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Sample records for impure plutonium metal

  1. Fused salt processing of impure plutonium dioxide to high-purity plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Christensen, D.C.; Babcock, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    A process for converting impure plutonium dioxide (approx. 96% pure) to high-purity plutonium metal (>99.9%) was developed. The process consists of reducing the oxide to an impure plutonium metal intermediate with calcium metal in molten calcium chloride. The impure intermediate metal is cast into an anode and electrorefined to produce high-purity plutonium metal. The oxide reduction step is being done now on a 0.6-kg scale with the resulting yield being >99.5%. The electrorefining is being done on a 4.0-kg scale with the resulting yield being 80 to 85%. The purity of the product, which averages 99.98%, is essentially insensitive to the purity of the feed metal. The yield, however, is directly dependent on the chemical composition of the feed. To date, approximately 250 kg of impure oxide has been converted to pure metal by this processing sequence. The availability of impure plutonium dioxide, together with the need for pure plutonium metal, makes this sequence a valuable plutonium processing tool

  2. Plutonium-241 processing: from impure oxide to high purity metal target disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.; Baaso, D.L.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of three plutonium-241 metal target disks, using a precision casting technique, is described. The disks were 0.625 inch in diameter and 0.125, 0.025, and 0.010 inch thick. All three disks were prepared simultaneously in a single casting. The variation in thickness of each disk was within +-1 percent of the disk's average thickness. The plutonium-241 was highly pure, and the finished disks contained a total of only 297 parts per million of detectable impurities. Purification of the plutonium oxide ( 241 PuO 2 ) and the conversion of the purified 241 PuO 2 to metal are also described. (U.S.)

  3. Rapid Separation Methods to Characterize Actinides and Metallic Impurities in Plutonium Scrap Materials at SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.L. III; Jones, V.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Storage Division at SRS plans to stabilize selected plutonium scrap residue materials for long term storage by dissolution processing and plans to stabilize other plutonium vault materials via high-temperature furnace processing. To support these nuclear material stabilization activities, the SRS Analytical Laboratories Department (ALD) will provide characterization of materials required prior to the dissolution or the high-firing of these materials. Lab renovations to install new analytical instrumentation are underway to support these activities that include glove boxes with simulated-process dissolution and high- pressure microwave dissolution capability. Inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), inductively- coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and thermal-ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) will be used to measure actinide isotopics and metallic impurities. New high-speed actinide separation methods have been developed that will be applied to isotopic characterization of nuclear materials by TIMS and ICP-MS to eliminate isobaric interferences between Pu-238 /U- 238 and Pu-241/Am-241. TEVA Resin, UTEVA Resin, and TRU Resin columns will be used with vacuum-assisted flow rates to minimize TIMS and ICP-MS sample turnaround times. For metallic impurity analysis, rapid column removal methods using UTEVA Resin, AGMP-1 anion resin and AG MP-50 cation resin have also been developed to remove plutonium and uranium matrix interferences prior to ICP-AES and ICP- MS measurements

  4. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bridgewater, Jon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ward, John W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Thomas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH{sub 2}). The heats of solution for PuH{sub s} and PuD{sub s} are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  5. The solubility of hydrogen and deuterium in alloyed, unalloyed and impure plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, S; Bridgewater, J S; Ward, J W; Allen, T H

    2010-01-01

    Pressure-Composition-Temperature (PCT) data are presented for the plutonium-hydrogen (Pu-H) and plutonium-deuterium (Pu-D) systems in the solubility region up to terminal solubility (precipitation of PuH 2 ). The heats of solution for PuH S and PuD S are determined from PCT data in the ranges 350-625 deg. C for gallium alloyed Pu and 400-575 deg. C for unalloyed Pu. The solubility of high purity plutonium alloyed with 2 at.% gallium is compared to high purity unalloyed plutonium. Significant differences are found in hydrogen solubility for unalloyed Pu versus gallium alloyed Pu. Differences in hydrogen solubility due to an apparent phase change are observable in the alloyed and unalloyed solubilities. The effect of iron impurities on Pu-Ga alloyed Pu is shown via hydrogen solubility data as preventing complete homogenization.

  6. A New Neutron Multiplicity Counter for the Measurement of Impure Plutonium Metal at Westinghouse Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, L.B.; Faison, D.M.; Langner, D.G.; Sweet, M.R.; Salazar, S.D.; Kroncke, K.E.

    1998-07-01

    A new neutron multiplicity counter has been designed, fabricated, characterized, and installed for use in the assay of impure plutonium metal buttons from the FB-Line at the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS). This instrument incorporates the performance characteristics of the Pyrochemical or In-plant Multiplicity Counter with the package size of the Plutonium Scrap Multiplicity Counter. In addition, state-of-the art features such as the de-randomizer circuit and separate ring outputs have been added. The counter consists of 113, 71 cm active length 3He tubes in a polyethylene moderator. Its efficiency for 252Cf is 57.8 percent, the highest of any multiplicity counter to date. Its die-away time is 50.4 ms and its deadtime is 50 ns. In this paper we will present the characterization data for the counter and the results of preliminary metal measurements at WSRS. We will also discuss the new challenges the impure metal buttons from FB-Line are presenting to the multiplicity counting technique

  7. Specification analysis of plutonium fuels for non-metallic impurities. I. Estimation of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizvi, G H; Sethuraman, P R; Venkataramana, P; Natarajan, P R

    1975-01-01

    An analytical method for the estimation of carbon in plutonium samples in the range of 10-400 ..mu..g by conductometry has been developed. In the first step of the method, the entire carbon in sample is converted into CO/sub 2/ which in the second step is completely absorbed in barium hydroxide solution in conductivity of the solution.

  8. Specification analysis of plutonium fuels for non-metallic impurities. I - estimation of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, G.H.; Sethuraman, P.R.; Venkataramana, P.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical method for the estimation of carbon in plutonium samples in the range of 10-400 μg by conductometry has been developed. In the first step of the method, the entire carbon in sample is converted into CO 2 which in the second step is completely absorbed in barium hydroxide solution in conductivity of the solution. (M.G.B.)

  9. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  10. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  11. Impurity diffusion of cobalt in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charissoux, Christian; Calais, Daniel.

    1975-01-01

    The sectioning method for investigation of the impurity diffusion of 60 Co in the fcc and bcc phases of plutonium gives the following results: 344-426 deg C: D=1.2x10 -2 exp(-12700/RT)cm 2 /s in delta Pu(fcc); 484-621 deg C: D=1.4x10 -3 exp(-9900/RT)cm 2 /s in epsilon Pu(bcc). Cobalt is a fast diffuser in plutonium; the diffusion coefficient being unaffected by phase changes delta'→delta; delta'→epsilon, the diffusion mechanism is probably dissociative in both phases, the solute becoming interstitial by: solute (substitution) reversible solute (interstitial) + vacancy [fr

  12. Prototype fast neutron counter for the assay of impure plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, J.R.; Adams, E.L.; Ensslin, N.

    1987-01-01

    A fast coincident neutron counter using liquid scintillators and gamma-ray/neutron pulse-shape discrimination has been constructed for the analysis of plutonium samples with unknown self-multiplication and (α,n) production. The counter was used to measure plutonium-bearing materials that cover a range of masses and (α,n) reaction rates of importance to the safeguards community. Measured values of the 240 Pu effective mass differed, on average, from their declared values by 0.4% for plutonium oxides and by -2.2% for metal and MgO-loaded samples. Poorer results were obtained for materials with large (α,n) reaction rates and low self-multiplication such as plutonium ash and plutonium fluoride

  13. Conversion of metal plutonium to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panov, A.V.; Subbotin, V.G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Report contains experimental results on metal plutonium of weapon origin samples conversion to plutonium dioxide by pyrochemical method. Circuits of processes are described. Their advantages and shortcomings are shown. Parameters of plutonium dioxide powders (phase and fraction compositions, poured density) manufactured by pyrochemical method in RFNC-VNIITF are shown as well. (authors)

  14. A conceptual and calculational model for gas formation from impure calcined plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, John L.; Eller, P. Gary

    2000-01-01

    Safe transport and storage of pure and impure plutonium oxides requires an understanding of processes that may generate or consume gases in a confined storage vessel. We have formulated conceptual and calculational models for gas formation from calcined materials. The conceptual model for impure calcined plutonium oxides is based on the data collected to date

  15. Production of Plutonium Metal from Aqueous Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, D.A.

    2003-01-16

    The primary separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium by the Purex solvent extraction process at the Savannah River Plant produces a dilute plutonium solution containing residual fission products and uranium. A cation exchange process is used for concentration and further decontamination of the plutonium, as the first step in the final preparation of metal. This paper discusses the production of plutonium metal from the aqueous solutions.

