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Sample records for in-beam pet measurement

  1. In-beam PET measurement of $^{7}Li^{3+}$ irradiation induced $\\beta^+}$-activity

    CERN Document Server

    Priegnitz, M; Parodi, K; Sommerer, F; Fiedler, F; Enghardt, W

    2008-01-01

    At present positron emission tomography (PET) is the only feasible method of an in situ and non-invasive monitoring of patient irradiation with ions. At the experimental carbon ion treatment facility of the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt an in-beam PET scanner has been integrated into the treatment site and lead to a considerable quality improvement of the therapy. Since ions other than carbon are expected to come into operation in future patient treatment facilities, it is highly desirable to extend in-beam PET also to other therapeutic relevant ions, e.g. 7Li. Therefore, by means of the in-beam PET scanner at GSI the β+-activity induced by 7Li3+ ions has been investigated for the first time. Targets of PMMA, water, graphite and polyethylene were irradiated with monoenergetic, pencil-like beams of 7Li3+ with energies between 129.1 A MeV and 205.3 A MeV and intensities ranging from 3.0 × 107 to 1.9 × 108 ions s−1. This paper presents the measured β+-activity profiles as well as d...

  2. In-beam PET at clinical proton beams with pile-up rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmbrecht, Stephan; Fiedler, Fine; Iltzsche, Marc [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Physics; Enghardt, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Physics; OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiooncology; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Pausch, Guntram [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Tintori, Carlo [CAEN S.p.A., Viareggio (Italy); Kormoll, Thomas [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). AG Radiation Physics

    2017-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a means of imaging the β{sup +}-activity produced by the radiation field in ion beam therapy and therefore for treatment verification. Prompt γ-rays that are emitted during beam application challenge the detectors and electronics of PET systems, since those are designed for low and medium count rates. Typical PET detectors operated according to a modified Anger principle suffer from multiple events at high rates. Therefore, in-beam PET systems using such detectors rely on a synchronization of beam status and measurement to reject deteriorated data. In this work, a method for pile-up rejection is applied to conventional Anger logic block detectors. It allows for an in-beam data acquisition without further synchronization. Though cyclotrons produce a continuous wave beam, the radiation field shaping technique introduces breaks in the application. Time regimes mimicking synchrotrons as well as cyclotron based ones using double-scattering or pencil beam scanning field shaping at dose rates of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy/min were investigated. Two types of inhomogeneous phantoms were imaged. The first one simulates cavity structures, the other one mimics a static lung irradiation. It could be shown that, depending on the dose rate and the beam time structure, in-beam measurement including a few seconds decay time only, yield images which revealed all inhomogeneities in the phantoms. This technique can be the basis for the development of an in-beam PET system with traditional detectors and off-the-shelf electronics.

  3. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun; Lee, Kisung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  4. Production of an 15O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-01

    In advanced ion therapy, the 15O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an 15O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable 16O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors' group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of 15O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of 15O fragments. The highest production rate of 15O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the 15O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is sufficiently high. In-beam PET imaging was also

  5. Production of an {sup 15}O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Akram, E-mail: mohammadi.akram@qst.go.jp; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-21

    In advanced ion therapy, the {sup 15}O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an {sup 15}O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable {sup 16}O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors’ group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of {sup 15}O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of {sup 15}O fragments. The highest production rate of {sup 15}O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the {sup 15}O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is

  6. Electron beam induced conductivity in 'PET' and 'FEP'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzade, S.J.; Jog, J.P.; Dake, S.B.; Bhoraskar, S.V.

    1983-01-01

    Electron Beam Induced Conductivity (EBIC), classified into EBIC (bulk) and EBIC (surface) have been measured in PET and FEP respectively. The peculiar oscillatory nature of the induced gain versus beam energy variations is explained in terms of the spatial distributions of the trapping centres near the surface of the polymers. (author)

  7. In-beam PET at high-energy photon beams: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Enghardt, W.

    2006-04-01

    For radiation therapy with carbon ion beams, either for the stable isotope 12C or for the radioactive one 11C, it has been demonstrated that the β+-activity distribution created or deposited, respectively, within the irradiated volume can be visualized by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The PET images provide valuable information for quality assurance and precision improvement of ion therapy. Dedicated PET scanners have been integrated into treatment sites at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (HIMAC), Japan, and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany, to make PET imaging feasible during therapeutic irradiation (in-beam PET). A similar technique may be worthwhile for radiotherapy with high-energy bremsstrahlung. In addition to monitoring the dose delivery process which in-beam PET has been primarily developed for, it may be expected that radiation response of tissue can be detected by means of in-beam PET. We investigate the applicability of PET for treatment control in the case of using bremsstrahlung spectra produced by 15-50 MeV electrons. Target volume activation due to (γ, n) reactions at energies above 20 MeV yields moderate β+-activity levels, which can be employed for imaging. The radiation from positrons produced by pair production is not presently usable because the detectors are overloaded due to the low duty factor of medical electron linear accelerators. However, the degradation of images caused by positron motion between creation and annihilation seems to be tolerable.

  8. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (<1%) after each beam, due mainly to the neutron exposure of SSPM that increased the dark-count noise. This minor effect was corrected offline with a shifting 350-650 keV energy window for each dataset. The results show a fast converging of activity-ranges measured by the prototype PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  9. Automated analysis of PET based in-vivo monitoring in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuess, P.

    2014-01-01

    Particle Therapy (PT)-PET is currently the only clinically approved in-vivo method for monitoring PT. Due to fragmentation processes in the patients' tissue and the beam projectiles, a beta plus activity distribution (BAD) can be measured during or shortly after the irradiation. The recorded activity map can not be directly compared to the planned dose distribution. However, by means of a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation it is possible to predict the measured BAD from a treatment plan (TP). Thus to verify a patient's treatment fraction the actual PET measurement can be compared to the respective BAD prediction. This comparison is currently performed by visual inspection which requires experienced evaluators and is rather time consuming. In this PhD thesis an evaluation tool is presented to compare BADs in an automated and objective way. The evaluation method was based on the Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) – an established measure in medical image processing – which was coded into a software tool. The patient data used to develop, test and validate the software tool were acquired at the GSI research facility where over 400 patient treatments with 12C were monitored by means of an in-beam PET prototype. The number of data sets was increased by artificially altering BAD to simulate different beam ranges. The automated detection tool was tested in head and neck (H&N), prostate, lung, and brain. To generate carbon ion TPs the treatment planning system TRiP98 was used for all cases. From these TPs the respective BAD predictions were derived. Besides the detection of range deviations by means of PT-PET also the automated detection of patient setup uncertainties was investigated. Although all measured patient data were recorded during the irradiation (in-beam) also scenarios performing PET scans shortly after the irradiation (in-room) were considered. To analyze the achievable precision of PT-PET with the automated evaluation tool based on

  10. Monte Carlo simulation tool for online treatment monitoring in hadrontherapy with in-beam PET: A patient study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, E; Ferrero, V; Pennazio, F; Baroni, G; Battistoni, G; Belcari, N; Cerello, P; Camarlinghi, N; Ciocca, M; Del Guerra, A; Donetti, M; Ferrari, A; Giordanengo, S; Giraudo, G; Mairani, A; Morrocchi, M; Peroni, C; Rivetti, A; Da Rocha Rolo, M D; Rossi, S; Rosso, V; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Tampellini, S; Valvo, F; Wheadon, R; Bisogni, M G

    2018-05-07

    Hadrontherapy is a method for treating cancer with very targeted dose distributions and enhanced radiobiological effects. To fully exploit these advantages, in vivo range monitoring systems are required. These devices measure, preferably during the treatment, the secondary radiation generated by the beam-tissue interactions. However, since correlation of the secondary radiation distribution with the dose is not straightforward, Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are very important for treatment quality assessment. The INSIDE project constructed an in-beam PET scanner to detect signals generated by the positron-emitting isotopes resulting from projectile-target fragmentation. In addition, a FLUKA-based simulation tool was developed to predict the corresponding reference PET images using a detailed scanner model. The INSIDE in-beam PET was used to monitor two consecutive proton treatment sessions on a patient at the Italian Center for Oncological Hadrontherapy (CNAO). The reconstructed PET images were updated every 10 s providing a near real-time quality assessment. By half-way through the treatment, the statistics of the measured PET images were already significant enough to be compared with the simulations with average differences in the activity range less than 2.5 mm along the beam direction. Without taking into account any preferential direction, differences within 1 mm were found. In this paper, the INSIDE MC simulation tool is described and the results of the first in vivo agreement evaluation are reported. These results have justified a clinical trial, in which the MC simulation tool will be used on a daily basis to study the compliance tolerances between the measured and simulated PET images. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A.; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, H.; Cascio, E.; Bonab, A.; Bortfeld, T.

    2008-08-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6° to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the PET

  12. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knopf, A; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bortfeld, T [Department of Radiation Oncology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Parodi, K [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bonab, A [Department of Radiology, MGH and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6{sup 0} to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  13. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K; Paganetti, H; Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, T

    2008-08-07

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these biological and treatment specific factors, the accuracy of the method is constrained by the underlying physical processes. This phantom study distinguishes physical factors from other factors, assessing the reproducibility, consistency and sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. A spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) proton field was delivered to a phantom consisting of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA), lung and bone equivalent material slabs. PET data were acquired in listmode at a commercial PET/CT scanner available within 10 min walking distance from the proton therapy unit. The measured PET activity distributions were compared to simulations of the PET signal based on Geant4 and FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) codes. To test the reproducibility of the measured PET signal, data from two independent measurements at the same geometrical position in the phantom were compared. Furthermore, activation depth profiles within identical material arrangements but at different positions within the irradiation field were compared to test the consistency of the measured PET signal. Finally, activation depth profiles through air/lung, air/bone and lung/bone interfaces parallel as well as at 6 degrees to the beam direction were studied to investigate the sensitivity of the PET/CT range verification method. The reproducibility and the consistency of the measured PET signal were found to be of the same order of magnitude. They determine the physical accuracy of the PET measurement to be about 1 mm. However, range discrepancies up to 2.6 mm between two measurements and range variations up to 2.6 mm within one measurement were found at the beam edge and at the edge of the field of view (FOV) of the

  14. First full-beam PET acquisitions in proton therapy with a modular dual-head dedicated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportelli, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Ortuño, J. E.; Romano, F.; Santos, A.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-01-01

    During particle therapy irradiation, positron emitters with half-lives ranging from 2 to 20 min are generated from nuclear processes. The half-lives are such that it is possible either to detect the positron signal in the treatment room using an in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) system, right after the irradiation, or to quickly transfer the patient to a close PET/CT scanner. Since the activity distribution is spatially correlated with the dose, it is possible to use PET imaging as an indirect method to assure the quality of the dose delivery. In this work, we present a new dedicated PET system able to operate in-beam. The PET apparatus consists in two 10 cm × 10 cm detector heads. Each detector is composed of four scintillating matrices of 23 × 23 LYSO crystals. The crystal size is 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 16 mm. Each scintillation matrix is read out independently with a modularized acquisition system. The distance between the two opposing detector heads was set to 20 cm. The system has very low dead time per detector area and a 3 ns coincidence window, which is capable to sustain high single count rates and to keep the random counts relatively low. This allows a new full-beam monitoring modality that includes data acquisition also while the beam is on. The PET system was tested during the irradiation at the CATANA (INFN, Catania, Italy) cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Four acquisitions with different doses and dose rates were analysed. In all cases the random to total coincidences ratio was equal or less than 25%. For each measurement we estimated the accuracy and precision of the activity range on a set of voxel lines within an irradiated PMMA phantom. Results show that the inclusion of data acquired during the irradiation, referred to as beam-on data, improves both the precision and accuracy of the range measurement with respect to data acquired only after irradiation. Beam-on data alone are enough to give precisions better than 1 mm

  15. First full-beam PET acquisitions in proton therapy with a modular dual-head dedicated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sportelli, G; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Ferretti, S; Kraan, A; Straub, K; Guerra, A Del; Rosso, V; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Romano, F; Tramontana, A; Ortuño, J E; Santos, A

    2014-01-01

    During particle therapy irradiation, positron emitters with half-lives ranging from 2 to 20 min are generated from nuclear processes. The half-lives are such that it is possible either to detect the positron signal in the treatment room using an in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) system, right after the irradiation, or to quickly transfer the patient to a close PET/CT scanner. Since the activity distribution is spatially correlated with the dose, it is possible to use PET imaging as an indirect method to assure the quality of the dose delivery. In this work, we present a new dedicated PET system able to operate in-beam. The PET apparatus consists in two 10 cm × 10 cm detector heads. Each detector is composed of four scintillating matrices of 23 × 23 LYSO crystals. The crystal size is 1.9 mm × 1.9 mm × 16 mm. Each scintillation matrix is read out independently with a modularized acquisition system. The distance between the two opposing detector heads was set to 20 cm. The system has very low dead time per detector area and a 3 ns coincidence window, which is capable to sustain high single count rates and to keep the random counts relatively low. This allows a new full-beam monitoring modality that includes data acquisition also while the beam is on. The PET system was tested during the irradiation at the CATANA (INFN, Catania, Italy) cyclotron-based proton therapy facility. Four acquisitions with different doses and dose rates were analysed. In all cases the random to total coincidences ratio was equal or less than 25%. For each measurement we estimated the accuracy and precision of the activity range on a set of voxel lines within an irradiated PMMA phantom. Results show that the inclusion of data acquired during the irradiation, referred to as beam-on data, improves both the precision and accuracy of the range measurement with respect to data acquired only after irradiation. Beam-on data alone are enough to give precisions better than 1

  16. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions; Anwendung des in-beam PET Therapiemonitorings auf Praezisionsbestrahlungen mit Helium-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, F.

    2008-02-19

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for {sup 3}He irradiations. For this experiments on a {sup 3}He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at {sup 12}C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the {sup 3}He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work.

  17. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the clinical potential.

  18. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Richter, Daniel; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Methods: Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results: Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the

  19. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung An, Su; Beak, Cheol-Ha; Lee, Kisung; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10 C, 11 C, and 15 O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12 C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  20. Construction and tests of an in-beam PET-like demonstrator for hadrontherapy beam ballistic control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montarou, G., E-mail: montarou@clermont.in2p3.fr [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Bony, M.; Busato, E.; Chadelas, R. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Donnarieix, D. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Force, P.; Guicheney, C.; Insa, C.; Lambert, D.; Lestand, L.; Magne, M.; Martin, F. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Millardet, C. [Centre Jean Perrin, Service de Physique Médicale, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France); Nivoix, M.; Podlyski, F.; Rozes, A. [Clermont University, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, BP 10448, Clermont-Ferrand F-63000 (France)

    2017-02-11

    We present the first results obtained with a detector, called Large Area Pixelized Detector (LAPD), dedicated to the study the ballistic control of the beam delivered to the patient by in-beam and real time detection of secondary particles, emitted during its irradiation in the context of hadrontherapy. These particles are 511 keV γ from the annihilation of a positron issued from the β{sup +} emitters induced in the patient tissues along the beam path. The LAPD basic concepts are similar to a conventional PET camera. The 511 keV γ are detected and the reconstructed lines of response allow to measure the β{sup +} activity distribution. Nevertheless, when trying to use γ from positron annihilation for the ballistic control in hadrontherapy, the large prompt γ background should be taken into account and properly rejected. First reconstruction results, obtained with a phantom filled with a high intensity FDG source at the cancer research centre of Clermont-Ferrand are shown. We also report results of measurements performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Centre with one third of the detector, using proton and carbon ion beams.

  1. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Di Rosa, F.; Lanconelli, N.; Rosso, V.; Russo, G.; Vecchio, S.

    2008-01-01

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy β + emitters like 11 C, 15 O, 10 C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5x5 cm 2 . Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2x2x18 mm 3 pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction

  2. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Di Rosa, F.; Lanconelli, N.; Rosso, V.; Russo, G.; Vecchio, S.

    2008-06-01

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy β + emitters like 11C, 15O, 10C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5×5 cm 2. Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2×2×18 mm 3 pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction.

  3. Preliminary results of an in-beam PET prototype for proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attanasi, F.; Belcari, N.; Camarda, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Del Guerra, A. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Di Rosa, F. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lanconelli, N. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Rosso, V. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: valeria.rosso@pi.infn.it; Russo, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Vecchio, S. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa and INFN Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-06-11

    Proton therapy can overcome the limitations of conventional radiotherapy due to the more selective energy deposition in depth and to the increased biological effectiveness. Verification of the delivered dose is desirable, but the complete stopping of the protons in patient prevents the application of electronic portal imaging methods that are used in conventional radiotherapy During proton therapy {beta}{sup +} emitters like {sup 11}C, {sup 15}O, {sup 10}C are generated in irradiated tissues by nuclear reactions. The measurement of the spatial distribution of this activity, immediately after patient irradiation, can lead to information on the effective delivered dose. First, results of a feasibility study of an in-beam PET for proton therapy are reported. The prototype is based on two planar heads with an active area of about 5x5 cm{sup 2}. Each head is made up of a position sensitive photomultiplier coupled to a square matrix of same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2x2x18 mm{sup 3} pixel dimensions). Four signals from each head are acquired through a dedicated electronic board that performs signal amplification and digitization. A 3D reconstruction of the activity distribution is calculated using an expectation maximization algorithm. To characterize the PET prototype, the detection efficiency and the spatial resolution were measured using a point-like radioactive source. The validation of the prototype was performed using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line of INFN LNS and PMMA phantoms. Using the full energy proton beam and various range shifters, a good correlation between the position of the activity distal edge and the thickness of the beam range shifter was found along the axial direction.

  4. Regional MLEM reconstruction strategy for PET-based treatment verification in ion beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianoli, Chiara; Riboldi, Marco; Fattori, Giovanni; Baselli, Giuseppe; Baroni, Guido; Bauer, Julia; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia; De Bernardi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam radiotherapy, PET-based treatment verification provides a consistency check of the delivered treatment with respect to a simulation based on the treatment planning. In this work the region-based MLEM reconstruction algorithm is proposed as a new evaluation strategy in PET-based treatment verification. The comparative evaluation is based on reconstructed PET images in selected regions, which are automatically identified on the expected PET images according to homogeneity in activity values. The strategy was tested on numerical and physical phantoms, simulating mismatches between the planned and measured β + activity distributions. The region-based MLEM reconstruction was demonstrated to be robust against noise and the sensitivity of the strategy results were comparable to three voxel units, corresponding to 6 mm in numerical phantoms. The robustness of the region-based MLEM evaluation outperformed the voxel-based strategies. The potential of the proposed strategy was also retrospectively assessed on patient data and further clinical validation is envisioned. (paper)

  5. Measuring the residual stress of transparent conductive oxide films on PET by the double-beam shadow Moiré interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Huang, Kuo-Ting; Lo, Yen-Ming; Chiu, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Guan-Jhen

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to construct a measurement system which can fast and accurately analyze the residual stress of the flexible electronics. The transparent conductive oxide (TCO) films, tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), were deposited by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering using corresponding oxide targets on PET substrate. As we know that the shadow Moiré interferometry is a useable way to measure the large deformation. So we set up a double beam shadow Moiré interferometer to measure and analyze the residual stress of TCO films on PET. The feature was to develop a mathematical model and combine the image processing software. By the LabVIEW graphical software, we could measure the distance which is between the left and right fringe on the pattern to solve the curvature of deformed surface. Hence, the residual stress could calculate by the Stoney correction formula for the flexible electronics. By combining phase shifting method with shadow Moiré, the measurement resolution and accuracy have been greatly improved. We also had done the error analysis for the system whose relative error could be about 2%. Therefore, shadow Moiré interferometer is a non-destructive, fast, and simple system for the residual stress on TCO/PET films.

  6. Mechanical and thermal properties of commercial multilayer PET/PP film irradiated with electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Angel V.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Oliveira, Vitor M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical and thermal properties, for one commercial flexible food packaging multilayer structure, were studied. The laminated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/ polypropylene (PP) structure was irradiated up to 60 kGy, using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. Mechanical properties showed significant changes (p < 0.05). In addition, the DSC analysis, after treatment, showed that the fusion enthalpy and crystallinity of the PET/PP structure components presented significant changes (p < 0.05) with the electron-beam radiation doses applied. It was observed an increase in PP crystallinity while the PET crystallinity decreases. Such decrease in PET crystallinity indicates the predominance of a cross-linking process on the irradiated PET layer; responsible for the increase in some mechanical properties of the studied film. (author)

  7. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, F.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for 3 He irradiations. For this experiments on a 3 He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at 12 C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the 3 He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work

  8. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C; Indelicato, Daniel J; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li, Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the posttreatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. The less than 2 degrees of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D(AP)) and superior-inferior (D(SI)) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D(AP) or D(SI)), 13 studies, referred as motion-after-Tx cases

  9. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder [Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Boca Radiation Oncology Associates, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (United States); Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. Methods: A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the post-treatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. Results: The less than 2 deg. of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D{sub AP}) and superior-inferior (D{sub SI}) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D{sub AP} or D{sub SI}), 13

  10. Induced radioactivity of a GSO scintillator by secondary fragments in carbon ion therapy and its effects on in-beam OpenPET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nitta, Munetaka; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Eiji; Inadama, Naoko; Yamaya, Taiga

    2016-07-07

    The accumulation of induced radioactivity within in-beam PET scanner scintillators is of concern for its long-term clinical usage in particle therapy. To estimate the effects on OpenPET which we are developing for in-beam PET based on GSOZ (Zi doped Gd2SiO5), we measured the induced radioactivity of GSO activated by secondary fragments in a water phantom irradiation by a (12)C beam with an energy of 290 MeV u(-1). Radioisotopes of Na, Ce, Eu, Gd, Nd, Pm and Tb including positron emitters were observed in the gamma ray spectra of the activated GSO with a high purity Ge detector and their absolute radioactivities were calculated. We used the Monte Carlo simulation platform, Geant4 in which the observed radioactivity was assigned to the scintillators of a precisely reproduced OpenPET and the single and coincidence rates immediately after one treatment and after one-year usage were estimated for the most severe conditions. Comparing the highest coincidence rate originating from the activated scintillators (background) and the expected coincidence rate from an imaging object (signal), we determined the expected signal-to-noise ratio to be more than 7 within 3 min and more than 10 within 1 min from the scan start time. We concluded the effects of scintillator activation and their accumulation on the OpenPET imaging were small and clinical long-term usage of the OpenPET was feasible.

  11. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  12. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the β+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited β+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  13. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-06-12

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β{sup +}-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  14. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β + -emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  15. 4D in-beam positron emission tomography for verification of motion-compensated ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Richter, Christian; Durante, Marco; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Rietzel, Eike; Bert, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Clinically safe and effective treatment of intrafractionally moving targets with scanned ion beams requires dedicated delivery techniques such as beam tracking. Apart from treatment delivery, also appropriate methods for validation of the actual tumor irradiation are highly desirable. In this contribution the feasibility of four-dimensionally (space and time) resolved, motion-compensated in-beam positron emission tomography (4DibPET) was addressed in experimental studies with scanned carbon ion beams. Methods: A polymethyl methracrylate block sinusoidally moving left-right in beam's eye view was used as target. Radiological depth changes were introduced by placing a stationary ramp-shaped absorber proximal of the moving target. Treatment delivery was compensated for motion by beam tracking. Time-resolved, motion-correlated in-beam PET data acquisition was performed during beam delivery with tracking the moving target and prolonged after beam delivery first with the activated target still in motion and, finally, with the target at rest. Motion-compensated 4DibPET imaging was implemented and the results were compared to a stationary reference irradiation of the same treatment field. Data were used to determine feasibility of 4DibPET but also to evaluate offline in comparison to in-beam PET acquisition. Results: 4D in-beam as well as offline PET imaging was found to be feasible and offers the possibility to verify the correct functioning of beam tracking. Motion compensation of the imaged β + -activity distribution allows recovery of the volumetric extension of the delivered field for direct comparison with the reference stationary condition. Observed differences in terms of lateral field extension and penumbra in the direction of motion were typically less than 1 mm for both imaging strategies in comparison to the corresponding reference distributions. However, in-beam imaging retained a better spatial correlation of the measured activity with the delivered

  16. SU-E-J-82: Intra-Fraction Proton Beam-Range Verification with PET Imaging: Feasibility Studies with Monte Carlo Simulations and Statistical Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, K [U.T M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rice University, Houston, TX (United States); Mirkovic, D; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Poenisch, F; Grosshans, D; Shao, Y [U.T M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Clark, J [Rice University, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of intra-fraction proton beam-range verification with PET imaging. Methods: Two phantoms homogeneous cylindrical PMMA phantoms (290 mm axial length, 38 mm and 200 mm diameter respectively) were studied using PET imaging: a small phantom using a mouse-sized PET (61 mm diameter field of view (FOV)) and a larger phantom using a human brain-sized PET (300 mm FOV). Monte Carlo (MC) simulations (MCNPX and GATE) were used to simulate 179.2 MeV proton pencil beams irradiating the two phantoms and be imaged by the two PET systems. A total of 50 simulations were conducted to generate 50 positron activity distributions and correspondingly 50 measured activity-ranges. The accuracy and precision of these activity-ranges were calculated under different conditions (including count statistics and other factors, such as crystal cross-section). Separate from the MC simulations, an activity distribution measured from a simulated PET image was modeled as a noiseless positron activity distribution corrupted by Poisson counting noise. The results from these two approaches were compared to assess the impact of count statistics on the accuracy and precision of activity-range calculations. Results: MC Simulations show that the accuracy and precision of an activity-range are dominated by the number (N) of coincidence events of the reconstructed image. They are improved in a manner that is inversely proportional to 1/sqrt(N), which can be understood from the statistical modeling. MC simulations also indicate that the coincidence events acquired within the first 60 seconds with 10{sup 9} protons (small phantom) and 10{sup 10} protons (large phantom) are sufficient to achieve both sub-millimeter accuracy and precision. Conclusion: Under the current MC simulation conditions, the initial study indicates that the accuracy and precision of beam-range verification are dominated by count statistics, and intra-fraction PET image-based beam-range verification is

  17. PET measurements od dopaminergic pathways in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, J.S. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology; Moerlein, S.M. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology

    1999-06-01

    Position emission tomography (PET) measurements of dopaminergic pathways have revealed several new insights into the role of dopamine in the pathophysiology and pharmacology of brain diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD), dystonia and schizophrenia. PET studies of regional blood flow of metabolism identifies sites of regional pathology. Drug-induced changes in flow or metabolism indicate the function of dopamine-mediated pathways. Measurements of radioligand binding 'in vivo' with PET reveals abnormalities associated with specific diseases and the actions of various drugs that effect the dopaminergic system. Finally, PET measurements of the uptake of analogues of levodopa provide clues to the function of dopamine pathways potentially important for diagnosis and treatment of disease like PD.

  18. Simulations of Beam Quality in a 13 MeV PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pramudita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of the trajectories of negative hydrogen ion (H− beam in a 13 MeV PET cyclotron (DECY-13 were carried out by using the Runge-Kutta (RK4 approximation method and Scilab 5.4.1. The magnetic and electric fields were calculated using Opera-3d/TOSCA softwares at 1 mm resolution. The cyclotron is of a fourth-harmonics type, meaning that the acceleration occurs four times per cycle, with a radiofrequency (RF field of 77.66 MHz frequency and 40 kV amplitude. The calculations and simulations show that the maximum distance between the ion source and the puller is about 6 mm, while the maximum width of the beam at 13 MeV is about 10 mm, and the initial phase between the RF field and the beam ranges from -10° to 10°, with a yield of about 10% of the beam from the ion source getting accelerated to 13 MeV.

  19. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T.-H.; Liang, C.-H.; Wu, J.-K.; Lien, C.-Y.; Yang, B.-H.; Huang, Y.-H.; Lee, J. J. S.

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  20. Integration of PET-CT and cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy with high image quality and registration accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T-H; Liang, C-H; Wu, J-K; Lien, C-Y; Yang, B-H; Lee, J J S; Huang, Y-H

    2009-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) system enhances better differentiation of tissue uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and provides much more diagnostic value in the non-small-cell lung cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In PET-CT, high quality CT images not only offer diagnostic value on anatomic delineation of the tissues but also shorten the acquisition time for attenuation correction (AC) compared with PET-alone imaging. The linear accelerators equipped with the X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging system for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) provides excellent verification on position setup error. The purposes of our study were to optimize the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT and to integrate the PET-CT and CBCT for IGRT. The CT imaging parameters were modified in PET-CT for increasing the image quality in order to enhance the diagnostic value on tumour delineation. Reproducibility and registration accuracy via bone co-registration algorithm between the PET-CT and CBCT were evaluated by using a head phantom to simulate a head and neck treatment condition. Dose measurement in computed tomography dose index (CTDI) was also estimated. Optimization of the CT acquisition protocols of PET-CT was feasible in this study. Co-registration accuracy between CBCT and PET-CT on axial and helical modes was in the range of 1.06 to 2.08 and 0.99 to 2.05 mm, respectively. In our result, it revealed that the accuracy of the co-registration with CBCT on helical mode was more accurate than that on axial mode. Radiation doses in CTDI were 4.76 to 18.5 mGy and 4.83 to 18.79 mGy on axial and helical modes, respectively. Registration between PET-CT and CBCT is a state-of-the-art registration technology which could provide much information on diagnosis and accurate tumour contouring on radiotherapy while implementing radiotherapy procedures. This novelty technology of PET-CT and cone-beam CT integration for IGRT may have a

  1. Simulation study of LYSO crystal pixels for In-Beam TOF-PET prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ze; Hu Zhengguo; Chen Jinda; Zhang Xiuling

    2014-01-01

    In-beam TOF-PET is currently the only feasible method implemented for in-situ and noninvasive monitoring of the precision of the treatment in highly conformal ion radiotherapy. It ensures the safety of patient and accurate implementation of treatment plan. Therefore, we intent to carry out the development of In-beam TOF-PET prototype, which is made of LYSO crystal, for ion radiotherapy. LYSO crystal has perfect properties such as high light yield, fast decay time, good energy and time resolution, which makes it a good candidate. In the development of positron emission tomography (PET) detectors, understanding and optimizing scintillator light collection and energy resolution is critical for achieving high performance, particularly when the design incorporates depth-of-interaction (DOI) encoding or time-of-flight information. Monte Carlo simulations play an important role in guiding research in detector designs and popular software such as Gate now include models of light transport in scintillators. This study uses Gate software to investigate the influence of crystal length and wrapping materials to the light collection. Accurate physical modeling of scintillation detection process, from scintillation light generation through detection, is devised and performed for varying detector attributes, such as the crystal pixel length, light yield, decay time, attenuation length and surface treatment. The dependence of light output and energy resolution is studied and compared with experiment results. The results show that LYSO pixel with length of 5 mm has better light yield and energy resolution, meanwhile prove that it is possible to accurately simulate the light output using Gate. (authors)

  2. WE-EF-303-06: Feasibility of PET Image-Based On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification with Simulated Uniform Phantom and Human Brain Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, K; Sun, X; Zhu, X; Grosshans, D; Clark, J; Shao, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of clinical on-line proton beam range verification with PET imaging Methods: We simulated a 179.2-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a PMMA phantom of human brain size, which was then imaged by a brain PET with 300*300*100-mm 3 FOV and different system sensitivities and spatial resolutions. We calculated the mean and standard deviation of positron activity range (AR) from reconstructed PET images, with respect to different data acquisition times (from 5 sec to 300 sec with 5-sec step). We also developed a technique, “Smoothed Maximum Value (SMV)”, to improve AR measurement under a given dose. Furthermore, we simulated a human brain irradiated by a 110-MeV proton beam of 50-mm diameter with 0.3-Gy dose at Bragg peak and imaged by the above PET system with 40% system sensitivity at the center of FOV and 1.7-mm spatial resolution. Results: MC Simulations on the PMMA phantom showed that, regardless of PET system sensitivities and spatial resolutions, the accuracy and precision of AR were proportional to the reciprocal of the square root of image count if image smoothing was not applied. With image smoothing or SMV method, the accuracy and precision could be substantially improved. For a cylindrical PMMA phantom (200 mm diameter and 290 mm long), the accuracy and precision of AR measurement could reach 1.0 and 1.7 mm, with 100-sec data acquired by the brain PET. The study with a human brain showed it was feasible to achieve sub-millimeter accuracy and precision of AR measurement with acquisition time within 60 sec. Conclusion: This study established the relationship between count statistics and the accuracy and precision of activity-range verification. It showed the feasibility of clinical on-line BR verification with high-performance PET systems and improved AR measurement techniques. Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP120326, NIH grant R21CA187717, The Cancer Center Support (Core) Grant CA016672

  3. Development of UV absorbing PET through Electron Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Woo; Lee, Na Eun; Lim, Hyung San; Park, Yang Jeong; Cho, Sung Oh

    2017-01-01

    Experiment to increase UV absorbance through electron beam irradiation on PET was performed. Moreover, surface hardness and roughness of each sample were observed to find the key factor increasing UV absorbance. PET sheets were irradiated with an electron beam at various fluences. The irradiated samples, as well as pristine sample, were subjected to UV-visible spectral study(UV-Vis), pencil hardness test, and scanning electron microscopy(SEM) experiment. In this study, PET samples irradiated at several conditions were analyzed through various measurements. UV absorbance-another meaning of transmittance in this study- of irradiated PET sample increased compared with pristine sample as fluence was increased in UV-Visible spectroscopy experiment.

  4. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-03: Development of a Human Brain PET for On-Line Proton Beam-Range Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yiping [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a prototype PET for verifying proton beam-range before each fractionated therapy that will enable on-line re-planning proton therapy. Methods: Latest “edge-less” silicon photomultiplier arrays and customized ASIC readout electronics were used to develop PET detectors with depth-of-interaction (DOI) measurement capability. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5×1.5 and 2.0×2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables or PCB board to dedicated ASIC front-end electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition of coincidence events and data transfer. The modular detector and scalable electronics/data acquisition will enable flexible PET system configuration for different imaging geometry. Results: Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ∼18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2–3 mm DOI resolution. A small prototype PET scanner with one detector ring has been built and evaluated, validating the technology and design. A large size detector panel has been fabricated by scaling up from modular detectors. Different designs of resistor and capacitor based signal multiplexing boards were tested and selected based on optimal crystal identification and timing performance. Stackable readout electronics boards and FPGA-based data acquisition boards were developed and tested. A brain PET is under construction. Conclusion: Technology of large-size DOI detector based on SiPM array and advanced readout has been

  5. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J; Unholtz, D; Kurz, C; Parodi, K

    2013-01-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β + activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β + activity induced in the investigated

  6. An experimental approach to improve the Monte Carlo modelling of offline PET/CT-imaging of positron emitters induced by scanned proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J.; Unholtz, D.; Kurz, C.; Parodi, K.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the experimental campaign carried out at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) to optimize the Monte Carlo (MC) modelling of proton-induced positron-emitter production. The presented experimental strategy constitutes a pragmatic inverse approach to overcome the known uncertainties in the modelling of positron-emitter production due to the lack of reliable cross-section data for the relevant therapeutic energy range. This work is motivated by the clinical implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at our facility. Here, the irradiation induced tissue activation in the patient is monitored shortly after the treatment delivery by means of a commercial PET/CT scanner and compared to a MC simulated activity expectation, derived under the assumption of a correct treatment delivery. At HIT, the MC particle transport and interaction code FLUKA is used for the simulation of the expected positron-emitter yield. For this particular application, the code is coupled to externally provided cross-section data of several proton-induced reactions. Studying experimentally the positron-emitting radionuclide yield in homogeneous phantoms provides access to the fundamental production channels. Therefore, five different materials have been irradiated by monoenergetic proton pencil beams at various energies and the induced β+ activity subsequently acquired with a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner. With the analysis of dynamically reconstructed PET images, we are able to determine separately the spatial distribution of different radionuclide concentrations at the starting time of the PET scan. The laterally integrated radionuclide yields in depth are used to tune the input cross-section data such that the impact of both the physical production and the imaging process on the various positron-emitter yields is reproduced. The resulting cross-section data sets allow to model the absolute level of measured β+ activity induced in the investigated

  7. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martišíková, Mária; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Hartmann, Bernadette; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Jäkel, Oliver

    2011-11-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient`s condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2-30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  8. Measurement of secondary radiation during ion beam therapy with the pixel detector Timepix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martišíková, Mária; Hartmann, Bernadette; Jäkel, Oliver; Jakubek, Jan; Granja, Carlos; Opálka, Lukáš; Pospíšil, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    In ion beam therapy the finite range of the ion beams in tissue and the presence of the Bragg-peak are exploited. Unpredictable changes in the patient's condition can alter the range of the ion beam in the body. Therefore it is desired to verify the actual ion range during the treatment, preferably in a non-invasive way. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used successfully to monitor the applied dose distributions. This method however suffers from limited applicability and low detection efficiency. In order to increase the detection efficiency and to decrease the uncertainties, in this study we investigate the possibility to measure secondary charged particles emerging from the patient during irradiation. An initial experimental study to register the particle radiation coming out of a patient phantom during the therapy was performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT) in Germany. A static narrowly-focused beam of carbon ions was directed into a head phantom. The emerging secondary radiation was measured with the position-sensitive Timepix detector outside of the phantom. The detector, developed by the Medipix Collaboration, consists of a silicon sensor bump bonded to a pixelated readout chip (256 × 256 pixels with 55 μm pitch). Together with the USB-based readout interface, Timepix can operate as an active nuclear emulsion registering single particles online with 2D-track visualization. In this contribution we measured the signal behind the head phantom and investigated its dependence on the beam energy (corresponding to beam range in water 2–30 cm). Furthermore, the response was measured at four angles between 0 and 90 degrees. At all investigated energies some signal was registered. Its pattern corresponds to ions. Differences in the total amount of signal for different beam energies were observed. The time-structure of the signal is correlated with that of the incoming beam, showing that we register products of prompt processes. Such

  9. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarlinghi, N.; Sportelli, G.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Cecchetti, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Ferretti, S.; Kraan, A.; Retico, A.; Romano, F.; Sala, P.; Straub, K.; Tramontana, A.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2014-04-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β+ activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β+ activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo.

  10. An in-beam PET system for monitoring ion-beam therapy: test on phantoms using clinical 62 MeV protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarlinghi, N; Sportelli, G; Belcari, N; Cecchetti, M; Ferretti, S; Kraan, A; Retico, A; Straub, K; Guerra, A Del; Rosso, V; Battistoni, G; Sala, P; Cirrone, G A P; Cuttone, G; Romano, F; Tramontana, A

    2014-01-01

    Ion therapy allows the delivery of highly conformal dose taking advantage of the sharp depth-dose distribution at the Bragg-peak. However, patient positioning errors and anatomical uncertainties can cause dose distortions. To exploit the full potential of ion therapy, an accurate monitoring system of the ion range is needed. Among the proposed methods to monitor the ion range, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has proven to be the most mature technique, allowing to reconstruct the β + activity generated in the patient by the nuclear interaction of the ions, that can be acquired during or after the treatment. Taking advantages of the spatial correlation between positron emitters created along the ions path and the dose distribution, it is possible to reconstruct the ion range. Due to the high single rates generated during the beam extraction, the acquisition of the β + activity is typically performed after the irradiation (cyclotron) or in between the synchrotron spills. Indeed the single photon rate can be one or more orders of magnitude higher than normal for cyclotron. Therefore, acquiring the activity during the beam irradiation requires a detector with a very short dead time. In this work, the DoPET detector, capable of sustaining the high event rate generated during the cyclotron irradiation, is presented. The capability of the system to acquire data during and after the irradiation will be demonstrated by showing the reconstructed activity for different PMMA irradiations performed using clinical dose rates and the 62 MeV proton beam at the CATANA-LNS-INFN. The reconstructed activity widths will be compared with the results obtained by simulating the proton beam interaction with the FLUKA Monte Carlo. The presented data are in good agreement with the FLUKA Monte Carlo

  11. Modeling and analysis of all the positron emitters simulation steps generated during the treatment phase in proton-therapy - from the beam to the PET camera - for the follow-up of the irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ty, C.V.N.

    2012-01-01

    The proton-therapy is an innovative technique for cancer treatment in critical areas, such as the eye or the head. Even though the interaction of protons with human tissues is a well-known physical phenomenon which gives rise to the proton-therapy, there are uncertainties on the proton trajectory due to heterogeneities in the irradiated tissue, the calculation of the beam parameters in the planning treatment affects the theoretical benefits of the protons and the chosen dose delivery process. Thus, methods for irradiation quality control have been suggested. Most of them rely on utilizing the mapping of the positron emitters generated during the irradiation. They are detectable and quantifiable thanks to the use of the PET (positron emitter tomography), a medical imaging technique mainly used for the cancer expansion assessment. PET acquisitions were proposed and then realized on phantoms and patients after proton-therapy. The quality control relies on comparing the measured radioactive distribution to the simulated β + distribution. The modeling of the positron activity generated by protons in the irradiated area can be divided into three steps: the simulation of the proton beam, the modeling of the proton interactions in the irradiated object and the modeling of the PET acquisition. Different ways of simulating these steps are possible. This PhD work suggests different ways of modeling the three steps and evaluates theirs benefits for the irradiation quality control. We have restrained our evaluation to the verification of the proton range and to the uncertainties related to the proton range. This research work utilizes on irradiations in homogenous and inhomogeneous areas in a head model. We have compared the uncertainties on the proton range measured thanks to the following β + distributions: 1) A β + distribution obtained by modeling the irradiation with a proton beam simulated analytically and simulated using the complete Monte Carlo method; 2) A Monte

  12. Methodological studies into the applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) in light-ion beam tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelke, J.

    1995-06-01

    For reconstruction of measured activity distributions, a multiplicative iteration scheme was used which, however, does not fulfill the clinical requirement of availability of reconstructed activity distributions within a few minutes after measuring. This disadvantage was set off by the development of an empirical algorithm for determination of the 3D-distribution of the intersection points of all possible coincidence line pairs. This algorithm was then applied for the reconstruction of the positron emitter distributions measured during range measurement of light ions. For the simple, compact source distributions and small number of measured coincidences in this case, the method of intersecting point computation is better than the iterative method in that it is significantly faster and yields images of comparable quality. On the basis of these results, a PET system was set up for clinical applications at the irradiation system for experimental light-ion beam therapy at GSI Darmstadt. (orig./DG) [de

  13. On the feasibility of dose quantification with in-beam PET data in radiotherapy with 12C and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, K.

    2004-11-01

    The physical advantages of light ions in combination with technological advances like intensity controlled raster scanning offer a unique tool for high precision radiotherapy. This is particularly applied to delicate clinical situations of inoperable tumours growing in close proximity to critical organs. The potential benefit of such a high selectivity of ion beam therapy demands the complex and strictly conformal dose delivery to be monitored in-situ and non-invasively in three dimensions. In contrast to conventional photon radiation, light ions exhibit a well defined range which determines the position of the maximum dose delivery in the inhomogeneous tumour target. This requires a monitoring technology along the ion trajectory offering millimetre precision. Additionally, accurate control of the lateral position of the irradiation field within the patient can be a crucial issue for the frequent case of portals passing adjacent to organs at risk. At present, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the only feasible method fulfilling these requirements. For this purpose a dedicated in-beam positron camera has been completely integrated into the experimental heavy ion treatment site at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. This allows to measure the minor amount of β + -activity produced in nuclear reactions between the projectiles and the target nuclei of the tissue simultaneously to the tumour irradiation. The emitted signal is correlated but not directly proportional to the spatial pattern of the delivered dose. Hence, therapy control is achieved by comparing the measured β + -activity distribution with a prediction based on the treatment plan and the specific time course of the particular irradiation. (orig.)

  14. The Development and Clinical Use of a Beam ON-LINE PET System Mounted on a Rotating Gantry Port in Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, Teiji; Miyatake, Aya; Ogino, Takashi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Saijo, Nagahiro; Esumi, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the usefulness of our developed beam ON-LINE positron emission tomography (PET) system mounted on a rotating gantry port (BOLPs-RGp) for dose-volume delivery-guided proton therapy (DGPT). Methods and Materials: In the proton treatment room at our facility, a BOLPs-RGp was constructed so that a planar PET apparatus could be mounted with its field of view covering the iso-center of the beam irradiation system. Activity measurements were performed in 48 patients with tumors of the head and neck, liver, lungs, prostate, and brain. The position and intensity of the activity were measured using the BOLPs-RGp during the 200 s immediately after the proton irradiation. Results: The daily measured activity images acquired by the BOLPs-RGp showed the proton irradiation volume in each patient. Changes in the proton-irradiated volume were indicated by differences between a reference activity image (taken at the first treatment) and the daily activity-images. In the case of head-and-neck treatment, the activity distribution changed in the areas where partial tumor reduction was observed. In the case of liver treatment, it was observed that the washout effect in necrotic tumor cells was slower than in non-necrotic tumor cells. Conclusions: The BOLPs-RGp was developed for the DGPT. The accuracy of proton treatment was evaluated by measuring changes of daily measured activity. Information about the positron-emitting nuclei generated during proton irradiation can be used as a basis for ensuring the high accuracy of irradiation in proton treatment.

  15. Beam tracking simulation in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraita, Pramudita; Santosa, Budi; Taufik, Mulyani, Emy; Diah, Frida Iswinning

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the trajectories simulation of proton beam in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron, operating with negative proton beam (for easier beam extraction using a stripper foil), 40 kV peak accelerating dee voltage at fourth harmonic frequency of 77.88 MHz, and average magnetic field of 1.275 T. The central region covers fields of 240mm × 240mm × 30mm size at 1mm resolution. The calculation was also done at finer 0.25mm resolution covering fields of 30mm × 30mm × 4mm size to see the effects of 0.55mm horizontal width of the ion source window and the halted trajectories of positive proton beam. The simulations show up to 7 turns of orbital trajectories, reaching about 1 MeV of beam energy. The distribution of accelerating electric fields and magnetic fields inside the cyclotron were calculated in 3 dimension using Opera3D code and Tosca modules for static magnetic and electric fields. The trajectory simulation was carried out using Scilab 5.3.3 code.

  16. Detectability of T Measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer in FDG PET CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sun Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kim, Young Chul; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Seung Eun; Choe, Jae Gol

    2012-01-01

    Usefulness of FDG PET CT in monitoring response in locally advanced gastric cancer has been reported. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the related factors to detect measurable diseases in advanced gastric cancer on FDG PET CT. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients diagnosed as having advanced gastric cancer. We defined the measurable diseases when there was visualized tumor of which maximum standardized uptake value(SUVmax) was higher than 1.35*SUVmax of liver + 2*SD of liver SUV. We evaluated what kinds of factors from the clinicopathologic features were related to identifying measurable diseases. Of 38 patients with advanced gastric cancer, 18 (50%) had measurable tumors on FDG PET CT. Measurable tumors were significantly more frequent in well or moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (70.5% vs 35.3%, p<0.05), in the tumors located at antrum or angle (66.7% vs 29.4%, p<0.05) and in the elderly group (age of 55 years old or more, 72.0% vs 8.3%, p<0.001) than the others, respectively. By multivariate analysis, age at diagnosis was the only independent predictor for the measurable disease on FDG PET CT. We found that age at diagnosis, as well as histologic types and location of tumors, were the affecting factors to detect measurable disease on FDG PET CT in patients with advanced gastric cancer. Our study suggests that elderly patients of age of 55 years old or more can frequently have T measurable disease on FDG PET CT in advanced gastric cancer and FDG PET CT will be helpful to monitor measurable disease

  17. A PET Prototype for “In-Beam” Monitoring of Proton Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchio, Sara; Attanasi, Francesca; Belcari, Nicola; Camarda, Manuela; Cirrone, G. A. Pablo; Cuttone, Giacomo; Di Rosa, Francesco; Lanconelli, Nico; Moehrs, Sascha; Rosso, Valeria; Russo, Giorgio; Del Guerra, Alberto

    2009-02-01

    The in-beam PET is a novel PET application to image the beta+ activity induced in biological tissues by hadronic therapeutic beams. Thanks to the correlation existing between beam-delivered dose profiles and beam-induced activity profiles, in vivo information about the effective ion paths can be extracted from the in-beam pet image. in situ measurements, immediately after patient irradiation, are recommended in order to exploit the maximum statistics, by also detecting the contribution provided by the very short lived isotopes, e.g. 15O. A compact, dedicated tomograph should then be developed for such an application, so as to be used in the treatment room. We developed a small PET prototype in order to demonstrate the feasibility of such a technique for the monitoring of proton therapy of ocular tumors at the CATANA facility (Catania, Italy). The prototype consists of two planar heads with an active area of about 5 cm times 5 cm. Each head is made up of a square position sensitive photomultiplier (Hamamatsu H8500) coupled to a matrix of the same size of LYSO scintillating crystals (2 mm times 2 mm times 18 mm pixel dimensions). Dedicated, compact electronic boards are used for the signal multiplexing, amplification and digitization. The distance between the pair can be varied from 10 cm up to a maximum of about 20 cm. The validation of the prototype was performed on plastic phantoms using 62 MeV protons at the CATANA beam line. Different dose distributions were delivered and a good correlation between the distal fall-off of the activity profiles and of the dose profiles was found, i.e., better than 2 mm along the beam direction.

