is the first occasion after the program started, the first purpose of the symposium is to present and discuss the experimental results so far obtained using the JAERI Tandem-Booster. The second purpose of the symposium is to discuss new possibilities of gamma-ray spectroscopy using new resources such as RI-beam and Photon-beam. The participants from RIKEN, Tohoku University and JAERI Neutron Science Research Center presented the future plans of experiments with RI-beam at each facility. Compared with these nuclear beams, photon beam provides a completely new tool for the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, which is achieved by inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electron and laser beams. The 23 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  17. In situ observation of Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticle formation by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy: Influence of Cu/Ni ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray...... diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were applied to follow the reduction and alloying process of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on silica. In situ reduction of Cu-Ni samples with structural characterization by combined synchrotron XRD and XAS reveals a strong interaction between Cu and Ni species......, which results in improved reducibility of the Ni species compared with monometallic Ni. At high Ni concentrations silica-supported Cu-Ni alloys form a homogeneous solid solution of Cu and Ni, whereas at lower Ni contents Cu and Ni are partly segregated and form metallic Cu and Cu-Ni alloy phases. Under...

  18. Recoil Distance Method lifetime measurements via gamma-ray and charged-particle spectroscopy at NSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Philip Jonathan

    The Recoil Distance Method (RDM) is a well-established technique for measuring lifetimes of electromagnetic transitions. Transition matrix elements derived from the lifetimes provide valuable insight into nuclear structure. Recent RDM investigations at NSCL present a powerful new model-independent tool for the spectroscopy of nuclei with extreme proton-to-neutron ratios that exhibit surprising behavior. Neutron-rich 18C is one such example, where a small B(E2; 2+1 → 0+gs) represented a dramatic shift from the expected inverse relationship between the B(E2) and 2+1 excitation energy. To shed light on the nature of this quadrupole excitation, the RDM lifetime technique was applied with the Koln/NSCL plunger. States in 18C were populated by the one-proton knockout reaction of a 19N secondary beam. De-excitation gamma rays were detected with the Segmented Germanium Array in coincidence with reaction residues at the focal plane of the S800 Magnetic Spectrometer. The deduced B(E2) and excitation energy were both well described by ab initio no-core shell model calculations. In addition, a novel extension of RDM lifetime measurements via charged-particle spectroscopy of exotic proton emitters has been investigated. Substituting the reaction residue degrader of the Koln/NSCL plunger with a thin silicon detector permits the study of short-lived nuclei beyond the proton dripline. A proof of concept measurement of the mean lifetime of the two-proton emitter 19Mg was conducted. The results indicated a sub-picosecond lifetime, one order of magnitude smaller than the published results, and validate this new technique for lifetime measurements of charged-particle emitters.

  19. Internet accessible hot cell with gamma spectroscopy at the Missouri S and T nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Edwin [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Mueller, Gary, E-mail: gmueller@mst.edu [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States); Castano, Carlos; Usman, Shoaib; Kumar, Arvind [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 203 Fulton Hall, 300 W. 13th St., Rolla, MO 65409 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility has been built. > The facility allows distance users to analyze neutron irradiated samples remotely. > The Missouri S and T system uses computer automation with user feedback. > The system can analyze multiple samples and assist several researchers concurrently. - Abstract: A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility with pneumatic access to the University of Missouri Science and Technology (Missouri S and T) 200 kW Research Nuclear Reactor (MSTR) core has been built and is currently available for irradiation and analysis of samples. The facility allows authorized distance users engaged in collaborative activities with Missouri S and T to remotely manipulate and analyze neutron irradiated samples. The system consists of two shielded compartments, one for multiple sample storage, and the other dedicated exclusively for radiation measurements and spectroscopy. The second chamber has multiple detector ports, with graded shielding, and has the capability to support gamma spectroscopy using radiation detectors such as an HPGe detector. Both these chambers are connected though a rapid pneumatic system with access to the MSTR nuclear reactor core. This new internet-based system complements the MSTR's current bare pneumatic tube (BPT) and cadmium lined pneumatic tube (CPT) facilities. The total transportation time between the core and the hot cell, for samples weighing 10 g, irradiated in the MSTR core, is roughly 3.0 s. This work was funded by the DOE grant number DE-FG07-07ID14852 and expands the capabilities of teaching and research at the MSTR. It allows individuals who do not have on-site access to a nuclear reactor facility to remotely participate in research and educational activities.