  16. Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory

  17. Decontaminaion of metals containing plutonium and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seitz, M.G.; Gerding, T.J.; Steindler, M.J.

    1979-06-01

    Melt-slagging (melt-refining) techniques were evaluated as a decontamination and consolidation step for metals contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium. Experiments were performed in which mild steel, stainless steel, and nickel contaminated with oxides of plutonium and americium were melted in the presence of silicate slags of various compositions. The metal products were low in contamination, with the plutonium and americium strongly fractionated to the slags. Partition coefficients (plutonium in slag/plutonium in steel) of 7 x 10 6 were measured with boro-silicate slag and of 3 x 10 6 with calcium, magnesium silicate slag. Decontamination of metals containing as much as 14,000 ppM plutonium appears to be as efficient as for metals with plutonium levels of 400 ppM. Staged extraction, that is, a remelting of processed metal with clean slag, results in further decontamination of the metal. The second extraction is effective with either resistance-furnace melting or electric-arc melting. Slag adhering to the metal ingots and in defects within the ingots is in the important contributors to plutonium retained in processed metals. If these sources of plutonium are controlled, the melt-refining process can be used on a large scale to convert highly contaminated metals to homogeneous and compact forms with very low concentrations of plutonium and americium. A conceptual design of a melt-refining process to decontaminate plutonium- and americium-contaminated metals is described. The process includes single-stage refining of contaminated metals to produce a metal product which would have less than 10 nCi/g of TRU-element contamination. Two plant sizes were considered. The smaller conceptual plant processes 77 kg of metal per 8-h period and may be portable.The larger one processes 140 kg of metal per 8-h period, is stationary, and may be near te maximum size that is practical for a metal decontamination process

  18. Plutonium metal preparation and purification at Los Alamos, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.; McNeese, J.A.; Fife, K.W.

    1984-01-01

    Plutonium metal preparation and purification are well established at Los Alamos. Metal is prepared by calcothermic reduction of both PuF 4 and PuO 2 . Metal is purified by halide slagging, casting, and electrorefining. The product from the production sequence is ultrapure plutonium metal. All of the processes involve high temperature operation and all but casting involve molten salt media. Development efforts are fourfold: (1) recover plutonium values from residues; (2) reduce residue generation through process improvements and changes; (3) recycle of reagents, and (4) optimize and integrate all processes into a close-loop system. Plutonium residues are comprised of oxides, chlorides, colloidal metal suspensions, and impure metal heels. Pyrochemical recovery techniques are under development to address each residue. In addition, we are looking back at each residue generation step and are making process changes to reduce plutonium content in each residue. Reagent salt is the principle media used in pyrochemical processing. The regeneration and recycle of these reagents will both reduce our waste handling and operating expense. The fourth area, process optimization, involves both existing processes and new process developments. A status of efforts in all four of these areas will be summarized

  19. VARIABILITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE SOLUBILITY OF IMPURITIES IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING, LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Charles Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; James Marra, J

    2007-09-26

    This study focuses on the development of a compositional envelope that describes the retention of various impurities in lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass for vitrification and immobilization of excess, defense-related plutonium. A limited amount of impurity data for the various plutonium sources is available and projections were made through analysis of the available information. These projections were used to define types and concentrations of impurities in the LaBS glass compositions to be fabricated and tested. Sixty surrogate glass compositions were developed through a statistically designed approach to cover the anticipated ranges of concentrations for several impurity species expected in the plutonium feeds. An additional four glass compositions containing actual plutonium oxide were selected based on their targeted concentrations of metals and anions. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory and shielded cells facility to determine the degree of retention of the impurity components, the impact of the impurities on the durability of each glass, and the degree of crystallization that occurred, both upon quenching and slow cooling. Overall, the LaBS glass system appears to be very tolerant of most of the impurity types and concentrations projected in the plutonium waste stream. For the surrogate glasses, the measured CuO, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, NiO, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations fell very close to their target values across the ranges of concentrations targeted in this study for each of these components. The measured CaO and PbO concentrations were consistently higher than the targeted values. The measured Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were very close to the targets except for the one highest targeted value for each of these components. A solubility limit may have been approached in this glass system for K{sub 2}O and MgO. The measured Cl{sup -}, F{sup -}, SeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2

  20. Recovery of americium-241 from aged plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Burney, G.A.; Reilly, T.A.; Wilson, T.W.; McKibben, J.M.

    1980-12-01

    About 5 kg of ingrown 241 Am was recovered from 850 kg of aged plutonium using a process developed specifically for Savannah River Plant application. The aged plutonium metal was first dissolved in sulfamic acid. Sodium nitrite was added to oxidize the plutonium to Pu(IV) and the residual sulfamate ion was oxidized to nitrogen gas and sulfate. The plutonium and americium were separated by one cycle of solvent extraction. The recovered products were subsequently purified by cation exchange chromatography, precipitated as oxalates, and calcined to the oxides. Plutonium processng was routine. Before cation exchange purification, the aqueous americium solution from solvent extraction was concentrated and stripped of nitric acid. More than 98% of the 241 Am was then recovered from the cation exchange column where it was effectively decontaminated from all major impurities except nickel and chromium. This partially purified product solution was concentrated further by evaporation and then denitrated by reaction with formic acid. Individual batches of americium oxalate were then precipitated, filtered, washed, and calcined. About 98.5% of the americium was recovered. The final product purity averaged 98% 241 AmO 2 ; residual impurities were primarily lead and nickel

  1. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  2. Materials identification and surveillance project item evaluation: Items, impure plutonium oxide (ATL27960) and pure plutonium oxide (PEOR3258)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, T.; Appert, Q.; Davis, C.

    1997-03-01

    In this report, Los Alamos scientists characterize properties relevant to storage of an impure plutonium oxide (74 mass % plutonium) in accordance with the Department of Energy (DOE) standard DOE-STD-3013-96. This oxide is of interest because it is the first impure plutonium oxide sample to be evaluated and it is similar to other materials that must be stored. Methods used to characterize the oxide at certain points during calcination include surface-area analyses, mass loss-on-ignition (LOI) measurements, elemental analysis, moisture-adsorption measurements, and quantitative supercritical-CO 2 extraction of adsorbed water. Significant decreases in the LOI and surface area occurred as the oxide was calcined at progressively increasing temperatures. Studies indicate that supercritical-CO 2 extraction is an effective method for removing adsorbed water from oxides. We extracted the water from powdered oxides (high-purity ZrO 2 , pure PuO 2 , and impure plutonium oxide) using CO 2 at 3000 psi pressure and 75 degrees C, and we quantitatively determined it by using gravimetric and dew-point procedures. The effectiveness of the extraction method is demonstrated by good agreement between the amounts of water extracted from pure zirconium and plutonium dioxides and the mass changes obtained from LOI analyses. However, the amount of moisture (0.025 mass %) extracted from the impure plutonium oxide after it had been calcined at 950 degrees C and stored for a period of months is much less than the LOI value (0.97 mass %). These results imply that the impure plutonium oxide is free of adsorbed water after calcination at 950 degrees C, even though the sample does not satisfy the LOI requirement of <0.50 mass % for storage

  3. The origin of metal impurities in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, Kazumi; Sengoku, Seio; Maeda, Hikosuke; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shin

    1978-10-01

    The origin of metal impurities in DIVA (JFT-2a Tokamak) has been studied experimentally. Three processes of metal impurity release from the first wall were identified; i.e. ion sputtering, evaporation, and arcing. Among of these, ion sputtering is the predominant process in the quiet phase of the discharge, which is characterized by no spikes in the loop voltage and no localized heat flux concentrations on the first wall. ''Cones'' formation due to the sputtering is observed on the gold protection plate (guard limiter) exposed to about 10,000 discharges by scanning electron micrograph. In the SEM photographs, the spacial distribution of cones on the shell surface due to the ion sputtering coincides with the spacial distribution of intensity of Au-I line radiation. Gold is the dominant metal impurity in DIVA. The honeycomb structure can decrease release of the metal impurity. (author)

  4. Separation of uranium and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, Nimai; Kumar, Mithlesh; Thulasidas, S.K.; Hon, N.S.; Kulkarni, M.J.; Mhatre, Amol; Natarajan, V.