  18. On the feasibility of dose quantification with in-beam PET data in radiotherapy with {sup 12}C and proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, K.

    2004-11-01

    The physical advantages of light ions in combination with technological advances like intensity controlled raster scanning offer a unique tool for high precision radiotherapy. This is particularly applied to delicate clinical situations of inoperable tumours growing in close proximity to critical organs. The potential benefit of such a high selectivity of ion beam therapy demands the complex and strictly conformal dose delivery to be monitored in-situ and non-invasively in three dimensions. In contrast to conventional photon radiation, light ions exhibit a well defined range which determines the position of the maximum dose delivery in the inhomogeneous tumour target. This requires a monitoring technology along the ion trajectory offering millimetre precision. Additionally, accurate control of the lateral position of the irradiation field within the patient can be a crucial issue for the frequent case of portals passing adjacent to organs at risk. At present, positron emission tomography (PET) represents the only feasible method fulfilling these requirements. For this purpose a dedicated in-beam positron camera has been completely integrated into the experimental heavy ion treatment site at the Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Darmstadt. This allows to measure the minor amount of {beta}{sup +}-activity produced in nuclear reactions between the projectiles and the target nuclei of the tissue simultaneously to the tumour irradiation. The emitted signal is correlated but not directly proportional to the spatial pattern of the delivered dose. Hence, therapy control is achieved by comparing the measured {beta}{sup +}-activity distribution with a prediction based on the treatment plan and the specific time course of the particular irradiation. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  20. Dynamic neurotransmitter interactions measured with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiffer, W.K.; Dewey, S.L.

    2001-04-02

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has become a valuable interdisciplinary tool for understanding physiological, biochemical and pharmacological functions at a molecular level in living humans, whether in a healthy or diseased state. The utility of tracing chemical activity through the body transcends the fields of cardiology, oncology, neurology and psychiatry. In this, PET techniques span radiochemistry and radiopharmaceutical development to instrumentation, image analysis, anatomy and modeling. PET has made substantial contributions in each of these fields by providing a,venue for mapping dynamic functions of healthy and unhealthy human anatomy. As diverse as the disciplines it bridges, PET has provided insight into an equally significant variety of psychiatric disorders. Using the unique quantitative ability of PET, researchers are now better able to non-invasively characterize normally occurring neurotransmitter interactions in the brain. With the knowledge that these interactions provide the fundamental basis for brain response, many investigators have recently focused their efforts on an examination of the communication between these chemicals in both healthy volunteers and individuals suffering from diseases classically defined as neurotransmitter specific in nature. In addition, PET can measure the biochemical dynamics of acute and sustained drug abuse. Thus, PET studies of neurotransmitter interactions enable investigators to describe a multitude of specific functional interactions in the human brain. This information can then be applied to understanding side effects that occur in response to acute and chronic drug therapy, and to designing new drugs that target multiple systems as opposed to single receptor types. Knowledge derived from PET studies can be applied to drug discovery, research and development (for review, see (Fowler et al., 1999) and (Burns et al., 1999)). Here, we will cover the most substantial contributions of PET to understanding

  1. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Lou, Kai [Rice University (United States)

    2015-05-18

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  2. Development of compact DOI-measurable PET detectors for simultaneous PET/MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai

    2015-01-01

    It is critically needed yet challenging to develop compact PET detectors with high sensitivity and uniform, high imaging resolution for improving the performance of simultaneous PET/MR imaging, particularly for an integrated/inserted small-bore system. Using the latest “edge-less” SiPM arrays for DOI measurement using the design of dual-ended-scintillator readout, we developed several compact PET detectors suited for PET/MR imaging. Each detector consists of one LYSO array with each end coupled to a SiPM array. Multiple detectors can be seamlessly tiled together along all sides to form a large detector panel. Detectors with 1.5x1.5 and 2.0x2.0 mm crystals at 20 or 30 mm lengths were studied. Readout of individual SiPM or capacitor-based signal multiplexing was used to transfer 3D interaction position-coded analog signals through flexible-print-circuit cables to dedicated ASIC frontend electronics to output digital timing pulses that encode interaction information. These digital pulses can be transferred to, through standard LVDS cables, and decoded by a FPGA-based data acquisition positioned outside the MRI scanner for coincidence event selection. Initial detector performance measurement shows excellent crystal identification even with 30 mm long crystals, ~18% and 2.8 ns energy and timing resolutions, and around 2-3 mm DOI resolution. A large size detector panel can be scaled up with these modular detectors and different PET systems can be flexibly configured with the scalable readout electronics and data acquisition, providing an important design advantage for different system and application requirements. It is expected that standard shielding of detectors, electronics and signal transfer lines can be applied for simultaneous PET/MR imaging applications, with desired DOI measurement capability to enhance the PET performance and image quality.

  3. Feasibility of quantitative PET/CT dosimetry for proton therapy using polymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, O A; Hsi, W C; Lopatiuk-Tirpak, O; Sriprisan, S I; Meeks, S L; Kupelian, P A; Li, Z; Palta, J R, E-mail: lenatirpak@gmail.co

    2010-11-01

    A feasibility study of proton beam PET/CT off-line quantitative dosimetry using polymer gels is presented. A newly developed proton-sensitive polymer gel dosimeter (BANG( (registered)) 3-Pro2) is used as a dosimeter and a tissue-equivalent phantom medium for this study. We explore a new approach to correlating measured proton 3-dimensional (3D) dose distributions directly to measured positron emission from in the gel medium using PET/CT imaging. A large cylindrical volume (2.2 Litres) of the gel was irradiated with a clinical modulated proton beam using irregular-shaped aperture geometry. The gel was imaged in a nearby PET/CT unit immediately (<3 min) after irradiation. Dose distribution in the gel was generated using an optical tomography scanning system. Direct 3D spatial comparison of dose and positron emission distributions was then performed. Profiles along the beam path show that the distal fall-off of the dose is nearly 2 cm deeper than the activity profile which is comparable to previous studies with plastic phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations of activity distributions. Planar PET and dose distributions at depth and perpendicular to beam axis show a strong one-to-one spatial correlation. This phantom study demonstrates that the gel medium could be potentially useful for quantifying various physical factors that can influence the PET activity range verification method in patients.

  4. SU-C-207A-06: On-Line Beam Range Verification with Multiple Scanning Particle Beams: Initial Feasibility Study with Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Y; Sun, X; Lu, W; Jia, X; Wang, J; Shao, Y [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and requirement for intra-fraction on-line multiple scanning particle beam range verifications (BRVs) with in-situ PET imaging, which is beyond the current single-beam BRV with extra factors that will affect the BR measurement accuracy, such as beam diameter, separation between beams, and different image counts at different BRV positions. Methods: We simulated a 110-MeV proton beam with 5-mm diameter irradiating a uniform PMMA phantom by GATE simulation, which generated nuclear interaction-induced positrons. In this preliminary study, we simply duplicated these positrons and placed them next to the initial protons to approximately mimic the two spatially separated positron distributions produced by two beams parallel to each other but with different beam ranges. These positrons were then imaged by a PET (∼2-mm resolution, 10% sensitivity, 320×320×128 mm^3 FOV) with different acquisition times. We calculated the positron activity ranges (ARs) from reconstructed PET images and compared them with the corresponding ARs of original positron distributions. Results: Without further image data processing and correction, the preliminary study show the errors between the measured and original ARs varied from 0.2 mm to 2.3 mm as center-to-center separations and range differences were in the range of 8–12 mm and 2–8 mm respectively, indicating the accuracy of AR measurement strongly depends on the beam separations and range differences. In addition, it is feasible to achieve ≤ 1.0-mm accuracy for both beams with 1-min PET acquisition and 12 mm beam separation. Conclusion: This study shows that the overlap between the positron distributions from multiple scanning beams can significantly impact the accuracy of BRVs of distributed particle beams and need to be further addressed beyond the established method of single-beam BRV, but it also indicates the feasibility to achieve accurate on-line multi-beam BRV with further improved

  5. SU-E-J-174: Adaptive PET-Based Dose Painting with Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darwish, N; Mackie, T; Thomadsen, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET imaging can be converted into dose prescription directly. Due to the variability of the intensity of PET the image, PET prescription maybe superior over uniform dose prescription. Furthermore, unlike the case in image reconstruction of not knowing the image solution in advance, the prescribed dose is known from a PET image a priori. Therefore, optimum beam orientations are derivable. Methods: We can assume the PET image to be the prescribed dose and invert it to determine the energy fluence. The same method used to reconstruct tissue images from projections could be used to solve the inverse problem of determining beam orientations and modulation patterns from a dose prescription [10]. Unlike standard tomographic reconstruction of images from measured projection profiles, the inversion of the prescribed dose results in photon fluence which may be negative and therefore unphysical. Two-dimensional modulated beams can be modelled in terms of the attenuated or exponential radon transform of the prescribed dose function (assumed to be the PET image in this case), an application of a Ram-Lak filter, and inversion by backprojection. Unlike the case in PET processing, however, the filtered beam obtained from the inversion represents a physical photon fluence. Therefore, a positivity constraint for the fluence (setting negative fluence to zero) must be applied (Brahme et al 1982, Bortfeld et al 1990) Results: Truncating the negative profiles from the PET data results in an approximation of the derivable energy fluence. Backprojection of the deliverable fluence is an approximation of the dose delivered. The deliverable dose is comparable to the original PET image and is similar to the PET image. Conclusion: It is possible to use the PET data or image as a direct indicator of deliverable fluence for cylindrical radiotherapy systems such as TomoTherapy

  6. Experiments and FLUKA simulations of $^{12}C$ and $^{16}O$ beams for therapy monitoring by means of in-beam Positron Emission Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerer,; Ferrari, A

    2007-01-01

    Since 1997 at the experimental C-12 ion therapy facility at Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Darmstadt, Germany, more than 350 patients have been treated. The therapy is monitored with a dedicated positron emission tomograph, fully integrated into the treatment site. The measured beta+-activity arises from inelastic nuclear interactions between the beam particles an the nuclei of the patients tissue. Because the monitoring is done during the irradiation the method is called in-beam PET. The underlying principle of this monitoring is a comparison between the measured activity and a simulated one. The simulations are presently done by the PETSIM code which is dedicated to C-12 beams. In future ion therapy centers like the Heidelberger Ionenstrahl Therapiezentrum (HIT), Heidelberg, Germany, besides C-12 also proton, $^3$He and O-16 beams will be used for treatment and the therapy will be monitored by means of in-beam PET. Because PETSIM is not extendable to other ions in an easy way, a code capable ...

  7. Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozzi, L.; Bandi, Y.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-01

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with 30 ps time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below 600 e‑ RMS and a pulse rise time of less than 2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of 0.8 pF were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than 99% and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately 200 ps .

  8. PET measurements of cerebral metabolism corrected for CSF contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawluk, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.J.; Hurtig, H.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Reivich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-three subjects have been studied with PET and anatomic imaging (proton-NMR and/or CT) in order to determine the effect of cerebral atrophy on calculations of metabolic rates. Subgroups of neurologic disease investigated include stroke, brain tumor, epilepsy, psychosis, and dementia. Anatomic images were digitized through a Vidicon camera and analyzed volumetrically. Relative areas for ventricles, sulci, and brain tissue were calculated. Preliminary analysis suggests that ventricular volumes as determined by NMR and CT are similar, while sulcal volumes are larger on NMR scans. Metabolic rates (18F-FDG) were calculated before and after correction for CSF spaces, with initial focus upon dementia and normal aging. Correction for atrophy led to a greater increase (%) in global metabolic rates in demented individuals (18.2 +- 5.3) compared to elderly controls (8.3 +- 3.0,p < .05). A trend towards significantly lower glucose metabolism in demented subjects before CSF correction was not seen following correction for atrophy. These data suggest that volumetric analysis of NMR images may more accurately reflect the degree of cerebral atrophy, since NMR does not suffer from beam hardening artifact due to bone-parenchyma juxtapositions. Furthermore, appropriate correction for CSF spaces should be employed if current resolution PET scanners are to accurately measure residual brain tissue metabolism in various pathological states

  9. PET Imaging Stability Measurements During Simultaneous Pulsing of Aggressive MR Sequences on the SIGNA PET/MR System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deller, Timothy W; Khalighi, Mohammad Mehdi; Jansen, Floris P; Glover, Gary H

    2018-01-01

    The recent introduction of simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanners has enabled new research taking advantage of the complementary information obtainable with PET and MRI. One such application is kinetic modeling, which requires high levels of PET quantitative stability. To accomplish the required PET stability levels, the PET subsystem must be sufficiently isolated from the effects of MR activity. Performance measurements have previously been published, demonstrating sufficient PET stability in the presence of MR pulsing for typical clinical use; however, PET stability during radiofrequency (RF)-intensive and gradient-intensive sequences has not previously been evaluated for a clinical whole-body scanner. In this work, PET stability of the GE SIGNA PET/MR was examined during simultaneous scanning of aggressive MR pulse sequences. Methods: PET performance tests were acquired with MR idle and during simultaneous MR pulsing. Recent system improvements mitigating RF interference and gain variation were used. A fast recovery fast spin echo MR sequence was selected for high RF power, and an echo planar imaging sequence was selected for its high heat-inducing gradients. Measurements were performed to determine PET stability under varying MR conditions using the following metrics: sensitivity, scatter fraction, contrast recovery, uniformity, count rate performance, and image quantitation. A final PET quantitative stability assessment for simultaneous PET scanning during functional MRI studies was performed with a spiral in-and-out gradient echo sequence. Results: Quantitation stability of a 68 Ge flood phantom was demonstrated within 0.34%. Normalized sensitivity was stable during simultaneous scanning within 0.3%. Scatter fraction measured with a 68 Ge line source in the scatter phantom was stable within the range of 40.4%-40.6%. Contrast recovery and uniformity were comparable for PET images acquired simultaneously with multiple MR conditions. Peak noise equivalent count

  10. What do we measure in oncology PET?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pak, Kyoung June; Kim, Seong Jang [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has come to the practice of oncology. It is known that {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is more sensitive for the assessment of treatment response than conventional imaging. In addition, PET has an advantage in the use of quantitative analysis of the study. Nowadays, various PET parameters are adopted in clinical settings. In addition, a wide range of factors has been known to be associated with FDG uptake. Therefore, there has been a need for standardization and harmonization of protocols and PET parameters. We will introduce PET parameters and discuss major issues in this review.

  11. Measuring receptor occupancy with PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Waarde, A

    Many physiological and biochemical measurements can be performed noninvasively in humans with modern imaging techniques like magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). This review focuses on the monitoring of

  12. Online monitoring for proton therapy: A real-time procedure using a planar PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, A. C.; Battistoni, G.; Belcari, N.; Camarlinghi, N.; Ciocca, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferretti, S.; Mairani, A.; Molinelli, S.; Pullia, M.; Sala, P.; Sportelli, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Rosso, V.

    2015-06-01

    In this study a procedure for range verification in proton therapy by means of a planar in-beam PET system is presented. The procedure consists of two steps: the measurement of the β+-activity induced in the irradiated body by the proton beam and the comparison of these distributions with simulations. The experimental data taking was performed at the CNAO center in Pavia, Italy, irradiating plastic phantoms. For two different cases we demonstrate how a real-time feedback of the delivered treatment plan can be obtained with in-beam PET imaging.

  13. Online monitoring for proton therapy: A real-time procedure using a planar PET system

    CERN Document Server

    Kraan, A C; Belcari, N; Camarlinghi, N; Ciocca, M; Ferrari, A; Ferretti, S; Mairani, A; Molinelli, S; Pullia, M; Sala, P; Sportelli, G; Del Guerra, A; Rosso, V

    2015-01-01

    In this study a procedure for range verification in proton therapy by means of a planar in-beam PET system is presented. The procedure consists of two steps: the measurement of the β+-activity induced in the irradiated body by the proton beam and the comparison of these distributions with simulations. The experimental data taking was performed at the CNAO center in Pavia, Italy, irradiating plastic phantoms. For two different cases we demonstrate how a real-time feedback of the delivered treatment plan can be obtained with in-beam PET imaging.

  14. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gullberg, Grand; Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel; Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  15. Measuring cardiac efficiency using PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Grand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Aparici, Carina Mari; Brooks, Gabriel [University of California San Francisco (United States); Liu, Jing; Guccione, Julius; Saloner, David; Seo, Adam Youngho; Ordovas, Karen Gomes [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States)

    2015-05-18

    Heart failure (HF) is a complex syndrome that is projected by the American Heart Association to cost $160 billion by 2030. In HF, significant metabolic changes and structural remodeling lead to reduced cardiac efficiency. A normal heart is approximately 20-25% efficient measured by the ratio of work to oxygen utilization (1 ml oxygen = 21 joules). The heart requires rapid production of ATP where there is complete turnover of ATP every 10 seconds with 90% of ATP produced by mitochondrial oxidative metabolism requiring substrates of approximately 30% glucose and 65% fatty acids. In our preclinical PET/MRI studies in normal rats, we showed a negative correlation between work and the influx rate constant for 18FDG, confirming that glucose is not the preferred substrate at rest. However, even though fatty acid provides 9 kcal/gram compared to 4 kcal/gram for glucose, in HF the preferred energy source is glucose. PET/MRI offers the potential to study this maladapted mechanism of metabolism by measuring work in a region of myocardial tissue simultaneously with the measure of oxygen utilization, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and to study cardiac efficiency in the etiology of and therapies for HF. MRI is used to measure strain and a finite element mechanical model using pressure measurements is used to estimate myofiber stress. The integral of strain times stress provides a measure of work which divided by energy utilization, estimated by the production of 11CO2 from intravenous injection of 11C-acetate, provides a measure of cardiac efficiency. Our project involves translating our preclinical research to the clinical application of measuring cardiac efficiency in patients. Using PET/MRI to develop technologies for studying myocardial efficiency in patients, provides an opportunity to relate cardiac work of specific tissue regions to metabolic substrates, and measure the heterogeneity of LV efficiency.

  16. Electron-beam-induced conduction in polyethylene terephthalate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckley, L M; Lewis, T J; Taylor, D M [University Coll. of North Wales, Bangor (UK). School of Electronic Engineering Science

    1976-06-21

    Measurements are reported of electron-beam-induced conduction in thin polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films for electron energies up to 10 keV. The ratio of induced dielectric current to incident beam current (the gain) is orders of magnitude less than unity over practically the whole range of beam penetration. This result is quite unlike that normally found for inorganic dielectrics where the gain will exceed unity and reach a maximum at or near full penetration. In spite of the very different gain characteristics it is shown that the model recently proposed by Nunes de Oliviera and Gross (J. App. Phys.; 46:3132 (1975)), and by Aris et al (IEE Conf. Publ. No.129.; 267 (1975) and J. Phys. C. Solid State Phys.; 9:797 (1976)) and applied to mica and tantalum oxide respectively is also applicable to PET. Use is made of the known carrier mobility and lifetime data for this polymer and it is shown that very large space-charge distortions of the field can be produced by the beam which may well account for the frequent sample failure experienced during the experiments. The work supports suggestions by earlier workers that the current in unirradiated PET is electrode limited and predicts the maximum (space-charge limited) current likely to occur in this polymer.

  17. Monte Carlo patient study on the comparison of prompt gamma and PET imaging for range verification in proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteabbed, M.; España, S.; Paganetti, H.

    2011-02-01

    particular subject. Thus, similar to PET, direct range verification with PG in passive scattering is not easily viable. However, upon development of an optimized 3D PG detector, indirect range verification by comparing measured and simulated PG distributions (currently being explored for the PET method) would be more beneficial because it can avoid the inherent biological challenges of the PET imaging. The improved correlation of PG and PET with dose when using pencil beams was evident. PG imaging was found to be potentially advantageous especially for small tumors in the presence of high tissue heterogeneities. Including the effects of detector acceptance and efficiency may hold PET superior in terms of the amplitude of the detected signal (depending on the future development of PG detection technology), but the ability to perform online measurements and avoid signal disintegration (due to washout) with PG are important factors that can outweigh the benefits of higher detection sensitivity.

  18. Study of electron beam irradiation effects on morphologic properties of the PET/PP/PE/EVA polymeric blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, Edvaldo L.; Silva, Leonardo G. Andrade e; Wiebeck, Helio

    2009-01-01

    Amidst the pollutants, plastics and especially the 'PET bottles' packaging type, which comprise of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and poly[ethylene-co-(vinyl acetate)] (EVA) have been causing big damage to the environment. In this work, the polymeric blend PET/PP/PE/EVA was obtained by mechanical recycling 'PET bottles' after consumption, with the objective of finding a solution for this environmental problem. It was also studied the different ionizing radiation dose effects (25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400 and 500 kGy) on the blend properties using an electron beam accelerator. The morphologic properties of the non-irradiated and irradiated polymeric blend were evaluated by the Light Microscopy (LM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The analysis of the results appeared to be a not mixing and compatible blend. The use of the ionizing radiation improved the homogeneity of the blend. These modifications have been randomized and irregular, depending directly on the dose of applied radiation. (author)

  19. Study of electron beam irradiation effects on morphologic properties of the PET/PP/PE/EVA polymeric blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, Edvaldo L.; Silva, Leonardo G. Andrade e, E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Wiebeck, Helio, E-mail: hwiebeck@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    2009-07-01

    Amidst the pollutants, plastics and especially the 'PET bottles' packaging type, which comprise of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), polypropylene (PP), polyethylene (PE) and poly[ethylene-co-(vinyl acetate)] (EVA) have been causing big damage to the environment. In this work, the polymeric blend PET/PP/PE/EVA was obtained by mechanical recycling 'PET bottles' after consumption, with the objective of finding a solution for this environmental problem. It was also studied the different ionizing radiation dose effects (25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, 300, 400 and 500 kGy) on the blend properties using an electron beam accelerator. The morphologic properties of the non-irradiated and irradiated polymeric blend were evaluated by the Light Microscopy (LM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The analysis of the results appeared to be a not mixing and compatible blend. The use of the ionizing radiation improved the homogeneity of the blend. These modifications have been randomized and irregular, depending directly on the dose of applied radiation. (author)

  20. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are 12 C nuclei, 16 O nuclei, and 40 Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP beam

  1. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Profile Measurements (2/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  2. Comparison of multiple tau-PET measures as biomarkers in aging and Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maass, Anne [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg (Germany); Landau, Susan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Baker, Suzanne L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Horng, Andy [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lockhart, Samuel N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); La Joie, Renaud [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rabinovici, Gil D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Jagust, William J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-06-03

    The recent development of tau-specific positron emission tomography (PET) tracers enables in vivo quantification of regional tau pathology, one of the key lesions in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau PET imaging may become a useful biomarker for clinical diagnosis and tracking of disease progression but there is no consensus yet on how tau PET signal is best quantified. The goal of the current paper was to evaluate multiple whole-brain and region-specific approaches to detect clinically relevant tau PET signal. Two independent cohorts of cognitively normal adults and amyloid-positive (Aβ+) patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD-dementia underwent [18F]AV-1451 PET. Methods for tau tracer quantification included: (i) in vivo Braak staging, (ii) regional uptake in Braak composite regions, (iii) several whole-brain measures of tracer uptake, (iv) regional uptake in AD-vulnerable voxels, and (v) uptake in a priori defined regions. Receiver operating curves characterized accuracy in distinguishing Aβ- controls from AD/MCI patients and yielded tau positivity cutoffs. Clinical relevance of tau PET measures was assessed by regressions against cognition and MR imaging measures. Key tracer uptake patterns were identified by a factor analysis and voxel-wise contrasts. Braak staging, global and region-specific tau measures yielded similar diagnostic accuracies, which differed between cohorts. While all tau measures were related to amyloid and global cognition, memory and hippocampal/entorhinal volume/thickness were associated with regional tracer retention in the medial temporal lobe. Key regions of tau accumulation included medial temporal and inferior/middle temporal regions, retrosplenial cortex, and banks of the superior temporal sulcus. Finally, our data indicate that whole-brain tau PET measures might be adequate biomarkers to detect AD-related tau pathology. However, regional measures covering AD-vulnerable regions may

  3. First in situ TOF-PET study using digital photon counters for proton range verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambraia Lopes, P; Bauer, J; Salomon, A; Rinaldi, I; Tabacchini, V; Tessonnier, T; Crespo, P; Parodi, K; Schaart, D R

    2016-08-21

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is the imaging modality most extensively tested for treatment monitoring in particle therapy. Optimal use of PET in proton therapy requires in situ acquisition of the relatively strong (15)O signal due to its relatively short half-life (~2 min) and high oxygen content in biological tissues, enabling shorter scans that are less sensitive to biological washout. This paper presents the first performance tests of a scaled-down in situ time-of-flight (TOF) PET system based on digital photon counters (DPCs) coupled to Cerium-doped Lutetium Yttrium Silicate (LYSO:Ce) crystals, providing quantitative results representative of a dual-head tomograph that complies with spatial constraints typically encountered in clinical practice (2  ×  50°, of 360°, transaxial angular acceptance). The proton-induced activity inside polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyethylene (PE) phantoms was acquired within beam pauses (in-beam) and immediately after irradiation by an actively-delivered synchrotron pencil-beam, with clinically relevant 125.67 MeV/u, 4.6  ×  10(8) protons s(-1), and 10(10) total protons. 3D activity maps reconstructed with and without TOF information are compared to FLUKA simulations, demonstrating the benefit of TOF-PET to reduce limited-angle artefacts using a 382 ps full width at half maximum coincidence resolving time. The time-dependent contributions from different radionuclides to the total count-rate are investigated. We furthermore study the impact of the acquisition time window on the laterally integrated activity depth-profiles, with emphasis on 2 min acquisitions starting at different time points. The results depend on phantom composition and reflect the differences in relative contributions from the radionuclides originating from carbon and oxygen. We observe very good agreement between the shapes of the simulated and measured activity depth-profiles for post-beam protocols. However, our results

  4. H- beam neutralization measurements in a solenoidal beam transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherman, J.; Pitcher, E.; Stevens, R.; Allison, P.

    1992-01-01

    H minus beam space-charge neutralization is measured for 65-mA, 35-keV beams extracted from a circular-aperture Penning surface-plasma source, the small-angle source. The H minus beam is transported to a RFQ matchpoint by a two-solenoid magnet system. Beam noise is typically ±4%. A four-grid analyzer is located in a magnetic-field-free region between the two solenoid magnets. H minus potentials are deduced from kinetic energy measurements of particles (electrons and positive ions) ejected radially from the beam channel by using a griddled energy analyzer. Background neutral gas density is increased by the introduction of additional Xe and Ar gases, enabling the H minus beam to become overneutralized

  5. Development of a single-ring OpenPET prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Eiji, E-mail: rush@nirs.go.jp; Tashima, Hideaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Ito, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2013-11-21

    One of the challenging applications of PET is implementing it for in-beam PET, which is an in situ monitoring method for charged particle therapy. For this purpose, we have previously proposed an open-type PET scanner, OpenPET. The original OpenPET had a physically opened field-of-view (FOV) between two detector rings through which irradiation beams pass. This dual-ring OpenPET (DROP) had a wide axial FOV including the gap. This geometry was not necessarily the most efficient for application to in-beam PET in which only a limited FOV around the irradiation field is required. Therefore, we have proposed a new single-ring OpenPET (SROP) geometry which can provide an accessible and observable open space with higher sensitivity and a reduced number of detectors than the DROP. The proposed geometry was a cylinder shape with its ends cut at a slant, in which the shape of each cut end became an ellipse. In this work, we developed and evaluated a small prototype of the SROP geometry for proof-of-concept. The SROP prototype was designed with 2 ellipse-shaped detector rings of 16 depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors each. The DOI detectors consisted of 1024 GSOZ scintillator crystals which were arranged in 4 layers of 16×16 arrays, coupled to a 64-channel FP-PMT. Each ellipse-shaped detector ring had a major axis of 281.6 mm and a minor axis of 207.5 mm. For the slant mode, the rings were placed at a 45-deg slant from the axial direction and for the non-slant mode (used as a reference) they were at 90 deg from the axial direction with no gap. The system sensitivity measured from a {sup 22}Na point source was 5.0% for the slant mode. The average spatial resolutions of major and minor axis directions were calculated as 3.8 mm FWHM and 4.9 mm FWHM, respectively for the slant mode. This difference resulted from the ellipsoidal ring geometry and the spatial resolution of the minor axis direction degraded by the parallax error. Comparison between the slant mode and the non

  6. arXiv Test beam measurement of the first prototype of the fast silicon pixel monolithic detector for the TT-PET project

    CERN Document Server

    Paolozzi, L.; Benoit, M.; Cardarelli, R.; Débieux, S.; Forshaw, D.; Hayakawa, D.; Iacobucci, G.; Kaynak, M.; Miucci, A.; Nessi, M.; Ratib, O.; Ripiccini, E.; Rücker, H.; Valerio, P.; Weber, M.

    2018-04-12

    The TT-PET collaboration is developing a PET scanner for small animals with  30 ps  time-of-flight resolution and sub-millimetre 3D detection granularity. The sensitive element of the scanner is a monolithic silicon pixel detector based on state-of-the-art SiGe BiCMOS technology. The first ASIC prototype for the TT-PET was produced and tested in the laboratory and with minimum ionizing particles. The electronics exhibit an equivalent noise charge below  600 e− RMS  and a pulse rise time of less than  2 ns , in accordance with the simulations. The pixels with a capacitance of  0.8 pF  were measured to have a detection efficiency greater than  99%  and, although in the absence of the post-processing, a time resolution of approximately  200 ps .

  7. Quantitative assessment of the physical potential of proton beam range verification with PET/CT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knopf, A; Parodi, K.; Paganetti, Harald; Lo Cascio, E; Bonab, A; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A recent clinical pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of offline PET/CT range verification for proton therapy treatments. In vivo PET measurements are challenged by blood perfusion, variations of tissue compositions, patient motion and image co-registration uncertainties. Besides these

  8. Effects of ferumoxytol on quantitative PET measurements in simultaneous PET/MR whole-body imaging: a pilot study in a baboon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Ronald Jh; Cho, Hoon-Sung; Bowen, Spencer L; Attenberger, Ulrike; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Josephson, Lee; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous PET/MR imaging depends on MR-derived attenuation maps (mu-maps) for accurate attenuation correction of PET data. Currently, these maps are derived from gradient-echo-based MR sequences, which are sensitive to susceptibility changes. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have been used in the measurement of blood volume, tumor microvasculature, tumor-associated macrophages, and characterizing lymph nodes. Our aim in this study was to assess whether the susceptibility effects associated with iron oxide nanoparticles can potentially affect measured (18)F-FDG PET standardized uptake values (SUV) through effects on MR-derived attenuation maps. The study protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Using a Siemens Biograph mMR PET/MR scanner, we evaluated the effects of increasing concentrations of ferumoxytol and ferumoxytol aggregates on MR-derived mu-maps using an agarose phantom. In addition, we performed a baboon experiment evaluating the effects of a single i.v. ferumoxytol dose (10 mg/kg) on the liver, spleen, and pancreas (18)F-FDG SUV at baseline (ferumoxytol-naïve), within the first hour and at 1, 3, 5, and 11 weeks. Phantom experiments showed mu-map artifacts starting at ferumoxytol aggregate concentrations of 10 to 20 mg/kg. The in vivo baboon data demonstrated a 53% decrease of observed (18)F-FDG SUV compared to baseline within the first hour in the liver, persisting at least 11 weeks. A single ferumoxytol dose can affect measured SUV for at least 3 months, which should be taken into account when administrating ferumoxytol in patients needing sequential PET/MR scans. Advances in knowledge 1. Ferumoxytol aggregates, but not ferumoxytol alone, produce significant artifacts in MR-derived attenuation correction maps at approximate clinical dose levels of 10 mg/kg. 2. When performing simultaneous whole-body (18)F-FDG PET/MR, a single dose of ferumoxytol can result in observed SUV decreases up to 53%, depending on the

  9. A proposal of an open PET geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Minohara, Shinichi [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yoshida, Eiji [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Inadama, Naoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Nishikido, Fumihiko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Shibuya, Kengo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Lam, Chih Fung [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan); Murayama, Hideo [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

    2008-02-07

    letting the beams pass through the gap. The proposed open PET geometry will also allow simultaneous PET/CT measurements of the same PET FOV as the CT FOV, in contrast to the conventional PET/CT where each FOV is separated by several tens of centimeters.

  10. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2013-11-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and >97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at four depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160 MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the four distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  11. STRUCTURAL, OPTICAL AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF PET POLYMER FILMS MODIFIED BY LOW ENERGY Ar+ ION BEAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Y. H. A.; Abdel-Hamid, H. M.; El-Okr, M. M.; Atta, A.

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films with thickness 40μm are irradiated with 3keV argon ion beams with different fluence ranging from 0.5×1018ions.cm-2 to 2×1018ions.cm-2 using locally designed broad ion source. The changes in the PET structure are characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The XRD patterns show that the peak intensity decreases with irradiation and the particle size decreases from 65.75 Å for the un-irradiated to 52.80 Å after irradiation. The FTIR indicates partial decrease and reduction in the intensity of the bands due to the degradation of the polymer after ion irradiation. The optical energy band gap decreases from 3.14eV to 3.05eV and the number of carbon cluster increases from 119 to 126 after ion irradiation. The results show a slight increase in the electrical conductivities and the dielectric constant (ɛ). The results indicate the effectiveness of using PET films as capacitors and resistors in industrial applications.

  12. Dynamic PET/CT measurements of induced positron activity in a prostate cancer patient after 50-MV photon radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E; Andreassen, Björn; Näslund, Ingemar; Jonsson, Cathrine

    2013-01-23

    The purpose of this work was to reveal the research interest value of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in visualizing the induced tissue activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. More specifically, the focus was on the possibility of retrieving data such as tissue composition and physical half-lives from dynamic PET acquisitions, as positron-emitting radionuclides such as 15O, 11C, and 13N are produced in vivo during radiation treatment with high-energy photons (>15 MeV). The type, amount, and distribution of induced positron-emitting radionuclides depend on the irradiated tissue cross section, the photon spectrum, and the possible perfusion-driven washout. A 62-year-old man diagnosed with prostate cancer was referred for palliative radiation treatment of the pelvis minor. A total dose of 8 Gy was given using high-energy photon beams (50 MV) with a racetrack microtron, and 7 min after the end of irradiation, the patient was positioned in a PET/computed tomography (CT) camera, and a list-mode acquisition was performed for 30 min. Two volumes of interests (VOIs) were positioned on the dynamic PET/CT images, one in the urinary bladder and the other in the subcutaneous fat. Analysis of the measured relative count rate was performed in order to compute the tissue compositions and physical half-lives in the two regions. Dynamic analysis from the two VOIs showed that the decay constants of activated oxygen and carbon could be deduced. Calculation of tissue composition from analyzing the VOI containing subcutaneous fat only moderately agreed with that of the tabulated International Commission on Radiation Units & Measurements (ICRU) data of the adipose tissue. However, the same analysis for the bladder showed a good agreement with that of the tabulated ICRU data. PET can be used in visualizing the induced activity post high-energy photon radiation treatment. Despite the very low count rate in this specific application, wherein 7 min after treatment

  13. Beam induced vacuum measurement error in BEPC II

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    When the beam in BEPCII storage ring aborts suddenly, the measured pressure of cold cathode gauges and ion pumps will drop suddenly and decrease to the base pressure gradually. This shows that there is a beam induced positive error in the pressure measurement during beam operation. The error is the difference between measured and real pressures. Right after the beam aborts, the error will disappear immediately and the measured pressure will then be equal to real pressure. For one gauge, we can fit a non-linear pressure-time curve with its measured pressure data 20 seconds after a sudden beam abortion. From this negative exponential decay pumping-down curve, real pressure at the time when the beam starts aborting is extrapolated. With the data of several sudden beam abortions we have got the errors of that gauge in different beam currents and found that the error is directly proportional to the beam current, as expected. And a linear data-fitting gives the proportion coefficient of the equation, which we derived to evaluate the real pressure all the time when the beam with varied currents is on.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations in multi-detector CT (MDCT) for two PET/CT scanner models using MASH and FASH adult phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, W., E-mail: wbfisica@gmail.com [Bahia Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology – IFBA, Vitória da Conquista, 45.100-000 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Santos, W.S. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil); Paschoal, C.M.M., E-mail: cinthiam.paschoal@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Vale do Acarau State University – UVA, Sobral 62.040-730 (Brazil); Souza, D.N. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Sergipe – UFS, São Cristóvão, 49.100-000 (Brazil)

    2015-06-01

    The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) has been extensively used in oncology for diagnosis and staging of tumors, radiotherapy planning and follow-up of patients with cancer, as well as in cardiology and neurology. This study determines by the Monte Carlo method the internal organ dose deposition for computational phantoms created by multidetector CT (MDCT) beams of two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. The different MDCT beam parameters were largely related to the total filtration that provides a beam energetic change inside the gantry. This parameter was determined experimentally with the Accu-Gold Radcal measurement system. The experimental values of the total filtration were included in the simulations of two MCNPX code scenarios. The absorbed organ doses obtained in MASH and FASH phantoms indicate that bowtie filter geometry and the energy of the X-ray beam have significant influence on the results, although this influence can be compensated by adjusting other variables such as the tube current–time product (mAs) and pitch during PET/CT procedures.

  15. Absolute beam-charge measurement for single-bunch electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suwada, Tsuyoshi; Ohsawa, Satoshi; Furukawa, Kazuro; Akasaka, Nobumasa

    2000-01-01

    The absolute beam charge of a single-bunch electron beam with a pulse width of 10 ps and that of a short-pulsed electron beam with a pulse width of 1 ns were measured with a Faraday cup in a beam test for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB) injector linac. It is strongly desired to obtain a precise beam-injection rate to the KEKB rings, and to estimate the amount of beam loss. A wall-current monitor was also recalibrated within an error of ±2%. This report describes the new results for an absolute beam-charge measurement for single-bunch and short-pulsed electron beams, and recalibration of the wall-current monitors in detail. (author)

  16. Time of flight measurements based on FPGA using a breast dedicated PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguilar, A; García-Olcina, R; Martos, J; Soret, J; Torres, J; Benlloch, J M; González, A J; Sánchez, F

    2014-01-01

    In this work the implementation of a Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) using a Nutt delay line FPGA-based and applied on a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) device is going to be presented in order to check the system's suitability for Time of Flight (TOF) measurements. In recent years, FPGAs have shown great advantages for precise time measurements in PET. The architecture employed for these measurements is described in detail. The system developed was tested on a dedicated breast PET prototype, composed of LYSO crystals and Positive Sensitive Photomultipliers (PSPMTs). Two distinct experiments were carried out for this purpose. In the first test, system linearity was evaluated in order to calibrate the time measurements, providing a linearity error of less than 2% and an average time resolution of 1.4 ns FWHM. The second set of measurements tested system resolution, resulting in a FWHM as good as 1.35 ns. The results suggest that the coincidence window for the current PET can be reduced in order to minimize the random events and thus, achieve better image quality

  17. Interobserver and Intraobserver Variability among Measurements of FDG PET/CT Parameters in Pulmonary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülgün Büyükdereli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT provides information about metabolic and morphologic status of malignancies. Tumor size and standardized uptake value (SUV measurements are crucial for cancer treatment monitoring.: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET/CT provides information about metabolic and morphologic status of malignancies. Tumor size and standardized uptake value (SUV measurements are crucial for cancer treatment monitoring. Aims: The purpose of our study was to assess the variability of these measurements performed by observers evaluating lung tumors. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 97 patients with pulmonary tumors were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Primary tumor size (UDCT, maximum SUV (SUVmax, mean SUV (SUVmean and maximum SUV normalized to liver mean SUV (SUVnliv max were measured by each observer at two different times with an interval of at least 2 weeks. Interobserver and intraobserver variabilities of measurements were evaluated through statistical methods. Results: Size of the lesions varied from 0.81 to 13.6 cm (mean 4.29±2.24 cm. Very good agreement was shown with correlation, Bland-Altman and regression analysis for all measured PET/CT parameters. In the interobserver and intraobserver variability analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficients were greater than 0.96 and 0.98, respectively. Conclusion: Semi-quantitative measurements of pulmonary tumors were highly reproducible when determined by experienced physicians with clinically available software for routine FDG PET/CT evaluation. Consistency may be improved if the same observer performs serial measurements for any one patient.

  18. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Gabriela [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica; Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear. Lab. de Dosimetria das Radiacoes e Fisica Medica

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  19. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  20. A new PET detector concept for compact preclinical high-resolution hybrid MR-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Gola, Alberto; Ferri, Alessandro; Finster, Felix; Rucatti, Daniele; Paternoster, Giovanni; Jon Shah, N.; Piemonte, Claudio; Lerche, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a new PET detector concept for compact preclinical hybrid MR-PET. The detector concept is based on Linearly-Graded SiPM produced with current FBK RGB-HD technology. One 7.75 mm x 7.75 mm large sensor chip is coupled with optical grease to a black coated 8 mm x 8 mm large and 3 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal. The readout is obtained from four readout channels with the linear encoding based on integrated resistors and the Center of Gravity approach. To characterize the new detector concept, the spatial and energy resolutions were measured. Therefore, the measurement setup was prepared to radiate a collimated beam to 25 different points perpendicular to the monolithic scintillator crystal. Starting in the center point of the crystal at 0 mm / 0 mm and sampling a grid with a pitch of 1.75 mm, all significant points of the detector were covered by the collimator beam. The measured intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.74 +/- 0.01 mm in x- and 0.69 +/- 0.01 mm in the y-direction at the center of the detector. At the same point, the measured energy resolution (FWHM) was 13.01 +/- 0.05 %. The mean intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) over the whole detector was 0.80 +/- 0.28 mm in x- and 0.72 +/- 0.19 mm in y-direction. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the detector was between 13 and 17.3 % with an average energy resolution of 15.7 +/- 1.0 %. Due to the reduced thickness, the sensitivity of this gamma detector is low but still higher than pixelated designs with the same thickness due to the monolithic crystals. Combining compact design, high spatial resolution, and high sensitivity, the detector concept is particularly suitable for applications where the scanner bore size is limited and high resolution is required - as is the case in small animal hybrid MR-PET.

  1. In situ measurement of laser beam quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Somayeh Sadat; Ghavami Sabouri, Saeed; Khorsandi, Alireza

    2017-09-01

    An innovative optical method is introduced for the beam quality measurement of any arbitrary transverse mode based on the reconstruction of the mode from a few-frame image of the beam cross-section. This is performed by the decomposition of a mode to its basic Hermite-Gaussian modal coefficients. The performance of the proposed method is examined through M 2-factor measurement of the beam of a Nd:YAG laser which was forced to oscillate in a certain mode using a crossed rectangular intracavity aperture. Obtained results have shown that this method can be alternatively replaced for the hologram- and ISO-based techniques recently exploiting for beam quality measurement regardless of the mode type and the position of utilized CCD camera along the beam direction.

  2. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo verification of radiation treatment with high energy photon beams using PET/CT to image the induced positron activity. The measurements of the positron activation induced in a preoperative rectal cancer patient and a prostate cancer patient following 50 MV photon treatments are presented. A total dose of 5 and 8 Gy, respectively, were delivered to the tumors. Imaging was performed with a 64-slice PET/CT scanner for 30 min, starting 7 min after the end of the treatment. The CT volume from the PET/CT and the treatment planning CT were coregistered by matching anatomical reference points in the patient. The treatment delivery was imaged in vivo based on the distribution of the induced positron emitters produced by photonuclear reactions in tissue mapped on to the associated dose distribution of the treatment plan. The results showed that spatial distribution of induced activity in both patients agreed well with the delivered beam portals of the treatment plans in the entrance subcutaneous fat regions but less so in blood and oxygen rich soft tissues. For the preoperative rectal cancer patient however, a 2 ± (0.5) cm misalignment was observed in the cranial-caudal direction of the patient between the induced activity distribution and treatment plan, indicating a beam patient setup error. No misalignment of this kind was seen in the prostate cancer patient. However, due to a fast patient setup error in the PET/CT scanner a slight mis-position of the patient in the PET/CT was observed in all three planes, resulting in a deformed activity distribution compared to the treatment plan. The present study indicates that the induced positron emitters by high energy photon beams can be measured quite accurately using PET imaging of subcutaneous fat to allow portal verification of the delivered treatment beams. Measurement of the induced activity in the patient 7 min after receiving 5 Gy involved count rates which were about

  3. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  4. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Loss and Tune Measurements (3/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  5. Absolute measurements methods for proton beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    A widespread interest in improving proton beam characteristics and related dosimetry became apparent in the recent years, even if the advantages of protons in radiotherapy were pointed out since 1946. The early treatments by proton beams were made for a long time on a small number of patients in very few accelerators sharing their use with nuclear-physics experiments. The first proton accelerator totally dedicated to radiotherapy was established just in 1990 at the Loma Linda Medical Center in the USA. A further reason of the slowly growing use of protons for therapy in the early years, was the lack of adequate means for accurate localization of the treatment volume. The potentialities of protons in imparting a largest part of their energy to very small volumes became exploitable only after the established clinical use of accurate imaging techniques such as based on CT, NMR, PET, etc

  6. Measurement of beam energy spread in a space-charge dominated electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Cui

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of beam energy spread in a space-charge dominated beam is very important to understanding the physics of intense beams. It is believed that coupling between the transverse and longitudinal directions via Coulomb collisions will cause an increase of the beam longitudinal energy spread. At the University of Maryland, experiments have been carried out to study the energy evolution in such intense beams with a high-resolution retarding field energy analyzer. The temporal beam energy profile along the beam pulse has been characterized at the distance of 25 cm from the anode of a gridded thermionic electron gun. The mean energy of the pulsed beams including the head and tail is reported here. The measured rms energy spread is in good agreement with the predictions of the intrabeam scattering theory. As an application of the beam energy measurement, the input impedance between the cathode and the grid due to beam loading can be calculated and the impedance number is found to be a constant in the operation region of the gun.

  7. Development of a small prototype for a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Tsuji, Atsushi; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Kinouchi, Shoko; Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji; Nakajima, Yasunori; Kawai, Hideyuki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio

    2011-01-01

    The OpenPET geometry is our new idea to visualize a physically opened space between two detector rings. In this paper, we developed the first small prototype to show a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging. Two detector rings of 110 mm diameter and 42 mm axial length were placed with a gap of 42 mm. The basic imaging performance was confirmed through phantom studies; the open imaging was realized at the cost of slight loss of axial resolution and 24% loss of sensitivity. For a proof-of-concept of PET image-guided radiation therapy, we carried out the in-beam tests with 11 C radioactive beam irradiation in the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba to visualize in situ distribution of primary particles stopped in a phantom. We showed that PET images corresponding to dose distribution were obtained. For an initial proof-of-concept of real-time multimodal imaging, we measured a tumor-inoculated mouse with 18 F-FDG, and an optical image of the mouse body surface was taken during the PET measurement by inserting a digital camera in the ring gap. We confirmed that the tumor in the gap was clearly visualized. The result also showed the extension effect of an axial field-of-view (FOV); a large axial FOV of 126 mm was obtained with the detectors that originally covered only an 84 mm axial FOV. In conclusion, our initial imaging studies showed promising performance of the OpenPET.

  8. Development of a small prototype for a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Yoshida, Eiji; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Kokuryo, Daisuke; Tsuji, Atsushi; Mitsuhashi, Takayuki; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadama, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Kinouchi, Shoko [Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Inaniwa, Taku; Sato, Shinji [Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nakajima, Yasunori [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan); Kawai, Hideyuki; Haneishi, Hideaki; Suga, Mikio, E-mail: taiga@nirs.go.jp [Chiba University, 1-33 Yayoicho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan)

    2011-02-21

    The OpenPET geometry is our new idea to visualize a physically opened space between two detector rings. In this paper, we developed the first small prototype to show a proof-of-concept of OpenPET imaging. Two detector rings of 110 mm diameter and 42 mm axial length were placed with a gap of 42 mm. The basic imaging performance was confirmed through phantom studies; the open imaging was realized at the cost of slight loss of axial resolution and 24% loss of sensitivity. For a proof-of-concept of PET image-guided radiation therapy, we carried out the in-beam tests with {sup 11}C radioactive beam irradiation in the heavy ion medical accelerator in Chiba to visualize in situ distribution of primary particles stopped in a phantom. We showed that PET images corresponding to dose distribution were obtained. For an initial proof-of-concept of real-time multimodal imaging, we measured a tumor-inoculated mouse with {sup 18}F-FDG, and an optical image of the mouse body surface was taken during the PET measurement by inserting a digital camera in the ring gap. We confirmed that the tumor in the gap was clearly visualized. The result also showed the extension effect of an axial field-of-view (FOV); a large axial FOV of 126 mm was obtained with the detectors that originally covered only an 84 mm axial FOV. In conclusion, our initial imaging studies showed promising performance of the OpenPET.