  20. Internet accessible hot cell with gamma spectroscopy at the Missouri S and T nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, Edwin; Mueller, Gary; Castano, Carlos; Usman, Shoaib; Kumar, Arvind

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility has been built. → The facility allows distance users to analyze neutron irradiated samples remotely. → The Missouri S and T system uses computer automation with user feedback. → The system can analyze multiple samples and assist several researchers concurrently. - Abstract: A dual-chambered internet-accessible heavily shielded facility with pneumatic access to the University of Missouri Science and Technology (Missouri S and T) 200 kW Research Nuclear Reactor (MSTR) core has been built and is currently available for irradiation and analysis of samples. The facility allows authorized distance users engaged in collaborative activities with Missouri S and T to remotely manipulate and analyze neutron irradiated samples. The system consists of two shielded compartments, one for multiple sample storage, and the other dedicated exclusively for radiation measurements and spectroscopy. The second chamber has multiple detector ports, with graded shielding, and has the capability to support gamma spectroscopy using radiation detectors such as an HPGe detector. Both these chambers are connected though a rapid pneumatic system with access to the MSTR nuclear reactor core. This new internet-based system complements the MSTR's current bare pneumatic tube (BPT) and cadmium lined pneumatic tube (CPT) facilities. The total transportation time between the core and the hot cell, for samples weighing 10 g, irradiated in the MSTR core, is roughly 3.0 s. This work was funded by the DOE grant number DE-FG07-07ID14852 and expands the capabilities of teaching and research at the MSTR. It allows individuals who do not have on-site access to a nuclear reactor facility to remotely participate in research and educational activities.

  1. Natural background gamma-ray spectrum. List of gamma-rays ordered in energy from natural radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimiya, Tsutomu [Japan Radioisotope Association, Tokyo (Japan); Narita, Tsutomu; Kitao, Kensuke

    1998-03-01

    A quick index to {gamma}-rays and X-rays from natural radionuclides is presented. In the list, {gamma}-rays are arranged in order of increasing energy. The list also contains {gamma}-rays from radioactive nuclides produced in a germanium detector and its surrounding materials by interaction with cosmic neutrons, as well as direct {gamma}-rays from interaction with the neutrons. Artificial radioactive nuclides emitting {gamma}-rays with same or near energy value as that of the natural {gamma}-rays and X-rays are also listed. In appendix, {gamma}-ray spectra from a rock, uranium ore, thorium, monazite and uraninite and also background spectra obtained with germanium detectors placed in iron or lead shield have been given. The list is designed for use in {gamma}-ray spectroscopy under the conditions of highly natural background, such as in-situ environmental radiation monitoring or low-level activity measurements, with a germanium detector. (author)

  2. Solid state structural investigations of the bis(chalcone) compound with single crystal X-ray crystallography, DFT, gamma-ray spectroscopy and chemical spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakalı, Gül; Biçer, Abdullah; Eke, Canel; Cin, Günseli Turgut

    2018-04-01

    A bis(chalcone), (2E,6E)-2,6-bis((E)-3phenylallidene)cyclohexanone, was characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, gamma-ray spectroscopy and single crystal X- ray structural analysis. The optimized molecular structure of the compound is calculated using DFT/B3LYP with 6-31G (d,p) level. The calculated geometrical parameters are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained from our reported X-ray structure. The powder and single crystal compounds were gama-irradiated using clinical electron linear accelerator and 60Co gamma-ray source, respectively. Spectral studies (1H NMR, 13C NMR, FTIR and UV-Vis) of powder chalcone compound were also investigated before and after irradiation. Depending on the irradiation notable changes were observed in spectral features powder sample. Single crystal X-ray diffraction investigation shows that both unirradiated and irradiated single crystal samples crystallizes in a orthorhombic crystal system in the centrosymmetric space group Pbcn and exhibits an C-H..O intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The crystal packing is stabilised by strong intermolecular bifurcate C-H..O hydrogen bonds and π…π stacking interactions. The asymmetric unit of the title compound contains one-half of a molecule. The other half of the molecule is generated with (1-x,y,-3/2-z) symmetry operator. The molecule is almost planar due to having π conjugated system of chalcones. However, irradiated single crystal compound showed significant changes lattice parameters, crystal volume and density. According to results of gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive elements of powder compound which are 123Sb(n,g),124Sb,57Fe(g,p),56Mn, 55Mn(g,n), and 54Mn were determined using photoactivation analysis. However, the most intensive gamma-ray energy signals are 124Sb.

