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Sample records for impurity influx monitor

  1. Aberrations in preliminary design of ITER divertor impurity influx monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti, E-mail: kitazawa.siniti@jaea.go.jp [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, JAEA, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Ogawa, Hiroaki [Naka Fusion Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, JAEA, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Katsunuma, Atsushi; Kitazawa, Daisuke [Core Technology Center, Nikon Corporation, Yokohama 244-8533 (Japan); Ohmori, Keisuke [Customized Products Business Unit, Nikon Corporation, Mito 310-0843 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Divertor impurity influx monitor for ITER (DIM) is procured by JADA. • DIM is designed to observe light from nuclear fusion plasma directly. • DIM is under preliminary design phase. • The spot diagrams were suppressed within the core of receiving fiber. • The aberration of DIM is suppressed in the preliminary design. - Abstract: Divertor impurity influx monitor for ITER (DIM) is a diagnostic system that observes light from nuclear fusion plasma directly. This system is affected by various aberrations because it observes light from the fan-array chord near the divertor in the ultraviolet–near infrared wavelength range. The aberrations should be suppressed to the extent possible to observe the light with very high spatial resolution. In the preliminary design of DIM, spot diagrams were suppressed within the core of the receiving fiber's cross section, and the resulting spatial resolutions satisfied the design requirements.

  2. Aberrations in preliminary design of ITER divertor impurity influx monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Ogawa, Hiroaki; Katsunuma, Atsushi; Kitazawa, Daisuke; Ohmori, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Divertor impurity influx monitor for ITER (DIM) is procured by JADA. • DIM is designed to observe light from nuclear fusion plasma directly. • DIM is under preliminary design phase. • The spot diagrams were suppressed within the core of receiving fiber. • The aberration of DIM is suppressed in the preliminary design. - Abstract: Divertor impurity influx monitor for ITER (DIM) is a diagnostic system that observes light from nuclear fusion plasma directly. This system is affected by various aberrations because it observes light from the fan-array chord near the divertor in the ultraviolet–near infrared wavelength range. The aberrations should be suppressed to the extent possible to observe the light with very high spatial resolution. In the preliminary design of DIM, spot diagrams were suppressed within the core of the receiving fiber's cross section, and the resulting spatial resolutions satisfied the design requirements.

  3. Toroidal asymmetries in divertor impurity influxes in NSTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toroidal asymmetries in divertor carbon and lithium influxes were observed in NSTX, due to toroidal differences in surface composition, tile leading edges, externally-applied three-dimensional (3D fields and toroidally-localized edge plasma modifications due to radio frequency heating. Understanding toroidal asymmetries in impurity influxes is critical for the evaluation of total impurity sources, often inferred from measurements with a limited toroidal coverage. The toroidally-asymmetric lithium deposition induced asymmetries in divertor lithium influxes. Enhanced impurity influxes at the leading edge of divertor tiles were the main cause of carbon toroidal asymmetries and were enhanced during edge localized modes. Externally-applied 3D fields led to strike point splitting and helical lobes observed in divertor impurity emission, but marginal changes to the toroidally-averaged impurity influxes. Power coupled to the scrape-off layer SOL plasma during radio frequency (RF heating of H-mode discharges enhanced impurity influxes along the non-axisymmetric divertor footprint of flux tubes connecting to plasma in front of the RF antenna.

  4. Correlations between locked modes and impurity influxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishpool, G M [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Lawson, K D [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis of pulses that were disturbed by medium Z impurity influxes (Cl, Cr, Fe and Ni) recorded during the 91/92 JET operations, has demonstrated that such influxes can result in MHD modes which subsequently ``lock``. A correlation is found between the power radiated by the influx and the time difference between the start of the influx and the beginning of the locked mode. The growth in the amplitude of the locked mode itself can lead to further impurity influxes. A correlation is noted between intense influxes (superior to 10 MW) and the mode ``unlocking``. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Couture, P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Morris, W.

    1987-01-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Z eff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n met /n e ≅ 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm 3 , consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft X-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6x10 10 and 10x10 10 particles/cm 2 s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3x10 12 and 1x10 12 particles/cm 2 s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained. (orig.)

  6. Analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission as compared to those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion

  7. Divertor impurity monitor for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugie, T.; Ogawa, H.; Nishitani, T.; Kasai, S.; Katsunuma, J.; Maruo, M.; Ebisawa, K.; Ando, T.; Kita, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The divertor impurity monitoring system of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor has been designed. The main functions of this system are to identify impurity species and to measure the two-dimensional distributions of the particle influxes in the divertor plasmas. The wavelength range is 200-1000 nm. The viewing fans are realized by molybdenum mirrors located in the divertor cassette. With additional viewing fans seeing through the gap between the divertor cassettes, the region approximately from the divertor leg to the x point will be observed. The light from the divertor region passes through the quartz windows on the divertor port plug and the cryostat, and goes through the dog-leg optics in the biological shield. Three different type of spectrometers: (i) survey spectrometers for impurity species monitoring, (ii) filter spectrometers for the particle influx measurement with the spatial resolution of 10 mm and the time resolution of 1 ms, and (iii) high dispersion spectrometers for high resolution wavelength measurements are designed. These spectrometers are installed just behind the biological shield (for λthe transmission loss in fiber and in the diagnostic room (for λ⩾450 nm) from the point of view of accessibility and flexibility. The optics have been optimized by a ray trace analysis. As a result, 10-15 mm spatial resolution will be achieved in all regions of the divertor.

  8. An analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission compared with those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion. (orig.)

  9. Failure mode analysis of preliminary design of ITER divertor impurity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, Sin-iti; Ogawa, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Divertor impurity influx monitor for ITER (DIM) is procured by JADA. • DIM is designed to observe light from nuclear fusion plasma directly. • DIM is under preliminary design phase. • Failure mode of DIM was prepared for RAMI analysis. • RAMI analysis on DIM was performed to reduce technical risks. - Abstract: The objective of the divertor impurity influx monitor (DIM) for ITER is to measure the parameters of impurities and hydrogen isotopes (tritium, deuterium, and hydrogen) in divertor plasma using visible and UV spectroscopic techniques in the 200–1000 nm wavelength range. In ITER, special provisions are required to ensure accuracy and full functionality of the diagnostic components under harsh conditions (high temperature, high magnetic field, high vacuum condition, and high radiation field). Japan Domestic Agency is preparing the preliminary design of the ITER DIM system, which will be installed in the upper, equatorial and lower ports. The optical and mechanical designs of the DIM are conducted to fit ITER’s requirements. The optical and mechanical designs meet the requirements of spatial resolution. Some auxiliary systems were examined via prototyping. The preliminary design of the ITER DIM system was evaluated by RAMI analysis. The availability of the designed system is adequately high to satisfy the project requirements. However, some equipment does not have certain designs, and this may cause potential technical risks. The preliminary design should be modified to reduce technical risks and to prepare the final design.

  10. Self-sustaining thin films as a means of reducing first wall erosion and plasma impurity influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Neutral impurities ejected from Tokamak wall and limiter surfaces may travel several cm before being ionized very quickly upon entering the plasma edge. The influence of the unipolar sheath potential is exerted only within a very short distance of the surface and has no effect on neutral impurity atoms within a very short distance of the surface and has no effect on neutral impurity atoms which are subsequently ionized by charge-exchange collisions or electron impact ionization. However, secondary ions emanating from the limiter surfaces with kinetic energies less than the sheath potential will have essentially zero probability of traveling more than a few Debye lengths before being redeposited. Similarly, secondary ions originating at the first wall are redeposited as a result of the deflection produced by the magnetic field. Impurity influx resulting from sputtering would therefore be substantially reduced for surfaces which produce a very high ion/neutral ratio when sputtered. It has been previously shown that the high secondary ion yield associated with the alkali metal potassium does not apply to the bulk metal but pertains to ionic compounds and thin (mono-layer) films. Two processes are discussed as a means of producing these films in a self-sustaining manner compatible with the fusion reactor environment. (orig.)

  11. Impurity monitoring by laser-induced fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbwachs, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy can provide a highly sensitive and selective means of detecting atomic and ionic impurities. Because the photodetector can be physically isolated from the laser-excited region, these techniques can be applied to monitoring in hostile environments. The basic concepts behind fluorescence detection are reviewed. Saturated optical excitation is shown to maximize impurity atom emission yield while mitigating effects of laser intensity fluctuations upon absolute density calibration. Monitoring in high- and low-pressure monitoring environments is compared. Methods to improve detection sensitivity by luminescence background suppression are presented

  12. The optimisation of limiter geometry to reduce impurity influx in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, G.F.; McCracken, G.M.; Sewell, P.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Stangeby, P.C.; Pitcher, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional limiters are designed to withstand large power loadings and hence are constructed with surfaces at grazing angles to the toroidal magnetic field. As a result any impurities released from the limiter surface are projected towards the centre of the plasma and are poorly screened from it. The impurity control limiter (ICL), an alternative concept which has an inverted geometry is discussed. The ICL shape is designed to direct the impurities towards the wall. Results are presented from a two-dimensional neutral particle code which maps the ionisation of carbon physically sputtered by deuterons from a carbon limiter. This ionisation source is coupled to a one-dimensional impurity transport code which calculates the implied central impurity density. The results demonstrate that the ICL achieves impurity control in two ways. Firstly, many of the sputtered impurities directed towards the wall are not ionised and return to the wall as neutrals. Secondly, much of the ionisation which does occur is located in the scrape-off layer. Here there is a strong ion sink which may also be enhanced by the flow of hydrogenic ions entraining impurity ions created close to the limiter surface. We conclude that a reduction in central impurity density of a factor of 10 is possible in a Tokamak such as DITE provided that the limiter is the main source of impurities. (author)

  13. Monte Carlo modelling of impurity ion transport for a limiter source/sink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.; Farrell, C.; Hoskins, S.; Wood, L.

    1988-01-01

    In relating the impurity influx Φ I (0) (atoms per second) into a plasma from the edge to the central impurity ion density n I (0) (ions·m -3 ), it is necessary to know the value of τ I SOL , the average dwell time of impurity ions in the scrape-off layer. It is usually assumed that τ I SOL =L c /c s , the hydrogenic dwell time, where L c is the limiter connection length and c s is the hydrogenic ion acoustic speed. Monte Carlo ion transport results are reported here which show that, for a wall (uniform) influx, τ I SOL is longer than L c /c s , while for a limiter influx it is shorter. Thus for a limiter influx n I (0) is predicted to be smaller than the reference value. Impurities released from the limiter form ever large 'clouds' of successively higher ionization stages. These are reproduced by the Monte Carlo code as are the cloud shapes for a localized impurity injection far from the limiter. (author). 23 refs, 18 figs, 6 tabs

  14. Low-Z impurities in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnov, E.; Suckewer, S.; Bol, K.; Hawryluk, R.; Hosea, J.; Meservey, E.

    1977-11-01

    Low-Z impurities concentrations (oxygen and carbon) have been measured in different discharges in PLT. The contribution to Z/sub eff/, influx rates and radiation losses by oxygen and carbon were obtained. An inverse correlation was found between the low-Z impurity density (and also the edge ion temperature) and the high-Z impurity (tungsten) density. A one-dimensional computer transport model has been used to calculate the spatial profiles of different oxygen and carbon ionization states. This model predicts that fully stripped oxygen and carbon ions should exist near the plasma periphery

  15. Understanding of impurity behavior in SST-1 plasmas using visible spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchanda, Ranjana; Ramaiya, Nilam; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Banerjee, Santanu; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    Studies of impurity behavior in SST-1 plasma have been carried out using visible spectroscopic systems installed on the tokomak. This has been carried out using a low resolution and broadband survey spectrometer covering a 350-900 nm wavelength range, 0.5 m visible spectrometer having 600 and 1200 grooves/mm grating coupled with CCD camera and interference filter and photomultiplier (PMT) tube based systems. Temporal evolution of the hydrogen (H α , H β ) and impurities emissions like, C II, C III, O I, O II, O III, O V and a visible Continuum at 536.0 nm have been monitored using the PMT based system to understand impurity charge state evolution during plasma discharges. All systems are absolutely calibrated for impurity influx and plasma parameter estimations. Observed spectral lines in the visible range have been identified to recognize the presence of various impurities in the SST-1 plasmas. Comparison of impurities emission has been made for different plasma currents and toroidal magnetic fields. An analysis has been carried out to understand the impurities activities in plasmas of SST-1 tokomak in presence and absence of installed plasma facing components (PFC). Significantly higher carbon emissions have been observed indicating higher carbon content in the plasma with graphite PFCs installed. (author)

  16. Study on impurity screening in stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Morita, S.; Feng, Y.

    2008-10-01

    The impurity transport characteristics in the scrape-off layer associated with a stochastic magnetic boundary of LHD are analyzed. The remnant islands with very small internal field line pitch in the stochastic region play a key role in reducing the impurity influx. The thermal force driven impurity influx is significantly suppressed when the perpendicular energy flux exceeds the parallel one inside the islands due to the small pitch. Application of the 3D edge transport code, EMC3-EIRENE, confirmed the impurity retention (screening) effect in the edge region. It is also found that the edge surface layers are the most effective region to retain (screen) impurities because of the flow acceleration and plasma cooling via short flux tubes. The carbon emission obtained in experiments is in good agreement with the modelling results, showing the impurity retention (screening) potential of the stochastic magnetic boundary. (author)

  17. Light impurity production in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is given of the different erosion processes of carbon materials with special emphasis on conditions relevant to plasma surface interactions. New results on the chemical erosion and radiation enhanced sublimation of boron-carbon layers are presented. The chemical hydrocarbon formation produced by the interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a carbon target has been investigated up to temperatures of 1500K using a Sniffer probe. The chemical interaction of the plasma with the carbon walls in TEXTOR is also analysed by measuring the hydrocarbon and CO and CO 2 partial pressures built up on the surrounding walls during the discharges. The recycling of oxygen impurities in an all carbon surrounding occurs predominantly in the form of CO and Co 2 molecules and the analysis of both neutral pressures during the discharges has been used as an additional diagnostic for the oxygen impurity situation in TEXTOR. These data are discussed in view of spectroscopic measurements on the influx of carbon and oxygen atoms from the walls and impurity line radiation. CD-band spectroscopy in addition is employed to identify the hydrocarbon chemical carbon erosion. Our present understanding of the oxygen impurity recycling and the oxygen sources are described. Particle induced release of CO molecules from the entire first wall is believed to be the dominant influx process of oxygen in the SOL of plasmas with carbon facing materials. The influence of coating the TEXTOR first wall with a boron-carbon film (B/C ≅1) on the light impurity behaviour is shown. (author)

  18. Three new extreme ultraviolet spectrometers on NSTX-U for impurity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, M. E., E-mail: weller4@llnl.gov; Beiersdorfer, P.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Magee, E. W.; Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Three extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometers have been mounted on the National Spherical Torus Experiment–Upgrade (NSTX-U). All three are flat-field grazing-incidence spectrometers and are dubbed X-ray and Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (XEUS, 8–70 Å), Long-Wavelength Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrometer (LoWEUS, 190–440 Å), and Metal Monitor and Lithium Spectrometer Assembly (MonaLisa, 50–220 Å). XEUS and LoWEUS were previously implemented on NSTX to monitor impurities from low- to high-Z sources and to study impurity transport while MonaLisa is new and provides the system increased spectral coverage. The spectrometers will also be a critical diagnostic on the planned laser blow-off system for NSTX-U, which will be used for impurity edge and core ion transport studies, edge-transport code development, and benchmarking atomic physics codes.

  19. Multilayer mirror based monitors for impurity controls in large fusion reactor type devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regan, S.P.; May, M.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    Multilayer Mirror (MLM) based monitors are compact, high throughput diagnostics capable of extracting XUV emissions (the wavelength range including the soft-x-ray and the extreme ultraviolet, 10 angstrom to 304 angstrom) of impurities from the harsh environment of large fusion reactor type devices. For several years the Plasma Spectroscopy Group at Johns Hopkins University has investigated the application of MLM based XUV spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. MLM based monitors have been constructed for and extensively used on DIII-D, Alcator C-mod, TEXT, Phaedrus-T, and CDX-U tokamaks to study the impurity behavior of elements ranging from He to Mo. On ITER MLM based devices would be used to monitor the spectral line emissions from Li I-like to F I-like charge states of Fe, Cr, and Ni, as well as extractors for the bands of emissions from high Z elements such as Mo or W for impurity controls of the fusion plasma. In addition to monitoring the impurity emissions from the main plasma, MLM based devices can also be adapted for radiation measurements of low Z elements in the divertor. The concepts and designs of these MLM based monitors for impurity controls in ITER will be presented. The results of neutron irradiation experiments of the MLMs performed in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will also be discussed. These preliminary neutron exposure studies show that the dispersive and reflective qualities of the MLMs were not affected in a significant manner

  20. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.Y., E-mail: brbbebbero@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Y.H. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Y.S., E-mail: yhwang@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H{sub 2}/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H{sub 2} GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10{sup −5} Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H{sub 2} GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  1. Development of wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.Y.; Yang, J.; Kim, Y.G.; Yang, S.M.; Kim, Y.S.; Lee, K.H.; An, Y.H.; Chung, K.J.; Na, Y.S.; Hwang, Y.S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The baking for partial wall heating and H_2/He GDC systems are developed in VEST. • The RGA and OES systems for monitoring impurities are constructed in VEST. • The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics. • H_2 GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms. • After H_2 GDC, the discharge should be conducted within 3 h from treatment. - Abstract: Wall conditioning and impurity monitoring systems are developed in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus (VEST). As a wall conditioning system, a baking system covering the vacuum vessel wall partially and a glow discharge cleaning (GDC) system using two electrodes with dc and 50 kHz power supplies are installed. The GDC system operates with hydrogen and helium gases for both chemical and physical desorption. The impurity monitoring system with residual gas analyzer (RGA), operating at <10"−"5 Torr with a differential pumping system, is installed along with the optical emission spectroscopy (OES) system to monitor the hydrogen and impurity radiation lines. Effects of these wall conditioning techniques are investigated with the impurity monitoring system for ohmic discharges of VEST. The partial baking and He GDC show limited effects on plasma characteristics but sufficient H_2 GDC above 4 h enables the longer plasma current duration up to ∼15 ms within 3 h from the end of treatment.

  2. Studies of impurity recycling by the collector probe technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Herrmann, A.; Laux, M.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Wolff, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study recycling effects of the nonintrinsic impurity Li discharges with and without LiD-pellet injection were investigated. The observed maximum impurity level of Li in the SOL plasma of discharges without injection reaches less than 10% of that observed in discharges with injection. The measurements offer the possibility to distinguish between influxes from the wall and those which reach the collector probe via the core plasma. The time evolution, orientation and radial dependence of the impurity fluxes are characteristic features of their origin. The consideration of all these features facilitates a better understanding of collector probe measurements in the SOL-plasma. (orig.)

  3. Behaviour of impurities during the H-mode in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianella, R.; Behringer, K.; Denne, B.; Gottardi, N.; Hellermann, M. von; Morgan, P.D.; Pasini, D.; Stamp, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    In additionally-heated tokamak discharges, the H-mode phases are reported to display, together with a better energy confinement, a longer global containment time for particles. In particular, steep gradients of electron density and temperature are sustained in the outer region of the plasma column. This enhanced performance is observed especially in discharges in which the activity of edge localized modes (ELMs) is low or absent. High confinement and accumulation of metallic impurities, which quickly give raise to terminal disruptions have been described under similar conditions. In JET H-modes very long impurity confinement times are also observed. However the experimental condition is somewhat more favourable since quiescent H-modes are obtained lasting much longer than the energy confinement times and the radiation from metals is generally negligible. The dominant impurities are normally carbon and oxygen, the latter generally accounting for half or more of the power radiated from the bulk plasma. During the X-point operation the effective influx of carbon into the discharge, which is normally in close correlation with that of deuterium, is substantially reduced while the influx of oxygen, whose production mechanisms is believed to be of a chemical nature, does not show significant variations. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  4. Collimator type monochromator as a possible impurities monitor for fusion plasmas. Preliminary tests on the Tokamak TM-1-MH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musa, G.; Lungu, C.P.; Badalec, J.; Jakubka, K.; Kopecky, V.; Stoeckel, J.; Zacek, F.

    1984-09-01

    A collimator type monochromator has been tested for the first time as the impurity monitor on Tokamak. The possibility to use this type of monochromator in fusion devices is analyzed and a monoslit device is proposed as a convenient monitor for impurities. (authors)

  5. Effects of impurities and magnetic divertors on high-temperature tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Furth, H.P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Seidl, F.G.P.; Duechs, D.F.

    1974-10-01

    A one-dimensional tokamak plasma transport code has been adapted to include impurity influx, stripping, radiation, and diffusion, as well as the usual processes of hydrogen plasma and heat transport, recycling at the boundary, and multigeneration charge-exchange. Neutral-beam heating, adiabatic compression, and divertor boundary conditions are included as optional features. Illustrative computations are given for present-day and next-generation tokamaks. The problems of impurity control are discussed, and two technical approaches are examined in greater detail: the transient cold-plasma shield, and the poloidal divertor. (auth)

  6. Impurity transport in the Wendelstein VII-A stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Impurity radiation losses in net-current-free neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the Wendelstein W VII-A stellarator are the combined effect of particularly strong impurity sources and improved particle confinement as compared with ohmically heated tokamak-like plasma discharges. Experiments are described and conclusions are drawn about the impurity species, their origin and their transport behaviour. The impurity transport is modelled by a 1-D impurity transport and radiation code. The evolution of the total radiation in time and space deduced from soft-X-ray and bolometer measurements can be fairly well simulated by the code. Experimentally, oxygen was found to make the main contribution to the radiation losses. In the calculations, an influx of cold oxygen desorbed from the walls of the order of 10 13 -10 14 cm -2 .s -1 and a rate of fast injected oxygen corresponding to a 1% impurity content of the neutral beams in combination with neoclassical impurity transport leads to quantitative agreement between the simulation and the observed radiation. The transport of A1 trace impurities injected by the laser blow-off technique was experimentally studied by soft-X-ray measurements using a differential method allowing extraction of the time evolution of A1 XII, XIII radial profiles. These are compared with code predictions, together with additional spectroscopic measurements. The main features of the impurity transport are consistent with neoclassical predictions, which explain particularly the central impurity accumulation. Some details, however, seem to require additional 'anomalous' transport. Such an enhancement is correlated with distortions of the magnetic configuration around resonant magnetic surfaces. (author)

  7. EUV impurity study of the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Chen, K.I.; Moos, H.W.; Marmar, E.S.

    1977-06-01

    The intensity of resonance line radiation from oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and molybdenum impurities has been measured in the high field (80 kG), high density (6 x 10 14 cm -3 ) discharges of the Alcator tokamak, using a 0.4 m normal incidence monochromator (300 to 1300 A) with its line of sight fixed along a major radius. The total light impurity concentrations were 2 x 10 -3 , 7 x 10 -4 , and 3 x 10 -3 at central electron densities of 4.5 x 10 13 cm -3 (burnout), 4.0 x 10 13 (low density plateau) and 6.0 x 10 14 (high density plateau). Both a simple model and a computer code which included Pfirsch-Schluter impurity diffusion were used to estimate oxygen influxes of 1.6 x 10 13 cm -2 sec -1 and 1.5 x 10 14 cm -2 sec -1 at the plasma edge in the low and high density emission plateaus. The resulting values of Z/sub eff/, including the contributions due to both the light impurities and molybdenum, were close to one. The power lost through the impurity line radiation accounted for approximately equal to 7 percent of the total ohmic input power at high densities

  8. Investigations of impurity control in JET using fuelling, and interpretation of experiments using the LIM impurity code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of contamination of the plasma core in JET by edge impurities during high power heating of deuterium plasmas in limiter configuration using fuelling is demonstrated. By injecting deuterium gas during heating, in the presence of a much larger recycling deuterium flux, a reduction of more than a factor of 2 was effected in n z (0)/Φ z , the ratio of central impurity density to impurity influx at the plasma edge. The reduction in n z (0) was obtained without much effect on peak electron temperature and density. Reduction of plasma contamination by gas fuelling was observed also when hot spots formed on the limiter, a condition that without simultaneous gas fuelling culminated in runaway plasma contamination. Detailed analysis of the experiments is undertaken with the purpose of identifying the processes by which plasma contamination was inhibited, employing standard limiter plasma contamination modelling. Processes which might produce the observed impurity inhibiting effects of gas injection include: (a) reduction in impurity production at the limiter; (b) increase in impurity screening in the scrape-off layer; (c) increase in radial impurity transport at the plasma edge; (d) increase in average deuteron flow velocity to the limiter along the scrape-off layer. These are examined in detail using the Monte Carlo limiter impurity transport code LIM. Bearing in mind that uncertainties exist both in the choice of appropriate modelling assumptions to be used and in the measurement of required edge plasma parameters, changes in n z (0)/Φ z by a factor of 2 are at the limit of the present modelling capability. However, comparison between LIM code simulations and measurements of plasma impurity content indicate that the standard limiter plasma contamination model may not be adequate and that other processes need to be added in order to be able to describe the experiments in JET. (author). 24 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  9. On impurity handling in high performance stellarator/heliotron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenn, R.; Feng, Y.; Ida, K.

    2008-10-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X, under construction) are experiments specially designed to demonstrate long pulse (quasi steady-state) operation, which is an intrinsic property of Stellarators and Heliotrons. Significant progress was made in establishment of high performance plasmas. A crucial point is the increasing impurity confinement towards high density as observed at several machines (TJ-II, W7-AS, LHD) which can lead to impurity accumulation and early pulse termination by radiation collapse at high density. In addition, theoretical predictions for non-axisymmetric configurations prognosticate the absence of impurity screening by ion temperature gradients in standard ion root plasmas. Nevertheless, scenarios were found where impurity accumulation was successfully avoided in LHD and/or W7-AS by the onset of drag forces in the high density and low temperature scrape-off-layer, the generation of magnetic islands at the plasma boundary and to a certain degree also by ELMs, flushing out impurities and reducing the net-impurity influx into the core. Additionally, a reduction of impurity core confinement was observed in the W7-AS High Density H-mode (HDH) regime and by application of sufficient ECRH heating power. The exploration of such purification mechanisms is a demanding task for successful steady-state operation. The impurity transport at the plasma edge/SOL was identified to play a major role for the global impurity behaviour in addition to the core confinement. (author)

  10. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jia; Li Yingying; Shi Yuejiang; Wang Fudi; Zhang Wei; Lv Bo; Huang Juan; Wan Baonian; Zhou Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200∼750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Dα/Hα line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system. (magnetically confined plasma)

  11. Spectroscopic measurements of lithium influx from an actively water-cooled liquid lithium limiter on FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apruzzese, G.M., E-mail: gerarda.apruzzese@enea.it; Apicella, M.L.; Maddaluno, G.; Mazzitelli, G.; Viola, B.

    2017-04-15

    Since 2006, experiments using a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) were successfully performed on FTU, pointing out the problem of the quantity of lithium in the plasma, especially in conditions of strong evaporation due to the high temperature of limiter surface. In order to avoid the strong evaporation it is necessary to control the temperature by removing the heat from the limiter during the plasma exposure. To explore this issue a new actively cooled lithium limiter (CLL) has been installed and tested in FTU. Suitable monitors to detect the presence of lithium in the plasma are the spectroscopic diagnostics in the visible range that permit to measure the flux of lithium, coming from the limiter surface, through the brightness of the LiI spectral lines. For this aim an Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) spectrometer and a single wavelength impurities monitor have been used. The analysis of the Li influx signals has permitted to monitor the effects of interaction between the plasma and the limiter connected to the thermal load. Particular attention has been paid on the possible occurrence of sudden rise of the signals, which is an index of a strong interaction that could lead to a disruption. On the other hand, the appearance of significant signals gives useful indication if the interaction with the plasma has taken place.

  12. Experimental study of impurity production in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The release mechanism for low-Z impurities in Tokapole II has been characterized through impurity doping and isotopic exchange experiments. The desorption mechanism responsible for the low-Z impurity concentrations during the rise phase of the plasma current depends on the mass of the plasma ions. Doping with small amounts of any gas studied (H 2 , D 2 , He, N 2 , O 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) increases the early-time radiation of O, C, and N. For exotic gas doping this increase is linear with the dopant concentration, and proportional to the mass of the dopant, as expected for a momentum transfer process. Isotopic exchange experiments confirm the mass-dependence of oxygen production. A time-dependent coronal model is compared with the vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic signals of the ionizing oxygen. The quantity sigma/tau (desorption cross section divided by particle confinement time) is determined to be 4 x 10 13 cm 2 /msec. The oxygen influx has a large peak early in the start-up

  13. The impurity transport in HT-6B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Xie Jikang; Li Linzhong; He Yexi; Wang Shuya; Deng Chuanbao; Li Guoxiang; Qiu Lijian

    1992-06-01

    The quasi-stationary profiles of the impurity ionization stages in HT-6B tokamak were determined by monitoring the VUV (vacuum ultraviolet) and visible line emissions from impurities. An impurity transport code was set up. The impurity transport coefficients and other parameters of impurities in that device were simulated and determined. From the measurement of impurity emission profiles and simulation analysis, it is concluded that the impurity confinement is improved and the impurity recycling is reduced by the slow magnetic compression. Some characteristics of impurity transport in that device are also discussed

  14. Ketamine inhibits 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion by inhibiting 22Na influx in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takara, Hiroshi; Wada, Akihiko; Arita, Masahide; Izumi, Futoshi; Sumikawa, Koji

    1986-01-01

    The effects of ketamine, an intravenous anesthetic, on 22 Na influx, 45 Ca influx and catecholamine secretion were investigated in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Ketamine inhibited carbachol-induced 45 Ca influx and catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner with a similar potency. Ketamine also reduced veratridine-induced 45 Ca influx and catecholamine secretion. The influx of 22 Na caused by carbachol or by veratridine was suppressed by ketamine with a concentration-inhibition curve similar to that of 45 Ca influx and catecholamine secretion. Inhibition by ketamine of the carbachol-induced influx of 22 Na, 45 Ca and secretion of catecholamines was not reversed by the increased concentrations of carbachol. These observations indicate that ketamine, at clinical concentrations, can inhibit nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and that the inhibition of Na influx via the receptor-associated ionic channels is responsible for the inhibition of carbachol-induced Ca influx and catecholamine secretion. (Auth.)

  15. Impurity behavior during ion-Bernstein wave heating in PBX-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, R. C.; Post-Zwicker, A. P.; Paul, S. F.; Tighe, W.; Ono, M.; Leblanc, B. P.; Bell, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Kaita, R.

    1994-07-01

    Ion-Bernstein-wave heating (IBWH) has been tested in several tokamaks. In some cases the results have been quite positive, producing temperature increases and also improving both energy and particle confinement times, whereas in others, no distinctive changes were observed. Most recently, IBWH has been utilized in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modified (PBX-M) where the long-range goal is the achievement of operation in the second stable region by current and pressure profile control. Investigations have been performed in this machine using IBWH as the sole source of auxiliary power or using IBWH in conjunction with neutral-beam injection (NBI) or with lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD). Impurity studies seem particularly important for IBWH since not only have influxes often been observed to increase, but the global impurity confinement time has also been shown to lengthen as the confinement of the working gas improved. The authors present here a set of characteristic experimental results regarding the impurity behavior in PBX-M; in general, these are consonant with previous observations in other tokamaks.

  16. Urban-Dome GHG Monitoring: Challenges and Perspectives from the INFLUX Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetstone, J.; Shepson, P. B.; Davis, K. J.; Sweeney, C.; Gurney, K. R.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Razlivanov, I.; Zhou, Y.; Song, Y.; Turnbull, J. C.; Karion, A.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Callahan, W.; Novakovskaia, E.; Crosson, E.; Rella, C.; Possolo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Quantification of carbon dynamics in urban areas using advanced and diverse observing systems enables the development of measurable, reportable, and verifiable (MRV) mitigation strategies as suggested in the Bali Action Plan, agreed upon at the 13th Conference of the Parties of the UNFCCC (COP 13, 2007). The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), supports the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX). INFLUX is focused on demonstrating the utility of dense, surface-based observing networks coupled with aircraft-based measurements, advanced atmospheric boundary layer observation and modeling to determine GHG emission source location and strength in urban areas. The ability to correctly model transport and mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), responsible for carrying GHGs from their source to the point of measurement, is essential. The observing system design, using multiple instruments and observing methods, is intended to provide multi-scale measurements as a basis for mimicking the complex and evolving dynamics of a city. To better understand such a dynamic system, and incorporate this into models, reliable representations of horizontal and vertical transport, as well as ABL height, GHG mixing ratio measurements are planned for 11 tower locations, 2 are currently in operation with the remaining 9 planned for operational status in early to mid-2012. These observations are complimented by aircraft flights that measure mixing ratio as well as ABL parameters. Although measurements of ABL mixing heights and dynamics are presently only available intermittently, limiting efforts to evaluate ABL model performance and the uncertainties of GHG flux estimates, expansion of them is planned for the near future. INFLUX will significantly benefit from continuous, high resolution measurements of mixing depth, wind speed and direction, turbulence profiles in the boundary layer, as well as measurements of surface energy balance, momentum flux, and short and

  17. Chemical sensors for monitoring non-metallic impurities in liquid sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Jayaraman, V.; Rajan Babu, S.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for fast breeder reactors. Liquid sodium is highly compatible with structural steels when the concentration of dissolved non-metallic impurities such as oxygen and carbon are low. However, when their concentrations are above certain threshold limits, enhanced corrosion and mass transfer and carburization of the steels would occur. The threshold concentration levels of oxygen in sodium are determined by thermochemical aspects of various ternary oxides of Na-M-O systems (M alloying elements in steels) which take part in corrosion and mass transfer. Dissolved carbon also influences these threshold levels by establishing relevant carbide equilibria. An event of steam leak into sodium at the steam generator, if undetected at its inception itself, can lead to extensive wastage of the tubes of the steam generator and prolonged shutdown. Air ingress into the argon cover gas and leak of hydrocarbon oil used as cooling fluids of the shafts of the centrifugal pumps of sodium are the sources of oxygen and carbon impurities in sodium. Continuous monitoring of the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in sodium coolant will help identifying their ingress at inception itself. An electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaHBr-CaBr 2 hydride ion conducting solid electrolyte has been developed for detecting the steam leak during normal operating conditions of the reactor. A nickel diffuser based sensor system using thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and Pd-doped tin oxide thin film sensor has been developed for use during low power operations of the reactor or during its start up. For monitoring carbon in sodium, an electrochemical sensor with molten Na 2 CO 3 -LiCO 3 as the electrolyte and pure graphite as reference electrode has been developed. Yttria Doped Thoria (YDT) electrolyte based oxygen sensor is under development for monitoring dissolved oxygen levels in sodium. Fabrication, assembly, testing and performance of

  18. Studies of visible impurity radiation from JET plasmas during heating and fuelling experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, P.D.; Hellermann, M. von; Mandl, W.; Stamp, M.F.; Summers, H.P.; Weisen, H.; Forrest, M.J.; Horton, L.; Zinoviev, A.

    1989-01-01

    At JET extensive use is made of visible spectroscopy in the study of plasma impurities. Measurements of absolute line intensities from such species as O II, C III and D I are used to deduce the influxes of light impurities as well as deuterium at the plasma periphery. The absolute continuum emission at 523.5 nm, measured using a 15-telescope poloidal array, is used to determine Z eff (r) and its temporal evolution. Charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) has proved to be a powerful technique during NBI to measure, amongst other parameters, the density of C and O at up to 15 separate points on the plasma minor radius. The combination of these diagnostic techniques permits the global impurity behaviour in the plasma to be followed. In this paper, results are reported pertaining to studies of plasmas heated by NBI and ICRF, and fuelled by the injection of D 2 pellets. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  19. Edge and Core Impurity Transport Study with Spectroscopic Instruments in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Muto, Sadatsugu; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Chunfeng, Dong; Hangyu, Zhou; Zhengying, Cui; Fujii, Keisuke; Hasuo, Masahiro; Iwamae, Atsushi; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Sakurai, Ikuya; Tawara, Yuzuru; Yinxian, Jie; Baonian, Wan; Zhenwei, Wu; Koubiti, Mohammed; Yamaguchi, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Impurity transport was investigated at both edge and core regions in large helical device (LHD) with developed spectroscopic instruments which can measure one- and two-dimensional distributions of impurities. The edge impurity behavior was studied recently using four carbon resonant transitions in different ionization stages of CIII (977A), CIV (1548A), CV (40.3A) and CVI (33.7A). When the line-averaged electron density, n e , is increased from 1 to 6 x 10 13 cm -3 , the ratio of (CIII+CIV)/n e increases while the ratio of (CV+CVI)/n e decreases. Here, CIII+CIV (CV+CVI) expresses the sum of CIII (CV) and CIV (CVI) intensities. The CIII+CIV indicates the carbon influx and the CV+CVI indicates the emissions through the transport in the ergodic layer. The result thus gives experimental evidence on the impurity screening by the ergodic layer in LHD, which is also supported by a three-dimensional edge particle simulation. The core impurity behavior is also studied in high-density discharges (n e ≤ 1x 10 15 cm -3 ) with multi H 2 -pellets injection. It is found that the ratio of V/D (V: convection velocity, D: diffusion coefficient) decreases after pellet injection and Z eff profile shows a flat one at values of 1.1-1.2. These results confirm no impurity accumulation occurs in high-density discharges. As a result, the iron density, n Fe , is analyzed to be 6 x 10 -7 ( = n Fe /n e ) of which the amount can be negligible as radiation source even in such high-density discharges. One- and two-dimensional impurity distributions from space-resolved VUV and EUV spectrometers newly developed for further impurity transport study are also presented with their preliminary results. (magnetically confined plasma)

  20. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  1. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T. D.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Chernov, A.; Frolov, T.; Magee, E.; Rudd, R.; Umansky, M.

    2016-01-01

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  2. Prevention of serious impurity penetration into water-steam circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgmann, F.; Bursik, A.; Flunkert, F.; Nieder, R.

    1977-01-01

    In consequence of reports from several power Plants concerning heavy damages due to penetrations of impurities into the water-steam circuit, the VGB Sub-Committee 'Water Chemistry in Thermal Power Plants' has established a working group to check-up how serious impurity penetration can be avoided. The lecture describes possible danger points. Suitable technical arrangements for the avoidance of penetrations, and possibilities for monitoring will be discussed. Penetration of impurities cannot be avoided with absolute reliability, even when the recommended arrangements and usual monitoring are realized. Additional measures for the protection of water steam circuits will be suggested. (orig.) [de

  3. Observations of long impurity confinement times in the ISX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, K H; Wong, S K; Muller, III, C H; Hacker, M P [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA); Ketterer, H E; Isler, R C; Lazarus, E A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1981-08-01

    The transport of small amounts of silicon and aluminium injected into plasmas in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) tokamak is studied. By monitoring the time behaviour of ultra-violet spectral lines emitted by various charge states of those impurities and comparing this behaviour to the predictions of a multi-species impurity transport code, it is found that both impurity penetration times and impurity containment times are consistent with neoclassical predictions. The observed impurity containment times, which are greater than three times the energy containment time, are consistent with the inward convection predicted by neoclassical theory.

  4. Influence of impurities on the crystallization of dextrose monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markande, Abhay; Nezzal, Amale; Fitzpatrick, John; Aerts, Luc; Redl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The effects of impurities on dextrose monohydrate crystallization were investigated. Crystal nucleation and growth kinetics in the presence of impurities were studied using an in-line focused beam reflectance monitoring (FBRM) technique and an in-line process refractometer. Experimental data were obtained from runs carried out at different impurity levels between 4 and 11 wt% in the high dextrose equivalent (DE) syrup. It was found that impurities have no significant influence on the solubility of dextrose in water. However, impurities have a clear influence on the nucleation and growth kinetics of dextrose monohydrate crystallization. Nucleation and growth rate were favored by low levels of impurities in the syrup.

  5. Self-limitation of impurity production by radiation cooling at the edge of a fusion plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, J.; Lackner, K.; Wunderlich, R.

    1982-04-01

    The influence of radiation cooling at the edge of a fusion plasma on the plasma-wall interaction is numerically studied for parameters typical of the ZEPHYR ignition experiment. Various transport and impurity influx models and different external heating methods are studied using the 1D tokamak transport code BALDUR developed at Princeton. The results demonstrate the self-consistent formation of a radiating boundary layer (photosphere) for a wide range of parameters, limiting the impurity concentration in the plasma to a tolerable value. While the plasma behaviour is rather insensitive to model assumptions, the sputtering rate and the corresponding wall erosion depend on various parameters. Methods for external control of the photosphere and - more important - of the wall erosion are also discussed. (orig.)

  6. Impurity Dynamics under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II (simulation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guasp, J.; Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this study the simulations of plasma transport under NBI for TJ-II, previously performed, are extended. Since than a considerable number of important modifications have been introduced in the model: change of magnetic configuration, use of experimental initial profiles, expansion of the Data base from NBI calculations and, mainly, a detailed handling of impurities with inclusion of sputtering effects. Moreover there is now a particular emphasis on the analysis of the conditions for discharge collapse and on the possible effects of single beam injection. This analysis of impurity behaviour with sputtering shows that in the expected usual cases there is no radioactive collapse and that if the recycling coefficients remain lower the unity it is always possible to find a strategy for external gas puffing leading to a stationary state, with densities below the limit and efficient NBI absorption (>50%). The radioactive collapse can appear either at high densities (central value higher than 1.4x10''20 m''3), excessive influx of impurities (i. e. with sputtering rates higher than twice the expected values) o for insufficient injected beam power (less than 45 kW). The present study analyses only the 100 4 4 6 4 configuration of TJ-II, but future works will start a systematic scan of configuration using this same model. (Author) 12 Refs

  7. Calcium influx pathways in rat pancreatic ducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hug, M J; Pahl, C; Novak, I

    1996-01-01

    A number of agonists increase intracellular Ca2+ activity, [Ca2+]i, in pancreatic ducts, but the influx/efflux pathways and intracellular Ca2+ stores in this epithelium are unknown. The aim of the present study was to characterise the Ca2+ influx pathways, especially their pH sensitivity, in nati...

  8. Impurity sublattice localization in ZnO revealed by li marker diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarov, A.Yu.; Knutsen, K.E.; Neuvonen, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Sublattice localization of impurities in compound semiconductors, e.g., ZnO, determines their electronic and optical action. Despite that the impurity position may be envisaged based on charge considerations, the actual localization is often unknown, limiting our understanding of the incorporation...... and possible doping mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that the preferential sublattice occupation for a number of impurities in ZnO can be revealed by monitoring Li diffusion. In particular, using ion implantation, the impurity incorporation into the Zn sublattice (holds for, B, Mg, P, Ag, Cd, and Sb...

  9. Variational method for magnetic impurities in metals: impurity pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oles, A M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.); Chao, K A [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics and Measurement Technology

    1980-01-01

    Applying a variational method to the generalized Wolff model, we have investigated the effect of impurity-impurity interaction on the formation of local moments in the ground state. The direct coupling between the impurities is found to be more important than the interaction between the impurities and the host conduction electrons, as far as the formation of local moments is concerned. Under certain conditions we also observe different valences on different impurities.

  10. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  11. Spectroscopic impurity survey in Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttenschoen, Birger; Burhenn, Rainer; Thomsen, Henning [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Biel, Wolfgang; Assmann, Jochen; Hollfeld, Klaus-Peter [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: the Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    The High Efficiency eXtreme ultraviolet Overview Spectrometer (HEXOS) has been developed specifically for impurity identification and survey purposes on the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator. This spectrometer system, consisting of four individual spectrometers, covers the wavelength range between λ=2.5 nm and λ=160 nm, observing the intense resonance lines of relevant Mg-, Na-, Be- and Li-like impurity ions as well as the high-Z W/Ta quasi-continua. During the first operation phase of W7-X, commissioning of HEXOS was finished by providing an in-situ wavelength calibration. The permanently acquired spectra are evaluated to monitor the overall impurity content in the plasma, and serve as an indicator for unintended plasma-wall contact possibly leading to machine damage. HEXOS results from the first operation phase of W7-X are presented and discussed with respect to future scientific exploitation of the available data.

  12. Measurement of calcium influx in tethered rings of rabbit aorta under tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, M.M.; Ratz, P.H.; Flaim, S.F.

    1985-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) influx in vascular smooth muscle is routinely measured in untethered preparations not under passive stretch, and Ca influx data are correlated with data for steady-state isometric tension obtained under parallel conditions from tethered preparations under passive stretch. The validity of this method was tested by simultaneous measurement of Ca influx and tension in tethered rings of rabbit thoracic aorta. Ca influx ( 45 Ca 3-min pulse) and tension were measured at 3 and 30 min after norepinephrine (NE) or KCl and under control (no agonist) conditions. Active tension was significantly altered by variations in passive tension. Ca influx was unaffected by passive tension under control, NE, or KCl conditions, and results were similar at 3 and 30 min. The results confirm the validity of correlating Ca influx data from untethered rings with steady-state contractile response data obtained from tethered rings under similar experimental conditions

  13. ATP stimulates calcium influx in primary astrocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neary, J.T.; van Breemen, C.; Forster, E.; Norenberg, L.O.; Norenberg, M.D.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of ATP and other purines on 45 Ca uptake was studied in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Treatment of the cells with ATP for 1 to 30 min brought about an increase in cellular 45 Ca. Stimulation of calcium influx by ATP was investigated using a 90 sec exposure to 45 Ca and over a concentration range of 0.1 nM to 3 mM; a biphasic dose-response curve was obtained with EC50 values of 0.3 nM and 9 uM, indicating the presence of low and high affinity purinergic binding sites. Similar levels of 45 Ca influx at 90 sec were observed with ATP, ADP and adenosine (all at 100 uM). Prior treatment of the cultures with LaCl3 blocked the purine-induced 45 Ca influx. These findings indicate that one pathway for calcium entry in astrocytes involves purinergic receptor-operated, calcium channels

  14. Search for impurities of counting gases in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, T.

    1992-03-01

    In order to reach for the gas detectors applied at the ALADIN spectrometer of the GSI an as good as possible and timely remaining gas purity, a study on the kind and effects of impurities in different counting gases was performed. The gas purity was observed via the signal height of an α source after a drift path of the electrons of 50 cm. A steady decrease of the α-signals was measures, the steepness of which decreases slowly as function of the time. The half-life lies in the range of weeks, which lets conclude on a slow outgassing from the materials of the arrangement. By a gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy these impurities could be determined. Beside impurities by polar molecules as water and oxygen from the atmosphere, which are deposed in microscopical capillaries of the chamber materials and then outgassed in the samples after several days so-called softeners could be observed. Because these impurities in the arrangement at the ALADIN spectrometer cannot be avoided, a purification system in the flow-through operation was constructed and its effect tested. The gas quality can by this over several days be kept in the mean constant. In this dynamical process the fluctuations of the signal heights lie at ±0.7%. A ionization chamber as monitor for the gas purity was constructed and tested with different gas mixtures concerning observables like signal height and drift time. By this calibrated monitor in the experiment at the ALADIN spectrometer the gas quality can be independently determined. (orig.) [de

  15. Calcium influx determines the muscular response to electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Pernille Højman; Brolin, Camilla; Gissel, Hanne

    2012-01-01

    expression analyses and histology, we showed a clear association between Ca(2+) influx and muscular response. Moderate Ca(2+) influx induced by HVLV pulses results in activation of pathways involved in immediate repair and hypertrophy. This response could be attenuated by intramuscular injection of EGTA...... low-voltage pulse (HVLV), either alone or in combination with injection of DNA. Mice and rats were anesthetized before pulsing. At the times given, animals were killed, and intact tibialis cranialis muscles were excised for analysis. Uptake of Ca(2+) was assessed using (45)Ca as a tracer. Using gene...

  16. The influx of amino acids into the heart of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos, G.; Moorhouse, S.R.; Pratt, O.E.; Wilson, P.A.; Daniel, P.M.