    2014-07-01

    The report describes separation of uranium (U) and common impurities from solid analytical waste containing plutonium (Pu). This will be useful in recovery of Pu from nuclear waste. This is an important activity of any nuclear program in view of the strategic importance of Pu. In Radiochemistry Division, the trace metal analysis of Pu bearing fuel materials such as PuO 2 , (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,Pu)C are being carried out using the DC arc-Carrier Distillation technique. During these analyses, solid analytical waste containing Pu and 241 Am is generated. This comprises of left-over of samples and prepared charges. The main constituents of this waste are uranium oxide, plutonium oxide and silver chloride used as carrier. This report describes the entire work carried out to separate gram quantities of Pu from large amounts of U and mg quantities of 241 Am and the effect of leaching of the waste with nitric acid as a function of batch size. The effect of leaching the solid analytical waste of (U,Pu)O 2 and AgCl with concentrated nitric acid for different time intervals was also studied. Later keeping the time constant, the effect of nitric acid molarity on the leaching of U and Pu was investigated. Four different lots of the waste having different amounts were subjected to multiple leaching with 8 M nitric acid, each for 15 minutes duration. In all the experiments the amount of Uranium, Plutonium and other impurities leached were determined using ICP as an excitation source. The results are discussed in this report. (author)

  5. Plutonium metal exchange program : current status and statistical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tandon, L. (Lav); Eglin, J. L. (Judith Lynn); Michalak, S. E. (Sarah E.); Picard, R. R.; Temer, D. J. (Donald J.)

    2004-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plutonium (Pu) Metal Sample Exchange program was conducted to insure the quality and intercomparability of measurements such as Pu assay, Pu isotopics, and impurity analyses. The Rocky Flats program was discontinued in 1989 after more than 30 years. In 2001, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) reestablished the Pu Metal Exchange program. In addition to the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) at Aldermaston, six Department of Energy (DOE) facilities Argonne East, Argonne West, Livermore, Los Alamos, New Brunswick Laboratory, and Savannah River are currently participating in the program. Plutonium metal samples are prepared and distributed to the sites for destructive measurements to determine elemental concentration, isotopic abundance, and both metallic and nonmetallic impurity levels. The program provides independent verification of analytical measurement capabilies for each participating facility and allows problems in analytical methods to be identified. The current status of the program will be discussed with emphasis on the unique statistical analysis and modeling of the data developed for the program. The discussion includes the definition of the consensus values for each analyte (in the presence and absence of anomalous values and/or censored values), and interesting features of the data and the results.

  6. Glovebox enclosed dc plasma source for the determination of metals in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    The direct current plasma source of a Beckman Spectraspan IIIB emission spectrometer was enclosed in a glovebox at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in December 1982. Since that time, the system has been used for the routine determination of alloy and impurity metals in plutonium. This paper presents the systematic steps involved in developing the glovebox and gives information regarding performance of the plasma in the glovebox and the effectiveness of containment of plutonium. 8 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Variational method for magnetic impurities in metals: impurity pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oles, A M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.); Chao, K A [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics and Measurement Technology

    1980-01-01

    Applying a variational method to the generalized Wolff model, we have investigated the effect of impurity-impurity interaction on the formation of local moments in the ground state. The direct coupling between the impurities is found to be more important than the interaction between the impurities and the host conduction electrons, as far as the formation of local moments is concerned. Under certain conditions we also observe different valences on different impurities.

  8. Elimination device for metal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Ko.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable reuse of adsorbing materials by eliminating Fe 3 O 4 films reduced with adsorbing performance by way of electrolytic polishing and then forming fresh membranes using high temperature steams. Constitution: An elimination device is provided to a coolant clean-up system of a reactor for eliminating impurities such as cobalt. The elimination device comprises adsorbing materials made of stainless steel tips or the likes having Fe 3 O 4 films. The adsorbing materials are regenerated by applying an electric current between grid-like cathode plates and anode plates to leach out the Fe 3 O 4 films, washing out the electrolytic solution by cleaning water and then applying steams at high temperature onto the adsorbing materials to thereby form fresh Fe 3 O 4 films again thereon. The regeneration of the adsorbing materials enables to eliminate Co 60 and the like in the primary coolant efficiently. (Moriyama, K.)

  9. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-09-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Recovery of plutonium by pyroredox processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeese, J.A.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Using pyrochemical oxidation and reduction, we have developed a process to recover the plutonium in impure scrap with less than 95% plutonium. This plutonium metal was further purified by pyrochemical electrorefining. During development of the procedures, depleted electrorefining anodes were processed, and over 80% of the plutonium was recovered as high-purity metal in one electrorefining cycle. Over 40 kg of plutonium has been recovered from 55 kg of impure anodes with our procedures. 6 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  11. A method for the separation of sodium and iron from plutonium and other impurities in concentrated plutonium solution and their subsequent measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mair, M.A.; Brown, M.L.

    1988-06-01

    Sodium and iron are separated from plutonium and other impurities by solvent extraction. Sodium is determined by flame photometry and iron by spectrophotometric measurement of the orthophenanthroline complex. (author)

  12. A Calibration to Predict Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlesky, J.E.; Kelly, E.J.; Foster, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Prompt gamma (PG) analysis has been used to identify the presence of certain impurities in plutonium oxide, which has been stored in 3013 containers. A regression analysis was used to evaluate the trends between the count rates obtained from PG analysis and the concentration of the impurities in plutonium oxide samples measured by analytical chemistry techniques. The results of the analysis were used to obtain calibration curves, which may be used to predict the concentration of Al, Be, Cl, F, Mg, and Na in the 3013 containers. The scatter observed in the data resulted from several factors including sample geometry, error in sampling for chemical assay, statistical counting error, and intimacy of mixing of impurities and plutonium. Standards prepared by mixing plutonium oxide with CaF 2 , NaCl, and KCl show that intimacy mixing and sampling error have the largest influence on the results. Although these factors are difficult to control, the calibrations are expected to yield semiquantitative results that are sufficient for the purpose of ordering or ranking

  13. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in plutonium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffereau, M.; Crehange, G.; Deniaud, S.; Leclainche, C.

    1967-01-01

    After a review of previous works, various powdered or wet analytical methods are studied. One tries to give an explanation for some phenomena. A detailed know-how of studied methods is given. Validity of results is discussed. Problem of impurities in alloys analysis and non spectroscopic elements determination is quickly reviewed. One concludes to the interest of the use of some particular methods and the necessity of basic studies in order to obtain best information. (author) [fr

  14. PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-02-07

    Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

  15. A simple and rapid method of purification of impure plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, K.M.; Rakshe, P.R.; Dharmpurikar, G.R.; Thite, B.S.; Lokhande, Manisha; Sinalkar, Nitin; Dakshinamoorthy, A.; Munshi, S.K.; Dey, P.K.

    2007-01-01

    Impure plutonium oxides are conventionally purified by dissolution in HNO 3 in presence of HF followed by ion exchange separation and oxalate precipitation. The method is tedious and use of HF enhances corrosion of the plant equipment's. A simple and rapid method has been developed for the purification of the oxide by leaching with various reagents like DM water, NaOH and oxalic acid. A combination of DM water followed by hot leaching with 0.4 M oxalic acid could bring down the impurity levels in the oxide to the desired level required for fuel fabrication. (author)

  16. Manual for the Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Detector (ENMC) for Measurement of Impure MOX and Plutonium Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H. O.; Rael, C. D.; Kroncke, K. E.; DeAguero, K. J.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a high-efficiency neutron detector for passive neutron coincidence and multiplicity counting of dirty scrap and bulk samples of plutonium. The counter will be used for the measurement of impure plutonium samples at the JNC MOX fabrication facility in Japan. The counter can also be used to create working standards from bulk process MOX. The detector uses advanced design "3He tubes to increase the efficiency and to shorten the neutron die-away time. The efficiency is 64% and the die-away time is 19.1 ?s. The Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC) is designed for high-precision measurements of bulk plutonium samples with diameters of less than 200 mm. The average neutron energy from the sample can be measured using the ratio of the inner ring of He-3 tubes to the outer ring. This report describes the hardware, performance, and calibration for the ENMC.

  17. Six-kilogram-scale electrorefining of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.; Apgar, S.A. III; Christensen, D.C.