  3. Gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decay of (83)Se to levels of (83)Br.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krane, K S

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution γ ray spectroscopy experiments have been done to study the emissions from the radioactive decay of 22-min (83g)Se produced from neutron capture using samples of enriched (82)Se. Energy and intensity values have been obtained to roughly an order of magnitude greater precision than in previous studies. Based on energy sums, 2 new levels are proposed in the daughter (83)Br and one previously proposed level is shown to be doubtful. Some 25 new transitions appear to decay with the (83)Se halflife, about half of which can be accommodated among the previous or newly proposed levels. Several previous γ ray placements are shown to be inconsistent with the new determinations of the (83)Br energy levels, but cannot be accommodated anywhere else among the known levels. As a result of the missing γ ray placements, some of the β branchings in the decay to levels of (83)Br appear to be negative. Gamma rays from the 2.4-h decay of the daughter (83)Br to levels of (83)Kr have also been observed, along with decays of (81g)(,m)Se present as a small impurity in the enriched samples and also as a strong component in irradiated samples of natural Se. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, M A; Simpson, J; Paul, E S

    2016-01-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’ . High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum–excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists. (invited comment)

  5. High rate gamma spectroscopy system for activation analysis of short-lived isomeric transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphall, G P [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna

    1976-07-15

    A high rate spectroscopy system specially suited for measurement of short-lived isomeric transitions is described, which, as part of a fast activation analysis facility at the TRIGA Mark II reactor, provides for automatic recording and immediate evaluation of gamma spectra taken from nuclides activated at stationary or pulsed reactor power. The system consists of a commercial de-coupled Ge(Li)-detector of 70 cm/sup 3/ modified for recycling operation for input rates in excess of 500000 c/s /sup 60/Co, a time variant trapezoidal shaping section and a fast constant dead-time ADC coupled to a programmed multichannel analyzer. Novel circuits for efficient pile-up rejection and time variant base line restoration extend the concept of gated integration up to count rates of more than 200000 c/s /sup 60/Co. Time-sequenced recording of spectra is performed by a minicomputer operated as a front-end processor of a larger laboratory computer, where final data processing takes place. New concepts for very simple and cost-effective implementation of multichannel analyzers by means of general purpose small computers are described.

  6. Characterization system for Germanium detectors dedicated to gamma spectroscopy applied to nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roccaz, J.; Portella, C.; Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, VALDUC, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-07-01

    CEA-Valduc produces some radioactive waste (mainly alpha emitters). Legislation requires producers to sort their waste by activity and type of isotopes, and to package them in order to forward them to the appropriate reprocessing or storage facility. Our lab LMDE (laboratory for measurements on nuclear wastes and valuation) is in charge of the characterization of the majority of waste produced by CEA-Valduc. Among non-destructive methods to characterize a radioactive object, gamma-spectroscopy is one of the most efficient. We present to this conference the method we use to characterize nuclear waste and the system we developed to characterize our germanium detectors. The goal of this system is to obtain reliable numerical models of our detectors and calculate their efficiency curves. Measurements are necessary to checks models and improve them. These measurements are made on a bench using pinpoint sources ({sup 133}Ba, {sup 152}Eu) from 60 keV to 1500 keV, with distances from 'on contact' to a few meters from the diode and variable angles between the source and the detector axis. We have demonstrated that we are able to obtain efficiency curves

  7. A high rate gamma spectroscopy system for activation analysis of short lived isomeric transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, G P [Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria)