    1978-01-01

    The influx of nineteen amino acids into the heart of the living rat was studied by a method specially devised for experiments under controlled conditions in vivo. When, in separate experiments, the concentration of each amino acid in turn was artificially raised in the circulation, the influx of that amino acid into the heart increased. The data indicate that at least ten of these amino acids enter the heart in vivo by means of saturable carrier-mediated transport systems. The transport rates conform, at least approximately, to Michaelis kinetics and the transport systems are clearly, in the case of many amino acids, active, i.e. energy-dependent. The amino acids which were studied had rates of influx into the heart which differed from each other over a range of more than 10 to 1, even when allowances were made for the differences in their concentration in the circulating blood. These differences in influx were not related to such factors as the molecular size of the individual amino acids. The amino acids which have a high influx into the heart are mainly those which are needed either to re-synthesize contractile protein or as oxidizable substrates. (author)

  17. Radiation entropy influx as a measure of planetary dissipative processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izakov, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    Dissipative processes including high flows of matter and energy occur at the planets. Radiation negentropy influx, resulting from difference of entropy fluxes of incoming solar and outgoing thermal radiation of the planet, is a measure of all these processes. Large share of radiation negentropy influx is spent in the vertical thermal fluxes which keep the planet temperature conditions. Next share of radiation negentropy consumption at the Earth is water evaporation. It's rest part is used for the dynamics, which is explained by the efficiency insignificant amount of heat engine, which generates movements in the atmosphere and ocean. Essentially higher share of radiation negentropy influx, than at the Earth, is spent at the Venus, where there are practically no water

  18. Predicting dietborne metal toxicity from metal influxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Dietborne metal uptake prevails for many species in nature. However, the links between dietary metal exposure and toxicity are not well understood. Sources of uncertainty include the lack of suitable tracers to quantify exposure for metals such as copper, the difficulty to assess dietary processes such as food ingestion rate, and the complexity to link metal bioaccumulation and effects. We characterized dietborne copper, nickel, and cadmium influxes in a freshwater gastropod exposed to diatoms labeled with enriched stable metal isotopes. Metal influxes in Lymnaea stagnalis correlated linearly with dietborne metal concentrations over a range encompassing most environmental exposures. Dietary Cd and Ni uptake rate constants (kuf) were, respectively, 3.3 and 2.3 times higher than that for Cu. Detoxification rate constants (k detox) were similar among metals and appeared 100 times higher than efflux rate constants (ke). Extremely high Cu concentrations reduced feeding rates, causing the relationship between exposure and influx to deviate from linearity; i.e., Cu uptake rates leveled off between 1500 and 1800 nmol g-1 day-1. L. stagnalis rapidly takes up Cu, Cd, and Ni from food but detoxifies the accumulated metals, instead of reducing uptake or intensifying excretion. Above a threshold uptake rate, however, the detoxification capabilities of L. stagnalis are overwhelmed.

  19. The Lebanese–Syrian crisis: impact of influx of Syrian refugees to an already weak state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherri, Zeinab; Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Lebanon, a small Middle Eastern country facing constant political and national unity challenges with a population of approximately 300,000 Palestinian and Iraqi refugees, has welcomed more than 1.2 million Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)-registered Syrian refugees since 2012. The Government of Lebanon considers individuals who crossed Lebanese–Syrian borders since 2011 as “displaced”, emphasizing its long-standing position that Lebanon is not a state for refugees, refusing to establish camps, and adopting a policy paper to reduce their numbers in October 2014. Humanitarian response to the Syrian influx to Lebanon has been constantly assembling with the UNHCR as the main acting body and the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan as the latest plan for 2016. Methods Review of secondary data from gray literature and reports focusing on the influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon by visiting databases covering humanitarian response in complex emergencies. Limitations include obtaining majority of the data from gray literature and changing statistics due to the instability of the situation. Results The influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon, an already weak and vulnerable state, has negatively impacted life in Lebanon on different levels including increasing demographics, regressing economy, exhausting social services, complicating politics, and decreasing security as well as worsened the life of displaced Syrians themselves. Conclusion Displaced Syrians and Lebanese people share aggravating hardships of a mutual and precarious crisis resulting from the Syrian influx to Lebanon. Although a lot of response has been initiated, both populations still lack much of their basic needs due to lack of funding and nonsustainable program initiatives. The two major recommendations for future interventions are to ensure continuous and effective monitoring and sustainability in order to alleviate current and future suffering in Lebanon. PMID:27471417

  20. The Lebanese-Syrian crisis: impact of influx of Syrian refugees to an already weak state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherri, Zeinab; Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Lebanon, a small Middle Eastern country facing constant political and national unity challenges with a population of approximately 300,000 Palestinian and Iraqi refugees, has welcomed more than 1.2 million Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)-registered Syrian refugees since 2012. The Government of Lebanon considers individuals who crossed Lebanese-Syrian borders since 2011 as "displaced", emphasizing its long-standing position that Lebanon is not a state for refugees, refusing to establish camps, and adopting a policy paper to reduce their numbers in October 2014. Humanitarian response to the Syrian influx to Lebanon has been constantly assembling with the UNHCR as the main acting body and the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan as the latest plan for 2016. Review of secondary data from gray literature and reports focusing on the influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon by visiting databases covering humanitarian response in complex emergencies. Limitations include obtaining majority of the data from gray literature and changing statistics due to the instability of the situation. The influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon, an already weak and vulnerable state, has negatively impacted life in Lebanon on different levels including increasing demographics, regressing economy, exhausting social services, complicating politics, and decreasing security as well as worsened the life of displaced Syrians themselves. Displaced Syrians and Lebanese people share aggravating hardships of a mutual and precarious crisis resulting from the Syrian influx to Lebanon. Although a lot of response has been initiated, both populations still lack much of their basic needs due to lack of funding and nonsustainable program initiatives. The two major recommendations for future interventions are to ensure continuous and effective monitoring and sustainability in order to alleviate current and future suffering in Lebanon.

  1. Trace impurity analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.J.; Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The desirability for long-term reliability of large scale helium refrigerator systems used on superconducting accelerator magnets has necessitated detection of impurities to levels of a few ppM. An analyzer that measures trace impurity levels of condensable contaminants in concentrations of less than a ppM in 15 atm of He is described. The instrument makes use of the desorption temperature at an indicated pressure of the various impurities to determine the type of contaminant. The pressure rise at that temperature yields a measure of the contaminant level of the impurity. A LN 2 cryogenic charcoal trap is also employed to measure air impurities (nitrogen and oxygen) to obtain the full range of contaminant possibilities. The results of this detector which will be in use on the research and development helium refrigerator of the ISABELLE First-Cell is described

  2. Differential potassium influx influences growth of two cotton varieties in hydroponics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, L.; Maqsood, M.A.; Kanwal, S.; Aziz, T.

    2010-01-01

    Potassium uptake rate of two cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties viz., NIBGE-2 and MNH-786 was investigated in nutrient solution culture having deficient K at the rate 0.3 mM and deficient K+ Na at the rate 0.3 +2.7 mM. Depletion of K from solution was monitored over a period of 24 h at regular time intervals after 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 24 h to estimate K uptake kinetics of the roots i.e. maximum influx, I/sub max/ and the Michaelis-Menten constant, Km. NIBGE-2 had about 2-fold higher (2.0 mg g rdw-1 hr-1) I/sub max/ value for K uptake rate at deficient K+Na than that (1.207 mg g rdw-1 hr-1) for MNH-786. Higher, Michaelis-Menten constant, Km (12.82 ppm) for K uptake rate was observed in both cultivars NIBGE-2 and MNH-786 at deficient K+Na than that at deficient K. Main effects of treatments and varieties had significant (p< 0.05) effect on shoot dry matter, root dry matter, total dry matter and leaf area per plant. Maximum K influx in NIBGE-2 at deficient K and deficient K +Na was attributed to enhanced growth response as compared to that in MNH-786. (author)

  3. Potassium ion influx measurements on cultured Chinese hamster cells exposed to 60-hertz electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, A.P.; Tobey, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Potassium ion influx was measured by monitoring 42 KCl uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown in suspension culture and exposed in the culture medium to 60-Hz electromagnetic fields up to 2.85 V/m. In the presence of the field CHO cells exhibited two components of uptake, the same as previously observed for those grown under normal conditions; both these components of influx were decreased when compared to sham-exposed cells. Although decreases were consistently observed in exposed cells when plotted as loge of uptake, the differences between the means of the calculated fluxes of exposed and sham-exposed cells were quite small (on the order of 4-7%). When standard deviations were calculated, there was no significant difference between these means; however, when time-paired uptake data were analyzed, the differences were found to be statistically significant. Cells exposed only to the magnetic field exhibited similar small decreases in influx rates when compared to sham-exposed cells, suggesting that the reduction in K+ uptake could be attributed to the magnetic field. Additionally, intracellular K+ levels were measured over a prolonged exposure period (96 h), and no apparent differences in intracellular K+ levels were observed between field-exposed and sham-exposed cultures. These results indicate that high-strength electric fields have a small effect on the rate of transport of potassium ions but no effect on long-term maintenance of intracellular K+

  4. Relationship between sodium influx and salt tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apte, S.K.; Reddy, B.R.; Thomas, J.

    1987-08-01

    The relationship between sodium uptake and cyanobacterial salt (NaCl) tolerance has been examined in two filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing species of Anabaena. During diazotrophic growth at neutral pH of the growth medium, Anabaena sp. strain L-31, a freshwater strain, showed threefold higher uptake of Na+ than Anabaena torulosa, a brackish-water strain, and was considerably less salt tolerant (50% lethal dose of NaCl, 55 mM) than the latter (50% lethal dose of NaCl, 170 mM). Alkaline pH or excess K+ (more than 25 mM) in the medium causes membrane depolarization and inhibits Na+ influx in both cyanobacteria (S.K. Apte and J. Thomas, Eur. J. Biochem. 154:395-401, 1986). The presence of nitrate or ammonium in the medium caused inhibition of Na+ influx accompanied by membrane depolarization. These experimental manipulations affecting Na+ uptake demonstrated a good negative correlation between Na+ influx and salt tolerance. All treatments which inhibited Na+ influx (such as alkaline pH, K+ above 25 mM, NO3-, and NH4+), enhanced salt tolerance of not only the brackish-water but also the freshwater cyanobacterium. The results indicate that curtailment of Na+ influx, whether inherent or effected by certain environmental factors (e.g., combined nitrogen, alkaline pH), is a major mechanism of salt tolerance in cyanobacteria. (Refs. 27)

  5. Characterizing the glymphatic influx by utilizing intracisternal infusion of fluorescently conjugated cadaverine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui; Lin, Jun; Wei, Fang; Song, Jian; Chen, Wenyue; Shan, Lidong; Xue, Rong; Wang, Guoqing; Tao, Jin; Zhang, Guoxing; Xu, Guang-Yin; Wang, Linhui

    2018-05-15

    Accumulating evidence supports that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space (SAS) could reenter the brain parenchyma via the glymphatic influx. The present study was designed to characterize the detailed pathway of subarachnoid CSF influx by using a novel CSF tracer. Fluorescently conjugated cadaverine (A488-ca), for the first time, was employed to investigate CSF movement in the brain. Following intracisternal infusion of CSF tracers, mice brain was sliced and prepared for fluorescence imaging. Some brain sections were immunostained in order to observe tracer distribution and cellular uptake. A488-ca moved into the brain parenchyma rapidly, and the influx was time and region dependent. A488-ca entered the mice brain more readily and spread more widely than another commonly used CSF tracer-fluorescently conjugated ovalbumin (OA-45). Furthermore, A488-ca could enter the brain parenchyma either along the paravascular space or across the pial surface. Suppression of glymphatic transport by administration with acetazolamide strikingly reduced the influx of A488-ca. More importantly, relative to OA-45 largely remained in the extracellular space, A488-ca exhibited obvious cellular uptake by astrocytes surrounding the blood vessels and neurons in the cerebral cortex. Subarachnoid CSF could flow into the brain parenchyma via the glymphatic influx, in which the transcellular pathway was faithfully traced by intracisternal infusion with fluorescently conjugated cadaverine. These observations extend our comprehension on the glymphatic influx pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impurity diffusion in transition-metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    Intrinsic tracer impurity diffusion measurements in ceramic oxides have been primarily confined to CoO, NiO, and Fe 3 O 4 . Tracer impurity diffusion in these materials and TiO 2 , together with measurements of the effect of impurities on tracer diffusion (Co in NiO and Cr in CoO), are reviewed and discussed in terms of impurity-defect interactions and mechanisms of diffusion. Divalent impurities in divalent solvents seem to have a weak interaction with vacancies whereas trivalent impurities in divalent solvents strongly influence the vacancy concentrations and significantly reduce solvent jump frequencies near a trivalent impurity. Impurities with small ionic radii diffuse more slowly with a larger activation energy than impurities with larger ionic radii for all systems considered in this review. Cobalt ions (a moderate size impurity) diffuse rapidly along the open channels parallel to the c-axis in TiO 2 whereas chromium ions (a smaller-sized impurity) do not. 60 references, 11 figures

  7. Integrable quantum impurity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckle, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    By modifying some of the local L operators of the algebraic form of the Bethe Ansatz inhomogeneous one dimensional quantum lattice models can be constructed. This fact has recently attracted new attention, the inhomogeneities being interpreted as local impurities. The Hamiltonians of the so constructed one-dimensional quantum models have a nearest neighbour structure except in the vicinity of the local impurities which involve three-site interactions. The pertinent feature of these models is the absence of backscattering at the impurities: the impurities are transparent. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  8. Maintained LTP and Memory Are Lost by Zn2+ Influx into Dentate Granule Cells, but Not Ca2+ Influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Hisatsune, Marie; Murakami, Taku; Nakada, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Hiroaki

    2018-02-01

    The idea that maintained LTP and memory are lost by either increase in intracellular Zn 2+ in dentate granule cells or increase in intracellular Ca 2+ was examined to clarify significance of the increases induced by excess synapse excitation. Both maintained LTP and space memory were impaired by injection of high K + into the dentate gyrus, but rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, which blocked high K + -induced increase in intracellular Zn 2+ but not high K + -induced increase in intracellular Ca 2+ . High K + -induced disturbances of LTP and intracellular Zn 2+ are rescued by co-injection of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxakine-2,3-dione, an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, but not by co-injection of blockers of NMDA receptors, metabotropic glutamate receptors, and voltage-dependent calcium channels. Furthermore, AMPA impaired maintained LTP and the impairment was also rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, which blocked increase in intracellular Zn 2+ , but not increase in intracellular Ca 2+ . NMDA and glucocorticoid, which induced Zn 2+ release from the internal stores, did not impair maintained LTP. The present study indicates that increase in Zn 2+ influx into dentate granule cells through AMPA receptors loses maintained LTP and memory. Regulation of Zn 2+ influx into dentate granule cells is more critical for not only memory acquisition but also memory retention than that of Ca 2+ influx.

  9. Cytosine arabinoside influx and nucleoside transport sites in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J S; Jones, S P; Sawyer, W H; Paterson, A R

    1982-02-01

    Although cytosine arabinoside (araC) can induce a remission in a majority of patients presenting with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), a minority fail to respond and moreover the drug has less effect in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The carrier-mediated influx of araC into purified blasts from patients with AML, ALL, and acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) has been compared to that of normal lymphocytes and polymorphs. Blasts showed a larger mediated influx of araC than mature cells, since mean influxes for myeloblasts and lymphoblasts were 6- and 2.3-fold greater than polymorphs and lymphocytes, respectively. Also, the mean influx for myeloblasts was fourfold greater than the mean for lymphoblasts. The number of nucleoside transport sites was estimated for each cell type by measuring the equilibrium binding of [(3)H]nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR), which inhibits nucleoside fluxes by binding with high affinity to specific sites on the transport mechanism. The mean binding site numbers for myeloblasts and lymphoblasts were 5- and 2.8-fold greater, respectively, than for the mature cells of the same maturation series. The mean number of NBMPR binding sites for myeloblasts was fourfold greater than for lymphoblasts. Patients with AUL were heterogeneous since blasts from some gave values within the myeloblastic range and others within the lymphoblastic range. The araC influx correlated closely with the number of NBMPR binding sites measured in the same cells on the same day. Transport parameters were measured on blasts from 15 patients with AML or AUL who were then treated with standard induction therapy containing araC. Eight patients entered complete remission, while seven failed therapy, among whom were the three patients with the lowest araC influx (myeloblasts have both higher araC transport rates and more nucleoside transport sites than lymphoblasts and this factor may contribute to the greater sensitivity of AML to this drug. AraC transport varied >10

  10. Study of the heavy impurity influx into the plasma using laser fluorescence spectroscopy in the TO-2 tokamak with toroidal divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vukolov, K.Yu.; Shvindt, N.N.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement cycle for determination of iron atom absolute concentrations was carried out in divertor and diaphragm modes of laser fluorescence spectroscopy. The conclusion is made on effective wall shielding by divertor layer as compared to material diaphragm. The basic result of the work consists in creating and testing on the tokamak TO-2 of multichannel diagnostic complex for remote measurement of atom (ion) absolute concentrations of metallic impurities in the near-wall plasma with high spatial and time resolution through laser fluorescence spectroscopy method intended for studies at the Tokamak-15 facility

  11. Cytosine Arabinoside Influx and Nucleoside Transport Sites in Acute Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Wiley, J. S.; Jones, S. P.; Sawyer, W. H.; Paterson, A. R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Although cytosine arabinoside (araC) can induce a remission in a majority of patients presenting with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), a minority fail to respond and moreover the drug has less effect in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The carrier-mediated influx of araC into purified blasts from patients with AML, ALL, and acute undifferentiated leukemia (AUL) has been compared to that of normal lymphocytes and polymorphs. Blasts showed a larger mediated influx of araC than mature cells...

  12. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges.

  13. Impurity studies and discharge cleaning in Doublet III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, F.B.

    1979-10-01

    The goal of present and next generation tokamak experiments is to produce high-density, high-purity plasmas during high-power, extended-duration discharges. Plasma discharges with Z/sub eff/ values near unity and low concentrations of medium and high-Z metallic impurities have been obtained in Doublet III using a combination of low-power hydrogen discharge cleaning, gas puffing, precise plasma shape and position control, and high-Z limiters. Analysis of the first wall surface and residual gas impurities confirmed that clean conditions have been achieved. The high-Z limiters showed very limited amounts of melting or arcing. The progress of the wall cleaning process was monitored by three diagnostic techniques: Auger electron spectroscopy of metallic samples at the vessel wall, residual gas analysis, and the resistivity of full power discharges

  14. The Lebanese–Syrian crisis: impact of influx of Syrian refugees to an already weak state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherri Z

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zeinab Cherri, Pedro Arcos González, Rafael Castro Delgado Unit for Research in Emergency and Disaster, Department of Medicine, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain Background: Lebanon, a small Middle Eastern country facing constant political and national unity challenges with a population of approximately 300,000 Palestinian and Iraqi refugees, has welcomed more than 1.2 million Office of the United Nations Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR-registered Syrian refugees since 2012. The Government of Lebanon considers individuals who crossed Lebanese–Syrian borders since 2011 as “displaced”, emphasizing its long-standing position that Lebanon is not a state for refugees, refusing to establish camps, and adopting a policy paper to reduce their numbers in October 2014. Humanitarian response to the Syrian influx to Lebanon has been constantly assembling with the UNHCR as the main acting body and the Lebanon Crisis Response Plan as the latest plan for 2016. Methods: Review of secondary data from gray literature and reports focusing on the influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon by visiting databases covering humanitarian response in complex emergencies. Limitations include obtaining majority of the data from gray literature and changing statistics due to the instability of the situation. Results: The influx of Syrian refugees to Lebanon, an already weak and vulnerable state, has negatively impacted life in Lebanon on different levels including increasing demographics, regressing economy, exhausting social services, complicating politics, and decreasing security as well as worsened the life of displaced Syrians themselves. Conclusion: Displaced Syrians and Lebanese people share aggravating hardships of a mutual and precarious crisis resulting from the Syrian influx to Lebanon. Although a lot of response has been initiated, both populations still lack much of their basic needs due to lack of funding and nonsustainable program initiatives

  15. The effect of ICRF antenna phasing on metal impurities in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.E.; Bush, C.; Colestock, P.L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov

    1989-07-01

    ICRF power levels of up to 2.8 MW were achieved during the 1988 experimental run on TFTR. Metal impurity concentrations (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni) and Z eff were monitored during ICRF heating by x-ray pulse height analysis and uv spectroscopy. Antenna phasing was the key variable affecting ICRF performance. No increase in metallic impurities was observed for P rf approx lt 2.8 MW with the antenna straps 0-Π, while a measurable increase in titanium (Faraday screen material) was observed for P rf approx gt 1.0 MW with 0-0 phasing. 18 refs., 8 figs

  16. Impurity of Sulfur Layers and Magmatic Gas Scrubbing: Implications for Gas Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolamacchia, T.

    2017-12-01

    The evidence of bodies of elemental sulfur (Se) beneath acid crater lakes at the summit of composite active volcanoes has been recognized several decades ago (Oppenheimer and Stevenson, 1989; Christenson and Woods, 1993). But Se accumulation was already hypothesized a century ago at Kusatzu Shirane (Japan) based on the observation of sulfur spherules floating on its crater-lake (Ohashi, 1919). Since these pioneering works, other studies have focused on understanding key aspects of molten sulfur bodies, considered a feature unique of volcanic lakes. Instead, it is reasonable to assume that Se bodies occur in several volcanic settings because a) several reactions may lead to Se deposition from S-bearing gases, and b) crater-lakes, surface expressions of hydrothermal systems, are transient features. The scrubbing of several magmatic gases, some of which critical for volcano monitoring, has been attributed to ground/surface waters (Symonds et al. 2001). Nevertheless, gas scrubbing could reflect viscosity variations of impure Se within hydrothermal systems. Industrial experiments indicated that impurities (organics, H2S, ammonia, HCl, HF, HBr, HI) hinder Se polymerization at T ≥ 160ºC, allowing viscosity to remain low for long time depending on the maximum T achieved and heating rates (Bacon and Fanelli, 1943). However, a prolonged heating destroys the viscosity-modifying substances (e.g. H2Sx formed by reactions with organics, H2S, or ammonia) and dramatic Se viscosity increases occur after a certain number of heating and cooling cycles. A prolonged boiling of Se with organics was observed to release H2S, following H2Sx disruption. Some gases (e.g. SO2) do not affect Se viscosity. In volcanic environments gases such as SO2, CO2 could escape under Selow viscosity regimes. Also, halogens absence in gas emissions could be caused by their participation in reactions within S-layers causing its viscosity to remain low. More data are needed to validate the hypothesis

  17. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  18. Numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity internal energy and specific heat of quantum impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a method to obtain the specific heat of quantum impurity models via a direct calculation of the impurity internal energy requiring only the evaluation of local quantities within a single numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation for the total system. For the Anderson impurity model we show that the impurity internal energy can be expressed as a sum of purely local static correlation functions and a term that involves also the impurity Green function. The temperature dependence of the latter can be neglected in many cases, thereby allowing the impurity specific heat Cimp to be calculated accurately from local static correlation functions; specifically via Cimp=(∂Eionic)/(∂T)+(1)/(2)(∂Ehyb)/(∂T), where Eionic and Ehyb are the energies of the (embedded) impurity and the hybridization energy, respectively. The term involving the Green function can also be evaluated in cases where its temperature dependence is non-negligible, adding an extra term to Cimp. For the nondegenerate Anderson impurity model, we show by comparison with exact Bethe ansatz calculations that the results recover accurately both the Kondo induced peak in the specific heat at low temperatures as well as the high-temperature peak due to the resonant level. The approach applies to multiorbital and multichannel Anderson impurity models with arbitrary local Coulomb interactions. An application to the Ohmic two-state system and the anisotropic Kondo model is also given, with comparisons to Bethe ansatz calculations. The approach could also be of interest within other impurity solvers, for example, within quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

  19. Computerized flow monitors detect small kicks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, D.; White, D. (Sedco Forex, Paris (FR))

    1992-02-24

    This paper reports on a smart alarm system installed on a number of offshore rigs and one land rig which can detect kicks more quickly than conventional systems. This rapid kick detection improves rig safety because the smaller the detected influx, the easier it is to control the well. The extensive computerized monitoring system helps drilling personnel detect fluid influxes and fluid losses before the changes in flow would normally be apparent.

  20. Effective water influx control in gas reservoir development: Problems and countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Feng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the diversity of geological characteristics and the complexity of percolation rules, many problems are found ineffective water influx control in gas reservoir development. The problems mainly focus on how to understand water influx rules, to establish appropriate countermeasures, and to ensure the effectiveness of technical measures. It is hard to obtain a complete applicable understanding through the isolated analysis of an individual gas reservoir due to many factors such as actual gas reservoir development phase, research work, pertinence and timeliness of measures, and so on. Over the past four decades, the exploration, practicing and tracking research have been conducted on water control in gas reservoir development in the Sichuan Basin, and a series of comprehensive water control technologies were developed integrating advanced concepts, successful experiences, specific theories and mature technologies. Though the development of most water-drive gas reservoirs was significantly improved, water control effects were quite different. Based on this background, from the perspective of the early-phase requirements of water influx control, the influencing factors of a water influx activity, the dynamic analysis method of water influx performance, the optimizing strategy of a water control, and the water control experience of typical gas reservoirs, this paper analyzed the key problems of water control, evaluated the influencing factors of water control effect, explored the practical water control strategies, and proposed that it should be inappropriate to apply the previous water control technological model to actual work but the pertinence should be improved according to actual circumstances. The research results in the paper provide technical reference for the optimization of water-invasion gas reservoir development.

  1. Rapid and Simultaneous Determination of Acetylsalicylic Acid, Paracetamol, and Their Degradation and Toxic Impurity Products by HPLC in Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

    OpenAIRE

    AKAY, Cemal

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Determinations of drug impurity and drug degradation products are very important from both pharmacological and toxicological perspectives. Establishment of monitoring methods for impurities and degradation products during pharmaceutical development is necessary because of their potential toxicity. The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and simultaneous determination method for paracetamol and acetylsalicylic acid (ACA) and their degradation and toxic impurity products by high perf...

  2. Impurity solitons with quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Torres, Juan P-; Torner, Lluis

    1998-01-01

    We fmd families of solitary waves mediated by parametric mixing in quadratic nonlinear media that are localized at point-defect impurities. Solitons localized at attractive impurities are found to be dynamically stable. It is shown that localization at the impurity modifies strongly the soliton...

  3. INMS measures an influx of molecules from Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, M. E.

    2017-12-01

    In 1984, Connerney and Waite proposed water influx from Saturn's rings to explain the low electron densities measured during Pioneer and Voyager radio occultation experiments. Charge exchange with this minor species depleted the H+ ions and provided a faster path to electron recombination. With ice the primary constituent of the rings, water was the most likely in-falling molecule. During the Grand Finale orbits, Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) detected and quantified an influx from the rings. Unexpectedly, the primary influx molecules are CH4 and a heavier carbon-bearing species. Water was detected, but quantities were factors of ten lower than these other species. Distribution in both altitude and latitude are consistent with a ring influx. The concentration of the minor species in Saturn's atmosphere shows that they enter Saturn's atmosphere from the top. Both molecules have their highest concentrations at the highest altitudes, with concentrations >0.4% at 3,500 km altitude and only 0.02% at 2,700 km. Molecules from the rings deorbit to Saturn's atmosphere at altitudes near 4,000 km, consistent with the INMS measurements. The latitudinal dependence of the minor species indicates that their source is near the equatorial plane. At high altitudes, the minor species were observed primarily at zero latitude, where the 28u species was six times more concentrated than at 5° latitude. At lower altitudes, the peaking ratio was 1, indicating that the species had diffused and was fully mixed into Saturn's H2 atmosphere. The lighter molecule, CH4, diffuses more rapidly than the 28u species. INMS also detected both of these species during the earlier F-ring passes, finding that the neutrals were centered at the ring plane and extended 3,000 km (half width, half max) north and south.

  4. Impurity-generated non-Abelions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, G.; Kazakov, A.; Rokhinson, L. P.; Wojtowicz, T.; Lyanda-Geller, Y. B.

    2018-06-01

    Two classes of topological superconductors and Majorana modes in condensed matter systems are known to date: one in which disorder induced by impurities strongly suppresses topological superconducting gap and is detrimental to Majorana modes, and another where Majorana fermions are protected by a disorder-robust topological superconductor gap. Observation and control of Majorana fermions and other non-Abelions often requires a symmetry of an underlying system leading to a gap in the single-particle or quasiparticle spectra. In semiconductor structures, impurities that provide charge carriers introduce states into the gap and enable conductance and proximity-induced superconductivity via the in-gap states. Thus a third class of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes emerges, in which topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions appear exclusively when impurities generate in-gap states. We show that impurity-enabled topological superconductivity is realized in a quantum Hall ferromagnet, when a helical domain wall is coupled to an s -wave superconductor. As an example of emergence of topological superconductivity in quantum Hall ferromagnets, we consider the integer quantum Hall effect in Mn-doped CdTe quantum wells. Recent experiments on transport through the quantum Hall ferromagnet domain wall in this system indicated a vital role of impurities in the conductance, but left unresolved the question whether impurities preclude generation of Majorana fermions and other non-Abelions in such systems in general. Here, solving a general quantum-mechanical problem of impurity bound states in a system of spin-orbit coupled Landau levels, we demonstrate that impurity-induced Majorana modes emerge at boundaries between topological and conventional superconducting states generated in a domain wall due to proximity to an s superconductor. We consider both short-range disorder and a smooth random potential. The phase diagram of the system is defined by

  5. Phonon-impurity relaxation and acoustic wave absorption in yttrium-aluminium garnet crystals with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.N.; Kotelyanskij, I.M.; Medved', V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental results of investigations of the influence of substitution impurities in the yttrium-aluminium garnet lattice on absorption of high-frequency acoustic waves are presented. It is shown that the phonon-impurity relaxation processses affect at most the wave absorption and have resonance character when the acoustic wave interacts with the thermal phonon group in the vicinity of the perturbed part of the phonon spectrum caused by the impurity. The differences of time values between inelastic and elastic thermal phonons relaxations determined from the data on longitudinal and shear waves in pure and impurity garnet crystals are discussed

  6. Divertor experiment for impurity control in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagami, Masayuki

    1979-04-01

    Divertor actions of controlling the impurities and the transport of impurity ions in the plasma have been investigated in the DIVA device. Following are the results: (1) The radial transport of impurity ions is not described only by neoclassical theory, but it is strongly influenced by anomalous process. Radial diffusion of impurity ions across the whole minor radius is well described by a neoclassical diffusion superposed by the anomalous diffusion for protons. Due to this anomalous process, which spreads the radial density profile of impurity ions, 80 to 90% of the impurity flux in the plasma outer edge is shielded even in a nondiverted discharge. (2) The divertor reduces the impurity flux entering the main plasma by a factor of 2 to 4. The impurity ions shielded by the scrape-off plasma are rapidly guided into the burial chamber with a poloidal excursion time roughly equal to that of the scrape-off plasma. (3) The divertor reduces the impurity ion flux onto the main vacuum chamber by guiding the impurity ions diffusing from the main plasma into the burial chamber, thereby reducing the plasma-wall interaction caused by diffusing impurity ions at the main vacuum chamber. The impurity ions produced in the burial chamber may flow back to the main plasma through the scrape-off layer. However, roughly only 0.3% of the impurity flux into the scrape-off plasma in the burial chamber penetrates into the main plasma due to the impurity backflow. (4) A slight cooling of the scrape-off plasma with light-impurity injection effectively reduces the metal impurity production at the first wall by reducing the potential difference between the plasma and the wall, thereby reducing the accumulation of the metal impurity in the discharge. Radiation cooling by low-Z impurities in the plasma outer edge, which may become an important feature in future large tokamaks both with and without divertor, is numerically evaluated for carbon, oxygen and neon. (author)

  7. Cryptococcal capsular glucuronoxylomannan reduces ischaemia-related neutrophil influx

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellerbroek, PM; Schoemaker, RG; van Veghel, R; Hoepelman, AIM; Coenjaerts, FEJ

    Background The capsular polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) of Cryptococcus neoformans interferes with the chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of neutrophils. Intravenous administration of purified GXM has been shown to reduce the influx of inflammatory cells in an animal model of

  8. Graphene plasmons: Impurities and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; Wenger, Tobias; Kinaret, Jari; Fogelström, Mikael

    2018-02-01

    This work analyzes how impurities and vacancies on the surface of a graphene sample affect its optical conductivity and plasmon excitations. The disorder is analyzed in the self-consistent Green's function formulation and nonlocal effects are fully taken into account. It is shown that impurities modify the linear spectrum and give rise to an impurity band whose position and width depend on the two parameters of our model, the density and the strength of impurities. The presence of the impurity band strongly influences the electromagnetic response and the plasmon losses. Furthermore, we discuss how the impurity-band position can be obtained experimentally from the plasmon dispersion relation and discuss this in the context of sensing.

  9. Oxygen control systems and impurity purification in LBE: Learning from DEMETRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissonneau, L., E-mail: laurent.brissonneau@cea.fr [CEA/DEN, Cadarache, DTN/STPA/LIPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Beauchamp, F.; Morier, O. [CEA/DEN, Cadarache, DTN/STPA/LIPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Schroer, C.; Konys, J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Materialforschung III, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kobzova, A.; Di Gabriele, F. [NRI, UJV Husinec-Rez 130, Rez 25068 (Czech Republic); Courouau, J.-L. [CEA/DEN, Saclay, DPC/SCCME/LECNA, F-919191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-08-31

    Operating a system using Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) requires a control of the dissolved oxygen concentration to avoid corrosion of structural materials and oxide build-up in the coolant. Reliable devices are therefore needed to monitor and adjust the oxygen concentration and to remove impurities during operation. In this article, we describe the learning gained from experiments run in the framework of the DEMETRA project (IP-EUROTRANS 6th FP contract) on the oxygen supply in LBE and on impurity filtration and management in different European facilities. An oxygen control device should supply oxygen in LBE at sufficient rate to compensate loss by surface oxidation, otherwise local dissolution of oxide layers might lead to the loss of steel protection against dissolution. Oxygen can be supplied by gas phase H{sub 2}O or O{sub 2}, or by solid phase, PbO dissolution. Each of these systems has substantial advantages and drawbacks. Considerations are given on devices for large scale facilities. The management of impurities (lead oxides and corrosion products) is also a crucial issue as their presence in the liquid phase or in the aerosols is likely to impair the facility, instrumentation and mechanical devices. To avoid impurity build-up on the long-term, purification of LBE is required to keep the impurity inventory low by trapping oxide and metallic impurities in specific filter units. On the basis of impurities characterisation and experimental results gained through filtration tests in different loops, this paper gives a description of the state-of-art knowledge of LBE purification with different filter media. It is now understood that the nature and behaviour of impurities formed in LBE will change according to the operating modes as well as the method to propose to remove impurities. This experience can be used to validate the basis filtration process, define the operating procedures and evaluate perspectives for the design of purification units for long

  10. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  11. Ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticku, M.K.; Lowrimore, P.; Lehoullier, P.

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol has a pharmacological profile similar to other centrally acting drugs, which facilitate GABAergic transmission. GABA is known to produce its effects by increasing the conductance to Cl- ions. In this study, we have examined the effect of ethanol on GABA-induced 36Cl-influx in primary spinal cord cultured neurons. GABA produces a concentration-dependent, and saturable effect on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. Ethanol potentiates the effect of GABA on 36Cl-influx in these neurons. GABA (20 microM) increased the 36Cl-influx by 75% over the basal value, and in the presence of 50 mM ethanol, the observed increase was 142%. Eadie-Hoffstee analysis of the saturation curves indicated that ethanol decreases the Km value of GABA (10.6 microM to 4.2 microM), and also increases the Vmax. Besides potentiating the effect of GABA, ethanol also appears to have a direct effect in the absence of added GABA. These results suggest that ethanol enhances GABA-induced 36Cl-influx and indicate a role of GABAergic system in the actions of ethanol. These results also support the behavioral and electrophysiological studies, which have implicated GABA systems in the actions of ethanol. The potential mechanism(s) and the role of direct effect of ethanol is not clear at this time, but is currently being investigated

  12. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-01-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of 45 Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of 45 Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of 45 Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the 45 Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the 45 Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of 45 Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of 45 Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the 45 Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels

  13. Neutrophil elastase-induced elastin degradation mediates macrophage influx and lung injury in 60% O2-exposed neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Azhar; Yi, Man; Belcastro, Rosetta; Li, Jun; Lopez, Lianet; Kantores, Crystal; Jankov, Robert P; Tanswell, A Keith

    2015-07-01

    Neutrophil (PMNL) influx precedes lung macrophage (LM) influx into the lung following exposure of newborn pups to 60% O2. We hypothesized that PMNL were responsible for the signals leading to LM influx. This was confirmed when inhibition of PMNL influx with a CXC chemokine receptor-2 antagonist, SB-265610, also prevented the 60% O2-dependent LM influx, LM-derived nitrotyrosine formation, and pruning of small arterioles. Exposure to 60% O2 was associated with increased lung contents of neutrophil elastase and α-elastin, a marker of denatured elastin, and a decrease in elastin fiber density. This led us to speculate that neutrophil elastase-induced elastin fragments were the chemokines that led to a LM influx into the 60% O2-exposed lung. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase with sivelestat or elafin attenuated the LM influx. Sivelestat also attenuated the 60% O2-induced decrease in elastin fiber density. Daily injections of pups with an antibody to α-elastin prevented the 60% O2-dependent LM influx, impaired alveologenesis, and impaired small vessel formation. This suggests that neutrophil elastase inhibitors may protect against neonatal lung injury not only by preventing structural elastin degradation, but also by blocking elastin fragment-induced LM influx, thus preventing tissue injury from LM-derived peroxynitrite formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  15. Impurity-induced moments in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaliullin, G.; Kilian, R.; Krivenko, S.; Fulde, P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity in a two-dimensional spin liquid in the spin-gap phase, employing a drone-fermion representation of spin-1/2 operators. The properties of the local moment induced in the vicinity of the impurity are investigated and an expression for the nuclear-magnetic-resonance Knight shift is derived, which we compare with experimental results. Introducing a second impurity into the spin liquid an antiferromagnetic interaction between the moments is found when the two impurities are located on different sublattices. The presence of many impurities leads to a screening of this interaction as is shown by means of a coherent-potential approximation. Further, the Kondo screening of an impurity-induced local spin by charge carriers is discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  16. Impurities in uranium process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Several uranium purification circuits are presented in tabular form together with the average major impurity levels associated with each. The more common unit operations in these circuits, namely strong- and weak-base ion-exchange, solvent extraction and the precipitation of impurities are then discussed individually. Particular attention is paid to the effect and removal of impurities in each of these four unit operations. (author)

  17. TFTR L mode energy confinement related to deuterium influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    Tokamak energy confinement scaling in TFTR L mode and supershot regimes is discussed. The main result is that TFTR L mode plasmas fit the supershot scaling law for energy confinement. In both regimes, plasma transport coefficients increased with increased edge deuterium influx. The common L mode confinement scaling law on TFTR is also inversely proportional to the volume of wall material that is heated to a high temperature, possibly the temperature at which the deuterium sorbed in the material becomes detrapped and highly mobile. The deuterium influx is increased by: (a) increased beam power due to a deeper heated depth in the edge components and (b) decreased plasma current due to an increased wetted area as governed by the empirically observed dependence of the SOL width upon plasma current. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  18. Neo-classical impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, T.E.

    The neo-classical theory for impurity transport in a toroidal plasma is outlined, and the results discussed. A general account is given of the impurity behaviour and its dependence on collisionality. The underlying physics is described with special attention to the role of the poloidal rotation

  19. Enhanced carbon influx into TFTR supershots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, A.T.; Bush, C.E.; Dylla, H.F.; Owens, D.K.; Pitcher, C.S.; Ulrickson, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Under some conditions, a very large influx of carbon into TFTR occurs during neutral beam injection into low recycling plasmas (the supershot regime). These carbon ''blooms'' result in serious degradation of plasma parameters. The sources of this carbon have been identified as hot spots on the TFTR bumper limiter at or near the last closed flux surface. Two separate temperature thresholds have been identified. One threshold, at about 1650 deg. C, is consistent with radiation enhanced sublimation (RES). The other, at about 2300 deg. C, appears to be thermal sublimation of carbon from the limiter. The carbon influx can be quantitatively accounted for by taking laboratory values for RES rates, making reasonable assumptions about the extent of the blooming area and assuming unity carbon recycling at the limiter. Such high carbon recycling is expected, and it is shown that, in target plasmas at least, it is observed on TFTR. The sources of the carbon blooms are sites which have either loosely attached fragments of limiter material (caused by damage) or surfaces that are nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Such surfaces may have local power depositions two orders of magnitude higher than usual. The TFTR team modified the limiter during the opening of winter 1989-1990. The modifications greatly reduced the number and magnitude of the blooms, so that they are no longer a problem. (author). 27 refs, 9 figs

  20. Measuring and controlling method for organic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Igarashi, Hiroo

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns measurement and control for organic impurities contained in ultrapurified water for use in a nuclear power plant. A specimen containing organic impurities leached out of anionic exchange resins and cationic exchange resins is introduced to an organic material decomposing section to decompose organic impurities into organic carbon and other decomposed products. Sulfate ions, nitrate ions, nitrite ions and carbon dioxide are produced by the decomposition of the organic impurities. As a next step, carbon dioxide in the decomposed products is separated by deaerating with a nitrogen gas or an argon gas and then a TOC concentration is measured by a non-dispersion-type infrared spectrometer. Further, a specimen from which carbon dioxide was separated is introduced to a column filled with ion exchange resins and, after concentrating inorganic ion impurities, the inorganic ion impurities are identified by using a measuring theory of an ion chromatographic method of eluting and separating inorganic ion impurities and detecting them based on the change of electroconductivity depending on the kinds of the inorganic ion impurities. Organic impurities can be measured and controlled, to improve the reliability of water quality control. (N.H.)

  1. Dynamical impurity problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class

  2. Dynamical impurity problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  3. Reduction of hydrocarbon impurities in 200 L/H helium liquefier-refrigerator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Arata

    1993-11-01

    A cryogenic system with the capacity of 200 1/h or 500 W at 4.4 K has been operated to develop the superconducting conductors and coils for the LHD. The system has contributed in various superconducting technologies along with the dc 75kA power supply and 10 MN mechanical testing machine, and completed the basic R and D works of the LHD. On the way of operating the cryogenic system, impurity densities of hydrocarbon gases in circulating helium gas became much larger than the expected values for this cryogenic system, so that the densities of some impurity gases were carefully monitored in reference to the operational conditions of circulating compressor by using a gas chromatography. Impurity gas densities of oxygen, nitrogen and ethane increased obviously, when the output capacity of the compressor was reduced. In a two-stage oil injected compression system with a variable stroke mechanism for a first stage, a reduction in the capacity of the first stage leads to a larger compression ratio for the second stage, and the temperature of the injected oil becomes higher. The production of the impurities in the helium might be caused by cracking a part of injected oil in the compressor. The compressor, therefore, was reconstructed such that the injection oil is supplied sufficiently and the compression ratio division becomes even for each stage. It was confirmed that the impurities are not produced now after modification. (author)

  4. Identification and characterization of potential impurities of donepezil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Reddy, K V S R; Moses Babu, J; Kumar, P Anil; Chandrashekar, E R R; Mathad, Vijayavitthal T; Eswaraiah, S; Reddy, M Satyanarayana; Vyas, K

    2004-09-03

    Five unknown impurities ranging from 0.05 to 0.2% in donepezil were detected by a simple isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These impurities were isolated from crude sample of donepezil using isocratic reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Based on the spectral data (IR, NMR and MS), the structures of these impurities were characterised as 5,6-dimethoxy-2-(4-pyridylmethyl)-1-indanone (impurity I), 4-(5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-2-indenylmethyl) piperidine (impurity II), 2-(1-benzyl-4-piperdylmethyl)-5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanol (impurity III) 1-benzyl-4(5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-2-indenylmethyl) piperidine (impurity IV) and 1,1-dibenzyl-4(5,6-dimethoxy-1-oxo-2,3-dihydro-2H-2-indenylmethyl)hexahydropyridinium bromide (impurity V). The synthesis of these impurities and their formation was discussed.

  5. Use of geochemical tracers for estimating groundwater influxes to the Big Sioux River, eastern South Dakota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Ram P.; Mehan, Sushant; Kumar, Sandeep

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the spatial distribution and variability of geochemical tracers is crucial for estimating groundwater influxes into a river and can contribute to better future water management strategies. Because of the much higher radon (222Rn) activities in groundwater compared to river water, 222Rn was used as the main tracer to estimate groundwater influxes to river discharge over a 323-km distance of the Big Sioux River, eastern South Dakota, USA; these influx estimates were compared to the estimates using Cl- concentrations. In the reaches overall, groundwater influxes using the 222Rn activity approach ranged between 0.3 and 6.4 m3/m/day (mean 1.8 m3/m/day) and the cumulative groundwater influx estimated during the study period was 3,982-146,594 m3/day (mean 40,568 m3/day), accounting for 0.2-41.9% (mean 12.5%) of the total river flow rate. The mean groundwater influx derived using the 222Rn activity approach was lower than that calculated based on Cl- concentration (35.6 m3/m/day) for most of the reaches. Based on the Cl- approach, groundwater accounted for 37.3% of the total river flow rate. The difference between the method estimates may be associated with minimal differences between groundwater and river Cl- concentrations. These assessments will provide a better understanding of estimates used for the allocation of water resources to sustain agricultural productivity in the basin. However, a more detailed sampling program is necessary for accurate influx estimation, and also to understand the influence of seasonal variation on groundwater influxes into the basin.

  6. Surface impurity removal from DIII-D graphite tiles by boron carbide grit blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.L.; Hollerbach, M.A.; Holtrop, K.L.; Kellman, A.G.; Taylor, P.L.; West, W.P.

    1993-11-01

    During the latter half of 1992, the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics (GA) underwent several modifications of its interior. One of the major tasks involved the removal of accumulated metallic impurities from the surface of the graphite tiles used to line the plasma facing surfaces inside of the tokamak. Approximately 1500 graphite tiles and 100 boron nitride tiles from the tokamak were cleaned to remove the metallic impurities. The cleaning process consisted of several steps: the removed graphite tiles were permanently marked, surface blasted using boron carbide (B 4 C) grit media (approximately 37 μm. diam.), ultrasonically cleaned in ethanol to remove loose dust, and outgassed at 1000 degrees C. Tests were done using, graphite samples and different grit blaster settings to determine the optimum propellant and abrasive media pressures to remove a graphite layer approximately 40-50 μm deep and yet produce a reasonably smooth finish. EDX measurements revealed that the blasting technique reduced the surface Ni, Cr, and Fe impurity levels to those of virgin graphite. In addition to the surface impurity removal, tritium monitoring was performed throughout the cleaning process. A bubbler system was set up to monitor the tritium level in the exhaust gas from the grit blaster unit. Surface wipes were also performed on over 10% of the tiles. Typical surface tritium concentrations of the tiles were reduced from about 500 dpm/100 cm 2 to less than 80 dpm/100 cm 2 following the cleaning. This tile conditioning, and the installation of additional graphite tiles to cover a high fraction of the metallic plasma facing surfaces, has substantially reduced metallic impurities in the plasma discharges which has allowed rapid recovery from a seven-month machine opening and regimes of enhanced plasma energy confinement to be more readily obtained. Safety issues concerning blaster operator exposure to carcinogenic metals and radioactive tritium will also be addressed

  7. Impurity Dynamics under Neutral Beam Injection at TJ-II (simulation); Dinamica de Impurezas durante la Inyeccion de Haces Neutros en el TJ-II (simulacion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasp, J.; Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.

    2001-07-01

    In this study the simulations of plasma transport under NBI for TJ-II, previously performed, are extended. Since than a considerable number of important modifications have been introduced in the model: change of magnetic configuration, use of experimental initial profiles, expansion of the Data base from NBI calculations and, mainly, a detailed handling of impurities with inclusion of sputtering effects. Moreover there is now a particular emphasis on the analysis of the conditions for discharge collapse and on the possible effects of single beam injection. This analysis of impurity behaviour with sputtering shows that in the expected usual cases there is no radioactive collapse and that if the recycling coefficients remain lower the unity it is always possible to find a strategy for external gas puffing leading to a stationary state, with densities below the limit and efficient NBI absorption (>50%). The radioactive collapse can appear either at high densities (central value higher than 1.4x10''20 m''3), excessive influx of impurities (i. e. with sputtering rates higher than twice the expected values) o for insufficient injected beam power (less than 45 kW). The present study analyses only the 100{sub 4}4{sub 6}4 configuration of TJ-II, but future works will start a systematic scan of configuration using this same model. (Author) 12 Refs.