    1982-09-01

    The electrorefining of metallic plutonium scrap to produce high purity metal has been an established procedure at Los Alamos since 1964. This is a batch process and was limited to 4-kg plutonium because of criticality safety considerations. Improvements in critical mass measurements have permitted us to develop a process for 6-kg plutonium. The 6-kg process is now operational. The increased size of the process, together with other improvements which have been made, makes plutonium electrorefining the principal industrial tool for processing and purifying metallic plutonium scrap

  18. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  19. Gas generation in pure and impure plutonium-bearing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, R.; Allen, T.; Eller, P.G.; Hagan, R.; Horrell, D.; Rink, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) materials identification and surveillance (MIS) project identifies materials to be stored in DOE-STD-3013-96 containers, determines the chemical and physical character of stored materials, and evaluates processing to be used to stabilize materials to meet the standard. The project has completed processing and analysis of 9 Hanford items and 24 Rocky Flats items, representing a substantial portion of the oxides to be packaged for long-term storage. The resultant data provide insight into the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials at the sites. A component of the study was to investigate gas generation for representative materials. These studies included headspace gas measurements over the 9 Hanford items, measurement of gas generation in 10-g surveillance samples of MIS powders, and pressure monitoring. Before examining the Hanford cans, sampling and analysis methods were demonstrated on HRA-905191, an item from the LANL vault. This item was not typical of materials designated to be stored in 3013 cans, as it contained plastic vials, emery cloths, paper towels, and a large percentage of thorium. However, it was one of the items that contained significant hydrogen in the headspace. A mass spectrometer was used to determine the composition of headspace gases. Oxygen was substantially depleted in all cases, and the percent of nitrogen in many items was greater than that found in air. In both cans with a high hydrogen content, the corresponding oxygen content was near zero (HRA905191 and ARF-102-85-365). In some cases, carbon dioxide was generated in the cans. Carbon monoxide was found in item BLO-39-11-85-295. This item has a high americium content, thus higher temperature than other materials examined. The only notable impurities in item BLO-39-11-85-295 were carbon at ≅0.1 wt% and chlorides at 0.2 wt%. Seven long-term surveillance vessels each holding approximately10 g of MIS powders have been monitored

  20. Impurity Trapping of Positive Muons in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Polarized positive muons are implanted into metal samples. In an applied magnetic field the muon spin precession is studied. The line width in the precession frequency spectrum gives information about the static and dynamic properties of muons in a metal lattice. At temperatures where the muon is immobile within its lifetime the line width gives information about the site of location. At temperatures where the muon is mobile, the line width gives information on the diffusion process. It is known from experiments on quasi-elastic neutron scattering on hydrogen in niobium that interstitial impurities like nitrogen tend to act as traps for hydrogen. These trapping effects have now been studied systematically for muons in both f.c.c. metals (aluminium and copper) and b.c.c. metals (mainly niobium). Direct information on the trapping rates and the nature of the diffusion processes can be obtained since the muonic lifetime covers a time range where many of these processes occur.\\\\ \\\\ Mathematical models are set up ...

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in magnesium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrographic determination of trace quantities of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Hn, Mo, Ni and Si in magnesium metal is described. Samples are dissolved with HNO 3 and calcinate into MgO. In order to avoid losses of boron NH 4 OH is added to the nitric solution. Except for aluminium and chromium the analysis is performed through the use of the carrier distillation technique. These two impurities are determined by burning to completion the MgO. Among the compounds studied as carriers (AgCl, AgF, CsCl, CuF 2 , KCl and SrF 2 ) AgCl allows, In general, the best volatilization efficiency. Lithium determination is achieved by using KC1 or CsCl. Detection limits, on the basis of MgO, are in the range 0,1 to 30 ppm, depending on the element. (Author) 8 refs

  2. Impurity diffusion in transition-metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    Intrinsic tracer impurity diffusion measurements in ceramic oxides have been primarily confined to CoO, NiO, and Fe 3 O 4 . Tracer impurity diffusion in these materials and TiO 2 , together with measurements of the effect of impurities on tracer diffusion (Co in NiO and Cr in CoO), are reviewed and discussed in terms of impurity-defect interactions and mechanisms of diffusion. Divalent impurities in divalent solvents seem to have a weak interaction with vacancies whereas trivalent impurities in divalent solvents strongly influence the vacancy concentrations and significantly reduce solvent jump frequencies near a trivalent impurity. Impurities with small ionic radii diffuse more slowly with a larger activation energy than impurities with larger ionic radii for all systems considered in this review. Cobalt ions (a moderate size impurity) diffuse rapidly along the open channels parallel to the c-axis in TiO 2 whereas chromium ions (a smaller-sized impurity) do not. 60 references, 11 figures

  3. Recombination rates of hydrogen and oxygen over pure and impure plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term, safe storage of excess plutonium-bearing materials is required until stabilization and disposal methods are implemented or defined. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established a plan to address the stabilization, packing, and storage of plutonium-bearing materials from around the complex. The DOE's standard method, DOE-STD-3013-96 and its proposed revision, for stabilizing pure and impure actinide materials is by calcination in air followed by sealing the material in welded stainless steel containers. The 3013 standard contains and equation that predicts the total pressure buildup in the can over the anticipated storage time of 50 yr. This equation was meant to model a worst-case scenario to ensure that pressures would not exceed the strength of the container at the end of 50 yr. As a result, concerns about pressure generation in the storage cans, both absolute values and rates, have been raised with regard to rupture and dispersal of nuclear materials. Similar issues have been raised about the transportation of these materials around the complex. The purpose of this work is to provide a stronger technical basis for the 3013 standard by measuring the recombination rates of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures in contact with pure and impure plutonium oxides. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether the rate of recombination is faster than the rate of water radiolysis under controlled conditions. This was accomplished by using a calibrated pressure-volume-temperature apparatus to measure the recombination rates in a fixed volume as the gas mixture was brought into contact with oxide powders whose temperatures ranged from 50 to 300 C. These conditions were selected in order to bracket the temperature conditions expected in a typical storage can. In addition, a 2% H 2 /air mixture encompasses scenarios in which the cans are sealed in air, and over time various amounts of hydrogen are formed

  4. On the determination of various metallic and nonmetallic impurities in sodium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, H.; Gruenhaeuser, M.; Nagel, G.; Nold, E.; Schaefer, A.; Schumann, H.

    1976-04-01

    Methods for the determination of various metallic and nonmetallic impurities in sodium metal were developed or tested. Detection limits, reproducibilities and results of analyses are reported. (orig.) [de

  5. Adsorption of neptunium and plutonium on metal phosphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    The removal of neptunium and plutonium from water by adsorption on titanium, zirconium, bismuth, thorium, and uranium phosphites was investigated. These phosphites hydrolyze in neutral or alkaline solution producing the hydrous metal oxides that are more effective adsorbents than the original phosphite compounds. Ageing the plutonium-238 polymer changes its adsorption characteristics on commercial bone char. 37 figures, 7 tables

  6. Device for removing impurities from liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Kesahiro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ishida, Tomio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain highly reliable and efficient impurity removal by forming temperature distribution the impurity removing device thereby providing the function of corrosion product trap, nuclear fission product trap and cold trap under the conditions suitable to the impurity removing materials. Constitution: The impurity removing device comprises a container containing impurity removing fillers. The fillers comprise material for removing corrosion products, material for removing nuclear fission products and material for removing depositions from liquid sodium. The positions for the respective materials are determined such that the materials are placed under the temperature conditions easy to attain their function depending on the temperature distribution formed in the removing device, whereby appropriate temperature condition is set to each of the materials. (Yoshino, Y.)

  7. MIS High-Purity Plutonium Oxide Metal Oxidation Product TS707001 (SSR123): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stroud, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Worl, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Max A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carillo, Alex [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-09

    A high-purity plutonium dioxide material from the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Program inventory has been studied with regard to gas generation and corrosion in a storage environment. Sample TS707001 represents process plutonium oxides from several metal oxidation operations as well as impure and scrap plutonium from Hanford that are currently stored in 3013 containers. After calcination to 950°C, the material contained 86.98% plutonium with no major impurities. This study followed over time, the gas pressure of a sample with nominally 0.5 wt% water in a sealed container with an internal volume scaled to 1/500th of the volume of a 3013 container. Gas compositions were measured periodically over a six year period. The maximum observed gas pressure was 138 kPa. The increase over the initial pressure of 80 kPa was primarily due to generation of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas in the first six months. Hydrogen and oxygen were minor components of the headspace gas. At the completion of the study, the internal components of the sealed container showed signs of corrosion, including pitting.