    1976-07-01

    A high rate spectroscopy system specially suited for measurement of short-lived isomeric transitions is described, which, as part of a fast activation analysis facility at the TRIGA Mark II reactor, provides for automatic recording and immediate evaluation of gamma spectra taken from nuclides activated at stationary or pulsed reactor power. The system consists of a commercial DC-coupled Ge(Li)-detector of 70 cm{sup 3} modified for recycling operation for input rates in excess of 500,000 c/s Co-60, a time variant trapezoidal shaping section and a fast constant dead-time ADC coupled to a programmed multi-channel analyzer. Novel circuits for efficient pile-up rejection and time variant base line restoration extend the concept of gated integration up to count rates of more than 300,000 c/s Co-60. Time-sequenced recording of spectra is performed by a mini computer operated as a front-end processor of a larger laboratory computer, where final data processing takes place. New concepts for very simple and cost-effective implementation of multi-channel analyzers by means of general purpose small computers are described. (author)

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy and the fascinating angular momentum realm of the atomic nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M. A.; Simpson, J.; Paul, E. S.

    2016-12-01

    In 1974 Aage Bohr and Ben Mottelson predicted the different ‘phases’ that may be expected in deformed nuclei as a function of increasing angular momentum and excitation energy all the way up to the fission limit. While admitting their picture was highly conjectural they confidently stated ‘...with the ingenious experimental approaches that are being developed, we may look forward with excitement to the detailed spectroscopic studies that will illuminate the behaviour of the spinning quantised nucleus’. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy has indeed been a major tool in studying the structure of atomic nuclei and has witnessed numerous significant advances over the last four decades. This article will select highlights from investigations at the Niels Bohr Institute, Denmark, and Daresbury Laboratory, UK, in the late 1970s and early 1980s, some of which have continued at other national laboratories in Europe and the USA to the present day. These studies illustrate the remarkable diversity of phenomena and symmetries exhibited by nuclei in the angular momentum-excitation energy plane that continue to surprise and fascinate scientists.

  9. A Multi-Contact, Low Capacitance HPGe Detector for High Rate Gamma Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, Christopher [XIA LLC, Hayward, CA (United States)

    2014-12-04

    The detection, identification and non-destructive assay of special nuclear materials and nuclear fission by-products are critically important activities in support of nuclear non-proliferation programs. Both national and international nuclear safeguard agencies recognize that current accounting methods for spent nuclear fuel are inadequate from a safeguards perspective. Radiation detection and analysis by gamma-ray spectroscopy is a key tool in this field, but no instrument exists that can deliver the required performance (energy resolution and detection sensitivity) in the presence of very high background count rates encountered in the nuclear safeguards arena. The work of this project addresses this critical need by developing a unique gamma-ray detector based on high purity germanium that has the previously unachievable property of operating in the 1 million counts-per-second range while achieving state-of-the-art energy resolution necessary to identify and analyze the isotopes of interest. The technical approach was to design and fabricate a germanium detector with multiple segmented electrodes coupled to multi-channel high rate spectroscopy electronics. Dividing the germanium detector’s signal electrode into smaller sections offers two advantages; firstly, the energy resolution of the detector is potentially improved, and secondly, the detector is able to operate at higher count rates. The design challenges included the following; determining the optimum electrode configuration to meet the stringent energy resolution and count rate requirements; determining the electronic noise (and therefore energy resolution) of the completed system after multiple signals are recombined; designing the germanium crystal housing and vacuum cryostat; and customizing electronics to perform the signal recombination function in real time. In this phase I work, commercial off-the-shelf electrostatic modeling software was used to develop the segmented germanium crystal geometry

  10. Identification of Intermediates in Zeolite-Catalyzed Reactions Using In-situ UV/Vis Micro- Spectroscopy and a Complementary Set of Molecular Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelsoet, K.L.J.; Qian, Q.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34138609X; De Meyer, T.; De Wispelaere, K.; De Sterck, B.; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Waroquier, M.; Van Speybroeck, V.