  8. Reduction of hydrocarbon impurities in 200 l/h helium liquefier-refrigerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Arata; Takahata, Kazuya; Satoh, Sadao; Yamamoto, Junya; Yamamura, Hidemasa; Masuda, Kaoru; Kashihara, Shinichirou; Fukusada, Katsuaki

    1993-11-01

    A cryogenic system with the capacity of 200 l/h or 500 W at 4.4 K was developed in order to supply the superconducting conductors and coils of the LHD. As a by-product of operating the cryogenic system, the impurity densities of hydrocarbon gases in the circulating helium gas became much larger than the expected values for this cryogenic system. So much larger in fact, that it became necessary to carefully monitor the operational conditions of the circulating compressor by means of gas chromatography. Impurity gas densities of oxygen, nitrogen, and ethane increased significantly when the output capacity of the compressor was reduced. In a two-stage oil injected compression system, with a variable stroke mechanism for a first stage, a reduction in the capacity of the first stage leads to a larger compression ratio for the second stage, and the temperature of the injected oil becomes higher. The production of the impurities in the helium might be caused by decomposition of the injected oil in the compressor. The compressor, therefore, was reconstructed such that the injection oil is supplied sufficiently, and the compression ratio division becomes even for each stage. It was confirmed that the impurities were not produced after the modification.

  9. Thermal conductive heating in fractured bedrock: Screening calculations to assess the effect of groundwater influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baston, Daniel P.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2009-02-01

    A two-dimensional semi-analytical heat transfer solution is developed and a parameter sensitivity analysis performed to determine the relative importance of rock material properties (density, thermal conductivity and heat capacity) and hydrogeological properties (hydraulic gradient, fracture aperture, fracture spacing) on the ability to heat fractured rock using thermal conductive heating (TCH). The solution is developed using a Green's function approach in which an integral equation is constructed for the temperature in the fracture. Subsurface temperature distributions are far more sensitive to hydrogeological properties than material properties. The bulk ground water influx ( q) can provide a good estimate of the extent of influx cooling when influx is low to moderate, allowing the prediction of temperatures during heating without specific knowledge of the aperture and spacing of fractures. Target temperatures may not be reached or may be significantly delayed when the groundwater influx is large.

  10. Impurity Induced Phase Competition and Supersolidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Madhuparna; Ganesh, R.

    2017-12-01

    Several material families show competition between superconductivity and other orders. When such competition is driven by doping, it invariably involves spatial inhomogeneities which can seed competing orders. We study impurity-induced charge order in the attractive Hubbard model, a prototypical model for competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order. We show that a single impurity induces a charge-ordered texture over a length scale set by the energy cost of the competing phase. Our results are consistent with a strong-coupling field theory proposed earlier in which superconducting and charge order parameters form components of an SO(3) vector field. To discuss the effects of multiple impurities, we focus on two cases: correlated and random distributions. In the correlated case, the CDW puddles around each impurity overlap coherently leading to a "supersolid" phase with coexisting pairing and charge order. In contrast, a random distribution of impurities does not lead to coherent CDW formation. We argue that the energy lowering from coherent ordering can have a feedback effect, driving correlations between impurities. This can be understood as arising from an RKKY-like interaction, mediated by impurity textures. We discuss implications for charge order in the cuprates and doped CDW materials such as NbSe2.

  11. The impurity transport in HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Wan Baonian; Xie Jikang

    2003-01-01

    The space-time profile of impurities has been measured with a multichannel visible spectroscopic detect system and UV rotation-mirror system in the HT-6M tokamak. An ideal impurity transport code has been used to simulate impurities (carbon and oxygen) behaviour during the OHM discharge. The profiles of impurities diffusion and convection coefficient, impurities ion densities in different ionized state, loss power density and effective charge number have been derived. The impurity behaviour during low-hybrid current drive has also been analyzed, the results show that the confinement of particles, impurities and energy has been improved, and emission power and effective charge number have been reduced

  12. Radiation monitoring system in medical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuno, Kiyoshi

    1981-01-01

    (1) RI selective liquid effluent monitor is, in many cases, used at medical facilities to obtain data for density of radioactivity of six radionuclides. In comparison with the conventional gross measuring systems, over-evaluation is less, and the monitor is more practical. (2) Preventive monitor for loss of radium needle is a system which prevents missing of radium needle at a flush-toilet in radium treatment wards, and this monitor is capable of sensing a drop-off of radium needle of 0.5 mCi (minimum). (3) Short-lived positron gas measuring device belongs to a BABY CYCLOTRON installed in a hospital, and this device is used to measure density of radioactivity, radioactive impurity and chemical impurity of produced radioactive gas. (author)

  13. On impurities transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhanskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Transport of impurity ions is analitically analized in the case when main plasma is in plateau or banana regimes but impurity ions - in the Pfirsch-Schlutter mode. It is shown that in the large region of parameters the impUrity transport represents a drift in a p oloidal electric field, averaged from magnetic surface with provision for disturbance of concentration on it. Therefore, transport velocity does not depend on Z value and impurity type, as well as collision frequency both in the plateau and banana regimes. A value of flows is determined by the value of poloidal rotation velocity. At the rotation velocity corresponding to the electric field directed from the centre to periphery impurities are thrown out of a discharge, in the reverse case the flow is directed inside. Refusal from the assumption that Zsub(eff) > approximately 2, does not considerably change the results of work. The approach developed in the process of work can be applied to the case when impurity ions are in the plateau or banana modes

  14. Mechanisms of impurity diffusion in rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.; Sasaki, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion of 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 63 Ni, and 95 Zr, was measured as functions of crystal orientation, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure in rutile single crystals using the radioactive tracer sectioning technique. Compared to cation self-diffusion, divalent impurities (e.g., Co and Ni) diffuse extremely rapidly in TiO 2 and exhibit a large anisotropy in the diffusion behavior; divalent-impurity diffusion parallel to the c-axis is much larger than it is perpendicular to the c-axis. The diffusion of trivalent impurity ions (Sc and Cr) and tetravalent impurity ions (Zr) is similar to cation self-diffusion, as a function of temperature and of oxygen partial pressure. The divalent impurity ions Co and Ni apparently diffuse as interstitial ions along open channels parallel to the c-axis. The results suggest that Sc, Cr, and Zr ions diffuse by an interstitialcy mechanism involving the simultaneous and cooperative migration of tetravalent interstitial titanium ions and the tracer-impurity ions. Iron ions diffused both as divalent and as trivalent ions. 8 figures

  15. Impurity production and transport at limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the description and evaluation of experiments on the DITE tokamak. These are designed to characterise the processes involved in the production and transport of neutral and ionised impurities near carbon limiters. The need for good diagnostics in the scrape-off layer is highlighted. Langmuir probes are used to provide input data for models of impurity production at limiters. Observations of the radial profiles of carbon and oxygen impurities are compared with the code predictions. Changeover experiments involving hydrogen and helium plasmas are used as a means for investigating the role of the atomic physics and chemistry. The impurity control limiter (ICL) experiment is described which shows how geometry plays an important role in determining the spatial distributions of the neutral and ionised carbon. New diagnostics are required to study the flux and charge state distribution of impurities in the boundary. Preliminary results from an in-situ plasma ion mass-spectrometer are presented. The role of oxygen and the importance of evaluating the wall sources of impurity are emphasised. (orig.)

  16. Influx: A Tool and Framework for Reasoning under Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    document provides a high-level description of Influx1 from the reasoning perspective. The organisation of the document is given below. Section 2 presents a...exhibits behaviour similar to that of the proposed alternatives while maintaining mathematical simplicity and possessing highly-desirable

  17. Void growth suppression by dislocation impurity atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weertman, J.; Green, W.V.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed calculation is given of the effect of an impurity atmosphere on void growth under irradiation damage conditions. Norris has proposed that such an atmosphere can suppress void growth. The hydrostatic stress field of a dislocation that is surrounded by an impurity atmosphere was found and used to calculate the change in the effective radius of a dislocation line as a sink for interstitials and vacancies. The calculation of the impurity concentration in a Cottrell cloud takes into account the change in hydrostatic pressure produced by the presence of the cloud itself. It is found that void growth is eliminated whenever dislocations are surrounded by a condensed atmosphere of either oversized substitutional impurity atoms or interstitial impurity atoms. A condensed atmosphere will form whenever the average impurity concentration is larger than a critical concentration

  18. Moessbauer Studies of Implanted Impurities in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were performed on implanted radioactive impurities in semiconductors and metals. Radioactive isotopes (from the ISOLDE facility) decaying to a Moessbauer isotope were utilized to investigate electronic and vibrational properties of impurities and impurity-defect structures. This information is inferred from the measured impurity hyperfine interactions and Debye-Waller factor. In semiconductors isoelectronic, shallow and deep level impurities have been implanted. Complex impurity defects have been produced by the implantation process (correlated damage) or by recoil effects from the nuclear decay in both semiconductors and metals. Annealing mechanisms of the defects have been studied. \\\\ \\\\ In silicon amorphised implanted layers have been recrystallized epitaxially by rapid-thermal-annealing techniques yielding highly supersaturated, electrically-active donor concentrations. Their dissolution and migration mechanisms have been investigated in detail. The electronic configuration of Sb donors...

  19. Impurity Correction Techniques Applied to Existing Doping Measurements of Impurities in Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J. V.; Sun, J. P.; Zhang, J. T.; Deng, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities represent the most significant source of uncertainty in most metal fixed points used for the realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There are a number of different methods for quantifying the effect of impurities on the freezing temperature of ITS-90 fixed points, many of which rely on an accurate knowledge of the liquidus slope in the limit of low concentration. A key method of determining the liquidus slope is to measure the freezing temperature of a fixed-point material as it is progressively doped with a known amount of impurity. Recently, a series of measurements of the freezing and melting temperature of `slim' Zn fixed-point cells doped with Ag, Fe, Ni, and Pb were presented. Here, additional measurements of the Zn-X system are presented using Ga as a dopant, and the data (Zn-Ag, Zn-Fe, Zn-Ni, Zn-Pb, and Zn-Ga) have been re-analyzed to demonstrate the use of a fitting method based on Scheil solidification which is applied to both melting and freezing curves. In addition, the utility of the Sum of Individual Estimates method is explored with these systems in the context of a recently enhanced database of liquidus slopes of impurities in Zn in the limit of low concentration.

  20. Impurity energy level in the Haldane gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Lu Yu

    1995-11-01

    An impurity bond J' in a periodic 1D antiferromagnetic spin 1 chain with exchange J is considered. Using the numerical density matrix renormalization group method, we find an impurity energy level in the Haldane gap, corresponding to a bound state near the impurity bond. When J' J. The impurity level appears only when the deviation dev = (J'- J)/J' is greater than B c , which is close to 0.3 in our calculation. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  1. Inhibiting the Ca2+ Influx Induced by Human CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Drews

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD is to use antibodies that bind to small soluble protein aggregates to reduce their toxic effects. However, these therapies are rarely tested in human CSF before clinical trials because of the lack of sensitive methods that enable the measurement of aggregate-induced toxicity at low concentrations. We have developed highly sensitive single vesicle and single-cell-based assays that detect the Ca2+ influx caused by the CSF of individuals affected with AD and healthy controls, and we have found comparable effects for both types of samples. We also show that an extracellular chaperone clusterin; a nanobody specific to the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ; and bapineuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody raised against Aβ, could all reduce the Ca2+ influx caused by synthetic Aβ oligomers but are less effective in CSF. These assays could be used to characterize potential therapeutic agents in CSF before clinical trials.

  2. Multi-impurity polarons in a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D H; Timmermans, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    We describe the ground state of a large, dilute, neutral atom Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) doped with N strongly coupled mutually indistinguishable, bosonic neutral atoms (referred to as ‘impurity’) in the polaron regime where the BEC density response to the impurity atoms remains significantly smaller than the average density of the surrounding BEC. We find that N impurity atoms with N ≠ 1 can self-localize at a lower value of the impurity-boson interaction strength than a single impurity atom. When the ‘bare’ short-range impurity-impurity repulsion does not play a significant role, the self-localization of multiple bosonic impurity atoms into the same single particle orbital (which we call co-self-localization) is the nucleation process of the phase separation transition. When the short-range impurity-impurity repulsion successfully competes with co-self-localization, the system may form a stable liquid of self-localized single impurity polarons. (paper)

  3. Collision of impurities with Bose–Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingua, F.; Lepori, L.; Minardi, F.; Penna, V.; Salasnich, L.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dynamics of impurities in a bath of bosons is a long-standing problem in solid-state, plasma, and atomic physics. Recent experimental and theoretical investigations with ultracold atoms have focused on this problem, studying atomic impurities immersed in an atomic Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) and for various relative coupling strengths tuned by the Fano‑Feshbach resonance technique. Here, we report extensive numerical simulations on a closely related problem: the collision between a bosonic impurity consisting of a few 41K atoms and a BEC of 87Rb atoms in a quasi one-dimensional configuration and under a weak harmonic axial confinement. For small values of the inter-species interaction strength (regardless of its sign), we find that the impurity, which starts from outside the BEC, simply causes the BEC cloud to oscillate back and forth, but the frequency of oscillation depends on the interaction strength. For intermediate couplings, after a few cycles of oscillation the impurity is captured by the BEC, and strongly changes its amplitude of oscillation. In the strong interaction regime, if the inter-species interaction is attractive, a local maximum (bright soliton) in the BEC density occurs where the impurity is trapped; if, instead, the inter-species interaction is repulsive, the impurity is not able to enter the BEC cloud and the reflection coefficient is close to one. However, if the initial displacement of the impurity is increased, the impurity is able to penetrate the cloud, leading to the appearance of a moving hole (dark soliton) in the BEC.

  4. Determination of Impurities of Atrazine by HPLP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canping, Pan [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    The determination of the main impurities of the herbicide atrazine by GC/FID, GC/MS and LC/MS is described. The most relevant technical impurities were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy as well. The impurity profiles of different technical grade formulated products were tested and the typical impurities identified. (author)

  5. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  6. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism

  7. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  8. Impurity bound states in mesoscopic topological superconducting loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan-Yan; Zha, Guo-Qiao; Zhou, Shi-Ping

    2018-06-01

    We study numerically the effect induced by magnetic impurities in topological s-wave superconducting loops with spin-orbit interaction based on spin-generalized Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. In the case of a single magnetic impurity, it is found that the midgap bound states can cross the Fermi level at an appropriate impurity strength and the circulating spin current jumps at the crossing point. The evolution of the zero-energy mode can be effectively tuned by the located site of a single magnetic impurity. For the effect of many magnetic impurities, two independent midway or edge impurities cannot lead to the overlap of zero modes. The multiple zero-energy modes can be effectively realized by embedding a single Josephson junction with impurity scattering into the system, and the spin current displays oscillatory feature with increasing the layer thickness.

  9. Hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.F.

    2007-01-01

    The ground state binding energy and the average interparticle distances for a hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots with Gaussian confinement potential are studied by the variational method. The probability density of the electron is calculated, too. The dependence of the binding energy on the impurity position is investigated for GaAs quantum dots. The result shows that the binding energy has a minimum as a function of the distance between the two quantum dots when the impurity is located at the center of one quantum dot or at the center of the edge of one quantum dot. When the impurity is located at the center of the two dots, the binding energy decreases monotonically

  10. Models for impurity effects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    Models for impurity effects in tokamaks are described with an emphasis on the relationship between attainment of high β and impurity problems. We briefly describe the status of attempts to employ neutral beam heating to achieve high β in tokamaks and propose a qualitative model for the mechanism by which heavy metal impurities may be produced in the startup phase of the discharge. We then describe paradoxes in impurity diffusion theory and discuss possible resolutions in terms of the effects of large-scale islands and sawtooth oscillations. Finally, we examine the prospects for the Zakharov-Shafranov catastrophe (long time scale disintegration of FCT equilibria) in the context of present and near-term experimental capability

  11. Device for removing impurities from liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Kesahiro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ishida, Tomio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain highly reliable and efficient impurity removal by forming temperature distribution the impurity removing device thereby providing the function of corrosion product trap, nuclear fission product trap and cold trap under the conditions suitable to the impurity removing materials. Constitution: The impurity removing device comprises a container containing impurity removing fillers. The fillers comprise material for removing corrosion products, material for removing nuclear fission products and material for removing depositions from liquid sodium. The positions for the respective materials are determined such that the materials are placed under the temperature conditions easy to attain their function depending on the temperature distribution formed in the removing device, whereby appropriate temperature condition is set to each of the materials. (Yoshino, Y.)

  12. Induction of nitrate transport in maize roots, and kinetics of influx, measured with nitrogen-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hole, D.J.; Drew, M.C.; Emran, A.M.; Fares, Y.

    1990-01-01

    Unlike phosphate or potassium transport, uptake of nitrate by roots is induced, in part, by contact with the substrate ion. Plasmalemma influx of 13 N-labeled nitrate in maize roots was studied in relation to induction of the uptake system, and the influence of short-term N starvation. Maize (Zea mays) roots not previously exposed to nitrate had a constitutive transport system (state 1), but influx increased 250% during six hours of contact with 100 micromolar nitrate, by which time the transport mechanism appeared to be fully synthesized (state 2). A three-day period of N starvation prior to induction and measurement of nitrate influx resulted in a greater capacity to transport nitrate than in unstarved controls, but this was fully expressed only if roots were kept in contact with nitrate for the six hours needed for full induction (state 2E). A kinetic analysis indicated a 160% increase in maximum influx in N-starved, induced roots with a small decrease in K m . The inducible component to nitrate influx was induced only by contact with nitrate. Full expression of the nitrate inducible transport system was dependent upon mRNA synthesis. An inhibitor of cytoplasmic protein synthesis (cycloheximide) eliminated the formation of the transport system while inhibition by chloramphenicol of mitochondrial- or plastid-coded protein synthesis had no effect. Poisoning of membrane-bound proteins effectively disabled both the constitutive and induced transport systems

  13. Impurities in alfalfa seed and their impact on processing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Đokić, Dragoslav; Stanisavljević, Rade; Marković, Jordan; Terzić, Dragan; Anđelković, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine relevant parameters and optimal alfalfa seed processing technology by a comparative analysis of two systems of machinery for processing natural alfalfa seed of different purity (59.0% and 71.0%) and with different content of impurities. The relevant parameters monitored during the test were: pure seed (%), weed seeds and seeds of other crops (%), inert matter (%), amount of processed seed (kg), seed processing time (min), consumption of steel powder (...

  14. Magnetic states of single impurity in disordered environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Ponedilok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged and magnetic states of isolated impurities dissolved in amorphous metallic alloy are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the system under study is the generalization of Anderson impurity model. Namely, the processes of elastic and non-elastic scattering of conductive electrons on the ions of a metal and on a charged impurity are included. The configuration averaged one-particle Green's functions are obtained within Hartree-Fock approximation. A system of self-consistent equations is given for calculation of an electronic spectrum, the charged and the spin-polarized impurity states. Qualitative analysis of the effect of the metallic host structural disorder on the observed values is performed. Additional shift and broadening of virtual impurity level is caused by a structural disorder of impurity environment.

  15. New methodology for aquifer influx status classification for single wells in a gas reservoir with aquifer support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For gas reservoirs with strong bottom or edge aquifer support, the most important thing is avoiding aquifer breakthrough in a gas well. Water production in gas wells does not only result in processing problems in surface facilities, but it also explicitly reduces well productivity and reservoir recovery. There are a lot of studies on the prediction of water breakthrough time, but they are not completely practicable due to reservoir heterogeneity. This paper provides a new method together with three diagnostic curves to identify aquifer influx status for single gas wells; the aforementioned curves are based on well production and pressure data. The whole production period of a gas well can be classified into three periods based on the diagnostic curves: no aquifer influx period, early aquifer influx period, and middle-late aquifer influx period. This new method has been used for actual gas well analysis to accurately identify gas well aquifer influx status and the water breakthrough sequence of all wells in the same gas field. Additionally, the evaluation results are significantly beneficial for well production rate optimization and development of an effective gas field.

  16. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  17. Study of impurities in Aditya Tokamak during different conditions using quadrupole mass analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, S.B.; Jadeja, K.A.; Patel, K.M.; Patel, N.D.; Raval, M.K.; Ghosh, J.

    2015-01-01

    In fusion devices, e.g., Tokamak, the presence of the impurities, i.e. gas species other than the fuel gas, deteriorates plasma and makes confinement difficult. The gas molecules tend to get adsorbed on the surfaces of the solid state materials of the vessel wall during discharges. A Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA) is the most commonly useful instrument to measure the presence and quantity of the various gases in a vacuum system. Quadrupole Mass Analyzer (QMA) is installed on Aditya Tokamak to measure the concentrations of various gas species present in Aditya vacuum system. It is also used to monitor impurities generated during various phases of discharges in Aditya Tokamak. The impurities are reduced by various types of discharge cleaning and in-situ coatings. Presence of residual gas concentration in vacuum system creates limitation for achievement of ultrahigh vacuum and also affects plasma performance. The presence of residual gases is due to different reasons like atmospheric concentration, contamination of the wall materials, outgassing from the exposed materials, permeation, real and virtual leaks

  18. Impurity effects on ionic-liquid-based supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kun; Lian, Cheng; Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small amounts of an impurity may affect the key properties of an ionic liquid and such effects can be dramatically amplified when the electrolyte is under confinement. Here the classical density functional theory is employed to investigate the impurity effects on the microscopic structure and the performance of ionic-liquid-based electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors. Using a primitive model for ionic species, we study the effects of an impurity on the double layer structure and the integral capacitance of a room temperature ionic liquid in model electrode pores and find that an impurity strongly binding to the surface of a porous electrode can significantly alter the electric double layer structure and dampen the oscillatory dependence of the capacitance with the pore size of the electrode. Meanwhile, a strong affinity of the impurity with the ionic species affects the dependence of the integral capacitance on the pore size. Up to 30% increase in the integral capacitance can be achieved even at a very low impurity bulk concentration. As a result, by comparing with an ionic liquid mixture containing modified ionic species, we find that the cooperative effect of the bounded impurities is mainly responsible for the significant enhancement of the supercapacitor performance.

  19. Impurity effects on ionic-liquid-based supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Lian, Cheng; Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-02-01

    Small amounts of an impurity may affect the key properties of an ionic liquid and such effects can be dramatically amplified when the electrolyte is under confinement. Here the classical density functional theory is employed to investigate the impurity effects on the microscopic structure and the performance of ionic-liquid-based electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors. Using a primitive model for ionic species, we study the effects of an impurity on the double layer structure and the integral capacitance of a room temperature ionic liquid in model electrode pores and find that an impurity strongly binding to the surface of a porous electrode can significantly alter the electric double layer structure and dampen the oscillatory dependence of the capacitance with the pore size of the electrode. Meanwhile, a strong affinity of the impurity with the ionic species affects the dependence of the integral capacitance on the pore size. Up to 30% increase in the integral capacitance can be achieved even at a very low impurity bulk concentration. By comparing with an ionic liquid mixture containing modified ionic species, we find that the cooperative effect of the bounded impurities is mainly responsible for the significant enhancement of the supercapacitor performance.

  20. EUV impurity study of the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Chen, K.I.; Moos, H.W.; Marmar, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of resonance line radiation from oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and molybdenum impurities has been measured in the high-field (80kG), high-density (6x10 14 cm -3 ) discharges of the Alcator Tokamak, using a 0.4-m normal-incidence monochromator (300-1300A) with its line of sight fixed along a major radius. Total light-impurity concentrations of a few tenths of a percent have been estimated by using both a simple model and a computer code which included Pfirsch-Schlueter impurity diffusion. The resulting values of Zsub(eff), including the contributions due to both the light impurities and molybdenum, were close to one. The power lost through the impurity line radiation from the lower ionization states accounted for approximately 10% of the total Ohmic input power at high densities. (author)

  1. Interactions of impurities with a moving grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-01-01

    Most theories developed to explain interaction of impurities with a moving grain boundary involve a uniform excess impurity concentration distributed along a planar grain boundary. As boundary velocity increases, the excess impurities exert a net drag force on the boundary until a level is reached whereat the drag force no longer can balance the driving force and breakaway of the boundary from these impurities occurs. In this investigation, assumptions of a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are relaxed by allowing both forward and lateral diffusion of impurities in the vicinity of a grain boundary. It is found that the two usual regions (drag of impurities by, and breakaway of a planar grain boundary) are separated by an extensive region wherein a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are unstable. It is suspected that, in this unstable region, grain boundaries assume a spectrum of more complex morphologies and that elucidation of these morphologies can provide the first definitive description of the breakaway process and insight to more complex phenomena such as solid-solution strengthening, grain growth and secondary recrystallization.

  2. Lattice dynamics of impurity clusters : application to pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandralekha Devi, N.; Behera, S.N.

    1979-01-01

    A general solution is obtained for the lattice dynamics of a cluster of n-impurity atoms using the double-time Green's function formalism. The cluster is characterized by n-mass defect and m-force constant change parameters. It is shown that this general solution for the Green's function for the n-impurity cluster can also be expressed in terms of the Green's function for the (n-1)-impurity cluster. As an application, the cluster impurity modes for a pair are calculated using the Debye model for the host lattice dynamics. The splitting of the high frequency local modes and nearly zero frequency resonant modes due to pairs show an oscillatory behaviour on varying the distance of separation between the two impurity atoms. These oscillations are most prominent for two similar impurities and get damped for two dissimilar impurities or if one of the impurities produces a force constant change. The predictions of the calculation provide qualitative explanation of the data obtained from the infrared measurements of the resonant modes in mixed crystal system of KBrsub(1-c)Clsub(c):Lisup(+) and KBrsub(1-c)Isub(c):Lisup(+). (author)

  3. Liquid metal monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.; Roach, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid metal monitor of the by-pass plugging meter kind described in British Patent 1,308,466, is further provided with a pump arranged to oppose flow through a by-pass thereby to provide a constant pressure difference across an orifice and improve the sensitivity of the instrument. The monitor estimates the impurity content in a liquid metal stream. (author)

  4. Uranium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in uranium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 , particularly adapted for a low content. The method is quantitative for metallic impurities and qualitative for non metallic impurities [fr

  5. Fluid and gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, H; Skyman, A; Strand, P

    2011-01-01

    Impurity transport coefficients due to ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode and trapped-electron mode turbulence are calculated using profile data from dedicated impurity injection experiments at JET. Results obtained with a multi-fluid model are compared with quasi-linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic...... simulation results obtained with the code GENE. The sign of the impurity convective velocity (pinch) and its various contributions are discussed. The dependence of the impurity transport coefficients and impurity peaking factor −∇nZ/nZ on plasma parameters such as impurity charge number Z, ion logarithmic...

  6. Live Imaging of Calcium Dynamics during Axon Degeneration Reveals Two Functionally Distinct Phases of Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Yuya; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a key regulator of axon degeneration caused by trauma and disease, but its specific spatial and temporal dynamics in injured axons remain unclear. To clarify the function of calcium in axon degeneration, we observed calcium dynamics in single injured neurons in live zebrafish larvae and tested the temporal requirement for calcium in zebrafish neurons and cultured mouse DRG neurons. Using laser axotomy to induce Wallerian degeneration (WD) in zebrafish peripheral sensory axons, we monitored calcium dynamics from injury to fragmentation, revealing two stereotyped phases of axonal calcium influx. First, axotomy triggered a transient local calcium wave originating at the injury site. This initial calcium wave only disrupted mitochondria near the injury site and was not altered by expression of the protective WD slow (WldS) protein. Inducing multiple waves with additional axotomies did not change the kinetics of degeneration. In contrast, a second phase of calcium influx occurring minutes before fragmentation spread as a wave throughout the axon, entered mitochondria, and was abolished by WldS expression. In live zebrafish, chelating calcium after the first wave, but before the second wave, delayed the progress of fragmentation. In cultured DRG neurons, chelating calcium early in the process of WD did not alter degeneration, but chelating calcium late in WD delayed fragmentation. We propose that a terminal calcium wave is a key instructive component of the axon degeneration program. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Axon degeneration resulting from trauma or neurodegenerative disease can cause devastating deficits in neural function. Understanding the molecular and cellular events that execute axon degeneration is essential for developing treatments to address these conditions. Calcium is known to contribute to axon degeneration, but its temporal requirements in this process have been unclear. Live calcium imaging in severed zebrafish neurons and temporally controlled

  7. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  8. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  9. Impurity control in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The control of impurities in TFTR will be a particularly difficult problem due to the large energy and particle fluxes expected in the device. As part of the TFTR Flexibility Modification (TEM) project, a program has been implemented to address this problem. Transport code simulations are used to infer an impurity limit criterion as a function of the impurity atomic number. The configurational designs of the limiters and associated protective plates are discussed along with the consideration of thermal and mechanical loads due to normal plasma operation, neutral beams, and plasma disruptions. A summary is given of the materials-related research, which has been a collaborative effort involving groups at Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Conceptual designs are shown for getterng systems capable of regenerating absorbed tritium. Research on this topic by groups at the previously mentioned laboratories and SAES Research Laboratory is reviewed

  10. Local chemistry of Al and P impurities in silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Stokbro, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The local structure around Al and P impurities in silica is investigated using density-functional theory. Two distinct cases are considered: impurities substituting for a Si atom in alpha quartz, and impurities implanted in a stoichiometric alpha-quartz crystal. Both impurity elements are found t...

  11. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2004-01-01

    Impurity behaviour in JET internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges with reversed shear has been investigated. Metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the main ion density profile. The accumulation is due to inwardly directed drift velocities inside the ITB radius. The strength of the impurity peaking increases with the impurity charge and is low for the low-Z elements C and Ne. Transport calculations show that the observed behaviour is consistent with dominant neoclassical impurity transport inside the ITB. In some cases, MHD events in the core flatten the radial profile of the metallic impurity. (author)

  12. Local order dependent impurity levels in alloy semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris

    1981-01-01

    We develop a one band/may sites model for an isoelectronic impurity in a semiconductor alloy. The cluster-Bethe-lattice approximation is used to study the dependence of the impurity energy level upon the short range order (SRO) of the alloy. The Kikuchi parametrization is used to describe the latter. We take into account diagonal disorder only, with possible off-diagonal relaxation around the impurity site. All the inequivalent clusters of the impurity site and its first nearest neighbours are considered, thus including the important short range alloy potential fluctuations. Results are presented for the local density of impurity states, for different degrees of SRO in the alloy. (Author) [pt

  13. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and a...

  14. Achieving improved ohmic confinement via impurity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    Improved Ohmic Confinement (IOC) was obtained in ASDEX after a modification of the divertors that allowed a larger (deuterium and impurity) backflow from the divertor chamber. The quality of IOC depended crucially on the wall conditions, i.e. IOC was best for uncovered stainless steels walls and vanished with boronization. Furthermore, IOC was found only in deuterium discharges. These circumstances led to the idea that IOC correlates with the content of light impurities in the plasma. To substantiate this working hypothesis, we present observations in deuterium discharges with boronized wall conditions into which various impurities have been injected with the aim to induce IOC conditions. Firstly, the plasma behaviour in typical IOC discharges is characterized. Secondly, injection experiments with the low-Z impurities nitrogen and neon as well as with the high-Z impurities argon and krypton are discussed. Then, we concentrate on optimized neon puffing that yields the best confinement results which are similar to IOC conditions. Finally, these results are compared with eperiments in other tokamaks and some conclusions are drawn about the effects of the impurity puffing on both, the central and the edge plasma behaviour. (orig.)

  15. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx arising from compartmentalized electrical signals in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bloodgood

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Excitatory synapses on mammalian principal neurons are typically formed onto dendritic spines, which consist of a bulbous head separated from the parent dendrite by a thin neck. Although activation of voltage-gated channels in the spine and stimulus-evoked constriction of the spine neck can influence synaptic signals, the contribution of electrical filtering by the spine neck to basal synaptic transmission is largely unknown. Here we use spine and dendrite calcium (Ca imaging combined with 2-photon laser photolysis of caged glutamate to assess the impact of electrical filtering imposed by the spine morphology on synaptic Ca transients. We find that in apical spines of CA1 hippocampal neurons, the spine neck creates a barrier to the propagation of current, which causes a voltage drop and results in spatially inhomogeneous activation of voltage-gated Ca channels (VGCCs on a micron length scale. Furthermore, AMPA and NMDA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs and NMDARs, respectively that are colocalized on individual spine heads interact to produce two kinetically and mechanistically distinct phases of synaptically evoked Ca influx. Rapid depolarization of the spine triggers a brief and large Ca current whose amplitude is regulated in a graded manner by the number of open AMPARs and whose duration is terminated by the opening of small conductance Ca-activated potassium (SK channels. A slower phase of Ca influx is independent of AMPAR opening and is determined by the number of open NMDARs and the post-stimulus potential in the spine. Biphasic synaptic Ca influx only occurs when AMPARs and NMDARs are coactive within an individual spine. These results demonstrate that the morphology of dendritic spines endows associated synapses with specialized modes of signaling and permits the graded and independent control of multiple phases of synaptic Ca influx.

  16. Striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Xianjun

    2011-01-01

    Research Highlights: → We investigate striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs). → For the single-impurity and two-impurity cases, modulated checkerboard pattern and stripe-like structures are induced. → When more magnetic impurities are inserted, more complex modulated structures could be induced, including rectilinear and right-angled stripes and quantum-corral-like structures. → Impurities could induce complex striped morphologies in DSCs. - Abstract: We study striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping by self-consistently solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations based on the t - t' - U - V model. For the single-impurity case, it is found that the stable ground state is a modulated checkerboard pattern. For the two-impurity case, the stripe-like structures in order parameters are induced due to the impurity-pinning effect. The modulations of DSC and charge orders share the same period of four lattice constants (4a), which is half the period of modulations in the coexisting spin order. Interestingly, when three or more impurities are inserted, the impurities could induce more complex striped morphologies due to quantum interference. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  17. Influxed insects as Vectors for Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coll in Danish Broiler Houses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Birthe; Skovgård, Henrik; Pedersen, Karl

    2008-01-01

    ,816 flies captured from farm surroundings. Each individual fly was macerated, preenriched in Bolton broth for 24 h at 42 degrees C, streaked onto modified Campylobater blood-free selective agar and incubated under microaerobic conditions for 48 h at 42 degrees C. Second, the influx of insects to broiler...... houses was estimated by trapping of insects (n = 5,936) in ventilation vents. In total, 31 flies (28 of which were of the Muscidae family) caught in farm surroundings were Campylobacter spp.-positive (C. jejuni, n = 7; C. coli, n = 23; other Campylobacter spp., n = 1). Musca domestica (L) (house fly...... without other livestock, the prevalence was constantly below 1.0%. The average influx of insects per broiler rotation was estimated to be 30,728 +/- 2,443 SE (range 2,233 to 180,300), of which 21.4% were flies. The influx of insects correlated with the flow (m(3)/h) of ventilation air (P

  18. The Kinetics of Ouabain Inhibition and the Partition of Rubidium Influx in Human Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauge, L. A.; Adragna, Norma

    1971-01-01

    In the development of ouabain inhibition of rubidium influx in human red blood cells a time lag can be detected which is a function of at least three variables: the concentrations of external sodium, rubidium, and ouabain. The inhibition is antagonized by rubidium and favored by sodium. Similar considerations could be applied to the binding of ouabain to membrane sites. The total influx of rubidium as a function of external rubidium concentration can be separated into two components: (a) a linear uptake not affected by external sodium or ouabain and not requiring an energy supply, and (b) a saturable component. The latter component, on the basis of the different effects of the aforementioned factors, can be divided into three fractions. The first is ouabain-sensitive, inhibited by external sodium at low rubidium, and requires an energy supply; this represents about 70–80% of the total uptake and is related to the active sodium extrusion mechanism. The second is ouabain-insensitive, activated by external sodium over the entire range of rubidium concentrations studied, and dependent on internal ATP; this represents about 15% of the total influx; it could be coupled to an active sodium extrusion or belong to a rubidium-potassium exchange. The third, which can be called residual influx, is ouabain-insensitive, unaffected by external sodium, and independent of internal ATP; this represents about 10–20% of the total influx. PMID:5553102

  19. Impurity screening of scrape-off plasma in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tani, Keiji; Nakamura, Hiroo

    1981-11-01

    Impurity screening effect of a scrape-off layer has been studied in a tokamak, based on a simple model of wall-released impurity behavior. Wall-sputtered impurities are stopped effectively by the scrape-off plasma for a medium-Z or high-Z wall system while major part of impurities enters the main plasma in a low-Z wall system. The screening becomes inefficient with increase of scrape-off plasma temperature. Successive multiplication of recycling impurities in the scrape-off layer is large for a high-Z wall and is enhanced by a rise of scrape-off plasma temperature. The stability of plasma-wall interaction is determined by a multiplication factor of recycling impurities. (author)

  20. Optimization of IC/HPLC as a rapid analytical tool for characterization of total impurities in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, A.G.; Kapoor, Y.S.; Mahanty, B.N.; Fulzele, A.K.; Mallik, G.K.

    2007-01-01

    Use of ion chromatography in the determination of metallic and non metallic impurities has been studied and observed to be very satisfactory. In the present paper the total time was monitored in all these experiments and compared with the conventional analytical techniques. (author)

  1. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nabyendu, E-mail: nabyendudas@gmail.com; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-28

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  2. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-01

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  3. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks. [Neoclassical transport theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed.

  4. Impact of protein and ligand impurities on ITC-derived protein-ligand thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüner, Stefan; Neeb, Manuel; Barandun, Luzi Jakob; Sielaff, Frank; Hohn, Christoph; Kojima, Shun; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Diederich, François; Klebe, Gerhard

    2014-09-01

    The thermodynamic characterization of protein-ligand interactions by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a powerful tool in drug design, giving valuable insight into the interaction driving forces. ITC is thought to require protein and ligand solutions of high quality, meaning both the absence of contaminants as well as accurately determined concentrations. Ligands synthesized to deviating purity and protein of different pureness were titrated by ITC. Data curation was attempted also considering information from analytical techniques to correct stoichiometry. We used trypsin and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT), together with high affinity ligands to investigate the effect of errors in protein concentration as well as the impact of ligand impurities on the apparent thermodynamics. We found that errors in protein concentration did not change the thermodynamic properties obtained significantly. However, most ligand impurities led to pronounced changes in binding enthalpy. If protein binding of the respective impurity is not expected, the actual ligand concentration was corrected for and the thus revised data compared to thermodynamic properties obtained with the respective pure ligand. Even in these cases, we observed differences in binding enthalpy of about 4kJ⋅mol(-1), which is considered significant. Our results indicate that ligand purity is the critical parameter to monitor if accurate thermodynamic data of a protein-ligand complex are to be recorded. Furthermore, artificially changing fitting parameters to obtain a sound interaction stoichiometry in the presence of uncharacterized ligand impurities may lead to thermodynamic parameters significantly deviating from the accurate thermodynamic signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Control Strategy for Small Molecule Impurities in Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hai H; Ihle, Nathan; Jones, Michael T; Kelly, Kathleen; Kott, Laila; Raglione, Thomas; Whitlock, Scott; Zhang, Qunying; Zheng, Jie

    2018-04-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging class of biopharmaceuticals. As such, there are no specific guidelines addressing impurity limits and qualification requirements. The current ICH guidelines on impurities, Q3A (Impurities in New Drug Substances), Q3B (Impurities in New Drug Products), and Q6B (Specifications: Test Procedures and Acceptance Criteria for Biotechnological/Biological Products) do not adequately address how to assess small molecule impurities in ADCs. The International Consortium for Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development (IQ) formed an impurities working group (IWG) to discuss this issue. This white paper presents a strategy for evaluating the impact of small molecule impurities in ADCs. This strategy suggests a science-based approach that can be applied to the design of control systems for ADC therapeutics. The key principles that form the basis for this strategy include the significant difference in molecular weights between small molecule impurities and the ADC, the conjugation potential of the small molecule impurities, and the typical dosing concentrations and dosing schedule. The result is that exposure to small impurities in ADCs is so low as to often pose little or no significant safety risk.

  6. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.

    2002-01-01

    In JET plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) the behaviour of metallic and low-Z impurities (C, Ne) was investigated. In ITB discharges with reversed shear, the metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the density profile, while the concentration of low-Z elements C and Ne is only mildly peaked. The accumulation might be so strong, that the central radiation approximately equals the central heating power followed by a radiative collapse of the transport barrier. The radial location with strong impurity gradients (convective barrier) was identified to be situated inside (not at!) the heat flux barrier. Calculations of neo-classical transport were performed for these discharges, including impurity-impurity collisions. It was found, that the observed Z-dependence of the impurity peaking and the location of the impurity 'barrier' can be explained with neo-classical transport. ITB discharges with monotonic shear show less inward convection and seem to be advantageous with respect to plasma purity. (author)

  7. Microscopic models of impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, L.V.C.

    1985-01-01

    The study of electronic structure of insulated and complex puntual impurities in silicon responsible by the appearing of deep energy levels in the forbiden band of semiconductor, is presented. The molecular cluster model with the treatment of surface orbitals by Watson sphere within the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method, was used. The electronic structures of three clusters representative of perfect silicon crystal, which were used for the impurity studies, are presented. The method was applied to analyse insulated impurities of substitutional and interstitial hydrogen (Si:H and Si:H i ), subtitutional and interstitial iron in neutral and positive charge states (Si:Fe 0 , + , Si:Fe 0 , + ) and substitutional gold in three charge states(Si,Au - , 0 , + ). The thetraedic interstitial defect of silicon (Si:Si i ) was also studied. The complex impurities: neighbour iron pair in the lattice (Si:Fe 2 ), substitutional gold-interstitial iron pair (Si:Au s Fe) and substitutional boron-interstitial hydrogen pair (Si:B s H i ), were analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. Numerical studies of impurities in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest

  9. Impurity study of TMX using ultraviolet spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Strand, O.T.; Moos, H.W.; Fortner, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) study of the emissions from intrinsic and injected impurities in TMX is presented. Two survey spectrographs were used to determine that the major impurities present were oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and titanium. Three absolutely-calibrated monochromators were used to measure the time histories and radial profiles of these impurity emissions in the central cell and each plug. Two of these instruments were capable of obtaining radial profiles as a function of time in a single shot

  10. Multiscaling Dynamics of Impurity Transport in Drift-Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittency effects and the associated multiscaling spectrum of exponents are investigated for impurities advection in tokamak edge plasmas. The two-dimensional Hasagawa-Wakatani model of resistive drift-wave turbulence is used as a paradigm to describe edge tokamak turbulence. Impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma turbulent flow. The use of the extended self-similarity technique shows that the structure function relative scaling exponent of impurity density and vorticity follows the She-Leveque model. This confirms the intermittent character of the impurities advection in the turbulent plasma flow and suggests that impurities are advected by vorticity filaments

  11. Visible Imaging Diagnostic on Tore-Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dachicourt, R.; Monier Garbet, P.; Beaute, A.; Habib-Naiim, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache (France); Marandet, Y. [PIIM, CNRS-Universite de Provence, Marseille (France)

    2011-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Research for thermonuclear fusion aims at energy production using fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium nuclei. To this end, a deuterium/tritium mixture has to be heated to a very high temperature (about 100 millions degrees). Chemical and physical sputtering erodes the plasma facing components (PFC), leading to an impurity influx to the plasma. Estimating this erosion source is important both for the PFC lifetime and the quality of the confinement. In fact, impurities reaching the plasma core radiate energy and dilute the fuel. In this contribution, we describe an erosion diagnostic operated on the Tore Supra tokamak, consisting in the combination of visible spectroscopy and filtered imaging over a full TPL (Toroidal Pumped Limiter) sector. Quantitative measurements of spectral lines brightness on four spectrometer chords monitoring the TPL top are used to process the corresponding filtered images, namely to remove background emission or unwanted lines. The particle influx from the TPL's vicinity is obtained from photon fluxes measurements [1], which require absolute calibration in intensity of the system. Filtered images provide the spatial pattern of erosion, from which the total eroded carbon flux is reconstructed. The variation of the particle influx with the input power is studied by analyzing a dedicated experimental campaign. References: [1] Behringer K. et al. Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Vol. 31, No. 14, pp. 2059 to 2099, 1989. (authors)

  12. Polish Perceptions on the Immigration Influx: a Critical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Hódor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses the issue of Poles’ attitude to the problem of the influx of migrants to Poland in the context of the migration crisis, which Europe has to face today. The issues discussed in the present paper are aimed to illustrate the characteristic features specific to Poles’ attitudes in favor of or against the process of influx of migrants to the E.U. Member States or Poland. The analysis covers both positive and negative aspects of migration to Poland, which have been most often indicated by Poles with respects to migrants. On the one hand, they include fears with regard to national security, potential conflicts of cultural and religious background, fear of the alleged loss of jobs to migrants and their preying on the country’s social security system. All of the above result in anti-migration demonstrations and the language of hatred. On the other hand, positive aspects of the migration influx are believed to consist in cultural enrichment, benefits for the labor market resulting from the inflow of both qualified professionals and laborers with lower pay expectations in comparison to Polish workers and believing that migrants might be the chance of minimize the negative effects of the demographic crisis. The supporters of helping migrants also point out the issue of solidarity and sympathy for the victims and the fact that in the past it was the Poles who received support from other countries in Poland’s difficult moments. Thus, extending such help to others may prove to be beneficial in the future. The present paper is based on academic articles, internet sources and statistical data, which all reveal a division into two camps: supporters and opponents of receiving migrants in Poland, which prevents determining Poland’s definitive stance on this issue. All the aspects of the problem discussed in the paper are undoubtedly a basis for further analysis.

  13. A Ca2+ influx associated with exocytosis is specifically abolished in a Paramecium exocytotic mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerboeuf, D.; Cohen, J.

    1990-01-01

    A Paramecium possesses secretory organelles called trichocysts which are docked beneath the plasma membrane awaiting an external stimulus that triggers their exocytosis. Membrane fusion is the sole event provoked by the stimulation and can therefore be studied per se. Using 3 microM aminoethyl dextran as a vital secretagogue, we analyzed the movements of calcium (Ca 2+ ) during the discharge of trichocysts. We showed that (a) external Ca 2+ , at least at 3 X 10(-7) M, is necessary for AED to induce exocytosis; (b) a dramatic and transient influx of Ca 2+ as measured from 45 Ca uptake is induced by AED; (c) this influx is independent of the well-characterized voltage-operated Ca 2+ channels of the ciliary membranes since it persists in a mutant devoid of these channels; and (d) this influx is specifically abolished in one of the mutants unable to undergo exocytosis, nd12. We propose that the Ca 2+ influx induced by AED reflects an increase in membrane permeability through the opening of novel Ca 2+ channel or the activation of other Ca 2+ transport mechanism in the plasma membrane. The resulting rise in cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration would in turn induce membrane fusion. The mutation nd12 would affect a gene product involved in the control of plasma membrane permeability to Ca 2+ , specifically related to membrane fusion

  14. Impurities and conductivity in a D-wave superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatsky, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    Impurity scattering in the unitary limit produces low energy quasiparticles with anisotropic spectrum in a two-dimensional d-wave superconductor. The authors describe a new quasi-one-dimensional limit of the quasiparticle scattering, which might occur in a superconductor with short coherence length and with finite impurity potential range. The dc conductivity in a d-wave superconductor is predicted to be proportional to the normal state scattering rate and is impurity-dependent. They show that quasi-one-dimensional regime might occur in high-T c superconductors with Zn impurities at low temperatures T approx-lt 10 K

  15. Silicon impurity release and surface transformation of TiO2 anatase and rutile nanoparticles in water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xuyang; Chen, Gexin; Erwin, Justin G.; Su, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Surface transformation can affect the stability, reactivity, and toxicity of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) nanoparticles (NPs) in water environments. Herein, we investigated the release kinetics of Si impurity frequently introduced during NP synthesis and the resulting effect on TiO 2 NP transformation in aqueous solutions. The release of Si increased from 2 h to 19 d at three pHs with the order: pH 11.2 ≥ pH 2.4 > pH 8.2. The Si release process followed parabolic kinetics which is similar to diffusion controlled dissolution of minerals, and the release magnitude followed the order: 10 × 40 nm rutile > 50 nm anatase > 30 × 40 nm rutile. FTIR data indicated preferential dissolving of less polymerized Si species on NP surface. Surface potential and particle size of TiO 2 NPs remained almost constant during the 42-day monitoring, implying the unaffected stability and transport of these NPs by the incongruent dissolution of impurities. Highlights: • Si impurity may affect the colloid stability, reactivity, and toxicity of TiO 2 NPs. • Si impurity gradually released during 2 h – 19 d following a parabolic curve. • FTIR data indicated less polymerized Si species dissolved from TiO 2 NPs. • Surface potential and size of TiO 2 remained constant during impurity release. • NP production needs to consider ion release and environmental transformation. -- The incongruent dissolution of surface charge determining Si impurity did not significantly affect the surface potential and aggregation status of TiO 2 nanoparticles in aqueous solutions

  16. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Pilaniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH, the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA, and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs. The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are - reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas-liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid-liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC-Mass Spectroscopy (MS, LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research.