  8. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  9. Corrosion performance of several metals in plutonium nitrate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Seiichiro; Nagai, Takayuki; Yasu, Shozo; Koizumi, Tsutomu

    1995-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of several metals exposed in plutonium nitrate solution was studied. Plutonium nitrate solution with the plutonium concentration ranging from 0.01 to 300 g/l was used as a corrosive medium. Specimens tested were type 304 ULC (304 ULC) stainless steel, type 310 Nb (310 Nb) stainless steel, titanium (Ti), titanium-5% tantalum alloy (Ti-5Ta), and zirconium (Zr). Corrosion behavior of these metals in plutonium nitrate solution was evaluated through examining electrochemical characteristics and corrosion rates obtained by weight loss measurement. From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion rate of stainless steels i.e. 304 ULC and 310 Nb, increases by the presence of plutonium in nitric acid solution. The corrosion potential of the stainless steels shifted linearly towards the noble direction as the concentration of plutonium increases. It is thought that the shifts in corrosion potential of the stainless steels to the noble direction results an increase in anodic current and, hence, corrosion rate. Valve metals, i.e. Ti, Ti-5Ta and Zr, showed good corrosion resistance over the whole range of plutonium concentration examined here. (author)

  10. Nuclear orientation of rare earth impurities in ferromagnetic host metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keus, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are described investigating the behaviour of the metals Nd and Lu as impurities in a ferromagnetic host metal - iron, cobalt and nickel. The systems have been studied with the aid of nuclear orientation, making use of the interactions between the atom nuclei and the electrons - the so called hyperfine interactions. (C.F.)

  11. A calibration to predict the concentrations of impurities in plutonium oxide by prompt gamma analysis: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Foster, Lynn A.; Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Murray, Roy E. IV

    2009-01-01

    Over 5,500 containers of excess plutonium-bearing materials have been packaged for long-term storage following the requirements of DOE-STD- 3013. Knowledge of the chemical impurities in the packaged materials is important because certain impurities, such as chloride salts, affect the behavior of the material in storage leading to gas generation and corrosion when sufficient moisture also is present. In most cases, the packaged materials are not well characterized, and information about the chemical impurities is limited to knowledge of the material's processing history. The alpha-particle activity from the plutonium and americium isotopes provides a method of nondestructive self-interrogation to identify certain light elements through the characteristic, prompt gamma rays that are emitted from alpha-particle-induced reactions with these elements. Gamma-ray spectra are obtained for each 3013 container using a highresolution, coaxial high-purity germanium detector. These gamma-ray spectra are scanned from 800 to 5,000 keV for characteristic, prompt gamma rays from the detectable elements, which include lithium, beryllium, boron, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, chlorine, and potassium. The lower limits of detection for these elements in a plutonium-oxide matrix increase with atomic number and range from 100 or 200 ppm for the lightest elements such as lithium and beryllium, to 19,000 ppm for potassium. The peak areas from the characteristic, prompt gamma rays can be used to estimate the concentration of the light-element impurities detected in the material on a semiquantitative basis. The use of prompt gamma analysis to assess impurity concentrations avoids the expense and the risks generally associated with performing chemical analysis on radioactive materials. The analyzed containers are grouped by impurity content, which helps to identify high-risk containers for surveillance and in sorting materials before packaging.

  12. Spectrochemical determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldbart, Z.; Carmi, U.; Harrel, A.

    1978-02-01

    A spectrochemical method was developed for the determination of impurities and noble metal traces in carnallite by DC arc excitation. The investigated sample is brought to a standard form of potassium-magnesium sulphate mixed with graphite. Detection limits of 1-10 ppm were determined for 27 elements; the dynamical detection range is 1-400 ppm

  13. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C.; Hieslmair, H.

    1997-01-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L n values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions

  14. Features of accumulation of radiation defects in metal with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids are being studied for the last fifty years quite intensively. Many regularities of these processes are fixed, but there are more unsolved problems. The computer simulation is one of the effective tools in finding the mechanisms of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects in solids. The numerical solution of the system of the differential equations by means of computers describing kinetics of accumulation of radiation point defects in metals with impurity, has allowed to receive a number of new outcomes. It was revealed, that a determinative factor influential in concentration of point defects (vacancies and interstitial atoms), formed during an exposure of metal, is the correlation a speed of Frenkel twins recombination, the capture of defects by impurity atoms and absorption of defects by other drainage, for example by dislocations. If the speed of capture of interstitial atoms by impurity atoms for two - three order is lower than the recombination speed of Frenkel twins and on two - three order exceeds the speed of capture of vacancies by impurity atoms, the concentration of interstitial atoms within the first seconds of an exposure passes through a maximum, then quickly decreases in some times and after that starts slowly to grow. The change of concentration of interstitial atoms in an initial period of an exposure does not influence on the change of a vacancy concentration. Within the whole period of an exposure, during which the concentration of interstitial atoms achieves a maximum and then is reduced, the vacancy concentration is steadily enlarged. However subsequent sluggish rise of concentration of interstitial atoms during an exposure is followed by the decrease of the vacancy concentration. The most remarkable feature of the kinetics of accumulation of interstitial atoms in metals with impurity is the presence of two extremum on curve dependence of interstitial atoms on a

  15. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-04-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use.

  16. Massive subcritical compact arrays of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    Two experimental critical-approach programs are reported. Both were performed at the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado; and both date back to the late 1960s. Both involve very large arrays of massive plutonium ingots. These ingots had been cast in the foundry at the Rocky Flats Plant as part of their routine production operations; they were not specially prepared for either study. Consequently, considerable variation in ingot mass is encountered. This mass varied between approximately 7 kg and a little more than 10 kg. One program, performed in the spring of 1969, involved stacked arrays of ingots contained within cylindrical, disk-shaped, thin, steel cans. This program studied four arrays defined by the pattern of steel cans in a single layer. The four were: 1 x N, 3 x N, 2 x 2 x N, and 3 x 3 x N. The second was a tightly-packed, triangular-pitched patterns; the last two were square-pitched patterns. The other program, performed about a year earlier, involved similar ingots also contained in similar steel cans, but these canned plutonium ingots were placed in commercial steel drums. This study pertained to one-, two-, and three-layered horizontal arrays of drums. All cases proved to be well subcritical. Most would have remained subcritical had the parameters of the array under study been continued infinitely beyond the reciprocal multiplication safety limit. In one case for the drum arrays, an uncertain extrapolation of the data of the earlier program suggests that criticality might have eventually been attained had several thousand additional kilograms of plutonium been available for use

  17. Critical and subcritical parameters of the system simulating plutonium metal dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, Yury Yu.; Ryazanov, Boris G.; Sviridov, Victor I.; Mozhayeva, Lubov I.

    2003-01-01

    Dissolution of plutonium metal was simulated using the Monte Carlo computer code to calculate criticality safety limits for the process. Calculations were made for the constant masses of plutonium charged to the dissolving vessel considering distribution of plutonium in metal and solution phases. Critical parameters and limits were calculated as a function of dissolving vessel volume and plutonium metal mass. 240 Pu content was assumed to be from 0% to 10% (mass). Critical parameters were evaluated for the system with a water reflector. Results of this paper may be used in the designing process equipment for plutonium metal dissolution. (author)

  18. Rapid dissolution of plutonium metal in sulfamic acid followed by conversion to a nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    1981-01-01

    Plutonium metal that does not meet product purity specifications and aged plutonium metal into which /sup 241/Am has grown must be recycled through a recovery and purification process. At the Savannah River Plant (SRP), the initial recycle step is dissolution of the metal. Since about 1962, sulfamic acid has been the accepted dissolvent in the SRP process. This paper dicusses the dissolving of plutonium metal in sulfamic aid. 4 refs

  19. Plutonium microstructures. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.M.; Bergin, J.B.

    1981-09-01

    This report is the first of three parts in which Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory metallographers exhibit a consolidated set of illustrations of inclusions that are seen in plutonium metal as a consequence of inherent and tramp impurities, alloy additions, and thermal or mechanical treatments. This part includes illustrations of nonmetallic and intermetallic inclusions characteristic of major impurity elements as an aid to identifying unknowns. It also describes historical aspects of the increased purity of laboratory plutonium samples, and it gives the composition of the etchant solutions and describes the etching procedure used in the preparation of each illustrated sample. 25 figures

  20. Corrosion behavior of pyroclore-rich titanate ceramics for plutonium disposition; impurity effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakel, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    The baseline ceramic contains Ti, U, Ca, Hf, Gd, and Ce, and is made up of only four phases, pyrochlore, zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite. The impurities present in the three other ceramics represent impurities expected in the feed, and result in different phase distributions. The results from 3 day, 90 C MCC-1 tests with impurity ceramics were significantly different than the results from tests with the baseline ceramic. Overall, the addition of impurities to these titanate ceramics alters the phase distributions, which in turn, affects the corrosion behavior

  1. Low temperature dissolution flowsheet for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The H-Canyon flowsheet used to dissolve Pu metal for PuO2 production utilizes boiling HNO3. SRNL was requested to develop a complementary dissolution flowsheet at two reduced temperature ranges. The dissolution and H2 generation rates of Pu metal were investigated using a dissolving solution at ambient temperature (20-30 °C) and for an intermediate temperature of 50-60 °C. Additionally, the testing included an investigation of the dissolution rates and characterization of the off-gas generated from the ambient temperature dissolution of carbon steel cans and the nylon bags that contain the Pu metal when charged to the dissolver.