    2013-01-01

    The optical absorption properties of (poly)aromatic hydrocarbons occluded in a nanoporous environment were investigated by theoretical and experimental methods. The carbonaceous species are an essential part of a working catalyst for the methanol-toolefins (MTO) process. In situ UV/Vis microscopy

  11. SERS and in situ SERS spectroscopy of riboflavin adsorbed on silver, gold and copper substrates. Elucidation of variability of surface orientation based on both experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendisová-Vyškovská, Marcela; Kokaislová, Alžběta; Ončák, Milan; Matějka, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering and in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra have been collected to study influences of (i) used metal and (ii) applied electrode potential on orientation of adsorbed riboflavin molecules. Special in situ SERS spectroelectrochemical cell was used to obtain in situ SERS spectra of riboflavin adsorbed on silver, gold and copper nanostructured surfaces. Varying electrode potential was applied in discrete steps forming a cycle from positive values to negative and backward. Observed spectral features in in situ SERS spectra, measured at alternate potentials, have been changing very significantly and the spectra have been compared with SERS spectra of riboflavin measured ex situ. Raman spectra of single riboflavin molecule in the vicinity to metal (Ag, Au and Cu) clusters have been calculated for different mutual positions. The results demonstrate significant changes of bands intensities which can be correlated with experimental spectra measured at different potentials. Thus, the orientation of riboflavin molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces can be elucidated. It is influenced definitely by the value of applied potential. Furthermore, the riboflavin adsorption orientation on the surface depends on the used metal. Adsorption geometries on the copper substrates are more diverse in comparison with the orientations on silver and gold substrates.

  12. Revisiting the Brønsted acid catalysed hydrolysis kinetics of polymeric carbohydrates in ionic liquids by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Riisager, Anders; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan

    2013-01-01

    A new versatile method to measure rates and determine activation energies for the Brønsted acid catalysed hydrolysis of cellulose and cellobiose (and other polymeric carbohydrates) in ionic liquids is demonstrated by following the C–O stretching band of the glycoside bond with in situ ATR...

  13. CdZnTe detectors for gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahle, C.M.; Palmer, D.; Bartlett, L.M.; Parsons, A.; Shi Zhiqing; Lisse, C.M.; Sappington, C.; Cao, N.; Shu, P.; Gehrels, N.; Teegarden, B.; Birsa, F.; Singh, S.; Odom, J.; Hanchak, C.; Tueller, J.; Barthelmy, S.; Krizmanic, J.; Barbier, L.

    1996-01-01

    A CdZnTe detector array is being developed for the proposed gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) spaceflight mission to accurately locate gamma-ray bursts, determine their distance scale, and measure the physical characteristics of the emission region. Two-dimensional strip detectors with 100 μm pitch have been fabricated and wire bonded to readout electronics to demonstrate the ability to localize 60 and 122 keV gamma-rays to less than 100 μm. Radiation damage studies on a CdZnTe detector exposed to MeV neutrons showed a small amount of activation but no detector performance degradation for fluences up to 10 10 neutrons/cm 2 . A 1 x 1 in. CdZnTe detector has also been flown on a balloon payload at 115 000 ft in order to measure the CdZnTe background rates. (orig.)

  14. Interface electronic properties of co-evaporated MAPbI{sub 3} on ZnO(0001): In situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xianzhong; Li, Xiaoli; Huang, Feng; Zhong, Dingyong, E-mail: dyzhong@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-sen University, 510275 Guangzhou (China); Liu, Yuan [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350002 Fuzhou (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100049 Beijing (China)

    2016-03-21

    In this work, the interface electronic properties of ZnO(0001)/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} were investigated by both X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} thin films were grown on single crystalline ZnO(0001) substrate in situ by co-evaporation of PbI{sub 2} and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}I at room temperature with various thickness from 1.5 nm to 190 nm. It was found that the conduction band minimum of ZnO lies 0.3 eV below that of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, while the valence band maximum of ZnO lies 2.1 eV below that of CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, implying that the electrons can be effectively transported from CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} to ZnO, and the holes can be blocked in the same time. A PbI{sub 2} rich layer was initially formed at the interface of ZnO(0001)/CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3} during the growth. As a consequence, an interface barrier was built up which may prevent the electron transport at the interface.

  15. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich Ni region through heavy-ion deep-inelastic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.; Makishima, A.; Hossain, I.; Kleinheinz, P.; Ogawa, M.