  17. A validated stability-indicating UPLC method for desloratadine and its impurities in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dantu Durga; Satyanarayana, N V; Malleswara Reddy, A; Sait, Shakil S; Chakole, Dinesh; Mukkanti, K

    2010-02-05

    A novel stability-indicating gradient reverse phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-UPLC) method was developed for the determination of purity of desloratadine in presence of its impurities and forced degradation products. The method was developed using Waters Aquity BEH C18 column with mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of solvents A and B. The eluted compounds were monitored at 280nm. The run time was 8min within which desloratadine and its five impurities were well separated. Desloratadine was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. Desloratadine was found to degrade significantly in oxidative and thermal stress conditions and stable in acid, base, hydrolytic and photolytic degradation conditions. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, thus proved the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision and robustness. This method was also suitable for the assay determination of desloratadine in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  18. Striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xian-Jun

    2011-05-01

    We study striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping by self-consistently solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations based on the t - t‧ - U - V model. For the single-impurity case, it is found that the stable ground state is a modulated checkerboard pattern. For the two-impurity case, the stripe-like structures in order parameters are induced due to the impurity-pinning effect. The modulations of DSC and charge orders share the same period of four lattice constants (4 a), which is half the period of modulations in the coexisting spin order. Interestingly, when three or more impurities are inserted, the impurities could induce more complex striped morphologies due to quantum interference. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  19. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  20. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  1. Impurity-induced states in superconducting heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong E.; Rossi, Enrico; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2018-04-01

    Heterostructures allow the realization of electronic states that are difficult to obtain in isolated uniform systems. Exemplary is the case of quasi-one-dimensional heterostructures formed by a superconductor and a semiconductor with spin-orbit coupling in which Majorana zero-energy modes can be realized. We study the effect of a single impurity on the energy spectrum of superconducting heterostructures. We find that the coupling between the superconductor and the semiconductor can strongly affect the impurity-induced states and may induce additional subgap bound states that are not present in isolated uniform superconductors. For the case of quasi-one-dimensional superconductor/semiconductor heterostructures we obtain the conditions for which the low-energy impurity-induced bound states appear.

  2. Interpretation of plasma impurity deposition probes. Analytic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangeby, P. C.

    1987-10-01

    Insertion of a probe into the plasma induces a high speed flow of the hydrogenic plasma to the probe which, by friction, accelerates the impurity ions to velocities approaching the hydrogenic ion acoustic speed, i.e., higher than the impurity ion thermal speed. A simple analytic theory based on this effect provides a relation between impurity fluxes to the probe Γimp and the undisturbed impurity ion density nimp, with the hydrogenic temperature and density as input parameters. Probe size also influences the collection process and large probes are found to attract a higher flux density than small probes in the same plasma. The quantity actually measured, cimp, the impurity atom surface density (m-2) net-deposited on the probe, is related to Γimp and thus to nimp by taking into account the partial removal of deposited material caused by sputtering and the redeposition process.

  3. The screening of charged impurities in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenjing; Li, Lain-Jong

    2010-01-01

    Positively charged impurities were introduced into a bilayer graphene (BLG) transistor by n-doping with dimethylformamide. Subsequent exposure of the BLG device to moisture resulted in a positive shift of the Dirac point and an increase of hole mobility, suggesting that moisture could reduce the scattering strength of the existing charged impurities. In other words, moisture screened off the 'effective density' of charged impurities. At the early stage of moisture screening the scattering of hole carriers is dominated by long-range Coulomb scatter, but an alternative scattering mechanism should also be taken into consideration when the effective density of impurities is further lowered on moisture exposure.

  4. Collective impurity effects in the Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryasin, V S; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice doped with nonmagnetic impurities. Two nontrivial effects resulting from collective impurity behavior are predicted. The first one is related to presence of uncompensated magnetic moments localized near vacancies as revealed by the low-temperature Curie tail in the magnetic susceptibility. These moments exhibit an anomalous growth with the impurity concentration, which we attribute to the clustering mechanism. In an external magnetic field, impurities lead to an even more peculiar phenomenon lifting the classical ground-state degeneracy in favor of the conical state. We analytically demonstrate that vacancies spontaneously generate a positive biquadratic exchange, which is responsible for the above degeneracy lifting

  5. A LIBS method for simultaneous monitoring of the impurities and the hydrogenic composition present in the wall of the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Miranda, B., E-mail: belen.lopez@ciemat.es; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Martínez, M. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Av de la Universidad, 30, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    The study of plasma-wall interactions and impurity transport in the plasma fusion devices is critical for the development of future fusion reactors. An experiment to perform laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, using minor modifications of our existing laser blow-off impurity injection system, has been set up thus making both experiments compatible. The radiation produced by the laser pulse focused at the TJ-II wall evaporates a surface layer of deposited impurities and the subsequent radiation produced by the laser-produced plasma is collected by two separate lens and fiber combinations into two spectrometers. The first spectrometer, with low spectral resolution, records a spectrum from 200 to 900 nm to give a survey of impurities present in the wall. The second one, with high resolution, is tuned to the wavelengths of the Hα and Dα lines in order to resolve them and quantify the hydrogen isotopic ratio present on the surface of the wall. The alignment, calibration, and spectral analysis method will be described in detail. First experimental results obtained with this setup will be shown and its relevance for the TJ-II experimental program discussed.

  6. Chemical impurity monitoring in the turbine environment at ANO-1. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bour, D.P.

    1982-05-01

    An overview is presented here of three independent measurement campaigns for trace impurities in the secondary side water/steam of ANO-1, a PWR containing a once-through steam generator. The measurements took place in 1978-1979 between two turbine disc cracking incidents near the point of first condensation in the low pressure turbines. Turbine disc cracking occurred despite maintenance of conditions near the turbine manufacturers recommended limits. Measurements focused on sodium, chloride, and sulfate. The primary source of contamination was found to be the condensate polishing plant. Major improvements were seen to result from changes in regeneration procedures. Turbine damage may be the result of acid conditions at the Wilson Line since chloride and sulfate were enriched relative to sodium in the LP turbine inlet steam

  7. On neoclassical impurity transport in stellarator geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Regaña, J M; Kleiber, R; Beidler, C D; Turkin, Y; Maaßberg, H; Helander, P

    2013-01-01

    The impurity dynamics in stellarators has become an issue of moderate concern due to the inherent tendency of the impurities to accumulate in the core when the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field points radially inwards (ion root regime). This accumulation can lead to collapse of the plasma due to radiative losses, and thus limit high performance plasma discharges in non-axisymmetric devices. A quantitative description of the neoclassical impurity transport is complicated by the breakdown of the assumption of small E × B drift and trapping due to the electrostatic potential variation on a flux surface Φ-tilde compared with those due to the magnetic field gradient. This work examines the impact of this potential variation on neoclassical impurity transport in the Large Helical Device heliotron. It shows that the neoclassical impurity transport can be strongly affected by Φ-tilde . The central numerical tool used is the δf particle in cell Monte Carlo code EUTERPE. The Φ-tilde used in the calculations is provided by the neoclassical code GSRAKE. The possibility of obtaining a more general Φ-tilde self-consistently with EUTERPE is also addressed and a preliminary calculation is presented. (paper)

  8. Simulated impurity transport in LHD from MIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J.E. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    The impurity transport code MIST and atomic physics package LINES are used to calculate the time evolution of charge state density profiles, individual line emissivity profiles and total radiated power profiles for impurities in LHD plasmas. Three model LHD plasmas are considered; a high density, low temperature case, a low density, high temperature case and the initial LHD start-up plasma (500 kW ECH), using impurity transport coefficient profiles from Heliotron E. The elements oxygen, neon, scandium, iron, nickel and molybdenum are considered, both injected and in steady state. (author)

  9. Scattering of waves by impurities in precompressed granular chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Alejandro J; Yasuda, Hiromi; Kim, Eunho; Kevrekidis, P G; Porter, Mason A; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-05-01

    We study scattering of waves by impurities in strongly precompressed granular chains. We explore the linear scattering of plane waves and identify a closed-form expression for the reflection and transmission coefficients for the scattering of the waves from both a single impurity and a double impurity. For single-impurity chains, we show that, within the transmission band of the host granular chain, high-frequency waves are strongly attenuated (such that the transmission coefficient vanishes as the wavenumber k→±π), whereas low-frequency waves are well-transmitted through the impurity. For double-impurity chains, we identify a resonance-enabling full transmission at a particular frequency-in a manner that is analogous to the Ramsauer-Townsend (RT) resonance from quantum physics. We also demonstrate that one can tune the frequency of the RT resonance to any value in the pass band of the host chain. We corroborate our theoretical predictions both numerically and experimentally, and we directly observe almost complete transmission for frequencies close to the RT resonance frequency. Finally, we show how this RT resonance can lead to the existence of reflectionless modes in granular chains (including disordered ones) with multiple double impurities.

  10. Spin-1 two-impurity Kondo problem on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerdt, A.; Žitko, R.; Feiguin, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the two-impurity Kondo problem for spin-1 adatoms on a square lattice using an exact canonical transformation to map the problem onto an effective one-dimensional system that can be numerically solved using the density matrix renormalization group method. We provide a simple intuitive picture and identify the different regimes, depending on the distance between the two impurities, Kondo coupling JK, longitudinal anisotropy D , and transverse anisotropy E . In the isotropic case, two impurities on opposite (the same) sublattices have a singlet (triplet) ground state. However, the energy difference between the triplet ground state and the singlet excited state is very small and we expect an effectively fourfold-degenerate ground state, i.e., two decoupled impurities. For large enough JK the impurities are practically uncorrelated forming two independent underscreened states with the conduction electrons, a clear nonperturbative effect. When the impurities are entangled in an RKKY-like state, Kondo correlations persist and the two effects coexist: the impurities are underscreened, and the dangling spin-1 /2 degrees of freedom are responsible for the interimpurity entanglement. We analyze the effects of magnetic anisotropy in the development of quasiclassical correlations.

  11. Quantitative analysis of oxytetracycline and its impurities by LC-MS-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkeberg, Anne Kruse; Halling-Sørensen, Bent; Cornett, Claus

    2004-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric method using an Xterra MS C(18) chromatographic column ( 100 mm x 2.1 mm i.d., 3.5microm) that allows complete separation of oxytetracycline (OTC) and the impurities: 4-epi-oxytetracycline (EOTC), tetracycline (TC), 4-epi-tetracycline (ETC), 2......-acetyl-2-decarboxamido-oxytetracycline (ADOTC), alpha-apo-oxytetracycline (alpha-AOTC) and beta-apo-oxytetracycline (beta-AOTC) was developed. Gradient elution was used and calibration curves were obtained using the scan mode selected reaction monitoring (SRM). Acceptable correlations were obtained...

  12. Ca(2+) influx and neurotransmitter release at ribbon synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Soyoun; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+) influx through voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels triggers the release of neurotransmitters at presynaptic terminals. Some sensory receptor cells in the peripheral auditory and visual systems have specialized synapses that express an electron-dense organelle called a synaptic ribbon. Like conventional synapses, ribbon synapses exhibit SNARE-mediated exocytosis, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and short-term plasticity. However, unlike non-ribbon synapses, voltage-gated L-type Ca(2+) channel opening at ribbon synapses triggers a form of multiquantal release that can be highly synchronous. Furthermore, ribbon synapses appear to be specialized for fast and high throughput exocytosis controlled by graded membrane potential changes. Here we will discuss some of the basic aspects of synaptic transmission at different types of ribbon synapses, and we will emphasize recent evidence that auditory and retinal ribbon synapses have marked differences. This will lead us to suggest that ribbon synapses are specialized for particular operating ranges and frequencies of stimulation. We propose that different types of ribbon synapses transfer diverse rates of sensory information by expressing a particular repertoire of critical components, and by placing them at precise and strategic locations, so that a continuous supply of primed vesicles and Ca(2+) influx leads to fast, accurate, and ongoing exocytosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Breatherlike impurity modes in discrete nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennig, D.; Rasmussen, Kim; Tsironis, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a disordered generalized discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing both diagonal and nondiagonal nonlinear terms. The equation models a Linear host lattice doped with nonlinear impurities. We find different types of impurity states that form itinerant...

  14. Particle influx measurements with the ASDEX-upgrade multichord visible spectroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallenbach, A.; Mayer, H.M.; Schneider, W.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the hardware and software components of the ASDEX-Upgrade multichord visible spectroscopy system. Main emphasis is laid on a detailed description of the detector, a free programmable charge-coupled device intensified by a microchannel plate. As an experimental application, flux measurements of different impurity species from the inner heat shield are presented. Poloidal profiles of the released impurity amount obtained for various experimental situations are used to check the plasma position which is derived by the function parametrization analysis. (orig.)

  15. Incorporation, diffusion and segregation of impurities in polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, J.P.; Soltani, M.L. (Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Quesada, J. (Laboratoire de Metallurgie-Chimie des Materiaux, E.N.S.A.I.S., 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1982-01-01

    We studied by means of X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy the nature, distribution and, when possible, the chemical bond of impurities at the surface of polycrystalline silicon samples grown on a carbon ribbon. Besides main impurities (carbon and oxygen), always present at concentrations around their limit of solubility in silicon, metal impurities have been found: their nature varies from one sample to another. Their spatial distribution is not random: some are strictly confined at the surface (sodium), whereas others are in the superficial oxidized layer (calcium, magnesium) or localized at the oxide-bulk silicon interface (iron). Metal impurities are coming from the carbon ribbon and are incorporated to silicon during the growth process. It is not yet possible to give a model of diffusion processes of impurities since they are too numerous and interact one with the other. However oxygen seems to play a leading role in the spatial distribution of metal impurities.

  16. Quantum one dimensional spin systems. Disorder and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, V.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents three studies that are respectively the spin-1 disordered chain, the non magnetic impurities in the spin-1/2 chain and the reaction-diffusion process. The spin-1 chain of weak disorder is performed by the Abelian bosonization and the renormalization group. This allows to take into account the competition between the disorder and the interactions and predicts the effects of various spin-1 anisotropy chain phases under many different disorders. A second work uses the non magnetic impurities as local probes of the correlations in the spin-1/2 chain. When the impurities are connected to the chain boundary, the author predicts a temperature dependence of the relaxation rate (1/T) of the nuclear spin impurities, different from the case of these impurities connected to the whole chain. The last work deals with one dimensional reaction-diffusion problem. The Jordan-Wigner transformation allows to consider a fermionic field theory that critical exponents follow from the renormalization group. (A.L.B.)

  17. Impurity injection into tokamak plasmas by erosion probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Bakos, J.S.; Buerger, G.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.

    1987-08-01

    Exposing special erosion probes into the edge plasma of MT-1 the impurities Li and Ti were released and contaminated the plasma. By the use of collector probes the torodial transport of these impurities were investigated. The results indicate a preferential impurity flow into codirection of the plasma current. However, the asymmetric component of this flow is much larger than expected from the toroidal drift correlated to the plasma current. (author)

  18. Characteristic of Extracellular Zn2+ Influx in the Middle-Aged Dentate Gyrus and Its Involvement in Attenuation of LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Koike, Yuta; Osaw, Misa; Tamano, Haruna

    2018-03-01

    An increased influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into neurons is a cause of cognitive decline. The influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into dentate granule cells was compared between young and middle-aged rats because of vulnerability of the dentate gyrus to aging. The influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into dentate granule cells was increased in middle-aged rats after injection of AMPA and high K + into the dentate gyrus, but not in young rats. Simultaneously, high K + -induced attenuation of LTP was observed in middle-aged rats, but not in young rats. The attenuation was rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn 2+ chelator. Intracellular Zn 2+ in dentate granule cells was also increased in middle-aged slices with high K + , in which the increase in extracellular Zn 2+ was the same as young slices with high K + , suggesting that ability of extracellular Zn 2+ influx into dentate granule cells is greater in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, extracellular zinc concentration in the hippocampus was increased age-dependently. The present study suggests that the influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into dentate granule cells is more readily increased in middle-aged rats and that its increase is a cause of age-related attenuation of LTP in the dentate gyrus.

  19. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  20. Impurity effects in the electrothermal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimura, A.; Azevedo, M.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A 'impure' plasma model is proposed based on the homogeneous hydrogen plasma used in the theory formulated by Tomimura and Haines to explain the electrothermal instable mode growth with the wave vector perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The impurities are introduced implicitly in the transport coefficients of the two-fluid model through a effective charge number Z sub(eff). (Author) [pt

  1. Transport and re-deposition of limiter-released metal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claasen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1983-01-01

    The transport parallel B-vector and re-deposition of limiter- (or divertor-target-)released metal impurities in a given counter-streaming scrape-off layer plasma is studied analytically by using a kinetic approach. Electron impact ionization, Coulomb collisions with the hydrogen ions, and impurity ion acceleration in a pre-sheath electric field are accounted for. The friction and electric-field forces provide the driving forces for impurity re-cycling in front of the limiter. Both hydrogen ion sputtering and self-sputtering are included (the latter for impurity emission perpendicular to the limiter surface). The analytical formulas are numerically evaluated for the example of sputtered iron impurities, assuming a simple model for a scrape-off layer plasma in contact with a stainless-steel poloidal ring limiter. (author)

  2. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2014-05-08

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  3. Impurity concentration limits and activation in fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines waste management problems related to impurity activation in first-wall, shield, and magnet materials for fusion reactors. Definitions of low activity based on hands-on recycling, remote recycling, and shallow land burial waste management criteria are discussed. Estimates of the impurity concentration in low-activation materials (elementally substituted stainless steels and vanadium alloys) are reported. Impurity activation in first-wall materials turns out to be critical after a comparison of impurity concentration limits and estimated levels. Activation of magnet materials is then considered: Long-term activity is not a concern, while short-term activity is. In both cases, impurity activation is negligible. Magnet materials, and all other less flux-exposed materials, have no practical limitation on impurities in terms of induced radioactivity

  4. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian; Berloff, Natalia G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  5. The origin of metal impurities in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, Kazumi; Sengoku, Seio; Maeda, Hikosuke; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shin

    1978-10-01

    The origin of metal impurities in DIVA (JFT-2a Tokamak) has been studied experimentally. Three processes of metal impurity release from the first wall were identified; i.e. ion sputtering, evaporation, and arcing. Among of these, ion sputtering is the predominant process in the quiet phase of the discharge, which is characterized by no spikes in the loop voltage and no localized heat flux concentrations on the first wall. ''Cones'' formation due to the sputtering is observed on the gold protection plate (guard limiter) exposed to about 10,000 discharges by scanning electron micrograph. In the SEM photographs, the spacial distribution of cones on the shell surface due to the ion sputtering coincides with the spacial distribution of intensity of Au-I line radiation. Gold is the dominant metal impurity in DIVA. The honeycomb structure can decrease release of the metal impurity. (author)

  6. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  7. Excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miki; Fujise, Yuki; Tsuchiya, Yuka; Tamano, Haruna; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells is nonessential for dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) and the physiological significance of extracellular Zn(2+) dynamics is unknown in the dentate gyrus. Excess increase in extracellular Zn(2+) in the hippocampal CA1, which is induced with excitation of zincergic neurons, induces memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into CA1 pyramidal cells. In the present study, it was examined whether extracellular Zn(2+) induces object recognition memory deficit via excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells. KCl (100 mM, 2 µl) was locally injected into the dentate gyrus. The increase in intracellular Zn(2+) in dentate granule cells induced with high K(+) was blocked by co-injection of CaEDTA and CNQX, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator and an AMPA receptor antagonist, respectively, suggesting that high K(+) increases the influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation. Dentate gyrus LTP induction was attenuated 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also attenuated when KCl was injected 5 min after the induction. Memory deficit was induced when training of object recognition test was performed 1 h after KCl injection into the dentate gyrus and also induced when KCl was injected 5 min after the training. High K(+)-induced impairments of LTP and memory were rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA. These results indicate that excess influx of Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells via AMPA receptor activation affects object recognition memory via attenuated LTP induction. Even in the dentate gyrus where is scarcely innervated by zincergic neurons, it is likely that extracellular Zn(2+) homeostasis is strictly regulated for cognition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Impurity dynamics in stellarator W7-AS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igitkhanov, Yuri; Beidler, Craig D.; Burhenn, Reiner; Polunovsky, Eduard; Yamazaki, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    Numerical efforts to understand the neoclassical transport of impurities in stellarator plasmas have been undertaken. The new code solves the radial continuity equations for each ionization stage of the impurity ions for given background plasma profiles and magnetic configuration. An analytic description of the neoclassical transport coefficients based on numerical results from the DKES (Drift Kinetic Equation Solver) code and monoenergetic Monte-Carlo calculation (C.D. Beidler et al., EPS 1994), is here applied for impurity transport coefficients. The transition between the different charge states due to the ionization and recombination in balance equation is described by using the ADAS (Atomic Data and Analysis Structure) database. The impurity behavior in some typical discharges from W7-AS with moderate (NC) and improved energy confinement (HDH) has been considered. It is shown that the spatial distribution results from the competition between the radial electric field and the thermal force (which together produce a convective flux), and the diffusive term, which flattens the radial impurity distribution. The impurity ions are localized at the radial position where the convective flux goes through zero. It is also shown that for typical stellarator discharges there is no pronounced temperature screening effect as in tokamak plasmas. (author)

  9. Composition for limiting water influx into a well

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gazizov, A.Sh.; Budarina, L.A.; Kuznetsov, Ye.V.; Zhdanov, N.F.

    1982-01-01

    A composition is proposed for restricting water influx into a well. It contains acrylamide, ammonium persulfate, sodium hyposulfite, water and additive. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to improve water resistance of the copolymer formed in the bed and to preserve permeability of the bed for oil, it contains as an additive polymethacylic acid with the following ratio of components (% by weight): acrylamide 2.0-5.6; polymethacrylic acid 3.08.0; ammonium persulfate 0.020-0.072; sodium hyposulfite 0.018-0.068; water--the rest.

  10. Impurity and trace tritium transport in tokamak edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity or minority species, as for example tritium, is investigated in drift-Alfven edge turbulence. The full effects of perpendicular and parallel convection are kept for the impurity species. The impurity density develops a granular structure with steep gradients...... and locally exceeds its initial values due to the compressibility of the flow. An approximate decomposition of the impurity flux into a diffusive part and an effective convective part (characterized by a pinch velocity) is performed and a net inward pinch effect is recovered. The pinch velocity is explained...

  11. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  12. Impurities in radioactive solutions for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, J.U.

    1990-01-01

    The absolute and relative methods for radioactive sources calibration, like 4 Πβ-γ and 4Πγ ionization chamber respectively, allows to reach 0,1% of exactiness in activity measurement, but cannot distinguish radioactive impurities that interfere in the activity. Then, one of the problems associated to a quality control of calibrated sources furnished to users is the identification and quantification of the impurities. In this work, a routine technical procedure, using the facilities of gamma spectrometry method that allows to identify and to determine the impurities relative contribution to the source main radionuclide activity, is described. (author) [pt

  13. Transport of impurities during H-mode pulses in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannella, R.; Gottardi, N.; Mompean, F.; Mori, H.; Pasini, D.; Stork, D.; Barnsley, R.; Hawkes, N.C.; Lawson, K.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of impurities during the H-mode is very different from that observed in the other regimes. This is clearly evident in the quiescent discharges where the confinement time of impurities τ I are measured in all the quiescent H-mode discharges in spite of the variety of impurity behavior observed corresponding to different plasma parameters and operating scenarios. The condition of the machine has an influence on the role played by the various impurities, but this does not seem to affect the flow patterns of these ions substantially. In particular oxygen, which was often detected as the dominant radiator, can be reduced to a negligible fraction by He conditioning of the carbon X-point tiles or limiters or by evaporating beryllium in the vacuum vessel. Nevertheless the behaviour of the residual impurities in otherwise similar discharges remains substantially unchanged. The transport patterns appear in fact to be affected by the plasma parameters and their profiles. In particular, two extreme transport regimes are presented in the following. These discharges have been modelled with the aid of a recently developed fully time-dependent impurity transport code using heuristic profiles for the impurity diffusion D and the convection velocity v. (author) 4 refs., 5 figs

  14. Moving discrete breathers in a Klein-Gordon chain with an impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, J; Palmero, F; Archilla, J F R; Romero, F R

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the influence of an impurity in the evolution of moving discrete breathers in a Klein-Gordon chain with non-weak nonlinearity. Three different types of behaviour can be observed when moving breathers interact with the impurity: they pass through the impurity continuing their direction of movement; they are reflected by the impurity; they are trapped by the impurity, giving rise to chaotic breathers, as their Fourier power spectra show. Resonance with a breather centred at the impurity site is conjectured to be a necessary condition for the appearance of the trapping phenomenon. This paper establishes a difference between the resonance condition of the non-weak nonlinearity approach and the resonance condition with the linear impurity mode in the case of weak nonlinearity

  15. Spectroscopic methods for detection of impurities in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashnikova, Natalia V.; Papiashvili, Nona; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Mark, Shlomo; Shilon, Guy; Khankin, Daniel; Kalisky, Yehoshua; Kalisky, Ofra; Parola, Abraham H.

    2011-11-01

    Optical photoluminescence spectroscopic method for detection of impurities, hazardous materials, pesticides, and pollutants in water resources, both qualitatively and quantitatively, is presented. The method is based on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of organic aromatic compounds, or poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and is carried out by following simultaneously their excitation and emission spectra. The full excitation emission matrix (EEM) generated in this way provides a 2-D and 3-D fluorescence map of the tested sample and the diagonals through the axes origin provide the synchronous fluorescence spectra at a constant wavelengths differences between the emission and excitation wavelengths, thus enabling multitude components identification. This map contains all the relevant spectroscopic information of the tested sample, and serves as a unique "fingerprint" with a very specific and accurate identification. When compared with pre-determined spectra and calibration curves from a "databank", there is a one-toone correspondence between the image and the specific compound, and it can be identified accurately both qualitatively and quantitatively. This method offers several significant advantages, and it provides a sensitive (ppm detection level), accurate and simple spectroscopic tool to monitor impurities and pollutants in water. The design and performance of the spectrofluorimeter prototype, as well as the software development and analysis of chemical organic compounds and mixtures in water will be discussed in this paper.

  16. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  17. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pickenheim, B. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); BIBLER, N. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    This document has been revised to add analytical data for fresh, 1 year old, and 4 year old glycolic acid as recommended in Revision 2 of this document. This was needed to understand the concentration of formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid, impurities present in the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments. Based on this information, the concentration of these impurities did not change during storage. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in the first two versions of this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends.

  18. Complexity of Quantum Impurity Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2017-12-01

    We give a quasi-polynomial time classical algorithm for estimating the ground state energy and for computing low energy states of quantum impurity models. Such models describe a bath of free fermions coupled to a small interacting subsystem called an impurity. The full system consists of n fermionic modes and has a Hamiltonian {H=H_0+H_{imp}}, where H 0 is quadratic in creation-annihilation operators and H imp is an arbitrary Hamiltonian acting on a subset of O(1) modes. We show that the ground energy of H can be approximated with an additive error {2^{-b}} in time {n^3 \\exp{[O(b^3)]}}. Our algorithm also finds a low energy state that achieves this approximation. The low energy state is represented as a superposition of {\\exp{[O(b^3)]}} fermionic Gaussian states. To arrive at this result we prove several theorems concerning exact ground states of impurity models. In particular, we show that eigenvalues of the ground state covariance matrix decay exponentially with the exponent depending very mildly on the spectral gap of H 0. A key ingredient of our proof is Zolotarev's rational approximation to the {√{x}} function. We anticipate that our algorithms may be used in hybrid quantum-classical simulations of strongly correlated materials based on dynamical mean field theory. We implemented a simplified practical version of our algorithm and benchmarked it using the single impurity Anderson model.

  19. Full automation and validation of a flexible ELISA platform for host cell protein and protein A impurity detection in biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillaume; Wendeler, Markus W

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring host cell protein (HCP) and protein A impurities is important to ensure successful development of recombinant antibody drugs. Here, we report the full automation and validation of an ELISA platform on a robotic system that allows the detection of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) HCPs and residual protein A of in-process control samples and final drug substance. The ELISA setup is designed to serve three main goals: high sample throughput, high quality of results, and sample handling flexibility. The processing of analysis requests, determination of optimal sample dilutions, and calculation of impurity content is performed automatically by a spreadsheet. Up to 48 samples in three unspiked and spiked dilutions each are processed within 24 h. The dilution of each sample is individually prepared based on the drug concentration and the expected impurity content. Adaptable dilution protocols allow the analysis of sample dilutions ranging from 1:2 to 1:2×10(7). The validity of results is assessed by automatic testing for dilutional linearity and spike recovery for each sample. This automated impurity ELISA facilitates multi-project process development, is easily adaptable to other impurity ELISA formats, and increases analytical capacity by combining flexible sample handling with high data quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impurity and particle control for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.

    1985-02-01

    The INTOR impurity control system studies have been focused on the development of an impurity control system which would be able to provide the necessary heat removal and He pumping while satisfying the requirements for (1) minimum plasma contamination by impurities, (2) reasonable component lifetime (approx. 1 year), and (3) minimum size and cost. The major systems examined were poloidal divertors and pumped limiters. The poloidal divertor was chosen as the reference option since it offered the possibility of low sputtering rates due to the formation of a cool, dense plasma near the collector plates. Estimates of the sputtering rates associated with pumped limiters indicated that they would be too high for a reasonable system. Development of an engineering design concept was done for both the poloidal divertor and the pumped limiter

  1. 86Rb(K) influx and [3H]ouabain binding by human platelets: Evidence for beta-adrenergic stimulation of Na-K ATPase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turaihi, K.; Khokher, M.A.; Barradas, M.A.; Mikhailidis, D.P.; Dandona, P.

    1989-01-01

    Although active transport of potassium into human platelets has been demonstrated previously, there is hitherto no evidence that human platelets have an ouabain-inhibitable Na-K ATPase in their membrane. The present study demonstrates active rubidium (used as an index of potassium influx), 86 Rb(K), influx into platelets, inhibitable by ouabain, and also demonstrates the presence of specific [ 3 H]ouabain binding by the human platelet. This 86 Rb(K) influx was stimulated by adrenaline, isoprenaline, and salbutamol, but noradrenaline caused a mild inhibition. Active 86 Rb(K) influx by platelets was inhibited markedly by timolol, mildly by atenolol, but not by phentolamine. Therefore, active 86 Rb(K) influx in human platelets is enhanced by stimulation of beta adrenoceptors of the beta 2 subtype. The platelet may therefore replace the leukocyte in future studies of Na-K ATPase activity. This would be a considerable advantage in view of the ease and rapidity of preparation of platelets

  2. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  3. Scaling laws for trace impurity confinement: a variational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Haas, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    A variational approach is outlined for the deduction of impurity confinement scaling laws. Given the forms of the diffusive and convective components to the impurity particle flux, we present a variational principle for the impurity confinement time in terms of the diffusion time scale and the convection parameter, which is a non-dimensional measure of the size of the convective flux relative to the diffusive flux. These results are very general and apply irrespective of whether the transport fluxes are of theoretical or empirical origin. The impurity confinement time scales exponentially with the convection parameter in cases of practical interest. (orig.)

  4. Zirconium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass specrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in zirconium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 but particularly adapted for low contents. The method is quantitative only if a reference sample is available (metallic impurities) [fr

  5. Isospin impurity and super-allowed β transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, H.; Van Giai Nguyen; Suzuki, T.

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of isospin impurity on the super-allowed Fermi β decay using microscopic HF and RPA (or TDA) model taking into account CSB and CIB interactions. It is found that the isospin impurity of N = Z nuclei gives enhancement of the sum rule of Fermi transition probabilities. On the other hand, the super-allowed transitions between odd-odd J = 0 nuclei and even-even J = 0 nuclei are quenched because on the cancellation of the isospin impurity effects of mother and daughter nuclei. An implication of the calculated Fermi transition rate on the unitarity of Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix is also discussed. (authors)

  6. Dynamics of impurities in the scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon

    1988-01-01

    Impurity modelling of the Scrape-Off Layer, SOL, is reviewed. Simple analytic models are sometimes adequate for relating central impurity levels to edge plasma conditions and for explaining the patterns of net erosion/deposition found on limiters. More sophisticated approaches, which are also necessary, are categorized and reviewed. A plea is made for the acquisition of a more comprehensive data base of edge plasma properties since reliable impurity modelling appears to be dependent on more extensive use of experimental input. (author)

  7. Photochemistry Saturn's Atmosphere. 2; Effects of an Influx of External Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Julianne I.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Bezard, Bruno; Gladstone, G. Randall; Allen, Mark

    2000-01-01

    We use a one-dimensional diurnally averaged model of photochemistry and diffusion in Saturn's stratosphere to investigate the influence of extraplanetary debris on atmospheric chemistry. In particular, we consider the effects of an influx of oxygen from micrometeoroid ablation or from ring-particle diffusion; the contribution from cometary impacts, satellite debris, or ring vapor is deemed to be less important. The photochemical model results are compared directly with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) observations to constrain the influx of extraplanetary oxygen to Saturn. From the ISO observations, we determine that the column densities of CO2 and H2O above 10 mbar in Saturn's atmosphere are (6.3 +/- 1) x 10(exp 14) and (1.4 +/- 0.4) x 10(exp 15)/ square cm, respectively; our models indicate that a globally averaged oxygen influx of (4+/-2) x 10(exp 6) O atoms /sq cm/s is required to explain these observations. Models with a locally enhanced influx of H20 operating over a small fraction of the projected area do not provide as good a fit to the ISO H2O observations. If volatile oxygen compounds comprise one-third to one-half of the exogenic source by mass, then Saturn is currently being bombarded with (3 +/- 2) x 10(exp -16) g/square cm/s of extraplanetary material. To reproduce the observed CO2/H2O ratio in Saturn's stratosphere, some of the exogenic oxygen must arrive in the form of a carbon-oxygen bonded species such as CO or CO2. An influx consistent with the composition of cometary ices fails to reproduce the high observed CO2/H2O ratio, suggesting that (i) the material has ices that are slightly more carbon-rich than is typical for comets, (ii) a contribution from an organic-rich component is required, or (iii) some of the hydrogen-oxygen bonded material is converted to carbon-oxygen bonded material without photochemistry (e.g., during the ablation process). We have also reanalyzed the 5-micron CO observations of Noll and Larson and determine that the CO

  8. Anomalous temperature behavior of Sn impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskel, D.; Shechter, H.; Stern, E.A.; Newville, M.; Yacoby, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Sn impurities in Pb and Ag hosts have been investigated by Moessbauer effect and in Pb by x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) studies. The Sn atoms are dissolved up to at least 2 at. % in Pb and up to at least 8 at. % in Ag for the temperature ranges investigated. The concentration limit for Sn-Sn interactions is 1 at. % for Pb and 2 at. % for Ag as determined experimentally by lowering the Sn concentration until no appreciable change occurs in the Moessbauer effect. XAFS measurements verify that the Sn impurities in Pb are dissolved and predominantly at substitutional sites. For both hosts the temperature dependence of the spectral intensities of isolated Sn impurities below a temperature T 0 is as expected for vibrating about a lattice site. Above T 0 the Moessbauer spectral intensity exhibits a greatly increased rate of drop-off with temperature without appreciable broadening. This drop-off is too steep to be explained by ordinary anharmonic effects and can be explained by a liquidlike rapid hopping of the Sn, localized about a lattice site. Higher-entropy-density regions of radii somewhat more than an atomic spacing surround such impurities, and can act as nucleation sites for three-dimensional melting

  9. Interaction of ring dark solitons with ring impurities in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Jukui

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of ring dark solitons/vortexes with the ring-shaped repulsive and attractive impurities in two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates is investigated numerically. Very rich interaction phenomena are obtained, i.e., not only the interaction between the ring soliton and the impurity, but also the interaction between vortexes and the impurity. The interaction characters, i.e., snaking of ring soliton, quasitrapping or reflection of ring soliton and vortexes by the impurity, strongly depend on initial ring soliton velocity, impurity strength, initial position of ring soliton and impurity. The numerical results also reveal that ring dark solitons/vortexes can be trapped and dragged by an adiabatically moving attractive ring impurity

  10. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  11. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahner, C.T.; Shoun, R.R.; McDowell, W.J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl[(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl[(dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)[(diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl]phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl 4 as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen [(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions

  12. Effects of impurities on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.

    1986-01-01

    Strong impurity effects upon introduction and annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects in InP irradiated with 1-MeV electrons have been found. The main defect center of 0.37-eV hole trap H4 in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect, is annealed even at room temperature. Its annealing rate is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the preirradiation carrier concentration in InP. Moreover, the density of the hole trap H5 (E/sub v/+0.52 eV) in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect--impurity complex, increases with increase in the InP carrier concentration. These results suggest that the radiation-induced defects in InP must recover through long-range diffusion mediated by impurity atoms. A model is proposed in which point defects diffuse to sinks through impurities so as to disappear or bind impurities so as to form point defect--impurity complexes. In addition to the long-range diffusion mechanism, the possibility of charge-state effects responsible for the thermal annealing of radiation-induced defects in InP is also discussed

  13. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities in Oseltamivir Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Kumar Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three known impurities in oseltamivir phosphate bulk drug at level 0.1% (ranging from 0.05-0.1% were detected by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. These impurities were preliminarily identified by the mass number of the impurities. Different experiments were conducted and finally the known impurities were synthesized and characterized.

  14. Clinical review: Update on hemodynamic monitoring - a consensus of 16.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincent, J.L.; Rhodes, A.; Perel, A.; Martin, G.S.; Rocca, G.D.; Vallet, B.; Pinsky, M.R.; Hofer, C.K.; Teboul, J.L.; Boode, W.P. de; Scolletta, S.; Viellard-Baron, A.; Backer, D. de; Walley, K.R.; Maggiorini, M.; Singer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring plays a fundamental role in the management of acutely ill patients. With increased concerns about the use of invasive techniques, notably the pulmonary artery catheter, to measure cardiac output, recent years have seen an influx of new, less-invasive means of measuring

  15. Spectroscopic studies of carbon impurities in PISCES-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Y.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Pospieszczyk, A.

    1989-08-01

    The graphite used for the limiter of the tokamak reactor produces carbon-containing molecular impurities as a result of the interactions with the edge plasma. The behavior of these molecular impurities has been studied using emission spectroscopy. The present study includes: finding molecular bands and atomic lines in the visible spectral range which can be used for the study of the molecular impurities, studying the breakup processes of the molecular impurities on their way from the source into the plasma, developing a spectroscopic diagnostic method for the absolute measurement of the molecular impurity flux resulting from graphite erosion. For these studies, carbon-containing molecules such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , and CO 2 were injected into the tokamak-boundary,like plasma generated by PISCES-A. The spectrograms of these gases were taken. Many useful bands and lines were determined from the spectrograms. The breakup processes of these gases were studied by observing the spatial profiles of the emission of the molecules and their radicals for different plasma conditions. For the absolute measurement of the eroded molecular impurity flux, the photon efficiency of the lines and bands were found by measuring the absolute number of the emitted photons and injected gas molecules. The chemical sputtering yield of graphite by hydrogen plasma was spectroscopically measured using the previously obtained photon efficiencies. It showed good agreement with results obtained by weight loss measurements. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  16. Alternating current techniques for corrosion monitoring in water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Weeks, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Corrosion in both nuclear and fossil fueled steam generators is generally a consequence of the presence of aggressive impurities introduced into the coolant system through condenser leakage. The impurities concentrate in regions of the steam generator protected from coolant flow, in crevices or under deposited corrosion products and adjacent to heat transfer surfaces. These three factors, the aggressive impurity, crevice type areas and heat transfer surfaces appear to be the requirements for the onset of rapid corrosion. Under conditions where coolant impurities do not concentrate the corrosion rates are low, easily measured and can be accounted for by allowances in the design of the steam generator. Rapid corrosion conditions cannot be designed for and must be suppressed. The condition of the surfaces when rapid corrosion develops must be markedly different from those during normal operation and these changes should be observable using electrochemical techniques. This background formed the basis of a design of a corrosion monitoring device, work on which was initiated at BNL. The basic principles of the technique are described. The object of the work is to develop a corrosion monitoring device which can be operated with PWR steam generator secondary coolant feed water

  17. Influx of CO2 from Soil Incubated Organic Residues at Constant Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoukat Ali Abro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature induced CO2 from genotypic residue substances is still less understood. Two types of organic residues (wheat- maize were incubated at a constant temperature (25°C to determine the rate and cumulative influx of CO2 in laboratory experiment for 40 days. Further, the effect of surface and incorporated crop residues with and without phosphorus addition was also studied. Results revealed that mixing of crop residues increased CO2-C evolution significantly & emission rare was 37% higher than that of control. At constant temperature, soil mixed residues, had higher emission rates CO2-C than the residues superimposed. There was linear correlation of CO2-C influxed for phosphorus levels and residue application ways with entire incubation at constant temperature. The mixing of organic residues to soil enhanced SOC levels and biomass of microbially bound N; however to little degree ammonium (NH4-N and nitrate NO3-N nitrogen were decreased.

  18. Oscillations of quantum transport through double-AB rings with magnetic impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yingfang; Liang, J-Q

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the effect of impurity scattering on the quantum transport through double AB rings in the presence of spin-flipper in the middle lead in terms of one-dimensional quantum waveguide theory. The electron interacts with the impurity through the exchange interaction leading to spin-flip scattering. Transmissions in the spin-flipped and non-spin-flipped channels are calculated explicitly. It is found that the overall transmission and the conductance are distorted due to the impurity scattering. The extent of distortion not only depends on the strength of the impurity potential but also on the impurity position. Moreover, the transmission probability and the conductance are modulated by the magnetic flux, the size of the ring and the impurity potential strength as well

  19. Investigation of impurity defects in α-iron by molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation of the configuration of impurity defects in α-iron by the molecular dynamics method is presented. The Jhonson model potential has been used to calculate the interaction of matrix atoms. The impurity-matrix atom interaction is described by the same form of the potential shifted along the axis of interatomic distances for a definite value. The correspondence between the shift value and change in the radius of the impurity defect is established on the basis of calculation of the relaxation volume. Possible configurations of the impurity - interstitial matrix atom complexes are obtained for the given model of the impurity defect, dimensional boundaries of possible transitions between different configurations are determined. Formation and bound energies, relaxation volumes of impurity defects are calculated

  20. Anomalous diffusion, clustering, and pinch of impurities in plasma edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priego, M.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity particles in plasma edge turbulence is investigated. The impurities are modeled as a passive fluid advected by the electric and polarization drifts, while the ambient plasma turbulence is modeled using the two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani paradigm for resistive...... drift-wave turbulence. The features of the turbulent transport of impurities are investigated by numerical simulations using a novel code that applies semi-Lagrangian pseudospectral schemes. The diffusive character of the turbulent transport of ideal impurities is demonstrated by relative...... orientation determined by the charge of the impurity particles. Second, a radial pinch scaling linearly with the mass-charge ratio of the impurities is discovered. Theoretical explanation for these observations is obtained by analysis of the model equations. (C) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  1. Depolarization of diffusing spins by paramagnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Hutson, R.L.; Heffner, R.H.; Leon, M.; Dodds, S.A.; Estle, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    We study the depolarization of diffusing spins (muons) interacting with dilute paramagnetic impurities in a solid using a simple computational model which properly treats the muon motion and preserves correct muon-impurity distances. Long-range (dipolar) and nearest-neighbor (contact) interactions are treated together. Diffusion parameters are deduced and model comparisons made for AuGd (300 ppm). (orig.)

  2. Measurement of impurity emission profiles in CHS Plasma using AXUV photodiode arrays and VUV bandpass filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, C.; Peterson, B.J.; Ida, K.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a compact and low-cost diagnostic system for spatiotemporal distributions of specific vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission lines from impurities in Compact Helical System (CHS) plasmas. The system consists of 20 channel absolute extreme ultraviolet photodiode arrays combined with interchangeable thin foil filters which have passbands in the VUV region. A compact mounting module which contains all the components including an in-vacuum preamplifier for immediate current-voltage conversion has been designed and successfully fabricated. A preliminary measurement with a single module using an aluminum foil filter has been carried out for monitoring the behavior of oxygen impurity in CHS, and initial results have been obtained. Two identical modules equipped with Versa Module European bus-based analog-digital converters will be available for future tomographic measurements

  3. Innovative sludge pretreatment technology for impurity separation using micromesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaojie; Han, Xiaomeng; Zang, Lili; Wu, Zhichao

    2018-05-23

    In order to reduce the impacts on sludge treatment facilities caused by impurities such as fibers, hairs, plastic debris, and coarse sand, an innovative primary sludge pretreatment technology, sludge impurity separator (SIS), was proposed in this study. Non-woven micromesh with pore size of 0.40 mm was used to remove the impurities from primary sludge. Results of lab-scale tests showed that impurity concentration, aeration intensity, and channel gap were the key operation parameters, of which the optimized values were below 25 g/L, 0.8 m 3 /(m 2  min), and 2.5 cm, respectively. In the full-scale SIS with treatment capacity of 300 m 3 /day, over 88% of impurities could be removed from influent and the cleaning cycle of micromesh was more than 16 days. Economic analysis revealed that the average energy consumption was 1.06 kWh/m 3 treated sludge and operation cost was 0.6 yuan/m 3 treated sludge.

  4. Carbon impurity transport around limiters in the DITE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Stangeby, P.C.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Matthews, G.F.; McCracken, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of impurity ions originating at the limiter in a tokamak is critically dependent on the location of the ion in the boundary plasma. In the confined plasma, just inboard of the limiter, impurity ions will disperse freely into the discharge whilst in the scrape-off layer the pre-sheath plasma flow and the associated ambipolar electric field may tend to sweep impurities back to the limiter surface. In this paper we have studied, both by experiment and by theory, the transport of carbon impurity ions in the vicinity of the limiter. By comparing experimental measurements of the spatial distributions of impurities around the limiter with that predicted from a Monte Carlo computer code it appears that the parallel dispersal on closed field lines in the confined plasma is consistent with classical transport processes and that in the scrape-off layer the dispersal is indeed impeded by the pre-sheath plasma flow. (orig.)

  5. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0141 INTERACTIONS OF ULTRACOLD IMPURITY PARTICLES WITH BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES Georg Raithel UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final...SUBTITLE Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0453 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0453 Reporting Period: 8/15/2010 to 2/14

  6. Impurity production and acceleration in CTIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov; Clift, W.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Klauser, R.; Horton, R.D. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Howard, S.J. [General Fusion Inc., Burnaby, BC V5A 3H4 (Canada); Brockington, S.J. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Evans, R.W.; Hwang, D.Q. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) produces a high density, high velocity hydrogen plasma that maintains its configuration in free space on a MHD resistive time scale. In order to study the production and acceleration of impurities in the injector, several sets of silicon collector probes were exposed to spheromak-like CT's exiting the accelerator. Elemental analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy indicated the presence of O, Al, Fe, and Cu in films up to 200 A thickness (1000 CT interactions). Using a smaller number of CT interactions (10-20), implantation of Fe and Cu was measured by Auger depth profiling. The amount of impurities was found to increase with accelerating voltage and number of CT interactions while use of a solenoidal field reduced the amount. Comparison of the implanted Fe and Cu with TRIM simulations indicated that the impurities were traveling more slowly than the hydrogen CT.

  7. Increased 22Na+-influx in lymphocytes from offspring of essential hypertensive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Pedersen, K E; Klitgaard, N A

    1989-01-01

    Lymphocytes were used as a cellular model for the in vitro measurements of 22Na+-influx during sodium pump inhibition by ouabain. The measurements were made using lymphocytes from young men at increased risk of developing essential hypertension in order to assess any changes and to analyse whether...