  9. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gonzales, Fermin; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Kutac, Vincent G.; Martinez, Derwin; Sedillo, James Daniel; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H - beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  10. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  11. Positron Emission Tomography imaging with the SmartPET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cooperrj@ornl.gov; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P.; Mather, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-21

    The Small Animal Reconstruction Tomograph for Positron Emission Tomography (SmartPET) project is the development of a small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) demonstrator based on the use of High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors and state of the art digital electronics. The experimental results presented demonstrate the current performance of this unique system. By performing high precision measurements of one of the SmartPET HPGe detectors with a range of finely collimated gamma-ray beams the response of the detector as a function of gamma-ray interaction position has been quantified, facilitating the development of parametric Pulse Shape Analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in detector performance. These algorithms have then been applied to data from PET imaging measurements using two such detectors in conjunction with a specially designed rotating gantry. In this paper we show how the use of parametric PSA approaches allows over 60% of coincident events to be processed and how the nature and complexity of an event has direct implications for the quality of the resulting image.

  12. Bone metabolic activity in hyperostosis cranialis interna measured with 18F-fluoride PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterval, Jerome J.; Dongen, Thijs M.A. van; Stokroos, Robert J.; Manni, Johannes J.; Teule, Jaap G.J.; Kemerink, Gerrit J.; Brans, Boudewijn; Nieman, Fred H.M.

    2011-01-01

    18 F-Fluoride PET/CT is a relatively undervalued diagnostic test to measure bone metabolism in bone diseases. Hyperostosis cranialis interna (HCI) is a (hereditary) bone disease characterised by endosteal hyperostosis and osteosclerosis of the skull and the skull base. Bone overgrowth causes entrapment and dysfunction of several cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to compare standardised uptake values (SUVs) at different sites in order to quantify bone metabolism in the affected anatomical regions in HCI patients. Nine affected family members, seven non-affected family members and nine non-HCI non-family members underwent 18 F-fluoride PET/CT scans. SUVs were systematically measured in the different regions of interest: frontal bone, sphenoid bone, petrous bone and clivus. Moreover, the average 18 F-fluoride uptake in the entire skull was measured by assessing the uptake in axial slides. Visual assessment of the PET scans of affected individuals was performed to discover the process of disturbed bone metabolism in HCI. 18 F-Fluoride uptake is statistically significantly higher in the sphenoid bone and clivus regions of affected family members. Visual assessment of the scans of HCI patients is relevant in detecting disease severity and the pattern of disturbed bone metabolism throughout life. 18 F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in quantifying the metabolic activity in HCI and provides information about the process of disturbed bone metabolism in this specific disorder. Limitations are a narrow window between normal and pathological activity and the influence of age. This study emphasises that 18 F-fluoride PET/CT may also be a promising diagnostic tool for other metabolic bone disorders, even those with an indolent course. (orig.)

  13. Charging effects of PET under electron beam irradiation in a SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jbara, O; Rondot, S; Hadjadj, A; Patat, J M; Fakhfakh, S; Belhaj, M

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with charge trapping and charge transport of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) polymer subjected to electron irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Measurement of displacement current and leakage current using an arrangement adapted to the SEM allows the amount of trapped charge during and after electron irradiation to be determined and the charge mechanisms regulation to be studied. These mechanisms involve several parameters related to the electronic injection, the characteristics of insulator and the effects of the trapped charge itself. The dynamic trapping properties of PET samples are investigated and the time constants of charging are evaluated for various conditions of irradiation. The determination of the trapping cross section for electrons is possible by using the trapping rate at the onset of irradiation. Many physical processes are involved in the charging and discharging mechanisms; among them surface conduction is outlined. Through the control of irradiation conditions, various types of surface discharging (flashover phenomenon) behaviour are also observed. The strength of the electric field initiating surface discharge is estimated.

  14. A robotic system for 18F-FMISO PET-guided intratumoral pO2 measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenghwa; Wen, Bixiu; Kazanzides, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat; Finn, Ronald D; Fichtinger, Gabor; Ling, C Clifton

    2009-11-01

    An image-guided robotic system was used to measure the oxygen tension (pO2) in rodent tumor xenografts using interstitial probes guided by tumor hypoxia PET images. Rats with approximately 1 cm diameter tumors were anesthetized and immobilized in a custom-fabricated whole-body mold. Imaging was performed using a dedicated small-animal PET scanner (R4 or Focus 120 microPET) approximately 2 h after the injection of the hypoxia tracer 18F-fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO). The coordinate systems of the robot and PET were registered based on fiducial markers in the rodent bed visible on the PET images. Guided by the 3D microPET image set, measurements were performed at various locations in the tumor and compared to the corresponding 18F-FMISO image intensity at the respective measurement points. Experiments were performed on four tumor-bearing rats with 4 (86), 3 (80), 7 (162), and 8 (235) measurement tracks (points) for each experiment. The 18F-FMISO image intensities were inversely correlated with the measured pO2, with a Pearson coefficient ranging from -0.14 to -0.97 for the 22 measurement tracks. The cumulative scatterplots of pO2 versus image intensity yielded a hyperbolic relationship, with correlation coefficients of 0.52, 0.48, 0.64, and 0.73, respectively, for the four tumors. In conclusion, PET image-guided pO2 measurement is feasible with this robot system and, more generally, this system will permit point-by-point comparison of physiological probe measurements and image voxel values as a means of validating molecularly targeted radiotracers. Although the overall data fitting suggested that 18F-FMISO may be an effective hypoxia marker, the use of static 18F-FMISO PET postinjection scans to guide radiotherapy might be problematic due to the observed high variation in some individual data pairs from the fitted curve, indicating potential temporal fluctuation of oxygen tension in individual voxels or possible suboptimal imaging time postadministration of hypoxia

  15. PET attenuation coefficients from CT images: experimental evaluation of the transformation of CT into PET 511-keV attenuation coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, C; Goerres, G; Schoenes, S; Buck, A; Lonn, A H R; Von Schulthess, G K

    2002-07-01

    The CT data acquired in combined PET/CT studies provide a fast and essentially noiseless source for the correction of photon attenuation in PET emission data. To this end, the CT values relating to attenuation of photons in the range of 40-140 keV must be transformed into linear attenuation coefficients at the PET energy of 511 keV. As attenuation depends on photon energy and the absorbing material, an accurate theoretical relation cannot be devised. The transformation implemented in the Discovery LS PET/CT scanner (GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.) uses a bilinear function based on the attenuation of water and cortical bone at the CT and PET energies. The purpose of this study was to compare this transformation with experimental CT values and corresponding PET attenuation coefficients. In 14 patients, quantitative PET attenuation maps were calculated from germanium-68 transmission scans, and resolution-matched CT images were generated. A total of 114 volumes of interest were defined and the average PET attenuation coefficients and CT values measured. From the CT values the predicted PET attenuation coefficients were calculated using the bilinear transformation. When the transformation was based on the narrow-beam attenuation coefficient of water at 511 keV (0.096 cm(-1)), the predicted attenuation coefficients were higher in soft tissue than the measured values. This bias was reduced by replacing 0.096 cm(-1) in the transformation by the linear attenuation coefficient of 0.093 cm(-1) obtained from germanium-68 transmission scans. An analysis of the corrected emission activities shows that the resulting transformation is essentially equivalent to the transmission-based attenuation correction for human tissue. For non-human material, however, it may assign inaccurate attenuation coefficients which will also affect the correction in neighbouring tissue.

  16. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte...... Carlo simulations with SHIELD-HIT10A reasonably matched the most abundant PET isotopes 11C and 15O. We observed an ion-energy (i.e., depth) dependence of the agreement between SHIELD-HIT10A and measurement. Improved modeling requires more accurate measurements of cross-section values....

  17. Electron Beam Size Measurements in a Cooling Solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Kroc, Thomas K; Burov, Alexey; Seletsky, Sergey; Shemyakin, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires a straight trajectory and constant beam size to provide effective cooling of the antiprotons in the Recycler. A measurement system was developed using movable appertures and steering bumps to measure the beam size in a 20 m long, nearly continuous, solenoid. This paper discusses the required beam parameters, the implimentation of the measurement system and results for our application.

  18. Evaluation of ECG-gated [(11)C]acetate PET for measuring left ventricular volumes, mass, and myocardial external efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils Henrik; Tolbod, Lars; Harms, Johannes; Wiggers, Henrik; Kim, Won Yong; Hansen, Esben; Zaremba, Tomas; Frøkiær, Jørgen; Jakobsen, Steen; Sørensen, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Noninvasive estimation of myocardial external efficiency (MEE) requires measurements of left ventricular (LV) oxygen consumption with [(11)C]acetate PET in addition to LV stroke volume and mass with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Measuring LV geometry directly from ECG-gated [(11)C]acetate PET might enable MEE evaluation from a single PET scan. Therefore, we sought to establish the accuracy of measuring LV volumes, mass, and MEE directly from ECG-gated [(11)C]acetate PET. Thirty-five subjects with aortic valve stenosis underwent ECG-gated [(11)C]acetate PET and CMR. List mode PET data were rebinned into 16-bin ECG-gated uptake images before measuring LV volumes and mass using commercial software and compared to CMR. Dynamic datasets were used for calculation of mean LV oxygen consumption and MEE. LV mass, volumes, and ejection fraction measured by CMR and PET correlated strongly (r = 0.86-0.92, P PET (P PET-based MEE, corrected for bias, correlated fairly with PET/CMR-based MEE (r = 0.60, P PET-based MEE bias was strongly associated with LV wall thickness. Although analysis-related improvements in accuracy are recommended, LV geometry estimated from ECG-gated [(11)C]acetate PET correlate excellently with CMR and can indeed be used to evaluate MEE.

  19. Scanning-probe-microscopy of polyethylene terephthalate surface treatment by argon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Beltran, Francisco [Polymer & Biopolymer Group, Libramiento Norponiente no. 2000, Cinvestav Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico); Sanchez, Isaac C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); España-Sánchez, Beatriz L.; Mota-Morales, Josué D.; Carrillo, Salvador; Enríquez-Flores, C.I. [Polymer & Biopolymer Group, Libramiento Norponiente no. 2000, Cinvestav Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico); Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne, E-mail: epaill@univ-lemans.fr [Institute for Molecules and Materials, UMR CNRS 6283, Av. O. Messiaen, Universitè du Maine, Le Mans 72085 (France); Luna-Barcenas, Gabriel, E-mail: gluna@qro.cinvestav.mx [Polymer & Biopolymer Group, Libramiento Norponiente no. 2000, Cinvestav Queretaro, Queretaro 76230 (Mexico)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Kelvin-probe-force microscopy helps study of PET surface treated by Ar ion beam. • Ar ion beam surface treatment promotes chain scission and N insertion. • Surface roughness and work function increases as intensity of ion energy increases. • Adhesive force of PET decrease due to the surface changes by ion bombardment. - Abstract: The effect of argon (Ar{sup +}) ion beam treatment on the surface of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) samples was studied by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) and the changes in surface topography were assessed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) sheds light of adhesion force between treated polymer films and a Pt/Cr probe under dry conditions, obtaining the contact potential difference of material. As a result of Ar{sup +} ion bombardment, important surface chemical changes were detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements such as chains scission and incorporation of nitrogen species. Ion beam treatment increases the surface roughness from 0.49 ± 0.1 nm to 7.2 ± 0.1 nm and modify the surface potential of PET samples, decreasing the adhesive forces from 12.041 ± 2.1 nN to 5.782 ± 0.06 nN, and producing a slight increase in the electronic work function (Φ{sub e}) from 5.1 V (untreated) to 5.2 V (treated). Ar{sup +} ion beam treatment allows to potentially changing the surface properties of PET, modifying surface adhesion, improving surface chemical changes, wetting properties and surface potential of polymers.

  20. Trends in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, William W.

    2000-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging is a well established method for obtaining information on the status of certain organs within the human body or in animals. This paper presents an overview of recent trends PET instrumentation. Significant effort is being expended to develop new PET detector modules, especially those capable of measuring depth of interaction. This is aided by recent advances in scintillator and pixellated photodetector technology. The other significant area of effort is development of special purpose PET cameras (such as for imaging breast cancer or small animals) or cameras that have the ability to image in more than one modality (such as PET / SPECT or PET / X-Ray CT)

  1. Beam lifetime measurement and analysis in Indus-2 electron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, the beam lifetime measurement and its theoretical analysis are presented using measured vacuum pressure and applied radio frequency (RF) cavity voltage in Indus-2 electron storage ring at 2 GeV beam energy. Experimental studies of the effect of RF cavity voltage and bunched beam filling pattern on beam ...

  2. Robust framework for PET image reconstruction incorporating system and measurement uncertainties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Liu

    Full Text Available In Positron Emission Tomography (PET, an optimal estimate of the radioactivity concentration is obtained from the measured emission data under certain criteria. So far, all the well-known statistical reconstruction algorithms require exactly known system probability matrix a priori, and the quality of such system model largely determines the quality of the reconstructed images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for PET image reconstruction for the real world case where the PET system model is subject to uncertainties. The method counts PET reconstruction as a regularization problem and the image estimation is achieved by means of an uncertainty weighted least squares framework. The performance of our work is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan simulated and real phantom data, which demonstrates significant improvements in image quality over the least squares reconstruction efforts.

  3. Site specific measurements of bone formation using [18F] sodium fluoride PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Glen M; Puri, Tanuj; Siddique, Musib; Frost, Michelle L; Moore, Amelia E B; Fogelman, Ignac

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with fluorine-18 labelled sodium fluoride ([ 18 F]NaF) allows the quantitative assessment of regional bone formation by measuring the plasma clearance of fluoride to bone at any site in the skeleton. Today, hybrid PET and computed tomography (CT) dual-modality systems (PET/CT) are widely available, and [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT offers a convenient non-invasive method of studying bone formation at the important osteoporotic fracture sites at the hip and spine, as well as sites of pure cortical or trabecular bone. The technique complements conventional measurements of bone turnover using biochemical markers or bone biopsy as a tool to investigate new therapies for osteoporosis, and has a potential role as an early biomarker of treatment efficacy in clinical trials. This article reviews methods of acquiring and analyzing dynamic [ 18 F]NaF PET/CT scan data, and outlines a simplified approach combining venous blood sampling with a series of short (3- to 5-minute) static PET/CT scans acquired at different bed positions to estimate [ 18 F]NaF plasma clearance at multiple sites in the skeleton with just a single injection of tracer.

  4. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  5. Beam tuning and stabilization using beam phase measurements at GANIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabert, A.; Loyer, F.; Sauret, J.

    1984-06-01

    Owing to the great sensitivity of the beam phase to the various parameters, on line beam phase measurements proved to be a very efficient way of tuning and stabilizing the beam of the multi-accelerator complex. We recall the system which allows to obtain the different kinds of accurate measurements we need and describe the main applications: - tuning process (buncher and SSC's RF phase determination, setting of the required radial beam phase law in the SSC's); - stabilization of the beam by loops, the basic principle of which being to keep constant the beam central phase all along the machine by adjusting RF voltages or magnetic fields. Feedback loops are described and comparative results with and without feedback are given

  6. Automated measurement of uptake in cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body FDG PET/CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Christian; Sun, Shanhui; Sun, Wenqing; Otis, Justin; Wallace, Audrey; Smith, Brian J; Sunderland, John J; Graham, Michael M; Sonka, Milan; Buatti, John M; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate fully automated methods for uptake measurement of cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch in full-body PET/CT scans. Such measurements are of interest in the context of uptake normalization for quantitative assessment of metabolic activity and/or automated image quality control. Cerebellum, liver, and aortic arch regions were segmented with different automated approaches. Cerebella were segmented in PET volumes by means of a robust active shape model (ASM) based method. For liver segmentation, a largest possible hyperellipsoid was fitted to the liver in PET scans. The aortic arch was first segmented in CT images of a PET/CT scan by a tubular structure analysis approach, and the segmented result was then mapped to the corresponding PET scan. For each of the segmented structures, the average standardized uptake value (SUV) was calculated. To generate an independent reference standard for method validation, expert image analysts were asked to segment several cross sections of each of the three structures in 134 F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT scans. For each case, the true average SUV was estimated by utilizing statistical models and served as the independent reference standard. For automated aorta and liver SUV measurements, no statistically significant scale or shift differences were observed between automated results and the independent standard. In the case of the cerebellum, the scale and shift were not significantly different, if measured in the same cross sections that were utilized for generating the reference. In contrast, automated results were scaled 5% lower on average although not shifted, if FDG uptake was calculated from the whole segmented cerebellum volume. The estimated reduction in total SUV measurement error ranged between 54.7% and 99.2%, and the reduction was found to be statistically significant for cerebellum and aortic arch. With the proposed methods, the authors have demonstrated that

  7. Aliasing errors in measurements of beam position and ellipticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are used in accelerators and ion experiments to measure currents, position, and azimuthal asymmetry. These usually consist of discrete arrays of electromagnetic field detectors, with detectors located at several equally spaced azimuthal positions at the beam tube wall. The discrete nature of these arrays introduces systematic errors into the data, independent of uncertainties resulting from signal noise, lack of recording dynamic range, etc. Computer simulations were used to understand and quantify these aliasing errors. If required, aliasing errors can be significantly reduced by employing more than the usual four detectors in the BPMs. These simulations show that the error in measurements of the centroid position of a large beam is indistinguishable from the error in the position of a filament. The simulations also show that aliasing errors in the measurement of beam ellipticity are very large unless the beam is accurately centered. The simulations were used to quantify the aliasing errors in beam parameter measurements during early experiments on the DARHT-II accelerator, demonstrating that they affected the measurements only slightly, if at all

  8. Aliasing errors in measurements of beam position and ellipticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2005-09-01

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are used in accelerators and ion experiments to measure currents, position, and azimuthal asymmetry. These usually consist of discrete arrays of electromagnetic field detectors, with detectors located at several equally spaced azimuthal positions at the beam tube wall. The discrete nature of these arrays introduces systematic errors into the data, independent of uncertainties resulting from signal noise, lack of recording dynamic range, etc. Computer simulations were used to understand and quantify these aliasing errors. If required, aliasing errors can be significantly reduced by employing more than the usual four detectors in the BPMs. These simulations show that the error in measurements of the centroid position of a large beam is indistinguishable from the error in the position of a filament. The simulations also show that aliasing errors in the measurement of beam ellipticity are very large unless the beam is accurately centered. The simulations were used to quantify the aliasing errors in beam parameter measurements during early experiments on the DARHT-II accelerator, demonstrating that they affected the measurements only slightly, if at all.

  9. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-15

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 {mu}m precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  10. Measuring the electron beam energy in a magnetic bunch compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, Kirsten

    2010-09-01

    Within this thesis, work was carried out in and around the first bunch compressor chicane of the FLASH (Free-electron LASer in Hamburg) linear accelerator in which two distinct systems were developed for the measurement of an electron beams' position with sub-5 μm precision over a 10 cm range. One of these two systems utilized RF techniques to measure the difference between the arrival-times of two broadband electrical pulses generated by the passage of the electron beam adjacent to a pickup antenna. The other system measured the arrival-times of the pulses from the pickup with an optical technique dependent on the delivery of laser pulses which are synchronized to the RF reference of the machine. The relative advantages and disadvantages of these two techniques are explored and compared to other available approaches to measure the same beam property, including a time-of-flight measurement with two beam arrival-time monitors and a synchrotron light monitor with two photomultiplier tubes. The electron beam position measurement is required as part of a measurement of the electron beam energy and could be used in an intra-bunch-train beam-based feedback system that would stabilize the amplitude of the accelerating field. By stabilizing the accelerating field amplitude, the arrival-time of the electron beam can be made more stable. By stabilizing the electron beam arrival-time relative to a stable reference, diagnostic, seeding, and beam-manipulation lasers can be synchronized to the beam. (orig.)

  11. Comparison between PET/MR and PET/CT in evaluation of oncological patients%PET/MR与PET/CT的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐白萱; 富丽萍; 关志伟; 尹大一; 刘家金; 杨晖; 张锦明; 陈英茂; 安宁豫

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify the feasibility of the integrated PET/MR for oncological applications by comparing PET/MR with PET/CT in terms of lesion detection and quantitative measurement.Methods A total of 277 patients (165 males,112 females,average age (52.9± 12.6) years) voluntarily participated in this same-day PET/CT and PET/MR comparative study.The time interval between the two studies was 15-35 min.PET/CT images were acquired and reconstructed following standard protocols.PET/MR covered the body trunk with a sequence combination of transverse T1 weighted imaging (WI) 3D-volumetric interpolated breath-hold,T2WI turbo spin echo with fat saturation,diffusion-weighted imaging,and simultaneous PET acquisition.PET images were reconstructed by vender-provided attenuation correction methods.The results of PET/CT and PET/MR were regarded as positive if any modality (CT,PET or MRI) was positive.SUVmax was obtained by the manually drawn ROI.Detection rates were compared with x2 test and SUVmax from the two modalities was analyzed with Spearman correlation analysis.Results A total of 353 lesions were detected in 220 patients.Compared to PET/CT,PET/MR revealed 30 additional true-positive lesions,while missed 6.The detection rates between PET/CT and PET/MR were significantly different (P<0.05).The lesion-based and patient-based consistency was 89.8% (317/353) and 85.9% (189/220),respectively.There were significant correlations of SUVmax between PET/MR and PET/CT for lesions(rs =0.91,P<0.01) and for normal tissues(rs =0.62-0.76,all P<0.01).Conclusions With reference to PET/CT,integrated PET/MR may provide comparable semi-quantitative measurements of pathological lesions as well as normal tissues.Integrated PET/MR may be more effective to detect lesions in abdomen and pelvis.%目的 通过与PET/CT在病灶检测及定量分析方面的比较,论证PET/MR一体机应用于临床的可行性.方法 2012年5月至2013年2月共300例患者同天间隔15 ~ 35 min行PET/CT和PET

  12. Bone metabolic activity in hyperostosis cranialis interna measured with {sup 18}F-fluoride PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterval, Jerome J.; Dongen, Thijs M.A. van; Stokroos, Robert J.; Manni, Johannes J. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Teule, Jaap G.J.; Kemerink, Gerrit J.; Brans, Boudewijn [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Nieman, Fred H.M. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-15

    {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is a relatively undervalued diagnostic test to measure bone metabolism in bone diseases. Hyperostosis cranialis interna (HCI) is a (hereditary) bone disease characterised by endosteal hyperostosis and osteosclerosis of the skull and the skull base. Bone overgrowth causes entrapment and dysfunction of several cranial nerves. The aim of this study is to compare standardised uptake values (SUVs) at different sites in order to quantify bone metabolism in the affected anatomical regions in HCI patients. Nine affected family members, seven non-affected family members and nine non-HCI non-family members underwent {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT scans. SUVs were systematically measured in the different regions of interest: frontal bone, sphenoid bone, petrous bone and clivus. Moreover, the average {sup 18}F-fluoride uptake in the entire skull was measured by assessing the uptake in axial slides. Visual assessment of the PET scans of affected individuals was performed to discover the process of disturbed bone metabolism in HCI. {sup 18}F-Fluoride uptake is statistically significantly higher in the sphenoid bone and clivus regions of affected family members. Visual assessment of the scans of HCI patients is relevant in detecting disease severity and the pattern of disturbed bone metabolism throughout life. {sup 18}F-Fluoride PET/CT is useful in quantifying the metabolic activity in HCI and provides information about the process of disturbed bone metabolism in this specific disorder. Limitations are a narrow window between normal and pathological activity and the influence of age. This study emphasises that {sup 18}F-fluoride PET/CT may also be a promising diagnostic tool for other metabolic bone disorders, even those with an indolent course. (orig.)

  13. Comparison of PET/CT with Sequential PET/MRI Using an MR-Compatible Mobile PET System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Kido, Aki; Togashi, Kaori

    2018-05-01

    The current study tested a newly developed flexible PET (fxPET) scanner prototype. This fxPET system involves dual arc-shaped detectors based on silicon photomultipliers that are designed to fit existing MRI devices, allowing us to obtain fused PET and MR images by sequential PET and MR scanning. This prospective study sought to evaluate the image quality, lesion detection rate, and quantitative values of fxPET in comparison with conventional whole-body (WB) PET and to assess the accuracy of registration. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or known malignant tumors were analyzed. Approximately 1 h after intravenous injection of 18 F-FDG, WB PET/CT was performed, followed by fxPET and MRI. For reconstruction of fxPET images, MRI-based attenuation correction was applied. The quality of fxPET images was visually assessed, and the number of detected lesions was compared between the 2 imaging methods. SUV max and maximum average SUV within a 1 cm 3 spheric volume (SUV peak ) of lesions were also compared. In addition, the magnitude of misregistration between fxPET and MR images was evaluated. Results: The image quality of fxPET was acceptable for diagnosis of malignant tumors. There was no significant difference in detectability of malignant lesions between fxPET and WB PET ( P > 0.05). However, the fxPET system did not exhibit superior performance to the WB PET system. There were strong positive correlations between the 2 imaging modalities in SUV max (ρ = 0.88) and SUV peak (ρ = 0.81). SUV max and SUV peak measured with fxPET were approximately 1.1-fold greater than measured with WB PET. The average misregistration between fxPET and MR images was 5.5 ± 3.4 mm. Conclusion: Our preliminary data indicate that running an fxPET scanner near an existing MRI system provides visually and quantitatively acceptable fused PET/MR images for diagnosis of malignant lesions. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  14. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bambade, P [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Moenig, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schulte, D [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  15. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  16. Simultaneous PET-MR acquisition and MR-derived motion fields for correction of non-rigid motion in PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoumpas, C.; Mackewn, J.E.; Halsted, P.; King, A.P.; Buerger, C.; Totman, J.J.; Schaeffter, T.; Marsden, P.K.

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides an accurate measurement of radiotracer concentration in vivo, but performance can be limited by subject motion which degrades spatial resolution and quantitative accuracy. This effect may become a limiting factor for PET studies in the body as PET scanner technology improves. In this work, we propose a new approach to address this problem by employing motion information from images measured simultaneously using a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. The approach is demonstrated using an MR-compatible PET scanner and PET-MR acquisition with a purpose-designed phantom capable of non-rigid deformations. Measured, simultaneously acquired MR data were used to correct for motion in PET, and results were compared with those obtained using motion information from PET images alone. Motion artefacts were significantly reduced and the PET image quality and quantification was significantly improved by the use of MR motion fields, whilst the use of PET-only motion information was less successful. Combined PET-MR acquisitions potentially allow PET motion compensation in whole-body acquisitions without prolonging PET acquisition time or increasing radiation dose. This, to the best of our knowledge, is the first study to demonstrate that simultaneously acquired MR data can be used to estimate and correct for the effects of non-rigid motion in PET. (author)

  17. Effects of high energy (MeV) ion beam irradiation on polyethylene terephthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nandlal; Sharma, Anita; Avasthi, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Irradiation effects of 50 MeV Li 3+ ion beams in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films were studied with respect to their structural and electrical properties by using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ac electrical measurement in the frequency range: 50-100 kHz at different temperatures of 30-150 deg. C. It is found that ac resistivity of PET decreases as frequency increases. The temperature dependencies of dielectric loss tangent exhibit a peak (T g ) at 60 deg. C. The capacitance value of irradiated PET is almost temperature independent and ones increases with an increasing of lithium fluence. FTIR spectra show various bands related to C-H, C-O, C-O-C molecular bonds and groups which get modified or break down due to ion beam irradiation

  18. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew; Finger, Elizabeth; Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John; Pavlosky, William; Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith

    2015-01-01

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  20. Non-invasive monitoring of therapeutic carbon ion beams in a homogeneous phantom by tracking of secondary ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwosch, K.; Hartmann, B.; Jakubek, J.; Granja, C.; Soukup, P.; Jäkel, O.; Martišíková, M.

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy with narrow scanned carbon ion beams enables a highly accurate treatment of tumours while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. Changes in the patient’s geometry can alter the actual ion range in tissue and result in unfavourable changes in the dose distribution. Consequently, it is desired to verify the actual beam delivery within the patient. Real-time and non-invasive measurement methods are preferable. Currently, the only technically feasible method to monitor the delivered dose distribution within the patient is based on tissue activation measurements by means of positron emission tomography (PET). An alternative monitoring method based on tracking of prompt secondary ions leaving a patient irradiated with carbon ion beams has been previously suggested. It is expected to help in overcoming the limitations of the PET-based technique like physiological washout of the beam induced activity, low signal and to allow for real-time measurements. In this paper, measurements of secondary charged particle tracks around a head-sized homogeneous PMMA phantom irradiated with pencil-like carbon ion beams are presented. The investigated energies and beam widths are within the therapeutically used range. The aim of the study is to deduce properties of the primary beam from the distribution of the secondary charged particles. Experiments were performed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany. The directions of secondary charged particles emerging from the PMMA phantom were measured using an arrangement of two parallel pixelated silicon detectors (Timepix). The distribution of the registered particle tracks was analysed to deduce its dependence on clinically important beam parameters: beam range, width and position. Distinct dependencies of the secondary particle tracks on the properties of the primary carbon ion beam were observed. In the particular experimental set-up used, beam range differences of 1.3 mm were detectable. In addition, variations

  1. Spin-orbit beams for optical chirality measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samlan, C. T.; Suna, Rashmi Ranjan; Naik, Dinesh N.; Viswanathan, Nirmal K.

    2018-01-01

    Accurate measurement of chirality is essential for the advancement of natural and pharmaceutical sciences. We report here a method to measure chirality using non-separable states of light with geometric phase-gradient in the circular polarization basis, which we refer to as spin-orbit beams. A modified polarization Sagnac interferometer is used to generate spin-orbit beams wherein the spin and orbital angular momentum of the input Gaussian beam are coupled. The out-of-phase interference between counter-propagating Gaussian beams with orthogonal spin states and lateral-shear or/and linear-phase difference between them results in spin-orbit beams with linear and azimuthal phase gradient. The spin-orbit beams interact efficiently with the chiral medium, inducing a measurable change in the center-of-mass of the beam, using the polarization rotation angle and hence the chirality of the medium are accurately calculated. Tunable dynamic range of measurement and flexibility to introduce large values of orbital angular momentum for the spin-orbit beam, to improve the measurement sensitivity, highlight the techniques' versatility.

  2. Measurement of neutral beam power and beam profile distribution on DNB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhimin; Liu Sheng; Song Shihua; Han Xiaopu; Li Jun; Hu Chundong; Hu Liqun; Xie Jun

    2005-01-01

    The injection power of a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) can be obtained with the thermocouple probe measurement system on the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). With the 49 kv, 6 A, 100 ms pulse charge of an acceleration electrode, a thermocouple probe measurement system with 13 thermocouples crossly distributed on a coppery heat target was used to measure the temperature rise of the target, and the maximum measured temperature rise was 14 degree C. And the neutral beam power of 160 kW and beam profile distribution was obtained by calculation. The total neutral beam power of 130 kW was also obtained by integral calculation with the temperature rise on the heat section board. The difference between the two means was analyzed. The experiment results shows that the method of heat section board with thermocouple probe is one of the effective ways to measure the beam power and beam profile distribution. (authors)

  3. Validating the Patient Experience with Treatment and Self-Management (PETS), a patient-reported measure of treatment burden, in people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth A; Yost, Kathleen J; Rosedahl, Jordan K; Linzer, Mark; Boehm, Deborah H; Thakur, Azra; Poplau, Sara; Anderson, Roger T; Eton, David T

    2017-01-01

    To validate a comprehensive general measure of treatment burden, the Patient Experience with Treatment and Self-Management (PETS), in people with diabetes. We conducted a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey study with 120 people diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and at least one additional chronic illness. Surveys included established patient-reported outcome measures and a 48-item version of the PETS, a new measure comprised of multi-item scales assessing the burden of chronic illness treatment and self-care as it relates to nine domains: medical information, medications, medical appointments, monitoring health, interpersonal challenges, health care expenses, difficulty with health care services, role activity limitations, and physical/mental exhaustion from self-management. Internal reliability of PETS scales was determined using Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was determined through correlation of PETS scores with established measures (measures of chronic condition distress, medication satisfaction, self-efficacy, and global well-being), and known-groups validity through comparisons of PETS scores across clinically distinct groups. In an exploratory test of predictive validity, step-wise regressions were used to determine which PETS scales were most associated with outcomes of chronic condition distress, overall physical and mental health, and medication adherence. Respondents were 37-88 years old, 59% female, 29% non-white, and 67% college-educated. PETS scales showed good reliability (Cronbach's alphas ≥0.74). Higher PETS scale scores (greater treatment burden) were correlated with more chronic condition distress, less medication convenience, lower self-efficacy, and worse general physical and mental health. Participants less (versus more) adherent to medications and those with more (versus fewer) health care financial difficulties had higher mean PETS scores. Medication burden was the scale that was most consistently associated with

  4. Electron-beam induced conduction in some polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuoki, Yasuo; Mizutani, Teruyoshi; Ieda, Masayuki

    1976-01-01

    The charge signal induced by pulsed electron beam consists of two components, i.e. the fast and the slow components. The slow component which corresponds to carrier transport via shallow traps exhibited an asymmetry with respect to the bias field polarity. The asymmetry revealed that the main carriers which drifted via shallow traps were electrons in PET, both electrons and holes in PEN, and holes in PS. TSC spectra of electron-beam induced electrets proved directly the existence of electron shallow traps in PET and both electron and hole traps in PEN. Their trap energies were 0.1 to 0.2 eV. (auth.)

  5. Beam Optics Measurements Through Turn by Turn Beam Position Data in the SLS

    CERN Document Server

    Zisopoulos, P; Streun, A; Ziemann, v

    2013-01-01

    Refined Fourier analysis of turn-by-turn (TBT) transverse position data measurements can be used for determining several beam properties of a ring, such as transverse tunes, optics functions, phases, chromatic properties and coupling. In particular, the Numerical Analysis of Fundamental Frequencies (NAFF) algorithm is used to analyse TBT data from the Swiss Light Source (SLS) storage ring in order to estimate on and off-momentum beam characteristics. Of particular interest is the potential of using the full position information within one turn in order to measure beam optics properties.

  6. Magnetic Field Measurements in Beam Guiding Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Henrichsen, K N

    1998-01-01

    Electromagnets used as beam guiding elements in particle accelerators and colliders require very tight tole-rances on their magnetic fields and on their alignment along the particle path. This article describes the methods and equipment used for magnetic measurements in beam transport magnets. Descriptions are given of magnetic resonance techniques, various induction coil methods, Hall generator measurements, the fluxgate magnetometer as well as the recently developed method of beam based alignment. References of historical nature as well as citations of recent work are given. The present commercial availability of the different sensors and asso-ciated equipment is indicated. Finally we shall try to analyze possible future needs for developments in those fields.

  7. Measurements of pulmonary vascular permeability with PET and gallium-68 transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mintun, M.A.; Dennis, D.R.; Welch, M.J.; Mathias, C.J.; Schuster, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    We quantified pulmonary vascular permeability with positron emission tomography (PET) and gallium-68-( 68 Ga) labeled transferrin. Six dogs with oleic acid-induced lung injury confined to the left lower lobe, two normal human volunteers, and two patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were evaluated. Lung tissue-activity measurements were obtained from sequential 1-5 min PET scans collected over 60 min, after in vivo labeling of transferrin through intravenous administration of [ 68 Ga]citrate. Blood-activity measurements were measured from simultaneously obtained peripheral blood samples. A forward rate constant describing the movement of transferrin from pulmonary vascular to extravascular compartments, the pulmonary transcapillary escape rate (PTCER), was then calculated from these data using a two-compartment model. In dogs, PTCER was 49 +/- 18 in normal lung tissue and 485 +/- 114 10(-4) min-1 in injured lung. A repeat study in these dogs 4 hr later showed no significant change. Values in the human subjects showed similarly marked differences between normal and abnormal lung tissue. We conclude that PET will be a useful method of evaluating vascular permeability changes after acute lung injury

  8. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz; Leiner, Tim; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  9. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and com...

  10. Development of dose delivery verification by PET imaging of photonuclear reactions following high energy photon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janek, S; Svensson, R; Jonsson, C; Brahme, A

    2006-01-01

    A method for dose delivery monitoring after high energy photon therapy has been investigated based on positron emission tomography (PET). The technique is based on the activation of body tissues by high energy bremsstrahlung beams, preferably with energies well above 20 MeV, resulting primarily in 11 C and 15 O but also 13 N, all positron-emitting radionuclides produced by photoneutron reactions in the nuclei of 12 C, 16 O and 14 N. A PMMA phantom and animal tissue, a frozen hind leg of a pig, were irradiated to 10 Gy and the induced positron activity distributions were measured off-line in a PET camera a couple of minutes after irradiation. The accelerator used was a Racetrack Microtron at the Karolinska University Hospital using 50 MV scanned photon beams. From photonuclear cross-section data integrated over the 50 MV photon fluence spectrum the predicted PET signal was calculated and compared with experimental measurements. Since measured PET images change with time post irradiation, as a result of the different decay times of the radionuclides, the signals from activated 12 C, 16 O and 14 N within the irradiated volume could be separated from each other. Most information is obtained from the carbon and oxygen radionuclides which are the most abundant elements in soft tissue. The predicted and measured overall positron activities are almost equal (-3%) while the predicted activity originating from nitrogen is overestimated by almost a factor of two, possibly due to experimental noise. Based on the results obtained in this first feasibility study the great value of a combined radiotherapy-PET-CT unit is indicated in order to fully exploit the high activity signal from oxygen immediately after treatment and to avoid patient repositioning. With an RT-PET-CT unit a high signal could be collected even at a dose level of 2 Gy and the acquisition time for the PET could be reduced considerably. Real patient dose delivery verification by means of PET imaging seems to be

  11. A dedicated tool for PET scanner simulations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, P.G.; Boehlen, T.T.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.P.W.; Ferrari, A.; Mancini, C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Mairani, A.; Sala, Paola R.

    2013-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a well-established medical imaging technique. It is based on the detection of pairs of annihilation gamma rays from a beta+-emitting radionuclide, usually inoculated in the body via a biologically active molecule. Apart from its wide-spread use for clinical diagnosis, new applications are proposed. This includes notably the usage of PET for treatment monitoring of radiation therapy with protons and ions. PET is currently the only available technique for non-invasive monitoring of ion beam dose delivery, which was tested in several clinical pilot studies. For hadrontherapy, the distribution of positron emitters, produced by the ion beam, can be analyzed to verify the correct treatment delivery. The adaptation of previous PET scanners to new environments and the necessity of more precise diagnostics by better image quality triggered the development of new PET scanner designs. The use of Monte Carlo (MC) codes is essential in the early stages of the scanner design to simulate the transport of particles and nuclear interactions from therapeutic ion beams or radioisotopes and to predict radiation fields in tissues and radiation emerging from the patient. In particular, range verification using PET is based on the comparison of detected and simulated activity distributions. The accuracy of the MC code for the relevant physics processes is obviously essential for such applications. In this work we present new developments of the physics models with importance for PET monitoring and integrated tools for PET scanner simulations for FLUKA, a fully-integrated MC particle-transport code, which is widely used for an extended range of applications (accelerator shielding, detector and target design, calorimetry, activation, dosimetry, medical physics, radiobiology, ...). The developed tools include a PET scanner geometry builder and a dedicated scoring routine for coincident event determination. The geometry builder allows the efficient

  12. Application of PET in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Dong Young

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging method that employs radionuclide and tomography techniques. Since 1995, we applied PET not only to the diagnosis of breast cancer but also to the detection of abnormalities in the augmented breast and to the detection of metastasis. Until 2001, we evaluated 242 breast cases by PET at PET center of Seoul National University Hospital. Our group has reported serially at the international journals. In the firtst report, PET showed high sensitivity for detecting breast cancer, both the primary and axillary node metastasis. A total of 27 patients underwent breast operations based on PET results at Seoul National University Hospital from 1995 to 1996. The diagnostic accuracy of PET were 97% for the primary tumor mass and 96% for axillary lymph node metastasis. In case of the breast augmented, PET also showed excellent diagnostic results for primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis where mammography and ultrasound could not diagnose properly. PET also had outstanding results in the detection of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer(sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%, accuracy 89%). In addition, our study gave some evidence that PET could be applied further to evaluate the growth rate of tumors by measuring SUV, and finally to prognosticated the disease. PET could also be applied to evaluate the response after chemotherapy to measure its metabolic rate and size. In conclsion, PET is a highly sensitive, accurate diagnostic tool for breast cancer of primary lesion in various conditions including metastasis

  13. Sensitive beam current measurement for FAIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwickert, Marcus; Kurian, Febin; Reeg, Hansjoerg [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Seidel, Paul; Neubert, Ralf [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany); Geithner, Rene; Vodel, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Institut Jena (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Presently FAIR, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research, entered the final planning phase at GSI. The new accelerator facility requires precise devices for beam current measurements due to the large dynamics in beam intensities for the various synchrotrons, transport lines and storage rings. We report on the actual developments of beam diagnostic devices for the measurement of beam intensities ranging from 5 x 10{sup 11} uranium ions down to the detection of less than 10{sup 4} antiprotons. This contribution gives an overview of the planned instruments with a focus on non-intercepting beam current transformers, and summarizes the on-going development of a cryogenic current comparator.

  14. Beam diagnostics using an emittance measurement device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarstedt, M.; Becker, R.; Klein, H.; Maaser, A.; Mueller, J.; Thomae, R.; Weber, M.

    1995-01-01

    For beam diagnostics aside from Faraday cups for current measurements and analysing magnets for the determination of beam composition and energy the most important tool is an emittance measurement device. With such a system the distribution of the beam particles in phase-space can be determined. This yields information not only on the position of the particles but also on their angle with respect to the beam axis. There are different kinds of emittance measurement devices using either circular holes or slits for separation of part of the beam. The second method (slit-slit measurement), though important for the determination of the rms-emittance, has the disadvantage of integrating over the y- and y'-coordinate (measurement in xx'-plane assumed). This leads to different emittance diagrams than point-point measurements, since in xx'-plane for each two corresponding points of rr'-plane there exists a connecting line. With regard to beam aberrations this makes xx'-emittances harder to interpret. In this paper the two kinds of emittance diagrams are discussed. Additionally the influence of the slit height on the xx'-emittance is considered. The analytical results are compared to experimental measurements in rr'-, rx'- and xx'-phase-space. (orig.)

  15. FDG Dose Extravasations in PET/CT: Frequency and Impact on SUV Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Medhat M.; Muzaffar, Razi; Altinyay, M. Erkan; Teymouri, Cyrus

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Positron emission tomography (PET)/CT with 18F-FDG has proven to be effective in detecting and assessing various types of cancers. However, due to cancer and/or its therapy, intravenous (IV) FDG injection may be problematic resulting in dose extravasations. In the most frequently used field of view (FOV), arms-up, and base of skull to upper thigh [limited whole body (LWB)], the injection site may not be routinely imaged. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of dose extravasations in FDG PET and the potential impact on standard uptake value (SUV) measurements. Methods: True whole body FDG PET/CT scans (including all extremities) of 400 patients were retrospectively reviewed. A log recorded cases of IV dose extravasations. When possible, SUVs were measured in two frequently used reference locations: mediastinum and liver. The SUVs were obtained in the same patients who had studies with and without FDG extravasations within an average of 3 months without interval therapy. Results: Of the 400 scans, 42 (10.5%) had extravasations on the maximum intensity projections images. In scans with or without dose infiltration, FDG injection site was at or distal to the antecubital fossa in 97% of studies. Of those 42 cases, dose infiltration was within the LWB FOV in 29/42 (69%) and outside in the remaining 13/42 (31%). Of those 42 patients, 5 had repeat PET studies with no interval therapy. For those 5 patients, liver maximum SUV was 11.7% less in patients with infiltration than those without (2.22 ± 0.54 vs. 2.48 ± 0.6). Mediastinum SUVmax was 9.3% less in patients with infiltration than those without (1.72 ± 0.54 vs. 1.88 ± 0.49). Conclusion: We conclude dose extravasations were commonly encountered (10.5%) in PET/CT. However, it is underreported by at least 31% due to omitting injection site from the FOV. When present, extravasations may lead to underestimation of SUVmax. Therefore, it should not only be avoided but also reported in order to

  16. FDG dose extravasations in PET/CT: frequency and impact on SUV measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medhat M Osman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: PET/CT with 18F-FDG has proven to be effective in detecting and assessing various types of cancers. However, due to cancer and/or its therapy, intravenous (IV FDG injection may be problematic resulting in dose extravasations. In the most frequently used field of view (FOV, arms-up and base of skull to upper-thigh (limited Whole Body (LWB, the injection site may not be routinely imaged. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of dose extravasations in FDG PET and the potential impact on SUV measurements.Methods: True Whole Body (TWB FDG-PET/CT scans (including all extremities of 400 patients were retrospectively reviewed. A log recorded cases of IV dose extravasations. When possible, SUVs were measured in two frequently used reference locations: mediastinum and liver. The SUVs were obtained in the same patients who had studies with and without FDG extravasations within an average of 3 months without interval therapy.Results: Of the 400 scans, 42 (10.5% had extravasations on the maximum intensity projections (MIP images. In scans with or without dose infiltration, FDG injection site was at or distal to the antecubital fossa in 97% of studies. Of those 42 cases, dose infiltration was within the LWB FOV in 29/42 (69% and outside in the remaining 13/42 (31%. Of those 42 patients, 5 had repeat PET studies with no interval therapy. For those 5 patients, liver maximum SUV was 11.7% less in patients with infiltration than those without (2.22 ± 0.54 vs. 2.48 ± 0.6. Mediastinum SUVmax was 9.3% less in patients with infiltration than those without (1.72 ± 0.54 vs. 1.88 ± 0.49.Conclusion: We conclude dose extravasations were commonly encountered (10.5% in PET/CT. However, it is underreported by at least 31% due to omitting injection site from the FOV. When present, extravasations may lead to underestimation of SUVmax. Therefore, it should not only be avoided but also reported in order to avoid false interpretations of the exam.

  17. Beam profile measurements on RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, R.; Michnoff, R.; Moore, T.; Shea, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2000-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab was commissioned during the summer of 1999. Transverse beam profiles on RHIC are measured with ionization profile monitors (IPMs). An IPM measures beam profiles by collecting the electrons liberated by residual gas ionization by the beam. The detector is placed in the gap of a dipole magnet to force the electrons to travel in straight lines from the beamline center to the collector. One IPM was tested and it measured the profiles of a single gold bunch containing 10 8 ions on consecutive turns. We show an example of one of these profiles giving transverse emittance. Also several profiles are combined into a mountain-range plot which shows betatron oscillations at injection

  18. Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Using fMRI and PET: A Cross-Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean J. Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aspect of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is the study of brain hemodynamics, and MR arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion imaging has gained wide acceptance as a robust and noninvasive technique. However, the cerebral blood flow (CBF measurements obtained with ASL fMRI have not been fully validated, particularly during global CBF modulations. We present a comparison of cerebral blood flow changes (ΔCBF measured using a flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR ASL perfusion method to those obtained using H2O15 PET, which is the current gold standard for in vivo imaging of CBF. To study regional and global CBF changes, a group of 10 healthy volunteers were imaged under identical experimental conditions during presentation of 5 levels of visual stimulation and one level of hypercapnia. The CBF changes were compared using 3 types of region-of-interest (ROI masks. FAIR measurements of CBF changes were found to be slightly lower than those measured with PET (average ΔCBF of 21.5±8.2% for FAIR versus 28.2±12.8% for PET at maximum stimulation intensity. Nonetheless, there was a strong correlation between measurements of the two modalities. Finally, a t-test comparison of the slopes of the linear fits of PET versus ASL ΔCBF for all 3 ROI types indicated no significant difference from unity (P>.05.

  19. Beam based measurement of beam position monitor electrode gains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Rubin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Low emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR test accelerator depends on precision measurement of vertical dispersion and transverse coupling. The CESR beam position monitors (BPMs consist of four button electrodes, instrumented with electronics that allow acquisition of turn-by-turn data. The response to the beam will vary among the four electrodes due to differences in electronic gain and/or misalignment. This variation in the response of the BPM electrodes will couple real horizontal offset to apparent vertical position, and introduce spurious measurements of coupling and vertical dispersion. To alleviate this systematic effect, a beam based technique to measure the relative response of the four electrodes has been developed. With typical CESR parameters, simulations show that turn-by-turn BPM data can be used to determine electrode gains to within ∼0.1%.

  20. Beam based measurement of beam position monitor electrode gains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D. L.; Billing, M.; Meller, R.; Palmer, M.; Rendina, M.; Rider, N.; Sagan, D.; Shanks, J.; Strohman, C.