    2002-01-01

    Nuclei in the neutron-rich Ni region have been studied by γ-ray spectroscopy. Gamma-rays emitted from isomers, with T 1/2 >1 ns, produced in heavy-ion deep-inelastic collisions were measured with an isomer-scope. The nuclear structure of the doubly magic 68 Ni and its neighbor 69,71 Cu is discussed on the basis of the shell model. Future experiments for more neutron-rich Ni nuclei are also viewed. (orig.)

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of the neutron-rich Ni region through heavy-ion deep-inelastic collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, T.; Asai, M.; Makishima, A.; Hossain, I.; Kleinheinz, P.; Ogawa, M.; Matsuda, M.; Ichikawa, S.

    Nuclei in the neutron-rich Ni region have been studied by γ-ray spectroscopy. Gamma-rays emitted from isomers, with T1/2 > 1 ns, produced in heavy-ion deep-inelastic collisions were measured with an isomer-scope. The nuclear structure of the doubly magic 68Ni and its neighbor 69,71Cu is discussed on the basis of the shell model. Future experiments for more neutron-rich Ni nuclei are also viewed.

  17. In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and capacitance voltage characterization of plasma treatments for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Xiaoye; Lucero, Antonio; Azcatl, Angelica; Kim, Jiyoung; Wallace, Robert M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We investigate the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor structure pretreated by O{sub 2} anneals, N{sub 2} remote plasma, and forming gas remote plasma prior to atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and capacitance- voltage measurements. Plasma pretreatments reduce the Ga-oxide/oxynitride formation and the interface state density, while inducing a threshold voltage instability.

  18. Ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K-Abdelhalim, Mohamed Anwar; Moussa, Sherif A-Abdelmottaleb

    2016-09-01

    The spectroscopic properties can indicate important features about the nature and severity of the disease. However, no earlier studies have been used the spectroscopic properties as a diagnostic tool for radiation detection. This study was aimed to use ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for gamma irradiation detection in rats in vivo. Adult male rats were exposed to 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray as single dose, using Cobalt-60 (Co-60) source with a dose rate of 0.883 centi Gray/sec (cGy/s). Ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy of rat's blood serum were measured. After gamma irradiation of rats in vivo, the blood serum absorbance peaks for 25, 50, 75 and 100 Gray (Gy) decreased and shifted towards the ultra violet wavelength. A maximal change in fluorescence intensity of blood serum at 350 nm was obtained when exciting light at 194 nm after irradiation. The fluorescence intensity also decreased with the dose. The highest radiation gamma dose might be accompanied with the highest oxidative stress. This study suggests that at the above mentioned gamma radiation doses, the blood is highly fragmented; with low aggregation at 25 Gy and with high aggregation at 50-100 Gy.

  19. Quantification by Raman spectroscopy of the gamma radiation effects in water purification; Cuantificacion por espectroscopia Raman de los efectos de la radiacion gamma en la purificacion de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez C, V M; Santiago J, P; Castano, V M [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The world problem about water pollution has been confronted by traditional methods such as: chlorination, filtration, etc. In this work is presented an alternative method, which consists in to radiate different concentrations of simulated polluted water (purified water + thinner) at different gamma radiation doses. The structural changes were analysed by Raman spectroscopy. Using a 52.5 Krad dose it was possible to eliminate all the thinner chemical linkages, which appear in the Raman spectra corresponding to the 87.5/12.5 water/thinner mixture. (Author)

  20. Future planetary X-ray and gamma-ray remote sensing system and in situ requirements for room temperature solid state detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Trombka, J I; Starr, R; Clark, P E; Floyd, S R

    1999-01-01

    X-Ray and gamma-ray remote sensing observations find important applications in the study of the development of the planets. Orbital measurements can be carried out on solar-system bodies whose atmospheres and trapped radiation environments do not interfere significantly with the emissions. Elemental compositions can be inferred from observations of these line emissions. Future planetary missions also will involve landing both stationery and roving probes on planetary surfaces. Both X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers will be used for performing elemental analysis of surface samples. These future planetary missions will impose a number of constraints: the flight instruments must be significantly reduced in weight from those previously flown; for many missions, gravity assist will be required, greatly increasing mission duration, resulting in the passage of several years before the first scientific measurement of a solar system body. The detector systems must operate reliably after years of cosmic-ray irradiation...