  8. Modeling of the Microchemistry for Diffusion of Selected Impurities in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. R.; Bullock, J.S. IV

    2001-01-01

    Unalloyed metallic uranium used in some work done at Y-12 contains small quantities of impurities, the three most significant of which are carbon, iron, and silicon. During metallurgical processing, as the metal cools from a molten condition towards room temperature, the metallic matrix solution becomes supersaturated in each of the impurities whose concentration exceeds the solubility limit. Many impurity atoms form compounds with uranium that precipitate out of the solution, thus creating and growing inclusions. The objective of the present work is to study the distribution of impurity atoms about some of the inclusions, with a view toward examining the effect of the interaction between inclusions on the impurity atom distribution. The method used is time-dependent mass diffusion from the supersaturated solution to the surfaces of the inclusions. Micrographs of metal samples suggest that the inclusions form in successive stages. After each inclusion forms, it begins to draw impurity atoms from its immediate vicinity, thus altering the amounts and distributions of impurity atoms available for formation and growth of later inclusions. In the present work, a one-dimensional spherical approximation was used to simulate inclusions and their regions of influence. A first set of calculations was run to simulate the distribution of impurity atoms about the largest inclusions. Then, a second set of calculations was run to see how the loss of impurity atoms to the largest inclusions might affect the distribution of impurity atoms around the next stage of inclusions. Plots are shown for the estimated distributions of impurity atoms in the region of influence about the inclusions for the three impurities studied. The authors believe that these distributions are qualitatively correct. However, there is enough uncertainty about precisely when inclusions nucleate and begin to grow that one should not put too much reliance on the quantitative results. This work does provide a

  9. Impurity-induced tuning of quantum-well States in spin-dependent resonant tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, Alan; Coho, A; Kioussis, Nicholas; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Chshiev, M; Granovsky, A

    2004-07-23

    We report exact model calculations of the spin-dependent tunneling in double magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of impurities in the well. We show that the impurity can tune selectively the spin channels giving rise to a wide variety of interesting and novel transport phenomena. The tunneling magnetoresistance, the spin polarization, and the local current can be dramatically enhanced or suppressed by impurities. The underlying mechanism is the impurity-induced shift of the quantum well states (QWSs), which depends on the impurity potential, impurity position, and the symmetry of the QWS. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  10. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Emanuel; Werner, Philipp; Fuchs, Sebastian; Surer, Brigitte; Pruschke, Thomas; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers are algorithms that sample the partition function of an impurity model using diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques. The present paper describes codes that implement the interaction expansion algorithm originally developed by Rubtsov, Savkin, and Lichtenstein, as well as the hybridization expansion method developed by Werner, Millis, Troyer, et al. These impurity solvers are part of the ALPS-DMFT application package and are accompanied by an implementation of dynamical mean-field self-consistency equations for (single orbital single site) dynamical mean-field problems with arbitrary densities of states. Program summaryProgram title: dmft Catalogue identifier: AEIL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: ALPS LIBRARY LICENSE version 1.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 899 806 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 153 916 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: The ALPS libraries have been tested on the following platforms and compilers: Linux with GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher), and Intel C++ Compiler (icc version 7.0 and higher) MacOS X with GNU Compiler (g++ Apple-version 3.1, 3.3 and 4.0) IBM AIX with Visual Age C++ (xlC version 6.0) and GNU (g++ version 3.1 and higher) compilers Compaq Tru64 UNIX with Compq C++ Compiler (cxx) SGI IRIX with MIPSpro C++ Compiler (CC) HP-UX with HP C++ Compiler (aCC) Windows with Cygwin or coLinux platforms and GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher) RAM: 10 MB-1 GB Classification: 7.3 External routines: ALPS [1], BLAS/LAPACK, HDF5 Nature of problem: (See [2].) Quantum impurity models describe an atom or molecule embedded in a host material with which it can exchange electrons. They are basic to nanoscience as

  11. Impurity transport calculations for the limiter shadow region of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1981-01-01

    Impurity transport calculations are presented for the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with a poloidal ring limiter. The theory is based on the drift-kinetic equations for the impurity ions in their different ionization states. It is developed in the limit of low impurity concentrations under due consideration of electron impact ionization, Coulomb collisions with hydrogen ions streaming onto a neutralizing surface, a convection along the magnetic field, and a radial drift. The background plasma and the impurity sources at the walls enter the theory as input parameters. Numerical results are given for the radial profiles of density, temperature, particle flux, and energy flux of wall-released impurity ions as well as for the screening efficiency of the scrape-off layer neglecting impurity re-emission from the limiter. (author)

  12. Radiation-chemical disinfection of dissolved impurities and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities formed in the production processes of different materials, while modern plants being in use, is considered. For the first time the processes of deep industrial waste detoxication and due to this peculiarities of practically thorough neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities are considered. Attention is paid to devices and economic factors of neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities. The role of radiation-chemical detoxication for environment protection is considered

  13. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Green, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  14. [Impurity removal technology of Tongan injection in liquid preparation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-fang; Wang, Xiu-hai; Bai, Wei-rong; Kang, Xiao-dong; Liu, Jun-chao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively remove the invalid impurities in Tongan injection, optimize the optimal parameters of the impurity removal technology of liquid mixing process, in this paper, taking Tongan injection as the research object, with the contents of celandine alkali, and sinomenine, solids reduction efficiency, and related substances inspection as the evaluation indexes, the removal of impurities and related substances by the combined process of refrigeration, coction and activated carbon adsorption were investigated, the feasibility of the impurity removal method was definited and the process parameters were optimized. The optimized process parameters were as follows: refrigerated for 36 h, boiled for 15 min, activated carbon dosage of 0.3%, temperature 100 degrees C, adsorption time 10 min. It can effectively remove the tannin, and other impurities, thus ensure the quality and safety of products.

  15. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented

  16. Identification and control of unspecified impurity in trimetazidine dihydrochloride tablet formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefri; Puspitasari, A. D.; Talpaneni, J. S. R.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    Trimetazidine dihydrochloride is an anti-ischemic metabolic agent which is used as drug for angina pectoris treatment. The drug substance monograph is available in European Pharmacopoeia and British Pharmacopoeia, while the drug product monograph is not available in any of the pharmacopoeias. During development of trimetazidine dihydrochloride tablet formulation, we found increase of an unspecified impurity during preliminary stability study. The unspecified impurity was identified by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the molecular weight obtained was matching with the molecular weight of N-formyl trimetazidine (m/z 295). Further experiments were performed to confirm the suspected result by injecting the impurity standard and spiking formic acid into the drug substance. The retention time of N-formyl trimetazidine was similar to the unspecified impurity in drug product. Even spiking of formic acid into drug substance showed that the suspected impurity increased with increasing concentration of formic acid. The proposed mechanism of impurity formation is via amidation of piperazine moiety of trimetazidine by formic acid which present as residual solvent in tablet binder used in the formulation. Subsequently, the impurity in our product was controlled by choosing the primary packaging which could minimize the formation of impurity.

  17. Investigation of the impurity transport in the ASDEX tokamak by spectroscopical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K.W.

    1990-12-01

    Plasma impurities: a central problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion; magnetic plasma confinement in a Tokamak; methods to the determination of plasma impurity transport coefficients - by temporally modulated gas admission; the transport equation for impurities; neoclassical and anomalous transport; harmonic analysis of time-dependent signals; solutions of the transport equation; experimental equipment and measurements; measuring results - consistency of simple transport models with radial phase measurements; linearity of the transport processes; plasma disturbance by impurity injection; determination of the diffusion coefficient by simplified transport models; comparison of transport models for impurities and background plasma; measurements of the impurity transport at the plasma edge by high modulation frequencies. (AH)

  18. Impurity effects of hydrogen isotope retention on boronized wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio

    2010-11-01

    The impurity effect on hydrogen isotopes retention in the boron film deposited in LHD was evaluated by means of XPS and TDS. It was found that the impurity concentrations in boron film were increased after H-H main plasma exposure in LHD. The ratio of hydrogen retention trapped by impurity to total hydrogen retention during H-H main plasma exposure was reached to 70%, although that of deuterium retention by impurity in D 2 + implanted LHD-boron film was about 35%. In addition, the dynamic chemical sputtering of hydrogen isotopes with impurity as the form of water and / or hydrocarbons was occurred by energetic hydrogen isotopes irradiation. It was expected that the enhancement of impurity concentration during plasma exposure in LHD would induce the dynamic formation of volatile molecules and their re-emission to plasma. These facts would prevent stable plasma operation in LHD, concluding that the dynamic impurity behavior in boron film during plasma exposure is one of key issues for the steady-state plasma operation in LHD. (author)

  19. High temperature water chemistry monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaltonen, P.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all corrosion phenomena in nuclear power plants can be prevented or at least damped by water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry control or by the change of water chemistry. Successful water chemistry control needs regular and continuous monitoring of such water chemistry parameters like dissolved oxygen content, pH, conductivity and impurity contents. Conventionally the monitoring is carried out at low pressures and temperatures, which method, however, has some shortcomings. Recently electrodes have been developed which enables the direct monitoring at operating pressures and temperatures. (author). 2 refs, 5 figs

  20. Effect of suprathermal electrons on the impurity ionization state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochando, M A; Medina, F; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J; Pedrosa, M A; Baciero, A; Rapisarda, D; Carmona, J M; Jimenez, D

    2006-01-01

    The effect of electron cyclotron resonance heating induced suprathermal electron tails on the ionization of iron impurities in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated. The behaviour of plasma emissivity immediately after injection provides evidence of a spatially localized 'shift' towards higher charge states of the impurity. Bearing in mind that the non-inductive plasma heating methods generate long lasting non-Maxwellian distribution functions, possible implications on the deduced impurity transport coefficients, when fast electrons are present, are discussed

  1. Impurity levels: corrections to the effective mass approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentosela, F.

    1977-07-01

    Some rigorous results concerning the effective mass approximation used for the calculation of the impurity levels in semiconductors are presented. Each energy level is expressed as an asymptotic series in the inverse of the dielectric constant K, in the case where the impurity potential is 1/μ

  2. On importance of impurities, potential leachables and extractables in algal nanocellulose for biomedical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Willför, Stefan; Mihranyan, Albert

    2017-09-15

    Nanocellulose-based biomaterials for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications have been extensively explored. However, studies on different levels of impurities in the nanocellulose and their potential risks are lacking. This article is the most comprehensive to date survey of the importance and characterization of possible leachables and extractables in nanocellulose for biomedical use. In particular, the (1,3)-β-d-glucan interference in endotoxin detection in algal nanocellulose was addressed. Potential lipophilic and hydrophilic leachables, toxic heavy metals, and microbial contaminants are also monitored. As a model system, nanocellulose from Cladophora sp. algae is investigated. The leachable (1,3)-β-d-glucan and endotoxin, which possess strong immunogenic potential, from the cellulose were minimized to clinically insignificant levels of 4.7μg/g and 2.5EU/g, respectively. The levels of various impurities in the Cladophora cellulose are acceptable for future biomedical applications. The presented approach could be considered as a guideline for other types of nanocellulose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. VUV study of impurity generation during ICRF heating experiments on the Alcator C tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, H.L.

    1986-06-01

    A 2.2 meter grazing incidence VUV monochromator has been converted into a time-resolving spectrograph by the addition of a new detector system, based on a microchannel plate image intensifier linked to a 1024-element linear photodiode array. The system covers the wavelength range 15 to 1200 A (typically 40 A at a time) with resolution of up to .3 A FWHM. Time resolution is selectable down to 0.5 msec. The system sensitivity was absolutely calibrated below 150 A by a soft x-ray calibration facility. The spectrograph was installed on the Alcator C tokamak at MIT to monitor plasma impurity emission. There, cross-calibration with a calibrated EUV monochromator was performed above 400 A. Calibration results, system performance characteristics, and data from Alcator C are presented. Observations of impurity behavior are presented from a series of ICRF heating experiments (180 MHz, 50 to 400 kW) performed on the Alcator C tokamak, using graphite limiters and stainless steel antenna Faraday shields

  4. Damping of elastic waves in crystals with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemanov, V.V.; Petrov, A.V.; Akhmedzhanov, F.R.; Nasyrov, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Elastic wave damping and thermal conductivity of NaCl-NaBr and Y 3 AL 5 O 12 crystals with Er impurity has been examined. The experimental results on a decrease in elastic wave damping in such crystals are analyzed in the framework of the Ahiezer damping theory. The measurements were made in the frequency range of 300-1500 MHz in propagation of longitudinal and transverse elastic waves along the [100] and [110] directions. At 10 % concentration of erbium impurity the transverse wave damping decreases by a factor of three, and for longitudinal waves by a factor of two in NaBr:Cl crystals, and by approximately 10 and 30 % for NaBr:Cl and Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Er crystals, respectively. In Y 3 Al 5 O 12 crystals, unlike NaCl-NaBr crystals, no noticeable anisotropy of damping is observed. The transVerse wave damping in impurity crystals has been shown to increase significantly with decreasing temperature and increasing the impurity concentration

  5. Separation and determination of synthetic impurities of difloxacin by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Nageswara; Nagaraju, V

    2004-11-19

    A simple and rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for separation and determination of process-related impurities of difloxacin (DFL) was developed. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C(18) column using methanol-water-acetic acid (78:21.9:0.1, v/v/v) as a mobile solvent at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min at 28 degrees C using UV detection at 230 nm. It was linear over a range of 0.03 x 10(-6) to 1.60 x 10(-6)g for process related impurities and 0.05 x 10(-6) to 2.40 x 10(-6)g for difloxacin. The detection limits were 0.009 x 10(-6) to 0.024 x 10(-6)g for all the compounds examined. The recoveries were found to be in the range of 97.6-102.0% for impurities as well as difloxacin. The precision and robustness of the method were evaluated. It was used for not only quality assurance, but also monitoring the synthetic reactions involved in the process development work of difloxacin. The method was found to be specific, precise and reliable for the determination of unreacted levels of raw materials, intermediates in the reaction mixtures and the finished products of difloxacin.

  6. Impurity investigations in the boundary layer of the DITE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.; Partridge, J.W.; Erents, S.K.; Sofield, C.J.; Ferguson, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The results obtained in the present investigation show large fluctuations both during discharges and from one discharge to the next. The radial density gradient of impurities in the boundary is not large. It is clear that the density and in particular dn/dt can have a strong effect on the impurity level. However there are apparently a number of other factors causing changes in impurity level which have not been well controlled in the present experiments. Possibilities include flaking from the walls, and changes in the level of the light impurities, oxygen and carbon, in the discharges. (orig./RW)

  7. Investigation of impurity-helium solid phase decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltnev, R.E.; Gordon, E.B.; Krushinskaya, I.N.; Martynenko, M.V.; Pel'menev, A.A.; Popov, E.A.; Khmelenko, V.V.; Shestakov, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    The element composition of the impurity-helium solid phase (IHSP), grown by injecting helium gas jet, involving Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and N 2 molecules, into superfluid helium, has been studied. The measured stoichiometric ratios, S = N H e / N I m, are well over the values expected from the model of frozen together monolayer helium clusters. The theoretical possibility for the freezing of two layers helium clusters is justified in the context of the model of IHSP helium subsystem, filled the space between rigid impurity centers. The process of decomposition of impurity-helium (IH)-samples taken out of liquid helium in the temperature range 1,5 - 12 K and the pressure range 10-500 Torr has been studied. It is found that there are two stages of samples decomposition: a slow stage characterized by sample self cooling and a fast one accompanied by heat release. These results suggest, that the IHSP consists of two types of helium - weakly bound and strongly bound helium - that can be assigned to the second and the first coordination helium spheres, respectively, formed around heavy impurity particles. A tendency for enhancement of IHSP thermo stability with increasing the impurity mass is observed. Increase of helium vapor pressure above the sample causes the improvement of IH sample stability. Upon destruction of IH samples, containing nitrogen atoms, a thermoluminescence induced by atom recombination has been detected in the temperature region 3-4,5 K. This suggests that numerous chemical reactions may be realized in solidified helium

  8. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, very high ion temperature plasmas were first produced in TFTR with co-injecting neutral beams in low current, low density plasmas. This mode of operation is called the energetic ion mode in which the plasma rotates at very high speed. It was found that heavy impurities injected into these plasmas diffused out very quickly. In this paper, the authors calculate the impurity ion orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma based on the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is shown that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. During impurity injection experiments, freshly ionized impurities near the plasma surface are essentially stationary in the laboratory frame and they are counter-rotating in the plasma frame with co-beam injection. The results are substantiated by numeral particle simulation. The computer code follows the impurity guiding center positions by integrating the equation of motion with the second order predictor-corrector method

  9. Resonant scattering on impurities in the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurvitz, A.

    1994-06-01

    We developed a new approach to carrier transport between the edge states via resonant scattering on impurities, which is applicable both for short and long range impurities. A detailed analysis of resonant scattering on a single impurity is performed. The results used for study of the inter-edge transport by multiple resonant hopping via different impurities' site. We found the total conductance can be obtained from an effective Schroedinger equation with constant diagonal matrix elements in the Hamiltonian, where the complex non-diagonal matrix elements are the amplitudes of a carrier hopping between different impurities. It is explicitly shown how the complex phase leads to Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the total conductance. Neglecting the contribution of self-crossing resonant-percolation trajectories, we found that the inter-edge carrier transport is similar to propagation in one-dimensional system with off-diagonal disorder. Then we demonstrated that each Landau band has an extended state Ε Ν , while all other states are localized, and the localization length behaves as L - 1 Ν (Ε) ∼ (Ε - Ε Ν ) 2 . (author)

  10. Harmful situations, impure people: an attribution asymmetry across moral domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroff, Alek; Young, Liane

    2015-03-01

    People make inferences about the actions of others, assessing whether an act is best explained by person-based versus situation-based accounts. Here we examine people's explanations for norm violations in different domains: harmful acts (e.g., assault) and impure acts (e.g., incest). Across four studies, we find evidence for an attribution asymmetry: people endorse more person-based attributions for impure versus harmful acts. This attribution asymmetry is partly explained by the abnormality of impure versus harmful acts, but not by differences in the moral wrongness or the statistical frequency of these acts. Finally, this asymmetry persists even when the situational factors that lead an agent to act impurely are stipulated. These results suggest that, relative to harmful acts, impure acts are linked to person-based attributions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Impurity strength and impurity domain modulated frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear response properties of doped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Nirmal Kumar [Department of Physics, Suri Vidyasagar College, Suri, Birbhum 731 101, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2011-08-15

    We explore the pattern of frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear optical responses of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots harmonically confined in two dimensions. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes a Gaussian form and it is doped into an on-center location. The quantum dot is subject to a periodically oscillating external electric field. For some fixed values of transverse magnetic field strength ({omega}{sub c}) and harmonic confinement potential ({omega}{sub 0}), the influence of impurity strength (V{sub 0}) and impurity domain ({xi}) on the diagonal components of the frequency-dependent linear ({alpha}{sub xx} and {alpha}{sub yy}) and second non-linear ({gamma}{sub xxxx} and {gamma}{sub yyyy}) responses of the dot are computed through a linear variational route. The investigations reveal that the optical responses undergo enhancement with increase in both V{sub 0} and {xi} values. However, in the limitingly small dopant strength regime one observes a drop in the optical responses with increase in V{sub 0}. A time-average rate of energy transfer to the system is often invoked to support the findings. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. sup 86 Rb(K) influx and ( sup 3 H)ouabain binding by human platelets: Evidence for beta-adrenergic stimulation of Na-K ATPase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turaihi, K.; Khokher, M.A.; Barradas, M.A.; Mikhailidis, D.P.; Dandona, P. (Royal Free Hospital and School of Medicine, London (England))

    1989-08-01

    Although active transport of potassium into human platelets has been demonstrated previously, there is hitherto no evidence that human platelets have an ouabain-inhibitable Na-K ATPase in their membrane. The present study demonstrates active rubidium (used as an index of potassium influx), {sup 86}Rb(K), influx into platelets, inhibitable by ouabain, and also demonstrates the presence of specific ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding by the human platelet. This {sup 86}Rb(K) influx was stimulated by adrenaline, isoprenaline, and salbutamol, but noradrenaline caused a mild inhibition. Active {sup 86}Rb(K) influx by platelets was inhibited markedly by timolol, mildly by atenolol, but not by phentolamine. Therefore, active {sup 86}Rb(K) influx in human platelets is enhanced by stimulation of beta adrenoceptors of the beta 2 subtype. The platelet may therefore replace the leukocyte in future studies of Na-K ATPase activity. This would be a considerable advantage in view of the ease and rapidity of preparation of platelets.

  13. Boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in GeC nanoribbons: A first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhuo; Li, Yangping, E-mail: liyp@nwpu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhengtang

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. • The impurities could result in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR. • The impurities turns the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR into semiconductor. • The impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR. • The impurities could introduce magnetic moments into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory we investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of substitutional boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in germanium carbide (GeC) nanoribbons. Hydrogen terminated GeC ribbons with armchair and zigzag edges are considered here. We observed that all three impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. In addition, the electronic band structures of the doped systems indicate that (i) the impurities could introduce impurity bands in the band gap and resulting in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR, (ii) the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR turns into semiconductor because of the incorporation of the impurities, (iii) the impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR and even introduce magnetic moment into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR.

  14. Identification and Structural Characterization of Unidentified Impurity in Bisoprolol Film-Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Mitrevska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the identification, structural characterization, and qualification of a degradation impurity of bisoprolol labeled as Impurity RRT 0.95. This degradation product is considered as a principal thermal degradation impurity identified in bisoprolol film-coated tablets. The impurity has been observed in the stress thermal degradation study of the drug product. Using HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS method, a tentative structure was assigned and afterwards confirmed by detailed structural characterization using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the target Impurity RRT 0.95 was elucidated as phosphomonoester of bisoprolol, having relative molecular mass of 406 (positive ionization mode. The structural characterization was followed by qualification of Impurity RRT 0.95 using several different in silico methodologies. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that no new structural alerts have been generated for Impurity RRT 0.95 relative to the parent compound bisoprolol. The current study presents an in-depth analysis of the full characterization and qualification of an unidentified impurity in a drug product with the purpose of properly defining the quality specification of the product.

  15. Characterization of intermittency of impurity turbulent transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical properties of impurity transport of a tokamak edge plasma embedded in a dissipative drift-wave turbulence are investigated using structure function analysis. The impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma flow. Two cases of impurity advection are studied and compared: A decaying impurities case (given by a diffusion-advection equation) and a driven case (forced by a mean scalar gradient). The use of extended self-similarity enables us to show that the relative scaling exponent of structure functions of impurity density and vorticity exhibit similar multifractal scaling in the decaying case and follows the She-Leveque model. However, this property is invalidated for the impurity driven advection case. For both cases, potential fluctuations are self-similar and exhibit a monofractal scaling in agreement with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan theory for two-dimensional turbulence. These results obtained with a passive scalar model agree also with test-particle simulations.

  16. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  17. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  18. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  19. The effect of resonant magnetic perturbations on the impurity transport in TEXTOR-DED plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiche, Albert Josef

    2009-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion provides a new mechanism for the generation of electrical power which has the perspective to serve humanity for several millions of years. One possibility to implement fusion on earth is to magnetically confine hot deuterium tritium plasmas in so called tokamaks. The fusion reactions take place in the hot plasma core. Each of the fusion reactions between deuterium and tritium yields 17.6 MeV which can be used in the process of generating electrical power. Impurities contaminate the plasma which then is cooled down and diluted. This leads to a reduction of the fusion reactions and in consequence the energy yield. The transport behaviour of the impurities in the plasma is not fully understood up to now. Nevertheless, experiments have shown that the application of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP) can control the impurity content in the plasma. The dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) on the tokamak Textor is able to induce static and dynamic RMPs. During the application of RMPs transient impurity transport experiments with argon have been performed and the time evolution of the impurity concentrations have been monitored. The line emission intensity of the impurities in the plasma is measured in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and in the soft X-ray (SXR) with the absolutely calibrated VUV spectrometer Hexos and SXR PIN diodes, respectively. The analysis of the transient impurity transport experiments is performed with the help of the transport code Strahl. The impurity flows in Strahl are described by a combination of a diffusive and a convective flow. In the computing process the code solves the coupled set of continuity equations of each of the ionization stages of an impurity. With this method the time evolution of the impurity ion densities and the line emission intensities of the ionization stages can be computed. The adaption to the experimental measurements is performed with the help of the diffusion coefficient and the drift velocity which

  20. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  1. Sodium sampling and impurities determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, J.; Kovar, C.; Stuchlik, S.

    1980-01-01

    Samples may be obtained from tubes in-built in the sodium facility and further processed or they are taken into crucibles, stored and processed later. Another sampling method is a method involving vacuum distillation of sodium, thus concentrating impurities. Oxygen is determined by malgamation, distillation or vanadium balance methods. Hydrogen is determined by the metal diaphragm extraction, direct extraction or amalgamation methods. Carbon is determined using dry techniques involving burning a sodium sample at 1100 degC or using wet techniques by dissolving the sample with an acid. Trace amounts of metal impurities are determined after dissolving sodium in ethanol. The trace metals are concentrated and sodium excess is removed. (M.S.)

  2. Influence of the impurity-defect and impurity-impurity interactions on the crystalline silicon solar cells conversion efficiency; Influence des interactions impurete-defaut et impurete-impurete sur le rendement de conversion des cellules photovoltaiques au silicium cristallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, S

    2007-05-15

    This study aims at understanding the influence of the impurity - defect interaction on the silicon solar cell performances. We studied first the case of single-crystalline silicon. We combined numerical simulations and experimental data providing new knowledge concerning metal impurities in silicon, to quantify the evolution of the conversion efficiency with the impurity concentration. Mainly due to the gettering effects, iron appears to be quite well tolerated. It is not the case for gold, diffusing too slowly. Hydrogenation effects were limited. We transposed then this study toward multi-crystalline silicon. Iron seems rather well tolerated, due to the gettering effects but also due to the efficiency of the hydrogenation. When slow diffusers are present, multi crystalline silicon is sensitive to thermal degradation. n-type silicon could solve this problem, this material being less sensitive to metal impurities. (author)

  3. Impurity states in two - and three-dimensional disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.F. da; Fabbri, M.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the impurity states in two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3d) disordered systems. A cluster model is outlined for the donor impurity density of states (DIDS) of doped semiconductors. It is shown that the impurity states are very sensitive to a change in the dimensionality of the system, i.e from 3D to 2D system. It is found that all eigenstates become localized in 2D disordered system for a large range of concentration. (Author) [pt

  4. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  5. Impurity states in two-and three-dimensional disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.F. da; Fabbri, M.

    1984-04-01

    The microscopic structure of the impurity states in two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) disordered systems is investigated. A cluster model is outlined for the donor impurity density of states (DIDS) of doped semiconductors. It is shown that the impurity states are very sensitive to a change in the dimensionality of the system, i.e., from 3D to 2D system. It is found that all eigenstates become localized in 2D disordered system for a large range of concentration. (Author) [pt

  6. Effect of HEH[EHP] impurities on the ALSEP solvent extraction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holfeltz, Vanessa E. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Campbell, Emily L. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Peterman, Dean R. [Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA; Standaert, Robert F. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Department of Biochemistry & amp, Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Biology & amp, Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Shull Wollan Center — a Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Paulenova, Alena [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Lumetta, Gregg J. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA

    2017-12-20

    In solvent extraction processes, organic phase impurities can negatively impact separation factors, hydrolytic performance, and overall system robustness. This affects the process-level viability of a separation concept and necessitates knowledge of the behavior and mechanisms to control impurities in the solvent. The most widespread way through which impurities are introduced into a system is through impure extractants and/or diluents used to prepare the solvent, and often development of new purification schemes to achieve the desired level of purity is needed. In this work, the acidic extractant, 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP])—proposed for application in extractive processes aimed at separating trivalent minor actinides from lanthanides and other fission products—is characterized with respect to its common impurities and their impact on Am(III) stripping in the Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) system. To control impurities in HEH[EHP], existing purification technologies commonly applied for the acidic organophosphorus reagents are reviewed, and a new method specific to HEH[EHP] purification is presented.

  7. Tight-Binding Description of Impurity States in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Adame, F.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory textbooks in solid state physics usually present the hydrogenic impurity model to calculate the energy of carriers bound to donors or acceptors in semiconductors. This model treats the pure semiconductor as a homogeneous medium and the impurity is represented as a fixed point charge. This approach is only valid for shallow impurities…

  8. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  9. [On the origin, course and influx-vessels of the V. basalis and the V. cerebri interna (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J; Köth, R; Reiss, G

    1981-01-01

    Origin, course and influx-vessels of the basal vein are investigated on 100 brains. An anterior formation of the basal vein (textbook) was found in 41%, a posterior formation in 34%. The different possibilities of drainage are examined procentually at the different types. Course and number of the different variations of the influx-vessels are taken into account: Vv. thalamostriata inferiores, gyri olfactorii, ventricularis inferior, peduncularis, cerebri interna, thalamostriata superioris, (terminalis), septi pellucidi anterior, septi pellucidi posterior, atrii medialis, atrii lateralis, nuclei caudati.

  10. STM tunneling through a quantum wire with a side-attached impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwapinski, T.; Krawiec, M.; Jalochowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    The STM tunneling through a quantum wire (QW) with a side-attached impurity (atom, island) is investigated using a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green function method. The impurity can be coupled to one or more QW atoms. The presence of the impurity strongly modifies the local density of states of the wire atoms, thus influences the STM tunneling through all the wire atoms. The transport properties of the impurity itself are also investigated mainly as a function of the wire length and the way it is coupled to the wire. It is shown that the properties of the impurity itself and the way it is coupled to the wire strongly influence the STM tunneling, the density of states and differential conductance

  11. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  12. Properties of magnetic impurities embedded into an anisotropic Heisenberg chain with spin gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a U(1)-invariant model consisting of the integrable anisotropic easy-axis Heisenberg chain of arbitrary spin S embedding an impurity of spin S'. The host chain has a spin gap for all values of S. The ground state properties and the elementary excitations of the host are studied as a function of the anisotropy and the magnetic field. The impurity is located on a link of the chain and interacts only with both neighboring sites. The coupling of the impurity to the lattice can be tuned by the impurity rapidity p 0 (usually playing the role of the Kondo coupling). The impurity model is then integrable as a function of two continuous parameters (the anisotropy and the impurity rapidity) and two discrete variables (the spins S and S'). The Bethe ansatz equations are derived and used to obtain the magnetization of the impurity. The impurity magnetization is non-universal as a function of p 0 . For small fields the impurity magnetization is determined by the spin gap and the van Hove singularity of the rapidity band. For an overcompensated impurity (S'< S) at intermediate fields there is a crossover to non-Fermi-liquid behavior remnant from the suppressed quantum critical point

  13. Impurity production and transport at the JET belt limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; McCracken, G.M.; Strangeby, P.C.; Toronto Univ., ON; Summers, D.D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Under certain operating conditions in JET the impurity content of the discharge can be high, thus reducing the fusion reaction rate through the dilution of the hydrogenic fuel. The dilution in most discharges is predominantly due to carbon impurities. In order to understand how carbon impurities are produced and transported into the plasma, detailed measurements with interference filters centered on intense spectral lines of the low ionization states of carbon (C I, C II, C III) as well as the fuel species (Dα) and helium (He I). (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  14. Hopping conductivity via deep impurity states in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Messerer, M.A.; Omel'yanovskij, Eh.M.

    1984-01-01

    Hopping (epsilon 3 ) and Mott conductivities via deep impurity compounds with localization radius below 10 A have been studied using as an example Mn in InP. It is shown, that the existing theory of hopping conductivity in low-alloyed semiconductors with Na 3 << 1 can be Used for the case of deep centres as successfully as for the case of insignificant hydrogen-like impurities. Fundamental parameters of the theory: localization radius of wave function of deep impurities, state density near the Fermi level, mean hop length, are determined

  15. The impact of impurities on long-term PEMFC performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopes, Thiago [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sansinena, Jose - Maria [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kienitz, Brian [LLNL

    2009-06-23

    Electrochemical experimentation and modeling indicates that impurities degrade fuel cell performance by a variety of mechanisms. Electrokinetics may be inhibited by catalytic site poisoning from sulfur compounds and CO and by decreased local proton activity and mobility caused by the presence of foreign salt cations or ammonia. Cation impurity profiles vary with current density, valence and may change local conductivity and water concentrations in the ionomer. Nitrogen oxides and ammonia species may be electrochemically active under fuel cell operating conditions. The primary impurity removal mechanisms are electrooxidation and water fluxes through the fuel cell.

  16. Behavior of arsenic impurity at antimony electric precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.N.; Rakhmanov, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the arsenic impurity electrochemical behavior and it purification from antimony by electric precipitation out of fluoride solutions was studied. For this the arsenic sample with mass 0.003-0.006 g has been irradiated at the WWR-SM nuclear reactor during 3-5 hour in the thermal neutron flux 10 13 n/cm 2 s, after 24 h keeping the sample has being dissolved in the concentrated nitric acid, and then it has been evaporated several times with distillation water addition up to wet precipitation state. It is shown, that arsenic impurity behavior character in the antimony electric precipitation out to fluoride electrolyte depends on the electrolyte content, electrolysis conditions, arsenic valency state in arsenic impurity existence in the five-valency state its joint electric reduction with antimony is practically not observing. In the case the arsenic being in three-valency state, it joint electric reduction with antimony is taking place. In this time the electrolytic antimony contents arsenic impurities less in dozen time than initial material

  17. Quenching of overcompensated Kondo impurities via channel asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.; Lee, K.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron Γ 8 into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect and to the application of an external magnetic field in the electron assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential. We study the ground-state properties of the impurity as a function of the magnetic and crystalline fields. The crystalline field quenches the critical behavior of the overcompensated fixed point: The impurity ground state is a singlet. (orig.)

  18. A one-dimensional plasma and impurity transport model for reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1991-11-01

    In this thesis a one-dimensional (1-D) plasma and impurity transport model is developed to address issues related to impurity behavior in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) fusion plasmas. A coronal non-equilibrium model is used for impurities. The impurity model is incorporated into an existing one dimensional plasma transport model creating a multi-species plasma transport model which treats the plasma and impurity evolution self-consistently. Neutral deuterium particles are treated using a one-dimensional (slab) model of neutral transport. The resulting mode, RFPBI, is then applied to existing RFP devices such as ZT-40M and MST, and also to examine steady state behavior of ZTH based on the design parameters. A parallel algorithm for the impurity transport equations is implemented and tested to determine speedup and efficiency

  19. Computers in the investigation of the impurity content of high-purity materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Yu.B.; Yan'kov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of the concept of data banks for the accumulation and processing of information is now generally acknowledged. In scientific investigations not only bibliographic but also factual data banks are becoming more and more prevalent. In this article, the authors consider the possibilities of providing a data bank on high-purity materials for the study of impurity contents. Also in this paper, the authors distinguish the following groups of problems that arise in the study of impurity composition and presents examples of their proposed solutions to these problems: the analysis of error and the determination of the most probably value of impurity concentration; the estimation of average properties of impurity composition with respect to groups of impurities and samples, and the forecast of the complete impurity composition

  20. Impurity binding energy for δ-doped quantum well structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Calculations are made for the case of not so big impurity concentrations, when impurity bands are not .... Blom et al (2003), but our data correspond qualitatively to Bastard's .... 0113U000612 and by Ukrainian Ministry of Education and Science ...

  1. Summary of IAEA technical committee meeting on impurity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka.

    1989-03-01

    Presentations given in the IAEA technical committee meeting on impurity control (held in JAERI from 13 to 15 February, 1989) are summarized, putting the emphasis on the physics modelling of the plasma related to the impurity production and confinement. (author)

  2. Purification of simple substances by distillation with impurity hydrothermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnik, O.N.; Nisel'son, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    A possibility of applying distillation method in water vapours for purification of simple substances from impurities is studied. Based on thermodynamic analysis of interaction processes in E-H 2 O system, conducted using a computer, it is as certained that SS, Se, Te, As, Cd, Hg can be purified from the majority of the impurities analysed by distillation in a water vapour flow. Behaviour of Zn, C, Ge, Al, Sb characteristic impurities under cadmium, arsenic and tellurium distillation is studied. Experiments on cadmium, arsenic and tellurium purification have confirmed, that distillation with hydrothermal oxidation of Zn, C, Ge impurities sometimes appears to be a more effective method as compared to distillation in a hydrogen flow

  3. The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalili, Seifollah [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjalili@nano.ipm.ac.ir; Majidi, Roya [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-10-01

    The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO is investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local-orbitals method based on density functional theory. The electronic band structures and density of states of MgO in the presence of Ca, Li, and Na impurities were calculated. It is found that increasing the amount of Ca impurity decreases the energy band gap and increases the width of the upper part of the valence band. Some of the considered impurities (Li and Na) change the electronic properties of MgO extensively.

  4. The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Majidi, Roya

    2008-01-01

    The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO is investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local-orbitals method based on density functional theory. The electronic band structures and density of states of MgO in the presence of Ca, Li, and Na impurities were calculated. It is found that increasing the amount of Ca impurity decreases the energy band gap and increases the width of the upper part of the valence band. Some of the considered impurities (Li and Na) change the electronic properties of MgO extensively

  5. Device for separating, purifying and recovering nuclear fuel material, impurities and materials from impurity-containing nuclear fuel materials or nuclear fuel containing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate, purify and recover nuclear fuel materials, impurities and materials with no formation of liquid wastes. Constitution: Oxidizing atmosphere gases are introduced from both ends of a heating furnace. Vessels containing impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing material are continuously disposed movably from one end to the other of the heating furnace. Then, impurity oxides or material oxides selectively evaporated from the impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing materials are entrained in the oxidizing atmosphere gas and the gases are led out externally from a discharge port opened at the intermediate portion of the heating furnace, filters are disposed to the exit to solidify and capture the nuclear fuel substances and traps are disposed behind the filters to solidify and capture the oxides by spontaneous air cooling or water cooling. (Sekiya, K.)

  6. Helium impurities in a PNP-primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, M.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of impurities to be expected have been defined in consideration of recent findings concerning the rates of infiltration and formation and the reaction mechanisms of the impurity components in the circuit. The data obtained correspond with the requirements on the metallic high-temperature components as well as with the requirements of limited graphite corrosion. (DG) [de

  7. Determining factors for the presence of impurities in selectively collected biowaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi; Freire-González, Jaume; Jofra-Sora, Marta

    2013-05-01

    The presence of impurities in biodegradable waste (biowaste) causes problems with the management of waste, among which are additional costs derived from the need to improve pre-treatment of biowaste, loss of treatment capacity and the difficulty selling treated biowaste as compost owing to its low quality. When treated biowaste is used for soil conditioning it can also cause soil pollution. Understanding the reasons why impurities are in biowaste and the factors affecting the percentage of impurities present can be used to determine ways to minimise these negative effects. This article attempts to identify the main causes for the presence of impurities in biowaste. In order to do so, it carries out an empirical analysis of the level of impurities in biowaste from municipal waste collection in two steps. First, a bivariate analysis focuses on significant correlations between the presence of impurities and several variables. Second, the construction of an explanatory model based on the significant relations obtained in the first step, and on literature research, are used to check the stated hypothesis. The estimates demonstrate that the collection system, the global levels of separate collection, the urban density of the municipality and the requirement to use compostable bags may be the main drivers of impurity levels in biowaste.

  8. Quasiparticle Properties of a Mobile Impurity in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rasmus Søgaard; Levinsen, Jesper; Bruun, Georg M

    2015-10-16

    We develop a systematic perturbation theory for the quasiparticle properties of a single impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Analytical results are derived for the impurity energy, effective mass, and residue to third order in the impurity-boson scattering length. The energy is shown to depend logarithmically on the scattering length to third order, whereas the residue and the effective mass are given by analytical power series. When the boson-boson scattering length equals the boson-impurity scattering length, the energy has the same structure as that of a weakly interacting Bose gas, including terms of the Lee-Huang-Yang and fourth order logarithmic form. Our results, which cannot be obtained within the canonical Fröhlich model of an impurity interacting with phonons, provide valuable benchmarks for many-body theories and for experiments.

  9. Parametric dependences of impurity transport in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisot, Th.

    2007-09-01

    During this Ph.D. work, a full setup of tools for an experimental investigation of impurity transport has been developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. It includes a laser blow-off system for metallic impurity injections and developments for ITC (Impurity Transport Code), a transport code which allows the extraction of the experimental impurity transport coefficients (diffusion and convection velocity). This tool has been used to perform and analyse several experiments, to evidence parametric dependences of impurity transport. In a first experiment, a confinement time law for nickel in Tore Supra has been obtained as a function of collisionality ν * and normalized Larmor radius ρ * . Then the impurity charge Z role has been investigated in various conditions: ohmic regime with or without sawteeth, and sawtooth less L-mode with LH power. No Z effect is observed, consistently with theoretical predictions, whether neoclassical (NCLASS) or for turbulent transport with both non linear gyro-fluid (TRB) and quasilinear gyrokinetic (QuaLiKiz) simulations. An exception is found for LH heated plasmas where the confinement time seems to decrease for the heaviest impurities. This is not explained by any model available. The observed transport is close to neoclassical between sawtooth relaxations, in the centre (r q-1 ) of ohmic plasmas, turbulent outside. Without sawteeth, it is turbulent in the whole plasma, for ohmic or L mode discharges. The profile shape of the diffusion coefficient is here qualitatively different, with a stronger and deeper transition between the low diffusion central region and a more turbulent peripheral region for LH heated plasmas. (author)

  10. Organic impurity profiling of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) synthesised from catechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Erin; Shimmon, Ronald; McDonagh, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    This work examines the organic impurity profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that has been synthesised from catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), a common chemical reagent available in industrial quantities. The synthesis of MDMA from catechol proceeded via the common MDMA precursor safrole. Methylenation of catechol yielded 1,3-benzodioxole, which was brominated and then reacted with magnesium allyl bromide to form safrole. Eight organic impurities were identified in the synthetic safrole. Safrole was then converted to 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl-2-propanone (MDP2P) using two synthetic methods: Wacker oxidation (Route 1) and an isomerisation/peracid oxidation/acid dehydration method (Route 2). MDMA was then synthesised by reductive amination of MDP2P. Thirteen organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 1 and eleven organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 2. Overall, organic impurities in MDMA prepared from catechol indicated that synthetic safrole was used in the synthesis. The impurities also indicated which of the two synthetic routes was utilised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

  12. Magnetic impurity coupled to interacting conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, T.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a magnetic impurity which interacts by hybridization with a system of weakly correlated electrons and determine the energy of the ground state by means of a 1/N f expansion. The correlations among the conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard Hamiltonian and are treated to the lowest order in the interaction strength. We find that their effect on the Kondo temperature, T K , in the Kondo limit is twofold: first, the position of the impurity level is shifted due to the reduction of charge fluctuations, which reduces T K . Secondly, the bare Kondo exchange coupling is enhanced as spin fluctuations are enlarged. In total, T K increases. Both corrections require intermediate states beyond the standard Varma-Yafet ansatz. This shows that the Hubbard interaction does not just provide quasiparticles, which hybridize with the impurity, but also renormalizes the Kondo coupling. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Influence of impurities on the surface morphology of the TIBr crystal semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Robinson A. dos; Silva, Julio B. Rodrigues da; Martins, Joao F.T.; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Costa, Fabio E. da; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M.; Gennari, Roseli F.

    2013-01-01

    The impurity effect in the surface morphology quality of TlBr crystals was evaluated, aiming a future application of these crystals as room temperature radiation semiconductor detectors. The crystals were purified and grown by the Repeated Bridgman technique. Systematic measurements were carried out for determining the stoichiometry, structure orientation, surface morphology and impurity of the crystal. A significant difference in the crystals impurity concentration was observed for almost all impurities, compared to those found in the raw material. The crystals wafer grown twice showed a surface roughness and grains which may be due to the presence of impurities on the surface, while those obtained with crystals grown three times presented a more uniform surface: even though, a smaller roughness was still observed. It was demonstrated that the impurities affect strongly the surface morphology quality of crystals. (author)

  14. Stacking change in MoS2 bilayers induced by interstitial Mo impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Natalia; Rosales, Luis; Orellana, Pedro A; Ayuela, Andrés; González, Jhon W

    2018-02-01

    We use a theoretical approach to reveal the electronic and structural properties of molybdenum impurities between MoS 2 bilayers. We find that interstitial Mo impurities are able to reverse the well-known stability order of the pristine bilayer, because the most stable form of stacking changes from AA' (undoped) into AB' (doped). The occurrence of Mo impurities in different positions shows their split electronic levels in the energy gap, following octahedral and tetrahedral crystal fields. The energy stability is related to the accommodation of Mo impurities compacted in hollow sites between layers. Other less stable configurations for Mo dopants have larger interlayer distances and band gaps than those for the most stable stacking. Our findings suggest possible applications such as exciton trapping in layers around impurities, and the control of bilayer stacking by Mo impurities in the growth process.

  15. Phase transition in one Josephson junction with a side-coupled magnetic impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Jiang, Cui; Yi, Guang-Yu; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2018-04-01

    This work focuses on one Josephson junction with a side-coupled magnetic impurity. And then, the Josephson phase transition is theoretically investigated, with the help of the exact diagonalization approach. It is found that even in the absence of intradot Coulomb interaction, the magnetic impurity can efficiently induce the phenomenon of Josephson phase transition, which is tightly related to the spin correlation manners (i.e., ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic) between the impurity and the junction. Moreover, the impurity plays different roles when it couples to the dot and superconductor, respectively. This work can be helpful in describing the influence of one magnetic impurity on the supercurrent through the Josephson junction.

  16. The influence of optical parameters on impurity determinations by IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    The important role of impurities in semiconductor materials is the subject of continuous research. The concentration of interstitial oxygen impurities in silicon are determined with the aid of infrared spectroscopy. The maximum absorption coefficient of the oxygen absorption peak, centered at 9,06 μm, is determined and the impurity concentration is then calculated using a calibration factor. This procedure was evaluated, paying particular attention to those optical parameters which may influence these impurity determinations. A thorough discussion of the theoretical and experimental aspects of infrared spectroscopy in general is followed by an overview of previous experimental work. This lead to some theoretical analysis regarding the influence of the index of refraction, the index of absorption and multiple reflections in the silicon wafer on impurity determinations. This lead to specific experimental investigations. The influence of the surface morphology of samples on impurity determinations was studied by determining the reflectance of silicon surfaces. It was established that the surface reflectance plays a role and that it must be taken into consideration for accurate impurity concentration determinations. The most accurate values for the absorption coefficient due to oxygen in silicon are calculated. This requires that the surface of the silicon wafers must be highly polished for the formula to be valid. Acceptable values for the absorption coefficient of damaged surfaces are obtained if the uncorrected formula is used. Experimental results may deviate as much as 32% from the real impurity concentration if the wrong formula is used to calculate the absorption coefficient of oxygen in silicon at 9,06 μm

  17. On the radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities on snowpack evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Tuzet, F.; Lafaysse, M.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Lejeune, Y.; Lamare, M.; Morin, S.; Voisin, D.; Di Mauro, B.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of light absorbing impurities in snow strongly decreases snow reflectance leading to an increase in the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. This effect is also known as impurities direct radiative effect. The change in the amount of energy absorbed by the snowpack modifies the temperature profile inside the snowpack and in turn snow metamorphism (impurities indirect radiative effects). In this work, we used the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus with an explicit representation of snow light-absorbing impurities content (Tuzet et al., 2017) fed by medium-resolution ALADIN-Climate atmospheric model to represent dust and black carbon atmospheric deposition fluxes. The model is used at two sites: Col de Porte (medium elevation site in the French Alps) and Torgnon (high elevation site in the Italian Alps). The simulations are compared to in-situ observations and used to quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow melt rate and timing. The respective parts of the direct and indirect radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow are also computed for the two sites, emphasizing the need to account for the interactions between snow metamorphism and LAI radiative properties, to accurately predict the effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow. Moreover, we describe how automated hyperspectral reflectance can be used to estimate effective impurities surface content in snow. Finally we demonstrate how these reflectances measurements either from in situ or satellite data can be used via an assimilation scheme to constrain snowpack ensemble simulations and better predict the snowpack state and evolution.

  18. Steady-state organization of binary mixtures by active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Gilhøj, Henriette; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    The structural reorganization of a phase-separated binary mixture in the presence of an annealed dilution of active impurities is studied by computer-simulation techniques via a simple two-dimensional lattice-gas model. The impurities, each of which has two internal states with different affinity...

  19. Identification of impurities in sodium and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, B.I.; Voltchkov, L.G.; Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Kuznetsov, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents some investigation results on sodium technology. In particular, a description is given of a calculation method for evaluation of sodium-cover gas-impurities equilibrium compositions as well as experimental results on development of methods for sodium sampling, equipment for non-metallic impurities (oxygen, hydrogen, carbon) constant control in sodium. The investigation results on sodium purification with cold traps are presented

  20. Spectroscopical studies of impurities in the belt pinch HECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singethan, J.

    1981-04-01

    In this paper UV-line-intensity measurements of impurities are presented, which have been performed in the belt-pinch HECTOR. From the line-intensities impurity concentrations and information on the radiation losses is be obtained. At temperatures below 100 eV, the energy loss due to line emission of oxygen and carbon impurities is one of the most important electron energy loss mechanisms. Thus the measurement and calculation of the radiation losses is of particular relevance. Furthermore the electron temperature time dependence can be obtained by comparing the line intensity time dependence with the solution of the respective rate equations. (orig./HT) [de

  1. Atomic Physics in the Quest for Fusion Energy and ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    The urgent quest for new energy sources has led developed countries, representing over half of the world population, to collaborate on demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of magnetic fusion through the construction and operation of ITER. Data on high-Z ions will be important in this quest. Tungsten plasma facing components have the necessary low erosion rates and low tritium retention but the high radiative efficiency of tungsten ions leads to stringent restrictions on the concentration of tungsten ions in the burning plasma. The influx of tungsten to the burning plasma will need to be diagnosed, understood and stringently controlled. Expanded knowledge of the atomic physics of neutral and ionized tungsten will be important to monitor impurity influxes and derive tungsten concentrations. Also, inert gases such as argon and xenon will be used to dissipate the heat flux flowing to the divertor. This article will summarize the spectroscopic diagnostics planned for ITER and outline areas where additional data is needed.