  2. Trends on 3d transition metal impurities in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, L.V.C.; Machado, W.V.M.; Justo, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    We carried out a first principles investigation on the electronic properties and chemical trends of 3d transition metal related impurities in diamond. In terms of formation energy, the interstitial site is considerably more unfavorable than the substitutional or divacancy ones. Going from Ti to Ni, the 3d-related energy levels in the gap become deeper toward the valence band in all three sites. However, in the divacancy one, those levels cross with the divacancy-related ones, such that the electronic property of the center depends on the character of the highest occupied level.

  3. Solvent anode for plutonium purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.; Fife, K.W.; Christensen, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a technique to allow complete oxidation of plutonium from the anode during plutonium electrorefining. This will eliminate the generation of a ''spent'' anode heel which requires further treatment for recovery. Our approach is to employ a solvent metal in the anode to provide a liquid anode pool throughout electrorefining. We use molten salts and metals in ceramic crucibles at 700 0 C. Our goal is to produce plutonium metal at 99.9% purity with oxidation and transfer of more than 98% of the impure plutonium feed metal from the anode into the salt and product phases. We have met these criteria in experiments on the 100 to 1000 g scale. We plan to scale our operations to 4 kg of feed plutonium and to optimize the process parameters

  4. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1989-03-01

    This report contains with regard to 'plutonium' statements on chemistry, occurrence and reactions in the environment, handling procedures in the nuclear fuel cycle, radiation protection methods, biokinetics, toxicology and medical treatment to make available reliable data for the public discussion on plutonium especially its use in nuclear power plants and its radiological assessment. (orig.) [de

  5. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Discovery of the neutron made it easy to create elements which do not exist in nature. One of these is plutonium, and its isotope with mass number 239 has nuclear properties which make it both a good fuel for nuclear power reactors and a good explosive for nuclear weapons. Since it was discovered during a war the latter characteristic was put to use, but it is now evident that use of plutonium in a particular kind of nuclear reactor, the fast breeder reactor, will allow the world's resources of uranium to last for millennia as a major source of energy. Plutonium is very radiotoxic, resembling radium in this respect. Therefore the widespread introduction of fast breeder reactors to meet energy demands can be contemplated only after assurances on two points; that adequate control of the radiological hazard resulting from the handling of very large amounts of plutonium can be guaranteed, and that diversion of plutonium to illicit use can be prevented. The problems exist to a lesser degree already, since all types of nuclear reactor produce some plutonium. Some plutonium has already been dispersed in the environment, the bulk of it from atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons. (author)

  6. Thermal and Physical Properties of Plutonium Dioxide Produced from the Oxidation of Metal: a Data Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-13

    The ARIES Program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory removes plutonium metal from decommissioned nuclear weapons, and converts it to plutonium dioxide in a specially-designed Direct Metal Oxidation furnace. The plutonium dioxide is analyzed for specific surface area, particle size distribution, and moisture content. The purpose of these analyses is to certify that the plutonium dioxide powder meets or exceeds the specifications of the end-user, and the specifications for the packaging and transport of nuclear materials. Analytical results from plutonium dioxide from ARIES development activities, from ARIES production activities, from muffle furnace oxidation of metal, and from metal that was oxidized over a lengthy time interval in air at room temperature, are presented. The processes studied produce plutonium dioxide powder with distinct differences in measured properties, indicating the significant influence of oxidation conditions on physical properties.

  7. X-ray photoemission study of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptist, R.

    1982-01-01

    The x-ray induced photoemission from clean pure plutonium metal is described and the results for both core and valence levels are compared with previous measurements on light actinides. It is found that, as in thorium and urnaium, the configuration interaction plays an important role for core levels, in particular for those of the n=5 shell. The experimental valence-band spectrum confirms the existence of 5f states at the Fermi level and is compared with a density of states of FCC Pu derived from a recent relativistic band structure calculation. (author)

  8. Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miner, William N

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet discusses plutonium from discovery to its production, separation, properties, fabrication, handling, and uses, including use as a reactor fuel and use in isotope power generators and neutron sources.

  9. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  10. Experience on the removal of impurities from liquid metal systems by cold-trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, J. A.

    1963-10-15

    Experience in impurity removal by cold-trapping, which was obtained on DFR and its associated liquid metal rigs, is reviewed. The development of the present DFR cold-trapping system is outlined, and the operation of the additional pumped loops, which were required in order to control the reactor impurity levels, are described. Operation of the liquid metal rigs ancillary to the reactor project is discussed with particular reference to the control of impurity levels. (auth)

  11. Experimental critical parameters of plutonium metal cylinders flooded with water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Forty-nine critical configurations are reported for experiments involving arrays of 3 kg plutonium metal cylinders moderated and reflected by water. Thirty-four of these describe systems assembled in the laboratory, while 15 others are derived critical parameters inferred from 46 subcritical cases. The arrays included 2x2xN, N = 2, 3, 4, and 5, in one program and 3x3x3 configurations in a later study. All were three-dimensional, nearly square arrays with equal horizontal lattice spacings but a different vertical lattice spacing. Horizontal spacings ranged from units in contact to 180 mm center-to-center; and vertical spacings ranged from about 80 mm to almost 400 mm center-to-center. Several nearly-equilateral 3x3x3 arrays exhibit an extremely sensitive dependence upon horizontal separation for identical vertical spacings. A line array of unreflected and essentially unmoderated canned plutonium metal units appeared to be well subcritical based on measurements made to assure safety during the manual assembly operations. All experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the mid-1970s and early 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory.

  12. Experimental critical parameters of plutonium metal cylinders flooded with water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    Forty-nine critical configurations are reported for experiments involving arrays of 3 kg plutonium metal cylinders moderated and reflected by water. Thirty-four of these describe systems assembled in the laboratory, while 15 others are derived critical parameters inferred from 46 subcritical cases. The arrays included 2x2xN, N = 2, 3, 4, and 5, in one program and 3x3x3 configurations in a later study. All were three-dimensional, nearly square arrays with equal horizontal lattice spacings but a different vertical lattice spacing. Horizontal spacings ranged from units in contact to 180 mm center-to-center; and vertical spacings ranged from about 80 mm to almost 400 mm center-to-center. Several nearly-equilateral 3x3x3 arrays exhibit an extremely sensitive dependence upon horizontal separation for identical vertical spacings. A line array of unreflected and essentially unmoderated canned plutonium metal units appeared to be well subcritical based on measurements made to assure safety during the manual assembly operations. All experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the mid-1970s and early 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant's Critical Mass Laboratory

  13. Estimation of metallic impurities in uranium by carrier distillation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, A.G.; Godbole, S.V.; Deshkar, S.B.; Joshi, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    An emission spectrographic method has been standardised for the estimation of twenty-two metallic impurities in uranium using carrier-distillation technique. Silver chloride with a concentration of 5% has been used as the carrier and palladium and gallium are used as internal standards. Precision and accuracy determinations of the synthetic samples indicate 6-15% deviation for most of the elements. Using the method described here, five uranium reference samples received from C.E.A.-France were analysed. The detection limits obtained for Cd, Co and W are lower than those reported in the literature while limits for the remaining elements are comparable to the values reported. The method is suitable for the chemical quality control analysis of uranium used for the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel. (author)

  14. Transition-metal impurities in semiconductors and heterojunction band lineups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Jerzy M.; Delerue, C.; Lannoo, M.; Heinrich, Helmut

    1988-10-01

    The validity of a recent proposal that transition-metal impurity levels in semiconductors may serve as a reference in band alignment in semiconductor heterojunctions is positively verified by using the most recent data on band offsets in the following lattice-matched heterojunctions: Ga1-xAlxAs/GaAs, In1-xGaxAsyP1-y/InP, In1-xGaxP/GaAs, and Cd1-xHgxTe/CdTe. The alignment procedure is justified theoretically by showing that transition-metal energy levels are effectively pinned to the average dangling-bond energy level, which serves as the reference level for the heterojunction band alignment. Experimental and theoretical arguments showing that an increasingly popular notion on transition-metal energy-level pinning to the vacuum level is unjustified and must be abandoned in favor of the internal-reference rule proposed recently [J. M. Langer and H. Heinrich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 1414 (1985)] are presented.