    2010-09-01

    Low emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) test accelerator depends on precision measurement of vertical dispersion and transverse coupling. The CESR beam position monitors (BPMs) consist of four button electrodes, instrumented with electronics that allow acquisition of turn-by-turn data. The response to the beam will vary among the four electrodes due to differences in electronic gain and/or misalignment. This variation in the response of the BPM electrodes will couple real horizontal offset to apparent vertical position, and introduce spurious measurements of coupling and vertical dispersion. To alleviate this systematic effect, a beam based technique to measure the relative response of the four electrodes has been developed. With typical CESR parameters, simulations show that turn-by-turn BPM data can be used to determine electrode gains to within ˜0.1%.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of second-generation open-type PET ''single-ring OpenPET'' implemented with DOI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashima, Hideaki; Yamaya, Taiga; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouch, Shoko; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Eiichi

    2013-01-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, we are developing OpenPET, an open-type positron emission tomography (PET) geometry with a physically open space, which allows easy access to the patient during PET studies. Our first-generation OpenPET system, dual-ring OpenPET, which consisted of two detector rings, could provide an extended axial field of view (FOV) including the open space. However, for applications such as in-beam PET to monitor the dose distribution in situ during particle therapy, higher sensitivity concentrated on the irradiation field is required rather than a wide FOV. In this report, we propose a second-generation OpenPET geometry, single-ring OpenPET, which can efficiently improve sensitivity while providing the required open space. When the proposed geometry was realized with block detectors, position-dependent degradation of the spatial resolution was expected because it was necessary to arrange the detector blocks in ellipsoidal rings stacked and shifted relative to one another. However, we found by Monte Carlo simulation that the use of depth-of-interaction (DOI) detectors made it feasible to achieve uniform spatial resolution in the FOV. (author)

  2. Simultaneous PET/MRI with (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Adam E; Andersen, Flemming L; Henriksen, Sarah T; Vignaud, Alexandre; Ardenkjaer-Larsen, Jan H; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas; Klausen, Thomas L

    2016-12-01

    Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ((13)C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous (1)H-MRI and PET but never for (13)C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Combined PET and (13)C-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [(18)F]-FDG phantom, (13)C-acetate and (13)C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or (13)C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET trues; and (13)C-MRSI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for urea and acetate phantoms. Differences between measurement conditions were evaluated using t tests. PET and (13)C-MRSI data acquisition could be performed simultaneously without any discernible artifacts. The average difference in PET activity between acquisitions with and without simultaneous (13)C-MRSI was 0.83 (largest sphere) and -0.76 % (background). The average difference in net trues was -0.01 %. The average difference in (13)C-MRSI SNR between acquisitions with and without simultaneous PET ranged from -2.28 to 1.21 % for all phantoms and measurement conditions. No differences were significant. The system was capable of (13)C-MRSI of hyperpolarized (13)C-pyruvate. Simultaneous PET and (13)C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is feasible. Phantom experiments showed that possible interference effects introduced by acquiring data from the two modalities simultaneously are small and non-significant. Further experiments can now investigate the benefits of simultaneous PET and

  3. Hybrid FDG-PET/MR compared to FDG-PET/CT in adult lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Wendy; Catana, Ciprian; Abramson, Jeremy S; Arabasz, Grae; McDermott, Shanaugh; Catalano, Onofrio; Muse, Victorine; Blake, Michael A; Barnes, Jeffrey; Shelly, Martin; Hochberg, Ephraim; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of simultaneous FDG-PET/MR including diffusion compared to FDG-PET/CT in patients with lymphoma. Eighteen patients with a confirmed diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's (NHL) or Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) underwent an IRB-approved, single-injection/dual-imaging protocol consisting of a clinical FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MR scan. PET images from both modalities were reconstructed iteratively. Attenuation correction was performed using low-dose CT data for PET/CT and Dixon-MR sequences for PET/MR. Diffusion-weighted imaging was performed. SUVmax was measured and compared between modalities and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) using ROI analysis by an experienced radiologist using OsiriX. Strength of correlation between variables was measured using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r p). Of the 18 patients included in this study, 5 had HL and 13 had NHL. The median age was 51 ± 14.8 years. Sixty-five FDG-avid lesions were identified. All FDG-avid lesions were visible with comparable contrast, and therefore initial and follow-up staging was identical between both examinations. SUVmax from FDG-PET/MR [(mean ± sem) (21.3 ± 2.07)] vs. FDG-PET/CT (mean 23.2 ± 2.8) demonstrated a strongly positive correlation [r s = 0.95 (0.94, 0.99); p < 0.0001]. There was no correlation found between ADCmin and SUVmax from FDG-PET/MR [r = 0.17(-0.07, 0.66); p = 0.09]. FDG-PET/MR offers an equivalent whole-body staging examination as compared with PET/CT with an improved radiation safety profile in lymphoma patients. Correlation of ADC to SUVmax was weak, understating their lack of equivalence, but not undermining their potential synergy and differing importance.

  4. Specialized beam diagnostic measurements for an ADTT accelerator funnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1995-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has proposed several CW-proton-beam facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies (ADTT) with beam-current densities greater than 5 mA/mm{sup 2}. The primary beam-diagnostics-instrumentation requirement for these facilities is to provide sufficient beam information to understand and minimize beam-loss. To accomplish this task, the beam diagnostics instrumentation must measure beam parameters such as the projected centroids and profiles, total integrated current, and particle loss. Because of the high specific energy loss in materials at beam energies less than 20 MeV, interceptive measurements such as wire scanners or fluors cannot be used to determine beam profiles or centroids. Therefore, noninterceptive techniques must be used for on-line diagnosis of high-intensity CW beam at low energies. The beam funnel area of these proposed accelerator facilities provide a particular interesting beam measurement challenge. In this area of the accelerator, beam measurements must also sense how well the two funnel-input-beams are matched to each other in phase space. This paper will discuss some of the measurement requirements for these proposed accelerator facilities and the various noninterceptive techniques to measure dual-beam funnel operation.

  5. Beam Shaping for CARS Measurements in Turbulent Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique to mitigate the effect of beam steering on CARS measurements in turbulent, variable density environments. The new approach combines Planar BOXCARS phase-matching with elliptical shaping of one of the beams to generate a signal insensitive to beam steering, while keeping the same spatial resolution. Numerical and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. One set of experiments investigated the effect of beam shaping in the presence of a controlled and well quantified displacement of the beams at the focal plane. Another set of experiments, more qualitative, proved the effectiveness of the technique in the presence of severe beam steering due to turbulence.

  6. (18) F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: (18) F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. AIM: To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part...... planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET......% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. CONCLUSION: Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change...

  7. Particle Accelerators for PET radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost-effectively achie......The requirements set for particle accelerators for production of radioactive isotopes for PET can easily be derived from first principles. The simple general need is for proton beams with energy in the region 10–20 MeV and current 20–100 microAmps. This is most reliably and cost......-effectively achieved by the well proven technology of the compact medical cyclotron, presently available from several companies. The main features of these cyclotrons are essential similar: resistive, sector focused iron magnets, internal negative ion sources and stripping extraction. The remaining differences between...... different manufacturers will be discussed the light of what is actually needed for a given PET site operation. Alternatives to the conventional cyclotron have been proposed and tested but have at present very limited use. These alternatives will be discussed, as well as the future possibilities of supplying...

  8. Evaluation of the PET component of simultaneous [18F]choline PET/MRI in prostate cancer: comparison with [18F]choline PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetter, Axel; Lipponer, Christine; Nensa, Felix; Altenbernd, Jens-Christian; Schlosser, Thomas; Lauenstein, Thomas; Heusch, Philipp; Ruebben, Herbert; Bockisch, Andreas; Poeppel, Thorsten; Nagarajah, James

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the positron emission tomography (PET) component of [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI and compare it with the PET component of [ 18 F]choline PET/CT in patients with histologically proven prostate cancer and suspected recurrent prostate cancer. Thirty-six patients were examined with simultaneous [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI following combined [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Fifty-eight PET-positive lesions in PET/CT and PET/MRI were evaluated by measuring the maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) using volume of interest (VOI) analysis. A scoring system was applied to determine the quality of the PET images of both PET/CT and PET/MRI. Agreement between PET/CT and PET/MRI regarding SUV max and SUV mean was tested using Pearson's product-moment correlation and Bland-Altman analysis. All PET-positive lesions that were visible on PET/CT were also detectable on PET/MRI. The quality of the PET images was comparable in both groups. Median SUV max and SUV mean of all lesions were significantly lower in PET/MRI than in PET/CT (5.2 vs 6.1, p max of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.86, p mean of PET/CT and PET/MRI (R = 0.81, p max of PET/CT vs PET/MRI and -1.12 to +2.23 between SUV mean of PET/CT vs PET/MRI. PET image quality of PET/MRI was comparable to that of PET/CT. A highly significant correlation between SUV max and SUV mean was found. Both SUV max and SUV mean were significantly lower in [ 18 F]choline PET/MRI than in [ 18 F]choline PET/CT. Differences of SUV max and SUV mean might be caused by different techniques of attenuation correction. Furthermore, differences in biodistribution and biokinetics of [ 18 F]choline between the subsequent examinations and in the respective organ systems have to be taken into account. (orig.)

  9. Electron beam water calorimetry measurements to obtain beam quality conversion factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Bryan R; Cojocaru, Claudiu D; McEwen, Malcolm R; Ross, Carl K

    2017-10-01

    To provide results of water calorimetry and ion chamber measurements in high-energy electron beams carried out at the National Research Council Canada (NRC). There are three main aspects to this work: (a) investigation of the behavior of ionization chambers in electron beams of different energies with focus on long-term stability, (b) water calorimetry measurements to determine absorbed dose to water in high-energy beams for direct calibration of ion chambers, and (c) using measurements of chamber response relative to reference ion chambers, determination of beam quality conversion factors, k Q , for several ion chamber types. Measurements are made in electron beams with energies between 8 MeV and 22 MeV from the NRC Elekta Precise clinical linear accelerator. Ion chamber measurements are made as a function of depth for cylindrical and plane-parallel ion chambers over a period of five years to investigate the stability of ion chamber response and for indirect calibration. Water calorimetry measurements are made in 18 MeV and 22 MeV beams. An insulated enclosure with fine temperature control is used to maintain a constant temperature (drifts less than 0.1 mK/min) of the calorimeter phantom at 4°C to minimize effects from convection. Two vessels of different designs are used with calibrated thermistor probes to measure radiation induced temperature rise. The vessels are filled with high-purity water and saturated with H 2 or N 2 gas to minimize the effect of radiochemical reactions on the measured temperature rise. A set of secondary standard ion chambers are calibrated directly against the calorimeter. Finally, several other ion chambers are calibrated in the NRC 60 Co reference field and then cross-calibrated against the secondary standard chambers in electron beams to realize k Q factors. The long-term stability of the cylindrical ion chambers in electron beams is better (always <0.15%) than plane-parallel chambers (0.2% to 0.4%). Calorimetry measurements

  10. Simultaneous measurement of FDG-PET and NAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musha, Toshimitsu; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Ishii, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    NAT (Neuronal Activity Topography), which has been developed by the Brain Functions Lab., Inc., displays on the standard brain surface locations of hyperactive and hyperactive neuronal activities, and this result is compared with locations of enhanced and suppressed glucose metabolism which were measured with fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for three AD patients. Locations with enhanced glucose metabolism are approximately overlap areas with enhanced neuronal activities. (author)

  11. Laser beam complex amplitude measurement by phase diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Védrenne, Nicolas; Mugnier, Laurent M; Michau, Vincent; Velluet, Marie-Thérèse; Bierent, Rudolph

    2014-02-24

    The control of the optical quality of a laser beam requires a complex amplitude measurement able to deal with strong modulus variations and potentially highly perturbed wavefronts. The method proposed here consists in an extension of phase diversity to complex amplitude measurements that is effective for highly perturbed beams. Named camelot for Complex Amplitude MEasurement by a Likelihood Optimization Tool, it relies on the acquisition and processing of few images of the beam section taken along the optical path. The complex amplitude of the beam is retrieved from the images by the minimization of a Maximum a Posteriori error metric between the images and a model of the beam propagation. The analytical formalism of the method and its experimental validation are presented. The modulus of the beam is compared to a measurement of the beam profile, the phase of the beam is compared to a conventional phase diversity estimate. The precision of the experimental measurements is investigated by numerical simulations.

  12. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael V; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R; Wong, Karen J; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L; Jagoda, Elaine M

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (-)). All animals were injected with [ 18 F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R 2 >0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. PET measured evoked cerebral blood flow responses in an awake monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Lich, L.L.; Margenau, W.; Buchholz, S.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed a method to measure task-related regional cerebral blood flow (BF) responses in an awake, trained monkey using positron emission tomography (PET) and H215O. We trained an animal with operant conditioning using only positive reinforcement to climb unassisted into a modified primate chair that was then positioned in the PET scanner. A special headholder and acrylic skull cap permitted precise placement and accurate repositioning. We measured BF qualitatively with bolus injection of H215O and 40-s scan. Each session included scans at rest interposed with scans during vibration of a forepaw. Regional responses were identified using subtraction image analysis. After global normalization, a resting image was subtracted on a pixel-by-pixel basis from a comparable image collected during vibration. The region of peak response occurred in contralateral sensorimotor cortex with a mean magnitude of 11.6% (+/- 3.2%) of the global mean value for 10 separate experiments, significantly greater than the mean qualitative BF change (0.4 +/- 3.6%; p less than 0.00001) in the same region for seven rest-rest pairs. This newly developed technique forms the basis for a wide variety of experiments

  14. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 07: Monte Carlo Simulation of Primary Dose and PET Isotope Production for the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, C; Jirasek, A [University of Victoria (Australia); Blackmore, E; Hoehr, C; Schaffer, P; Trinczek, M [TRIUMF (Canada); Sossi, V [University of British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Uveal melanoma is a rare and deadly tumour of the eye with primary metastases in the liver resulting in an 8% 2-year survival rate upon detection. Large growths, or those in close proximity to the optic nerve, pose a particular challenge to the commonly employed eye-sparing technique of eye-plaque brachytherapy. In these cases external beam charged particle therapy offers improved odds in avoiding catastrophic side effects such as neuropathy or blindness. Since 1995, the British Columbia Cancer Agency in partnership with the TRIUMF national laboratory have offered proton therapy in the treatment of difficult ocular tumors. Having seen 175 patients, yielding 80% globe preservation and 82% metastasis free survival as of 2010, this modality has proven to be highly effective. Despite this success, there have been few studies into the use of the world's largest cyclotron in patient care. Here we describe first efforts of modeling the TRIUMF dose delivery system using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. Details on geometry, estimating beam parameters, measurement of primary dose and simulation of PET isotope production are discussed. Proton depth dose in both modulated and pristine beams is successfully simulated to sub-millimeter precision in range (within limits of measurement) and 2% agreement to measurement within in a treatment volume. With the goal of using PET signals for in vivo dosimetry (alignment), a first look at PET isotope depth distribution is presented — comparing favourably to a naive method of approximating simulated PET slice activity in a Lucite phantom.

  15. Effect of motion-induced PET-CT misalignment on cardiac function and myocardial blood flow measured using dynamic 15O-water PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubberink, Mark; Ebrahimi, M; Harms, Hans

    -CT misalignment on MBF, transmural MBF (MBFt), perfusable tissue fraction (PTF), cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV) and left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) based on dynamic 15O-water scans. Methods: 10 patients underwent 6 min PET scans after injection of 400 MBq 15O-water at rest and during adenosine......Aim: Motion-induced PET-CT misalignment artifacts are common in myocardial blood flow (MBF) measurements with 82Rb and 13N-ammonia. For 15O-water, MBF is based on the clearance rate rather than uptake of the tracer. The clearance rate is determined by the shape of the time-activity curve, not its...... amplitude, and is thus not affected by attenuation correction errors. Hence, misalignment is hypothesized not to affect 15O-water-based MBF to any large extent, but it may affect cardiac function measures derived from 15O-water scans. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of PET...

  16. Plasma fluctuation measurements in tokamaks using beam-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Duperrex, P.A.; Paul, S.F.

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency observations of light emitted from the interactions between plasma ions and injected neutral beam atoms allow the measurement of moderate-wavelength fluctuations in plasma and impurity ion densities. To detect turbulence in the local plasma ion density, the collisionally excited fluorescence from a neutral beam is measured either separately at several spatial points or with a multichannel imaging detector. Similarly, the role of impurity ion density fluctuations is measured using charge exchange recombination excited transitions emitted by the ion species of interest. This technique can access the relatively unexplored region of long-wavelength plasma turbulence with k perpendicular ρ i much-lt 1, and hence complements measurements from scattering experiments. Optimization of neutral beam geometry and optical sightlines can result in very good localization and resolution (Δx≤1 cm) in the hot plasma core region. The detectable fluctuation level is determined by photon statistics, atomic excitation processes, and beam stability, but can be as low as 0.2% in a 100 kHz bandwidth over the 0--1 MHz frequency range. The choices of beam species (e.g., H 0 , He 0 , etc.), observed transition (e.g., H α , L α , He I singlet or triplet transitions, C VI Δn=1, etc.) are dictated by experiment-specific factors such as optical access, flexibility of beam operation, plasma conditions, and detailed experimental goals. Initial tests on the PBX-M tokamak using the H α emissions from a heating neutral beam show low-frequency turbulence in the edge plasma region

  17. Liver kinetics of glucose analogs measured in pigs by PET: importance of dual-input blood sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, O L; Bass, L; Roelsgaard, K

    2001-01-01

    -input functions were very similar. CONCLUSION: Compartmental analysis of MG and FDG kinetics using dynamic PET data requires measurements of dual-input activity concentrations. Using the dual-input function, physiologically reasonable parameter estimates of K1, k2, and Vp were obtained, whereas the use......Metabolic processes studied by PET are quantified traditionally using compartmental models, which relate the time course of the tracer concentration in tissue to that in arterial blood. For liver studies, the use of arterial input may, however, cause systematic errors to the estimated kinetic...... parameters, because of ignorance of the dual blood supply from the hepatic artery and the portal vein to the liver. METHODS: Six pigs underwent PET after [15O]carbon monoxide inhalation, 3-O-[11C]methylglucose (MG) injection, and [18F]FDG injection. For the glucose scans, PET data were acquired for 90 min...

  18. Measured PET Data Characterization with the Negative Binomial Distribution Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarelli, Maria Filomena; Positano, Vincenzo; Landini, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate statistical model of PET measurements is a prerequisite for a correct image reconstruction when using statistical image reconstruction algorithms, or when pre-filtering operations must be performed. Although radioactive decay follows a Poisson distribution, deviation from Poisson statistics occurs on projection data prior to reconstruction due to physical effects, measurement errors, correction of scatter and random coincidences. Modelling projection data can aid in understanding the statistical nature of the data in order to develop efficient processing methods and to reduce noise. This paper outlines the statistical behaviour of measured emission data evaluating the goodness of fit of the negative binomial (NB) distribution model to PET data for a wide range of emission activity values. An NB distribution model is characterized by the mean of the data and the dispersion parameter α that describes the deviation from Poisson statistics. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate: (a) the performances of the dispersion parameter α estimator, (b) the goodness of fit of the NB model for a wide range of activity values. We focused on the effect produced by correction for random and scatter events in the projection (sinogram) domain, due to their importance in quantitative analysis of PET data. The analysis developed herein allowed us to assess the accuracy of the NB distribution model to fit corrected sinogram data, and to evaluate the sensitivity of the dispersion parameter α to quantify deviation from Poisson statistics. By the sinogram ROI-based analysis, it was demonstrated that deviation on the measured data from Poisson statistics can be quantitatively characterized by the dispersion parameter α, in any noise conditions and corrections.

  19. Auditory cortical activation and plasticity after cochlear implantation measured by PET using fluorodeoxyglucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukaszewicz-Moszyńska, Zuzanna; Lachowska, Magdalena; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible relationships between duration of cochlear implant use and results of positron emission tomography (PET) measurements in the temporal lobes performed while subjects listened to speech stimuli. Other aspects investigated were whether implantation side impacts significantly on cortical representations of functions related to understanding speech (ipsi- or contralateral to the implanted side) and whether any correlation exists between cortical activation and speech therapy results. Objective cortical responses to acoustic stimulation were measured, using PET, in nine cochlear implant patients (age range: 15 to 50 years). All the patients suffered from bilateral deafness, were right-handed, and had no additional neurological deficits. They underwent PET imaging three times: immediately after the first fitting of the speech processor (activation of the cochlear implant), and one and two years later. A tendency towards increasing levels of activation in areas of the primary and secondary auditory cortex on the left side of the brain was observed. There was no clear effect of the side of implantation (left or right) on the degree of cortical activation in the temporal lobe. However, the PET results showed a correlation between degree of cortical activation and speech therapy results.

  20. Overview of LHC Beam Loss Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Effinger, E; Emery, J; Fadakis, E; Holzer, E B; Jackson, S; Kruk, G; Kurfuerst, C; Marsili, A; Misiowiec, M; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Priebe, A; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M; Zamantzas, C; Grishin, V; Griesmayer, E

    2011-01-01

    The LHC beam loss monitoring system provides measurements with an update rate of 1 Hz and high time resolution data by event triggering. These informations are used for the initiation of beam aborts, fixed displays and the off line analysis. The analysis of fast and localized loss events resulted in the determination of its rate, duration, peak amplitudes, its scaling with intensity, number of bunches and beam energy. The calibration of the secondary shower beam loss signal in respect to the needed beam energy deposition to quench the magnet coil is addressed at 450GeV and 3.5T eV . The adjustment of collimators is checked my measuring the loss pattern and its variation in the collimation regions of the LHC. Loss pattern changes during a fill allow the observation of non typical fill parameters.

  1. Monitoring proton radiation therapy with in-room PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xuping; Ouyang Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges; Espana, Samuel; Daartz, Juliane; Liebsch, Norbert; Paganetti, Harald; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    We used a mobile positron emission tomography (PET) scanner positioned within the proton therapy treatment room to study the feasibility of proton range verification with an in-room, stand-alone PET system, and compared with off-line equivalent studies. Two subjects with adenoid cystic carcinoma were enrolled into a pilot study in which in-room PET scans were acquired in list-mode after a routine fractionated treatment session. The list-mode PET data were reconstructed with different time schemes to generate in-room short, in-room long and off-line equivalent (by skipping coincidences from the first 15 min during the list-mode reconstruction) PET images for comparison in activity distribution patterns. A phantom study was followed to evaluate the accuracy of range verification for different reconstruction time schemes quantitatively. The in-room PET has a higher sensitivity compared to the off-line modality so that the PET acquisition time can be greatly reduced from 30 to 15 O component and lower biological washout. For soft tissue-equivalent material, the distal fall-off edge of an in-room short acquisition is deeper compared to an off-line equivalent scan, indicating a better coverage of the high-dose end of the beam. In-room PET is a promising low cost, high sensitivity modality for the in vivo verification of proton therapy. Better accuracy in Monte Carlo predictions, especially for biological decay modeling, is necessary.

  2. LINAC4 low energy beam measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hein, L M; Lallement, J B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Posocco, P; Scrivens, R

    2012-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting linear accelerator for negative Hydrogen ions (H−), which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac (Linac2) as linear injector for the CERN accelerators. The low energy part, comprising a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport system (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) is being assembled in a dedicated test stand for pre-commissioning with a proton beam. During 2011 extensive measurements were done after the source and after the LEBT with the aim of preparing the RFQ commissioning and validating the simulation tools, indispensable for future source upgrades. The measurements have been thoroughly simulated with a multi-particle code, including 2D magnetic field maps, error studies, steering studies and the generation of beam distribution from measurements. Emittance, acceptance and transmission measurements will be presented and compared to the results of the simulations.

  3. Emittance Measurements For Future LHC Beams Using The PS Booster Measurement Line

    CERN Document Server

    Abelleira, Jose; Mikulec, Bettina; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The CERN PS Booster measurement line contains three pairs of SEM grids separated by drift space that measures the beam size in both planes. The combined analysis of these grids allows calculating a value for the transverse beam emittances. The precision of such a measurement depends on the ratio of RMS beam size and wire spacing. Within the LIU-PSB upgrade the extraction kinetic energy of the PSB will be increased from the current 1.4 GeV to 2.0 GeV. This will result in smaller transverse beam sizes for some of the future beams. The present layout of the transverse emittance measurement line is reviewed to verify if it will satisfy future requirements.

  4. DoPET: an in-treatment monitoring system for proton therapy at 62 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, V.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Collini, F.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Milluzzo, G.; Morrocchi, M.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.

    2016-12-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is highly effective in treating cancer thanks to its conformal dose deposition. This superior capability in dose deposition has led to a massive growth of the treated patients around the world, raising the need of treatment monitoring systems. An in-treatment PET system, DoPET, was constructed and tested at CATANA beam-line, LNS-INFN in Catania, where 62 MeV protons are used to treat ocular melanoma. The PET technique profits from the beta+ emitters generated by the proton beam in the irradiated body, mainly 15-O and 11-C. The current DoPET prototype consists of two planar 15 cm × 15 cm LYSO-based detector heads. With respect to the previous versions, the system was enlarged and the DAQ up-graded during the years so now also anthropomorphic phantoms, can be fitted within the field of view of the system. To demonstrate the capability of DoPET to detect changes in the delivered treatment plan with respect to the planned one, various treatment plans were used delivering a standard 15 Gy fraction to an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were acquired during and after the treatment delivery up to 10 minutes. When the in-treatment phase was long enough (more than 1 minute), the corresponding activated volume was visible just after the treatment delivery, even if in presence of a noisy background. The after-treatment data, acquired for about 9 minutes, were segmented finding that few minutes are enough to be able to detect changes. These experiments will be presented together with the studies performed with PMMA phantoms where the DoPET response was characterized in terms of different dose rates and in presence of range shifters: the system response is linear up to 16.9 Gy/min and has the ability to see a 1 millimeter range shifter.

  5. DoPET: an in-treatment monitoring system for proton therapy at 62 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, V.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Guerra, A. Del; Morrocchi, M.; Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Milluzzo, G.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Collini, F.

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is highly effective in treating cancer thanks to its conformal dose deposition. This superior capability in dose deposition has led to a massive growth of the treated patients around the world, raising the need of treatment monitoring systems. An in-treatment PET system, DoPET, was constructed and tested at CATANA beam-line, LNS-INFN in Catania, where 62 MeV protons are used to treat ocular melanoma. The PET technique profits from the beta+ emitters generated by the proton beam in the irradiated body, mainly 15-O and 11-C. The current DoPET prototype consists of two planar 15 cm × 15 cm LYSO-based detector heads. With respect to the previous versions, the system was enlarged and the DAQ up-graded during the years so now also anthropomorphic phantoms, can be fitted within the field of view of the system. To demonstrate the capability of DoPET to detect changes in the delivered treatment plan with respect to the planned one, various treatment plans were used delivering a standard 15 Gy fraction to an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were acquired during and after the treatment delivery up to 10 minutes. When the in-treatment phase was long enough (more than 1 minute), the corresponding activated volume was visible just after the treatment delivery, even if in presence of a noisy background. The after-treatment data, acquired for about 9 minutes, were segmented finding that few minutes are enough to be able to detect changes. These experiments will be presented together with the studies performed with PMMA phantoms where the DoPET response was characterized in terms of different dose rates and in presence of range shifters: the system response is linear up to 16.9 Gy/min and has the ability to see a 1 millimeter range shifter.

  6. 18 F-FDG PET/CT for planning external beam radiotherapy alters therapy in 11% of 581 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk Christensen, Charlotte; Loft-Jakobsen, Annika; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Højgaard, Liselotte; Roed, Henrik; Berthelsen, Anne K

    2018-03-01

    18 F-FDG PET/CT (FDG PET/CT) used in radiotherapy planning for extra-cerebral malignancy may reveal metastases to distant sites that may affect the choice of therapy. To investigate the role of FDG PET/CT on treatment strategy changes induced by the use of PET/CT as part of the radiotherapy planning. 'A major change of treatment strategy' was defined as either including more lesions in the gross tumour volume (GTV) distant from the primary tumour or a change in treatment modalities. The study includes 581 consecutive patients who underwent an FDG PET/CT scan for radiotherapy planning in our institution in the year 2008. All PET/CT scans were performed with the patient in treatment position with the use of immobilization devices according to the intended radiotherapy treatment. All scans were evaluated by a nuclear medicine physician together with a radiologist to delineate PET-positive GTV (GTV-PET). For 63 of the patients (11%), the PET/CT simulation scans resulted in a major change in treatment strategy because of the additional diagnostic information. Changes were most frequently observed in patients with lung cancer (20%) or upper gastrointestinal cancer (12%). In 65% of the patients for whom the PET/CT simulation scan revealed unexpected dissemination, radiotherapy was given - changed (n = 38) or unchanged (n = 13) according to the findings on the FDG PET/CT. Unexpected dissemination on the FDG PET/CT scanning performed for radiotherapy planning caused a change in treatment strategy in 11% of 581 patients. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  8. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-01-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D y is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10 10 particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 μm horizontally and 0.55 μm vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H D of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit

  9. Enhancing ejection fraction measurement through 4D respiratory motion compensation in cardiac PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Wang, Xinhui; Gao, Xiangzhen; Segars, W. Paul; Lodge, Martin A.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    ECG gated cardiac PET imaging measures functional parameters such as left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction (EF), providing diagnostic and prognostic information for management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Respiratory motion degrades spatial resolution and affects the accuracy in measuring the LV volumes for EF calculation. The goal of this study is to systematically investigate the effect of respiratory motion correction on the estimation of end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV), and EF, especially on the separation of normal and abnormal EFs. We developed a respiratory motion incorporated 4D PET image reconstruction technique which uses all gated-frame data to acquire a motion-suppressed image. Using the standard XCAT phantom and two individual-specific volunteer XCAT phantoms, we simulated dual-gated myocardial perfusion imaging data for normally and abnormally beating hearts. With and without respiratory motion correction, we measured the EDV, ESV, and EF from the cardiac-gated reconstructed images. For all the phantoms, the estimated volumes increased and the biases significantly reduced with motion correction compared with those without. Furthermore, the improvement of ESV measurement in the abnormally beating heart led to better separation of normal and abnormal EFs. The simulation study demonstrated the significant effect of respiratory motion correction on cardiac imaging data with motion amplitude as small as 0.7 cm. The larger the motion amplitude the more improvement respiratory motion correction brought about on the EF measurement. Using data-driven respiratory gating, we also demonstrated the effect of respiratory motion correction on estimating the above functional parameters from list mode patient data. Respiratory motion correction has been shown to improve the accuracy of EF measurement in clinical cardiac PET imaging.

  10. Luminosity measurement and beam condition monitoring at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The BRIL system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. In expectation of higher luminosity and denser proton bunch spacing during LHC Run II, many of the BRIL subsystems are being upgraded and others are being added to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) will deliver an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. Data from each of the subsystems will be collected and combined in the BRIL DAQ framework, which will publish it to CMS and LHC. The current status of installation and commissioning results for the BRIL subsystems are given.

  11. PET in cerebrovascular disease; PET bei zerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herholz, K. [Neurologische Universitaetsklinik der Univ. Koeln (Germany)]|[Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Koeln (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Tissue viability is of particular interest in acute cerebral ischemia because it may be preserved if reperfusion can be achieved rapidly, e.g. by acute thrombolysis. Measurements of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen consumption by PET can assess tissue viability, and they have substantially increased our knowledge of th pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the associated penumbra. Widerspread clinical application in acute stroke, however, is unlikely because of the large logistic and personnel resources required. In chronic cerebrovascular disease, measurement of regional CBF and glucose metabolism, which is usually coupled, provide detailed insights in disturbance of cortical function, e.g. due to deafferentiation, and contribute to differentiation of dementia types. Chronic misery perfusion, i.e. reduced perfusion that does not match the metabolic demand of the tissue, can be demonstrated by PET. It may be found in some patients with high-grade arterial stenoses. Less severe impairment of brain perfusion can be demonstrated by measurement of the cerebrovascular reserve capacity. The most frequent clinical situations can be assessed by less demanding procedures, e.g. by SPECT. In conclusion, PET has its role in cerebrovascular disease primarily within scientific studies, where high resolution and absolute quantitation of physiological variables are essential. (orig.). 65 refs. [Deutsch] Beim akuten ischaemischen Insult ist die Vitalitaet des Gewebes von besonderem Interesse, da sie durch rasche Reperfusion, z.B. durch Thrombolyse, erhalten bleiben kann. Messungen der zerebralen Durchblutung und des Sauerstoffumsatzes mittels PET geben darueber wesentliche Aufschluesse, und sie sind wichtig fuer das Verstaendnis der Pathophysiologie ischaemischer Infarkte und der Penumbra mit kritischer Perfusion beim Menschen. Ihre breitere Anwendung in der klinischen Patientenversorgung kommt allerdings wegen des hohen Aufwandes derzeit kaum in Betracht. Bei

  12. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiljeva, I.V.; Mjakin, S.V.; Makarov, A.V.; Krasovsky, A.N.; Varlamov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  13. Electron beam induced modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiljeva, I.V. [Technology Center RADIANT, 10, Kurchatova Str., 194223 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: radiant@skylink.spb.ru; Mjakin, S.V. [Technology Center RADIANT, 10, Kurchatova Str., 194223 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Makarov, A.V. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Krasovsky, A.N. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Varlamov, A.V. [St.-Petersburg State University of Cinema and Television, 13, ul. Pravdy, 191126 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-10-15

    Electron beam processing of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films is found to promote significant changes in the melting heat, intrinsic viscosity and polymer film-liquid (water, isooctane and toluene) boundary surface tension. These properties are featured with several maximums depending on the absorbed dose and correlating with the modification of PET surface functionality. Studies using adsorption of acid-base indicators and IR-spectroscopy revealed that the increase of PET surface hydrophilicity is determined by the oxidation of methylene and methyne groups. Electron beam treatment of PET films on the surface of N-vinylpyrrolidone aqueous solution provided graft copolymerization with this comonomer at optimum process parameters (energy 700 keV, current 1 mA, absorbed dose 50 kGy)

  14. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Martinez, Derwin; Pillai, Chandra; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2012-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H + LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  15. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, S

    2015-01-01

    Three methods for handling beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at ILC are tested and evaluated in this work. The first method represents an optimization of the LEPtype asymmetric selection cuts that reduce the counting biases. The second method uses the experimentally reconstructed shape of the √ s ′ spectrum to determine the Beamstrahlung component of the bias. The last, recently proposed, collision-frame method relies on the reconstruction of the collision-frame velocity to define the selection function in the collision frame both in experiment and in theory. Thus the luminosity expression is insensitive to the difference between the CM frame of the collision and the lab frame. The collision-frame method is independent of the knowledge of the beam parameters, and it allows an accurate reconstruction of the luminosity spectrum above 80% of the nominal CM energy. However, it gives no precise infromation about luminosity below 80% of the nominal CM energy. The compatibility of diverse selection cut...

  16. Validating the Patient Experience with Treatment and Self-Management (PETS, a patient-reported measure of treatment burden, in people with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers EA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth A Rogers,1,2 Kathleen J Yost,3 Jordan K Rosedahl,3 Mark Linzer,4 Deborah H Boehm,5 Azra Thakur,5 Sara Poplau,5 Roger T Anderson,6 David T Eton3 1Department of Medicine, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Department of Health Services Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 5Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 6University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA Aims: To validate a comprehensive general measure of treatment burden, the Patient Experience with Treatment and Self-Management (PETS, in people with diabetes. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey study with 120 people diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and at least one additional chronic illness. Surveys included established patient-reported outcome measures and a 48-item version of the PETS, a new measure comprised of multi-item scales assessing the burden of chronic illness treatment and self-care as it relates to nine domains: medical information, medications, medical appointments, monitoring health, interpersonal challenges, health care expenses, difficulty with health care services, role activity limitations, and physical/mental exhaustion from self-management. Internal reliability of PETS scales was determined using Cronbach’s alpha. Construct validity was determined through correlation of PETS scores with established measures (measures of chronic condition distress, medication satisfaction, self-efficacy, and global well-being, and known-groups validity through comparisons of PETS scores across clinically distinct groups. In an exploratory test of predictive validity, step-wise regressions were used to determine which PETS scales were most associated with outcomes of chronic condition

  17. Beam Based RF Voltage Measurements and Longitudinal Beam Tomography at the Fermilab Booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C. M. [Fermilab; Bhat, S. [Fermilab

    2017-10-19

    Increasing proton beam power on neutrino production targets is one of the major goals of the Fermilab long term accelerator programs. In this effort, the Fermilab 8 GeV Booster synchrotron plays a critical role for at least the next two decades. Therefore, understanding the Booster in great detail is important as we continue to improve its performance. For example, it is important to know accurately the available RF power in the Booster by carrying out beam-based measurements in order to specify the needed upgrades to the Booster RF system. Since the Booster magnetic field is changing continuously measuring/calibrating the RF voltage is not a trivial task. Here, we present a beam based method for the RF voltage measurements. Data analysis is carried out using computer programs developed in Python and MATLAB. The method presented here is applicable to any RCS which do not have flat-bottom and flat-top in the acceleration magnetic ramps. We have also carried out longitudinal beam tomography at injection and extraction energies with the data used for RF voltage measurements. Beam based RF voltage measurements and beam tomography were never done before for the Fermilab Booster. The results from these investigations will be very useful in future intensity upgrades.

  18. Faraday Cup - it is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    A Faraday Cup is used to measure beam intensities at low energy beams. An electrically isolated metallic electrode intercepts the beam and captures all its charges. These charges are integrated using an current sensitive amplifier. When the beam impinges onto the electrode surface low energy electrons are liberated. In order to prevent these electrons from escaping the cup and thus falsifying the measurement, a repeller electrode with negative potential pushes the electrons back onto the electrode.

  19. Radiation exposure during transmission measurements: comparison between CT- and germanium-based techniques with a current PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tung-Hsin; Huang, Yung-Hui; Lee, Jason J.S.; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Wang, Su-Cheng; Su, Cheng-Tau; Chen, Liang-Kung; Chu, Tieh-Chi

    2004-01-01

    In positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning, transmission measurements for attenuation correction are commonly performed by using external germanium-68 rod sources. Recently, combined PET and computed tomographic (CT) scanners have been developed in which the CT data can be used for both anatomical-metabolic image formation and attenuation correction of the PET data. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between germanium- and CT-based transmission scanning in terms of their radiation doses by using the same measurement technique and to compare the doses that patients receive during brain, cardiac and whole-body scans. Measurement of absorbed doses to organs was conducted by using a Rando Alderson phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters. Effective doses were calculated according to the guidelines in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication Number 60. Compared with radionuclide doses used in routine 2-[fluorine-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET imaging, doses absorbed during germanium-based transmission scans were almost negligible. On the other hand, absorbed doses from CT-based transmission scans were significantly higher, particularly with a whole-body scanning protocol. Effective doses were 8.81 mSv in the high-speed mode and 18.97 mSv in the high-quality mode for whole-body CT-based transmission scans. These measurements revealed that the doses received by a patient during CT-based transmission scanning are more than those received in a typical PET examination. Therefore, the radiation doses represent a limitation to the generalised use of CT-based transmission measurements with current PET/CT scanner systems. (orig.)

  20. NON-CONVENTIONAL PET NUCLIDES: PRODUCTION AND IMAGING

    OpenAIRE

    Laforest, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical cyclotrons are now commonly used for the production of PET nuclides by the (pn) reaction. These devices are typically capable of delivering 10-15 MeV protons beams at sufficiently high intensity for timely production of β+ decaying nuclides. Non-conventional PET nuclides have emerged recently and offers new opportunities for diagnostic and therapy drug discovery. In this paper, we will review the production capabilities for such nuclides at Washington University Medical Schoo...

  1. Respiratory gating in cardiac PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Martin Lyngby; Rasmussen, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory motion due to breathing during cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) results in spatial blurring and erroneous tracer quantification. Respiratory gating might represent a solution by dividing the PET coincidence dataset into smaller respiratory phase subsets. The aim...... of our study was to compare the resulting imaging quality by the use of a time-based respiratory gating system in two groups administered either adenosine or dipyridamole as the pharmacological stress agent. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-eight patients were randomized to adenosine or dipyridamole cardiac...... stress (82)RB-PET. Respiratory rates and depths were measured by a respiratory gating system in addition to registering actual respiratory rates. Patients undergoing adenosine stress showed a decrease in measured respiratory rate from initial to later scan phase measurements [12.4 (±5.7) vs 5.6 (±4...

  2. Non-perturbative measurement of low-intensity charged particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, M.; Geithner, R.; Golm, J.; Neubert, R.; Schwickert, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Tan, J.; Welsch, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    Non-perturbative measurements of low-intensity charged particle beams are particularly challenging to beam diagnostics due to the low amplitude of the induced electromagnetic fields. In the low-energy antiproton decelerator (AD) and the future extra low energy antiproton rings at CERN, an absolute measurement of the beam intensity is essential to monitor the operation efficiency. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based cryogenic current comparators (CCC) have been used for measuring slow charged beams in the nA range, showing a very good current resolution. But these were unable to measure fast bunched beams, due to the slew-rate limitation of SQUID devices and presented a strong susceptibility to external perturbations. Here, we present a CCC system developed for the AD machine, which was optimised in terms of its current resolution, system stability, ability to cope with short bunched beams, and immunity to mechanical vibrations. This paper presents the monitor design and the first results from measurements with a low energy antiproton beam obtained in the AD in 2015. These are the first CCC beam current measurements ever performed in a synchrotron machine with both coasting and short bunched beams. It is shown that the system is able to stably measure the AD beam throughout the entire cycle, with a current resolution of 30 {nA}.

  3. qPET - a quantitative extension of the Deauville scale to assess response in interim FDG-PET scans in lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasenclever, Dirk [University of Leipzig, Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), Leipzig (Germany); Kurch, Lars; Georgi, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Mauz-Koerholz, Christine; Koerholz, Dieter [University Hospital Halle, Department of Pediatrics, Halle (Germany); Elsner, Andreas [Hermes Medical Solutions AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Wallace, Hamish [Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Landman-Parker, Judith [Hopital d' Enfants Armand Trousseau, Paris (France); Moryl-Bujakowska, Angelina [Jagiellonian University Medical College, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Polish-American Institute of Pediatrics, Krakow (Poland); Cepelova, Michaela [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Faculty Hospital Motol, Prague (Czech Republic); Karlen, Jonas [Karolinska University Hospital, Pediatric Cancer Unit, Astrid Lindgrens Childrens Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Alvarez Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana [University Hospital Virgen Macarena Avda, Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Sevilla (Spain); Attarbaschi, Andishe [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, St. Anna Children' s Hospital, Vienna (Austria); Fossaa, Alexander [Department of Medical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Rikshospitalet - Radiumhospitalet HF, Oslo (Norway); Pears, Jane [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Crumlin, Dublin (Ireland); Hraskova, Andrea [University Children' s Hospital, Clinic of Pediatric Oncology, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bergstraesser, Eva [University Children' s Hospital, Department Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Beishuizen, Auke [MC - Sophia Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Uyttebroeck, Anne [University Hospitals of Leuven, Department of Pediatric Hemato-Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Schomerus, Eckhard [University of Odense (OUH), Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, H. C. Andersen Children' s Hospital, Odense (Denmark)

    2014-07-15

    Interim FDG-PET is used for treatment tailoring in lymphoma. Deauville response criteria consist of five ordinal categories based on visual comparison of residual tumor uptake to physiological reference uptakes. However, PET-response is a continuum and visual assessments can be distorted by optical illusions. With a novel semi-automatic quantification tool we eliminate optical illusions and extend the Deauville score to a continuous scale. SUV{sub peak} of residual tumors and average uptake of the liver is measured with standardized volumes of interest. The qPET value is the quotient of these measurements. Deauville scores and qPET-values were determined in 898 pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma patients after two OEPA chemotherapy cycles. Deauville categories translate to thresholds on the qPET scale: Categories 3, 4, 5 correspond to qPET values of 0.95, 1.3 and 2.0, respectively. The distribution of qPET values is unimodal with a peak representing metabolically normal responses and a tail of clearly abnormal outliers. In our patients, the peak is at qPET = 0.95 coinciding with the border between Deauville 2 and 3. qPET cut values of 1.3 or 2 (determined by fitting mixture models) select abnormal metabolic responses with high sensitivity, respectively, specificity. qPET methodology provides semi-automatic quantification for interim FDG-PET response in lymphoma extending ordinal Deauville scoring to a continuous scale. Deauville categories correspond to certain qPET cut values. Thresholds between normal and abnormal response can be derived from the qPET-distribution without need for follow-up data. In our patients, qPET < 1.3 excludes abnormal response with high sensitivity. (orig.)

  4. qPET - a quantitative extension of the Deauville scale to assess response in interim FDG-PET scans in lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenclever, Dirk; Kurch, Lars; Georgi, Thomas; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine; Mauz-Koerholz, Christine; Koerholz, Dieter; Elsner, Andreas; Wallace, Hamish; Landman-Parker, Judith; Moryl-Bujakowska, Angelina; Cepelova, Michaela; Karlen, Jonas; Alvarez Fernandez-Teijeiro, Ana; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Fossaa, Alexander; Pears, Jane; Hraskova, Andrea; Bergstraesser, Eva; Beishuizen, Auke; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Schomerus, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Interim FDG-PET is used for treatment tailoring in lymphoma. Deauville response criteria consist of five ordinal categories based on visual comparison of residual tumor uptake to physiological reference uptakes. However, PET-response is a continuum and visual assessments can be distorted by optical illusions. With a novel semi-automatic quantification tool we eliminate optical illusions and extend the Deauville score to a continuous scale. SUV peak of residual tumors and average uptake of the liver is measured with standardized volumes of interest. The qPET value is the quotient of these measurements. Deauville scores and qPET-values were determined in 898 pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma patients after two OEPA chemotherapy cycles. Deauville categories translate to thresholds on the qPET scale: Categories 3, 4, 5 correspond to qPET values of 0.95, 1.3 and 2.0, respectively. The distribution of qPET values is unimodal with a peak representing metabolically normal responses and a tail of clearly abnormal outliers. In our patients, the peak is at qPET = 0.95 coinciding with the border between Deauville 2 and 3. qPET cut values of 1.3 or 2 (determined by fitting mixture models) select abnormal metabolic responses with high sensitivity, respectively, specificity. qPET methodology provides semi-automatic quantification for interim FDG-PET response in lymphoma extending ordinal Deauville scoring to a continuous scale. Deauville categories correspond to certain qPET cut values. Thresholds between normal and abnormal response can be derived from the qPET-distribution without need for follow-up data. In our patients, qPET < 1.3 excludes abnormal response with high sensitivity. (orig.)

  5. Measurements of beam-ion confinement during tangential beam-driven instabilities in PBX [Princeton Beta Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Kaita, R.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Hammett, G.W.; Kaye, S.

    1987-01-01

    During tangential injection of neutral beams into low density tokamak plasmas with β > 1% in the Princeton Beta Experiment (PBX), instabilities are observed that degrade the confinement of beam ions. Neutron, charge-exchange, and diamagnetic loop measurements are examined in order to identify the mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the beam-ion transport. The data suggest a resonant interaction between the instabilities and the parallel energetic beam ions. Evidence for some nonresonant transport also exists

  6. Detection and quantification of focal uptake in head and neck tumours: {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR versus PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varoquaux, Arthur; Rager, Olivier; Ratib, Osman; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Becker, Minerva [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Imaging, Divisions of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Poncet, Antoine [Geneva University Hospital, Center for Clinical Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Delattre, Benedicte M.A. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Imaging, Divisions of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Philips Healthcare AG, Nuclear Medicine Division, Gland (Switzerland); Dulguerov, Pavel; Dulguerov, Nicolas [Geneva University Hospital, Clinic of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Our objectives were to assess the quality of PET images and coregistered anatomic images obtained with PET/MR, to evaluate the detection of focal uptake and SUV, and to compare these findings with those of PET/CT in patients with head and neck tumours. The study group comprised 32 consecutive patients with malignant head and neck tumours who underwent whole-body {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR and PET/CT. PET images were reconstructed using the attenuation correction sequence for PET/MR and CT for PET/CT. Two experienced observers evaluated the anonymized data. They evaluated image and fusion quality, lesion conspicuity, anatomic location, number and size of categorized (benign versus assumed malignant) lesions with focal uptake. Region of interest (ROI) analysis was performed to determine SUVs of lesions and organs for both modalities. Statistical analysis considered data clustering due to multiple lesions per patient. PET/MR coregistration and image fusion was feasible in all patients. The analysis included 66 malignant lesions (tumours, metastatic lymph nodes and distant metastases), 136 benign lesions and 470 organ ROIs. There was no statistically significant difference between PET/MR and PET/CT regarding rating scores for image quality, fusion quality, lesion conspicuity or anatomic location, number of detected lesions and number of patients with and without malignant lesions. A high correlation was observed for SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} measured on PET/MR and PET/CT for malignant lesions, benign lesions and organs (ρ = 0.787 to 0.877, p < 0.001). SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} measured on PET/MR were significantly lower than on PET/CT for malignant tumours, metastatic neck nodes, benign lesions, bone marrow, and liver (p < 0.05). The main factor affecting the difference between SUVs in malignant lesions was tumour size (p < 0.01). In patients with head and neck tumours, PET/MR showed equivalent performance to PET/CT in terms of qualitative results. Comparison of

  7. Adapting MR-BrainPET scans for comparison with conventional PET: experiences with dynamic FET-PET in brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohmann, Philipp; Herzog, Hans; Kops, Elena Rota; Stoffels, Gabriele; Filss, Christian [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany); Coenen, Heinrich H; Shah, N Jon; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3,-4,-5), Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Imaging results from subsequent measurements (preclinical 3T MR-BrainPET, HR+) are compared. O-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) may exhibit non-uniform tracer uptake in gliomas. The aim was to analyse and adapt the physical properties of the scanners and study variations of biological tumour volume (BTV) in early and late FET-PET.