  2. Impurity effects on the magnetic ordering in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, R.S.

    1992-05-01

    It is well-known that impurities profoundly alter the magnetic properties of chromium. While vanadium impurities suppress the Neel temperature T N , manganese impurities enhanced T N substantially. As evidenced by neutron scattering experiments, doping with as little as 0.2% vanadium changes the transition from weakly first order to second order. Young and Sokoloff explained that the first-order transition in pure chromium is caused by a charge-density wave which is the second harmonic of the spin-density wave. By examining the subtle balance between the spin-density and charge- density wave terms in the mean-field free energy, we find that the first-order transition is destroyed when the vanadium concentration exceeds about 0.15%, in agreement with experiments

  3. Impurity Effects in Electroplated-Copper Solder Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu electroplating is a mature technology, and has been extensively applied in microelectronic industry. With the development of advanced microelectronic packaging, Cu electroplating encounters new challenges for atomic deposition on a non-planar substrate and to deliver good throwing power and uniform deposit properties in a high-aspect-ratio trench. The use of organic additives plays an important role in modulating the atomic deposition to achieve successful metallic coverage and filling, which strongly relies on the adsorptive and chemical interactions among additives on the surface of growing film. However, the adsorptive characteristic of organic additives inevitably results in an incorporation of additive-derived impurities in the electroplated Cu film. The incorporation of high-level impurities originating from the use of polyethylene glycol (PEG and chlorine ions significantly affects the microstructural evolution of the electroplated Cu film, and the electroplated-Cu solder joints, leading to the formation of undesired voids at the joint interface. However, the addition of bis(3-sulfopropyl disulfide (SPS with a critical concentration suppresses the impurity incorporation and the void formation. In this article, relevant studies were reviewed, and the focus was placed on the effects of additive formula and plating parameters on the impurity incorporation in the electroplated Cu film, and the void formation in the solder joints.

  4. Two-dimensional impurity transport calculations for a high recycling divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    Two dimensional analysis of impurity transport in a high recycling divertor shows asymmetric particle fluxes to the divertor plate, low helium pumping efficiency, and high scrapeoff zone shielding for sputtered impurities

  5. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  6. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and... degradation of less than 10 percent in a 30-day period. (b) Contaminants and impurities. The presence in any...

  7. Effects of electronically neutral impurities on muonium in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clawson, C.W.; Crowe, K.M.; Haller, E.E.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Brewer, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    Low-temperature measurements of muonium parameters in various germanium crystals have been performed. We have measured crystals with different levels of neutral impurities, with and without dislocations, and with different annealing histories. The most striking result is the apparent trapping of Mu by silicon impurities in germanium

  8. Impurities in Drug Products and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kątny, M; Frankowski, M

    2017-05-04

    Analytical methods should be selective and fast. In modern times, scientists strive to meet the criteria of green chemistry, so they choose analytical procedures that are as short as possible and use the least toxic solvents. It is quite obvious that the products intended for human consumption should be characterized as completely as possible. The safety of a drug is dependent mainly on the impurities that it contains. High pressure liquid chromatography and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography have been proposed as the main techniques for forced degradation and impurity profiling. The aim of this article was to characterize the relevant classification of drug impurities and to review the methods of impurities determination for atorvastatin (ATV) and duloxetine (DLX) (both in active pharmaceutical ingredients and in different dosage forms). These drugs have an impact on two systems of the human body: cardiac and nervous. Simple characteristics of ATV and DLX, their properties and specificity of action on the human body, are also included in this review. The analyzed pharmaceuticals-ATV (brand name Lipiron) and DLX (brand name Cymbalta)-were selected for this study based on annual rankings prepared by Information Medical Statistics.

  9. High-frequency EPR of surface impurities on nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zaili; Stepanov, Viktor; Takahashi, Susumu

    Diamond is a fascinating material, hosting nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers with unique magnetic and optical properties. There have been many reports that suggest the existence of paramagnetic impurities near surface of various kinds of diamonds. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of mechanically crushed nanodiamonds (NDs) as well as detonation NDs revealed g 2 like signals that are attributed to structural defects and dangling bonds near the diamond surface. In this presentation, we investigate paramagnetic impurities in various sizes of NDs using high-frequency (HF) continuous wave (cw) and pulsed EPR spectroscopy. Strong size dependence on the linewidth of HF cw EPR spectra reveals the existence of paramagnetic impurities in the vicinity of the diamond surface. We also study the size dependence of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T1 and T2) of single substitutional nitrogen defects in NDs Significant deviations from the temperature dependence of the phonon-assisted T1 process were observed in the ND samples, and were attributed to the contribution from the surface impurities. This work was supported by the Searle Scholars Program and the National Science Foundation (DMR-1508661 and CHE-1611134).

  10. Self-consistent gyrokinetic modeling of neoclassical and turbulent impurity transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estève, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Breton, S.; Donnel, P.; Asahi, Y.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ehrlacher, C.; Emeriau, C.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Gillot, C.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.

    2018-03-01

    Trace impurity transport is studied with the flux-driven gyrokinetic GYSELA code (Grandgirard et al 2016 Comput. Phys. Commun. 207 35). A reduced and linearized multi-species collision operator has been recently implemented, so that both neoclassical and turbulent transport channels can be treated self-consistently on an equal footing. In the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime that is probably relevant for tungsten, the standard expression for the neoclassical impurity flux is shown to be recovered from gyrokinetics with the employed collision operator. Purely neoclassical simulations of deuterium plasma with trace impurities of helium, carbon and tungsten lead to impurity diffusion coefficients, inward pinch velocities due to density peaking, and thermo-diffusion terms which quantitatively agree with neoclassical predictions and NEO simulations (Belli et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 015015). The thermal screening factor appears to be less than predicted analytically in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime, which can be detrimental to fusion performance. Finally, self-consistent nonlinear simulations have revealed that the tungsten impurity flux is not the sum of turbulent and neoclassical fluxes computed separately, as is usually assumed. The synergy partly results from the turbulence-driven in-out poloidal asymmetry of tungsten density. This result suggests the need for self-consistent simulations of impurity transport, i.e. including both turbulence and neoclassical physics, in view of quantitative predictions for ITER.

  11. Impurities block the alpha to omega martensitic transformation in titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Richard G; Trinkle, Dallas R; Bouchet, Johann; Srinivasan, Srivilliputhur G; Albers, Robert C; Wilkins, John W

    2005-02-01

    Impurities control phase stability and phase transformations in natural and man-made materials, from shape-memory alloys to steel to planetary cores. Experiments and empirical databases are still central to tuning the impurity effects. What is missing is a broad theoretical underpinning. Consider, for example, the titanium martensitic transformations: diffusionless structural transformations proceeding near the speed of sound. Pure titanium transforms from ductile alpha to brittle omega at 9 GPa, creating serious technological problems for beta-stabilized titanium alloys. Impurities in the titanium alloys A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) suppress the transformation up to at least 35 GPa, increasing their technological utility as lightweight materials in aerospace applications. These and other empirical discoveries in technological materials call for broad theoretical understanding. Impurities pose two theoretical challenges: the effect on the relative phase stability, and the energy barrier of the transformation. Ab initio methods calculate both changes due to impurities. We show that interstitial oxygen, nitrogen and carbon retard the transformation whereas substitutional aluminium and vanadium influence the transformation by changing the d-electron concentration. The resulting microscopic picture explains the suppression of the transformation in commercial A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. In general, the effect of impurities on relative energies and energy barriers is central to understanding structural phase transformations.

  12. Maitotoxin-induced liver cell death involving loss of cell ATP following influx of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, R.K.; Singh, Y.; Santostasi, G.; Krishna, G.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, one of the most potent marine toxins known, produced cell death in cultures of rat hepatocytes with a TD50 of 80 pM at 24 hr. The cell death, as indicated by a dose- and time-dependent leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was also associated with the leakage of [14C]adenine nucleotides from hepatocytes prelabeled with [14C]-adenine. The toxic effect of maitotoxin was completely abolished by the omission of calcium from the culture medium. The cell death induced by maitotoxin increased with increasing concentrations of calcium in the medium. Treatment of hepatocytes with low concentrations of the toxin (less than 0.5 ng/ml) resulted in increases in 45Ca influx into the cells. At higher concentrations of maitotoxin (greater than 1ng/ml), the initial increase in 45Ca influx was followed by the release of the 45Ca from the cells into the medium. Since the 45Ca release paralleled the LDH leakage, the release of calcium was due to cell death. The 45Ca influx, [14C]adenine nucleotide leakage, and LDH leakage were effectively inhibited by verapamil, a calcium channel blocker. Maitotoxin also induced a time- and dose-dependent loss of ATP from hepatocytes, which preceded the [14C]adenine nucleotide and LDH leakage. Thus, it appears that the cell death resulting from maitotoxin treatment is caused by the elevated intracellular calcium, which in turn inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation causing depletion of cell ATP. Loss of cell ATP may be the causative event in the maitotoxin-induced cell death

  13. Influence of impurities on silicide contact formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Meermanov, G.B.; Kazdaev, R.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    Research objectives of this work are to investigate the influence of light impurities implantation on peculiarities of the silicides formation in molybdenum monocrystal implanted by silicon, and in molybdenum films sputtered on silicon substrate at subsequent annealing. Implantation of the molybdenum samples was performed with silicon ions (90 keV, 5x10 17 cm -2 ). Phase identification was performed by X ray analysis with photographic method of registration. Analysis of the results has shown the formation of the molybdenum silicide Mo 3 Si at 900 deg. C. To find out the influence of impurities present in the atmosphere (C,N,O) on investigated processes we have applied combined implantation. At first, molybdenum was implanted with ions of the basic component (silicon) and then -- with impurities ions. Acceleration energies (40keV for C, 45 keV for N and 50 keV for O) were chosen to obtain the same distribution profiles for basic and impurities ions. Ion doses were 5x10 17 cm -2 for Si-ions and 5x10 16 cm -2 - for impurities. The most important results are reported here. The first, for all three kinds of impurities the decreased formation temperatures of the phase Mo 3 Si were observed; in the case of C and N it was ∼100 deg. and in the case of nitrogen - ∼200 deg. Further, simultaneously with the Mo 3 Si phase, the appearance of the rich-metal phase Mo 5 Si 3 was registered (not observed in the samples without additional implantation). In case of Mo/Si-structure, the implantation of the impurities (N,O) was performed to create the peak concentration (∼4at/%) located in the middle of the molybdenum film (∼ 150nm) deposited on silicon substrate. Investigation carried out on unimplanted samples showed the formation of the silicide molybdenum MoSi 2 , observed after annealing at temperatures 900/1000 deg. C, higher than values 500-600 deg. C reported in other works. It is discovered that electrical conductivity of Mo 5 Si 3 -films synthesized after impurities

  14. Defect-impurity interactions in irradiated germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, J.W.; James, F.J.; Westbrook, R.D.

    1975-07-01

    Results of experiments are used to formulate a better model for the structures of lattice defects and defect-impurity complexes in irradiated n-type Ge. Single crystals were grown by the Czochralski process from P, As, or Sb-doped melts, and less than or equal to 10 15 to greater than or equal to 10 17 oxygen cm -3 was added to the furnace chamber after approximately 1 / 3 of the crystal had been solidified. Hall coefficient and resistivity measurements (at 77 0 K) were used to determine the initial donor concentration due to the dopant and clustered oxygen, and infrared absorption measurements (at 11.7 μ) were used to determine the dissociated oxygen concentration. Certain impurity and defect-impurity interactions were then investigated that occurred as a consequence of selected annealing, quenching, Li diffusion, and irradiation experiments at approximately 300 0 K with 60 Co photons, 1.5 to 2.0 MeV electrons, or thermal energy neutrons. Particular attention was given to determining the electrical role of the irradiation produced interstitial and vacancy, and to look for any evidence from electrical and optical measurements of vacancy--oxygen, lithium--oxygen, and lithium--vacancy interactions. (U.S.)

  15. Transfer of plasma lipoprotein components and of plasma proteins into aortas of cholesterol-fed rabbits. Molecular size as a determinant of plasma lipoprotein influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, S.; Zilversmit, D.B.

    1981-01-01

    The arterial influx of esterified and free cholesterol from low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins in 20 hypercholesterolemic rabbits was measured simultaneously by the use of lipoproteins labeled in vivo with [ 3 H]- and [ 14 C]-cholesterol. The simultaneous arterial influx of either [ 3 H]-leucine-labeled very low density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins, high density lipoproteins, or plasma proteins was also measured in each rabbit. The arterial influx was calculated as intimal clearance, i.e., the influx of a given fraction divided by its plasma concentration. The intimal clearance of low density lipoprotein esterified cholesterol was equal to that for the apolipoproteins of that fraction, which is compatible with an arterial influx of intact low density lipoprotein molecules. The intimal clearance of very low density apolipoprotein or cholesteryl ester was less than that for low density lipoprotein, whereas high density lipoprotein and albumin clearances exceeded low density lipoprotein clearance by 1.5- to 3-fold. The intimal clearances of plasma proteins, high density, low density, and very low density lipoproteins decreased linearly with the logarithm of the macromolecular diameter. This indicates that the arterial influx of three plasma lipoprotein fractions and of plasma proteins proceeds by similar mechanisms. Apparently the relative intimal clearances of lipoproteins are more dependent on their size relative to pores or vesicular diameters at the plasma-artery interface than on specific interactions between lipoproteins and the arterial intimal surface

  16. A validated stability-indicating LC method for the separation of enantiomer and potential impurities of Linezolid using polar organic mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana Raju, T; Vishweshwari Kutty, O; Ganesh, V; Yadagiri Swamy, P

    2012-08-01

    Although a number of methods are available for evaluating Linezolid and its possible impurities, a common method for separation if its potential impurities, degradants and enantiomer in a single method with good efficiency remain unavailable. With the objective of developing an advanced method with shorter runtimes, a simple, precise, accurate stability-indicating LC method was developed for the determination of purity of Linezolid drug substance and drug products in bulk samples and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of its impurities and degradation products. This method is capable of separating all the related substances of Linezolid along with the chiral impurity. This method can also be used for the estimation of assay of Linezolid in drug substance as well as in drug product. The method was developed using Chiralpak IA (250 mm×4.6 mm, 5 μm) column. A mixture of acetonitrile, ethanol, n-butyl amine and trifluoro acetic acid in 96:4:0.10:0.16 (v/v/v/v) ratio was used as a mobile phase. The eluted compounds were monitored at 254 nm. Linezolid was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines with respect to specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, linearity, accuracy, robustness and system suitability.

  17. Spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.; Marchand, R.; Tawara, H.; Vainshtein, L.; Wiese, W.

    1992-01-01

    This Working Group Report briefly reviews and summarizes the available spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities. Included are lithium, neon, and argon, which, although they are not plasma impurities per se, are introduced into the plasma through the application of diagnostic techniques. 32 refs, 2 tabs

  18. Plasma impurity-control studies in CTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, magnetized coaxial gun generated Compact Toroids (CTs) have exhibited magnetic field and density lifetimes of about 250 to 350 μs and electron temperatures of about 10 eV. In recent experiments, after hydrogen discharge cleaning the gun and flux conserver surfaces, the lifetimes have been extended to 550 μs. This improvement in lifetime, together with spectroscopic and bolometric measurements, are consistent with the interpretation that the CT plasma losses are impurity dominated and that discharge cleaning is reducing the impurities. Details of these measurements are described as well as successful experiments which led to a more open flux conserver

  19. Plasma impurity-control studies in CTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, magnetized coaxial gun generated Compact Toroids (CTs) have exhibited magnetic field and density lifetimes of about 250 to 350 ..mu..s and electron temperatures of about 10 eV. In recent experiments, after hydrogen discharge cleaning the gun and flux conserver surfaces, the lifetimes have been extended to 550 ..mu..s. This improvement in lifetime, together with spectroscopic and bolometric measurements, are consistent with the interpretation that the CT plasma losses are impurity dominated and that discharge cleaning is reducing the impurities. Details of these measurements are described as well as successful experiments which led to a more open flux conserver.

  20. Impurity penetration and transport during VH-mode on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, S.I.; Evans, T.E.; Jackson, G.L.; West, W.P.

    1992-05-01

    A new modeling effort is made in order to understand the observed relatively low levels of impurity contamination during the VH-mode phase on DIII-D, as compared to those observed during the H-mode phase of selected discharges. The key element is the inclusion of the real 2-D flux surface geometry in the prediction of impurity penetration of sputtered atoms through the scrape-off layer into the core plasma. Of the elements which determine the impurity content in the plasma: sputtering yield, penetration, and core transport, the penetration through the scrape-off layer is found to be the most determinative factor. The low impurity content in VH-mode is attributed to the development of a scrape-off layer with higher density and temperature properties than those normally obtained in H-mode

  1. Involvement of plasma membrane calcium influx in bacterial induction of the K+/H+ and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, M.M.; Keppler, L.D.; Orlandi, E.W.; Baker, C.J.; Mischke, C.F.

    1990-01-01

    An early event in the hypersensitive response of tobacco to Pseudomonas syringae pv syringae is the initiation of a K + /H + response characterized by specific plasma membrane K + efflux, extracellular alkalinization, and intracellular acidification. We investigated the role of calcium in induction of these host responses. Suspension-cultured tobacco cells exhibited a baseline Ca 2+ influx of 0.02 to 0.06 micromole per gram per hour as determined from 45 Ca 2+ uptake. Following bacterial inoculation, uptake rates began to increase coincidently with onset of the K + /H + response. Rates increased steadily for 2 to 3 hours, reaching 0.5 to 1 micromole per gram per hour. This increased Ca 2+ influx was prevented by EGTA and calcium channel blockers such as La 3+ , Co 2+ , and Cd 2+ but not by verapamil and nifedipine. Lanthanum, cobalt, cadmium, and EGTA inhibited the K + /H + response in both suspension-cultured cells and leaf discs and prevented hypersensitive cell death in leaf discs. We conclude that increase plasmalemma Ca 2+ influx is required for the K + /H + and hypersensitive responses in tobacco

  2. Impaired leukocyte influx in cervix of postterm women not responding to prostaglandin priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masironi Britt

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolonged pregnancies are associated with increased rate of maternal and fetal complications. Post term women could be divided into at least two subgroups, one where parturition is possible to induce by prostaglandins and one where it is not. Our aim was to study parameters in cervical biopsies in women with spontaneous delivery at term (controls and compare to those that are successfully induced post term (responders, and those that are not induced (non-responders, by local prostaglandin treatment. Methods Stromal parameters examined in this study were the accumulation of leukocytes (CD45, CD68, mRNAs and/or proteins for the extracellular matrix degrading enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9, their inhibitors (tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, interleukin-8 (IL-8, the platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R, syndecan-1 and estrogen binding receptors (estrogen receptor (ERα, ERβ and G-coupled protein receptor (GPR 30 as well as the proliferation marker Ki-67. Results The influx of leukocytes as assessed by CD45 was strongest in the responders, thereafter in the controls and significantly lower in the non-responders. IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9, all predominantly expressed in leukocytes, showed significantly reduced immunostaining in the group of non-responders, while ERα and GPR30 were more abundant in the non-responders, as compared to the controls. Conclusion The impaired leukocyte influx, as reflected by the reduced number of CD45 positive cells as well as decreased immunostaining of IL-8, PAF-R and MMP-9 in the non-responders, could be one explanation of the failed ripening of the cervix in post term women. If the decreased leukocyte influx is a primary explanation to absent ripening or secondary, as a result of other factors, is yet to be established.

  3. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Xianjun; Gong Changde; Zhou Yuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t ' -U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8a or 4a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  4. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xian-Jun; Gong, Chang-De; Zhou, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t-U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8 a or 4 a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8 a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  5. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... of the impurity. Transforming the equation to the noninertial frame of reference coupled with the center of mass we investigate the soliton behavior in the close vicinity of the impurity. With the help of the lens transformation we show that the soliton width is governed by an Ermakov-Pinney equation. We also...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....

  6. Finite-temperature behavior of an impurity in the spin-1/2 XXZ chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahagi, Ryoko; Deguchi, Tetsuo; Sato, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We study the zero- and the finite-temperature behavior of the integrable spin-1/2 XXZ periodic chain with an impurity by the algebraic and thermal Bethe ansatz methods. We evaluate the local magnetization on the impurity site at zero temperature analytically and derive the impurity susceptibility exactly from it. In the graphs of the impurity specific heat versus temperature, we show how the impurity spin becomes more liberated from the bulk many-body effect as the exchange coupling between the impurity spin and other spins decreases and that at low temperature it couples strongly to them such as in the Kondo effect. Thus, we observe not only the crossover behavior from the high- to the low-temperature regime, but another from the N-site chain to the (N − 1)-site chain with a free impurity spin. We also show that the estimate of the Wilson ratio at a given low temperature is independent of the impurity parameter if its absolute value is small enough with respect to the temperature and the universality class is described by the XXZ anisotropy in terms of the dressed charge. (paper)

  7. Pharmacologic study of calcium influx pathways in rabbit aortic smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukeman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Functional characteristics and pharmacologic domains of receptor-operated and potential-sensitive calcium (Ca 2+ ) channels (ROCs and PSCs, respectively) were derived via measurements of 45 Ca 2+ influx (M/sup Ca/) during activation by the neurotransmitters norepinephrine (NE), histamine (HS), and serotonin (5-HT) and by elevated extracellular potassium (K + ) in the individual or combined presence of organic Ca 2+ channel antagonists (CAts), calmodulin antagonists (Calm-ants), lanthanum (La 3+ ), and agents that increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP

  8. Sputtering measurements on JET using a multichannel visible spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamp, M.F.; Morgan, P.D.; Summers, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    A multichannel visible spectrometer has been used on JET to simultaneously observe the emission from D, H, C and O atoms and ions in the proximity of a belt limiter. The absolute intensity of the line emission, along with a Langmuir probe measurement of the edge electron temperature and an atomic physics model, allows us to calculate the influxes of these species. Under steady-state conditions the influxes of D and He are the same as the effluxes, so the ratio of impurity to fuel fluxes, e.g. carbon to deuterium, is the apparent sputtering yield of deuterium on carbon in the tokamak environment. The measured flux ratio Γ c /Γ D is also indicative of the central carbon impurity concentration in JET, because the limiters are the main source of impurities. For similar particle transport, Γ c /Γ D =n c (o)/n D (o), so for a 10% flux ratio, n c /n e =6.6%, Z eff =3. (author) 7 refs., 5 figs

  9. Plasma edge cooling during RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckewer, S.; Hawryluk, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    A new approach to prevent the influx of high-Z impurities into the core of a tokamak discharge by using RF power to modify the edge plasma temperature profile is presented. This concept is based on spectroscopic measurements on PLT during ohmic heating and ATC during RF heating. A one dimensional impurity transport model is used to interpret the ATC results

  10. Nonlinearity and disorder: Classification and stability of nonlinear impurity modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Bang, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We study the effects produced by competition of two physical mechanisms of energy localization in inhomogeneous nonlinear systems. As an example, we analyze spatially localized modes supported by a nonlinear impurity in the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and describe three types of no...... the case of a power-law nonlinearity in detail. We discuss several scenarios of the instability-induced dynamics of the nonlinear impurity modes, including the mode decay or switching to a new stable state, and collapse at the impurity site....

  11. Detection, isolation and characterization of principle synthetic route indicative impurity in telmisartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Srinivasan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An unknown impurity was detected in the telmisartan bulk drug (active pharmaceutical ingredient – API using an isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. This impurity was isolated by preparative HPLC. Spectral data of the isolated impurity were collected. Based on the spectral data deriving from two dimensional nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (2D-NMR and mass spectrometry (MS, the impurity was characterized as “methyl 4′,4′-dibromo methyl biphenyl-2-carboxylate”. The arrived structure was further confirmed by theoretical studies.

  12. Pfirsch–Schlüter neoclassical heavy impurity transport in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, E A; Candy, J; Angioni, C

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we extend previous analytic theories for the neoclassical transport of a trace heavy impurity in a rotating plasma in the Pfirsch–Schlüter regime. The complete diffusive and convective components of the ambipolar particle flux are derived. The solution is valid for arbitrary impurity charge and impurity Mach number and for general geometry. Inclusion of finite main-ion temperature gradient effects is shown in the small ion Mach number limit. A simple interpolation formula is derived for the case of high impurity charge and circular geometry. While an enhancement of the diffusion coefficient is found for order one impurity Mach number, a reduction due to the rotation-driven poloidal asymmetry in the density occurs for very large Mach number. (paper)

  13. Extended numerical modeling of impurity neoclassical transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, H.; Yamoto, S.; Hatayama, A.; Homma, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of impurity transport in tokamaks is an important issue in order to reduce the impurity contamination in fusion core plasmas. Recently, a new kinetic numerical scheme of impurity classical/neoclassical transport has been developed. This numerical scheme makes it possible to include classical self-diffusion (CL SD), classical inward pinch (CL IWP), and classical temperature screening effect (CL TSE) of impurity ions. However, impurity neoclassical transport has been modeled only in the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) regime. The purpose of this study is to extend our previous model to wider range of collisionality regimes, i.e., not only the PS regime, but also the plateau regime. As in the previous study, a kinetic model with Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Model (BMC) has been adopted. We focus on the modeling of the neoclassical self-diffusion (NC SD) and the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP). In order to simulate the neoclassical transport with the BCM, velocity distribution of background plasma ions has been modeled as a deformed Maxwell distribution which includes plasma density gradient. Some test simulations have been done. As for NC SD of impurity ions, our scheme reproduces the dependence on the collisionality parameter in wide range of collisionality regime. As for NC IWP, in cases where test impurity ions and background ions are in the PS and plateau regimes, parameter dependences have been reproduced. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Extended numerical modeling of impurity neoclassical transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, H.; Yamoto, S.; Hatayama, A. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Homma, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama (Japan); Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Understanding of impurity transport in tokamaks is an important issue in order to reduce the impurity contamination in fusion core plasmas. Recently, a new kinetic numerical scheme of impurity classical/neoclassical transport has been developed. This numerical scheme makes it possible to include classical self-diffusion (CL SD), classical inward pinch (CL IWP), and classical temperature screening effect (CL TSE) of impurity ions. However, impurity neoclassical transport has been modeled only in the case where background plasmas are in the Pfirsch-Schluter (PS) regime. The purpose of this study is to extend our previous model to wider range of collisionality regimes, i.e., not only the PS regime, but also the plateau regime. As in the previous study, a kinetic model with Binary Collision Monte-Carlo Model (BMC) has been adopted. We focus on the modeling of the neoclassical self-diffusion (NC SD) and the neoclassical inward pinch (NC IWP). In order to simulate the neoclassical transport with the BCM, velocity distribution of background plasma ions has been modeled as a deformed Maxwell distribution which includes plasma density gradient. Some test simulations have been done. As for NC SD of impurity ions, our scheme reproduces the dependence on the collisionality parameter in wide range of collisionality regime. As for NC IWP, in cases where test impurity ions and background ions are in the PS and plateau regimes, parameter dependences have been reproduced. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. Electromagnetic effects on trace impurity transport in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, T.; Angioni, C.

    2010-01-01

    The impact of electromagnetic effects on the transport of light and heavy impurities in tokamak plasmas is investigated by means of an extensive set of linear gyrokinetic numerical calculations with the code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and of analytical derivations with a fluid model. The impurity transport is studied by appropriately separating diffusive and convective contributions, and conditions of background microturbulence dominated by both ion temperature gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes (TEMs) are analyzed. The dominant contribution from magnetic flutter transport turns out to be of pure convective type. However it remains small, below 10% with respect to the E ×B transport. A significant impact on the impurity transport due to an increase in the plasma normalized pressure parameter β is observed in the case of ITG modes, while for TEM the overall effect remains weak. In realistic conditions of high β plasmas in the high confinement (H-) mode with dominant ITG turbulence, the impurity diffusivity is found to decrease with increasing β in qualitative agreement with recent observations in tokamaks. In contrast, in these conditions, the ratio of the total off-diagonal convective velocity to the diagonal diffusivity is not strongly affected by an increase in β, particularly at low impurity charge, due to a compensation between the different off-diagonal contributions.

  16. Nuclear relaxation in semiconductors doped with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mel'nichuk, S.V.; Tovstyuk, N.K.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature and concentration dependences are investigated of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time with account of spin diffusion for degenerated and non-degenerated semicon- ductors doped with magnetic impurities. In case of the non-degenerated semiconductor the time is shown to grow with temperature, while in case of degenerated semiconductor it is practically independent of temperature. The impurity concentration growth results in decreasing the spin-lattice relaxation time

  17. Alpha particle diagnostics using impurity pellet injection (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.K.; McChesney, J.M.; Howald, A.W.; Parks, P.B.; Snipes, J.A.; Terry, J.L.; Marmar, E.S.; Zweben, S.J.; Medley, S.S.

    1992-01-01

    We have proposed using impurity pellet injection to measure the energy distribution of the fast confined alpha particles in a reacting plasma [R. K. Fisher et al., Fusion Technol. 13, 536 (1988)]. The ablation cloud surrounding the injected pellet is thick enough that an equilibrium fraction F ∞ 0 (E) of the incident alphas should be neutralized as they pass through the cloud. By observing neutrals created in the large spatial region of the cloud which is expected to be dominated by the heliumlike ionization state, e.g., Li + ions, we can determine the incident alpha distribution dn He 2+ /dE from the measured energy distribution of neutral helium atoms dn He 0 /dE using dn He 0 /dE = dn He 2+ /dE·F ∞ 0 (E,Li + ). Initial experiments were performed on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) in which we compared pellet penetration with our impurity pellet ablation model [P. B. Parks et al., Nucl. Fusion 28, 477 (1988)], and measured the spatial distribution of various ionization states in carbon pellet clouds [R. K. Fisher et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 61, 3196 (1990)]. Experiments have recently begun on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with the goal of measuring the alpha particle energy distribution during D--T operation in 1993--94. A series of preliminary experiments are planned to test the diagnostic concept. The first experiments will observe neutrals from beam-injected deuterium ions and the high energy 3 He tail produced during ion cyclotron (ICH) minority heating on TFTR interacting with the cloud. We will also monitor by line radiation the charge state distributions in lithium, boron, and carbon clouds

  18. Impurity band Mott insulators: a new route to high Tc superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Baskaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Last century witnessed the birth of semiconductor electronics and nanotechnology. The physics behind these revolutionary developments is certain quantum mechanical behaviour of 'impurity state electrons' in crystalline 'band insulators', such as Si, Ge, GaAs and GaN, arising from intentionally added (doped impurities. The present article proposes that certain collective quantum behaviour of these impurity state electrons, arising from Coulomb repulsions, could lead to superconductivity in a parent band insulator, in a way not suspected before. Impurity band resonating valence bond theory of superconductivity in boron doped diamond, recently proposed by us, suggests possibility of superconductivity emerging from impurity band Mott insulators. We use certain key ideas and insights from the field of high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates and organics. Our suggestion also offers new possibilities in the field of semiconductor electronics and nanotechnology. The current level of sophistication in solid state technology and combinatorial materials science is very well capable of realizing our proposal and discover new superconductors.

  19. Modeling impurity-assisted chain creation in noble-metal break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Napoli, S; Thiess, A; Blügel, S; Mokrousov, Y

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the generalization of the model for chain formation in break junctions, introduced by Thiess et al (2008 Nano Lett. 8 2144), to zigzag transition-metal chains with s and p impurities. We apply this extended model to study the producibility trends for noble-metal chains with impurities, often present in break junction experiments, namely, Cu, Ag and Au chains with H, C, O and N adatoms. Providing the material-specific parameters for our model from systematic full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave first-principles calculations, we find that the presence of such impurities crucially affects the binding properties of the noble-metal chains. We reveal that both the impurity-induced bond strengthening and the formation of zigzag bonds can lead to a significantly enhanced probability for chain formation in break junctions. (paper)

  20. Corrosion behavior of pyroclore-rich titanate ceramics for plutonium disposition; impurity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The baseline ceramic contains Ti, U, Ca, Hf, Gd, and Ce, and is made up of only four phases, pyrochlore, zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite. The impurities present in the three other ceramics represent impurities expected in the feed, and result in different phase distributions. The results from 3 day, 90 C MCC-1 tests with impurity ceramics were significantly different than the results from tests with the baseline ceramic. Overall, the addition of impurities to these titanate ceramics alters the phase distributions, which in turn, affects the corrosion behavior

  1. Classical impurity ion confinement in a toroidal magnetized fusion plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S T A; Den Hartog, D J; Caspary, K J; Magee, R M; Mirnov, V V; Chapman, B E; Craig, D; Fiksel, G; Sarff, J S

    2012-03-23

    High-resolution measurements of impurity ion dynamics provide first-time evidence of classical ion confinement in a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma. The density profile evolution of fully stripped carbon is measured in MST reversed-field pinch plasmas with reduced magnetic turbulence to assess Coulomb-collisional transport without the neoclassical enhancement from particle drift effects. The impurity density profile evolves to a hollow shape, consistent with the temperature screening mechanism of classical transport. Corroborating methane pellet injection experiments expose the sensitivity of the impurity particle confinement time to the residual magnetic fluctuation amplitude.

  2. First-principles thermodynamic calculations of diffusion characteristics of impurities in γ-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuru, T.; Kaji, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Because solute impurities have an effect on embrittlement through segregation under irradiation, solute stability and the influence of irradiation on the diffusion characteristics of impurities become prominent due to several acceleration effects of high irradiance circumstances in irradiated materials. In this study, the diffusion characteristics of several impurities in non-magnetic fcc iron are investigated using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In accordance with classical diffusion and transition state theories, we nonempirically evaluated the contribution to properties of the binding energy between vacancy and each impurity and the migration enthalpy. The migration energy was calculated using the nudged elastic band method with DFT. The vacancy formation energy, including the entropic contributions to free energies in γ-iron, was evaluated by considering vibrational phonon frequencies based on frozen phonons employing the harmonic approximation for the lattice dynamics. Consequently, we confirmed that the binding energy between large-radius impurities and vacancies is larger than that with an equivalent size of the solvent element, and that the migration enthalpies of these impurities are quite small compared with self diffusion. This finding may indicate that the electronic binding states at the saddle point have a large influence on the migration of impurities

  3. Strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity in diamond: X-ray spectroscopic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baskaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent X-ray absorption study in boron doped diamond, Nakamura et al. have seen a well isolated narrow boron impurity band in non-superconducting samples and an additional narrow band at the chemical potential in a superconducting sample. We interpret the beautiful spectra as evidence for upper Hubbard band of a Mott insulating impurity band and an additional metallic 'mid-gap band' of a conducting 'self-doped' Mott insulator. This supports the basic framework of a recent theory of the present author of strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity (impurity band resonating valence bond, IBRVB theory in a template of a wide-gap insulator, with no direct involvement of valence band states.

  4. The effects of naturally occurring impurities in rock salt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we investigate the effect that naturally occurring impurities in salt mines have both on effective permittivity of the medium and on radio wave propagation at ∼200 MHz. The effective permittivity is determined based on the dielectric properties of salt and the characteristics of the main impurities. We conclude that ...

  5. Effect of selective blockade of oxygen consumption, glucose transport, and Ca2+ influx on thyroxine action in human mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvetny, J; Matzen, L E

    1990-01-01

    The effect of selective blockade of cellular glucose transporters, Ca2+ influx, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption on thyroxine (T4)-stimulated oxygen consumption and glucose uptake was examined in human mononuclear blood cells. Blockade of glucose transporters by cytochalasin B (1 x 10(-5) mol....../L) and of Ca2+ influx by alprenolol (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and verapamil (4 x 10(-4) mol/L) inhibited T4-activated glucose uptaken and reduced T4-stimulated oxygen consumption by 20%. Uncoupling of mitochondrial oxygen consumption by azide (1 x 10(-3) mol/L) inhibited T4-stimulated oxygen consumption, but had...... no effect on glucose uptake. We conclude that T4-stimulated glucose uptake in human mononuclear blood cells is dependent on intact glucose transporters and Ca2+ influx, but not on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. However, oxygen consumption is, in part, dependent on intact glucose uptake....

  6. Size, Shape and Impurity Effects on Superconducting critical temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masaki; Kato, Masaru; Sato, Osamu

    Bulk superconductors have their own critical temperatures Tc. However, for a nano-structured superconductor, Tc depends on size and shape of the superconductor. Nishizaki showed that the high pressure torsion on bulks of Nb makes Tc higher, because the torsion makes many nano-sized fine grains in the bulks. However the high pressure torsion on bulks of V makes Tc lower, and Nishizaki discussed that the decrease of Tc is caused by impurities in the bulks of V. We studied size, shape, and impurity effects on Tc, by solving the Gor'kov equations, using the finite element method. We found that smaller and narrower superconductors show higher Tc. We found how size and shape affects Tc by studying spacial order parameter distributions and quasi-particle eigen-energies. Also we studied the impurity effects on Tc, and found that Tc decreases with increase of scattering rate by impurities. This work was supported in part of KAKENHI Grant Number JP26400367 and JP16K05460, and program for leading graduate schools of ministry of education, culture, sports, science and technology-Japan.

  7. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  8. Soliton scatterings by impurities in a short-length sine-Gordon chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dikande, A.M.; Kofane, T.C.

    1995-07-01

    The scattering of soliton by impurities at the frontiers of a finite-length region of an infinite sine-Gordon chain is analyzed. The impurities consist of two isotopic inhomogeneities installed at the boundaries of the finite-length region. The soliton solution in the region is found in term of snoidal sine-Gordon soliton which properly takes into account the effects of the boundaries. By contrast, the soliton solutions in the neighboring sides of the region are obtained in terms of the so-called large-amplitude, localized kinks with limiting spatial extensions at x → ± ∞, which is equal ±π. Using the continuity of these soliton solutions at the frontiers as well as appropriate boundary conditions, it is shown that the soliton may be either i) reflected by the incident impurity; ii) trapped (with oscillating motions) between the two impurities (i.e. inside the infinite region); or iii) transmitted by the second impurity into the third, infinitely extended region. The threshold velocities for the reflection and transmission into different regions are found and shown to vary exponentially as a function of the length of the bounded region. The frequency of soliton oscillations between the impurities has also been calculated in some acceptable limit. (author). 28 refs, 1 fig

  9. Models for impurity production and transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Models for the edge conditions which are commonly used in tokamak transport codes have been kept simple partly because of a lack of data. A report is presented on an improved model for the particle and energy balance of e - , H 1 + , H 1 0 , H 2 + , H 2 0 , O 0 , O/sup (1 yields 8) + / in the plasma scrape-off region. Experiments should yield the needed data in the near future, and allow one to test the model. The diffusion of impurities has been studied with a neoclassical model. The role of 'anomalous spreading' of the impurity distribution has been studied for the case of Fe. A model is presented for the expulsion of low-Z (oxygen) impurities for cases where q(0) greater than 1, but in which a large shear-free region is produced in the plasma core

  10. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospieszczyk, A; Bay, H L; Bogen, P; Hartwig, H; Hintz, E; Koenen, L; Ross, G G; Rusbueldt, D; Samm, U; Schweer, B

    1987-02-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n/sub e/, of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers.

  11. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Bay, H.L.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Koenen, L.; Ross, G.G.; Rusbueldt, D.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    1987-01-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n e , of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers. (orig.)

  12. A crystalline cluster method for deep impurities in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    An 'ab initio' self-consistent-field crystalline-cluster approach to the study of deep impurity states in insulators is proposed. It is shown that, in spite of being a cluster calculation, the interaction of the impurity with the crystal environment is fully taken into account. It is also shown that the present representation of the impurity states is, at least, as precise as the crystalline cluster representation of the pure crystal electronic structure. The procedure has been tested by performing the calculation of the electronic structure of the U center in a sodium chloride crystal, and it has been observed that the calculated GAMMA 1 - GAMMA 15 absorption energy is in good agreement with experiment. (Author) [pt

  13. A crystalline cluster method for deep impurities in insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    An ''ab initio'' self-consistent-field crysttalline-cluster approach to the study of deep impurity states in insulators is proposed. It is shown that, in spite of being a cluster calculation, the interaction of the impurity with the crystal environment is fully taken into account. It is also shown that the present representation of the impurity states is, at least, as precise as the crystalline cluster representation of the pure crystal electronic structure. The procedure has been tested by performing the calculation of the electronic structure of the U center in a sodium chloride crystal, and it has been observed that the calculated γ 1 - γ 15 absorption energy is in good agreement with experiment. (author) [pt

  14. Experimental and gyrokinetic investigation of core impurity transport in Alcator C-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, N.; Greenwald, M.; Podpaly, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J. E.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Puetterich, T.

    2010-11-01

    A new multiple pulse laser blow-off system coupled with an upgraded high resolution x-ray spectrometer with spatial resolution allow for the most detailed studies of impurity transport on Alcator C-mod to date. Trace impurity injections created by the laser blow-off technique were introduced into plasmas with a wide range of parameters and time evolving profiles of He-like calcium were measured. The unique measurement of a single charge state profile and line integrated emission measurements from spectroscopic diagnostics were compared with the simulated emission from the impurity transport code STRAHL. A nonlinear least squares fitting routine was coupled with STRAHL, allowing for core impurity transport coefficients with errors to be determined. With this method, experimental data from trace calcium injections were analyzed and radially dependent, core values (< r/a ˜.6) of the diffusive and convective components of the impurity flux were obtained. The STRAHL results are compared with linear and global, nonlinear simulations from the gyrokinetic code GYRO. Results of this comparison and an investigation of the underlying physics associated with turbulent impurity transport will be presented.

  15. On-line sodium and cover as purity monitors gas operating tools at EBR-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.R.F.; Richardson, W.J.; Holmes, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Plugging temperature indicators, electrochemical oxygen meters and hydrogen diffusion meters are the on-line sodium purity monitors now in use at EBR-II. On-line gas chromatographs are used to monitor helium, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen impurities in the argon cover gases. Monitors for tritium-in-sodium and for hydrocarbons-in-cover gas have been developed and are scheduled for installation in the near future. An important advantage of on-line monitors over the conventional grab-sampling techniques is the speed of response to changing reactor conditions. This helps us to identify the source of the impurity, whether the cause may be transient or constant, and take corrective action as necessary. The oxygen meter is calibrated monthly against oxygen in sodium determined by the vanadium wire equilibration method. The other instruments either do not require calibration or are self-calibrating. The ranges, sensitivity and response times of all of the on-line purity monitors has proven satisfactory under EBR-II operating conditions

  16. Engineering and material aspects of impurity control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The design of impurity control devices for fusion energy devices is discussed from the engineering and materials viewpoint. First, examples of impurity control devices are presented, and the plasma edge environment for which they are designed is briefly described. Materials concerns related to the design of the components are discussed and some currently proposed designs presented. Engineering tools available to the designer are listed, and some commonly encountered engineering analysis problems described

  17. Method of plasma impurity control without magnetic divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schivell, J.F.

    1977-06-01

    A method is proposed for controlling impurity generation in a tokomak by skimming and pumping the scrape-off. This method avoids many of the complications of a magnetic divertor, such as specially configured magnetic fields, toroidal symmetry, and inefficient use of toroidal field volume. Estimates are given for operating parameters. Impurity reductions of as much as a factor of 10 should be achievable. The necessary high-capacity pump would employ either titanium gettering or cryocondensation

  18. Ca2+ influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca 2+ signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca 2+ elevation is mainly via Ca 2+ influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca 2+ influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca 2+ ] i transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca 2+ ] i . The stretch-induced [Ca 2+ ] i elevation was attenuated in Ca 2+ -free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca 2+ ] i by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd 3+ , ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca 2+ ] i elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca 2+ influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP

  19. On the photo-ionization of impurity centres in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomak, M.

    1982-10-01

    The dependence of the photo-ionization cross-section on photon energy is calculated. The impurity potential is assumed to be of the Hulthen potential type and bound state wave function is calculated variationally. The results show that, at least in some cases, the Hulthen potential may describe the impurity better than the hydrogen or delta function potentials. (author)

  20. Effect of current profile evolution on plasma-limiter interaction and the energy confinement time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Bol, K.; Bretz, N.

    1979-04-01

    Experiments conducted on the PLT tokamak have shown that both plasma-limiter interaction and the gross energy confinement time are functions of the gas influx during the discharge. By suitably controlling the gas influx, it is possible to contract the current channel, decrease impurity radiation from the core of the discharge, and increase the gross energy confinement time, whether the aperture limiters were of tungsten, stainless steel or carbon

  1. Demixing of impurities and hydrogen as deduced from Zeff profiles in the boronized ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuer, K.H.; Roehr, H.; Engelhardt, W.; Fussmann, G.; Kallenbach, A.; Kurzan, B.; Murmann, H.D.

    1990-01-01

    Substantial progress towards fusion has been made in the confinement, stability and heating of tokamak plasmas. The transport behaviour of magnetically confined plasmas, however, is still an unsolved problem. The transport mechanisms of hydrogen and of impurities are known to be different, leading to phenomena such as impurity accumulation on axis, especially in good confinement regimes, and more generally to demixing of the various species. Besides energy losses from impurity radiation, one has to be concerned about dilution of the fuel-ion density, and about effects that impurities may have on the main ion and electron transport. To understand the transport behaviour of the different plasma species, one needs their spatial density profiles. It is convenient to represent the various impurities by a characteristic impurity ion with a density n z and a fictive charge Z (Z = Σn i Z i 2 / Σn i Z i ; i ≥ 2). A typical value for Z is 7, indicating that light impurities are dominating. Comparing the different profiles, we find characteristic differences in the electron, proton and impurity transport behaviour. (orig./AH)

  2. Neutron activation determination of impurities in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanova, M.M.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.; Obraztsova, T.V.; Saidakhmedov, K.Kh.

    1984-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation techniques of impurity element determination in molybdenum and MoO 3 (solid and powdered samples) have been developed. When determining impurities of Na, K, Mn, Cu, W, Re molybdenum has been irradiated by thermal neutrons in reactor for 20 min, the sample mass constituted 200-300 mg, sample cooling time after irradiation - 2.5-3.5 h. It is shown that in the process of Cr, Fe, Co, Zn determination the samples should be irradiated with thermal neutrons, and in the process of Sb, Ta and Ni determination - with resonance and fast neutrons. Simultaneous determination of the elements during irradiation with neutrons with reactor spectrum is possible. When determining P and S the samples are irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons and β-activity of samples and comparison samples are measured using β-spectrometer with anthracene crystal. The techniques developed permit to determine impurities in Mo with a relative standard deviation 0.07-0.15 and lower boundaries of contents determined - 10 -4 - 10 -7 %

  3. Separation coefficients of liquid-vapor in systems formed by yttrium chloride with some impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, V.T.; Nikiforova, T.V.; Nisel'son, L.A.; Telegin, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Using equilibrium Rayleigh distillation in the 800-950 deg C temperature range, separation coefficients of liquid-vapor for systems, formed by yttrium chloride with Co, Cr, Ni, Mn, Fe, Cu, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Li impurities are determined. The impurity concentration lies within 0.02-0.4 mass. % limits of each impurity, and total impurity concentration does not exceed 1 mass. %. The tested impurities, except for calcium, are more volatile than the base, yttrium trichloride. In most systems negative deviation from the Raoult's law is observed

  4. Application of secondary ion emission to impurity control in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The extent to which high Z impurities enter the plasma of a magnetic confinement fusion device depends on the kinetic energy, angle of emission, and very importantly, the charge state of the ejected material. We have been studying both the fundamental process of secondary ion emission and possible techniques for producing surfaces which give rise to high ion fractions during sputtering, with a view to assessing the potential of this approach to impurity control in tokamaks. By carefully choosing materials exposed to fusion plasmas and by properly modifying the surface it may be possible to insure that nearly all the impurities are ejected as ions. As long as certain gas blanket configurations are avoided and especially if a divertor is used, it should then be possible to remove the impurities before they reach the plasma. The relative merits of a variety of materials are considered with regard to this application

  5. Ca2+ influx and efflux in animal cells in the presence of panax notoginseng extracts: investigated by using 45Ca as a radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yuanyou; Liu Ning; Mo Shangwu; Liao Jiali; Xu Falun

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of extracts of Panax notoginseng on Ca 2+ influx and efflux in isolated rat visceral organs was investigated by using 45 Ca as a radioactive tracer. The results indicated that both extracts, the total flavonoids and total saponins of Panax notoginseng had significant influence on Ca 2+ influx and efflux in the isolated rat aorta, heart, and kidney, in those organs it could markedly block 45 Ca entering into cell and could facilitate efflux of intracellular Ca 2+ . Compared with the total flavonoids, total saponins had stronger role in the regulation of Ca 2+ influx and efflux. Also, regulation effects of Ca 2+ influx and efflux of the total saponins were compared with positive drug Verapamil, or even better. This implies that the total flavonoids and total saponins of Panax notoginseng have calcium antagonistic effect, and both may be the active ingredients in Panax notoginseng for coronary heart disease treatment. (authors)

  6. A validated stability-indicating LC method for the separation of enantiomer and potential impurities of Linezolid using polar organic mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Satyanarayana Raju

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although a number of methods are available for evaluating Linezolid and its possible impurities, a common method for separation if its potential impurities, degradants and enantiomer in a single method with good efficiency remain unavailable. With the objective of developing an advanced method with shorter runtimes, a simple, precise, accurate stability-indicating LC method was developed for the determination of purity of Linezolid drug substance and drug products in bulk samples and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of its impurities and degradation products. This method is capable of separating all the related substances of Linezolid along with the chiral impurity. This method can also be used for the estimation of assay of Linezolid in drug substance as well as in drug product. The method was developed using Chiralpak IA (250 mm×4.6 mm, 5 μm column. A mixture of acetonitrile, ethanol, n-butyl amine and trifluoro acetic acid in 96:4:0.10:0.16 (v/v/v/v ratio was used as a mobile phase. The eluted compounds were monitored at 254 nm. Linezolid was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, linearity, accuracy, robustness and system suitability. Keywords: HPLC, Linezolid, Validation, Polar organic mode, Stability-indicating

  7. Impurity penetration through the stochastic layer near the separatrix in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, D.K.; Herrera, J.J.E.; Rantsev-Kartinov, V.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that a stochastic layer produced by ripple perturbations near the separatrix in tokamaks, leads to anomalous plasma flow out of the bulk plasma along perturbed field lines, which brings out impurities. This suggests that the stochastic layer may play a cleaning role. There is an opposite process of anomalous impurity diffusion into the plasma. The balance of these two processes defines the impurity concentration in the bulk plasma. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Impact of the Injection Protocol on an Impurity's Stationary State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamayun, Oleksandr; Lychkovskiy, Oleg; Burovski, Evgeni; Malcomson, Matthew; Cheianov, Vadim V.; Zvonarev, Mikhail B.