  15. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Plutonium, which was obtained and identified for the first time in 1941 by chemist Glenn Seaborg - through neutron irradiation of uranium 238 - is closely related to the history of nuclear energy. From the very beginning, because of the high radiotoxicity of plutonium, a tremendous amount of research work has been devoted to the study of the biological effects and the consequences on the environment. It can be said that plutonium is presently one of the elements, whose nuclear and physico-chemical characteristics are the best known. The first part of this issue is a survey of the knowledge acquired on the subject, which emphasizes the sanitary effects and transfer into the environment. Then the properties of plutonium related to energy generation are dealt with. Fissionable, like uranium 235, plutonium has proved a high-performance nuclear fuel. Originally used in breeder reactors, it is now being more and more widely recycled in light water reactors, in MOX fuel. Reprocessing, recycling and manufacturing of these new types of fuel, bound of become more and more widespread, are now part of a self-consistent series of operations, whose technical, economical, industrial and strategical aspects are reviewed. (author)

  16. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction

  17. Preparation of fused chloride salts for use in pyrochemical plutonium recovery operations at Los Alamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fife, K.W.; Bowersox, D.F.; Christensen, D.C.; Williams, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    The Plutonium Metal Technology Group at Los Alamos routinely uses pyrochemical processes to produce and purify plutonium from impure sources. The basic processes (metal production, metal purification, and residue treatment) involve controlling oxidation and reduction reactions between plutonium and its compounds in molten salts. Current production methods are described, as well as traditional approaches and recent developments in the preparation of solvent salts for electrorefining, molten salt extraction, lean metal (pyroredox) purification, and direct oxide reduction.

  18. A statistically designed matrix to evaluate solubility, impurity tolerance, and thermal stability of plutonium-bearing glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeler, D.K.; Meaker, T.F.; Edwards, T.B.; McIntyre, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    In support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Material Disposition (OFDM) Program, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is evaluating a unique lanthanide borosilicate glass to immobilize excess plutonium and other heavy metals. The lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass system met all FY96 programmatic planning objectives. Those objectives were focused on (1) demonstrating 10 wt% Pu solubility, and (2) meeting preliminary product performance criteria. Although 10 wt% Pu solubility was demonstrated with product performance exceeding high level waste glasses based on PCT results, the LaBS system was not optimized

  19. Plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Christiansen, K.; Wollesen, M.

    1979-01-01

    As emotions and fear of plutonium are neither useful for the non-professionals nor for the political decision makers and the advantages and disadvantages of plutonium can only put against each other under difficulties, the paper wants to present the most essential scientific data of plutonium in a generally understandable way. Each of the individual sections is concluded and they try to give an answer to the most discussed questions. In order to make understanding easier, the scientific facts are only brought at points where it cannot be done without for the correctness of the presentation. Many details were left out knowingly. On the other hand, important details are dealt with several times if it seems necessary for making the presentation correct. The graphical presentations and the figures in many cases contain more than said in the text. They give the interested reader hints to scientific-technical coherences. The total material is to enable the reader to form his own opinion on plutonium problems which are being discussed in public. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V.; Mashirev, V.P.

    2000-01-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  1. Metal plutonium conversion to components of nuclear reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, V.G.; Panov, A.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, ALL-Russian Science and Research, Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Mashirev, V.P. [ALL-Russian Science and Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2000-07-01

    Capabilities of different technologies for plutonium conversion to the fuel components of nuclear reactors are studied. Advantages and shortcomings of aqueous and nonaqueous methods of plutonium treatment are shown. Proposals to combine and coordinate efforts of world scientific and technological community in solving problems concerning plutonium of energetic and weapon origin treatment were put forward. (authors)

  2. Electronic properties of iron impurity in hcp metals from Moessbauer studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janot, C.; Delcroix, P.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy was used in quantitative investigating the electronic properties of iron impurities in hexagonal close-packed metals. Beryllium of the highest commercially obtainable purity containing about 300 ppm residual impurities was used as a host element. Experimental evidence is given for the existence of localized electronic states which have non-spherical distribution and obviously contribute especially to the electric field gradient. Iron impurity seems to retain the same electronic behaviour as long as the host hcp metal is a normal one (Mg, Cd, Zn), but the localized electronic states seem to disappear when the host is a transition hcp metal (Co, Ti, Sc, Zr, etc.). (Z.S.)

  3. A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-10

    This report documents the new PG calibration regression equation. These calibration equations incorporate new data that have become available since revision 1 of “A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis” was issued [3] The calibration equations are based on a weighted least squares (WLS) approach for the regression. The WLS method gives each data point its proper amount of influence over the parameter estimates. This gives two big advantages, more precise parameter estimates and better and more defensible estimates of uncertainties. The WLS approach makes sense both statistically and experimentally because the variances increase with concentration, and there are physical reasons that the higher measurements are less reliable and should be less influential. The new magnesium calibration includes a correction for sodium and separate calibration equation for items with and without chlorine. These additional calibration equations allow for better predictions and smaller uncertainties for sodium in materials with and without chlorine. Chlorine and sodium have separate equations for RICH materials. Again, these equations give better predictions and smaller uncertainties chlorine and sodium for RICH materials.

  4. Determination of metal impurities in MOX powder by direct current arc atomic emission spectroscopy. Application of standard addition method for direct analysis of powder sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Takahiro; Taguchi, Shigeo; Kuno, Takehiko; Surugaya, Naoki

    2016-12-01

    Metal impurities in MOX powder obtained from uranium and plutonium recovered from reprocessing process of spent nuclear fuel have to be determined for its characterization. Direct current arc atomic emission spectroscopy (DCA-AES) is one of the useful methods for direct analysis of powder sample without dissolving the analyte into aqueous solution. However, the selection of standard material, which can overcome concerns such as matrix matching, is quite important to create adequate calibration curves for DCA-AES. In this study, we apply standard addition method using the certified U_3O_8 containing known amounts of metal impurities to avoid the matrix problems. The proposed method provides good results for determination of Fe, Cr and Ni contained in MOX samples at a significant quantity level. (author)

  5. Modeling impurity-assisted chain creation in noble-metal break junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Napoli, S; Thiess, A; Blügel, S; Mokrousov, Y

    2012-01-01

    In this work we present the generalization of the model for chain formation in break junctions, introduced by Thiess et al (2008 Nano Lett. 8 2144), to zigzag transition-metal chains with s and p impurities. We apply this extended model to study the producibility trends for noble-metal chains with impurities, often present in break junction experiments, namely, Cu, Ag and Au chains with H, C, O and N adatoms. Providing the material-specific parameters for our model from systematic full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave first-principles calculations, we find that the presence of such impurities crucially affects the binding properties of the noble-metal chains. We reveal that both the impurity-induced bond strengthening and the formation of zigzag bonds can lead to a significantly enhanced probability for chain formation in break junctions. (paper)

  6. Chloride removal from plutonium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, H.P.

    1983-01-01

    SRP is evaluating a program to recover plutonium from a metallic alloy that will contain chloride salt impurities. Removal of chloride to sufficiently low levels to prevent damaging corrosion to canyon equipment is feasible as a head-end step following dissolution. Silver nitrate and mercurous nitrate were each successfully used in laboratory tests to remove chloride from simulated alloy dissolver solution containing plutonium. Levels less than 10 ppM chloride were achieved in the supernates over the precipitated and centrifuged insoluble salts. Also, less than 0.05% loss of plutonium in the +3, +4, or +6 oxidation states was incurred via precipitate carrying. These results provide impetus for further study and development of a plant-scale process to recover plutonium from metal alloy at SRP

  7. Transport and re-deposition of limiter-released metal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claasen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1983-01-01

    The transport parallel B-vector and re-deposition of limiter- (or divertor-target-)released metal impurities in a given counter-streaming scrape-off layer plasma is studied analytically by using a kinetic approach. Electron impact ionization, Coulomb collisions with the hydrogen ions, and impurity ion acceleration in a pre-sheath electric field are accounted for. The friction and electric-field forces provide the driving forces for impurity re-cycling in front of the limiter. Both hydrogen ion sputtering and self-sputtering are included (the latter for impurity emission perpendicular to the limiter surface). The analytical formulas are numerically evaluated for the example of sputtered iron impurities, assuming a simple model for a scrape-off layer plasma in contact with a stainless-steel poloidal ring limiter. (author)

  8. Thor, a thorium-reflected plutonium-metal critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Critical specifications of Thor, an old assembly of thorium-reflected plutonium, have been refined. These specifications are brought together with void coefficients, Rossi-alpha values, fission traverses, and spectral indices

  9. Synthesis of complex plutonium oxides with alkaline-earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasufumi; Nakajima, Kunihisa; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko; Yamawaki, Michio.