  8. Measurement of a beam orbit stability in the NAP-M storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorodnikov, E.I.; Kalinin, A.S.; Medvedko, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A system for measuring an equilibrium orbit of the beam with beam position electrostatic sensors in the NAP-M storage is described. Sensor signals are processed at the first harmonic of the beam rotation frequency measured in the range of 0.36-2.5 MHz. The respective equipment is described. The system operates in case the number of particles in the beam exceeds (1-2)x10 8

  9. Phase measurement and control of pulsed charged beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    A method and system is described that measures and controls the arrival phase of a pulsed ion beam. The repetitive beam pulse passes through and resonantly excites a high-Q structure, tuned to the beam repetition frequency or to a higher harmonic thereof. A reference signal of the same frequency is phase-flipped from -90 0 to +90 0 at a high audio rate and also coupled to the resonator. The low-level output signal, comprised of the vector sum of the beam-induced signal and the phase-flipped reference, is amplified and processed to obtain phase information. The system is usable for beams with average currents as low as a few picoamperes and can be used in the measurement and control of pulsed beam experiments involving timing, the control of beam phase for rf particle accelerators and the nondestructive measurement of beam energy. (Auth.)

  10. Method to measure composition modifications in polyethylene terephthalate during ion beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdesselam, M.; Stoquert, J. P.; Chami, S.; Djebara, M.; Chami, A. C.; Siad, M.

    2009-01-01

    Matter losses of polyethylene terephthalate (PET, Mylar) films induced by 1600 keV deuteron beams have been investigated in situ simultaneously by nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), deuteron forward elastic scattering (DFES) and hydrogen elastic recoil detection (HERD) in the fluence range from 1 × 10 14 to 9 × 10 16 cm -2. Volatile degradation products escape from the polymeric film, mostly as hydrogen-, oxygen- and carbon-containing molecules. Appropriate experimental conditions for observing the composition and thickness changes during irradiation are determined. 16O(d,p 0) 17O, 16O(d,p 1) 17O and 12C(d,p 0) 13C nuclear reactions were used to monitor the oxygen and carbon content as a function of deuteron fluence. Hydrogen release was determined simultaneously by H(d,d)H DFES and H(d,H)d HERD. Comparisons between NRA, DFES and HERD measurements show that the polymer carbonizes at high fluences because most of the oxygen and hydrogen depletion has already occured below a fluence of 3 × 10 16 cm -2. Release curves for each element are determined. Experimental results are consistent with the bulk molecular recombination (BMR) model.

  11. Dog and Cat Allergies and Allergen Avoidance Measures in Korean Adult Pet Owners Who Participated in a Pet Exhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Suk; Lee, Sang Pyo; Kwon, Young Jae; Lee, Sang Min

    2018-03-01

    This study evaluated dog and cat allergies and their association with allergen avoidance measures in Korean adults. The study population consisted of 537 adults who currently kept dogs or cats and participated in a pet exhibition in Korea. The subjects were asked to complete questionnaires regarding pet ownership, allergen avoidance, and allergy symptoms, and underwent skin prick tests. They were considered to have a dog or cat allergy if they suffered from one or more of allergy symptoms during contact with their pets. In total, 103 of 407 dog owners (25.3%) and 45 of 130 cat owners (34.6%) had a dog or cat allergy, respectively. Dog owners kept 1.3±1.5 dogs; this number did not differ according to the presence of dog allergy. Dog owners with a dog allergy had owned their dogs longer than those without (88.0±72.0 vs 67.5±72.7 months, PCat owners kept 2.1±3.6 cats; this number did not differ according to the presence of cat allergy, nor did the duration of cat ownership. Cat owners with a cat allergy had facial contact and slept with their cats less frequently (8.6±11.9 vs 18.3±27.0 times/day, Pcats shaved and beds cleaned less frequently than those without (1.8±3.3 vs 3.2±4.4 times/year, PCat owners with a cat allergy tried to minimize contact with their cats, but efforts to avoid indoor cat allergens were lower than those without. In comparison, dog owners with a dog allergy had kept their dogs for longer time than those without; however, current contact with their dogs and allergen avoidance measures did not differ between the 2 groups. Copyright © 2018 The Korean Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Clinical Immunology · The Korean Academy of Pediatric Allergy and Respiratory Disease

  12. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements for the LANSCE Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing beam profile measurement systems, commonly known as Wire Scanners (WS). Using the principal of secondary electron emission, the WS measurement system moves a wire or fiber across an impinging particle beam, sampling a projected transverse-beam distribution. Because existing WS actuators and electronic components are either no longer manufactured or home-built with antiquated parts, a new WS beam profile measurement is being designed, fabricated, and tested. The goals for these new WS's include using off-the-shelf components while eliminating antiquated components, providing quick operation while allowing for easy maintainability, and tolerating external radioactivation. The WS measurement system consists of beam line actuators, a cable plant, an electronics processor chassis, and software located both in the electronics chassis (National Instruments LabVIEW) and in the Central Control Room (EPICS-based client software). This WS measurement system will measure Hand H{sup +} LANSCE-facility beams and will also measure less common beams. This paper describes these WS measurement systems.

  13. PET imaging of thin objects: measuring the effects of positron range and partial-volume averaging in the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, David L., E-mail: alexoff@bnl.gov; Dewey, Stephen L.; Vaska, Paul; Krishnamoorthy, Srilalan; Ferrieri, Richard; Schueller, Michael; Schlyer, David J.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: PET imaging in plants is receiving increased interest as a new strategy to measure plant responses to environmental stimuli and as a tool for phenotyping genetically engineered plants. PET imaging in plants, however, poses new challenges. In particular, the leaves of most plants are so thin that a large fraction of positrons emitted from PET isotopes ({sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N) escape while even state-of-the-art PET cameras have significant partial-volume errors for such thin objects. Although these limitations are acknowledged by researchers, little data have been published on them. Methods: Here we measured the magnitude and distribution of escaping positrons from the leaf of Nicotiana tabacum for the radionuclides {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N using a commercial small-animal PET scanner. Imaging results were compared to radionuclide concentrations measured from dissection and counting and to a Monte Carlo simulation using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Results: Simulated and experimentally determined escape fractions were consistent. The fractions of positrons (mean{+-}S.D.) escaping the leaf parenchyma were measured to be 59{+-}1.1%, 64{+-}4.4% and 67{+-}1.9% for {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C and {sup 13}N, respectively. Escape fractions were lower in thicker leaf areas like the midrib. Partial-volume averaging underestimated activity concentrations in the leaf blade by a factor of 10 to 15. Conclusions: The foregoing effects combine to yield PET images whose contrast does not reflect the actual activity concentrations. These errors can be largely corrected by integrating activity along the PET axis perpendicular to the leaf surface, including detection of escaped positrons, and calculating concentration using a measured leaf thickness.

  14. Neutron measurements from beam-target reactions at the ELISE neutral beam test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xufei, X.; Fan, T.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Bonomo, F.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Grosso, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Grünauer, F.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of 2.5 MeV neutron emission from beam-target reactions performed at the ELISE neutral beam test facility are presented in this paper. The measurements are used to study the penetration of a deuterium beam in a copper dump, based on the observation of the time evolution of the neutron counting rate from beam-target reactions with a liquid scintillation detector. A calculation based on a local mixing model of deuterium deposition in the target up to a concentration of 20% at saturation is used to evaluate the expected neutron yield for comparison with data. The results are of relevance to understand neutron emission associated to beam penetration in a solid target, with applications to diagnostic systems for the SPIDER and MITICA Neutral Beam Injection prototypes

  15. Beam dynamics studies and emittance optimization in the CTF3 linac at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Urschütz, Peter; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Ferrari, Arnaud; Tecker, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Small transverse beam emittances and well-known lattice functions are crucial for the 30 GHz power production in the Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) and for the commissioning of the Delay Loop of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). Following beam dynamics simulation results, two additional solenoids were installed in the CTF3 injector in order to improve the emittance. During the runs in 2005 and 2006, an intensive measurement campaign to determine Twiss parameters and beam sizes was launched. The results obtained by means of quadrupole scans for different modes of operation suggest emittances well below the nominal .n,rms = 100 ?Î?Êm and a good agreement with PARMELA simulations.

  16. Automated cyclotron tuning using beam phase measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmer, J.H.; Roecken, H.; Stephani, T.; Baumgarten, C.; Geisler, A.

    2006-01-01

    The ACCEL K250 superconducting cyclotron is specifically designed for the use in proton therapy systems. The compact medical 250 MeV proton accelerator fulfils all present and future beam requirements for fast scanning treatment systems and is delivered as a turn key system; no operator is routinely required. During operation of the cyclotron heat dissipation of the RF system induces a small drift in iron temperature. This temperature drift slightly detunes the magnetic field and small corrections must be made. A non-destructive beam phase detector has been developed to measure and quantify the effect of a magnetic field drift. Signal calculations were made and the design of the capacitive pickup probe was optimised to cover the desired beam current range. Measurements showed a very good agreement with the calculated signals and beam phase can be measured with currents down to 3 nA. The measured phase values are used as input for a feedback loop controlling the current in the superconducting coil. The magnetic field of the cyclotron is tuned automatically and online to maintain a fixed beam phase. Extraction efficiency is thereby optimised continuously and activation of the cyclotron is minimised. The energy and position stability of the extracted beam are well within specification

  17. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated aspects were spatial resolution, sensitivity, scatter fraction, count rate performance, image quality, count loss and random events correction accuracy. The findings of this study demonstrated superior sensitivity (~ 4 folds) of PET scanner in PET/MR compared to PET/CT system. Image quality test exhibited higher contrast in PET/MR (~ 9%) compared with PET/CT. The scatter fraction of PET/MR was 43.4% at noise equivalent count rate (NECR) peak of 218 kcps and the corresponding activity concentration was 17.7 kBq/cc. Whereas the scatter fraction of PET/CT was found as 39.2% at NECR peak of 72 kcps and activity concentration of 24.3 kBq/cc. The percentage error of the random event correction accuracy was 3.4% and 3.1% in PET/MR and PET/CT, respectively. It was concluded that PET/MR system is about 4 times more sensitive than PET/CT, and the contrast of hot lesions in PET/MR was ~ 9% higher than PET/CT. These outcomes also emphasize the possibility to achieve excellent clinical PET images with low administered dose and/or a short acquisition time in PET/MR.

  18. Pet-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Michael J

    2016-11-15

    Physicians and veterinarians have many opportunities to partner in promoting the well-being of people and their pets, especially by addressing zoonotic diseases that may be transmitted between a pet and a human family member. Common cutaneous pet-acquired zoonoses are dermatophytosis (ringworm) and sarcoptic mange (scabies), which are both readily treated. Toxoplasmosis can be acquired from exposure to cat feces, but appropriate hygienic measures can minimize the risk to pregnant women. Persons who work with animals are at increased risk of acquiring bartonellosis (e.g., cat-scratch disease); control of cat fleas is essential to minimize the risk of these infections. People and their pets share a range of tick-borne diseases, and exposure risk can be minimized with use of tick repellent, prompt tick removal, and appropriate tick control measures for pets. Pets such as reptiles, amphibians, and backyard poultry pose a risk of transmitting Salmonella species and are becoming more popular. Personal hygiene after interacting with these pets is crucial to prevent Salmonella infections. Leptospirosis is more often acquired from wildlife than infected dogs, but at-risk dogs can be protected with vaccination. The clinical history in the primary care office should routinely include questions about pets and occupational or other exposure to pet animals. Control and prevention of zoonoses are best achieved by enhancing communication between physicians and veterinarians to ensure patients know the risks of and how to prevent zoonoses in themselves, their pets, and other people.

  19. Techniques for intense-proton-beam profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilpatrick, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    In a collaborative effort with industry and several national laboratories, the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) facility and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac are presently being designed and developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The APT facility is planned to accelerate a 100-mA H + cw beam to 1.7 GeV and the SNS linac is planned to accelerate a 1- to 4-mA-average, H - , pulsed-beam to 1 GeV. With typical rms beam widths of 1- to 3-mm throughout much of these accelerators, the maximum average-power densities of these beams are expected to be approximately 30- and 1-MW-per-square millimeter, respectively. Such power densities are too large to use standard interceptive techniques typically used for acquisition of beam profile information. This paper summarizes the specific requirements for the beam profile measurements to be used in the APT, SNS, and the Low Energy Development Accelerator (LEDA)--a facility to verify the operation of the first 20-MeV section of APT. This paper also discusses the variety of profile measurement choices discussed at a recent high-average-current beam profile workshop held in Santa Fe, NM, and will present the present state of the design for the beam profile measurements planned for APT, SNS, and LEDA

  20. Electron cyclotron beam measurement system in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, S., E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Takahashi, H.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Igami, H.; Ito, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Mizuno, Y.; Okada, K.; Osakabe, M.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    In order to evaluate the electron cyclotron (EC) heating power inside the Large Helical Device vacuum vessel and to investigate the physics of the interaction between the EC beam and the plasma, a direct measurement system for the EC beam transmitted through the plasma column was developed. The system consists of an EC beam target plate, which is made of isotropic graphite and faces against the EC beam through the plasma, and an IR camera for measuring the target plate temperature increase by the transmitted EC beam. This system is applicable to the high magnetic field (up to 2.75 T) and plasma density (up to 0.8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}). This system successfully evaluated the transmitted EC beam profile and the refraction.

  1. Measurement of an electron-beam size with a beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, K.; Nakamura, N.; Sakai, H.; Shinoe, K.; Takaki, H.; Fujisawa, M.; Hayano, H.; Nomura, M.; Kamiya, Y.; Koseki, T.; Amemiya, Y.; Aoki, N.; Nakayama, K.

    2003-01-01

    We present a non-destructive and real-time beam profile monitor using Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) and the measurement of an electron-beam size with this monitor in the KEK-Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring. The monitor system has the structure of a long-distance X-ray microscope, where two FZPs constitute an X-ray imaging optics. The synchrotron radiation from the electron beam at the bending magnet is monochromatized by a crystal monochromator and the transverse electron beam image is twenty times magnified by the two FZPs and detected on an X-ray CCD camera. The expected spatial resolution for the selected photon energy of 3.235 keV is sufficiently high to measure the horizontal and vertical beam sizes of the ATF damping ring. With the beam profile monitor, we succeeded in obtaining a clear electron-beam image and measuring the extremely small beam size less than 10 μm. The measured magnification of the X-ray imaging optics in the monitor system was in good agreement with the design value

  2. Commissioning status of the decelerator test beam line in CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Lillestol, R; Olvegaard, M; Syratchev, I; Carrillo, D; Toral, F; Faus-Golfe, A; Garcia-Garrigos, J J; Kubyshin, Y; Montoro, G

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) at CERN was constructed by the CTF3 collaboration to study the feasibility of the concepts for a compact linear collider. The test beam line (TBL) recently added to the CTF3 machine was designed to study the CLIC decelerator beam dynamics and 12 GHz power production. The beam line consists of a FODO lattice with high precision BPM’s and quadrupoles on movers for precise beam alignment. A total of 16 Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS) will be installed in between the quadrupoles to extract 12 GHz power from the drive beam provided by the CTF3 machine. The CTF3 drive beam with a bunch-train length of 140 ns, 12 GHz bunch repetition frequency and an average current over the train of up to 28 A will be injected into the test beam line. Each PETS structure will produce 135 MW of 12 GHz power at nominal current. The beam will have lost more than 50 % of its initial energy of 150 MeV at the end of the beam line and will contain particles with energies between 65 MeV and 1...

  3. Measurement of beam driven hydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norem, J.; Black, E.; Bandura, L.; Errede, D.; Cummings, M. A. C.

    2003-01-01

    Cooling intense muon beams in liquid hydrogen absorbers introduces kW of heating to the cold fluid, which will drive turbulent flow. The amount of turbulence may be sufficient to help cool the liquid, but calculations are difficult. We have used a 20 MeV electron beam in a water tank to look at the scale of the beam driven convection and turbulence. The density and flow measurements are made with schlieren and Ronchi systems. We describe the optical systems and the turbulence measured. These data are being used to calibrate hydrodynamic calculations of convection driven and forced flow cooling in muon cooling absorbers

  4. Comparison of planar, PET and well-counter measurements of total tumor radioactivity in a mouse xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael V.; Seidel, Jurgen; Williams, Mark R.; Wong, Karen J.; Ton, Anita; Basuli, Falguni; Choyke, Peter L.; Jagoda, Elaine M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Quantitative small animal radionuclide imaging studies are often carried out with the intention of estimating the total radioactivity content of various tissues such as the radioactivity content of mouse xenograft tumors exposed to putative diagnostic or therapeutic agents. We show that for at least one specific application, positron projection imaging (PPI) and PET yield comparable estimates of absolute total tumor activity and that both of these estimates are highly correlated with direct well-counting of these same tumors. These findings further suggest that in this particular application, PPI is a far more efficient data acquisition and processing methodology than PET. Methods: Forty-one athymic mice were implanted with PC3 human prostate cancer cells transfected with prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA (+)) and one additional animal (for a total of 42) with a control blank vector (PSMA (−)). All animals were injected with [ 18 F] DCFPyl, a ligand for PSMA, and imaged for total tumor radioactivity with PET and PPI. The tumors were then removed, assayed by well counting for total radioactivity and the values between these methods intercompared. Results: PET, PPI and well-counter estimates of total tumor radioactivity were highly correlated (R 2 > 0.98) with regression line slopes near unity (0.95 < slope ≤ 1.02) and intercepts near zero (−0.001 MBq ≤ intercept ≤0.004 MBq). Conclusion: Total mouse xenograft tumor radioactivity can be measured with PET or PPI with an accuracy comparable to well counting if certain experimental and pharmacokinetic conditions are met. In this particular application, PPI is significantly more efficient than PET in making these measurements.

  5. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET or PET/CT in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty: a meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, H.; Yuan, L.; Li, C.; Kan, Y.; Yang, J.; Hao, R.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of published data regarding the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published through May 31, 2012 regarding PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection on a per prosthesis-based analysis were calculated. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to measure the accuracy of PET or PET/CT in patients with suspicious of prosthetic infection. Fourteen studies comprising 838 prosthesis with suspicious of prosthetic infection after arthroplasty were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-90%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The pooled specificity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% CI 83-89%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93 on a per prosthesis-based analysis. In patients suspicious of prosthetic infection, FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET or PET/CT are accurate methods in this setting. Nevertheless, possible sources of false positive results and influcing factors should kept in mind.

  6. Diagnostic performance of FDG PET or PET/CT in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, H; Yuan, L; Li, C; Kan, Y; Hao, R; Yang, J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically review and perform a meta-analysis of published data regarding the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) or PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) in prosthetic infection after arthroplasty. A comprehensive computer literature search of studies published through May 31, 2012 regarding PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Scopus databases. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of PET or PET/CT in patients suspicious of prosthetic infection on a per prosthesis-based analysis were calculated. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve was calculated to measure the accuracy of PET or PET/CT in patients with suspicious of prosthetic infection. Fourteen studies comprising 838 prosthesis with suspicious of prosthetic infection after arthroplasty were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-90%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The pooled specificity of PET or PET/CT in detecting prosthetic infection was 86% (95% CI 83-89%) on a per prosthesis-based analysis. The area under the ROC curve was 0.93 on a per prosthesis-based analysis. In patients suspicious of prosthetic infection, FDG PET or PET/CT demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity. FDG PET or PET/CT are accurate methods in this setting. Nevertheless, possible sources of false positive results and influcing factors should kept in mind.

  7. PET studies in epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Ismet

    2015-01-01

    Various PET studies, such as measurements of glucose, serotonin and oxygen metabolism, cerebral blood flow and receptor bindings are availabe for epilepsy. 18Fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET imaging of brain glucose metabolism is a well established and widely available technique. Studies have demonstrated that the sensitivity of interictal FDG-PET is higher than interictal SPECT and similar to ictal SPECT for the lateralization and localization of epileptogenic foci in presurgical patients refractory to medical treatments who have noncontributory EEG and MRI. In addition to localizing epileptogenic focus, FDG-PET provide additional important information on the functional status of the rest of the brain. The main limitation of interictal FDG-PET is that it cannot precisely define the surgical margin as the area of hypometabolism usually extends beyond the epileptogenic zone. Various neurotransmitters (GABA, glutamate, opiates, serotonin, dopamine, acethylcholine, and adenosine) and receptor subtypes are involved in epilepsy. PET receptor imaging studies performed in limited centers help to understand the role of neurotransmitters in epileptogenesis, identify epileptic foci and investigate new treatment approaches. PET receptor imaging studies have demonstrated reduced 11C-flumazenil (GABAA-cBDZ) and 18F-MPPF (5-HT1A serotonin) and increased 11C-cerfentanil (mu opiate) and 11C-MeNTI (delta opiate) bindings in the area of seizure. 11C-flumazenil has been reported to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for identifying epileptic foci. The area of abnormality on GABAAcBDZ and opiate receptor images is usually smaller and more circumscribed than the area of hypometabolism on FDG images. Studies have demonstrated that 11C-alpha-methyl-L-tryptophan PET (to study synthesis of serotonin) can detect the epileptic focus within malformations of cortical development and helps in differentiating epileptogenic from non-epileptogenic tubers in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex

  8. Simultaneous PET/MRI with 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (hyperPET): phantom-based evaluation of PET quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Henriksen, Sarah T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Integrated PET/MRI with hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (13C-MRSI) offers simultaneous, dual-modality metabolic imaging. A prerequisite for the use of simultaneous imaging is the absence of interference between the two modalities. This has been documented...... for a clinical whole-body system using simultaneous 1 H-MRI and PET but never for 13C-MRSI and PET. Here, the feasibility of simultaneous PET and 13C-MRSI as well as hyperpolarized 13C-MRSI in an integrated whole-body PET/MRI hybrid scanner is evaluated using phantom experiments. Methods: Combined PET and 13C......-MRSI phantoms including a NEMA [18F]-FDG phantom, 13C-acetate and 13C-urea sources, and hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate were imaged repeatedly with PET and/or 13C-MRSI. Measurements evaluated for interference effects included PET activity values in the largest sphere and a background region; total number of PET...

  9. First Measurements of Beam Backgrounds at SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Vahsen, S.E.; Jaegle, I.; Nakayama, H.; Aloisio, A.; Ameli, F.; Barrett, M.; Beaulieu, A.; Bosisio, L.; Branchini, P.; Browder, T.E.; Budano, A.; Cautero, G.; Cecchi, C.; Chen, Y.-T.; Chu, K.-N.; Cinabro, D.; Cristaudo, P.; de Jong, S.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Flanagan, J.; Funakoshi, Y.; Gabriel, M.; Giordano, R.; Giuressi, D.; Hedges, M. T.; Honkanen, N.; Ikeda, H.; Ishibashi, T.; Kaji, H.; Kanazawa, K.; Kiesling, C.; Koirala, S.; Križan, P.; La Licata, C.; Lanceri, L.; Liau, J.-J.; Lin, F.-H.; Lin, J.-C.; Liptak, Z.; Longo, S.; Manoni, E.; Marinas, C.; Miyabayashi, K.; Mulyani, E.; Morita, A.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Passeri, A.; Poffenberger, P.; Ritzert, M.; Roney, J M.; Rossi, A.; Röder, T.; Seddon, R.M.; Seong, I.S.; Shiu, J.-G.; Simon, F.; Soloviev, Y.; Suetsugu, Y.; Szalay, M.; Terui, S.; Tortone, G.; van der Kolk, N.; Vitale, L.; Wang, M.Z.; Windel, H.; Yokoyama, S.

    2018-01-01

    The high design luminosity of the SuperKEKB electron-positron collider is expected to result in challenging levels of beam-induced backgrounds in the interaction region. Properly simulating and mitigating these backgrounds is critical to the success of the Belle~II experiment. We report on measurements performed with a suite of dedicated beam background detectors, collectively known as BEAST II, during the so-called Phase 1 commissioning run of SuperKEKB in 2016, which involved operation of both the high energy ring (HER) of 7 GeV electrons as well as the low energy ring (LER) of 4 GeV positrons. We describe the BEAST II detector systems, the simulation of beam backgrounds, and the measurements performed. The measurements include standard ones of dose rates versus accelerator conditions, and more novel investigations, such as bunch-by-bunch measurements of injection backgrounds and measurements sensitive to the energy spectrum and angular distribution of fast neutrons. We observe beam-gas, Touschek, beam-dust...

  10. Automated translating beam profiler for in situ laser beam spot-size and focal position measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keaveney, James

    2018-03-01

    We present a simple and convenient, high-resolution solution for automated laser-beam profiling with axial translation. The device is based on a Raspberry Pi computer, Pi Noir CMOS camera, stepper motor, and commercial translation stage. We also provide software to run the device. The CMOS sensor is sensitive over a large wavelength range between 300 and 1100 nm and can be translated over 25 mm along the beam axis. The sensor head can be reversed without changing its axial position, allowing for a quantitative estimate of beam overlap with counter-propagating laser beams. Although not limited to this application, the intended use for this device is the automated measurement of the focal position and spot-size of a Gaussian laser beam. We present example data of one such measurement to illustrate device performance.

  11. Quantitative simultaneous PET-MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-06-01

    Whole-body PET is currently limited by the degradation due to patient motion. Respiratory motion degrades imaging studies of the abdomen. Similarly, both respiratory and cardiac motions significantly hamper the assessment of myocardial ischemia and/or metabolism in perfusion and viability cardiac PET studies. Based on simultaneous PET-MR, we have developed robust and accurate MRI methods allowing the tracking and measurement of both respiratory and cardiac motions during abdominal or cardiac studies. Our list-mode iterative PET reconstruction framework incorporates the measured motion fields into PET emission system matrix as well as the time-dependent PET attenuation map and the position dependent point spread function. Our method significantly enhances the PET image quality as compared to conventional methods.

  12. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET......Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  13. Generalized emittance measurements in a beam transport line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skelly, J.; Gardner, C.; Luccio, A.; Kponou, A.; Reece, K.

    1991-01-01

    Motivated by the need to commission 3 beam transport lines for the new AGS Booster project, we have developed a generalized emittance-measurement program; beam line specifics are entirely resident in data tables, not in program code. For instrumentation, the program requires one or more multi-wire profile monitors; one or multiple profiles are acquired from each monitor, corresponding to one or multiple tunes of the transport line. Emittances and Twiss parameters are calculated using generalized algorithms. The required matix descriptions of the beam optics are constructed by an on-line general beam modeling program. Design of the program, its algorithms, and initial experience with it will be described. 4 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  14. MD 2197: Experimental studies of Landau damping by means of Beam Transfer Function measurements in the presence of beam-beam interactions and diffusive mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Tambasco, Claudia; Barranco Garcia, Javier; Boccardi, Andrea; Buffat, Xavier; Bruce, Roderik; Gasior, Marek; Hostettler, Michi; Lefevre, Thibaut; Louro Alves, Diogo Miguel; Metral, Elias; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Pieloni, Tatiana; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    Beam Transfer Function (BTF) measurements are direct measurement of the stability diagrams that define the stability threshold of coherent beam instabilities driven by the impedance. At the LHC, some coherent instabilities at flat top energy are still not fully understood and the BTF measurements provide a method to experimentally probe the Landau damping of the proton beams. The BTF response is sensitive to the particle distribution changes and contain information about the transverse tune spread in the beams. The BTF system has been installed in the LHC in the 2015 in order to investigate the Landau damping at different stages of the operational cycle, machine configurations (different octupole currents, crossing angles, tunes etc...) and in presence of beam-beam excited resonances that may provoke diffusion mechanisms with a consequence change of Landau damping. Past MDs showed some difficulties for the reconstruction of the stability diagram from BTF measurements and several improvements on the BTF sy...

  15. Comparison of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake between PET from a simultaneously acquiring whole-body PET/MR hybrid scanner and PET from PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesmueller, Marco; Schmidt, Daniela; Beck, Michael; Kuwert, Torsten; Gall, Carl C. von; Quick, Harald H.; Navalpakkam, Bharath; Lell, Michael M.; Uder, Michael; Ritt, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    PET/MR hybrid scanners have recently been introduced, but not yet validated. The aim of this study was to compare the PET components of a PET/CT hybrid system and of a simultaneous whole-body PET/MR hybrid system with regard to reproducibility of lesion detection and quantitation of tracer uptake. A total of 46 patients underwent a whole-body PET/CT scan 1 h after injection and an average of 88 min later a second scan using a hybrid PET/MR system. The radioactive tracers used were 18 F-deoxyglucose (FDG), 18 F-ethylcholine (FEC) and 68 Ga-DOTATATE (Ga-DOTATATE). The PET images from PET/CT (PET CT ) and from PET/MR (PET MR ) were analysed for tracer-positive lesions. Regional tracer uptake in these foci was quantified using volumes of interest, and maximal and average standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV avg , respectively) were calculated. Of the 46 patients, 43 were eligible for comparison and statistical analysis. All lesions except one identified by PET CT were identified by PET MR (99.2 %). In 38 patients (88.4 %), the same number of foci were identified by PET CT and by PET MR . In four patients, more lesions were identified by PET MR than by PET CT , in one patient PET CT revealed an additional focus compared to PET MR . The mean SUV max and SUV avg of all lesions determined by PET MR were by 21 % and 11 % lower, respectively, than the values determined by PET CT (p CT and PET MR were minor, but statistically significant. Nevertheless, a more detailed study of the quantitative accuracy of PET MR and the factors governing it is needed to ultimately assess its accuracy in measuring tissue tracer concentrations. (orig.)

  16. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  17. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  18. Plasma fluctuation measurements in tokamaks using beam-plasma interactions (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Duperrex, P.A.; Paul, S.F.

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency observations of light emitted from the interactions between plasma ions and injected neutral beam atoms allow the measurement of moderate-wavelength fluctuations in plasma and impurity ion densities. To detect turbulence in the local plasma ion density, the collisionally excited fluorescence from a neutral beam is measured either separately at several spatial points or with a multichannel imaging detector. Similarly, the role of impurity ion density fluctuations is measured using charge exchange recombination excited transitions emitted by the ion species of interest. This technique can access the relatively unexplored region of long-wavelength plasma turbulence with k perpendicular ρ i much-lt 1, and hence complements measurements from scattering experiments. Optimization of neutral beam geometry and optical sightlines can result in very good localization and resolution (Δx≤1 cm) in the hot plasma core region. The detectable fluctuation level is determined by photon statistics, atomic excitation processes, and beam stability, but can be as low as 0.2% in a 100 kHz bandwidth over the 0--1 MHz frequency range. The choices of beam species (e.g., H 0 , He 0 , etc.), observed transition (e.g., H α , L α , He I singlet or triplet transitions, C VI Δn=1, etc.) are dictated by experiment-specific factors such as optical access, flexibility of beam operation, plasma conditions, and detailed experimental goals. Initial tests on the PBX-M tokamak using the H α emissions from a heating neutral beam show low-frequency turbulence in the edge plasma region

  19. Beam Stability in the Drive-Beam Decelerator of CLIC Using Structures of High-Order Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Millich, Antonio; Schulte, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    The RF power necessary to accelerate the main beam of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is produced by decelerating a high-current drive beam in Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). The reference structure is not cylindrically symmetric but has longitudinal waveguides carved into the inner surface. This gives rise to a transverse component of the main longitudinal mode which can not be damped, in contrast to the transverse dipole wake- field. The field is non-linear and couples the motion of the particles in the two planes. Limits of the stability of the decelerated beam are investigated for different structures.

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Clearance in Alzheimer Disease Measured with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Mony J; Li, Yi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tsui, Wai H; Saint-Louis, Les A; Glodzik, Lidia; Osorio, Ricardo S; Fortea, Juan; Butler, Tracy; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Fossati, Silvia; Kim, Hee-Jin; Carare, Roxana O; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Rusinek, Henry

    2017-09-01

    Evidence supporting the hypothesis that reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) clearance is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease (AD) comes primarily from rodent models. However, unlike rodents, in which predominant extracranial CSF egress is via olfactory nerves traversing the cribriform plate, human CSF clearance pathways are not well characterized. Dynamic PET with 18 F-THK5117, a tracer for tau pathology, was used to estimate the ventricular CSF time-activity as a biomarker for CSF clearance. We tested 3 hypotheses: extracranial CSF is detected at the superior turbinates; CSF clearance is reduced in AD; and CSF clearance is inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Methods: Fifteen subjects, 8 with AD and 7 normal control volunteers, were examined with 18 F-THK5117. Ten subjects additionally underwent 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B ( 11 C-PiB) PET scanning, and 8 were 11 C-PiB-positive. Ventricular time-activity curves of 18 F-THK5117 were used to identify highly correlated time-activity curves from extracranial voxels. Results: For all subjects, the greatest density of CSF-positive extracranial voxels was in the nasal turbinates. Tracer concentration analyses validated the superior nasal turbinate CSF signal intensity. AD patients showed ventricular tracer clearance reduced by 23% and 66% fewer superior turbinate CSF egress sites. Ventricular CSF clearance was inversely associated with amyloid deposition. Conclusion: The human nasal turbinate is part of the CSF clearance system. Lateral ventricle and superior nasal turbinate CSF clearance abnormalities are found in AD. Ventricular CSF clearance reductions are associated with increased brain amyloid depositions. These data suggest that PET-measured CSF clearance is a biomarker of potential interest in AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. Special relativity in beam trajectory simulation in small accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pramudita Anggraita; Budi Santosa; Taufik; Emy Mulyani; Frida Iswinning Diah

    2012-01-01

    Calculation for trajectory simulation of particle beam in small accelerators should account special relativity effect in the beam motion, which differs between parallel and perpendicular direction to the beam velocity. For small electron beam machine of 300 keV, the effect shows up as the rest mass of electron is only 511 keV. Neglecting the effect yields wrong kinetic energy after 300 kV of dc acceleration. For a 13 MeV PET (positron emission tomography) baby cyclotron accelerating proton beam, the effect increases the proton mass by about 1.4% at the final energy. To keep the beam isochronous with the accelerating radiofrequency, a radial increase of the average magnetic field must be designed accordingly. (author)

  2. MRPC-PET: A new technique for high precision time and position measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroud, K.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Li, S.; Williams, M.C.S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider a new technology for medical diagnosis: the MRPC-PET. This technology allows excellent time resolution together with 2-D position information thus providing a fundamental step in this field. The principle of this method is based on the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) capable of high precision time measurements. We have previously found that the route to precise timing is differential readout (this requires matching anode and cathode strips); thus crossed strip readout schemes traditionally used for 2-D readout cannot be exploited. In this paper we consider the time difference from the two ends of the strip to provide a high precision measurement along the strip; the average time gives precise timing. The MRPC-PET thus provides a basic step in the field of medical technology: excellent time resolution together with 2-D position measurement.

  3. A beam energy measurement system at NIRS-930 cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hojo, S.; Honma, T.; Sakamoto, Y.; Miyahara, N.; Okada, T.; Komatsu, K.; Tsuji, N.; Yamada, S.

    2005-01-01

    A beam energy measurement system employing a set of capacitive probes has been developed at NIRS-930 cyclotron. Principle of the measurement is applying a modified-TOF method, so that the two proves are installed at one of the straight section in the beam transport line. Usually they are separated about 5.8 m, which is equivalent to the almost final path length of the beam extracted in the cyclotron. In the measurement, two beam signals are superimposed by adjusting a position of the downstream-probe along the beam direction with watching an oscilloscope screen roughly. In order to determine the beam energy accurately the signals are processed by MCA with suitable electric module. (author)

  4. MEV Energy Electrostatic Accelerator Ion Beam Emittance Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    I.G. Ignat’ev; M.I. Zakharets; S.V. Kolinko; D.P. Shulha

    2014-01-01

    The testing equipment was designed, manufactured and tried out permitting measurements of total current, current profile and emittance of an ion beam extracted from the ion beam. MeV energy electrostatic accelerator ion H + beam emittance measurement results are presented.

  5. Digital DC beam current measurement on SSRF storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Liang; Yin Chongxian; Liu Ming; Chen Jianfeng

    2011-01-01

    Both DC current transformer (DCCT) and integrating current transformer (ICT) can be used in DC beam current measurement. The ICT has strong capability of resisting electromagnetic interference, but its measurement accuracy cannot satisfy the DC beam current measurement requirement when using traditional high speed A/D. With high resolution A/D and equivalent sampling system, DC beam current measuring system based on ICT can reach high accuracy compared with DCCT system. In this paper, the ICT-based DC beam current measurement, equivalent sampling method and testing results at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility(SSRF) is described. (authors)

  6. Beam diffusion measurements using collimator scans in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Valentino, Gianluca; Bruce, Roderik; Burkart, Florian; Previtali, Valentina; Redaelli, Stefano; Salvachua, Belen; Stancari, Giuliov; Valishev, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The time evolution of beam losses during a collimator scan provides information on halo diffusion and population. This is an essential input for machine performance characterization and for the design of collimation systems. Beam halo measurements in the CERN Large Hadron Collider were conducted through collimator scrapings in a dedicated beam study for the first time at 4 TeV. Four scans were performed with two collimators, in the vertical plane for beam 1 and horizontally for beam 2, before and after bringing the beams into collisions. Inward and outward steps were performed. A diffusion model was used to interpret the observed loss rate evolution in response to the collimator steps. With this technique, diffusion coefficients were estimated as a function of betatron oscillation amplitude from approximately 3 to 7 standard deviations of the transverse beam distribution. A comparison of halo diffusion and core emittance growth rates is also presented.

  7. Pet Problems at Home: Pet Problems in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltow, Willow

    1984-01-01

    Discusses problems of pets in the community, examining the community's role related to disruptive pets and pet overpopulation. Also discusses pet problems at home, offering advice on selecting a pet, meeting a pet's needs, and disciplining pets. Includes a list of books, films/filmstrips, teaching materials, and various instructional strategies.…

  8. Refined beam measurements on the SNS H- injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B. X.; Welton, R. F.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stinson, C. M.; Stockli, M. P.

    2017-08-01

    The H- injector for the SNS RFQ accelerator consists of an RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source and a compact, two-lens electrostatic LEBT. The LEBT output and the RFQ input beam current are measured by deflecting the beam on to an annular plate at the RFQ entrance. Our method and procedure have recently been refined to improve the measurement reliability and accuracy. The new measurements suggest that earlier measurements tended to underestimate the currents by 0-2 mA, but essentially confirm H- beam currents of 50-60 mA being injected into the RFQ. Emittance measurements conducted on a test stand featuring essentially the same H- injector setup show that the normalized rms emittance with 0.5% threshold (99% inclusion of the total beam) is in a range of 0.25-0.4 mm.mrad for a 50-60 mA beam. The RFQ output current is monitored with a BCM toroid. Measurements as well as simulations with the PARMTEQ code indicate an underperforming transmission of the RFQ since around 2012.

  9. Electron beam induced modifications in flexible biaxially oriented polyethylene terephthalate sheets: Improved mechanical and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, N. [Accelerator & Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Koiry, S.P. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Singh, A., E-mail: asb_barc@yahoo.com [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Tillu, A.R. [Accelerator & Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Jha, P.; Samanta, S.; Debnath, A.K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Aswal, D.K., E-mail: dkaswal@yahoo.com [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Mondal, R.K. [Radiation Technology Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India); Acharya, S.; Mittal, K.C. [Accelerator & Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, 400 085 (India)

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we have studied the effects of electron beam irradiation (with dose ranging from 2 to 32 kGy) on mechanical and electrical properties of biaxially oriented polyethylene terephthalate (BOPET) sheets. The sol-gel analysis, Fourier transformation infra-red (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterizations of the irradiated BOPET sheets suggest partial cross-linking of PET chains through the diethylene glycol (DEG). The mechanical properties of BOPET, such as, tensile strength, Young's modulus and electrical resistivity shows improvement with increasing dose and saturate for doses >10 kGy. The improved mechanical properties and high electrical resistivity of electron beam modified BOPET sheets may have additional advantages in applications, such as, packaging materials for food irradiation, medical product sterilization and electronic industries. - Graphical abstract: Irradiation of BOPET by electron beam leads to the formation of diethylene glycol that crosslink's the PET chains, resulting in improved mechanical properties and enhanced electrical resistivity. - Highlights: • BOPET exhibit improved tensile strength/Young's modulus after e-beam exposure. • Electrical resistivity of BOPET increases after e-beam exposure. • Cross-linking of PET chains through diethylene glycol was observed after e-beam exposure.

  10. Measurements on wave propagation characteristics of spiraling electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Getty, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of cyclotron-harmonic waves propagating on a neutralized spiraling electron beam immersed in a uniform axial magnetic field are studied experimentally. The experimental setup consisted of a vacuum system, an electron-gun corkscrew assembly which produces a 110-eV beam with the desired delta-function velocity distribution, a measurement region where a microwave signal is injected onto the beam to measure wavelengths, and a velocity analyzer for measuring the axial electron velocity. Results of wavelength measurements made at beam currents of 0.15, 1.0, and 2.0 mA are compared with calculated values, and undesirable effects produced by increasing the beam current are discussed. It is concluded that a suitable electron beam for studies of cyclotron-harmonic waves can be generated by the corkscrew device.

  11. Measurements of airborne short-lived radioactivity concentration in a PET facility at a national University hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Tadashi

    2006-01-01

    National universities in Japan became under regulation of Industrial Safety and Health Law since 2004FY. One of the legal obligations is working environment measurements such as airborne radioactivity concentration in the rooms where employees handle unsealed radiation sources. Both in 2004FY and in 2005FY, measurements of airborne radioactivity concentration were carried out by two different agencies. The most prominent difference among them is the measurement for short-lived PET nuclides. In 2004FY, one agency measured the radioactivity with a Ge spectrometer at its own laboratory, whereas, in 2005FY, the other agency brought a NaI scintillation counter for gross gamma counting to the Hospital. It can be shown that detection limits for short-lived PET nuclides are in principle almost the same in both methods. It is also found that, in the actual case, gamma spectrometry with a Ge spectrometer is superior in judgement of detection of the radioactivity. (author)

  12. Beam diffusion measurements using collimator scans in the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Valentino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The time evolution of beam losses during a collimator scan provides information on halo diffusion and population. This is an essential input for machine performance characterization and for the design of collimation systems. Beam halo measurements in the CERN Large Hadron Collider were conducted through collimator scrapings in a dedicated beam study for the first time at 4 TeV. Four scans were performed with two collimators, in the vertical plane for beam 1 and horizontally for beam 2, before and after bringing the beams into collisions. Inward and outward steps were performed. A diffusion model was used to interpret the observed loss rate evolution in response to the collimator steps. With this technique, diffusion coefficients were estimated as a function of betatron oscillation amplitude from approximately 3 to 7 standard deviations of the transverse beam distribution. A comparison of halo diffusion and core emittance growth rates is also presented.

  13. Linac4 Low Energy Beam Measurements with Negative Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Scrivens, R; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, O; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  14. Interference between PET and MRI sub-systems in a silicon-photomultiplier-based PET/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kanai, Yasukazu; Hatazawa, Jun; Aoki, Masaaki; Sugiyama, Eiji; Watabe, Tadashi; Imaizumi, Masao; Shimosegawa, Eku

    2011-01-01

    The silicon-photomultiplier (Si-PM) is a promising photodetector, especially for integrated PET/MRI systems, due to its small size, high gain, and low sensitivity to static magnetic fields. The major problem using a Si-PM-based PET system within the MRI system is the interference between the PET and MRI units. We measured the interference by combining a Si-PM-based PET system with a permanent-magnet MRI system. When the RF signal-induced pulse height exceeded the lower energy threshold level of the PET system, interference between the Si-PM-based PET system and MRI system was detected. The prompt as well as the delayed coincidence count rates of the Si-PM-based PET system increased significantly. These noise counts produced severe artifacts on the reconstructed images of the Si-PM-based PET system. In terms of the effect of the Si-PM-based PET system on the MRI system, although no susceptibility artifact was observed on the MR images, electronic noise from the PET detector ring was detected by the RF coil and reduced the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the MR images. The S/N degradation of the MR images was reduced when the distance between the RF coil and the Si-PM-based PET system was increased. We conclude that reducing the interference between the PET and MRI systems is essential for achieving the optimum performance of integrated Si-PM PET/MRI systems.

  15. PET motion correction in context of integrated PET/MR: Current techniques, limitations, and future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Ashley; Smith, Jye; Thomas, Paul; Rose, Stephen; Dowson, Nicholas

    2017-12-01

    Patient motion is an important consideration in modern PET image reconstruction. Advances in PET technology mean motion has an increasingly important influence on resulting image quality. Motion-induced artifacts can have adverse effects on clinical outcomes, including missed diagnoses and oversized radiotherapy treatment volumes. This review aims to summarize the wide variety of motion correction techniques available in PET and combined PET/CT and PET/MR, with a focus on the latter. A general framework for the motion correction of PET images is presented, consisting of acquisition, modeling, and correction stages. Methods for measuring, modeling, and correcting motion and associated artifacts, both in literature and commercially available, are presented, and their relative merits are contrasted. Identified limitations of current methods include modeling of aperiodic and/or unpredictable motion, attaining adequate temporal resolution for motion correction in dynamic kinetic modeling acquisitions, and maintaining availability of the MR in PET/MR scans for diagnostic acquisitions. Finally, avenues for future investigation are discussed, with a focus on improvements that could improve PET image quality, and that are practical in the clinical environment. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. The measurement of willingness to pay for mass cancer screening with whole-body PET (positron emission tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasunaga, Hideo; Ide, Hiroo; Imamura, Tomoaki; Ohe, Kazuhiko

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have seen an increase in the number of studies that measured the willingness to pay (WTP) for medical services using the contingent valuation method (CVM) and evaluated the benefits of these services. This study aimed to measure the general public's WTP for cancer screening with positron emission tomography (PET) and to determine consumer characteristics that may affect their WTP. A questionnaire survey of males and females living in Japan aged between 40 and 59 years was conducted via the Internet. A total of 274 individuals accepted the offer to participate and were enrolled in the study. The study participants were divided into two groups: Group A (n=138) and Group B (n=136). Group A was provided only with information about the PET procedure and the high cancer detection rate; Group B was provided with additional information regarding the possibility of ''false negative'' and false positive'' results and the fact that the efficacy of PET screening for reducing mortality has not yet been demonstrated. Participants were then asked to answer their WTP for cancer screening with PET by payment cards approach. The overall average amount consumers were willing to pay for PET cancer screening was $103.7 (n=274). The average value in Group A was $107.3, the average value in Group B was $100.0 and there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. The results of categorical regression analysis showed that household annual income was the only significant factor affecting WTP. Our study showed that household annual income affected the WTP for cancer screening with PET and therefore the demand for PET screening would be limited to the high-income group. Negative information about PET did not reduce the WTP. This finding suggests that test subjects mainly evaluated the high detection rate of PET screening and the reassurance'' value of receiving negative screening results. (author)

  17. Cost-effectiveness of PET and PET/Computed Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerke, Oke; Hermansson, Ronnie; Hess, Søren

    2015-01-01

    measure by means of incremental cost-effectiveness ratios when considering the replacement of the standard regimen by a new diagnostic procedure. This article discusses economic assessments of PET and PET/computed tomography reported until mid-July 2014. Forty-seven studies on cancer and noncancer...

  18. Matching the reaction-diffusion simulation to dynamic [18F]FMISO PET measurements in tumors: extension to a flow-limited oxygen-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kuangyu; Bayer, Christine; Gaertner, Florian C; Astner, Sabrina T; Wilkens, Jan J; Nüsslin, Fridtjof; Vaupel, Peter; Ziegler, Sibylle I

    2017-02-01

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) with hypoxia specific tracers provides a noninvasive method to assess the tumor oxygenation status. Reaction-diffusion models have advantages in revealing the quantitative relation between in vivo imaging and the tumor microenvironment. However, there is no quantitative comparison of the simulation results with the real PET measurements yet. The lack of experimental support hampers further applications of computational simulation models. This study aims to compare the simulation results with a preclinical [ 18 F]FMISO PET study and to optimize the reaction-diffusion model accordingly. Nude mice with xenografted human squamous cell carcinomas (CAL33) were investigated with a 2 h dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO PET followed by immunofluorescence staining using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the endothelium marker CD 31. A large data pool of tumor time-activity curves (TAC) was simulated for each mouse by feeding the arterial input function (AIF) extracted from experiments into the model with different configurations of the tumor microenvironment. A measured TAC was considered to match a simulated TAC when the difference metric was below a certain, noise-dependent threshold. As an extension to the well-established Kelly model, a flow-limited oxygen-dependent (FLOD) model was developed to improve the matching between measurements and simulations. The matching rate between the simulated TACs of the Kelly model and the mouse PET data ranged from 0 to 28.1% (on average 9.8%). By modifying the Kelly model to an FLOD model, the matching rate between the simulation and the PET measurements could be improved to 41.2-84.8% (on average 64.4%). Using a simulation data pool and a matching strategy, we were able to compare the simulated temporal course of dynamic PET with in vivo measurements. By modifying the Kelly model to a FLOD model, the computational simulation was able to approach the dynamic [ 18 F]FMISO measurements in the investigated

  19. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented

  20. Time-resolved beam energy measurements at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudgings, D.W.; Clark, D.A.; Bryant, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    A narrow atomic photodetachment resonance is used to measure the LAMPF beam energy. Energy and time resolution are adequate to permit the use of this method in studying transient changes in accelerated beam energy

  1. Evaluation of gross tumor size using CT, 18F-FDG PET, integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT and pathological analysis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huiming; Liu Yunfang; Hou Ming; Liu Jie; Li Xiaonan; Yu Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation of gross tumor sizes between combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and macroscopic surgical samples has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we compared CT, 18 F-FDG PET and combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and validated the results through examination of the macroscopic surgical specimen. Methods: Fifty-two operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients had integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans preoperatively and pathological examination post-operation. Four separate maximal tumor sizes at X (lateral direction), Y (ventro-dorsal direction) and Z (cranio-caudal direction) axis were measured on 18 F-FDG PET, CT, combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and surgical specimen, respectively. Linear regression was calculated for each of the three imaging measurements versus pathological measurement. Results: No significant differences were observed among the tumor sizes measured by three images and pathological method. Compared with pathological measurement, CT size at X, Y, Z axis was larger, whereas combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FDG PET size were smaller. Combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT size was more similar to the pathological size than that of 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Results of linear regressions showed that integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT was the most accurate modality in measuring the size of cancer. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT correlates more faithfully with pathological findings than 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT is an effective tool to define the target of GTV in radiotherapy.