    2018-06-01

    We examine stationary-state properties of an impurity particle injected into a one-dimensional quantum gas. We show that the value of the impurity's end velocity lies between zero and the speed of sound in the gas and is determined by the injection protocol. This way, the impurity's constant motion is a dynamically emergent phenomenon whose description goes beyond accounting for the kinematic constraints of the Landau approach to superfluidity. We provide exact analytic results in the thermodynamic limit and perform finite-size numerical simulations to demonstrate that the predicted phenomena are within the reach of the ultracold gas experiments.

  9. Low-Z impurity transport in DIII-D - observations and implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Houlberg, W.A.; Baylor, L.R.; West, W.P.; Baker, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Impurity transport studies on DIII-D have revealed transport phenomena that are qualitatively consistent with that expected from turbulence transport theory in some cases and neoclassical transport theory in other cases. The transport model proposed here, which assumes that the total impurity transport is a linear sum of turbulence-driven transport and neoclassical transport, is shown to reproduce many of these observed features. This transport model is then applied to burn condition calculations, revealing that profile effects associated with neoclassical transport have a large effect on the maximum allowable impurity fraction in machines based on achieving neoclassical transport levels

  10. Impurity transport and plasma rotation in the ISX-B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Murray, L.E.; Crume, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Recent calculations have shown that when external momentum sources and plasma rotation are included in the neoclassical theory, the standard results for impurity transport can be strongly altered. Under appropriate conditions, inward convection is reduced by co-injection and enhanced by counter-injection. In order to examine the theoretical predictions, several observations of impurity transport have been made in the ISX-B tokamak during neutral-beam injection for comparison with the transport seen with Ohmic heating alone. Both intrinsic contaminants and deliberately introduced test impurities display a behaviour that is in qualitative agreement with the predicted beam-driven effects. These correlations are particularly noticeable when the comparisons are made for deuterium when the impurity transport in the Ohmically heated discharges exhibits neoclassical-like characteristics, i.e. accumulation and long confinement times. Similar but smaller effects are observed in beam-heated hydrogen discharges; neoclassical-like behaviour is not seen in Ohmically heated hydrogen sequences. Emphasis has been placed on measuring toroidal plasma rotation, and semiquantitative comparisons with the theories of beam-induced impurity transport have been made. It is possible that radial electric fields other than those associated with momentum transfer and increased anomalous processes during injection could also play a role. (author)

  11. Impurity-defect induced noncentrosymmetricity in nonlinear optical processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2009-01-01

    Noncentrosymmetric nanosize-material processes in cadmium iodide are formed by doping it with the impurity copper. The noncentrosymmetricity in the processes are probed by the observation of the second-order optical susceptibility χ ijk (2) . The value of χ ijk (2) is found to depend fashionably on the impurity content of the nanomaterials. The results also show that a significant enhancement in the noncentrosymmetric response is achieved in nanomaterials with reduced sizes and at low temperatures.

  12. Effect of impurities on vacancy migration energy in Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Sakuraya, S.; Tanimoto, J.; Ohnuki, S.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of impurities, such as carbon, nitrogen, helium and hydrogen, on microstructural evolution in pure iron were investigated by means of a multi-beam electron microscope. Growth rate of dislocation loops were measured to calculate vacancy migration energies. In all irradiation temperature conditions, both the size and the number density of dislocation loops were increased as a function of dose. Irradiation with more impurities showed an increase in the temperature dependence of the dislocation loop growth rate compared to irradiation with little impurities. The in situ experiment indicated that the net migration energy of vacancies could be increased due to trapping by impurities, and the effect of C and N on the migration energy of vacancy would be larger than that of W, V, Ta. Furthermore, H and He would increase vacancy migration energy greater than C and N, as well as W, V, Ta. The density functional theory (DFT), applied to the atomic models of BCC iron, indicated an increase in vacancy migration energy by the trapping of impurity atoms, that is a good agreement with this in situ experiment

  13. Interaction between impurities in Ag dilute alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolas, K.; Wodniecka, B.; Wodniecki, P.; Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow

    1977-01-01

    Time dependent perturbed angular correlation measurements of gamma radiation in 111 Cd after 111 In decay were performed in AgPd and AgPt alloys. The concentration of Pd or Pt atoms being the nearest neighbours to the probe atoms is much higher than that one deduced from random impurity distribution. This effect results from the attractive interaction between the In probe atoms and Pt or Pd impurity atoms in silver host lattice. The binding energy of InPd and InPt complexes was measured as 135 +- 9 meV and 171 +- 9 meV, respectively. (author)

  14. Impurity studies in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isler, R.C.; Horton, L.D.; Crume, E.C.; Howe, H.C.; Voronov, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    Impurities have played an important role in the initial stages of operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility. Cleanup practices have been adequate enough that plasmas heated by ECH only can be operated in a quasi-steady state; however, neutral beam injected plasmas always collapse to a low temperature. It is not clear whether impurity radiation is actually responsible for initiating the collapse, but at the time the stored energy reaches a maximum, there are indications of poloidal asymmetries in radiation from low ionization stages, such as observed in marfes, which could play a dominant role in the plasma evolution. 3 refs., 5 figs

  15. Dynamics of an impurity in a one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massel, F; Kantian, A; Giamarchi, T; Daley, A J; Törmä, P

    2013-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of an impurity in a harmonic trap that is kicked with a well-defined quasi-momentum, and interacts with a bath of free fermions or interacting bosons in a one-dimensional lattice configuration. Using numerical and analytical techniques we investigate the full dynamics beyond linear response, which allows us to quantitatively characterize states of the impurity in the bath for different parameter regimes. These vary from a tightly bound molecular state in a strongly interacting limit to a polaron (dressed impurity) and a free particle for weak interactions, with composite behaviour in the intermediate regime. These dynamics and different parameter regimes should be readily realizable in systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. (paper)

  16. Quasi-regular impurity distribution driven by charge-density wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldea, I.; Badescu, M.

    1991-09-01

    The displacive motion of the impurity distribution immersed into the one-dimensional system has recently been studied in detail as one kind of quasi-regularity driven by CDW. As a further investigation of this problem we develop here a microscopical model for a different kind of quasi-regular impurity distribution driven by CDW, consisting of the modulation in the probability of occupied sites. The dependence on impurity concentration and temperature of relevant CDW quantities is obtained. Data reported in the quasi-1D materials NbSe 3 and Ta 2 NiSe 7 (particularly, thermal hysteresis effects at CDW transition) are interpreted in the framework of the present model. Possible similarities to other physical systems are also suggested. (author). 38 refs, 7 figs

  17. Dynamic conductivity modified by impurity resonant states in doping three-dimensional Dirac semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Chen; Zheng, Shi-Han; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Li, Jun; Yang, Mou

    2018-04-01

    The impurity effect is studied in three-dimensional Dirac semimetals in the framework of a T-matrix method to consider the multiple scattering events of Dirac electrons off impurities. It has been found that a strong impurity potential can significantly restructure the energy dispersion and the density of states of Dirac electrons. An impurity-induced resonant state emerges and significantly modifies the pristine optical response. It is shown that the impurity state disturbs the common longitudinal optical conductivity by creating either an optical conductivity peak or double absorption jumps, depending on the relative position of the impurity band and the Fermi level. More importantly, these conductivity features appear in the forbidden region between the Drude and interband transition, completely or partially filling the Pauli block region of optical response. The underlying physics is that the appearance of resonance states as well as the broadening of the bands leads to a more complicated selection rule for the optical transitions, making it possible to excite new electron-hole pairs in the forbidden region. These features in optical conductivity provide valuable information to understand the impurity behaviors in 3D Dirac materials.

  18. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  19. Novel sound phenomena in superfluid helium in aerogel and other impure superfluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusov, Peter; Brusov, Paul; Lawes, Gavin; Lee, Chong; Matsubara, Akira; Ishikawa, Osamu; Majumdar, Pinaki

    2003-01-01

    During the last decade new techniques for producing impure superfluids with unique properties have been developed. This new class of systems includes superfluid helium confined to aerogel, HeII with different impurities (D 2 , N 2 , Ne, Kr), superfluids in Vycor glasses, and watergel. These systems exhibit very unusual properties including unexpected acoustic features. We discuss the sound properties of these systems and show that sound phenomena in impure superfluids are modified from those in pure superfluids. We calculate the coupling between temperature and pressure oscillations for impure superfluids and for superfluid He in aerogel. We show that the coupling between these two sound modes is governed either by c∂ρ/∂c or σρ a ρ s (for aerogel) rather than thermal expansion coefficient ∂ρ/∂T, which is enormously small in pure superfluids. This replacement plays a fundamental role in all sound phenomena in impure superfluids. It enhances the coupling between the two sound modes that leads to the existence of such phenomena as the slow mode and heat pulse propagation with the velocity of first sound observed in superfluids in aerogel. This means that it is possible to observe in impure superfluids such unusual sound phenomena as slow pressure (density) waves and fast temperature (entropy) waves. The enhancement of the coupling between the two sound modes decreases the threshold values for nonlinear processes as compared to pure superfluids. Sound conversion, which has been observed in pure superfluids only by shock waves should be observed at moderate sound amplitude in impure superfluids. Cerenkov emission of second sound by first sound (which never been observed in pure superfluids) could be observed in impure superfluids

  20. Spectroscopic study of sources and control of impurities in TMX-U. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, T.L.; Allen, S.L.; Moos, H.W.

    1984-11-01

    Two absolutely calibrated euv instruments have been used to study the impurity characteristics in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). One instrument is a spectrograph that measures the time histories of several impurity emission lines in a single plasma shot. The other instrument is a monochromator that measures time-resolved radial profiles of a particular impurity emission line. The common intrinsic impurities found in TMX-U are C, N, O, and Ti. It has been shown that a large fraction of oxygen and nitrogen in the plasma is associated with the neutral beams. The plasma wall is the main source of carbon. In general, the concentration of each of the impurities is low (<1%), and the power radiated by them is less than 10 kW, which is a small portion of the total input power to the plasma. The concentrations of the impurities can be reduced substantially by glow discharge cleaning and titanium gettering

  1. Difference in oxygen impurity behavior between repetitive short discharges and one long discharge on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen impurity behaviors of one long duration discharge and repetition of short duration discharges have been investigated in TRIAM-1M. In the former case, the OII line intensity divided by the line averaged electron density, which is considered as a monitor of oxygen concentration on the plasma facing surface (PFS), decreased with the time constant, τ d , of 30-50 s during the discharge due to the hydrogen flux to PFS. In the latter case, τ d is in the range of 70-600 s. There exists a big difference of global behavior of oxygen impurity between both cases. The difference seems to result from the absence or presence of the interval time between the discharges. The oxygen concentration on PFS increases during the interval time due to adsorption of H 2 O. The time constant of the increase in the oxygen concentration is evaluated to be about 5500 s from Langmuir adsorption isotherms analysis

  2. Fermi-edge transmission resonance in graphene driven by a single Coulomb impurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnatak, Paritosh; Goswami, Srijit; Kochat, Vidya; Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2014-07-11

    The interaction between the Fermi sea of conduction electrons and a nonadiabatic attractive impurity potential can lead to a power-law divergence in the tunneling probability of charge through the impurity. The resulting effect, known as the Fermi edge singularity (FES), constitutes one of the most fundamental many-body phenomena in quantum solid state physics. Here we report the first observation of FES for Dirac fermions in graphene driven by isolated Coulomb impurities in the conduction channel. In high-mobility graphene devices on hexagonal boron nitride substrates, the FES manifests in abrupt changes in conductance with a large magnitude ≈e(2)/h at resonance, indicating total many-body screening of a local Coulomb impurity with fluctuating charge occupancy. Furthermore, we exploit the extreme sensitivity of graphene to individual Coulomb impurities and demonstrate a new defect-spectroscopy tool to investigate strongly correlated phases in graphene in the quantum Hall regime.

  3. Impurity enrichment and radiative enhancement using induced SOL flow in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; West, W.P.; Wood, R.D.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the efficacy of using induced scrap-off-layer (SOL) flow to preferentially enrich impurities in the divertor plasma. This SOL floe is produced through simultaneous deuterium gas injection at the midplane and divertor exhaust. Using this SOL flow, an improvement in enrichment (defined as the ratio of impurity fraction in the divertor to that in the plasma core) has been observed for all impurities in trace-level experiments (i.e., impurity level is non-perturbative), with the degree of improvement increasing with impurity atomic number. In the case of argon, exhaust gas enrichment using modest SOL flow is as high as 17. Using this induced SOL flow technique and argon injection, radiative plasmas have been produced that combine high radiation losses (P rad /P input > 70%), low core fuel dilution (Z eff E > 1.0 τ E,ITER93H )

  4. Nonmagnetic impurities in magnetic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetic field arising around the nonmagnetic impurity in magnetic superconductor with triplet pairing are found. The relationship of these results with the data of recent (gm)sR experiments in heavy fermionic superconductor U 1 - x Th x Be 13 is presented

  5. Physical behaviors of impure atoms during relaxation of impure NiAl-based alloy grain boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liping; Jiang Bingyao; Liu Xianghuai; Li Douxing

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation with the energetics described by the embedded atom method has been employed to mainly study physical behaviors of boron atoms during relaxation of the Ni 3 Al-x at.% B grain boundary. During relaxation of impure Ni 3 Al grain boundaries, authors suggest that for different types of impure atoms (Mg, B, Cr and Zr atoms etc.), as the segregating species, they have the different behaviors, but as the inducing species, they have the same behaviors, i.e. they all induce Ni atoms to substitute Al atoms. Calculations show that at the equilibrium, when x(the B bulk concentration) increases from 0.1 to 0.9, the peak concentration of B increases, correspondently, the peak concentration of Ni maximizes but the valley concentration of Al minimizes, at x=0.5. The calculations also show the approximate saturation of Ni at the grain boundary at x=0.5

  6. Occurrence and Characterization Microstructure of Iron Impurities in Halloysite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Yan, Chunjie; Wang, Hongquan; Xiao, Guoqi; Tu, Dong

    2015-09-01

    The quality of the clays and over all halloysite are mostly associated with minor amounts of ferruginous impurities content, since this element gives an undesirable reddish color to the halloysite mineral. Hence, finding out the modes of occurrence of iron in halloysite is of prime importance in the value addition and optimum utilization of halloysite. In order to analyze the occurrence of iron impurities in halloysite, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were combined with wet chemical analysis methods to study the low-grade halloysite. The results indicated that the mineral phases of iron impurities in the concentrates are mainly composed of amounts of magnetite, goethite and hematite. Two types of occurrences for iron impurities have been found. One is single crystalline mineral consist in the halloysite, which contains three different phases of Goethite FeO(OH) (44.75%), Magnetite Fe3O4 (27.43%) and Hematite Fe2O3 (31.96%). The other is amorphous Fe-Al-Si glial materials. This study is of significance in the theoretical research on the halloysite mineralogy and in the developmental practice of halloysite in coal measures.

  7. Multiple x-ray diffraction applied to the study of crystal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, L.P.

    1983-06-01

    The x-ray multiple diffraction technique is used in the study of impurities concentration and localization in the crystal lattice, implemented with the fundamental observation that the impurities cannot be distributed with the same spatial group symmetry of the crystal. This fact could introduce scattered intensity in the crystal reciprocal lattice forbidden nodes. This effect was effectively observed in multiple diffraction diagrams, where a reinforcement of the scattered intensity in the pure crystal is produced, when choosing conveniently the involved reflections. The reflectivity theory was developed in the kinematic case, which take into account the scattering by the impurities atoms, and the analysis showed that, in the first approximation, the impurities can influence both in the allowed and forbidden positions for the pure crystal. (L.C.J.A.)

  8. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadnyk, V. I., E-mail: vasylstadnyk@ukr.net; Kiryk, Yu. I. [Lviv National University (Ukraine)

    2013-07-15

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined.

  9. Refractometry of TGS crystals doped with L-threonine impurity under uniaxial pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadnyk, V. I.; Kiryk, Yu. I.

    2013-01-01

    The temperature and spectral dependences of the refractive indices of triglycine sulphate (TGS) crystals doped with L-threonine impurity have been investigated. It is established that the introduction of an impurity weakens the temperature dependence of refractive indices. The electronic polarizability, refractions, and parameters of UV oscillators of mechanically deformed impurity crystals are calculated. The temperature coefficients of the phase transition shift are determined

  10. Gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugov, Yu.S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of concentration, separation, detection in gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds including low-boiling gases, reactive gases, organometallic compounds, free metals, anions, etc. are reviewed. Methods of reaction gas chromatography for determining reactive gases, water, anions, metal chelates are considered in detail as well as methods of reaction-sorption concentration and reaction gas extraction. The application of gas chromatograpny ior anaiysis of water and atmosphere contamination, for determination of impurities in highly pure solid substances and gases is described

  11. Sensitivity of graphene flakes and nanorings to impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-Ukrainskaya Str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the influence of impurity on the graphene flakes and nanorings conductance. Based on the jumping Hamiltonian for graphene electrons with its direct diagonalization, we obtain the density of states. Further, the tunneling current is calculated for the following contacts: graphene flake-metal, graphene flake-quantum dots, graphene nanoring-quantum dots. We analyze the effect of the flake dimensions and the positions of the adsorbed molecule of impurity on the characteristic properties of the tunneling current.

  12. Impurity-defect induced noncentrosymmetricity in nonlinear optical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2009-12-15

    Noncentrosymmetric nanosize-material processes in cadmium iodide are formed by doping it with the impurity copper. The noncentrosymmetricity in the processes are probed by the observation of the second-order optical susceptibility {chi}{sub ijk}{sup (2)}. The value of {chi}{sub ijk}{sup (2)} is found to depend fashionably on the impurity content of the nanomaterials. The results also show that a significant enhancement in the noncentrosymmetric response is achieved in nanomaterials with reduced sizes and at low temperatures.

  13. Characterization of impurities in biogas before and after upgrading to vehicle fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Johansson, Ulrika [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Biogases produced by digesting organic wastes, residual sludge from waste water treatment, energy crops,byproducts from industry or in landfills contain impurities which can be harmful for components that will be in contact with the biogas during its utilization. In this project, the impurities present in biogases have been mapped out depending upon which feedstock is digested. P-cymene och D-limonene, two terpenes, have been found to be characteristics for biogases produced from the digestion of waste including household wastes while an 'oil' fraction containing alkanes with 9 to 13 carbon atoms is characteristic for biogases produced at waste water treatment plants. Ketones and sulfur compounds are found in biogases produced from the digestion of food industry wastes or energy crops. It was not possible to characterize impurities in biogases produced in farm plants digesting manure because not enough samples were analyzed from these plants. In order to understand the relation between the feedstock and the impurities present in the biogas, an extensive study on feedstock characterization must be conducted. One question to be answered is if these impurities only originate from the volatilization from the feedstock and in this case, why only these specific compounds are found at significant concentrations. In this study we have also studied how effective purification/upgrading techniques are to remove impurities that have been identified in biogases. En general comment is that the upgraded gas still contains a part of the characteristic impurities which have been identified for each feedstock at different levels of concentration depending on which technique has been used. The results show that activated carbon filters are more or less effective. Some of them can remove more than 90 % of the impurities while others remove less that 10 %. Results show also that the amine scrubber have very moderate effects on the impurities composition. In that case, the

  14. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hieslmair, H.

    1997-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L n values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions

  15. Upper critical magnetic field of superconducting films with magnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemberger, T.R.

    1978-01-01

    The upper critical magnetic field, H/sub c2/(T), of In-Mn and Pb-Mn alloy films was measured. H/sub c2/ was determined from the resistance of the films. The results were compared with the theory of Fulde and Maki. This theory assumes that the electron-phonon coupling is weak, and that the interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins is weak. The theory predicts that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature-independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. Furthermore, it predicts explicitly the temperature dependence of H/sub c2/. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the In-Mn alloy films is well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, despite the moderately strong electron-phonon coupling and the strong interaction between the impurity spins and the conduction electron spins. The temperature dependence of H/sub c2/ for the Pb-Mn alloy films is not well described by the Fulde-Maki theory, probably due to the strong electron-phonon coupling in Pb. However, even without a quantitatively correct theory, one can conclude from the Pb-Mn data that the pair-breaking effect of the magnetic impurities is temperature independent, and that the pair-breaking effects of the magnetic impurities and the applied magnetic field are additive. For some of the Pb-Mn alloy films, there was a region of positive curvature in H/sub c2/(T) near the zero-field transition temperature. This positive curvature is not understood

  16. Limitation of the influx of formation water into oil wells. Ogranichenie pritoka plastovykh vod v neftyanye skvazhiny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulgakov, R.T.; Gazizov, A.Sh.; Gabdullin, R.G.; Yusupov, I.G.

    1976-01-01

    The problems of limiting the influx of water into oil wells are examined. On the basis of studies, systemization, and generalization of the reasons for the premature flooding of wells, the improvement of strata by polymer-cement solutions with consolidating liquid phases is considered. A detailed description is given of the technology and results of cementing well using solutions based on plugging cement and water-soluble phenol-formaldehyde resins of the TSD-9 type. Results are reported on the study of the properties of selective water-insulating substances based on acrylamide monomers and hydrolyzed polyacrylonitriles. Industrial testing of these materials is generalized. An economic evaluation is made of the efficiency of measures undertaken to prevent water influx into oil wells.

  17. Self-consistent modeling of plasma response to impurity spreading from intense localized source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koltunov, Mikhail

    2012-07-01

    Non-hydrogen impurities unavoidably exist in hot plasmas of present fusion devices. They enter it intrinsically, due to plasma interaction with the wall of vacuum vessel, as well as are seeded for various purposes deliberately. Normally, the spots where injected particles enter the plasma are much smaller than its total surface. Under such conditions one has to expect a significant modification of local plasma parameters through various physical mechanisms, which, in turn, affect the impurity spreading. Self-consistent modeling of interaction between impurity and plasma is, therefore, not possible with linear approaches. A model based on the fluid description of electrons, main and impurity ions, and taking into account the plasma quasi-neutrality, Coulomb collisions of background and impurity charged particles, radiation losses, particle transport to bounding surfaces, is elaborated in this work. To describe the impurity spreading and the plasma response self-consistently, fluid equations for the particle, momentum and energy balances of various plasma components are solved by reducing them to ordinary differential equations for the time evolution of several parameters characterizing the solution in principal details: the magnitudes of plasma density and plasma temperatures in the regions of impurity localization and the spatial scales of these regions. The results of calculations for plasma conditions typical in tokamak experiments with impurity injection are presented. A new mechanism for the condensation phenomenon and formation of cold dense plasma structures is proposed.

  18. Gold and Platinum in Silicon - Isolated Impurities Complexes

    CERN Multimedia

    Mcglynn, P

    2002-01-01

    %IS357 :\\\\ \\\\ Gold and platinum impurities in silicon are exploited for the control of minority carrier lifetimes, and this important feature has resulted in sustained research interest over several decades. Although the properties of isolated substitutional Au~atoms are well understood, this is not the case for Pt. Considerable uncertainty exists regarding the nature of several Pt related defects observed in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance~(EPR) and Photo~Luminescence~(PL). One of the objectives of this experiment is to exploit the transformation of radioactive Au isotopes as a means of producing specific Pt centres, and to use our thorough knowledge of Au in silicon to guide in the interpretation of data obtained for the centres when they transform to Pt.\\\\ \\\\ In addition to isolated impurities, the experiment also addresses the question of pairs of atoms formed by Au and Pt. Studies of these impurity pairs have been reported, but the benefits of a direct comparison of the defects in both the Au and Pt form...

  19. Impurity production and transport in the boundary layer of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.

    1987-01-01

    The processes by which impurities are produced and enter the discharge are discussed. Emphasis is placed on sputtering at the limiter and an analytical global model is described which incorporates the self-stabilizing effects whch control the edge temperature. Predictions of the scaling of edge temperature and of total radiated power are compared with experimental data from JET and other tokamaks operating with limiters. Under many conditions the scaling of the edge conditions and of the radiated power is accurately predicted. Impurity transport in the boundary and the question of how to control the boundary layer is then discussed. The example of the Impurity Control Limiter on DITE is described. (author)

  20. Reduction of impurities and activation of lithium orthosilicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knitter, Regina; Fischer, Ulrich; Herber, Stefan; Adelhelm, Christel

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of lithium orthosilicate pebbles by melt-spraying enables a facile reprocessing of irradiated material by direct remelting. However, the necessary waiting period for the reprocessing is determined by the long-term activation of the material under irradiation that is dominated by the impurities. The activation characteristics for the current composition of lithium orthosilicate pebbles were assessed on the basis of three-dimensional activation calculations for a fusion power reactor. The calculations were used to identify critical amounts of impurities and were compared to the results of a hypothetical, pure material without impurities, as well as to a calculated Li-6 enriched OSi composition.

  1. Modelling of impurity transport in ergodic layer of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Y.; Masuzaki, S.; Morisaki, T.; Ohyabu, N.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Motojima, O.; Kobayashi, M.

    2008-01-01

    The impurity transport properties in the ergodic layer of LHD are analyzed by the 3D edge transport code as well as 1D simple model, which is used to illustrate the essential transport terms in the analysis. It is found that as the plasma density increases the edge surface layers, very edge region of the ergodic layer, enters friction dominant regime, resulting in impurity retention. It is considered that the cause for the retention is both temperature drop and the flow acceleration in the edge surface layers. The edge surface layers can provide effective retention of impurities coming from divertor as well as the first wall, because of the geometrical advantage of the edge region of LHD. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Interplay of light and heavy impurities in a fusion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaja, Mustafa [IPP, Garching (Germany); Tokar, Mikhail [IEK4, Juelich FZ, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Radiation from impurities eroded from the walls can lead to a broad spectrum of spectacular phenomena in fusion devices An example of such events are breathing oscillations observed in the large helical device (LHD), in long pulse discharges with a stainless steel divertor. They were characterized with oscillations of a period of a second in various plasma parameters. By optimizing magnetic geometry this operation mode, leading to a deteriorate plasma performance, can be avoided. Nonetheless it is of interest and practical importance to understand and firmly predict conditions for breathing phenomenon, in particular, in view of similar impurity environment in W-7 X stellarator. A qualitative explanation for breathing oscillations proposed earlier presumes that they arise due to non-linear synergetic interplay of diverse physical processes. A one-dimensional non-stationary model, describing the generation and transport of main, impurity particles and heat by including the radiation of high-Z (Fe) and low-Z (C and O) impurities is elaborated here. The calculations predict the appearance of oscillations in the relevant range of plasma parameters, reproduce well experimentally observed amplitudes and period of oscillations. It demonstrates that the smaller the fraction of the plasma interaction with a stainless steel surface, the higher the light impurity concentration needed to excite the breathing oscillations. This shows a way to avoid oscillations in future experiments.

  3. Risk evaluation of impurities in topical excipients: The acetol case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jente Boonen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical excipients for topical use may contain impurities, which are often neglected from a toxicity qualification viewpoint. The possible impurities in the most frequently used topical excipients were evaluated in-silico for their toxicity hazard. Acetol, an impurity likely present in different topical pharmaceutical excipients such as propylene glycol and glycerol, was withheld for the evaluation of its health risk after dermal exposure.An ex-vivo in-vitro permeation study using human skin in a Franz Diffusion Cell set-up and GC as quantification methodology showed a significant skin penetration with an overall Kp value of 1.82×10−3 cm/h. Using these data, limit specifications after application of a dermal pharmaceutical product were estimated. Based on the TTC approach of Cramer class I substances, i.e. 1800 µg/(day∙person, the toxicity-qualified specification limits of acetol in topical excipients were calculated to be 90 µg/mL and 180 µg/mL for propylene glycol and glycerol, respectively.It is concluded that setting specification limits for impurities within a quality-by-design approach requires a case-by-case evaluation as demonstrated here with acetol. Keywords: Acetol, Impurity, Excipients, Transdermal penetration, Specification limits

  4. Non-Fermi-liquid theory of a compactified Anderson single-impurity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, G.; Hewson, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a version of the symmetric Anderson impurity model (compactified) which has a non-Fermi-liquid weak-coupling regime. We find that in the Majorana fermion representation the perturbation theory can be conveniently developed in terms of Pfaffian determinants and we use this formalism to calculate the impurity free energy, self-energies, and vertex functions. We derive expressions for the impurity and the local conduction-electron charge and spin-dynamical susceptibilities in terms of the impurity self-energies and vertex functions. In the second-order perturbation theory, a linear temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity is obtained, and the leading corrections to the impurity specific heat are found to behave as TlnT. The impurity static susceptibilities have terms in lnT to zero, first, and second order, and corrections of ln 2 T to second order as well. The conduction-electron static susceptibilities, and the singlet superconducting paired static susceptibility at the impurity site, have second-order corrections lnT, which indicate that a singlet conduction-electron pairing resonance forms at the Fermi level (the chemical potential). When the perturbation theory is extended to third order logarithmic divergences are found in the only vertex function Γ 0,1,2,3 (0,0,0,0), which is nonvanishing in the zero-frequency limit. We use the multiplicative renormalization-group (RG) method to sum all the leading-order logarithmic contributions. This gives a weak-coupling low-temperature energy scale T c =Δexp[-(1/9)(πΔ/U) 2 ], which is the combination of the two independent coupling parameters. The RG scaling equation is derived and shows that the dimensionless coupling constant bar U=U/πΔ is increased as the high-energy scale Δ is reduced, so our perturbational results can be justified in the regime T approx-gt T c

  5. Effect of light impurities on the early stage of swelling in austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igata, N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse the early stage of swelling and clarify the role of light impurities (nitrogen) in swelling of austenitic stainless steel. Recent results show that light impurities affect the swelling of 316 stainless steel under HVEM irradiation up to 10 dpa. At low concentration of light impurities the radiation swelling increases then decreases through the maximum as the concentration of light impurities increases. In the present paper the theoretical model is presented for the explanation of this effect. The model is based on the two factors: the influence of absorbed impurities on the voids caused by the production of an additional gas pressure in voids for their stabilization and the effect of impurities segregated around the surface of voids by the lowering of surface tension. These two affects are taken into account in the calculations of the critical size and the growth rate of cavities. The theoretical predictions on the radiation swelling rate dependent on the impurity concentration and temperature coincided with the experimental results on 316 stainless steel irradiated by HVEM. (orig.)

  6. Behavior of oxygen impurities in tokamak. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharif, R N; Beket, A H [Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Aurhority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Impurity transport in tokamak plasma is a subject of great importance in present day tokamak experiments. The transport of oxygen as an impurity element in small tokamak was studied theoretically. The viscosity coefficient of oxygen has been calculated in different approximation 13 and 21 moment approximation, taking into consideration {chi}>>1,{chi}{omega}{sub c} {tau}. It was found that in 21 moment approximation additional terms added to the perturbation from equilibrium leads to increase in viscosity coefficients than in 13 moments approximation. 9 figs.

  7. Influence of impurities on the fuel retention in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retention in metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors. This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogen retention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ion energy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma composition is a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma will also contain impurities like helium or seeded impurities like argon. The experiments treated in this thesis were performed in the linear plasma generator PSI-2 at Forschungszentrum Juelich, and are divided in 3 parts: The first experiments cover the plasma diagnostics, most importantly the measurement of the impurity ion concentration in the plasma by optical emission spectroscopy. This is a requirement for the later experiments with mixed plasmas. Diagnostics like Langmuir probe measurements are not applicable for this task because they do not distinguish different ionic species. The results also show that the impurity ion concentrations cannot be simply concluded from the neutral gas input to the plasma source, because the relation between the neutral gas concentration and impurity ion concentration is not linear. The second and main part of the experiments covers the exposure of tungsten samples to deuterium plasmas. In the experiments, the impurity ion type and concentration is variated, to verify the general influence of helium and argon on the deuterium retention in tungsten samples exposed at low temperatures. It shows that helium impurities reduce the amount of retained deuterium by a factor of 3, while argon impurities slightly increase the total retention, compared to exposures to a pure deuterium plasma. Cross-sections of the exposed tungsten surfaces via TEM-imaging reveal a 12-15 nm deep helium nanobubble layer at the surface of the sample, while for the cases of

  8. Influence of impurities on the fuel retention in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is the influence of plasma impurities on the hydrogen retention in metals, in the scope of plasma-wall-interaction research for fusion reactors. This is addressed experimentally and by modelling. The mechanisms of the hydrogen retention are influenced by various parameters like the wall temperature, ion energy, flux and fluence as well as the plasma composition. The plasma composition is a relevant factor for hydrogen retention in fusion reactors, as their plasma will also contain impurities like helium or seeded impurities like argon. The experiments treated in this thesis were performed in the linear plasma generator PSI-2 at Forschungszentrum Juelich, and are divided in 3 parts: The first experiments cover the plasma diagnostics, most importantly the measurement of the impurity ion concentration in the plasma by optical emission spectroscopy. This is a requirement for the later experiments with mixed plasmas. Diagnostics like Langmuir probe measurements are not applicable for this task because they do not distinguish different ionic species. The results also show that the impurity ion concentrations cannot be simply concluded from the neutral gas input to the plasma source, because the relation between the neutral gas concentration and impurity ion concentration is not linear. The second and main part of the experiments covers the exposure of tungsten samples to deuterium plasmas. In the experiments, the impurity ion type and concentration is variated, to verify the general influence of helium and argon on the deuterium retention in tungsten samples exposed at low temperatures. It shows that helium impurities reduce the amount of retained deuterium by a factor of 3, while argon impurities slightly increase the total retention, compared to exposures to a pure deuterium plasma. Cross-sections of the exposed tungsten surfaces via TEM-imaging reveal a 12-15 nm deep helium nanobubble layer at the surface of the sample, while for the cases of

  9. TeBG- and CBG-bound steroid hormones in rabbits are available for influx into uterus in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, G.; Steingold, K.A.; Pardridge, W.M.; Judd, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    The metabolic clearance rate (MCR) of gonadal or adrenal steroid hormones in rabbits often does not bear the expected inverse relationship with hormone binding to testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) or corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). This suggests TeBG or CBG may not impede steroid hormone delivery to tissues. The effects of rabbit plasma proteins on the influxes of 3 H-labeled steroids from the circulation into the rabbit uterus were measured in vivo using a tissue sampling single-injection technique. In the absence of plasma proteins, estradiol (E 2 ) and testosterone (T) were freely diffusible through the uterine microvasculature (i.e., extraction >80%). The extractions of dihydrostestosterone (DHT) and corticosterone (B) ranged from 60 to 72%, while that of cortisol (F) was reduced at 40%. Rabbit serum exerted no inhibition of the influxes of the steroids tested. The influxes of T and B greatly exceeded the rates that would be expected if only the free and albumin-bound fractions estimated in vitro were diffusible in vivo. However, the extraction of [ 3 H]corticosteroid-binding globulin or bovine [ 3 H]albumin were low, consistent with little, if any, extravascular uptake of the plasma proteins. The results indicate both albumin-bound and globulin-bound steroid hormone are available for transport into the uterus in the rabbit in vivo without significant exodus of the plasma protein, per se

  10. High Ca2+ Influx During Traumatic Brain Injury Leads to Caspase-1-Dependent Neuroinflammation and Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Muneer, P M; Long, Mathew; Conte, Adriano Andrea; Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Pfister, Bryan J

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that high Ca 2+ influx during traumatic brain injury induces the activation of the caspase-1 enzyme, which triggers neuroinflammation and cell apoptosis in a cell culture model of neuronal stretch injury and an in vivo model of fluid percussion injury (FPI). We first established that stretch injury causes a rapid increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ level, which activates interleukin-converting enzyme caspase-1. The increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ level and subsequent caspase-1 activation culminates into neuroinflammation via the maturation of IL-1β. Further, we analyzed caspase-1-mediated apoptosis by TUNEL staining and PARP western blotting. The voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, mitigated the stretch injury-induced neuroinflammation and subsequent apoptosis by blocking Ca 2+ influx during the injury. The effect of tetrodotoxin was similar to the caspase-1 inhibitor, zYVAD-fmk, in neuronal culture. To validate the in vitro results, we demonstrated an increase in caspase-1 activity, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in fluid percussion-injured animals. Our data suggest that neuronal injury/traumatic brain injury (TBI) can induce a high influx of Ca 2+ to the cells that cause neuroinflammation and cell death by activating caspase-1, IL-1β, and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. We conclude that excess IL-1β production and cell death may contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cognitive impairment associated with TBI.

  11. Impurities enhance caking in lactose powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpin, M.; Bertelsen, H.; Dalberg, A.

    2017-01-01

    Caking of lactose and other dry ingredients is a common problem in the dairy and food industries. The lactose production process includes different purification steps, depending on the type of lactose produced. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate how the remaining impurities (i.......e. non-lactose components) affect the caking tendency of the final powder. The results from a combination of different methods, including dynamic vapor sorption, characterization of the physicochemical composition and assessment of caking with a ring shear tester, suggested humidity caking. Larger...... amounts of impurities in the lactose powder resulted in enhanced moisture sorption and greater caking tendency. These findings emphasize the importance of controlling the washing and purification steps throughout the production process in order to limit caking in the final product...

  12. Investigation of impurity confinement in lower hybrid wave heated plasma on EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Wu, Z. W.; Zhang, L.; Gao, W.; Ye, Y.; Chen, K. Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, W.; Yang, X. D.; Chen, Y. J.; Zhang, P. F.; Huang, J.; Wu, C. R.; Morita, S.; Oishi, T.; Zhang, J. Z.; Duan, Y. M.; Zang, Q.; Ding, S. Y.; Liu, H. Q.; Chen, J. L.; Hu, L. Q.; Xu, G. S.; Guo, H. Y.; the EAST Team

    2018-01-01

    The transient perturbation method with metallic impurities such as iron (Fe, Z  =  26) and copper (Cu, Z  =  29) induced in plasma-material interaction (PMI) procedure is used to investigate the impurity confinement characters in lower hybrid wave (LHW) heated EAST sawtooth-free plasma. The dependence of metallic impurities confinement time on plasma parameters (e.g. plasma current, toroidal magnetic field, electron density and heating power) are investigated in ohmic and LHW heated plasma. It is shown that LHW heating plays an important role in the reduction of the impurity confinement time in L-mode discharges on EAST. The impurity confinement time scaling is given as 42IP0.32Bt0.2\\overline{n}e0.43Ptotal-0.4~ on EAST, which is close to the observed scaling on Tore Supra and JET. Furthermore, the LHW heated high-enhanced-recycling (HER) H-mode discharges with ~25 kHz edge coherent modes (ECM), which have lower impurity confinement time and higher energy confinement time, provide promising candidates for high performance and steady state operation on EAST.

  13. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, F A; Zagorulko, Yu I; Alexseev, V V [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (USSR)

    1980-05-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  14. Behaviour of carbon-bearing impurity suspensions in sodium loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Alexseev, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The experimental estimation results of the carbon-bearing impurity particle sizes in sodium by the sedimentometric analysis methods are presented. The techniques and results of the mass transfer calculations between the sodium flows contained the carbon-bearing impurity disperse phase, and the channel walls, the carbon particles solution kinetics and the soluble carbon near-wall concentration in channel with allowance for the flow-wall mass transfer processes, are given. (author)

  15. Deep-sea spherules from Pacific clay - Mass distribution and influx rate. [extraterrestrial origins from optical and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, M. T.; Davis, P. A., Jr.; Nishiizumi, K.; Millard, H. T., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    From 411 kg of Pacific clay, 22 mg of stony spherules and 50 mg of iron spherules larger than 150 microns were concentrated. The extraterrestrial origin of these particles was evaluated with the aid of optical and electron microscopy and atomic absorption elemental analysis. An expression for the integral number of stony particles from this sediment in the mass range 20-300 micrograms was derived. The world-wide influx rate of stony particles in the mass range which survive atmospheric heating and ocean sediment storage is calculated to be 90 tons/yr. The relative contributions of ablation debris vs fused interplanetary dust to the influx of stony spherules is discussed, but no conclusions could be made.

  16. Impurity flux collection at the plasma edge of the tokamak MT-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Bakos, J.S.; Petravich, G.

    1989-09-01

    Fluxes of intrinsic and injected impurities and background plasma ions were collected using a bidirectional probe at the plasma edge of the tokamak MT-1. The directional and radial dependences of injected impurities and plasma ions were very similar indicating a strong coupling of the impurity transport to the dynamics of the background plasma. The measured intrinsic concentration of about 10 -4 for Mo at the plasma edge is derived. (author) 17 refs.; 5 figs

  17. Instability of homogeneous distribution of charged substitutional impurity in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevskij, M.I.; Ershov, S.N.; Panteleev, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested of instability of uniform impurity distribution in a semiconductor. The mechanism is associated with the vacancy wind effect and deflection from local neutrality in case of impurity concentration fluctuation occurrence. It is shown that the mechanism can be realized by irradiation of silicon doped with group-3 and group 5 elements

  18. Stability-indicating HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/MS impurity profiling of the anti-malarial drug lumefantrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Mathieu; Suleman, Sultan; Baert, Bram; Vangheluwe, Elien; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Jansen, Frans H; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2011-02-28

    Lumefantrine (benflumetol) is a fluorene derivative belonging to the aryl amino alcohol class of anti-malarial drugs and is commercially available in fixed combination products with β-artemether. Impurity characterization of such drugs, which are widely consumed in tropical countries for malaria control programmes, is of paramount importance. However, until now, no exhaustive impurity profile of lumefantrine has been established, encompassing process-related and degradation impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished pharmaceutical products (FPPs). Using HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/ion trap/MS, a comprehensive impurity profile was established based upon analysis of market samples as well as stress, accelerated and long-term stability results. In-silico toxicological predictions for these lumefantrine related impurities were made using Toxtree® and Derek®. Several new impurities are identified, of which the desbenzylketo derivative (DBK) is proposed as a new specified degradant. DBK and the remaining unspecified lumefantrine related impurities are predicted, using Toxtree® and Derek®, to have a toxicity risk comparable to the toxicity risk of the API lumefantrine itself. From unstressed, stressed and accelerated stability samples of lumefantrine API and FPPs, nine compounds were detected and characterized to be lumefantrine related impurities. One new lumefantrine related compound, DBK, was identified and characterized as a specified degradation impurity of lumefantrine in real market samples (FPPs). The in-silico toxicological investigation (Toxtree® and Derek®) indicated overall a toxicity risk for lumefantrine related impurities comparable to that of the API lumefantrine itself.

  19. A pharmacology guided approach for setting limits on product-related impurities for bispecific antibody manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Sharmila; Sonoda, Junichiro; Tully, Timothy; Williams, Ambrose J; Yang, Feng; Macchi, Frank; Hudson, Terry; Chen, Mark Z; Liu, Shannon; Valle, Nicole; Cowan, Kyra; Gelzleichter, Thomas

    2018-04-13

    bFKB1 is a humanized bispecific IgG1 antibody, created by conjoining an anti-Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1) half-antibody to an anti-Klothoβ (KLB) half-antibody, using the knobs-into-holes strategy. bFKB1 acts as a highly selective agonist for the FGFR1/KLB receptor complex and is intended to ameliorate obesity-associated metabolic defects by mimicking the activity of the hormone FGF21. An important aspect of the biologics product manufacturing process is to establish meaningful product specifications regarding the tolerable levels of impurities that copurify with the drug product. The aim of the current study was to determine acceptable levels of product-related impurities for bFKB1. To determine the tolerable levels of these impurities, we dosed obese mice with bFKB1 enriched with various levels of either HMW impurities or anti-FGFR1-related impurities, and measured biomarkers for KLB-independent FGFR1 signaling. Here, we show that product-related impurities of bFKB1, in particular, high molecular weight (HMW) impurities and anti-FGFR1-related impurities, when purposefully enriched, stimulate FGFR1 in a KLB-independent manner. By taking this approach, the tolerable levels of product-related impurities were successfully determined. Our study demonstrates a general pharmacology-guided approach to setting a product specification for a bispecific antibody whose homomultimer-related impurities could lead to undesired biological effects. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Isotope effects of trapped electron modes in the presence of impurities in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Dong, J. Q.; Sun, A. P.; Qu, H. P.; Lu, G. M.; He, Z. X.; He, H. D.; Wang, L. F.

    2016-04-01

    The trapped electron modes (TEMs) are numerically investigated in toroidal magnetized hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas, taking into account the effects of impurity ions such as carbon, oxygen, helium, tungsten and others with positive and negative density gradients with the rigorous integral eigenmode equation. The effects of impurity ions on TEMs are investigated in detail. It is shown that impurity ions have substantially-destabilizing (stabilizing) effects on TEMs in isotope plasmas for {{L}ez}\\equiv {{L}ne}/{{L}nz}>0 (TEM turbulences in hydrogenic isotope plasmas with and without impurities are performed. The relations between the maximum growth rate of the TEMs with respect to the poloidal wave number and the ion mass number are given in the presence of the impurity ions. The results demonstrate that the maximum growth rates scale as {γ\\max}\\propto Mi-0.5 in pure hydrogenic plasmas. The scale depends on the sign of its density gradient and charge number when there is a second species of (impurity) ions. When impurity ions have density profiles peaking inwardly (i.e. {{L}ez}\\equiv {{L}ne}/{{L}nz}>0 ), the scaling also depends on ITG parameter {ηi} . The maximum growth rates scale as {γ\\max}\\propto M\\text{eff}-0.5 for the case without ITG ({ηi}=0 ) or the ITG parameter is positive ({ηi}>0 ) but the impurity ion charge number is low (Z≤slant 5.0 ). However, when {ηi}>0 and the impurity ion charge number is moderate (Z=6.0-8.0 ), the scaling law is found as {γ\\max}\\propto M\\text{eff}-1.0 . Here, Z is impurity ion charge number, and the effective mass number, {{M}\\text{eff}}=≤ft(1-{{f}z}\\right){{M}i}+{{f}z}{{M}z} , with {{M}i} and {{M}Z} being the mass numbers of the hydrogenic and impurity ions, respectively, and {{f}z}=Z{{n}0z}/{{n}0e} being the charge concentration of impurity ions. In addition, with regard to the case of {{L}ez}<0 , the maximum growth rate scaling is {γ\\max}\\propto Mi-0.5 . The possible relations of the results

  1. [Kinetic properties of the fructose influx across the brush border of the rat jejunum. Effects of a diet rich in fructose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzoulon, G

    1978-10-01

    The unidirectional influx (i.e. initial rate of uptake) of D-fructose across the brush border of rat jejunum is a saturable function of concentration, with a Kt of 125 mM, which implicates a carrier mechanism. This mechanism appears to be very specific for fructose in view of the lack of influx inhibition observed in the presence of large concentrations of the sugars or polyols, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-mannose, D-xylose, L-sorbose, D-tagatose, sorbitol or mannitol. D-Fructose uptake is inhibited by incubation, preceded by a 30-min preincubation in the same inhibitory conditions, in the absence of Na, or in the presence of metabolic poisons, NaF, 2,4-dinitrophenol, monoiodoacetate. Phloridzin (10-3 M), with or without preincubation, has no effect on uptake. D-Fructose influx is stimulated by fructose feeding, mainly because the augmentation of the number of active sites of transfer: Jmax is increased two-fold, Kt is more weakly affected.