  2. Measurements and simulations of focused beam for orthovoltage therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Hassan; Mahato, Dip N.; Satti, Jahangir; MacDonald, C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Megavoltage photon beams are typically used for therapy because of their skin-sparing effect. However, a focused low-energy x-ray beam would also be skin sparing, and would have a higher dose concentration at the focal spot. Such a beam can be produced with polycapillary optics. MCNP5 was used to model dose profiles for a scanned focused beam, using measured beam parameters. The potential of low energy focused x-ray beams for radiation therapy was assessed. Methods: A polycapillary optic was used to focus the x-ray beam from a tungsten source. The optic was characterized and measurements were performed at 50 kV. PMMA blocks of varying thicknesses were placed between optic and the focal spot to observe any variation in the focusing of the beam after passing through the tissue-equivalent material. The measured energy spectrum was used to model the focused beam in MCNP5. A source card (SDEF) in MCNP5 was used to simulate the converging x-ray beam. Dose calculations were performed inside a breast tissue phantom. Results: The measured focal spot size for the polycapillary optic was 0.2 mm with a depth of field of 5 mm. The measured focal spot remained unchanged through 40 mm of phantom thickness. The calculated depth dose curve inside the breast tissue showed a dose peak several centimeters below the skin with a sharp dose fall off around the focus. The percent dose falls below 10% within 5 mm of the focus. It was shown that rotating the optic during scanning would preserve the skin-sparing effect of the focused beam. Conclusions: Low energy focused x-ray beams could be used to irradiate tumors inside soft tissue within 5 cm of the surface

  3. BEAM EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT TOOL FOR CEBAF OPERATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevtsov, Pavel; Tiefenback, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A new software tool was created at Jefferson Lab to measure the emittance of the CEBAF electron beams. The tool consists of device control and data analysis applications. The device control application handles the work of wire scanners and writes their measurement results as well as the information about accelerator settings during these measurements into wire scanner data files. The data analysis application reads these files and calculates the beam emittance on the basis of a wire scanner data processing model. Both applications are computer platform independent but are mostly used on LINUX PCs recently installed in the accelerator control room. The new tool significantly simplifies beam emittance measurement procedures for accelerator operations and contributes to a very high availability of the CEBAF machine for the nuclear physics program at Jefferson Lab.

  4. Radioactive Beam Measurements to Probe Stellar Explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Michael Scott [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Unique beams of unstable nuclei from the Holi eld Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are being used to measure the thermonuclear reactions that occur in novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. The astrophysical impact of these measurements is determined by synergistic nuclear data evaluations and element synthesis calculations. Results of recent measurements and explosion simulations are brie y described, along with future plans and software research tools for the community.

  5. Performance evaluation and calibration of the neuro-pet scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sank, V.J.; Brooks, R.A.; Cascio, H.E.; Di Chiro, G.; Friauf, W.S.; Leighton, S.B.

    1983-01-01

    The Neuro-PET is a circular ring seven-slice positron emission tomograph designed for imaging human heads and small animals. The scanner uses 512 bismuth germanate detectors 8.25 mm wide packed tightly together in four layers to achieve high spatial resolution (6-7 mm FWHM) without the use of beam blockers. Because of the small 38 cm ring diameter, the sensitivity is also very high: 70,000 c/s per true slice with medium energy threshold (375 keV) for a 20 cm diameter phantom containing 1 μCi/cc of positron-emitting activity, according to a preliminary measurement. There are three switch-selectable thresholds, and the sensitivity will be higher in the low threshold setting. The Neuro-PET is calibrated with a round or elliptical phantom that approximates a patient's head; this method eliminates the effects of scatter and self-attenuation to first order. Further software corrections for these artifacts are made in the reconstruction program, which reduce the measured scatter to zero, as determined with a 5 cm cold spot. With a 1 cm cold spot, the apparent activity at the center of the cold spot is 18% of the surrounding activity, which is clearly a consequence of the limits of spatial resolution, rather than scatter. The Neuro-PET has been in clinical operation since June 1982, and approximately 30 patients have been scanned to date

  6. Preservation of beam loss induced quenches, beam lifetime and beam loss measurements with the HERA-p beam-loss-monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittenburg, K.

    1994-01-01

    The beam-loss-monitors (BLMs) in the HERA-Proton-ring (HERAp) must fulfil the following requirements: They have to measure losses sensitive and fast enough to prevent the superconducting magnets from beam loss induced quenching; the dynamic range of the monitors must exceed several decades in order to measure losses during beam lifetimes of hundreds of hours as well as the much stronger losses that may quench superconducting magnets; they have to be insensitive to the synchrotron radiation of the adjacent electron-ring (HERAe); and their radiation hardness must allow a monitor-lifetime of a few years of HERA operation. These requirements are well satisfied by the HERAp-BLM-System. (orig.)

  7. High current density ion beam measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, W.C.; Sawatzky, E.

    1976-01-01

    High ion beam current measurements are difficult due to the presence of the secondary particles and beam neutralization. For long Faraday cages, true current can be obtained only by negative bias on the target and by summing the cage wall and target currents; otherwise, the beam will be greatly distorted. For short Faraday cages, a combination of small magnetic field and the negative target bias results in correct beam current. Either component alone does not give true current

  8. Walking beam pumping unit system efficiency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilgore, J.J.; Tripp, H.A.; Hunt, C.L. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of electricity used by walking beam pumping units is a major expense in producing crude oil. However, only very limited information is available on the efficiency of beam pumping systems and less is known about the efficiency of the various components of the pumping units. This paper presents and discusses measurements that have been made on wells at several Shell locations and on a specially designed walking beam pump test stand at Lufkin Industries. These measurements were made in order to determine the overall system efficiency and efficiency of individual components. The results of this work show that the overall beam pumping system efficiency is normally between 48 and 58 percent. This is primarily dependent on the motor size, motor type, gearbox size, system's age, production, pump size, tubing size, and rod sizes

  9. Measurement of γ-quanta beam polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchkov, B.I.; Tugaenko, V.Yu.; Maishev, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    A beam of polarized γ-quanta is produced and its polarization degree is measured. The experiment is conducted using an electron beam of the Serpukhov accelerator at the 'Kaskad' facility. 28 GeV energy electrons are recorded in a proportional chamber after which they enter a 15 mm thickness silicon crystal. After passing the second proportional chamber the electrons get into complete absorption spectrometer where their energy is measured, and the emitted gamma quanta get to 30 mm thickness silicon crystal. E + e - -pair coordinates are measured in the third proportional chamber. Gamma-quantum polarization value of 0.3±0.1 is obtained. 1 ref.; 1 fig

  10. RF Phase Scan for Beam Energy Measurement of KOMAC DTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hansung; Kwon, Hyeokjung; Kim, Seonggu; Lee, Seokgeun; Cho, Yongsub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The energy gain through the drift tube linac is a function of the synchronous phase, therefore, the output beam energy from DTL can be affected by the RF phase setting in low-level RF (LLRF) system. The DTL at Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) consists of 11 tanks and the RF phase setting in each tank should be matched for synchronous acceleration in successive tanks. That means a proper setting of RF phase in each DTL tank is critical for efficient and loss-free operation. The matching RF phase can be determined based on the output energy measurement from the DTL tank. The beam energy can be measured by several methods. For example, we can use a bending magnet to determine the beam energy because the higher momentum of beam means the less deflection angle in the fixed magnetic field. By measuring the range of proton beam through a material with known stopping power also can be utilized to determine the beam energy. We used a well-known time-of-flight method to determine the output beam energy from the DTL tank by measuring beam phase with a beam position monitor (BPM). Based on the energy measurement results, proper RF operating point could be obtained. We performed a RF phase scan to determine the output beam energy from KOMAC DTL by using a time-of-flight method and to set RF operating point precisely. The measured beam energy was compared with a beam dynamics simulation and showed a good agreement. RF phase setting is critical issue for the efficient operation of the proton accelerator, we have a plan to implement and integrate the RF phase measurement system into an accelerator control system for future need.

  11. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  12. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  13. High spatial resolution measurement of depth-of-interaction of a PET LSO crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, A.; Kalinka, G.; Novak, D.; Sipos, A.; Vegh, J.; Molnar, J.

    2004-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. A new type of experimental technique to investigate the depth-of-interaction (DOI) dependence in small scintillator elements designed for high-resolution animal PET [1] has been introduced at our institute, recently. A lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) crystal (2x2x10 mm 3 ) was irradiated with a highly focused 2 MeV He + beam at the ATOMKI nuclear microprobe laboratory. Pulse height spectra from a photomultiplier (PMT) attached to one end of the LSO crystal were collected in list mode. Sequential scans of 1000x1000 μm 2 areas along the 10 mm long crystal were made to get high lateral resolution images of pulse height spectra at different distances from the window of the PMT. A mean pulse height algorithm was applied to each pixel to generate two dimensional intensity images and the corresponding spectra of 100 μmx1 mm areas. Representative pulse height spectra are shown in Fig. 1 for different distances between the position of irradiation and the PMT. The mean value of the pulse height spectrum describing the position of the full energy peak is a way to measure DOI effects. It is seen that the closer the DOI to the PMT-end of the crystal the higher the energy of the peak. The centre of the detected peak varies about 30 % along the lateral side of the crystal. This effect is due to the increasing number of reflections with associated loss of light when the distance between the DOI position and the light collecting PMT grows. Further these results, no difference in the light intensity was found depending on which position across (perpendicular to the length of) the crystal was irradiated with the microbeam. The obtained results of the overall DOI dependence confirm previous measurements on LSO crystals with similar geometry and wrapping but based on collimated gamma-ray irradiation. Since the present experimental setup allows obtaining data with several orders of magnitude better spatial resolution (from μm up to mm) than with

  14. SU-E-J-49: Distal Edge Activity Fall Off Of Proton Therapy Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmekawy, A; Ewell, L [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Butuceanu, C; Zhu, L [HUPTI, Hampton, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize and quantify the distal edge activity fall off, created in a phantom by a proton therapy beam Method and Materials: A 30x30x10cm polymethylmethacrylate phantom was irradiated with a proton therapy beam using different ranges and beams. The irradiation volume is approximated by a right circular cylinder of diameter 7.6cm and varying lengths. After irradiation, the phantom was scanned via a Philips Gemini Big Bore™ PET-CT for isotope activation. Varian Eclipse™ treatment planning system as well as ImageJ™ were used to analyze the resulting PET and CT scans. The region of activity within the phantom was longitudinally measured as a function of PET slice number. Dose estimations were made via Monte Carlo (GATE) simulation. Results: For both the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) and the mono-energetic pristine Bragg peak proton beams, the proximal activation rise was steep: average slope −0.735 (average intensity/slice number) ± 0.091 (standard deviation) for the pristine beams and −1.149 ± 0.117 for the SOBP beams. In contrast, the distal fall offs were dissimilar. The distal fall off in activity for the pristine beams was fit well by a linear curve: R{sup 2} (Pierson Product) was 0.9968, 0.9955 and 0.9909 for the 13.5, 17.0 and 21.0cm range beams respectively. The good fit allows for a slope comparison between the different ranges. The slope varied as a function of range from 1.021 for the 13.5cm beam to 0.8407 (average intensity/slice number) for the 21.0cm beam. This dependence can be characterized: −0.0234(average intensity/slice number/cm range). For the SOBP beams, the slopes were significantly less and were also less linear: average slope 0.2628 ± 0.0474, average R{sup 2}=0.9236. Conclusion: The distal activation fall off edge for pristine proton beams was linear and steep. The corresponding quantities for SOBP beams were shallower and less linear. Philips has provided support for this work.

  15. 2D imaging simulations of a small animal PET scanner with DOI measurement. jPET-RD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Hagiwara, Naoki

    2005-01-01

    We present a preliminary study on the design of a high sensitivity small animal depth of interaction (DOI)-PET scanner: jPET-RD (for Rodents with DOI detectors), which will contribute to molecular imaging. The 4-layer DOI block detector for the jPET-RD that consists of scintillation crystals (1.4 mm x 1.4 mm x 4.5 mm) and a flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (52 mm x 52 mm) was previously proposed. In this paper, we investigate imaging performance of the jPET-RD through numerical simulations. The scanner has a hexagonal geometry with a small diameter and a large axial aperture. Therefore DOI information is expected to improve resolution uniformity in the whole field of view (FOV). We simulate the scanner for various parameters of the number of DOI channels and the crystal length. Simulated data are reconstructed using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization with accurate system modeling. The trade-off results between background noise and spatial resolution show that only shortening the length of crystal does not improve the trade-off at all, and that 4-layer DOI information improves uniformity of spatial resolution in the whole FOV. Excellent performance of the jPET-RD can be expected based on the numerical simulation results. (author)

  16. Thoracic staging in lung cancer: prospective comparison of 18F-FDG PET/MR imaging and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusch, Philipp; Buchbender, Christian; Köhler, Jens; Nensa, Felix; Gauler, Thomas; Gomez, Benedikt; Reis, Henning; Stamatis, Georgios; Kühl, Hilmar; Hartung, Verena; Heusner, Till A

    2014-03-01

    Therapeutic decisions in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients depend on the tumor stage. PET/CT with (18)F-FDG is widely accepted as the diagnostic standard of care. The purpose of this study was to compare a dedicated pulmonary (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging protocol with (18)F-FDG PET/CT for primary and locoregional lymph node staging in NSCLC patients using histopathology as the reference. Twenty-two patients (12 men, 10 women; mean age ± SD, 65.1 ± 9.1 y) with histopathologically confirmed NSCLC underwent (18)F-FDG PET/CT, followed by (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging, including a dedicated pulmonary MR imaging protocol. T and N staging according to the seventh edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging manual was performed by 2 readers in separate sessions for (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging, respectively. Results from histopathology were used as the standard of reference. The mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(mean) and SUV(max), respectively) and maximum diameter of the primary tumor was measured and compared in (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR imaging. PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT agreed on T stages in 16 of 16 of patients (100%). All patients were correctly staged by (18)F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MR (100%), compared with histopathology. There was no statistically significant difference between (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging for lymph node metastases detection (P = 0.48). For definition of thoracic N stages, PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were concordant in 20 of 22 patients (91%). PET/MR imaging determined the N stage correctly in 20 of 22 patients (91%). (18)F-FDG PET/CT determined the N stage correctly in 18 of 22 patients (82%). The mean differences for SUV(mean) and SUV(max) of NSCLC in (18)F-FDG PET/MR imaging and (18)F-FDG PET/CT were 0.21 and -5.06. These differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The SUV(mean) and SUV(max) measurements derived from (18)F-FDG PET/CT and (18)F-FDG PET

  17. Phase measurement and control of bunched beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, R.N.

    1978-01-01

    An ion bean buncher was developed at ANL for bunching all ion species through a tandem accelerator. Transit time variations through the tandem, caused by ripple and fluctuations in the injection and lens power supplies and terminal voltage, and to varying voltage distributions in the accelerating tube, cause a beam-phase variation at the output of the tandem. A beam-phase measurement and control system was designed and installed in conjunction with the ion beam buncher to control beam phase at the tandem output. That system is described

  18. Metabolic liver function measured in vivo by dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT without arterial blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Jacob; Munk, Ole Lajord; Sørensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic liver function can be measured by dynamic PET/CT with the radio-labelled galactose-analogue 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose ((18)F-FDGal) in terms of hepatic systemic clearance of (18)F-FDGal (K, ml blood/ml liver tissue/min). The method requires arterial blood sampling from a radial artery (arterial input function), and the aim of this study was to develop a method for extracting an image-derived, non-invasive input function from a volume of interest (VOI). Dynamic (18)F-FDGal PET/CT data from 16 subjects without liver disease (healthy subjects) and 16 patients with liver cirrhosis were included in the study. Five different input VOIs were tested: four in the abdominal aorta and one in the left ventricle of the heart. Arterial input function from manual blood sampling was available for all subjects. K*-values were calculated using time-activity curves (TACs) from each VOI as input and compared to the K-value calculated using arterial blood samples as input. Each input VOI was tested on PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. All five image-derived input VOIs yielded K*-values that correlated significantly with K calculated using arterial blood samples. Furthermore, TACs from two different VOIs yielded K*-values that did not statistically deviate from K calculated using arterial blood samples. A semicircle drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta was the only VOI that was successful for both healthy subjects and patients as well as for PET data reconstructed with and without resolution modelling. Metabolic liver function using (18)F-FDGal PET/CT can be measured without arterial blood samples by using input data from a semicircle VOI drawn in the posterior part of the abdominal aorta.

  19. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  20. Quantitative and Visual Assessments toward Potential Sub-mSv or Ultrafast FDG PET Using High-Sensitivity TOF PET in PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Spencer C; Bahroos, Emma; Hawkins, Randall A; Nardo, Lorenzo; Ravanfar, Vahid; Capbarat, Emily V; Seo, Youngho

    2018-06-01

    Newer high-performance time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) systems have the capability to preserve diagnostic image quality with low count density, while maintaining a high raw photon detection sensitivity that would allow for a reduction in injected dose or rapid data acquisition. To assess this, we performed quantitative and visual assessments of the PET images acquired using a highly sensitive (23.3 cps/kBq) large field of view (25-cm axial) silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based TOF PET (400-ps timing resolution) integrated with 3 T-MRI in comparison to PET images acquired on non-TOF PET/x-ray computed tomography (CT) systems. Whole-body 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) PET/CT was acquired for 15 patients followed by whole body PET/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with an average injected dose of 325 ± 84 MBq. The PET list mode data from PET/MRI were reconstructed using full datasets (4 min/bed) and reduced datasets (2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed). Qualitative assessment between PET/CT and PET/MR images were made. A Likert-type scale between 1 and 5, 1 for non-diagnostic, 3 equivalent to PET/CT, and 5 superior quality, was used. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV mean ) of normal tissues and lesions detected were measured and compared. Mean visual assessment scores were 3.54 ± 0.32, 3.62 ± 0.38, and 3.69 ± 0.35 for the brain and 3.05 ± 0.49, 3.71 ± 0.45, and 4.14 ± 0.44 for the whole-body maximum intensity projections (MIPs) for 1, 2, and 4 min/bed PET/MR images, respectively. The SUV mean values for normal tissues were lower and statistically significant for images acquired at 4, 2, 1, 0.5, and 0.25 min/bed on the PET/MR, with values of - 18 ± 28 % (p PET/MR datasets. High-sensitivity TOF PET showed comparable but still better visual image quality even at a much reduced activity in comparison to lower-sensitivity non-TOF PET. Our data translates to a seven times

  1. Electron cloud density measurements in accelerator beam-pipe using resonant microwave excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, John P., E-mail: jps13@cornell.edu [CLASSE, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Carlson, Benjamin T. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Duggins, Danielle O. [Gordon College, Wenham, MA 01984 (United States); Hammond, Kenneth C. [Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); De Santis, Stefano [LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Tencate, Alister J. [Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    An accelerator beam can generate low energy electrons in the beam-pipe, generally called electron cloud, that can produce instabilities in a positively charged beam. One method of measuring the electron cloud density is by coupling microwaves into and out of the beam-pipe and observing the response of the microwaves to the presence of the electron cloud. In the original technique, microwaves are transmitted through a section of beam-pipe and a change in EC density produces a change in the phase of the transmitted signal. This paper describes a variation on this technique in which the beam-pipe is resonantly excited with microwaves and the electron cloud density calculated from the change that it produces in the resonant frequency of the beam-pipe. The resonant technique has the advantage that measurements can be localized to sections of beam-pipe that are a meter or less in length with a greatly improved signal to noise ratio.

  2. PET-CT for nuclear medicine diagnostics of multiple myeloma; PET-CT in der nuklearmedizinischen Diagnostik des multiplen Myeloms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Klinische Kooperationseinheit Nuklearmedizin, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Functional or morphofunctional imaging modalities are used in myeloma patients for the diagnosis and therapy management within research protocols. Despite new staging criteria, which take into account the viability of a myeloma lesion, positron emission tomography (PET) is not used routinely. The impact of PET is therefore open. The role of PET and PET computed tomography (PET-CT) for the diagnosis and therapy management is discussed. The use of PET with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) allows the measurement of viable myeloma lesions and correlates with the stage of disease. A negative FDG examination correlates with a better prognosis. Furthermore, the number of focal lesions as well as the whole functional volume of myeloma lesions in FDG have a prognostic impact. Several studies have demonstrated the impact of FDG for the assessment of therapy monitoring and show that FDG is an earlier indicator for therapy response as compared to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The CT component of the new hybrid systems allows the assessment of osteolytic lesions in CT and their viability in FDG. The combination of PET with an MRT scanner allows the simultaneous measurement of bone marrow infiltration, focal lesions and their viability. The use of modern hybrid scanners, such as PET-CT and PET-MRT facilitates the simultaneous measurement of viable myeloma lesions, osteolytic lesions and bone marrow infiltration in the whole body; therefore, it is expected that these imaging modalities will play a greater role both in diagnosis and therapy management. (orig.) [German] Funktionelle oder morphologisch-funktionelle bildgebende Verfahren werden in der Diagnostik und im Therapiemanagement des multiplen Myeloms (MM) primaer fuer wissenschaftliche Zwecke eingesetzt. Ein routinemaessiger klinischer Einsatz ist trotz neuer Stadieneinteilung nicht erfolgt. Die Wertigkeit der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) ist noch offen. Die Rolle von PET und PET-CT fuer die Diagnostik und das

  3. Beam parameter measurements for the SLAC linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clendenin, J.E.; Blocker, C.; Breidenbach, M.

    1982-01-01

    A stable, closely-controlled, high-intensity, single-bunch beam will be required for the SLAC Linear Collider. The characteristics of short-pulse, low-intensity beams in the SLAC linac have been studied. A new, high-intensity thermionic gun, subharmonic buncher and S-band buncher/accelerator section were installed recently at SLAC. With these components, up to 10 11 electrons in a single S-band bunch are available for injection into the linac. the first 100-m accelerator sector has been modified to allow control of short-pulse beams by a model-driven computer program. Additional instrumentation, including a computerized energy analyzer and emittance monitor have been added at the end of the 100-m sector. The beam intensity, energy spectrum, emittance, charge distribution and the effect of wake fields in the first accelerator sector have been measured. The new source and beam control system will be described and the most recent results of the beam parameter measurements will be discussed

  4. Obtaining the Bunch Shape in a Linac from Beam Spectrum Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, Karl LF

    1999-01-01

    In linacs with high single-bunch charge, and tight tolerances for energy spread and emittance growth, controlling the short-range wakefield effects becomes extremely important. The effects of the wakefields, in turn, depend on the bunch length and also on the bunch shape. It was shown in the linac of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), for example, that by shaping the bunch, the final rms energy spread could be greatly reduced, compared to for the standard Gaussian bunch shape[1]. Therefore, in machines with high single-bunch charge, a method of measuring bunch shape can be an important beam diagnostic. In a linac with low single-bunch charge, the longitudinal bunch shape can be obtained relatively easily from a single measurement of the beam's final energy spectrum, provided that the final to initial energy ratio is large. One merely shifts the average phase of the beam, so that it rides off-crest sufficiently to induce an energy variation that is monotonic with longitudinal position. Then, by knowing the initial and final energies, the rf wave number, and the average beam phase, one can directly map the spectrum into the bunch shape. In a linac with high single-bunch charge, however, due to the effect of the longitudinal wakefield, this method either does not work at all, or it requires such a large shift in beam phase as to become impractical. In earlier work[2],[3] it was shown that, even when wakefields are important, if one measures the final beam spectrum for two different (properly chosen) values of beam phase, then one can again obtain the bunch shape, and--as a by-product--also the form of the wakefield induced voltage; this method was then illustrated using data from the linac of the SLC. These SLC measurements, however, had been performed with the machine in a special configuration, where the current was low; in addition, the noise the data was low and the measured spectra were smooth distributions. Under normal SLC conditions, however, the currents

  5. Measurements of the ionising radiation level at a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/CT examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulik, P.; Kowalska, M.; Golnik, N.; Budzynska, A.; Dziuk, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radiation level measurements at workplaces in a nuclear medicine facility performing PET/ CT examinations. This study meticulously determines the staff radiation exposure in a PET/CT facility by tracking the path of patient movement. The measurements of the instantaneous radiation exposure were performed using an electronic radiometer with a proportional counter that was equipped with the option of recording the results on line. The measurements allowed for visualisation of the staff's instantaneous exposure caused by a patient walking through the department after the administration of "1"8F-FDG. An estimation of low doses associated with each working step and the exposure during a routine day in the department was possible. The measurements were completed by determining the average radiation level using highly sensitive thermoluminescent detectors. (authors)

  6. Measurement of the electron beam mode in earth's foreshock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsager, T. G.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1990-01-01

    High frequency electric field measurements from the AMPTE IRM plasma wave receiver are used to identify three simultaneously excited electrostatic wave modes in the earth's foreshock region: the electron beam mode, the Langmuir mode, and the ion acoustic mode. A technique is developed which allows the rest frame frequecy and wave number of the electron beam waves to be determined. It is shown that the experimentally determined rest frame frequency and wave number agree well with the most unstable frequency and wave number predicted by linear homogeneous Vlasov theory for a plasma with Maxwellian background electrons and a Lorentzian electron beam. From a comparison of the experimentally determined and theoretical values, approximate limits are put on the electron foreshock beam temperatures. A possible generation mechanism for ion acoustic waves involving mode coupling between the electron beam and Langmuir modes is also discussed.

  7. Observation of surface discharge on polymer films irradiated by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsubara, Minoru; Ishii, Masaru; Tsumura, Eiji.

    1992-01-01

    The surface discharge on dielectric surfaces of a spacecraft caused by spacecraft charging is simulated by using a high vacuum chamber equipped with an electron beam gun. Fluoroethylene-propylene (FEP) and polyethleneterephthalate (PET) films frequently employed as thermal control materials are irradiated by an electron beam until surface discharges occur, then the spectrum and waveform of emitted light of discharge, together with the current waveform of the discharge and the mass spectrum of the gas in the vacuum chamber are measured. In the range of 300 through 700 nm of the wavelength, light emission from CN radicals, C 2 radicals, CH radicals and hydrogen atoms are detected. From this result, it is suggested that water molecules in the residual gas and molecules in the structure of the specimen contribute the light emission. The spectroscopic observation of the light emission suggests that the discharge energy is concentrated on PET more than that on FEP. (author)

  8. Detection of Cancer with PET and PET/CT in Asymptomatic Volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ji In; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae; Choi, Yoon Ho; Cho, Han Byoul; Shim, Jae Yong

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the diagnostic performance of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer detection in asymptomatic health-check examinees. This study consisted of 5091 PET or PET/CT conducted as part of annual health examination at one hospital from March 1998 to February 2008. To find the incidence of cancers, medical records of the subjects were thoroughly reviewed for a follow-up period of one year. The patterns of formal readings of PET and PET/CT were analyzed to assess the sensitivity and specificity for cancer detection. The histopathology and stage of the cancers were evaluated in relation to the results of PET. Eighty-six cancers (1.7%) were diagnosed within one year after PET or PET/CT. When PET and PET/CT results were combined, the sensitivity was 48.8% and specificity was 81.1% for cancer detection. PET only had a sensitivity of 46.2% and a specificity of 81.4%, and PET/CT only had a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 78.5% respectively. There were no significant differences in cancer site, stage and histopathology between PET positive and PET negative cancers. In 19.3% of formal readings of PET and PET/CT, further evaluation to exclude malignancy or significant disease was recommended. Head and neck area and upper gastrointestinal tract were commonly recommended sites for further evaluation. PET and PET/CT showed moderate performance for detecting cancers in asymptomatic adults in this study. More experience and further investigation are needed to overcome limitations of PET and PET/CT for cancer screening

  9. Characterisation of the SmartPET planar Germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: H.C.Boston@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Cooper, R.J.; Cresswell, J.; Grint, A.N.; Mather, A.R.; Nolan, P.J.; Scraggs, D.P.; Turk, G. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Hall, C.J.; Lazarus, I. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Berry, A.; Beveridge, T.; Gillam, J.; Lewis, R. [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia)

    2007-08-21

    Small Animal Reconstruction PET (SmartPET) is a project funded by the UK medical research council (MRC) to demonstrate proof of principle that Germanium can be utilised in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The SmartPET demonstrator consists of two orthogonal strip High Purity Germanium (HPGe) planar detectors manufactured by ORTEC. The aim of the project is to produce images of an internal source with sub mm{sup 3} spatial resolution. Before this image can be achieved the detectors have to be fully characterised to understand the response at any given location to a {gamma}-ray interaction. This has been achieved by probing the two detectors at a number of specified points with collimated sources of various energies and strengths. A 1 mm diameter collimated beam of photons was raster scanned in 1 mm steps across the detector. Digital pulse shape data were recorded from all the detector channels and the performance of the detector for energy and position determination has been assessed. Data will be presented for the first SmartPET detector.

  10. Measurement of centroid trajectory of Dragon-I electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaoguo; Wang Yuan; Zhang Wenwei; Zhang Kaizhi; Li Jing; Li Chenggang; Yang Guojun

    2005-01-01

    The control of the electron beam in an intense current linear induction accelerator (LIA) is very important. The center position of the electron beam and the beam profile are two important parameters which should be measured accurately. The setup of a time-resolved measurement system and a data processing method for determining the beam center position are introduced for the purpose of obtaining Dragon-I electron beam trajectory including beam profile. The actual results show that the centroid position error can be controlled in one to two pixels. the time-resolved beam centroid trajectory of Dragon-I (18.5 MeV, 2 kA, 90 ns) is obtained recently in 10 ns interval, 3 ns exposure time with a multi-frame gated camera. The results show that the screw movement of the electron beam is mainly limited in an area with a radius of 0.5 mm and the time-resolved diameters of the beam are 8.4 mm, 8.8 mm, 8.5 mm, 9.3 mm and 7.6 mm. These results have provided a very important support to several research areas such as beam trajectory tuning and beam transmission. (authors)

  11. The KFA TierPET: Performance characteristics and measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, S.; Herzog, H.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    We will present first results of the KFA Tier-PET, a positron emission tomograph with flexible geometry dedicated to in vivo studies of small animals. The flexible geometry allows us to change between measurements with high spatial resolution and measurements with increased sensitivity at the cost of resolution. The detectors consist of yttrium aluminum perovskit scintillator arrays which are glued together from 20 x 20 optically isolated crystals, coupled to position sensitive photomultiplier tubes. The fundamental design features concerning crystal dimensions and detector arrangement have been simulated. Based on this data, the definite dimensional outline of the crystals was determined. The YAP:Ce matrix in combination with a position sensitive photomultiplier leads to a detector block with a high spatial resolution. In first measurements a system sensitivity of 1.8 kcps/μCi/ml has been evaluated for a detector-to-detector distance of 16 cm

  12. Comparison of calculated neutral beam shine through with measured shine-through in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, H.K.; Hong, R.

    1997-11-01

    A comparison of the calculated shine through of neutral particle beams in the DIII-D plasma to measured values inferred from the target temperature rise is reported. This provides an opportunity to verify the shine through calculations and makes them more reliable in those cases where the shine through can not be measured. The DIII-D centerpost neutral beam target tiles are safe-guarded against excessive beam shine-through by pyrometry and thermocouple (TC) arrays on the tiles. Shine-through beam power is calculated from the measured temperature changes reported by the target tile TC array. These measurements are performed at the beginning of each operational year at DIII-D. Theoretically, the beam energy deposited into the plasma can be expressed as a function of the change in beam density. Neutral beam energy deposition in plasma (of known density) is inferred by comparing the results of a series of shine-through measurements for the 1997 campaign at DIII-D to the expected shine-through given by theory

  13. Evaluation of attenuation correction in cardiac PET using PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jeffrey M C; Laforest, R; Sotoudeh, H; Nie, X; Sharma, S; McConathy, J; Novak, E; Priatna, A; Gropler, R J; Woodard, P K

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous acquisition Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is a new technology that has potential as a tool both in research and clinical diagnosis. However, cardiac PET acquisition has not yet been validated using MR imaging for attenuation correction (AC). The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of PET imaging using a standard 2-point Dixon volume interpolated breathhold examination (VIBE) MR sequence for AC. Evaluation was performed in both phantom and patient data. A chest phantom containing heart, lungs, and a lesion insert was scanned by both PET/MR and PET/CT. In addition, 30 patients underwent whole-body 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT followed by simultaneous cardiac PET/MR. Phantom study showed 3% reduction of activity values in the myocardium due to the non-inclusion of the phased array coil in the AC. In patient scans, average standardized uptake values (SUVs) obtained by PET/CT and PET/MR showed no significant difference (n = 30, 4.6 ± 3.5 vs 4.7 ± 2.8, P = 0.47). There was excellent per patient correlation between the values acquired by PET/CT and PET/MR (R 2  = 0.97). Myocardial SUVs PET imaging using MR for AC shows excellent correlation with myocardial SUVs obtained by standard PET/CT imaging. The 2-point Dixon VIBE MR technique can be used for AC in simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition.

  14. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  15. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET contains additional valuable information on the temporal changes in tracer distribution. Kinetic modeling can be used to extract relevant pharmacokinetic parameters of tracer behavior in vivo that reflects relevant physiological processes. In this paper, we review the potential contribution of kinetic analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia. PMID:25250200

  16. Application of digital beam position processor Libera on tune measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunhui; Sun Baogen; Cao Yong; Lu Ping; Li Jihao

    2006-01-01

    Digital signal processing (DSP) is widely used in the field of beam diagnostics. Especially, DSP achieves very good performance in beam position signal analysis and betatron tune measurement. In Hefei light source, when beam was excited by narrow-band Gaussian white nose, Libera, a digital beam position processor, was used to process the signals from beam position monitor (BPM), which contained betatron oscillation. Fast Fourier transform (FFT) was applied to finding out betatron resonance frequency, from which the decimal part of betatron oscillation tune was calculated. By this means, the measure of horizontal tune was 3.5352 and the measure of vertical tune is 2.6299. (authors)

  17. 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in Burkitt's lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karantanis, Dimitrios; Durski, Jolanta M.; Lowe, Val J.; Nathan, Mark A.; Mullan, Brian P.; Georgiou, Evangelos; Johnston, Patrick B.; Wiseman, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of 18 F fluorodeoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in Burkitt's lymphoma. Methods: All Burkitt's lymphoma patients referred for FDG PET or FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) exams at our institution from June 2003 to June 2006 were included. Selected patients were followed and clinical information was reviewed retrospectively. Results from FDG PET-PET/CT, as blindly reviewed by a consensus of two experienced readers, were compared with the status of the disease as determined by other laboratory, clinical and imaging exams and clinical follow-up. FDG PET-PET/CT results were classified as true positive or negative and false positive or negative. The degree of FDG uptake in the positive lesions was semiquantified as maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax). Results: Fifty-seven FDG PET-PET/CT exams were done in 15 patients. Seven exams were done for initial staging, 8 during and 14 after the completion of therapy, and 28 for disease surveillance. For nodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 8, true negative in 47 and false positive in 2 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 96%). For extranodal disease FDG PET-PET/CT was true positive in 6, true negative in 48 and false positive in 3 exams (sensitivity 100%, specificity 94%). The mean SUVmax for the positive nodal lesions was 15.7 (range 6.9-21.7, median 18.5) and for extranodal lesions was 14.2 (range 6.2-24.3, median 12.4). Conclusions: FDG PET-PET/CT is sensitive for the detection of viable disease in Burkitt's lymphoma. Affected areas demonstrated high degree of uptake that was reversible upon successful implementation of treatment.

  18. Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy is at risk to be missed in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET of PET/CT and PET/MRI: comparison with mpMRI integrated in simultaneous PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, Martin T. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, Jan P. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Flechsig, Paul; Giesel, Frederik; Haberkorn, Uwe [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Roethke, Matthias C.; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Hadaschik, Boris A.; Hohenfellner, Markus [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Urology, Heidelberg (Germany); Gleave, Martin [University of British Columbia, The Vancouver Prostate Centre, Vancouver (Canada); Kopka, Klaus; Eder, Matthias [Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Heusser, Thorsten; Kachelriess, Marc [Department of Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wieczorek, Kathrin [University Hospital Heidelberg, Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg (Germany); Sachpekidis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, A. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11, targeting the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), is rapidly excreted into the urinary tract. This leads to significant radioactivity in the bladder, which may limit the PET-detection of local recurrence (LR) of prostate cancer (PC) after radical prostatectomy (RP), developing in close proximity to the bladder. Here, we analyze if there is additional value of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) compared to the {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET-component of PET/CT or PET/MRI to detect LR. One hundred and nineteen patients with biochemical recurrence after prior RP underwent both hybrid {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET/CT{sub low-dose} (1 h p.i.) and -PET/MRI (2-3 h p.i.) including a mpMRI protocol of the prostatic bed. The comparison of both methods was restricted to the abdomen with focus on LR (McNemar). Bladder-LR distance and recurrence size were measured in axial T2w-TSE. A logistic regression was performed to determine the influence of these variables on detectability in {sup 68}Ga-PSMA-11-PET. Standardized-uptake-value (SUV{sub mean}) quantification of LR was performed. There were 93/119 patients that had at least one pathologic finding. In addition, 18/119 Patients (15.1%) were diagnosed with a LR in mpMRI of PET/MRI but only nine were PET-positive in PET/CT and PET/MRI. This mismatch was statistically significant (p = 0.004). Detection of LR using the PET-component was significantly influenced by proximity to the bladder (p = 0.028). The PET-pattern of LR-uptake was classified into three types (1): separated from bladder; (2): fuses with bladder, and (3): obliterated by bladder. The size of LRs did not affect PET-detectability (p = 0.84), mean size was 1.7 ± 0.69 cm long axis, 1.2 ± 0.46 cm short-axis. SUV{sub mean} in nine men was 8.7 ± 3.7 (PET/CT) and 7.0 ± 4.2 (PET/MRI) but could not be quantified in the remaining nine cases (obliterated by bladder). The present study demonstrates

  19. PET/CT in lymphoma patients; PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinert, H.C. [Universitaetsspital Zuerich, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Switzerland)

    2004-11-01

    First results of PET/CT in Hodgkin's disease (HD) and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are reported. From March 2001 to August 2004 822 PET/CT were performed at our clinic in lymphoma patients for primary staging, restaging after therapy, and diagnosis of recurrence. For coregistration non contrast-enhanced low-dose CT were used. Due to the exact anatomic localization of {sup 18}F-FDG accumulating lesions equivocal or false positive PET findings are avoided. In comparison to contrast enhanced CT, PET/CT has a higher sensitivity and specificity in patients with HD and aggressive NHL. Integration of PET/CT in treatment planning of radiation therapy optimizes the field volume. Even in the initial phase of clinical evaluation, PET/CT has proven useful in staging and restaging of lymphoma. The exact anatomic localization of the PET findings is essential for a precise report, for treatment planning of radiation therapy, and for planning surgical biopsy. (orig.) [German] Erste Ergebnisse der PET-CT bei Morbus Hodgkin (HD) und den aggressiven Non-Hodgkin-Lymphomen (NHL) werden beschrieben. Von Maerz 2001 bis August 2004 wurden 822 PET-CT bei Lymphompatienten zum primaeren Staging, zum Restaging nach Therapie und zur Rezidivdiagnostik an unserer Klinik durchgefuehrt. Fuer die Koregistration wurde ein Low-dose-CT ohne i.v.-Kontrastmittel verwendet. Durch die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der {sup 18}F-FDG aufnehmenden Laesionen wurden unklare oder falsch-positive PET-Befunde vermieden. Die PET-CT erzielte im Vergleich zur KM-verstaerkten CT eine hoehere Sensitivitaet und Spezifitaet bei Patienten mit HD und aggressiven NHL. Die Integration der PET-CT in die Planung der Strahlentherapie fuehrte zu einer Optimierung der Feldgrenzen. Die PET-CT hat sich bereits in der Phase der initialen klinischen Evaluation als wertvoll beim Staging und Restaging von Lymphomen erwiesen. Die exakte anatomische Zuordnung der PET-Informationen ist fuer eine sichere Befundung

  20. A room temperature LSO/PIN photodiode PET detector module that measures depth of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Melcher, C.L.; Manente, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    We present measurements of a 4 element PET detector module that uses a 2x2 array of 3 mm square PIN photodiodes to both measure the depth of interaction (DOI) and identify the crystal of interaction. Each photodiode is coupled to one end of a 3x3x25 mm LSO crystal, with the opposite ends of all 4 crystals attached to a single PMT that provides a timing signal and initial energy discrimination. Each LSO crystal is coated with a open-quotes lossyclose quotes reflector, so the ratio of light detected in the photodiode and PMT depends on the position of interaction in the crystal, and is used to determine this position on an event by event basis. This module is operated at +25 degrees C with a photodiode amplifier peaking time of 2 μs. When excited by a collimated beam of 511 keV photons at the photodiode end of the module (i.e. closest to the patient), the DOI resolution is 4 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 95% of the time. When excited at the opposite end of the module, the DOI resolution is 13 mm fwhm and the crystal of interaction is identified correctly 73% of the time. The channel to channel variations in performance are minimal

  1. Development of an external Faraday cup for beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kye-Ryung; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Ra, Se-Jin; Lee, Seok-Ki

    2010-01-01

    In general, beam current measurements are very important for many kinds of experiments using highly energetic particle beams at accelerators, such as cyclotrons, linacs, etc. The Faraday cup is known to be one of the most popular beam current measurement tools. We developed an external Faraday cup to measure the beam current at a dedicated beam line for low-flux experiments installed at the MC-50 cyclotron of Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (KIRAMS). It was designed for external beam current measurements and is composed of a vacuum chamber, an entrance window, a collimator, a electrostatic suppressor ring, and a cup. The window is made of 75-um-thick Kapton film, and the diameter of the collimator is 10 mm or 20 mm. The ring and the cup has 5-cm inner diameters, and the thickness of the bottom of the cup is 2 cm, which is enough to absorb the total proton energy up to 45 MeV. Using this external Faraday cup, we measured the beam current from the cyclotron, and we compared measured flux to the results from film dosimetry using GAF films.

  2. Neutrino velocity measurement with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunetti, G.

    2011-05-01

    The thesis concerns the measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA experiment in the CNGS beam. There are different theoretical models that allow for Lorentz violating effects which can be investigated with measurements on terrestrial neutrino beams. The MINOS experiment published in 2007 a measure on the muon neutrinos over a distance of 730 km finding a deviation with respect to the expected time of flight of 126 ns with a statistical error of 32 ns and a systematic error of 64 ns. The OPERA experiment observes as well muon neutrinos 730 km away from the source, with a sensitivity significantly better than MINOS thanks to the higher number of interactions in the detector due to the higher energy beam and the much more sophisticated timing system explicitly upgraded in view of the neutrino velocity measurement. This system is composed by atomic cesium clocks and GPS receivers operating in 'common view mode'. Thanks to this system a time-transfer between the two sites with a precision at the level of 1 ns is possible. Moreover, a Fast Waveform Digitizer was installed along the proton beam line at CERN in order to measure the internal time structure of the proton pulses that are sent to the CNGS target. The result on the neutrino velocity is the most precise measurement so far with terrestrial neutrino beams: the neutrino time of flight was determined with a statistical uncertainty of about 10 ns and a systematic uncertainty smaller than 20 nano-seconds. (author)

  3. PET measurement of FK506 concentration in a monkey model of stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Noda, Akihiro; Osoda, Kazuhiko; Nishimura, Shintaro

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The immunosuppressive agent FK506 (tacrolimus) has neuroprotective properties in an experimental model of cerebral ischemia. To improve the accuracy of clinical studies in acute stroke, a clinical dose setting should be based on the brain concentration, but not on the blood concentration of agents in humans. We have already established a measurement method using PET for FK506 concentration in the normal monkey brain, which could be applicable for human study; however, under ischemic conditions, in this study, we aimed to examine the brain concentration of FK506 in a monkey model of stroke. Methods: Studies were performed on six male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) and a middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion model was used. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured by an intravenous injection of [ 15 O]H 2 O 165 min after MCA occlusion. FK506 (0.1 mg/kg) containing [ 11 C]FK506 was intravenously injected into the monkeys 180 min after MCA occlusion, and dynamic PET images were acquired for 30 min after administration. FK506 concentrations in the brain were calculated in moles per liter (M) units using the specific activity of injected FK506. Results: MCA occlusion produced ischemia, confirmed by rCBF measurement before the administration of [ 11 C]FK506. Fifteen minutes after FK506 (0.1 mg/kg) administration, the concentrations in the contralateral and ipsilateral cortex were 22.4±6.4 and 19.7±4.0 ng/g, respectively. Conclusion: We successfully measured the brain concentration of FK506 in a monkey model of stroke. The difference between the contralateral and ipsilateral concentrations of FK506 was not significant. This characteristic that FK506 readily penetrates ischemic tissue as well as normal tissue might explain the neuroprotective effect of FK506 in the ischemic brain and is suitable for the treatment of stroke patients

  4. Three-dimensional space charge distribution measurement in electron beam irradiated PMMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Yoichi; Suzuki, Ken; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Takada, Tatsuo

    1996-01-01

    The localized space charge distribution in electron beam irradiated PMMA was investigated using pulsed electroacoustic method. Using a conventional space charge measurement system, the distribution only in the depth direction (Z) can be measured assuming the charges distributed uniformly in the horizontal (X-Y) plane. However, it is difficult to measure the distribution of space charge accumulated in small area. Therefore, we have developed the new system to measure the three-dimensional space charge distribution using pulsed electroacoustic method. The system has a small electrode with a diameter of 1mm and a motor-drive X-Y stage to move the sample. Using the data measured at many points, the three-dimensional distribution were obtained. To estimate the system performance, the electron beam irradiated PMMA was used. The electron beam was irradiated from transmission electron microscope (TEM). The depth of injected electron was controlled using the various metal masks. The measurement results were compared with theoretically calculated values of electron range. (author)

  5. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook; Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  6. Development of PET/MRI with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong, E-mail: ychoi.image@gmail.com; Jung, Jiwoong; Kim, Sangsu; Lim, Hyun Keong; Im, Ki Chun [Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyun-wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Min; Kim, Jong Guk [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, 75 Nowon-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-709 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a dual-modality positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with insertable PET for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of the human brain. Methods: The PET detector block was composed of a 4 × 4 matrix of detector modules, each consisting of a 4 × 4 array LYSO coupled to a 4 × 4 Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (GAPD) array. The PET insert consisted of 18 detector blocks, circularly mounted on a custom-made plastic base to form a ring with an inner diameter of 390 mm and axial length of 60 mm. The PET gantry was shielded with gold-plated conductive fabric tapes with a thickness of 0.1 mm. The charge signals of PET detector transferred via 4 m long flat cables were fed into the position decoder circuit. The flat cables were shielded with a mesh-type aluminum sheet with a thickness of 0.24 mm. The position decoder circuit and field programmable gate array-embedded DAQ modules were enclosed in an aluminum box with a thickness of 10 mm and located at the rear of the MR bore inside the MRI room. A 3-T human MRI system with a Larmor frequency of 123.7 MHz and inner bore diameter of 60 cm was used as the PET/MRI hybrid system. A custom-made radio frequency (RF) coil with an inner diameter of 25 cm was fabricated. The PET was positioned between gradient and the RF coils. PET performance was measured outside and inside the MRI scanner using echo planar imaging, spin echo, turbo spin echo, and gradient echo sequences. MRI performance was also evaluated with and without the PET insert. The stability of the newly developed PET insert was evaluated and simultaneous PET and MR images of a brain phantom were acquired. Results: No significant degradation of the PET performance caused by MR was observed when the PET was operated using various MR imaging sequences. The signal-to-noise ratio of MR images was slightly degraded due to the PET insert installed inside the MR bore while the homogeneity was

  7. Reproducibility of MR-based Attenuation Maps in PET/MRI and the Impact on PET Quantification in Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olin, Anders; Ladefoged, Claes N; Langer, Natasha H

    2018-01-01

    AIM: Quantitative positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) is dependent upon reliable and reproducible MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). In this study we evaluated the quality of current vendor-provided thoracic MR-AC maps, and further investigated...... affecting the reproducibility of PET/MRI. This, in combination with other well-known sources of error associated with PET/MRI examinations, leads to inconsistent SUV measurements in serial studies and follow-up scenarios, which may affect the reliability of therapy response assessment. A thorough visual...

  8. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y position entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM

  9. The beam based alignment technique for the measurements of beam position monitors offsets and beam offsets from quadrupoles in the Pohang Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Huang, J.Y.; Ko, I.S.

    1999-01-01

    The beam based alignment (BBA) technique is applied to the 2-GeV storage ring of the Pohang Light Source to measure the offsets of beam position monitors. This measurement is particularly necessary for beam position monitors (BPMs) plugged into a long (∼10 m) aluminum chamber, since the mechanical deformation of the vacuum chamber is experienced after repeated heating for the outgassing process, and the BPM positions are changed accordingly. A part of the excitation current of each quadrupole magnet is shunted through an electronic shunt circuit. Then, the closed orbit receives a perturbation due to the current reduction. Using two quadrupole magnets, we can measure the offset of each BPM. Also, the BBA technique is applied to measure the beam offsets from the center of quadrupole magnets, and gives information to the survey team about which quadrupole magnets should be aligned mostly. In this process, we introduce the merit function to reduce various errors such as BPM characteristic changes and the lattice imperfection. By minimizing the merit function, we can get the beam offset as the maximized expectation value. This paper presents the BBA technique used and experimental results taken from the 2-GeV Pohang Light Source (PLS) storage ring. When the BPM offset is measured, it is observed that a 3% of the shunt current is suitable. (author)

  10. Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET; Stellenwert neuer MR-Techniken in der MR-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany); Quick, H.H. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik, Erlangen (Germany); Guimaraes, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown (United States); Catalano, O. [University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Morelli, J.N. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. (orig.) [German] Die klinische Implementierung der neuen Hybridtechnologie MR-Positronenemissionstomographie (MR-PET) bietet durch die Kombination aus hochaufloesender Morphologie, Funktion und Metabolismus bisher ungeahnte diagnostische Moeglichkeiten, die nicht nur fuer die Diagnose und die Verlaufskontrolle onkologischer und psychiatrischer Erkrankungen von hoher Bedeutung sind. Verglichen mit der PET-CT wird dies mit reduzierter Strahlenbelastung fuer den Patienten moeglich, was wiederum insbesondere fuer Patienten in der Tumornachsorge, die

  11. Regional metabolic liver function measured in patients with cirrhosis by 2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-galactose PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Michael; Mikkelsen, Kasper S; Frisch, Kim; Villadsen, Gerda E; Keiding, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    There is a clinical need for methods that can quantify regional hepatic function non-invasively in patients with cirrhosis. Here we validate the use of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-galactose (FDGal) PET/CT for measuring regional metabolic function to this purpose, and apply the method to test the hypothesis of increased intrahepatic metabolic heterogeneity in cirrhosis. Nine cirrhotic patients underwent dynamic liver FDGal PET/CT with blood samples from a radial artery and a liver vein. Hepatic blood flow was measured by indocyanine green infusion/Fick's principle. From blood measurements, hepatic systemic clearance (Ksyst, Lblood/min) and hepatic intrinsic clearance (Vmax/Km, Lblood/min) of FDGal were calculated. From PET data, hepatic systemic clearance of FDGal in liver parenchyma (Kmet, mL blood/mL liver tissue/min) was calculated. Intrahepatic metabolic heterogeneity was evaluated in terms of coefficient-of-variation (CoV, %) using parametric images of Kmet. Mean approximation of Ksyst to Vmax/Km was 86% which validates the use of FDGal as PET tracer of hepatic metabolic function. Mean Kmet was 0.157 mL blood/mL liver tissue/min, which was lower than 0.274 mL blood/mL liver tissue/min, previously found in healthy subjects (pdynamic FDGal PET/CT with arterial sampling provides an accurate measure of regional hepatic metabolic function in patients with cirrhosis. This is likely to have clinical implications for the assessment of patients with liver disease as well as treatment planning and monitoring. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Longitudinal Beam measurements at the LHC: The LHC Beam Quality Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G; Follin, F; Wehrle, U

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Beam Quality Monitor is a system that measures individual bunch lengths and positions, similarly to the twin system SPS Beam Quality Monitor, from which it was derived. The pattern verification that the system provides is vital during the injection process to verify the correctness of the injected pattern, while the bunch length measurement is fed back to control the longitudinal emittance blow up performed during the energy ramp and provides a general indication of the health of the RF system. The algorithms used, the hardware implementation and the system integration in the LHC control infrastructure are presented in this paper, along with possible improvements.

  13. LHC MD2877: Beam-beam long range impact on coupling measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Wenninger, Jorg; Carlier, Felix Simon; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Fuchsberger, Kajetan; Hostettler, Michi; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; Valuch, Daniel; Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    The LHC is now operating with a tune separation of ∼0.004 in collision. This puts tight constraints on the allowed transverse coupling since a |C−| larger than a fraction of the fractional tune split may lead to beam instabilities. In the last years a new tool based on the ADT used in a similar way as an AC-dipole to excite the beam was developed. The ADT AC-dipole gives coherent oscillations without increasing the beam emittance. These oscillations are analyzed automatically to obtain the value of the coupling. A coupling measurement campaign was done in 2017 and while the correction converged and stayed rather constant over time it was observed that depending on the target bunch and filling scheme the results could vary by Δ|C−| ∼ 0.002. In this MD report we investigated 3 different bunches, one with Long Range Beam-Beam (LRBB) in IPs 1 and 5, one with LRBB in all IPs and one with no LRBB. The results indicate that there are differences in coupling between the bunches experiencing different LR...

  14. Measuring specific receptor binding of a PET radioligand in human brain without pharmacological blockade: The genomic plot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Innis, Robert B; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-04-15

    PET studies allow in vivo imaging of the density of brain receptor species. The PET signal, however, is the sum of the fraction of radioligand that is specifically bound to the target receptor and the non-displaceable fraction (i.e. the non-specifically bound radioligand plus the free ligand in tissue). Therefore, measuring the non-displaceable fraction, which is generally assumed to be constant across the brain, is a necessary step to obtain regional estimates of the specific fractions. The nondisplaceable binding can be directly measured if a reference region, i.e. a region devoid of any specific binding, is available. Many receptors are however widely expressed across the brain, and a true reference region is rarely available. In these cases, the nonspecific binding can be obtained after competitive pharmacological blockade, which is often contraindicated in humans. In this work we introduce the genomic plot for estimating the nondisplaceable fraction using baseline scans only. The genomic plot is a transformation of the Lassen graphical method in which the brain maps of mRNA transcripts of the target receptor obtained from the Allen brain atlas are used as a surrogate measure of the specific binding. Thus, the genomic plot allows the calculation of the specific and nondisplaceable components of radioligand uptake without the need of pharmacological blockade. We first assessed the statistical properties of the method with computer simulations. Then we sought ground-truth validation using human PET datasets of seven different neuroreceptor radioligands, where nonspecific fractions were either obtained separately using drug displacement or available from a true reference region. The population nondisplaceable fractions estimated by the genomic plot were very close to those measured by actual human blocking studies (mean relative difference between 2% and 7%). However, these estimates were valid only when mRNA expressions were predictive of protein levels (i

  15. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivens, R., E-mail: richard.scrivens@cern.ch; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  16. DML and Foil Measurements of ETA Beam Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nexsen, W; Weir, J

    2005-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of the ETA beam radius have been made with a quartz foil and a diamagnetic loop (DML). While the measurements agreed at some settings they diverged at others. While the DML measures the rms radius of the total beam, the foil measures mainly the core and the divergence can be explained by the presence of a low density halo. Evidence of such a halo from other measurements is presented

  17. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Demir; Türkay Toklu; Mohammad Abuqbeitah; Hüseyin Çetin; H. Sezer Sezgin; Nami Yeyin; Kerim Sönmezoğlu

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated...

  18. Evaluation of PET Scanner Performance in PET/MR and PET/CT Systems: NEMA Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Mustafa; Toklu, Türkay; Abuqbeitah, Mohammad; Çetin, Hüseyin; Sezgin, H. Sezer; Yeyin, Nami; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of positron emission tomography (PET) component of PET/computed tomography (CT) with new emerging PET/magnetic resonance (MR) of the same vendor. Methods: According to National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-07, five separate experimental tests were performed to evaluate the performance of PET scanner of General Electric GE company; SIGNATM model PET/MR and GE Discovery 710 model PET/CT. The main investigated asp...

  19. Iodine-124 PET dosimetry in differentiated thyroid cancer: recovery coefficient in 2D and 3D modes for PET(/CT) systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentzen, Walter; Weise, Reiner; Kupferschläger, Jürgen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Brandau, Wolfgang; Bares, Ronald; Burchert, Wolfgang; Bockisch, Andreas

    2008-03-01

    This study evaluated the absolute quantification of iodine-124 ((124)I) activity concentration with respect to the use of this isotope for dosimetry before therapies with (131)I or (131)I-labeled radiotherapeuticals. The recovery coefficients of positron emission tomography(/computed tomography) PET(/CT) systems using (124)I were determined using phantoms and then validated under typical conditions observed in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. Transversal spatial resolution and recovery measurements with (124)I and with fluorine-18 ((18)F) as the reference were performed using isotope-containing line sources embedded in water and six isotope-containing spheres 9.7 to 37.0 mm in diameter placed in water-containing body and cylinder phantoms. The cylinder phantom spheres were filled with (18)F only. Measurements in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) modes were performed using both stand-alone PET (EXACT HR(+)) and combined PET/CT (BIOGRAPH EMOTION DUO) systems. Recovery comparison measurements were additionally performed on a GE ADVANCE PET system using the cylinder phantom. The recovery coefficients were directly determined using the activity concentration of circular regions of interest divided by the prepared activity concentration determined by the dose calibrator. The recovery correction method was validated using three consecutive scans of the body phantom under our (124)I PET(/CT) protocol for DTC patients. Compared with that of (18)F, transversal spatial resolution of (124)I was slightly, but statistically significantly degraded (7.4 mm vs. 8.3 mm, P or =12.6 mm in diameter. Recovery correction is mandatory for (124)I PET quantification, even for large structures. To ensure accurate dosimetry, thorough absolute recovery measurements must be individually established for the particular PET scanner and radionuclide to be used.

  20. Recovery coefficients for the quantification of the arterial input function from dynamic pet measurements: experimental and theoretical determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Bellemann, M.E.; Hauser, H.; Doll, J.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: For kinetic modelling of dynamic PET data, the arterial input function can be determined directly from the PET scans if a large artery is visualized on the images. It was the purpose of this study to experimentally and theoretically determine recovery coefficients for cylinders as a function of the diameter and level of background activity. Methods: The measurements were performed using a phantom with seven cylinder inserts (φ = 5-46 mm). The cylinders were filled with an aqueous 68 Ga solution while the main chamber was filled with a 18 F solution in order to obtain a varying concentration ratio between the cylinders and the background due to the different isotope half lives. After iterative image reconstruction, the activity concentrations were measured in the center of the cylinders and the recovery coefficients were calculated as a function of the diameter and the background activity. Based on the imaging properties of the PET system, we also developed a model for the quantitative assessment of recovery coefficients. Results: The functional dependence of the measured recovery data from the cylinder diameter and the concentration ratio is well described by our model. For dynamic PET measurements, the recovery correction must take into account the decreasing concentration ratio between the blood vessel and the surrounding tissue. Under the realized measurement and data analysis conditions, a recovery correction is required for vessels with a diameter of up to 25 mm. Conclusions: Based on the experimentally verified model, the activity concentration in large arteries can be calculated from the measured activity concentration in the blood vessel and the background activity. The presented approach offers the possibility to determine the arterial input function for pharmacokinetic PET studies non-invasively from large arteries (especially the aorta). (orig.) [de

  1. Radiographic film dosimetry of proton beams for depth‐dose constancy check and beam profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Anthony; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Johnson, Matt; Patyal, Baldev

    2015-01-01

    Radiographic film dosimetry suffers from its energy dependence in proton dosimetry. This study sought to develop a method of measuring proton beams by the film and to evaluate film response to proton beams for the constancy check of depth dose (DD). It also evaluated the film for profile measurements. To achieve this goal, from DDs measured by film and ion chamber (IC), calibration factors (ratios of dose measured by IC to film responses) as a function of depth in a phantom were obtained. These factors imply variable slopes (with proton energy and depth) of linear characteristic curves that relate film response to dose. We derived a calibration method that enables utilization of the factors for acquisition of dose from film density measured at later dates by adapting to a potentially altered processor condition. To test this model, the characteristic curve was obtained by using EDR2 film and in‐phantom film dosimetry in parallel with a 149.65 MeV proton beam, using the method. An additional validation of the model was performed by concurrent film and IC measurement perpendicular to the beam at various depths. Beam profile measurements by the film were also evaluated at the center of beam modulation. In order to interpret and ascertain the film dosimetry, Monte Carlos simulation of the beam was performed, calculating the proton fluence spectrum along depths and off‐axis distances. By multiplying respective stopping powers to the spectrum, doses to film and water were calculated. The ratio of film dose to water dose was evaluated. Results are as follows. The characteristic curve proved the assumed linearity. The measured DD approached that of IC, but near the end of the spread‐out Bragg peak (SOBP), a spurious peak was observed due to the mismatch of distal edge between the calibration and measurement films. The width of SOBP and the proximal edge were both reproducible within a maximum of 5 mm; the distal edge was reproducible within 1 mm. At 5 cm depth, the

  2. Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Neutron Beam Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ratanatongchai, Wichian

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Neutron beam tube of neutron radiography facility at Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1) Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (public organization) is a divergent beam. The rectangular open-end of the beam tube is 16 cm x 17 cm while the inner-end is closed to the reactor core. The neutron beam size was measured using 20 cm x 40 cm neutron imaging plate. The measurement at the position 100 cm from the end of the collimator has shown that the beam size was 18.2 cm x 19.0 cm. Gamma ray in neutron the beam was also measured by the identical position using industrial X ray film. The area of gamma ray was 27.8 cm x 31.1 cm with the highest intensity found to be along the neutron beam circumference

  3. 78 FR 27303 - Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ...-0178] Irradiation in the Production, Processing, and Handling of Animal Feed and Pet Food; Electron... electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of poultry feed and poultry feed ingredients. This action... CFR part 579) to provide for the safe use of electron beam and x-ray sources for irradiation of...

  4. PET measurements of hyperthermia-induced suppression of protein synthesis in tumors in relation to effects on tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, B.J.; Elsinga, P.H.; Mooibroek, J.; Paans, A.M.; Wieringa, A.R.; Konings, A.W.; Vaalburg, W.

    1991-01-01

    Hyperthermia-induced metabolic changes in tumor tissue have been monitored by PET. Uptake of L-[1-11C]tyrosine in rhabdomyosarcoma tissue of Wag/Rij rats was dose-dependently reduced after local hyperthermia treatment at 42, 45, or 47 degrees C. Tumor blood flow, as measured by PET with 13NH3, appeared to be unchanged. The L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data were compared to uptake data of L-[1-14C]tyrosine and with data on the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins. After intravenous injection, the 14C data were obtained from dissected tumor tissue. Heat-induced inhibition of the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins tallied with the L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data. Heat-induced inhibition of amino acid uptake in the tumor correlated well with regression of tumor growth. It is concluded that PET using L-[1-11C]tyrosine is eligible for monitoring the effect of hyperthermia on tumor growth

  5. Comparison Between In-Beam and Offline Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Proton and Carbon Ion Therapeutic Irradiation at Synchrotron- and Cyclotron-Based Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parodi, Katia; Bortfeld, Thomas; Haberer, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The benefit of using dedicated in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) detectors in the treatment room instead of commercial tomographs nearby is an open question. This work quantitatively compares the measurable signal for in-beam and offline PET imaging, taking into account realistic acquisition strategies at different ion beam facilities. Both scenarios of pulsed and continuous irradiation from synchrotron and cyclotron accelerators are considered, because of their widespread use in most carbon ion and proton therapy centers. Methods and Materials: A mathematical framework is introduced to compare the time-dependent amount and spatial distribution of decays from irradiation-induced isotope production. The latter is calculated with Monte Carlo techniques for real proton treatments of head-and-neck and paraspinal tumors. Extrapolation to carbon ion irradiation is based on results of previous phantom experiments. Biologic clearance is modeled taking into account available data from previous animal and clinical studies. Results: Ratios between the amount of physical decays available for in-beam and offline detection range from 40% to 60% for cyclotron-based facilities, to 65% to 110% (carbon ions) and 94% to 166% (protons) at synchrotron-based facilities, and increase when including biologic clearance. Spatial distributions of decays during irradiation exhibit better correlation with the dose delivery and reduced influence of biologic processes. Conclusions: In-beam imaging can be advantageous for synchrotron-based facilities, provided that efficient PET systems enabling detection of isotope decays during beam extraction are implemented. For very short (<2 min) irradiation times at cyclotron-based facilities, a few minutes of acquisition time after the end of irradiation are needed for counting statistics, thus affecting patient throughput

  6. Stability of the drive beam in the decelerator of CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The RF power necessary to accelerate the main beam in the compact linear collider (CLIC) is generated by decelerating high-intensity low energy drive beams in 44 decelerators. Recently new decelerating structures (PETS, power extraction and transfer structures) have been developed. In these structures the RF energy travels with particularly high group velocity, which can affect efficiency and transverse stability. The paper considers the transverse beam stability in the decelerator as well as the longitudinal effects in the presence of dynamic and static imperfections.

  7. Performance measurement of PSF modeling reconstruction (True X) on Siemens Biograph TruePoint TrueV PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Sub; Kim, Jin Su; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lim, Sang Moo; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-05-01

    The Siemens Biograph TruePoint TrueV (B-TPTV) positron emission tomography (PET) scanner performs 3D PET reconstruction using a system matrix with point spread function (PSF) modeling (called the True X reconstruction). PET resolution was dramatically improved with the True X method. In this study, we assessed the spatial resolution and image quality on a B-TPTV PET scanner. In addition, we assessed the feasibility of animal imaging with a B-TPTV PET and compared it with a microPET R4 scanner. Spatial resolution was measured at center and at 8 cm offset from the center in transverse plane with warm background activity. True X, ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) without PSF modeling, and filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction methods were used. Percent contrast (% contrast) and percent background variability (% BV) were assessed according to NEMA NU2-2007. The recovery coefficient (RC), non-uniformity, spill-over ratio (SOR), and PET imaging of the Micro Deluxe Phantom were assessed to compare image quality of B-TPTV PET with that of the microPET R4. When True X reconstruction was used, spatial resolution was RC with True X reconstruction was higher than that with the FBP method and the OSEM without PSF modeling method on the microPET R4. The non-uniformity with True X reconstruction was higher than that with FBP and OSEM without PSF modeling on microPET R4. SOR with True X reconstruction was better than that with FBP or OSEM without PSF modeling on the microPET R4. This study assessed the performance of the True X reconstruction. Spatial resolution with True X reconstruction was improved by 45 % and its % contrast was significantly improved compared to those with the conventional OSEM without PSF modeling reconstruction algorithm. The noise level was higher than that with the other reconstruction algorithm. Therefore, True X reconstruction should be used with caution when quantifying PET data.

  8. Measurement of the electron beam mode in the Earth's foreshock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onsager, T.G.; Holzworth, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    High frequency electric field measurements from the AMPTE IRM plasma wave receiver are used to identify three simultaneously excited electrostatic wave modes in the Earth's foreshock region: the electron beam mode the Langmuir mode, and the ion acoustic mode. A technique is developed which allows the rest frame frequency and wave number of the electron beam waves to be determined. Plasma wave and magnetometer data are used to determine the interplanetary magnetic field direction at which the spacecraft becomes magnetically connected to the Earth's bow shock. From the knowledge of this direction, the upstreaming electron cutoff velocity can be calculated. The authors take this calculated cutoff velocity to be the flow velocity of an electron beam in the plasma. Assuming that the wave phase speed is approximately equal to the beam speed and using the measured electric field frequency, they determine the plasma rest frame frequency and the wave number. They then show that the experimentally determined rest frame frequency and wave number agree well with the most unstable frequency and wave number predicted by linear homogeneous Vlasov theory for a plasma with Maxwellian background electrons and a Lorentzian electron beam. From a comparison of the experimentally determined and theoretical values, approximate limits are put on the electron foreshock beam temperatures. A possible generation mechanism for ion acoustic waves involving mode coupling between the electron beam and Langmuir modes is also discussed

  9. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamińska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwiński, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Białas, P.; Curceanu, C.; Dulski, K.; Głowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Gorgol, M.; Hiesmayr, B. C.; Jasińska, B.; Korcyl, G.; Kowalski, P.; Krzemień, W.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedźwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedźwiecka, M.; Raczyński, L.; Rudy, Z.; Silarski, M.; Wieczorek, A.; Wiślicki, W.; Zgardzińska, B.; Zieliński, M.; Moskal, P.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the { o-Ps }→ 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ (θ ) ≈ {0.4°} and σ (E) ≈ 4.1 {keV}, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities.

  10. Imaging corn plants with PhytoPET, a modular PET system for plant biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.; Kross, B.; McKisson, J.; McKisson, J. E.; Weisenberger, A. G.; Xi, W.; Zorn, C.; Bonito, G.; Howell, C. R.; Reid, C. D.; Crowell, A.; Cumberbatch, L. C.; Topp, C.; Smith, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    PhytoPET is a modular positron emission tomography (PET) system designed specifically for plant imaging. The PhytoPET design allows flexible arrangements of PET detectors based on individual standalone detector modules built from single Hamamatsu H8500 position sensitive photomultiplier tubes and pixelated LYSO arrays. We have used the PhytoPET system to perform preliminary corn plant imaging studies at the Duke University Biology Department Phytotron. Initial evaluation of the PhytoPET system to image the biodistribution of the positron emitting tracer {sup 11}C in corn plants is presented. {sup 11}CO{sub 2} is loaded into corn seedlings by a leaf-labeling cuvette and translocation of {sup 11}C-sugars is imaged by a flexible arrangement of PhytoPET modules on each side. The PhytoPET system successfully images {sup 11}C within corn plants and allows for the dynamic measurement of {sup 11}C-sugar translocation from the leaf to the roots.

  11. Collective effects and experimental verification of the CLIC drive beam and decelerator

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00418229; Stapnes, Steinar; Adli, Erik

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a potential next-generation particle collider, in which electrons and positrons collide at a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. In order to reach a high accelerating gradient and reduce the length of the machine, CLIC uses a novel two-beam scheme. Here, the acceleration energy for the main beam is provided by energy extraction from a secondary electron drive beam, by the use of Power Extraction and Transfer Structures (PETS). This Ph.D. thesis describes deceleration measurements from the CLIC Test Facility 3 at CERN, from a beam that had up to 37 % of its kinetic energy converted into 12 GHz rf power. The results are part of the feasibility demonstration of the CLIC scheme. The measured difference in beam energy of the decelerated beam is correlated with particle tracking simulations and with predictions based on analytical formulae, and a very good agreement is demonstrated. The evolution of the transverse emittance was also studied, since it is critical to contain th...

  12. Measurement of electron beam polarization at the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    1987-03-01

    The polarimeters needed to monitor and measure electron beam polarization at the Stanford Linear Collider are discussed. Two types of polarimeters, are to be used. The first is based on the spin dependent elastic scattering of photons from high energy electrons. The second utilizes the spin dependence of elastic electron-electron scattering. The plans of the SLC polarization group to measure and monitor electron beam polarization are discussed. A brief discussion of the physics and the demands it imposes on beam polarization measurements is presented. The Compton polarimeter and the essential characteristics of two Moeller polarimeters are presented

  13. Evaluation of Dixon Sequence on Hybrid PET/MR Compared with Contrast-Enhanced PET/CT for PET-Positive Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ju Hye; Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung; Chun, Kyung Ah

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging performs a two-point Dixon MR sequence for attenuation correction. However, MR data in hybrid PET/MR should provide anatomic and morphologic information as well as an attenuation map. We evaluated the Dixon sequence of hybrid PET/MR for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions compared with contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) in patients with oncologic diseases. Twelve patients underwent a single injection, dual imaging protocol. PET/CT was performed with an intravenous contrast agent (85±13 min after 18 F-FDG injection of 403± 45 MBq) and then (125±19 min after injection) PET/MR was performed. Attenuation correction and anatomic allocation of PET were performed using contrast-enhanced CT for PET/CT and Dixon MR sequence for hybrid PET/MR. The Dixon MR sequence and contrast-enhanced CT were compared for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions (scoring scale ranging from 0 to 3 for visual ratings). Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUVs) for the detected lesions were assessed for quantitative comparison. Both hybrid PET/MR and contrast-enhanced PET/CT identified 55 lesions with increased FDG uptake in ten patients. In total, 28 lymph nodes, 11 bone lesions, 3 dermal nodules, 3 pleural thickening lesions, 2 thyroid nodules, 1 pancreas, 1 liver, 1 ovary, 1 uterus, 1 breast, 1 soft tissue and 2 lung lesions were present. The best performance was observed for anatomic correlation of PET findings by the contrast-enhanced CT scans (contrast-enhanced CT, 2.64± 0.70; in-phase, 1.29±1.01; opposed-phase, 1.29±1.15; water-weighted, 1.71±1.07; fat weighted, 0.56±1.03). A significant difference was observed between the scores obtained from the contrast-enhanced CT and all four coregistered Dixon MR images. Quantitative evaluation revealed a high correlation between the SUVs measured with hybrid PET/MR (SUVmean, 2.63±1.62; SUVmax, 4.30±2.88) and contrast-enhanced PET

  14. Evaluation of Dixon Sequence on Hybrid PET/MR Compared with Contrast-Enhanced PET/CT for PET-Positive Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ju Hye; Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung; Chun, Kyung Ah [Yeungnam Univ. Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Hybrid positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging performs a two-point Dixon MR sequence for attenuation correction. However, MR data in hybrid PET/MR should provide anatomic and morphologic information as well as an attenuation map. We evaluated the Dixon sequence of hybrid PET/MR for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions compared with contrast-enhanced PET/computed tomography (CT) in patients with oncologic diseases. Twelve patients underwent a single injection, dual imaging protocol. PET/CT was performed with an intravenous contrast agent (85±13 min after {sup 18}F-FDG injection of 403± 45 MBq) and then (125±19 min after injection) PET/MR was performed. Attenuation correction and anatomic allocation of PET were performed using contrast-enhanced CT for PET/CT and Dixon MR sequence for hybrid PET/MR. The Dixon MR sequence and contrast-enhanced CT were compared for anatomic correlation of PET-positive lesions (scoring scale ranging from 0 to 3 for visual ratings). Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUVs) for the detected lesions were assessed for quantitative comparison. Both hybrid PET/MR and contrast-enhanced PET/CT identified 55 lesions with increased FDG uptake in ten patients. In total, 28 lymph nodes, 11 bone lesions, 3 dermal nodules, 3 pleural thickening lesions, 2 thyroid nodules, 1 pancreas, 1 liver, 1 ovary, 1 uterus, 1 breast, 1 soft tissue and 2 lung lesions were present. The best performance was observed for anatomic correlation of PET findings by the contrast-enhanced CT scans (contrast-enhanced CT, 2.64± 0.70; in-phase, 1.29±1.01; opposed-phase, 1.29±1.15; water-weighted, 1.71±1.07; fat weighted, 0.56±1.03). A significant difference was observed between the scores obtained from the contrast-enhanced CT and all four coregistered Dixon MR images. Quantitative evaluation revealed a high correlation between the SUVs measured with hybrid PET/MR (SUVmean, 2.63±1.62; SUVmax, 4.30±2.88) and contrast

  15. Use of the CT component of PET-CT to improve PET-MR registration: demonstration in soft-tissue sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somer, Edward J; Benatar, Nigel A; O'Doherty, Michael J; Smith, Mike A; Marsden, Paul K

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated improvements to PET-MR image registration offered by PET-CT scanning. Ten subjects with suspected soft-tissue sarcomas were scanned with an in-line PET-CT and a clinical MR scanner. PET to CT, CT to MR and PET to MR image registrations were performed using a rigid-body external marker technique and rigid and non-rigid voxel-similarity algorithms. PET-MR registration was also performed using transformations derived from the registration of CT to MR. The external marker technique gave fiducial registration errors of 2.1 mm, 5.1 mm and 5.3 mm for PET-CT, PET-MR and CT-MR registration. Target registration errors were 3.9 mm, 9.0 mm and 9.3 mm, respectively. Voxel-based algorithms were evaluated by measuring the distance between corresponding fiducials after registration. Registration errors of 6.4 mm, 14.5 mm and 9.5 mm, respectively, for PET-CT, PET-MR and CT-MR were observed for rigid-body registration while non-rigid registration gave errors of 6.8 mm, 16.3 mm and 7.6 mm for the same modality combinations. The application of rigid and non-rigid CT to MR transformations to accompanying PET data gives significantly reduced PET-MR errors of 10.0 mm and 8.5 mm, respectively. Visual comparison by two independent observers confirmed the improvement over direct PET-MR registration. We conclude that PET-MR registration can be more accurately and reliably achieved using the hybrid technique described than through direct rigid-body registration of PET to MR

  16. A multi-centre analysis of radiotherapy beam output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Bolt

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Machine beam output measurements were largely within ±2% of 1.00 cGy/MU. Clear trends in measured output over time were seen, with some machines having large drifts which would result in additional burden to maintain within acceptable tolerances. This work may act as a baseline for future comparison of beam output measurements.

  17. Clinical usefulness of PET in the management of oral cancer. Comparison between FDG-PET and MET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saitoh, Masaaki; Nakamura, Mikiko

    2007-01-01

    Inductive chemoradiotherapy has played an important role in preserving organs and functions in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To determine whether a reduced form of surgery should be performed after chemoradiotherapy, accurate evaluation of residual tumor cells is essential. We investigated the clinical value of positron emission tomography with 18 F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the management of oral SCCs. Forty-five patients underwent two FDG-PET studies, one prior to and one at 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment FDG-PET was useful in predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET could evaluate residual viable cells and prognosis. Organ preservation may be feasible based on PET evaluation. Hence FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of oral cancer. 11 C-Methionine (MET) is another promising tracer for PET that can be used to assess metabolic demand for amino acids in cancer cells. A MET-PET and FDG-PET study was performed during the same period to investigate diagnostic accuracy in 40 oral malignancies. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of MET-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively, and were comparable with those of FDG-PET. Further study is required to determine the diagnostic significance of MET-PET in evaluating response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  18. Precision analog signal processor for beam position measurements in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinkson, J.A.; Unser, K.B.

    1995-01-01

    Beam position monitors (BPM) in electron and positron storage rings have evolved from simple systems composed of beam pickups, coaxial cables, multiplexing relays, and a single receiver (usually a analyzer) into very complex and costly systems of multiple receivers and processors. The older may have taken minutes to measure the circulating beam closed orbit. Today instrumentation designers are required to provide high-speed measurements of the beam orbit, often at the ring revolution frequency. In addition the instruments must have very high accuracy and resolution. A BPM has been developed for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley which features high resolution and relatively low cost. The instrument has a single purpose; to measure position of a stable stored beam. Because the pickup signals are multiplexed into a single receiver, and due to its narrow bandwidth, the receiver is not intended for single-turn studies. The receiver delivers normalized measurements of X and Y posit ion entirely by analog means at nominally 1 V/mm. No computers are involved. No software is required. Bergoz, a French company specializing in precision beam instrumentation, integrated the ALS design m their new BPM analog signal processor module. Performance comparisons were made on the ALS. In this paper we report on the architecture and performance of the ALS prototype BPM

  19. Measurements of absorbed energy distributions in water from pulsed electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanney, J.A.

    1974-01-01

    An evaluation of the use of a holographic interferometer to measure the energy deposition as a function of depth in water from pulsed electron beams, together with a brief description of the interferometer and the technique of generating a hologram are presented. The holographic interferometer is used to measure the energy deposition as a function of depth in water from various pulsed beams of monoenergetic electrons in the energy range from 1.0 to 2.5 MeV. These results are compared to those computed by using a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, ETRAN-15, for the same electron energies. After the discrepancies between the measured and computed results are evaluated, reasonable agreement is found between the measured and computed absorbed energy distributions as a function of depth in water. An evalutation of the response of the interferometer as a function of electron intensities is performed. A comparison among four energy deposition curves that result from the irradiation of water with pulsed electron beams from a Febetron accelerator, model 705, is presented. These pulsed beams were produced by the same vacuum diode with the same charging voltage. The results indicate that the energy distribution of the electrons in the pulsed beam is not always constant. A comparison of the energy deposition curves that result from the irradiation of water with electron pulses from different vacuum diodes but the same charging voltage is presented. These results indicate again that the energy distribution of the electrons in the pulsed beam may vary between vacuum diodes. These differences would not be realized by using a totally absorbing metal calorimeter and Faraday Cup

  20. Poly-crystallinity of indium-tin-oxide films improved by using simultaneous ion beam and heat treatment of the plastic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Phil Kook; Kim, Tae Hyung; Choi, Suk Won; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2012-01-01

    The combined treatment effects of an ion beam with directionality and heat of a low temperature on a plastic substrate was investigated as a method to increase the electrical conductivity of indium tinoxide (ITO) films deposited on plastic substrate surfaces at low temperatures. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface treatment by using an ion beam at low temperature (120 .deg. C), which can be applied to plastic substrates, improves the conductivity of ITO films. X-ray diffraction indicates that ITO films deposited on PET surfaces treated simultaneously by using an ion beam and heat of a low temperature have an almost polycrystalline structure even though they have small amorphous party on. As a supplementary measurement, the contact angle showed that the polycrystalline structure was due to a self-assembly effect at the PET surfaces. Consequently, the electrical conductivity of an ITO film deposited by using the proposed technique is three times higher than that of an ITO film treated only with heat of low temperature due to the improved polycrystalline structure.

  1. Poly-crystallinity of indium-tin-oxide films improved by using simultaneous ion beam and heat treatment of the plastic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Phil Kook; Kim, Taehyung; Choi, Suk-Won; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2012-08-01

    The combined treatment effects of an ion beam with directionality and heat of a low temperature on a plastic substrate was investigated as a method to increase the electrical conductivity of indiumtin-oxide (ITO) films deposited on plastic substrate surfaces at low temperatures. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surface treatment by using an ion beam at low temperature (120 °C), which can be applied to plastic substrates, improves the conductivity of ITO films. X-ray diffraction indicates that ITO films deposited on PET surfaces treated simultaneously by using an ion beam and heat of a low temperature have an almost polycrystalline structure even though they have small amorphous party on. As a supplementary measurement, the contact angle showed that the polycrystalline structure was due to a self-assembly effect at the PET surfaces. Consequently, the electrical conductivity of an ITO film deposited by using the proposed technique is three times higher than that of an ITO film treated only with heat of low temperature due to the improved polycrystalline structure.

  2. Resistance and sheet resistance measurements using electron beam induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerwinski, A.; Pluska, M.; Ratajczak, J.; Szerling, A.; KaPtcki, J.

    2006-01-01

    A method for measurement of spatially uniform or nonuniform resistance in layers and strips, based on electron beam induced current (EBIC) technique, is described. High electron beam currents are used so that the overall resistance of the measurement circuit affects the EBIC signal. During the evaluation, the electron beam is scanned along the measured object, whose load resistance varies with the distance. The variation is compensated by an adjustable resistance within an external circuit. The method has been experimentally deployed for sheet resistance determination of buried regions of lateral confinements in semiconductor laser heterostructures manufactured by molecular beam epitaxy

  3. Beam-beam effect and luminosity in SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedemann, H.

    1980-01-01

    Many measurements on the beam-beam limit in SPEAR have been performed over the past years. The goal for these measurements was to find the proper parameterization of the beam-beam effect. All measurements presented were done with both beams equally blown up by control of the flip-flop phenomenon. Colliding beam measurements were made at energies as low as 600 MeV and together with earlier measurements the author presents the scaling of some relevant storage ring parameters from 600 MeV up to almost 4 GeV. (Auth.)

  4. Comparison of two methods for measuring the emittance of a beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parain, J.

    Two methods of measuring beam emittance were analyzed. The three-distance method is based on measurement of the dimensions of the beam at three points, while the three-slope method uses beam dimension measurements under three focusing conditions. Allowing for the errors in measuring the dimensions of the beam, the two methods are of equal accuracy. The three-distance method requires three detectors, but it has the advantage of making it possible to measure the emittance on a single cycle of the accelerator, and can therefore be used to perform control measurements on each cycle. (auth)

  5. Measurement and simulation of the TRR BNCT beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarnegin, Elham [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kasesaz, Yaser, E-mail: ykasesaz@aeoi.org.ir [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golshanian, Mohadeseh; Ghods, Hossein; Ezzati, Arsalan; Keyvani, Mehdi; Haddadi, Mohammad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-11

    Recently, the configuration of the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) thermal column has been modified and a proper thermal neutron beam for preclinical Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been obtained. In this study, simulations and experimental measurements have been carried out to identify the BNCT beam parameters including the beam uniformity, the distribution of the thermal neutron dose, boron dose, gamma dose in a phantom and also the Therapeutic Gain (TG). To do this, the entire TRR structure including the reactor core, pool, the thermal column and beam tubes have been modeled using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. To measure in-phantom dose distribution a special head phantom has been constructed and foil activation techniques and TLD700 dosimeter have been used. The results show that there is enough uniformity in TRR thermal BNCT beam. TG parameter has the maximum value of 5.7 at the depth of 1 cm from the surface of the phantom, confirming that TRR thermal neutron beam has potential for being used in treatment of superficial brain tumors. For the purpose of a clinical trial, more modifications need to be done at the reactor, as, for example design, and construction of a treatment room at the beam exit which is our plan for future. To date, this beam is usable for biological studies and animal trials. There is a relatively good agreement between simulation and measurement especially within a diameter of 10 cm which is the dimension of usual BNCT beam ports. This relatively good agreement enables a more precise prediction of the irradiation conditions needed for future experiments.

  6. On-line monitoring of heavy-ion therapy using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation authors present results of on-line monitoring of heavy-ion therapy using PET. It is concluded that in-beam positron emission tomography is a feasible and valuable method for in-situ and non-invasive monitoring of heavy-ion therapy

  7. In-vivo (entrance) dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy with aqueous FBX dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semwal, M.K.; Thakur, P.K.; Bansal, A.K.; Vidyasagar, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    FBX aqueous chemical dosimetry system has been found useful in radiotherapy owing to its low dose measuring capability. In the present work, entrance dose measurements in external beam radiotherapy on a telecobalt machine were carried out with the system on 100 patients. Treatments involving simple beam arrangement of open parallel-opposed beams in cranial and pelvic irradiations were selected for this study. In place of a spectrophotometer, a simple and inexpensive colorimeter was used for absorbance measurements. The purpose was to assess the efficacy of the FBX system for in-vivo dose measurements. The results obtained show that the average discrepancy between the measured and expected dose for both categories of patients was 0.2% (standard deviation 3.2%) with a maximum of +1 0.3%. There were 5.5% cases showing more than ± 5% discrepancy. Comparison of the results obtained with published work on entrance dose measurements, with diode detectors, shows that the inexpensive FBX system can be used for in-vivo (entrance) dose measurements for simple beam arrangements in radiotherapy and can thus serve as a useful QA tool. (author)

  8. Imaging with PET system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    PET deals with biochemistry and metabolic changes that occur at molecular level. Hence, PET differs fundamentally from other imaging modalities. CT imaging is based on tissue density, whereas MRI conveys anatomic information based on proton density and proton relaxation dynamics. CT and MRI are useful in clinical diagnosis only when disease process has caused significant anatomic alterations. However, in most disease conditions chemical changes precede anatomic changes, that can be detected by PET technology. Thus, PET can provide earliest and unique information about ongoing disease process long before anatomic or structural changes take place. There is no other modality available at present that can replace PET technology. Although PET produces cross-sectional images like that obtained in MRI or CT, they represent circulation, function and metabolism, and not anatomic structure. PET is extremely sensitive measuring quantitatively concentration of tracers in nano to pico-molar range. Thus, PET enables merger of biochemistry and biology in medicine giving birth to molecular medicine that focuses on identifying the molecular errors of disease leading to developing molecular corrections including gene therapy. Molecular imaging with PET has been playing a role in examining the biological nature of a disease condition and its characterization to guide selection and evaluation of treatment. (author)

  9. Standardised uptake values from PET/CT images: comparison with conventional attenuation-corrected PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souvatzoglou, M.; Ziegler, S.I.; Martinez, M.J.; Dzewas, G.; Schwaiger, M.; Bengel, F.; Busch, R.

    2007-01-01

    In PET/CT, CT-derived attenuation factors may influence standardised uptake values (SUVs) in tumour lesions and organs when compared with stand-alone PET. Therefore, we compared PET/CT-derived SUVs intra-individually in various organs and tumour lesions with stand-alone PET-derived SUVs. Thirty-five patients with known or suspected cancer were prospectively included. Sixteen patients underwent FDG PET using an ECAT HR+scanner, and subsequently a second scan using a Biograph Sensation 16PET/CT scanner. Nineteen patients were scanned in the reverse order. All images were reconstructed with an iterative algorithm (OSEM). Suspected lesions were grouped as paradiaphragmatic versus distant from the diaphragm. Mean and maximum SUVs were also calculated for brain, lung, liver, spleen and vertebral bone. The attenuation coefficients (μ values) used for correction of emission data (bone, soft tissue, lung) in the two data sets were determined. A body phantom containing six hot spheres and one cold cylinder was measured using the same protocol as in patients. Forty-six lesions were identified. There was a significant correlation of maximum and mean SUVs derived from PET and PET/CT for 14 paradiaphragmatic lesions (r=0.97 respectively; p<0.001 respectively) and for 32 lesions located distant from the diaphragm (r=0.87 and r=0.89 respectively; p<0.001 respectively). No significant differences were observed in the SUVs calculated with PET and PET/CT in the lesions or in the organs. In the phantom, radioactivity concentration in spheres calculated from PET and from PET/CT correlated significantly (r=0.99; p<0.001). SUVs of cancer lesions and normal organs were comparable between PET and PET/CT, supporting the usefulness of PET/CT-derived SUVs for quantification of tumour metabolism. (orig.)

  10. First Beam Based Aperture Measurements in the Arcs of the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Redaelli, S; Calaga, R; Dehning, B; Giovannozzi, M; Roncarolo, F; Tomás, R

    2010-01-01

    The LHC injection tests performed in August and early September 2008 in preparation for the circulating beam operation provided the first opportunity to measure with beam the mechanical aperture in two LHC sectors (2-3 and 7- 8). The aperture was probed by exciting free oscillations and local orbit bumps of the injected beam trajectories. Intensities of a few 109 protons were used to remain safely below the quench limit of superconductingmagnets in case of beam losses. The methods used to measure the mechanical aperture, the available on-line tools, and beam measurements for both sectors are presented. Detailed comparisons with the expected results from the as-built aperture models are also presented. It is shown that the measurements results are in good agreement with the LHC design aperture.

  11. Instruments for radiation measurement in life sciences (5), ''Development of imaging technology in life sciences'' III. Development of small animal PET scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the requisites for small animal PET scanners, present state of their market and of their development in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). Relative to the apparatus clinically used, the requisites involve the high spatial resolution of 0.8-1.5 mm and high sensitivity of the equipment itself due to low dose of the tracer to be given to animals. At present, more than 20 institutions like universities, research facilities and companies are developing the PET equipment for small animals and about 10 machines are in the market. However, their resolution and sensitivity are not fully satisfactory and for their improvement, investigators are paying attention to the gamma ray measurement by depth-of-interaction (DOI) method. NIRS has been also developing the machine jPET-D4 and has proposed to manufacture jPET-RD having 4-layer DOI detectors with the absolute central sensitivity as high as 14.7%. jPET-RD is to have the spatial resolution as high as <1mm (central view) and -1.4 mm (periphery). (T.I.)

  12. Enhanced Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer by Adding Early Dynamic Acquisition to a Standard Delayed PET Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Yoo, Jang; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the value of early dynamic (ED) PET for the detection and characterization of bladder cancer. Fifty-two bladder cancer patients were prospectively enrolled. The study protocol was composed of ED, whole-body (WB, 60 minutes after injection), and additional delayed (AD, 120 minutes after injection) PET acquisition. Early dynamic PET was acquired for 10 minutes and reconstructed as 5 frames at 2-minute intervals. A focal radiotracer accumulation confined to the bladder wall was considered as PET positive and referred for further quantitative measurement. SUVmax on ED (SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, and SUVmax for 5 frames), WB (SUVmax), and AD PET (SUVmax) were measured. PET results were correlated with bladder cancer pathology variables. The sensitivities of ED, WB, and AD PET for bladder cancer were 84.6%, 57.7%, and 61.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of ED PET was significantly higher than that of WB (P = 0.002) and AD PET (P = 0.008). On ED PET, SUVmax was significantly correlated with muscle invasiveness, histological grade, and pathological tumor size (P = 0.018, P = 0.030, and P = 0.030). On WB and AD PET, only pathological tumor size showed significant positive correlation with SUVmax and SUVmax (P = 0.043 and P = 0.007). Early dynamic PET can help to detect and characterize bladder cancer.

  13. Measuring Beam Quality of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shephard, J.D.; Roberts, John; Jones, J.D.C.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors measure the quality of the delivered beam from hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs). The$M^2$parameter is determined, and the near- to far-field transition is examined. The influence on these properties due to the presence of a core surround mode is evaluated.......17 for the same output beam. This highlights the need for careful consideration when measuring and describing the beam quality delivered by these novel photonic fibers....

  14. Beam Spot Measurement on a 400 keV Electron Accelerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne

    1979-01-01

    A line probe is used to measure the beam spot radius and beam divergence at a 400 keV ICT electron accelerator, and a method is shown for reducing the line probe data in order to get the radial function.......A line probe is used to measure the beam spot radius and beam divergence at a 400 keV ICT electron accelerator, and a method is shown for reducing the line probe data in order to get the radial function....

  15. PET/CT with intravenous contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthelsen, A.K.; Holm, S.; Loft, A.; Klausen, T.L.; Andersen, F.; Hoejgaard, L.

    2005-01-01

    If the CT scan of a combined PET/CT study is performed as a full diagnostic quality CT scan including intravenous (IV) contrast agent, the quality of the joint PET/CT procedure is improved and a separate diagnostic CT scan can be avoided. CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation correction, but this may result in a bias in the attenuation factors. The clinical significance of this bias has not been established. Our aim was to perform a prospective clinical study where each patient had CT performed with and without IV contrast agent to establish whether PET/CT with IV contrast can be used for PET attenuation without reducing the clinical value of the PET scan. A uniform phantom study was used to document that the PET acquisition itself is not significantly influenced by the presence of IV contrast medium. Then, 19 patients referred to PET/CT with IV contrast underwent CT scans without, and then with contrast agent, followed by an 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body PET scan. The CT examinations were performed with identical parameters on a GE Discovery LS scanner. The PET data were reconstructed with attenuation correction based on the two CT data sets. A global comparison of standard uptake value (SUV) was performed, and SUVs in tumour, in non-tumour tissue and in the subclavian vein were calculated. Clinical evaluation of the number and location of lesions on all PET/CT scans was performed twice, blinded and in a different random order, by two independent nuclear medicine specialists. In all patients, the measured global SUV of PET images based on CT with IV contrast agent was higher than the global activity using non-contrast correction. The overall increase in the mean SUV (for two different conversion tables tested) was 4.5±2.3% and 1.6±0.5%, respectively. In 11/19 patients, focal uptake was identified corresponding to malignant tumours. Eight out of 11 tumours showed an increased SUV max (2.9±3.1%) on the PET images reconstructed using IV contrast

  16. An experimental phantom study of the effect of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents on PET attenuation coefficients and PET quantification in PET-MR imaging: application to cardiac studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Doherty, Jim; Schleyer, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Simultaneous cardiac perfusion studies are an increasing trend in PET-MR imaging. During dynamic PET imaging, the introduction of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents (GBCA) at high concentrations during a dual injection of GBCA and PET radiotracer may cause increased attenuation effects of the PET signal, and thus errors in quantification of PET images. We thus aimed to calculate the change in linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of a mixture of PET radiotracer and increasing concentrations of GBCA in solution and furthermore, to investigate if this change in LAC produced a measurable effect on the image-based PET activity concentration when attenuation corrected by three different AC strategies. We performed simultaneous PET-MR imaging of a phantom in a static scenario using a fixed activity of 40 MBq [18 F]-NaF, water, and an increasing GBCA concentration from 0 to 66 mM (based on an assumed maximum possible concentration of GBCA in the left ventricle in a clinical study). This simulated a range of clinical concentrations of GBCA. We investigated two methods to calculate the LAC of the solution mixture at 511 keV: (1) a mathematical mixture rule and (2) CT imaging of each concentration step and subsequent conversion to LAC at 511 keV. This comparison showed that the ranges of LAC produced by both methods are equivalent with an increase in LAC of the mixed solution of approximately 2% over the range of 0-66 mM. We then employed three different attenuation correction methods to the PET data: (1) each PET scan at a specific millimolar concentration of GBCA corrected by its corresponding CT scan, (2) each PET scan corrected by a CT scan with no GBCA present (i.e., at 0 mM GBCA), and (3) a manually generated attenuation map, whereby all CT voxels in the phantom at 0 mM were replaced by LAC = 0.1 cm -1 . All attenuation correction methods (1-3) were accurate to the true measured activity concentration within 5%, and there were no trends in image

  17. The role of PET quantification in cardiovascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomka, Piotr; Berman, Daniel S; Alexanderson, Erick; Germano, Guido

    2014-08-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has several clinical and research applications in cardiovascular imaging. Myocardial perfusion imaging with PET allows accurate global and regional measurements of myocardial perfusion, myocardial blood flow and function at stress and rest in one exam. Simultaneous assessment of function and perfusion by PET with quantitative software is currently the routine practice. Combination of ejection fraction reserve with perfusion information may improve the identification of severe disease. The myocardial viability can be estimated by quantitative comparison of fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG) and rest perfusion imaging. The myocardial blood flow and coronary flow reserve measurements are becoming routinely included in the clinical assessment due to enhanced dynamic imaging capabilities of the latest PET/CT scanners. Absolute flow measurements allow evaluation of the coronary microvascular dysfunction and provide additional prognostic and diagnostic information for coronary disease. Standard quantitative approaches to compute myocardial blood flow from kinetic PET data in automated and rapid fashion have been developed for 13 N-ammonia, 15 O-water and 82 Rb radiotracers. The agreement between software methods available for such analysis is excellent. Relative quantification of 82 Rb PET myocardial perfusion, based on comparisons to normal databases, demonstrates high performance for the detection of obstructive coronary disease. New tracers, such as 18 F-flurpiridaz may allow further improvements in the disease detection. Computerized analysis of perfusion at stress and rest reduces the variability of the assessment as compared to visual analysis. PET quantification can be enhanced by precise coregistration with CT angiography. In emerging clinical applications, the potential to identify vulnerable plaques by quantification of atherosclerotic plaque uptake of 18 FDG and 18 F-sodium fluoride tracers in carotids, aorta and coronary arteries

  18. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwinski, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Bialas, P.; Dulski, K.; Glowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Korcyl, G.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedzwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Wieczorek, A.; Zielinski, M.; Moskal, P.; Curceanu, C.; Silarski, M.; Gorgol, M.; Jasinska, B.; Zgardzinska, B.; Hiesmayr, B.C.; Kowalski, P.; Raczynski, L.; Wislicki, W.; Krzemien, W.