  2. Impurity Deionization Effects on Surface Recombination DC Current-Voltage Characteristics in MOS Transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zuhui; Jie Binbin; Sah Chihtang

    2010-01-01

    Impurity deionization on the direct-current current-voltage characteristics from electron-hole recombination (R-DCIV) at SiO 2 /Si interface traps in MOS transistors is analyzed using the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall recombination kinetics and the Fermi distributions for electrons and holes. Insignificant distortion is observed over 90% of the bell-shaped R-DCIV curves centered at their peaks when impurity deionization is excluded in the theory. This is due to negligible impurity deionization because of the much lower electron and hole concentrations at the interface than the impurity concentration in the 90% range. (invited papers)

  3. Impurity effects on the grain boundary cohesion in copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunguo; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Sandström, Rolf; Lilja, Christina

    2017-12-01

    Segregated impurities at grain boundaries can dramatically change the mechanical behavior of metals, while the mechanism is still obscure in some cases. Here, we suggest a unified approach to investigate segregation and its effects on the mechanical properties of polycrystalline alloys using the example of 3 s p impurities (Mg, Al, Si, P, or S) at a special type Σ 5 (310 )[001 ] tilt grain boundary in Cu. We show that for these impurities segregating to the grain boundary, the strain contribution to the work of grain boundary decohesion is small and that the chemical contribution correlates with the electronegativity difference between Cu and the impurity. The strain contribution to the work of dislocation emission is calculated to be negative, while the chemical contribution is calculated to be always positive. Both the strain and chemical contributions to the work of dislocation emission generally become weaker with the increasing electronegativity from Mg to S. By combining these contributions together, we find, in agreement with experimental observations, that a strong segregation of S can reduce the work of grain boundary separation below the work of dislocation emission, thus embrittling Cu, while such an embrittlement cannot be produced by a P segregation because it lowers the energy barrier for dislocation emission relatively more than for work separation.

  4. Assessment of Embrittlement of VHTR Structural Alloys in Impure Helium Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crone, Wendy; Cao, Guoping; Sridhara, Kumar

    2013-05-31

    The helium coolant in high-temperature reactors inevitably contains low levels of impurities during steady-state operation, primarily consisting of small amounts of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} from a variety of sources in the reactor circuit. These impurities are problematic because they can cause significant long-term corrosion in the structural alloys used in the heat exchangers at elevated temperatures. Currently, the primary candidate materials for intermediate heat exchangers are Alloy 617, Haynes 230, Alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X. This project will evaluate the role of impurities in helium coolant on the stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in candidate alloys at elevated temperatures. The project team will: • Evaluate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack initiation and crack growth in the temperature range of 500-850°C in a prototypical helium environment. • Evaluate the effects of oxygen partial pressure on stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in impure helium at 500°C, 700°C, and 850°C respectively. • Characterize the microstructure of candidate alloys after long-term exposure to an impure helium environment in order to understand the correlation between stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation, creep crack growth, material composition, and impurities in the helium coolant. • Evaluate grain boundary engineering as a method to mitigate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth of candidate alloys in impure helium. The maximum primary helium coolant temperature in the high-temperature reactor is expected to be 850-1,000°C.Corrosion may involve oxidation, carburization, or decarburization mechanisms depending on the temperature, oxygen partial pressure, carbon activity, and alloy composition. These corrosion reactions can substantially affect long-term mechanical properties such as crack- growth rate and fracture

  5. A model of magnetic impurities within the Josephson junction of a phase qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, R P; Pappas, D P [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    We consider a superconducting phase qubit consisting of a monocrystalline sapphire Josephson junction with its symmetry axis perpendicular to the junction interfaces. Via the London gauge, we present a theoretical model of Fe{sup 3+} magnetic impurities within the junction that describes the effect of a low concentration of such impurities on the operation of the qubit. Specifically, we derive an interaction Hamiltonian expressed in terms of angular momentum states of magnetic impurities and low-lying oscillator states of a current-biased phase qubit. We discuss the coupling between the qubit and impurities within the model near resonance. When the junction is biased at an optimal point for acting as a phase qubit, with a phase difference of {pi}/2 and impurity concentration no greater than 0.05%, we find only a slight decrease in the Q factor of less than 0.01%.

  6. Enhanced carbon influx into TFTR supershots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, A.T.; Bush, C.E.; Dylla, H.F.; Owens, D.K.; Pitcher, C.S.; Ulrickson, M.

    1990-12-01

    Under some conditions, a very large influx of carbon into TFTR occurs during beam injection into low recycling plasmas (the Supershot regime). These carbon ''blooms'' result in serious degradation of plasma parameters. The sources of this carbon have been identified as hot spots on the TFTR bumper limiter at or near the last closed flux surface. Two separate temperature thresholds have been identified. One, at about 1650 degree C, is consistent with radiation enhanced sublimation. The other, at about 2300 degree C, appears to be thermal sublimation of carbon from the limiter. To account for the increased density caused by the blooms, near unity recycling of the carbon at the limiter by physical sputtering is required; this effect is expected from laboratory measurements, and we believe we are seeing it on TFTR. The sources of the carbon blooms are sites which have either loosely attached fragments of limiter material (caused by damage) or surfaces nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field lines. Such surfaces may have local power depositions two orders of magnitude higher than usual. The TFTR team modified the limiter during the opening of Winter 1989--90. The modifications greatly reduced the number and magnitude of the blooms, so that they are no longer a problem

  7. Impurity doping effects on the orbital thermodynamic properties of hydrogenated graphene, graphane, in Harrison model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    Using the Harrison model and Green's function technique, impurity doping effects on the orbital density of states (DOS), electronic heat capacity (EHC) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) of a monolayer hydrogenated graphene, chair-like graphane, are investigated. The effect of scattering between electrons and dilute charged impurities is discussed in terms of the self-consistent Born approximation. Our results show that the graphane is a semiconductor and its band gap decreases with impurity. As a remarkable point, comparatively EHC reaches almost linearly to Schottky anomaly and does not change at low temperatures in the presence of impurity. Generally, EHC and MS increases with impurity doping. Surprisingly, impurity doping only affects the salient behavior of py orbital contribution of carbon atoms due to the symmetry breaking.

  8. Lattice site location of electrical dopant impurities in group-III nitrides

    CERN Document Server

    Amorim, Lígia; Temst, Kristiaan; Wahl, Ulrich

    Dopants are impurities introduced in semiconductors in small quantities to tailor the material characteristics, the effects of which depend on the exact site the dopant occupies in the crystal lattice. The lattice location of impurities is, thus, crucial for the overall understanding of the semiconductor characteristics. In general, several techniques can be used to investigate the lattice site of an impurity, the most accurate and dedicated being emission channeling. However, a characteristic of this technique is that it requires the implantation of radioactive probes, usually created and accelerated in a radioactive ion beam facility. In some cases, emission channeling might however be the only technique capable to investigate the lattice sites occupied by the impurity atoms, provided an appropriate isotope for this technique can be used. For instance, the use of other methods such as Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, perturbed angular correlations, Mössbauer spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorptio...

  9. Non-Fermi-liquid behavior: Exact results for ensembles of magnetic impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Zvyagin, A A

    2002-01-01

    In this work we consider several exactly solvable models of magnetic impurities in critical quantum antiferromagnetic spin chains and multichannel Kondo impurities. Their ground state properties are studied and the finite set of nonlinear integral equations, which exactly describe the thermodynamics of the models, is constructed. We obtain several analytic low-energy expressions for the temperature, magnetic field, and frequency dependences of important characteristics of exactly solvable disordered quantum spin models and disordered multichannel Kondo impurities with essential many-body interactions. We show that the only low-energy parameter that gets renormalized is the velocity of the low-lying excitations (or the effective crossover scale connected with each impurity); the others appear to be universal. In our study several kinds of strong disorder important for experiments were used. Some of them produce low divergences in certain characteristics of our strongly disordered critical systems (compared wit...

  10. Impurity characterization of magnesium diuranate using simultaneous TG–DTA–FTIR measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raje, Naina, E-mail: nraje@barc.gov.in [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Ghonge, Darshana K. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India); Hemantha Rao, G.V.S. [NFC, ECIL Post, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, A.V.R. [Analytical Chemistry Division, B.A.R.C., Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-05-15

    Current studies describe the application of simultaneous thermogravimetry–differential thermal analysis – evolved gas analysis techniques for the compositional characterization of magnesium diuranate (MDU) with respect to the impurities present in the matrix. The stoichiometric composition of MDU was identified as MgU{sub 2}O{sub 7}⋅3H{sub 2}O. Presence of carbonate and sulphate as impurities in the matrix was confirmed through the evolved gas analysis using Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectrometry detection. Carbon and magnesium hydroxide content present as impurities in magnesium diuranate have been determined quantitatively using TG and FTIR techniques and the results are in good agreement. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis of magnesium diuranate suggests the presence of magnesium hydroxide as impurity in the matrix. Also these studies confirm the formation of magnesium uranate, uranium sesquioxide and uranium dioxide above 1000 °C, due to the decomposition of magnesium diuranate.

  11. Analysis of impurity effect on Silicide fuels of the RSG-GAS core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran-Surbakti

    2003-01-01

    Simulation of impurity effect on silicide fuel of the RSG-GAS core has been done. The aim of this research is to know impurity effect of the U-234 and U-236 isotopes in the silicide fuels on the core criticality. The silicide fuels of 250 g U loading and 19.75 of enrichment is used in this simulation. Cross section constant of fuels and non-structure material of core are generated by WIMSD/4 computer code, meanwhile impurity concentration was arranged from 0.01% to 2%. From the result of analysis can be concluded that the isotopes impurity in the fuels could make trouble in the core and the core can not be operated at critical after a half of its cycle length (350 MW D)

  12. Impurity engineering of Czochralski silicon used for ultra large-scaled-integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deren; Chen, Jiahe; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2009-01-01

    Impurities in Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) used for ultra large-scaled-integrated (ULSI) circuits have been believed to deteriorate the performance of devices. In this paper, a review of the recent processes from our investigation on internal gettering in Cz-Si wafers which were doped with nitrogen, germanium and/or high content of carbon is presented. It has been suggested that those impurities enhance oxygen precipitation, and create both denser bulk microdefects and enough denuded zone with the desirable width, which is benefit of the internal gettering of metal contamination. Based on the experimental facts, a potential mechanism of impurity doping on the internal gettering structure is interpreted and, a new concept of 'impurity engineering' for Cz-Si used for ULSI is proposed.

  13. Impurity modes in the one-dimensional XXZ Heisenberg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, J.M.; Leite, R.V.; Landim, R.R.; Costa Filho, R.N.

    2014-01-01

    A Green's function formalism is used to calculate the energy of impurity modes associated with one and/or two magnetic impurities in the one-dimensional Heisenberg XXZ magnetic chain. The system can be tuned from the Heisenberg to the Ising model varying a parameter λ. A numerical study is performed showing two types of localized modes (s and p). The modes depend on λ and the degeneracy of the acoustic modes is broken.

  14. Fabrication of Gate-tunable Graphene Devices for Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Studies with Coulomb Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Han Sae; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wong, Dillon; Germany, Chad; Kahn, Salman; Kim, Youngkyou; Aikawa, Andrew S.; Desai, Dhruv K.; Rodgers, Griffin F.; Bradley, Aaron J.; Velasco, Jairo; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Wang, Feng; Zettl, Alex; Crommie, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to its relativistic low-energy charge carriers, the interaction between graphene and various impurities leads to a wealth of new physics and degrees of freedom to control electronic devices. In particular, the behavior of graphene’s charge carriers in response to potentials from charged Coulomb impurities is predicted to differ significantly from that of most materials. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) can provide detailed information on both the spatial and energy dependence of graphene's electronic structure in the presence of a charged impurity. The design of a hybrid impurity-graphene device, fabricated using controlled deposition of impurities onto a back-gated graphene surface, has enabled several novel methods for controllably tuning graphene’s electronic properties.1-8 Electrostatic gating enables control of the charge carrier density in graphene and the ability to reversibly tune the charge2 and/or molecular5 states of an impurity. This paper outlines the process of fabricating a gate-tunable graphene device decorated with individual Coulomb impurities for combined STM/STS studies.2-5 These studies provide valuable insights into the underlying physics, as well as signposts for designing hybrid graphene devices. PMID:26273961

  15. Low-Z impurity transport studies using CXRS at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Cecilia; McDermott, Rachael; Dux, Ralph; Angioni, Clemente; Bobkov, Volodymyr; Kappatou, Athina; Lebschy, Alexander; Puetterich, Thomas; Viezzer, Eleonora [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Impurities in fusion plasmas arise from many sources including the erosion of material from plasma facing components and the intentional injection of impurities for control of the radiation losses. With the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) diagnostics at ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) the density profiles of low-Z impurity species can be measured with high spatial and temporal resolution and can, thus, be used to investigate the transport of these impurities. Previous work on this topic at AUG has focused primarily on steady state profiles, which deliver the ratio of the diffusive and convective transport coefficients. However, from the time response of the density profiles after applying an external perturbation (e.g. a fast impurity puff) the convective and diffusive components of the transport can be separately determined. The work presented here aims to achieve this by a less conventional approach that is better suited to the limited time resolution of the CXRS diagnostics; namely, a sinusoidal modulation of the boron densities invoked by modulating the power from the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas. The work presented here aims to achieve this by an approach that is better suited to the limited time resolution of the CXRS diagnostics; namely, a sinusoidal modulation of the boron densities invoked by modulating the power from the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) antennas. We present the first measurements of the boron density modulation as well as the machine and plasma parameter dependencies of the boron response to the ICRF power.

  16. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool

  17. PKA Controls Calcium Influx into Motor Neurons during a Rhythmic Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Sieburth, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine) rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels. PMID:24086161

  18. PKA controls calcium influx into motor neurons during a rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP has been implicated in the execution of diverse rhythmic behaviors, but how cAMP functions in neurons to generate behavioral outputs remains unclear. During the defecation motor program in C. elegans, a peptide released from the pacemaker (the intestine rhythmically excites the GABAergic neurons that control enteric muscle contractions by activating a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling pathway that is dependent on cAMP. Here, we show that the C. elegans PKA catalytic subunit, KIN-1, is the sole cAMP target in this pathway and that PKA is essential for enteric muscle contractions. Genetic analysis using cell-specific expression of dominant negative or constitutively active PKA transgenes reveals that knockdown of PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons blocks enteric muscle contractions, whereas constitutive PKA activation restores enteric muscle contractions to mutants defective in the peptidergic signaling pathway. Using real-time, in vivo calcium imaging, we find that PKA activity in the GABAergic neurons is essential for the generation of synaptic calcium transients that drive GABA release. In addition, constitutively active PKA increases the duration of calcium transients and causes ectopic calcium transients that can trigger out-of-phase enteric muscle contractions. Finally, we show that the voltage-gated calcium channels UNC-2 and EGL-19, but not CCA-1 function downstream of PKA to promote enteric muscle contractions and rhythmic calcium influx in the GABAergic neurons. Thus, our results suggest that PKA activates neurons during a rhythmic behavior by promoting presynaptic calcium influx through specific voltage-gated calcium channels.

  19. Impurities in chromium deposits produced by electroplating and physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Impurity contents in electrodeposited (hexavalent and trivalent) chromium deposits and physically vapor deposited (thermal evaporation, electron beam evaporation and rf-sputtering) were compared. Oxygen is the key impurity obtained in electrodeposited films but it can be minimized in hexavalent plating solutions by operating at high temperature, e. g., 85 C. Electrodeposits produced in trivalent chromium plating solutions and physically vapor deposited films have much higher oxygen contents than electrodeposits produced in hexavalent chromium solutions operated at temperatures around 85 C. Depending on the target material used for physically vapor deposited films, these films can also have high amounts of other impurities.

  20. Universal scaling for the quantum Ising chain with a classical impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollaro, Tony J. G.; Francica, Gianluca; Giuliano, Domenico; Falcone, Giovanni; Palma, G. Massimo; Plastina, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    We study finite-size scaling for the magnetic observables of an impurity residing at the end point of an open quantum Ising chain with transverse magnetic field, realized by locally rescaling the field by a factor μ ≠1 . In the homogeneous chain limit at μ =1 , we find the expected finite-size scaling for the longitudinal impurity magnetization, with no specific scaling for the transverse magnetization. At variance, in the classical impurity limit μ =0 , we recover finite scaling for the longitudinal magnetization, while the transverse one basically does not scale. We provide both analytic approximate expressions for the magnetization and the susceptibility as well as numerical evidences for the scaling behavior. At intermediate values of μ , finite-size scaling is violated, and we provide a possible explanation of this result in terms of the appearance of a second, impurity-related length scale. Finally, by going along the standard quantum-to-classical mapping between statistical models, we derive the classical counterpart of the quantum Ising chain with an end-point impurity as a classical Ising model on a square lattice wrapped on a half-infinite cylinder, with the links along the first circle modified as a function of μ .

  1. Transport of plasma impurities and the role of the plasma edge layers for the hot plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drawin, H.W.

    1987-01-01

    The first problem of impurity transport is removal of alpha particles from the interior outward. The second problem is the control of impurities produced in the plasma-wall interaction. Finally there is the problem of using injected impurities for assessment of transport coefficients. The influence of impurity radiation on the power balance of a DT plasma is considered. Limiters and divertors as impurity sources are mentioned and transport equations for impurities are given. As an example iron impurities transport in a hydrogen plasma is considered. The role of the edge layer is emphasized. Finally requirements for plasma diagnostics are stated. 50 refs., 10 figs. (qui)

  2. Choice of capillary electrophoresis systems for the impurity profiling of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.J; Somsen, G.W; de Jong, G.J.

    In order to develop a strategy for the impurity profiling of drugs, the possibilities of some capillary electrophoresis systems were investigated. A mixture containing a drug and some of its possible impurities has been used as a model problem. The test compounds were investigated by capillary zone

  3. Zeroth order phase transition in a holographic superconductor with single impurity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Hua Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    We investigate the single normal impurity effect in a superconductor by the holographic method. When the size of impurity is much smaller than the host superconductor, we can reproduce the Anderson theorem, which states that a conventional s-wave superconductor is robust to a normal (non-magnetic)

  4. Plasma shut-down with fast impurity puff on ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pautasso, G.; Fuchs, C.J.; Gruber, O.; Maggi, C.F.; Maraschek, M.; Puetterich, T.; Rohde, V.; Wittmann, C.; Wolfrum, E.; Cierpka, P.; Beck, M.

    2007-01-01

    The massive injection of impurity gas into a plasma has been proved to reduce forces and localized thermal loads caused by disruptions in tokamaks. This mitigation system is routinely used on ASDEX Upgrade to shut down plasmas with a locked mode. The plasma response to impurity injection and the mechanism of reduction of the mechanical forces is discussed in the paper

  5. Impurity model for mixed-valent Mn3+/Mn4+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.; Lee, K.

    1997-01-01

    Intermediate valent tri- and tetravalent manganese ions play an important role in LaMnO 3 -based systems. We consider a Mn impurity with five orbitals in cubic symmetry which hybridize with conduction electrons. The exchange interaction in the d shell maximizes the impurity spin. We study the valence of the Mn impurity as a function of the splitting of the e g to t 2g orbitals in zero magnetic field and for the totally spin-polarized state. The lifting of the degeneracy of the e g levels due to a small quadrupolar field, related to the Mn-O bond length or a Jahn-Teller effect, is also investigated. Possible implications on the magnetoresistance are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  6. Impurity effects in two-electron coupled quantum dots: entanglement modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta Coden, Diego S; Romero, Rodolfo H; Ferrón, Alejandro; Gomez, Sergio S

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the electronic and optical properties of two-electron quantum dots with a two-dimensional Gaussian confinement potential. We study the effects of Coulomb impurities and the possibility of manipulating the entanglement of the electrons by controlling the confinement potential parameters. The degree of entanglement becomes highly modulated by both the location and charge screening of the impurity atom, resulting in two regimes: one of low entanglement and the other of high entanglement, with both of them mainly determined by the magnitude of the charge. It is shown that the magnitude of the oscillator strength of the system could provide an indication of the presence and characteristics of impurities and, therefore, the degree of entanglement. (paper)

  7. Coefficients of viscosity for heavy impurity element in tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharif, R N; Bekhit, A M [Plasma Physics dept., NRC, Atomic energy Authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The transport of heavy impurity element in to tokamak was studied theoretically. The viscosity coefficients of chromium impurities has been calculated in 13 and 21 moment approximation, in the limit of strong fields where is the gyrofrequency of species it was found that the off diagonal coefficient approximately tends to zero. This means that the friction force in the off-diagonal direction is very small, for the perpendicular viscosity coefficient the two approximation coincide to each other. 3 figs.

  8. Radiation losses from oxygen and iron impurities in a high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, C.; Michelis, C. de; Mattioli, M.

    1976-06-01

    Radiation and ionization losses due to impurities present in a high temperature plasma have been calculated for a light element (oxygen), which is completely stripped in the core of existing Tokamak discharges, and a heavy one (iron), which is only partially stripped. Two extreme cases have been treated: in the first one coronal equilibrium is reached; the radiated power is then equal to the product of the electron density, the impurity density, and a function of the electron temperature; in the second one impurities recycle with a constant radial velocity v 0 in a background plasma; radiation and ionization losses are proportional to the impurity flux and are a decreasing function of the diffusion velocity. The results presented can be used to evaluate losses in a practical case [fr

  9. Impurity radiation from a beam-plasma neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.

    1995-01-01

    Impurity radiation, in a worst case evaluation for a beam-plasma neutron source (BPNS), does not limit performance. Impurities originate from four sources: (a) sputtering from walls by charge exchange or alpha particle bombardment, (b) sputtering from limiters, (c) plasma desorption of gas from walls and (d) injection with neutral beams. Sources (c) and (d) are negligible; adsorbed gas on the walls of the confinement chamber and the neutral beam sources is removed by the steady state discharge. Source (b) is negligible for impinging ion energies below the sputtering threshold (T i ≤ 0.025 keV on tungsten) and for power densities to the limiter within the capabilities of water cooling (30-40 MW/m 2 ); both conditions can be satisfied in the BPNS. Source (a) radiates 0.025 MW/m 2 to the neutron irradiation samples, compared with 5 to 10 MW/m 2 of neutrons; and radiates a total of 0.08 MW from the plasma column, compared with 60 MW of injected power. The particle bombardment that yields source (a) deposits an average of 2.7 MW/m 2 on the samples, within the capabilities of helium gas cooling (10 MW/m 2 ). An additional worst case for source (d) is evaluated for present day 2 to 5 s pulsed neutral beams with 0.1% impurity density and is benchmarked against 2XIIB. The total radiation would increase a factor of 1.5 to ≤ 0.12 MW, supporting the conclusion that impurities will not have a significant impact on a BPN. (author). 61 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  10. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  11. Deep impurity levels in n-type copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The density of Nd 2-x Ce x CuO 4 monoparticle states was calculated by the method of precise diagonalization of multielectron hamiltonian of 6-zone model for CuO cluster. Emergence of a deep impurity state of a symmetry in the middle of dielectric slit, which is a mixture of d z 2-states of copper and a 1 -molecular orbital of oxygen, is shown. Fluctuation of parameters of p-d jump and energies of charge transfer provide additional fine impurity levels near the bottom of conductivity zone and ceiling of valency zone. 30 refs., 4 figs

  12. Effects of Impurity on the Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 617 in the Helium Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Sujin; Kim, Dong Jin; Lee, Gyeong Geun

    2013-01-01

    The helium coolant in the primary circuit inevitably includes minor impurities such as H 2 , CO, CH 4 , and H 2 O under operating condition. Material degradation is aggravated through oxidation, carburization, and decarburization under the impure helium environment. In this study, high-temperature corrosion tests were carried out at 850-950 .deg. C in the impure helium environment. The mass changes of the specimens were measured and the microstructures were analyzed quantitatively. In addition, all corrosion tests were conducted in the pure helium environment and the results were compared to the results under the impure helium. Alloy 617 specimens showed a parabolic oxidation behavior at all temperatures under the impure helium environment. All specimens had similar microstructure in the outer Cr-oxide layers, internal Al-oxides, and carbide-depleted zone. The weight increase of the corroded specimens in the pure helium was relatively reduced. Microstructure result, oxide layer and carbide depleted zone were hardly ever observed. The impurity in helium affected the corrosion behavior of Alloy 617 and may cause a decrease in the mechanical properties. Therefore, the control of minor impurities in VHTR helium is necessary for the application of Alloy 617 to the IHX material of a VHTR

  13. The Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX: A test-bed for developing urban greenhouse gas emission measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J. Davis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX is to develop, evaluate and improve methods for measuring greenhouse gas (GHG emissions from cities. INFLUX’s scientific objectives are to quantify CO2 and CH4 emission rates at 1 km2 resolution with a 10% or better accuracy and precision, to determine whole-city emissions with similar skill, and to achieve high (weekly or finer temporal resolution at both spatial resolutions. The experiment employs atmospheric GHG measurements from both towers and aircraft, atmospheric transport observations and models, and activity-based inventory products to quantify urban GHG emissions. Multiple, independent methods for estimating urban emissions are a central facet of our experimental design. INFLUX was initiated in 2010 and measurements and analyses are ongoing. To date we have quantified urban atmospheric GHG enhancements using aircraft and towers with measurements collected over multiple years, and have estimated whole-city CO2 and CH4 emissions using aircraft and tower GHG measurements, and inventory methods. Significant differences exist across methods; these differences have not yet been resolved; research to reduce uncertainties and reconcile these differences is underway. Sectorally- and spatially-resolved flux estimates, and detection of changes of fluxes over time, are also active research topics. Major challenges include developing methods for distinguishing anthropogenic from biogenic CO2 fluxes, improving our ability to interpret atmospheric GHG measurements close to urban GHG sources and across a broader range of atmospheric stability conditions, and quantifying uncertainties in inventory data products. INFLUX data and tools are intended to serve as an open resource and test bed for future investigations. Well-documented, public archival of data and methods is under development in support of this objective.

  14. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  15. Impurity features in Ni-YSZ-H2-H2O electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utz, A.; Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion

    2011-01-01

    -of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry). This analysis yields comprehensive information on composition and lateral distribution of impurity species as well as the size of impurity features. Small impurity striations are found at the triple phase boundary (TPB) as well as on the former electrode......–electrolyte interface and the impurity features were found to be influenced by the electrode configuration and the initial behavior of the Ni electrode during thermal exposure (creep or shrinkage).Furthermore, the electrochemical performance (the line specific resistance LSR) was compared to data reported for Ni point...... anodes. Good agreement was obtained for data with comparable impurity features.Additionally, an order of magnitude estimation of the effect of SiO2 content on surface coverage with an impurity film is performed for different electrode designs (point, patterned and cermet anode) and shows different...

  16. The Consultancy Activity on In Silico Models for Genotoxic Prediction of Pharmaceutical Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Manuela; Kovarich, Simona; Bassan, Arianna; Broccardo, Lorenza; Yang, Chihae; Fioravanzo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of DNA-reactive/mutagenic or clastogenic impurities plays an important role in the regulatory process for pharmaceuticals; in this context, in silico structure-based approaches are applied as primary tools for the evaluation of the mutagenic potential of the drug impurities. The general recommendations regarding such use of in silico methods are provided in the recent ICH M7 guideline stating that computational (in silico) toxicology assessment should be performed using two (Q)SAR prediction methodologies complementing each other: a statistical-based method and an expert rule-based method.Based on our consultant experience, we describe here a framework for in silico assessment of mutagenic potential of drug impurities. Two main applications of in silico methods are presented: (1) support and optimization of drug synthesis processes by providing early indication of potential genotoxic impurities and (2) regulatory evaluation of genotoxic potential of impurities in compliance with the ICH M7 guideline. Some critical case studies are also discussed.

  17. Influence of negative substrate bias voltage on the impurity concentrations in Zr films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J.-W.; Bae, J.W.; Mimura, K.; Isshiki, M.

    2006-01-01

    Zr films were deposited on Si(1 0 0) substrates without a substrate bias voltage and with substrate bias voltages of -50 V and -100 V using a non-mass separated ion beam deposition system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry and glow discharge mass spectrometry were used to determine the impurity concentrations in a Zr target and Zr films. It was found that the total amount of impurities in the Zr film deposited at the substrate bias voltage of -50 V was much lower than that in the Zr film deposited without the substrate bias voltage. It means that applying a negative bias voltage to the substrate can suppress the increase in impurities of Zr films. Furthermore, it was confirmed that dominant impurity elements such as C, N and O have a considerable effect on the purity of Zr films and these impurities can be remarkably reduced by applying the negative substrate bias voltage

  18. Electron density of states in a one-dimensional distorted system with impurities: Coherent potential approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulka, B.R.

    1982-04-01

    A tight-binding one-dimensional distorted system with impurities is considered and the electron density of states is calculated in the coherent potential approximation. It is shown that two types of impurities, an impurity built in a chain and a domain wall (a soliton), play the essential role and a drastic reduction of the energy gap is observed for a few per cent of impurities. The experimental situation in polyacetylene is also discussed. (author)

  19. Electronic properties of iron impurity in hcp metals from Moessbauer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, C.; Delcroix, P.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in quantitative investigating the electronic properties of iron impurities in hexagonal close-packed metals. Beryllium of the highest commercially obtainable purity containing about 300 ppm residual impurities was used as a host element. Experimental evidence is given for the existence of localized electronic states which have non-spherical distribution and obviously contribute especially to the electric field gradient. Iron impurity seems to retain the same electronic behaviour as long as the host hcp metal is a normal one (Mg, Cd, Zn), but the localized electronic states seem to disappear when the host is a transition hcp metal (Co, Ti, Sc, Zr, etc.). (Z.S.)

  20. Deposition probe measurements of impurities injected into a tokamak plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Herrmann, A.

    1985-01-01

    Impurity confinement behaviour has been studied by using a deposition probe in conjunction with pellet injection. Generally, an exponential decay of the impurity efflux and nearly symmetric ion/electron side toroidal flows have been observed. During phases of strong plasma disturbances, asymmetric flow is seen, indicative of edge transport and prompt recycling from local sources. The application of ECRH may cause such disturbances. (author)

  1. Evidence for neutral beam injected oxygen impurities in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.; Moos, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    A series of experiments indicates that the principal source of impurities in the 2XIIB mirror confinement plasma experiment at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is oxygen in the neutral beams. The dependence of 0 II 539 A emissions on neutral beam current, spatial scans of oxygen emissions, impurity injection experiments, spectral scans of the 0 VI 1032 A line, and other experiments all support this conclusion

  2. Kinetic neoclassical calculations of impurity radiation profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.P. Stotler

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Modifications of the drift-kinetic transport code XGC0 to include the transport, ionization, and recombination of individual charge states, as well as the associated radiation, are described. The code is first applied to a simulation of an NSTX H-mode discharge with carbon impurity to demonstrate the approach to coronal equilibrium. The effects of neoclassical phenomena on the radiated power profile are examined sequentially through the activation of individual physics modules in the code. Orbit squeezing and the neoclassical inward pinch result in increased radiation for temperatures above a few hundred eV and changes to the ratios of charge state emissions at a given electron temperature. Analogous simulations with a neon impurity yield qualitatively similar results.

  3. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved

  4. Time-Dependent Impurity in Ultracold Fermions: Orthogonality Catastrophe and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Knap

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent experimental realization of strongly imbalanced mixtures of ultracold atoms opens new possibilities for studying impurity dynamics in a controlled setting. In this paper, we discuss how the techniques of atomic physics can be used to explore new regimes and manifestations of Anderson’s orthogonality catastrophe (OC, which could not be accessed in solid-state systems. Specifically, we consider a system of impurity atoms, localized by a strong optical-lattice potential, immersed in a sea of itinerant Fermi atoms. We point out that the Ramsey-interference-type experiments with the impurity atoms allow one to study the OC in the time domain, while radio-frequency (RF spectroscopy probes the OC in the frequency domain. The OC in such systems is universal, not only in the long-time limit, but also for all times and is determined fully by the impurity-scattering length and the Fermi wave vector of the itinerant fermions. We calculate the universal Ramsey response and RF-absorption spectra. In addition to the standard power-law contributions, which correspond to the excitation of multiple particle-hole pairs near the Fermi surface, we identify a novel, important contribution to the OC that comes from exciting one extra particle from the bottom of the itinerant band. This contribution gives rise to a nonanalytic feature in the RF-absorption spectra, which shows a nontrivial dependence on the scattering length, and evolves into a true power-law singularity with the universal exponent 1/4 at the unitarity. We extend our discussion to spin-echo-type experiments, and show that they probe more complicated nonequilibirum dynamics of the Fermi gas in processes in which an impurity switches between states with different interaction strength several times; such processes play an important role in the Kondo problem, but remained out of reach in the solid-state systems. We show that, alternatively, the OC can be seen in the energy-counting statistics

  5. Features of accumulation of radiation defects in metal with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids are being studied for the last fifty years quite intensively. Many regularities of these processes are fixed, but there are more unsolved problems. The computer simulation is one of the effective tools in finding the mechanisms of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids. The numerical solution of the system of the differential equations by means of computers describing kinetics of accumulation of radiation point defects in metals with impurity, has allowed to receive a number of new outcomes. It was revealed, that a determinative factor influential in concentration of point defects (vacancies and interstitial atoms), formed during an exposure of metal, is the correlation a speed of Frenkel twins recombination, the capture of defects by impurity atoms and absorption of defects by other drainage, for example by dislocations. If the speed of capture of interstitial atoms by impurity atoms for two - three order is lower than the recombination speed of Frenkel twins and on two - three order exceeds the speed of capture of vacancies by impurity atoms, the concentration of interstitial atoms within the first seconds of an exposure passes through a maximum, then quickly decreases in some times and after that starts slowly to grow. The change of concentration of interstitial atoms in an initial period of an exposure does not influence on the change of a vacancy concentration. Within the whole period of an exposure, during which the concentration of interstitial atoms achieves a maximum and then is reduced, the vacancy concentration is steadily enlarged. However subsequent sluggish rise of concentration of interstitial atoms during an exposure is followed by the decrease of the vacancy concentration. The most remarkable feature of the kinetics of accumulation of interstitial atoms in metals with impurity is the presence of two extremum on curve dependence of interstitial atoms on a

  6. Monitoring xenon purity in the LUX detector with a mass spectrometry system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Jon; LUX Experiment Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The LUX dark matter search experiment is a 350 kg two-phase liquid/gas xenon time projection chamber located at the 4850 ft level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. To monitor for radioactive impurities such as krypton and impurities which limit charge yield such as oxygen, LUX uses a xenon sampling system consisting of a mass spectrometer and a liquid nitrogen cold trap. The cold trap separates the gaseous impurities from a small sample of xenon and allows them to pass to the mass spectrometer for analysis. We report here on results from the LUX xenon sampling program. We also report on methods to enhance the sensitivity of the cold trap technique in preparation for the next-generation LUX-ZEPLIN experiment which will have even more stringent purity requirements.

  7. Heroin impurity profiling: trends throughout a decade of experimenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams, R; Benijts, T; Lambert, W E; Massart, D L; De Leenheer, A P

    2001-12-01

    Heroin is still one of the most frequently abused drugs of today. All over the world, law enforcement agencies try to eradicate the illicit production and trafficking of this potent and highly addictive narcotic. To this aim, important information is provided by physical and chemical toxicological analysis of confiscated samples, with special attention for the identification and the quantification of minor components, such as the impurities related to the origin and manufacturing. By combining these data complex characterisations, i.e. impurity profiles, chemical signatures or fingerprints, can be obtained and used for comparative analysis. This review focuses on heroin impurity profiling during the 1990s, proclaimed by the United Nations as the 'Decade for Eradicating Drug Abuse'. Special attention will be given to the new trends in analytical techniques as well as in data handling strategies, so called chemometrics, to produce these profiles. The latter can be used in comparative analysis of seized heroin samples for tactical (batch-to-batch comparison) and strategic (origin determination) intelligence purposes.

  8. Transport of light, trace impurities in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, W. L.; Bespamyatnov, I. O.; Liao, K. T.; Horton, W.; Fu, X. R.; Hughes, J. W.

    2012-10-01

    Light impurity profiles for boron were measured in ITB, H-mode, L-mode, and I-mode discharges in Alcator C-Mod. Within this wide range of modes, the profiles varied from peaked to hollow to flat. Specifically, hollow profiles are often observed in H-mode, while ITBs produce strong peaking, and L-mode produces moderate peaking. I-mode discharges are characterized by flat impurity profiles. For the study reported here, the profiles were measured with charge exchange recombination spectroscopy. The dependences of Rv/D were sought on dimensionless quantities including ion density scale length, effective charge, collisionality, and temperature scale length. We find that neoclassical transport consistently underestimates the measured transport. The excess measured transport is assumed to be turbulent. The strongest dependence of Rv/D is with temperature scale length. In addition, the measured transport was compared with the prediction of an analytical theory of drift wave turbulence that identifies transport implications for drift waves driven by ion and impurity density gradients.

  9. A theoretical study of impurity production at limiters in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Matthews, G.F.; Goodall, D.H.J.; McCracken, G.M.; Stangeby, P.C.

    1988-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral impurity emissions around graphite limiters in the DITE tokamak is investigated using a Monte Carlo neutral transport code based on physical sputtering. The Monte Carlo code results are compared with experiments for the CI distributions observed toroidally around the probe limiter and radially around the fixed limiter. The comparison between code and experiment demonstrates the ability of camera observations and Langmuir probe measurements to provide detailed information on the production of impurities at limiters. From the Monte Carlo simulation it is shown that the toroidal distribution of impurity emission is determined mainly by the geometry of the limiter and the radial variation of the sputtering yield, while the radial distribution is sensitive mainly to the sputtered atom velocity distribution and the rate coefficients for ionization and excitation

  10. Experimental validation of a method for performance monitoring of the impurity processing stage in the TEP system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornschein, B.; Corneli, D.; Glugla, M.; Guenther, K.; Le, T.L.; Simon, K.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Tokamak Exhaust Processing (TEP) system within the Tritium Plant of ITER needs to be designed such that tritium is recovered from all exhaust gases produced during different modes and operational conditions of the vacuum vessel. The reference process for the TEP system of ITER is called CAPER and comprises three different, consecutive steps to recover hydrogen isotopes at highest purity for direct transfer to the cryogenic Isotope Separation system. The second step ('impurity processing', IP) is carried out in a closed loop involving heterogeneously catalyzed cracking or conversion reactions to liberate tritium from tritiated hydrocarbons or tritiated water combined with permeation of hydrogen isotopes through a Pd/Ag permeator. This combination shifts chemical equilibria towards dehydrogenation and, therefore, enables detritiation factors higher than 1000 in the IP stage. Such a high decontamination factor requires the optimal performance of the permeator, which on the other hand is operated under conditions which provoke coking of the permeator membrane by hydrocarbon cracking. For this reason the permeator in the impurity processing loop needs to be repeatedly regenerated in order to sustain decontamination factors higher/in the order of 1000. At the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) a method to measure the actual performance of the second stage of the CAPER process has been developed. This method has been successfully tested with the CAPER facility and appears feasible for the TEP system of ITER

  11. Experience on the removal of impurities from liquid metal systems by cold-trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, J. A.

    1963-10-15

    Experience in impurity removal by cold-trapping, which was obtained on DFR and its associated liquid metal rigs, is reviewed. The development of the present DFR cold-trapping system is outlined, and the operation of the additional pumped loops, which were required in order to control the reactor impurity levels, are described. Operation of the liquid metal rigs ancillary to the reactor project is discussed with particular reference to the control of impurity levels. (auth)

  12. Photoionization cross-section of donor impurities in spherical GaAs quantum dots: hydrostatic pressure effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, J.D.; Duque, C.A.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Using a variational procedure for a hydrogenic donor-impurity we have calculated the photoionization cross-section in spherical GaAs quantum dots. We discuss the dependence on the photoionization cross-section for hydrogenic donor impurity in in nite and nite barrier quantum dots as a function of the size of the dot, impurity position, polarization of the photon, applied hydrostatic pressure, and normalized photon energy. For the nite case, calculations for the pressure effects are both in direct and indirect GaAsAl gap regime. We have considered the different transition rules that depend of the impurity position and photon polarization. Calculations are presented for impurity on-center, and o -center in the spherical quantum dots. We found that the photoionization cross-section increases with the applied hydrostatic pressure both for on-center and o - center impurities. The photoionization cross-section increases or decreases depending of the impurity position, photon polarization, and radius of dots. Also we have showed that the photoionization cross-section decreases as the normalized photon energy increases. The results we have obtained show that the photoionization cross- section is strongly a effected by the quantum dot size, and the position of the impurity. The measurement of photoionization in such systems would be of great interest in understanding the optical properties of carriers in quantum dots. (author)

  13. Controlling Thermodynamic Properties of Ferromagnetic Group-IV Graphene-Like Nanosheets by Dilute Charged Impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos

    2017-05-01

    Using the Kane-Mele Hamiltonian, Dirac theory and self-consistent Born approximation, we investigate the effect of dilute charged impurity on the electronic heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility of two-dimensional ferromagnetic honeycomb structure of group-IV elements including silicene, germanene and stanene within the Green’s function approach. We also find these quantities in the presence of applied external electric field. Our results show that the silicene (stanene) has the maximum (minimum) heat capacity and magnetic susceptibility at uniform electric fields. From the behavior of theses quantities, the band gap has been changed with impurity concentration, impurity scattering strength and electric field. The analysis on the impurity-dependent magnetic susceptibility curves shows a phase transition from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases. Interestingly, electronic heat capacity increases (decreases) with impurity concentration in silicene (germanene and stanene) structure.

  14. Power exhaust by impurity seeding in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernert, Matthias; Kallenbach, Arne; Dux, Ralph; Wischmeier, Marco [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Reimold, Felix [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, IEK, Juelich (Germany); Lipschultz, Bruce [University of York, York Plasma Institute, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Collaboration: the ASDEX Upgrade team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    Power exhaust is one of the big challenges for future fusion reactors. The power load at the divertor targets, the primary plasma-wall interaction zone, would exceed material limits and, thus, must be reduced. Therefore, 90% of the exhaust power needs to be dissipated and the divertor is anticipated to be in the detached regime, where the interaction of the plasma with the wall is significantly reduced. Radiation is the dominant dissipation process and is increased by impurity seeding. The radiation distribution can be tailored by using different seed impurities (N for radiation outside, Ne and Ar for radiation at the edge of and Kr for radiation inside the confined region). The tailoring of the radiation profile is required in order to maximize the radiated power and at the same time minimize the impact on the energy confinement. Recent experiments with intense impurity seeding at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak demonstrate operation at highest heat fluxes and detached divertor targets at radiated power fractions of up to 90%. In these scenarios the radiation originates predominantly from the confined region and leads to an unexpectedly small confinement reduction.

  15. Surface effects and impurity production in tokamak machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staib, P.; Staudenmaier, G.

    1978-01-01

    Plasma-wall interactions are presently investigated in two ways: a) The a priori assumption of a mechanism responsible for impurity release. Relevant experimental data can be used in a model and calculations made in order to understand the observed impurity behaviour in plasma. b) The comprehensive investigation of samples exposed to a plasma. Recent investigations have confirmed the earlier assumption that the interactions occur only in the topmost atomic layers of the wall, and so emphasize the major role of surface physics on this field. These investigations have further shown that besides atomic processes, such a desorption or sputtering, other processes occur, extending on a microscopic rather than an atomic scale. These are for example evaporation, arcing, and mechanical stress. Both aspects are discussed as far as possible in a quantitative way. The contribution of most probable processes is estimated using data available on flux and energy of particles and yields of single processes. The conclusion is reached that no process can be disregarded. Several processes seem to contribute to the impurity release and are different at different phases of the discharge. An interdependence between these processes is likely. (Auth.)

  16. Evaluation of determinative methods for sodium impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Marcelo; Guido, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose; Ares, Osvaldo

    1988-01-01

    Sodium, universally accepted as heat transfer fluid in fast breeder reactors, requires a special technology for every operation involved in any applicable methodology, due to its well known chemical reactivity. The purpose of this work is: a) to study the sources and effects of chemical species which, as traces, accompany sodium used in the nuclear field; b) to classify, taking into account, the present requirements and resources of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the procedures found in the literature for determination of the most important impurities which exist in experimental liquid sodium systems and c) to describe the principles of the methods and to evaluate them in order to make a selection. It was concluded the convenience to develop, as a first stage, laboratory procedures to determine carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and non-volatile impurities, which besides serving present needs, will be referential for direct methods with undeferred response. The latter are needed in liquid sodium experimental loops and require, primarily, more complex and extended development. Additionally, a description is made of experimental work performed up-to-now in this laboratory, consisting of a transfer device for sodium sampling and a sodium distillation device, adapted from a previous design, with associated vacuum and inert gas systems. It is intended as a separative technique for indirect determination of oxygen and non-volatile impurities. (Author) [es

  17. Impurity-induced anisotropic semiconductor-semimetal transition in monolayer biased black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, D. H.; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2018-07-01

    Taking into account the electron-impurity interaction within the continuum approximation of tight-binding model, the Born approximation, and the Green's function method, the main features of anisotropic electronic phase transition are investigated in monolayer biased black phosphorus (BP). To this end, we concentrated on the disordered electronic density of states (DOS), which gives useful information for electro-optical devices. Increasing the impurity concentration in both unbiased and biased impurity-infected single-layer BP, in addition to the decrease of the band gap, independent of the direction, leads to the midgap states and an extra Van Hove singularity inside and outside of the band gap, respectively. Furthermore, strong impurity scattering potentials lead to a semiconductor-semimetal transition and one more Van Hove singularity in x-direction of unbiased BP and surprisingly, this transition does not occur in biased BP. We found that there is no phase transition in y-direction. Since real applications require structures with modulated band gaps, we have studied the influence of different bias voltages on the disordered DOS in both directions, resulting in the increase of the band gap.

  18. Change in detector properties caused by electronegative impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, M.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Mindur, B.

    2006-01-01

    Detector properties (energy resolution, gas gain, drift-time measurements) depend quite critically on the concentration of impurities. The most frequent impurities in the working gas are water vapour and oxygen. Systematic measurements of the detector properties as a function of both H 2 O vapour and O 2 concentration have been made. Ar/CO 2 (80/20) and Ar/CO 2 /CF 4 (70/10/20) have been selected as the working gases. The first mixture is commonly used, the second one is very promising due to its fastness. The concentration of H 2 O vapour and O 2 was varied from 0% to 1.9% and 3%, respectively

  19. Quasibound states at thresholds in multichannel impurity scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Wook; Park, Hwa-Kyun; Sim, H-S; Schomerus, Henning

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the threshold behaviour of transmission resonances and quasibound states in the multichannel scattering problems of a one-dimensional (1D) time-dependent impurity potential, and the related problem of a single impurity in a quasi-1D wire. It was claimed before in the literature that a quasibound state disappears when a transmission zero collides with the subband boundary. However, the transmission line shape, the Friedel sum rule, and the delay time show that the quasibound states still survive and affect the physical quantities. We discuss the relation between threshold behaviour of transmission resonances, and quasibound states and their boundary conditions in the general context of multichannel scatterings

  20. Crossover physics in the nonequilibrium dynamics of quenched quantum impurity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Trinh, Kien; Haas, Stephan; Saleur, Hubert

    2013-06-14

    A general framework is proposed to tackle analytically local quantum quenches in integrable impurity systems, combining a mapping onto a boundary problem with the form factor approach to boundary-condition-changing operators introduced by Lesage and Saleur [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 4370 (1998)]. We discuss how to compute exactly the following two central quantities of interest: the Loschmidt echo and the distribution of the work done during the quantum quench. Our results display an interesting crossover physics characterized by the energy scale T(b) of the impurity corresponding to the Kondo temperature. We discuss in detail the noninteracting case as a paradigm and benchmark for more complicated integrable impurity models and check our results using numerical methods.