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps → 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ(θ) ∼ 0.4 circle and σ(E) ∼ 4.1 keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities. (orig.)

  19. A feasibility study of ortho-positronium decays measurement with the J-PET scanner based on plastic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminska, D.; Gajos, A.; Czerwinski, E.; Alfs, D.; Bednarski, T.; Bialas, P.; Dulski, K.; Glowacz, B.; Gupta-Sharma, N.; Korcyl, G.; Krawczyk, N.; Kubicz, E.; Mohammed, M.; Niedzwiecki, Sz.; Pawlik-Niedzwiecka, M.; Rudy, Z.; Wieczorek, A.; Zielinski, M.; Moskal, P. [Jagiellonian University, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Curceanu, C.; Silarski, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, CP 13, Frascati (Italy); Gorgol, M.; Jasinska, B.; Zgardzinska, B. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Department of Nuclear Methods, Institute of Physics, Lublin (Poland); Hiesmayr, B.C. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria); Kowalski, P.; Raczynski, L.; Wislicki, W. [Swierk Computing Centre, National Centre for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Krzemien, W. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, High Energy Department, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    We present a study of the application of the Jagiellonian positron emission tomograph (J-PET) for the registration of gamma quanta from decays of ortho-positronium (o-Ps). The J-PET is the first positron emission tomography scanner based on organic scintillators in contrast to all current PET scanners based on inorganic crystals. Monte Carlo simulations show that the J-PET as an axially symmetric and high acceptance scanner can be used as a multi-purpose detector well suited to pursue research including e.g. tests of discrete symmetries in decays of ortho-positronium in addition to the medical imaging. The gamma quanta originating from o-Ps decay interact in the plastic scintillators predominantly via the Compton effect, making the direct measurement of their energy impossible. Nevertheless, it is shown in this paper that the J-PET scanner will enable studies of the o-Ps → 3γ decays with angular and energy resolution equal to σ(θ) ∼ 0.4 {sup circle} and σ(E) ∼ 4.1 keV, respectively. An order of magnitude shorter decay time of signals from plastic scintillators with respect to the inorganic crystals results not only in better timing properties crucial for the reduction of physical and instrumental background, but also suppresses significantly the pile-ups, thus enabling compensation of the lower efficiency of the plastic scintillators by performing measurements with higher positron source activities. (orig.)

  20. Head and neck imaging with PET and PET/CT: artefacts from dental metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Hany, Thomas F.; Kamel, Ehab; Schulthess von, Gustav K.; Buck, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Germanium-68 based attenuation correction (PET Ge68 ) is performed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for quantitative measurements. With the recent introduction of combined in-line PET/CT scanners, CT data can be used for attenuation correction. Since dental implants can cause artefacts in CT images, CT-based attenuation correction (PET CT ) may induce artefacts in PET images. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of dental metallic artwork on the quality of PET images by comparing non-corrected images and images attenuation corrected by PET Ge68 and PET CT . Imaging was performed on a novel in-line PET/CT system using a 40-mAs scan for PET CT in 41 consecutive patients with high suspicion of malignant or inflammatory disease. In 17 patients, additional PET Ge68 images were acquired in the same imaging session. Visual analysis of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) distribution in several regions of the head and neck was scored on a 4-point scale in comparison with normal grey matter of the brain in the corresponding PET images. In addition, artefacts adjacent to dental metallic artwork were evaluated. A significant difference in image quality scoring was found only for the lips and the tip of the nose, which appeared darker on non-corrected than on corrected PET images. In 33 patients, artefacts were seen on CT, and in 28 of these patients, artefacts were also seen on PET imaging. In eight patients without implants, artefacts were seen neither on CT nor on PET images. Direct comparison of PET Ge68 and PET CT images showed a different appearance of artefacts in 3 of 17 patients. Malignant lesions were equally well visible using both transmission correction methods. Dental implants, non-removable bridgework etc. can cause artefacts in attenuation-corrected images using either a conventional 68 Ge transmission source or the CT scan obtained with a combined PET/CT camera. We recommend that the non-attenuation-corrected PET images also be

  1. Associations between [18F]AV1451 tau PET and CSF measures of tau pathology in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Joie, Renaud; Bejanin, Alexandre; Fagan, Anne M; Ayakta, Nagehan; Baker, Suzanne L; Bourakova, Viktoriya; Boxer, Adam L; Cha, Jungho; Karydas, Anna; Jerome, Gina; Maass, Anne; Mensing, Ashley; Miller, Zachary A; O'Neil, James P; Pham, Julie; Rosen, Howard J; Tsai, Richard; Visani, Adrienne V; Miller, Bruce L; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2018-01-23

    To assess the relationships between fluid and imaging biomarkers of tau pathology and compare their diagnostic utility in a clinically heterogeneous sample. Fifty-three patients (28 with clinical Alzheimer disease [AD] and 25 with non-AD clinical neurodegenerative diagnoses) underwent β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau ([ 18 F]AV1451) PET and lumbar puncture. CSF biomarkers (Aβ 42 , total tau [t-tau], and phosphorylated tau [p-tau]) were measured by multianalyte immunoassay (AlzBio3). Receiver operator characteristic analyses were performed to compare discrimination of Aβ-positive AD from non-AD conditions across biomarkers. Correlations between CSF biomarkers and PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) were assessed using skipped Pearson correlation coefficients. Voxelwise analyses were run to assess regional CSF-PET associations. [ 18 F]AV1451-PET cortical SUVR and p-tau showed excellent discrimination between Aβ-positive AD and non-AD conditions (area under the curve 0.92-0.94; ≤0.83 for other CSF measures), and reached 83% classification agreement. In the full sample, cortical [ 18 F]AV1451 was associated with all CSF biomarkers, most strongly with p-tau ( r = 0.75 vs 0.57 for t-tau and -0.49 for Aβ 42 ). When restricted to Aβ-positive patients with AD, [ 18 F]AV1451 SUVR correlated modestly with p-tau and t-tau (both r = 0.46) but not Aβ 42 ( r = 0.02). On voxelwise analysis, [ 18 F]AV1451 correlated with CSF p-tau in temporoparietal cortices and with t-tau in medial prefrontal regions. Within AD, Mini-Mental State Examination scores were associated with [ 18 F]AV1451-PET, but not CSF biomarkers. [ 18 F]AV1451-PET and CSF p-tau had comparable value for differential diagnosis. Correlations were robust in a heterogeneous clinical group but attenuated (although significant) in AD, suggesting that fluid and imaging biomarkers capture different aspects of tau pathology. This study provides Class III evidence that, in a clinical sample of patients with a variety

  2. Impedance computations and beam-based measurements: A problem of discrepancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor

    2018-04-01

    High intensity of particle beams is crucial for high-performance operation of modern electron-positron storage rings, both colliders and light sources. The beam intensity is limited by the interaction of the beam with self-induced electromagnetic fields (wake fields) proportional to the vacuum chamber impedance. For a new accelerator project, the total broadband impedance is computed by element-wise wake-field simulations using computer codes. For a machine in operation, the impedance can be measured experimentally using beam-based techniques. In this article, a comparative analysis of impedance computations and beam-based measurements is presented for 15 electron-positron storage rings. The measured data and the predictions based on the computed impedance budgets show a significant discrepancy. Three possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed: interference of the wake fields excited by a beam in adjacent components of the vacuum chamber, effect of computation mesh size, and effect of insufficient bandwidth of the computed impedance.

  3. Neutron beam measurement dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaro, C.R.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes animal dosimetry studies and phantom measurements. During 1994, 12 dogs were irradiated at BMRR as part of a 4 fraction dose tolerance study. The animals were first infused with BSH and irradiated daily for 4 consecutive days. BNL irradiated 2 beagles as part of their dose tolerance study using BPA fructose. In addition, a dog at WSU was irradiated at BMRR after an infusion of BPA fructose. During 1994, the INEL BNCT dosimetry team measured neutron flux and gamma dose profiles in two phantoms exposed to the epithermal neutron beam at the BMRR. These measurements were performed as a preparatory step to the commencement of human clinical trials in progress at the BMRR

  4. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  5. Measurement of Rayleigh Wave Beams Using Angle Beam Wedge Transducers as the Transmitter and Receiver with Consideration of Beam Spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuzeng; Li, Xiongbing; Jeong, Hyunjo

    2017-06-20

    A theoretical model, along with experimental verification, is developed to describe the generation, propagation and reception of a Rayleigh wave using angle beam wedge transducers. The Rayleigh wave generation process using an angle beam wedge transducer is analyzed, and the actual Rayleigh wave sound source distributions are evaluated numerically. Based on the reciprocity theorem and considering the actual sound source, the Rayleigh wave beams are modeled using an area integral method. The leaky Rayleigh wave theory is introduced to investigate the reception of the Rayleigh wave using the angle beam wedge transducers, and the effects of the wave spreading in the wedge and transducer size are considered in the reception process. The effects of attenuations of the Rayleigh wave and leaky Rayleigh wave are discussed, and the received wave results with different sizes of receivers are compared. The experiments are conducted using two angle beam wedge transducers to measure the Rayleigh wave, and the measurement results are compared with the predictions using different theoretical models. It is shown that the proposed model which considers the wave spreading in both the sample and wedges can be used to interpret the measurements reasonably.

  6. Measurement of a beam equilibrium orbit in the NAP-M storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagorodnikov, E.I.; Kalinin, A.S.; Medvedko, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    The equipment for measurement of the beam equilibrium orbit position in the NAP-M accumulator is described. The measurements are taken by the electrostatic transducers. The signals are delivered from the transducer electrodes to the source followers. At the output of the followers the signals are subtracted by the transformer with a volumetric coil. The total signal is picked off the common load of the followers. The further processing of the total and differential signals is performed with the 1st beam frequency harmonic and consists in rating of the differential signal for the beam current with subsequent synchronous detection. For discrimination of the 1st harmonic, a frequency converter employing field transistors has been designed. The problem of the increasing the accuracy of coincidence of the transmitter electric and geometric centers is discussed. The measuring system operates at the number of the particles on the orbit amounting to (1-2)x10 9 and the beam revesal frequency band within 0.36 - 2.5 MHz. The system has the beam displacement resolution of about 1 mm

  7. FEASIBILITY OF POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY OF DOSE DISTRIBUTION IN PROTON BEAM CANCER THERAPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE-WANG, J.J.; DILMANIAN, F.A.; PEGGS, S.G.; SCHLYEER, D.J.; VASKA, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proton therapy is a treatment modality of increasing utility in clinical radiation oncology mostly because its dose distribution conforms more tightly to the target volume than x-ray radiation therapy. One important feature of proton therapy is that it produces a small amount of positron-emitting isotopes along the beam-path through the non-elastic nuclear interaction of protons with target nuclei such as 12 C, 14 N, and 16 O. These radioisotopes, mainly 11 C, 13 N and 15 O, allow imaging the therapy dose distribution using positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting PET images provide a powerful tool for quality assurance of the treatment, especially when treating inhomogeneous organs such as the lungs or the head-and-neck, where the calculation of the dose distribution for treatment planning is more difficult. This paper uses Monte Carlo simulations to predict the yield of positron emitters produced by a 250 MeV proton beam, and to simulate the productions of the image in a clinical PET scanner

  8. Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Quick, H.H.; Guimaraes, A.; Catalano, O.; Morelli, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. (orig.) [de

  9. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant β-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  10. Effect of Short PET Fiber and Electron Beam Irradiation on The Properties of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber-Poly(Vinyl Chloride) (NBR-PVC) Blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, H.A.; Shaltout, N.A.; EI Nemer, K.F.; EI Miligy, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Blend of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR ) and ploy vinyl chloride(PYV) (70-30) has been loaded with different concentrations of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers waste ( 0.5 - 40 p hr); in the presence of resorcinol hexamethylenetetramine - precipitated silica (RHS) as bonding agent system and pentaeritheroal tetraacrylate (PET A) as co agent. Curing of the prepared composites has been carried out by electron beam irradiation (25 - 150 kGy) under atmospheric conditions. Evaluations of mechanical, physical, and thermal properties of uncured as well as cured composites have been undertaken. It has been found that the tensile strength, tensile modulus at 25 % elongation and hardness were increased with irradiation dose as well as fiber loading whereas the elongation at break and soluble fraction were decreased. Moreover, it has been found that the thermal stability of prepared composites at constant fiber loading of 10 p hr is improved on irradiation up to 100 kGy. Confirmation of latter data has been found through calculation of activation energy, Ea of the thermal degradation process

  11. Effect of Short PET Fiber and Electron Beam Irradiation on The Properties of Acrylonitrile Butadiene Rubber-Poly(Vinyl Chloride) (NBR-PVC) Blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, H.A.; Shaltout, N.A.; EI Nemer, K.F.; EI Miligy, A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Blend of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR ) and ploy vinyl chloride(PYV) (70-30) has been loaded with different concentrations of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fibers waste ( 0.5 - 40 p hr); in the presence of resorcinol hexamethylenetetramine - precipitated silica (RHS) as bonding agent system and pentaeritheroal tetraacrylate (PET A) as co agent. Curing of the prepared composites has been carried out by electron beam irradiation (25 - 150 kGy) under atmospheric conditions. Evaluations of mechanical, physical, and thermal properties of uncured as well as cured composites have been undertaken. It has been found that the tensile strength, tensile modulus at 25 % elongation and hardness were increased with irradiation dose as well as fiber loading whereas the elongation at break and soluble fraction were decreased. Moreover, it has been found that the thermal stability of prepared composites at constant fiber loading of 10 p hr is improved on irradiation up to 100 kGy. Confirmation of latter data has been found through calculation of activation energy, Ea of the thermal degradation process

  12. Surface flatness measurement of quasi-parallel plates employing three-beam interference with strong reference beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Zofia; Patorski, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    A big challenge for standard interferogram analysis methods such as Temporal Phase Shifting or Fourier Transform is a parasitic set of fringes which might occur in the analyzed fringe pattern intensity distribution. It is encountered, for example, when transparent glass plates with quasi-parallel surfaces are tested in Fizeau or Twyman-Green interferometers. Besides the beams reflected from the plate front surface and the interferometer reference the beam reflected from the plate rear surface also plays important role; its amplitude is comparable with the amplitude of other beams. In result we face three families of fringes of high contrast which cannot be easily separated. Earlier we proposed a competitive solution for flatness measurements which relies on eliminating one of those fringe sets from the three-beam interferogram and separating two remaining ones with the use of 2D Continuous Wavelet Transform. In this work we cover the case when the intensity of the reference beam is significantly higher than the intensities of two object beams. The main advantage of differentiating beam intensities is the change in contrast of individual fringe families. Processing of such three-beam interferograms is modified but also takes advantage of 2D CWT. We show how to implement this method in Twyman-Green and Fizeau setups and compare this processing path and measurement procedures with previously proposed solutions.

  13. The influence of electron-beam irradiation on some mechanical properties of commercial multilayer flexible packaging materials (PET MET/LDPE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Oliveira, Vitor M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.; Ortiz, Angel V.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment with electron-beam radiation is a promising approach to the controllable modification of the properties of the polymeric flexible packaging materials, in order to adjust their properties. In recent years electron-beam irradiation have been efficiently applied in the flexible packaging industry to promote crosslinking and scission of the polymeric chains in order to improve material mechanical properties. On the other hand, ionizing irradiation can also affect the polymeric materials itself leading to a production of free radicals. These free radicals can in turn lead to degradation and or cross-linking phenomena. The influence of electron beam irradiation on mechanical properties of commercial multilayer flexible packaging materials based on laminated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and metallized poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) was studied. The PETmet/LDPE structure was irradiated with doses up to 120 kGy, using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, dose rate 11.22kGy/s, at room temperature in presence of air. The results showed that penetration resistance of the irradiated PETmet/LDPE film increase up to 10 %, except for radiation dose of 30 kGy that resulted in a slight decrease of ca. 3%, while the sealing resistance decreased ca. 8-26% in all doses (p < 0.05). In addition, the samples of PETmet/LDPE film at 45, 60, 75 and 105 kGy presented a gain up to 18 % in their original tensile strength at break, a gain of ca. 38% in their original elongation at break for radiation dose of 45 kGy and ca. 17% for radiation doses of 60, 75 and 120 kGy. (author)

  14. Prototype system for phase advance measurements of LHC small beam oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Olexa, J; Brezovic, Z; Gasior, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnet lattice parameters of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are measured by exciting beam transverse oscillations that allow measuring their phase advance using the beam position measurement (BPM) system. However, the BPM system requires millimetre oscillation amplitudes, with which nominal high intensity beams would cause large particle loss, dangerous for the LHC superconducting magnets. Therefore, such measurements cannot be done often, as they require special low intensity beams with important set-up time. After its first long shut-down the LHC will be equipped with new collimators with embedded BPMs, for which a new front-end electronics has been developed. Its main processing channels based on compensated diode detectors are designed for beam orbit measurement with sub-micrometre resolution. It is planned to extend this system by adding dedicated channels optimised for phase advance measurement, allowing continuous LHC optics measurement with much smaller beam excitation. This subsystem will be based o...

  15. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  16. Emittance measuring unit for 100% duty factor linac injector beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubaly, M R; Pachner, J Jr; Ormrod, J H; Ungrin, J; Schriber, S O [ed.

    1976-11-01

    A description is given of a system to measure the emittance of a 750 keV 100 mA dc proton beam suitable for injection into a 100% duty factor linear accelerator. A relatively slowly pulsed 45/sup 0/ magnet switches the beam to a beam dump inside the emittance measuring unit for approx. 10 s. A fast pulsed 5/sup 0/ magnet then deflects the beam to a multiple aperture ''pepper-pot'' plate for 300 ..mu..s. Beamlets passing through the plate travel 520 mm and produce a pattern on a scintillator screen. A photograph of the pattern is analyzed to determine beam emittance. Preliminary results on low current beams show a gross increase in the emittance in the horizontal plane.

  17. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a ...

  18. In situ beam angle measurement in a multi-wafer high current ion implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freer, B.S.; Reece, R.N.; Graf, M.A.; Parrill, T.; Polner, D.

    2005-01-01

    Direct, in situ measurement of the average angle and angular content of an ion beam in a multi-wafer ion implanter is reported for the first time. A new type of structure and method are described. The structures are located on the spinning disk, allowing precise angular alignment to the wafers. Current that passes through the structures is known to be within a range of angles and is detected behind the disk. By varying the angle of the disk around two axes, beam current versus angle is mapped and the average angle and angular spread are calculated. The average angle measured in this way is found to be consistent with that obtained by other techniques, including beam centroid offset and wafer channeling methods. Average angle of low energy beams, for which it is difficult to use other direct methods, is explored. A 'pencil beam' system is shown to give average angle repeatability of 0.13 deg. (1σ) or less, for two low energy beams under normal tuning variations, even though no effort was made to control the angle

  19. Mini biased collimated faraday cups for measurement of intense pulsed ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Xiaoping; Shi Lei; Zhang Jiasheng; Qiu Aici

    2000-01-01

    An analysis of principle of a biased Faraday cup for measuring ion beams density and the main reasons related to the measuring accuracy were presented. An array of mini biased collimated Faraday cups was manufactured for the measurement of ion beam density of a compact 200 keV high power ion beam source. In the experiments the maximum density of ion beam was in the center of the beam, and it was about 170 A/cm 2

  20. Measurement of electron- and ion beam energies and currents in a plasma focus discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Toshikazu; Kondoh, Yoshiomi; Shimoda, Katsuji; Hirano, Katsumi

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of energetic particle beams in a plsma focus with a Mather type device are presented. Rogowski coils are used for time-resolved measurement, and solid-state nuclear track detectors for time-integrated measurement of the beams. In the upstream direction with respect to the discharge current, only the electron beam with the maximum current of several kA was detected, which was approximately one percent of the discharge current. The electron energies of the beam were spread from 0.1 to 1 MeV. In the downstream direction, two successive emissions of ions were observed. The first emission had an extremely high energy of the order of some MeV and a low beam current of less than 10 A. The second emission, the main part of the ion beam, with energies of 100 - 800 keV, followed the first one with a time lag of several tens of nanoseconds, and the beam current reached several tens of amperes. (author)

  1. Progress update on the development of the 3He linac for PET isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, P.; Sun, D.; Larson, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Anderson, K.; Bieniosek, F.; Schmidt, C.W.; Popovic, M.; McCrory, E.; Webber, R.; Link, J.; Krohn, K.; Bida, J.

    1996-01-01

    In 1995, Fermilab and SAIC formed a collaboration with partners from the University of Washington (UW) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana (BRF) to explore an innovative approach to the production of radioisotopes. The accelerator system that is being developed accelerates 3 He to 10.5 MeV and then delivers this beam to the target to produce the short lived radioisotopes of interest to the PET community ( 18 F, 15 0, 13 N, 11 C). Research is being conducted to investigate the contribution that this promising approach can make to clinical and research PET. The accelerator system has several very interesting aspects. These innovations include multiple RFQ accelerators configured in series, a gas stripper jet to doubly charge the low energy (1 MeV) 3 He beam, and an isochronous matching section to manipulate the transverse and maintain the longitudinal profile of the beam (without the use of an RF buncher) in the charge doubler transition section between RFQ's. This paper updates the progress of the PET 3 He RFQ accelerator, the current status of the design, and some of the interesting ongoing research. (author)

  2. Progress update on the development of the 3He linac for PET isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    In 1995, Fermilab and SAIC formed a collaboration with partners from the University of Washington (UW) and the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana (BRF) to explore an innovative approach to the production radioisotopes. The accelerator system that is being developed accelerates 3 He to 10.5 MeV and then delivers this beam to the target to produce the short lived radioisotopes of interest to the PET community ( 18 F, 15 0, 13 N, 11 C). Research is being conducted to investigate the contribution that this promising approach can make to clinical and research PET. The accelerator system has several very interesting aspects. These innovations include multiple RFQ accelerators configured in series, a gas stripper jet to doubly charge the low energy (I MeV) 3 He beam, and an isochronous matching section to manipulate the transverse and maintain the longitudinal profile of the beam (without the use of an RF buncher) in the charge doubler transition section between RFQ'S. This paper updates the progress of the PET 3 He RFQ accelerator, the current status of the design, and some of the interesting ongoing research

  3. Accuracy of a clinical PET/CT vs. a preclinical μPET system for monitoring treatment effects in tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Karin [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Winz, Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Rix, Anne; Bzyl, Jessica [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F.; Verburg, Frederic A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Academic Radiology Baden Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Small animal imaging is of growing importance for preclinical research and drug development. Tumour xenografts implanted in mice can be visualized with a clinical PET/CT (cPET); however, it is unclear whether early treatment effects can be monitored. Thus, we investigated the accuracy of a cPET versus a preclinical μPET using {sup 18}F-FDG for assessing early treatment effects. Materials and methods: The spatial resolution and the quantitative accuracy of a clinical and preclinical PET were evaluated in phantom experiments. To investigate the sensitivity for assessing treatment response, A431 tumour xenografts were implanted in nude mice. Glucose metabolism was measured in untreated controls and in two therapy groups (either one or four days of antiangiogenic treatment). Data was validated by γ-counting of explanted tissues. Results: In phantom experiments, cPET enabled reliable separation of boreholes ≥ 5 mm whereas μPET visualized boreholes ≥ 2 mm. In animal studies, μPET provided significantly higher tumour-to-muscle ratios for untreated control tumours than cPET (3.41 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± .0.28, respectively; p < 0.01). During treatment, cPET detected significant therapy effects at day 4 (p < 0.05) whereas μPET revealed highly significant therapy effects even at day one (p < 0.01). Correspondingly, γ-counting of explanted tumours indicated significant therapy effects at day one and highly significant treatment response at day 4. Correlation with γ-counting was good for cPET (r = 0.74; p < 0.01) and excellent for μPET (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Clinical PET is suited to investigate tumour xenografts ≥ 5 mm at an advanced time-point of treatment. For imaging smaller tumours or for the sensitive assessment of very early therapy effects, μPET should be preferred.

  4. A device for measuring electron beam characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Andreev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a device intended for diagnostics of electron beams and the results obtained with this device. The device comprises a rotating double probe operating in conjunction with an automated probe signal collection and processing system. This provides for measuring and estimating the electron beam characteristics such as radius, current density, power density, convergence angle, and brightness.

  5. A new measurement method for electrode gain in an orthogonally symmetric beam position monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Junying; Wu Fangfang; Yang Yongliang; Sun Baogen; Zhou Zeran; Luo Qing; Lu Ping; Xu Hongliang

    2014-01-01

    The new beam position monitor (BPM) system of the injector at the upgrade project of the Hefei Light Source (HLS Ⅱ) has 19 stripline beam position monitors. Most consist of four orthogonally symmetric stripline electrodes. Differences in electronic gain and mismaching tolerance can cause changes in the beam response of the BPM electrodes. This variation will couple the two measured horizontal positions, resulting in measuring error. To alleviate this effect, a new technique to measure the relative response of the four electrodes has been developed. It is independent of the beam charge, and the related coefficient can be calculated theoretically. The effect of electrode coupling on this technique is analyzed. The calibration data is used to fit the gain for all 19 injector beam position monitors. The results show the standard deviation of the distribution of measured gains is about 5%. (authors)

  6. Brain PET and functional MRI: why simultaneously using hybrid PET/MR systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchin, Diego; Palombit, Alessandro; Castellaro, Marco; Silvestri, Erica; Bui, Franco; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Corbetta, Maurizio; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2017-12-01

    In the last 20 years growing attention has been devoted to multimodal imaging. The recent literature is rich of clinical and research studies that have been performed using different imaging modalities on both separate and integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. However, today, hybrid PET/MR systems measure signals related to brain structure, metabolism, neurochemistry, perfusion, and neuronal activity simultaneously, i.e. in the same physiological conditions. A frequently raised question at meeting and symposia is: "Do we really need a hybrid PET/MR system? Are there any advantages over acquiring sequential and separate PET and MR scans?" The present paper is an attempt to answer these questions specifically in relation to PET combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and arterial spin labeling. We searched (last update: June 2017) the databases PubMed, PMC, Google Scholar and Medline. We also included additional studies if they were cited in the selected articles. No language restriction was applied to the search, but the reviewed articles were all in English. Among all the retrieved articles, we selected only those performed using a hybrid PET/MR system. We found a total of 17 papers that were selected and discussed in three main groups according to the main radiopharmaceutical used: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) (N.=8), 15O-water (15O-H2O) (N.=3) and neuroreceptors (N.=6). Concerning studies using 18F-FDG, simultaneous PET/fMRI revealed that global aspects of functional organization (e.g. graph properties of functional connections) are partially associated with energy consumption. There are remarkable spatial and functional similarities across modalities, but also discrepant findings. More work is needed on this point. There are only a handful of papers comparing blood flow measurements with PET 15O-H2O and MR arterial spin label (ASL) measures, and they show significant regional CBF differences

  7. First order simulations on time measurements using inorganic scintillators for PET applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joly, B.; Montarou, G.; Pauna, N.

    2008-01-01

    Time measurements based on scintillating crystals are used in many different experimental sets-up in high energy physics, nuclear physics and medical imaging (e.g. PET). Time of Flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) is based on the measurement of the difference between the detection times of the two gamma arising from positrons decays. The fundamental improvement of TOF is an increase in signal to noise ratio which translates into sensitivity improvement. Conventional method for time measurements is based on the detection of first photoelectrons. Recently, in LHC experiments and more particularly for electromagnetic calorimeter, a fully digital method based on optimal filtering that considers samples of the entire signal was successfully applied. Since such a method allows ultimately time resolutions of about a few tens of picoseconds, for this report, first order simulations were performed using a simplified model of a detection block made of a PMT coupled to a LYSO or LaBr 3 crystal. These simulations were achieved to estimate time resolutions with the conventional method (first photoelectrons detection with CFD) or the optimal filtering. A hybrid method is also tested to be applied with fast running front-end electronics. These simulations will be the basis for experimental future studies. (authors)

  8. First order simulations on time measurements using inorganic scintillators for PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joly, B.; Montarou, G.; Pauna, N

    2008-07-01

    Time measurements based on scintillating crystals are used in many different experimental sets-up in high energy physics, nuclear physics and medical imaging (e.g. PET). Time of Flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET) is based on the measurement of the difference between the detection times of the two gamma arising from positrons decays. The fundamental improvement of TOF is an increase in signal to noise ratio which translates into sensitivity improvement. Conventional method for time measurements is based on the detection of first photoelectrons. Recently, in LHC experiments and more particularly for electromagnetic calorimeter, a fully digital method based on optimal filtering that considers samples of the entire signal was successfully applied. Since such a method allows ultimately time resolutions of about a few tens of picoseconds, for this report, first order simulations were performed using a simplified model of a detection block made of a PMT coupled to a LYSO or LaBr{sub 3} crystal. These simulations were achieved to estimate time resolutions with the conventional method (first photoelectrons detection with CFD) or the optimal filtering. A hybrid method is also tested to be applied with fast running front-end electronics. These simulations will be the basis for experimental future studies. (authors)

  9. 11C-methionine PET as a prognostic marker in patients with glioma: comparison with18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungeun; Chung, June-Key; Jeong, Jae Min; Im, So-Hyang; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee Won; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Myung Chul

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the prognostic value of 11 C-methionine (MET) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in glioma patients. The study population comprised 47 patients with gliomas (19 glioblastoma, 28 others). Pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging, MET PET and FDG PET were performed within a time interval of 2 weeks in all patients. The uptake ratio and standard uptake values were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done to determine significant prognostic factors. Ki-67 index was measured by immunohistochemical staining, and compared with FDG and MET uptake in glioma. Among the several clinicopathological prognostic factors, tumour pathology (glioblastoma or not), age (≥60 or <60 years), Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (≥70 or <70) and MET PET (higher uptake or not compared with normal cortex) were found to be significant predictors by univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, tumour pathology, KPS and MET PET were identified as significant independent predictors. The Ki-67 proliferation index was significantly correlated with MET uptake (r=0.64), but not with FDG uptake. Compared with FDG PET in glioma, MET PET was an independent significant prognostic factor and MET uptake was correlated with cellular proliferation. MET PET may be a useful biological prognostic marker in glioma patients. (orig.)

  10. Quantitative Evaluation of Atlas-based Attenuation Correction for Brain PET in an Integrated Time-of-Flight PET/MR Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Jian, Yiqiang; Jenkins, Nathaniel; Behr, Spencer C; Hope, Thomas A; Larson, Peder E Z; Vigneron, Daniel; Seo, Youngho

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To assess the patient-dependent accuracy of atlas-based attenuation correction (ATAC) for brain positron emission tomography (PET) in an integrated time-of-flight (TOF) PET/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging system. Materials and Methods Thirty recruited patients provided informed consent in this institutional review board-approved study. All patients underwent whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) followed by TOF PET/MR imaging. With use of TOF PET data, PET images were reconstructed with four different attenuation correction (AC) methods: PET with patient CT-based AC (CTAC), PET with ATAC (air and bone from an atlas), PET with ATAC patientBone (air and tissue from the atlas with patient bone), and PET with ATAC boneless (air and tissue from the atlas without bone). For quantitative evaluation, PET mean activity concentration values were measured in 14 1-mL volumes of interest (VOIs) distributed throughout the brain and statistical significance was tested with a paired t test. Results The mean overall difference (±standard deviation) of PET with ATAC compared with PET with CTAC was -0.69 kBq/mL ± 0.60 (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC boneless (-9.4% ± 3.7) was significantly worse than that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET with ATAC patientBone (-1.5% ± 1.5) improved over that of PET with ATAC (-4.0% ± 3.2) (P PET/MR imaging achieves similar quantification accuracy to that from CTAC by means of atlas-based bone compensation. However, patient-specific anatomic differences from the atlas causes bone attenuation differences and misclassified sinuses, which result in patient-dependent performance variation of ATAC. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  11. PET-Studies in parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, J.

    2002-01-01

    Positron-emission-tomography (PET) has enabled to study the metabolism and blood flow in specific brain areas. Besides, there is a variety of radiotracers that allow quantification of the function of distinct molecules. In respect to Parkinson's disease, PET allowed for the first time to assess the number of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Thus, helping confirming a dopaminergic deficit, measuring disease progression and also help to determine the function of dopaminergic grafts. Current research has shifted to determine the role of related neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (orig.) [de

  12. Diagnostic value of [18F] FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huojun; Xing, Wei; Kang, Qinqin; Chen, Chao; Wang, Linhui; Lu, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    An early diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer is crucial for early treatment and management. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the overall diagnostic accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in urinary bladder cancer with meta-analysis. The PubMed and CNKI databases were searched for the eligible studies published up to June 01, 2014. The sensitivity, specificity, and other measures of accuracy of 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer were pooled along with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to summarize overall test performance. Ten studies met our inclusion criteria. The summary estimates for 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer in meta-analysis were as follows: a pooled sensitivity, 0.82 (95 % confidence interval [CI], 0.75 to 0.88); a pooled specificity, 0.92 (95 % CI, 0.87 to 0.95); positive likelihood ratio, 6.80 (95 % CI, 4.31 to 10.74); negative likelihood ratio, 0.27 (95 % CI, 0.19 to 0.36); and diagnostic odds ratio, 25.18 (95 % CI, 17.58 to 70.4). The results indicate that 18 F FDG-PET and PET/CT are relatively high sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer.

  13. Controls and Beam Diagnostics for Therapy-Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Eickhoff, H

    2000-01-01

    During the last four years GSI has developed a new procedure for cancer treatment by means of the intensity controlled rasterscan-method. This method includes active variations of beam parameters during the treatment session and the integration of 'on-line' PET monitoring. Starting in 1997 several patients have been successfully treated within this GSI experimental cancer treatment program; within this program about 350 patients shall be treated in the next 5 years. The developments and experiences of this program accompanied by intensive discussions with the medical community led to a proposal for a hospital based light ion accelerator facility for the clinic in Heidelberg. An essential part for patients treatments is the measurement of the beam properties within acceptance and constancy tests and especially for the rasterscan method during the treatment sessions. The presented description of the accelerator controls and beam diagnostic devices mainly covers the requests for the active scanning method, which...

  14. Event-based motion correction for PET transmission measurements with a rotating point source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Victor W; Kyme, Andre Z; Meikle, Steven R; Fulton, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Accurate attenuation correction is important for quantitative positron emission tomography (PET) studies. When performing transmission measurements using an external rotating radioactive source, object motion during the transmission scan can distort the attenuation correction factors computed as the ratio of the blank to transmission counts, and cause errors and artefacts in reconstructed PET images. In this paper we report a compensation method for rigid body motion during PET transmission measurements, in which list mode transmission data are motion corrected event-by-event, based on known motion, to ensure that all events which traverse the same path through the object are recorded on a common line of response (LOR). As a result, the motion-corrected transmission LOR may record a combination of events originally detected on different LORs. To ensure that the corresponding blank LOR records events from the same combination of contributing LORs, the list mode blank data are spatially transformed event-by-event based on the same motion information. The number of counts recorded on the resulting blank LOR is then equivalent to the number of counts that would have been recorded on the corresponding motion-corrected transmission LOR in the absence of any attenuating object. The proposed method has been verified in phantom studies with both stepwise movements and continuous motion. We found that attenuation maps derived from motion-corrected transmission and blank data agree well with those of the stationary phantom and are significantly better than uncorrected attenuation data.

  15. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Candel, Arno

    2010-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  16. Multi institutional quantitative phantom study of yttrium-90 PET in PET/MRI: the MR-QUEST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Nichole M; Eldib, Mootaz; Faul, David; Conti, Maurizio; Elschot, Mattijs; Knešaurek, Karin; Leek, Francesca; Townsend, David; DiFilippo, Frank P; Jackson, Kimberly; Nekolla, Stephan G; Lukas, Mathias; Tapner, Michael; Parikh, Parag J; Laforest, Richard

    2018-04-04

    Yttrium-90 ( 90 Y) radioembolization involves the intra-arterial delivery of radioactive microspheres to treat hepatic malignancies. Though this therapy involves careful pre-treatment planning and imaging, little is known about the precise location of the microspheres once they are administered. Recently, there has been growing interest post-radioembolization imaging using positron-emission tomography (PET) for quantitative dosimetry and identifying lesions that may benefit from additional salvage therapy. In this study, we aim to measure the inter-center variability of 90 Y PET measurements as measured on PET/MRI in preparation for a multi-institutional prospective phase I/II clinical trial. Eight institutions participated in this study and followed a standardized phantom filling and imaging protocol. The NEMA NU2-2012 body phantom was filled with 3 GBq of 90 Y chloride solution. The phantom was imaged for 30 min in listmode on a Siemens Biograph mMR non-TOF PET/MRI scanner at five time points across 10 days (0.3-3.0 GBq). Raw PET data were sent to a central site for image reconstruction and data analysis. Images were reconstructed with optimal parameters determined from a previous study. Volumes of interest (VOIs) matching the known sphere diameters were drawn on the vendor-provided attenuation map and propagated to the PET images. Recovery coefficients (RCs) and coefficient of variation of the RCs (COV) were calculated from these VOIs for each sphere size and activity level. Mean RCs ranged from 14.5 to 75.4%, with the lowest mean RC coming from the smallest sphere (10 mm) on the last day of imaging (0.16 MBq/ml) and the highest mean RC coming from the largest sphere (37 mm) on the first day of imaging (2.16 MBq/ml). The smaller spheres tended to exhibit higher COVs. In contrast, the larger spheres tended to exhibit lower COVs. COVs from the 37 mm sphere were  25%. Post-radioembolization dosimetry of lesions or other VOIs ≥ 22 mm in diameter can

  17. Measurement system with high accuracy for laser beam quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yi; Zeng, Ciling; Xie, Peiyuan; Jiang, Qingshan; Liang, Ke; Yang, Zhenyu; Zhao, Ming

    2015-05-20

    Presently, most of the laser beam quality measurement system collimates the optical path manually with low efficiency and low repeatability. To solve these problems, this paper proposed a new collimated method to improve the reliability and accuracy of the measurement results. The system accuracy controlled the position of the mirror to change laser beam propagation direction, which can realize the beam perpendicularly incident to the photosurface of camera. The experiment results show that the proposed system has good repeatability and the measuring deviation of M2 factor is less than 0.6%.

  18. Value of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT in patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scher, Bernhard; Albinger, Wolfram; Tiling, Reinhold; Gildehaus, Franz-Josef; Dresel, Stefan [University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Seitz, Michael [University of Munich, Department of Urology, Munich (Germany); Scherr, Michael; Becker, Hans-Christoph [University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Souvatzogluou, Michael; Wester, Hans-Juergen [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The value and limitations of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT for the detection of prostate cancer remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic efficacy of {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT in a large group of patients with suspected prostate cancer. Fifty-eight patients with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer underwent {sup 11}C-choline PET (25/58, Siemens ECAT Exact HR+) or PET/CT (33/58, Philips Gemini) scanning. On average, 500 MBq of {sup 11}C-choline was administered intravenously. Studies were interpreted by raters blinded to clinical information and other diagnostic procedures. Qualitative image analysis as well as semiquantitative SUV measurement was carried out. The reference standard was histopathological examination of resection specimens or biopsy. Prevalence of prostate cancer in this selected patient population was 63.8% (37/58). {sup 11}C-choline PET and PET/CT showed a sensitivity of 86.5% (32/37) and a specificity of 61.9% (13/21) in the detection of the primary malignancy. With regard to metastatic spread, PET showed a per-patient sensitivity of 81.8% (9/11) and produced no false positive findings. Based on our findings, differentiation between benign prostatic changes, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostatitis, and prostate cancer is feasible in the majority of cases when image interpretation is primarily based on qualitative characteristics. SUV{sub max} may serve as guidance. False positive findings may occur due to an overlap of {sup 11}C-choline uptake between benign and malignant processes. By providing functional information regarding both the primary malignancy and its metastases, {sup 11}C-choline PET may prove to be a useful method for staging prostate cancer. (orig.)

  19. Application of ion beams for elucidation of functions in living bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Takashi; Ishihara, Noriyuki; Omichi, Hideki; Tamura, Mamoru; Omasa, Kenji; Sasaki, Yasuhito.

    1992-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is planning a research project, 'Application of Ion Beams for Elucidation of Functions in Living Bodies'. This project is characterized by the non-invasive or non-destructive measurement for living plants, animals and microorganisms and divided into two fields. The first field is the utilization of positron emitters prepared with cyclotron. The development of a new method which combines PET with other methods like near infrared region spectroscopy or magnetic resonance spectroscopy is urgently desired. Positron emitters can be also applied to elucidate the functions of plants. The second field is in situ and non-invasive optical measurement of living bodies or cells irradiated with ion beams. Active species produced by irradiation could induce physiological and biochemical reactions in living bodies or cells. To actualize this project, a group of non-invasive measuring equipments for the first field will be set in a new building next to ion irradiation facilities (TIARA, Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application). For the second field, in situ and non-invasive optical measurement of living bodies or cells with be carried out in TIARA. (J.P.N.)

  20. Measuring serotonin synthesis: from conventional methods to PET tracers and their (pre)clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Anniek K.D.; Waarde, Aren van; Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Bosker, Fokko J. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Luiten, Paul G.M. [University of Groningen, Center for Behavior and Neurosciences, Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Haren (Netherlands); Boer, Johan A. den [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-03-15

    The serotonergic system of the brain is complex, with an extensive innervation pattern covering all brain regions and endowed with at least 15 different receptors (each with their particular distribution patterns), specific reuptake mechanisms and synthetic processes. Many aspects of the functioning of the serotonergic system are still unclear, partially because of the difficulty of measuring physiological processes in the living brain. In this review we give an overview of the conventional methods of measuring serotonin synthesis and methods using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, more specifically with respect to serotonergic function in affective disorders. Conventional methods are invasive and do not directly measure synthesis rates. Although they may give insight into turnover rates, a more direct measurement may be preferred. PET is a noninvasive technique which can trace metabolic processes, like serotonin synthesis. Tracers developed for this purpose are {alpha}-[{sup 11}C]methyltryptophan ([{sup 11}C]AMT) and 5-hydroxy-L-[{beta}-{sup 11}C]tryptophan ([{sup 11}C]5-HTP). Both tracers have advantages and disadvantages. [{sup 11}C]AMT can enter the kynurenine pathway under inflammatory conditions (and thus provide a false signal), but this tracer has been used in many studies leading to novel insights regarding antidepressant action. [{sup 11}C]5-HTP is difficult to produce, but trapping of this compound may better represent serotonin synthesis. AMT and 5-HTP kinetics are differently affected by tryptophan depletion and changes of mood. This may indicate that both tracers are associated with different enzymatic processes. In conclusion, PET with radiolabelled substrates for the serotonergic pathway is the only direct way to detect changes of serotonin synthesis in the living brain. (orig.)

  1. Measurement of microwave radiation from electron beam in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, I.S.; Akimune, H. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Inome, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Matthews, J.N. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 4112-0830 (United States); Ogio, S. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sagawa, H. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Sako, T. [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Shibata, T. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Yamamoto, T., E-mail: tokonatu@konan-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan)

    2016-02-21

    We report the use of an electron light source (ELS) located at the Telescope Array Observatory in Utah, USA, to measure the isotropic microwave radiation from air showers. To simulate extensive air showers, the ELS emits an electron beam into the atmosphere and a parabola antenna system for the satellite communication is used to measure the microwave radiation from the electron beam. Based on this measurement, an upper limit on the intensity of a 12.5 GHz microwave radiation at 0.5 m from a 10{sup 18} eV air shower was estimated to be 3.96×10{sup −16} W m{sup −2} Hz{sup −1} with a 95% confidence level.

  2. Beam measurements of the SPS longitudinal impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Lasheen, A

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal instabilities are one of the main limitationsin the CERN SPS to reach the beam parameters requiredfor the High Luminosity LHC project. In preparation tothe SPS upgrade, possible remedies are studied by perform-ing macroparticle simulations using the machine impedancemodel obtained from electromagnetic simulations and mea-surements. To benchmark the impedance model, the resultsof simulations are compared with various beam measure-ments. In this study, the reactive part of the impedance wasprobed by measuring the quadrupole frequency shift withintensity, obtained from bunch length oscillations at mis-matched injection into the SPS. This method was appliedover many last years to follow up the evolution of the SPSimpedance, injecting bunches with the same bunch length.A novel approach, giving significantly more information,consists in varying the injected bunch length. The compari-son of these measurements with macroparticle simulationsallowed to test the existing model and identify some missingSPS i...

  3. Linac4 45 keV Proton Beam Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bellodi, G; Hein, L M; Lallement, J-B; Lombardi, A M; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R; Posocco, P A

    2013-01-01

    Linac4 is a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, which will replace the 50 MeV proton Linac2 as injector for the CERN proton complex. Commissioning of the low energy part - comprising the H - source, a 45 keV Low Energy Beam Transport line (LEBT), a 3 MeV Radiofrequency Quadrupole (RFQ) and a Medium Energy Beam Transport (MEBT) - will start in fall 2012 on a dedicated test stand installation. In preparation to this, preliminary measurements were taken using a 45 keV proton source and a temporary LEBT setup, with the aim of characterising the output beam by comparison with the predictions of simulations. At the same time this allowed a first verification of the functionalities of diagnostics instrumentation and acquisition software tools. Measurements of beam profile, emittance and intensity were taken in three different setups: right after the source, after the first and after the second LEBT solenoids respectively. Particle distributions were reconstructed from emittance scan...

  4. PET and PET/CT in tumour of undetermined origin; PET y PET/CT en tumor de origen indeterminado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, J R [Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, PET/CT, Centro Medico ABC, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    In this presentation the following conclusions were obtained regarding the use of PET and PET/CT in patient with cancer of unknown primary: 1. Detection of the primary one in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 2. It detects metastases in other places in 50%. 3. It changes the initial therapy planned in 1/3 at 1/2 of patient. 4. Useful in initial phases of protocol study to limit the other procedures. After standard evaluation. Before advanced protocol. 5. PET/CT study increases the % of primary detection, although in a non significant way vs. PET. 6. They are required more studies to value their utility to a more objective manner. (Author)

  5. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane

  6. Frontiers of beam diagnostics in plasma accelerators: Measuring the ultra-fast and ultra-cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Giribono, A.; Marocchino, A.; Pompili, R.; Scifo, J.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Mostacci, A.; Bacci, A.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Zigler, A.

    2018-05-01

    Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of plasma-based accelerators. The accurate measurement of the quality of beams at the exit of the plasma channel is crucial to optimize the parameters of the plasma accelerator. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement, which is particularly complex due to large energy spread and divergence of the emerging beams, and on femtosecond bunch length measurements.