    1995-03-01

    Complex plutonium(IV) oxides with strontium and barium, SuPuO 3 and BaPuO 3 , were synthesized and their crystal structure was analyzed. Compacted mixture of plutonium dioxide powder and the carbonate of strontium or barium was heated in a stream of argon gas using a cell with a small orifice. The products obtained were found to be composed of a nearly single phase showing the structure of orthorhombic slightly distorted from cubic. (author)

  10. Simulation of the accumulation kinetics for radiation point defects in a metals with impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskakov, B.M.; Nurova, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    In the work a kinetics of vacancies (V) and interstitial atoms (IA) accumulation for cases when the V and IA are recombining with each other, absorbing by drain and capturing by impurity atoms has been simulated. The differential equations system numerical solution was carried out by the Runge-Kutta method. The dynamical equilibrium time achievement for the point radiation defects accumulation process in the metal with impurity is considered

  11. Metal impurity injection into DIVA plasmas with a Q-switched laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Nagami, Masayuki; Sengoku, Seio; Kumagai, Katsuaki

    1978-08-01

    Metal impurity injection into DIVA plasmas with a Q-switched ruby laser beam is described. Metal materials used are aluminium and gold. The Q-switched laser beam is incident onto a thin metal film thickness about 0.2 μm coated on pyrex glass plate surface. The metal film is vaporized by the laser beam and injected into DIVA plasma. The laser-beam injection method has advantages of sharp profile of vaporized metal, easy control of vaporized metal quantity and injection rate control of metal vapor. (author)

  12. Simulation and analysis of the plutonium oxide/metal storage containers subject to various loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, C.; Miller, R.F.

    1995-05-01

    The structural and functional requirements of the Plutonium Oxide/Metal Storage Containers are specified in the Report ''Complex 21 Plutonium Storage Facility Material Containment Team Technical Data Report'' [Complex 21, 1993]. There are no existing storage containers designed for long term storage of plutonium and current codes, standards or regulations do not adequately cover this case. As there is no extensive experience with the long term (50+ years) storage of plutonium, the design of high integrity storage containers must address many technical considerations. This analysis discusses a few potential natural phenomena that could theoretically adversely affect the container integrity over time. The plutonium oxide/metal storage container consists of a primary containment vessel (the outer container), a bagless transfer can (the inner container), two vertical plates on top of the primary containment vessel, a circular plate (the flange) supported by the two plates, tube for gas sampling operations mounted at the center of the primary containment vessel top and a spring system being inserted in the cavity between the primary containment vessel and the cap of the bagless transfer can. The dimensions of the plutonium oxide/metal storage container assembly can be found in Figure 2-1. The primary container, the bagless transfer can, and all the attached components are made of Type 304L stainless steel

  13. Atomistic modeling of an impurity element and a metal-impurity system: pure P and Fe-P system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won-Seok; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Kim, Nack J

    2012-01-01

    An interatomic potential for pure phosphorus, an element that has van der Waals, covalent and metallic bonding character, simultaneously, has been developed for the purpose of application to metal-phosphorus systems. As a simplification, the van der Waals interaction, which is less important in metal-phosphorus systems, was omitted in the parameterization process and potential formulation. On the basis of the second-nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method (2NN MEAM) interatomic potential formalism applicable to both covalent and metallic materials, a potential that can describe various fundamental physical properties of a wide range of allotropic or transformed crystalline structures of pure phosphorus could be developed. The potential was then extended to the Fe-P binary system describing various physical properties of intermetallic compounds, bcc and liquid alloys, and also the segregation tendency of phosphorus on grain boundaries of bcc iron, in good agreement with experimental information. The suitability of the present potential and the parameterization process for atomic scale investigations about the effects of various non-metallic impurity elements on metal properties is demonstrated. (paper)

  14. The role of the excited impurity levels on the metal-non metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.S.F. da; Makler, S.S.; Anda, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic density of states for the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is calculated using the Green function method. The system is described by a Hamiltonian with local Coulomb interactions represented in a tight binding basis composed by two orbitals per site. The electronic correlation is treated in the CPA approximation. To calculate the configurational average for this structural disordered system a diagrammatic scheme is developed. It represents an extension of the Matsubara and Toyozawa method for the case of two hybridized bands in the presence of electronic correlation. The excited levels show to play a crutial role in the undestanding of the metal-non metal transition. This work represents an improvement of a previous result. The particular case of Si : P is analyzed. (author) [pt

  15. The role of the excited impurity levels on the metal-non metal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.S.F. da; Makler, S.S.; Anda, E.V.

    1983-01-01

    The electronic density of states for the impurity bands in doped semiconductors is calculated using the Green function method. The system is described by a Hamiltonian with local Coulomb interactions represented in a tight binding basis composed by two orbitals per site. The electronic correlation is treated in the CPA approximation. To calculate the configurational average for this structural disordered system a diagrammatic scheme is developed. It represents an extension of the Matsubara and Toyozawa method for the case of two hybridized bands in the presence of electronic correlation. The excited levels shown to play a crutial role in the understanding of the metal-non metal transition. This work represents an improvement of a previous result. The particular case of Si:P is analyzed. (Author) [pt

  16. Magnetic properties of metallic impurities with strongly correlated electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Ringel, Matouš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2009), s. 30-35 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : And erson impurity * strong electron correlations * spin-polarized solution * three-channel parquet equations * magnetic field Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.433, year: 2009 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/ABSTR/115/a115-1-5.html

  17. The Determination of Uranium and Trace Metal Impurities in Yellow Cake Sample by Chemical Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busamongkol, Arporn; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    1999-01-01

    The purity of uranium cake is very critical in nuclear-grade uranium (UO 2 ) and uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) production. The major element in yellow cake is uranium and trace metal impurities. The objective of this study is to determine uranium and 25 trace metal impurities; Aluminum, Barium, Bismuth, Calcium, Cadmium, Cobalt, Chromium, Copper, Iron, Potassium, Iithium, Magnesium, Manganese, Molybdenum, Sodium, Niobium, Nickel, Lead, Antimony, Tin, Strontium, Titanium, Vanadium, Zinc and Zirconium, Uranium is determined by Potassium dichromate titration, after solvent extraction with Cupferon in Chloroform, Trace metal impurities are determined by solvent extraction with Tributyl Phosphate in Carbon-tetrachloride ( for first 23 elements) and N-Benzoyl-N-Phenylhydroxylamine in Chloroform ( for last 2 elements), then analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) compared with Inductively Couple Plasma Spectrophotometers (ICP). The accuracy and precision are studied with standard uranium octaoxide

  18. Recent irradiation tests of uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahl, R.G.; Lahm, C.E.; Villarreal, R.; Hofman, G.L.; Beck, W.N.

    1986-09-01

    Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium metal fuel irradiation tests to support the ANL Integral Fast Reactor concept are discussed. Satisfactory performance has been demonstrated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup in three alloys having 0, 8, and 19 wt % plutonium. Fuel swelling measurements at low burnup in alloys to 26 wt % plutonium show that fuel deformation is primarily radial in direction. Increasing the plutonium content in the fuel diminishes the rate of fuel-cladding gap closure and axial fuel column growth. Chemical redistribution occurs by 2.1 at.% peak burnup and generally involves the inward migration of zirconium and outward migration of uranium. Fission gas release to the plenum ranges from 46% to 56% in the alloys irradiated to 2.9 at.% peak burnup. No evidence of deleterious fuel-cladding chemical or mechanical interaction was observed

  19. The effect of ICRF antenna phasing on metal impurities in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.E.; Bush, C.; Colestock, P.L.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kharkov

    1989-07-01

    ICRF power levels of up to 2.8 MW were achieved during the 1988 experimental run on TFTR. Metal impurity concentrations (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni) and Z eff were monitored during ICRF heating by x-ray pulse height analysis and uv spectroscopy. Antenna phasing was the key variable affecting ICRF performance. No increase in metallic impurities was observed for P rf approx lt 2.8 MW with the antenna straps 0-Π, while a measurable increase in titanium (Faraday screen material) was observed for P rf approx gt 1.0 MW with 0-0 phasing. 18 refs., 8 figs

  20. Metal impurity fluxes and plasma-surface interactions in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsåker, H.; Menmuir, S.; Rachlew, E.; Brunsell, P. R.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    The EXTRAP T2R is a large aspect ratio Reversed Field Pinch device. The main focus of interest for the experiments is the active feedback control of resistive wall modes [1]. With feedback it has been possible to prolong plasma discharges in T2R from about 20 ms to nearly 100 ms. In a series of experiments in T2R, in H- and D- plasmas with and without feedback, quantitative spectroscopy and passive collector probes have been used to study the flux of metal impurities. Time resolved spectroscopic measurements of Cr and Mo lines showed large metal release towards discharge termination without feedback. Discharge integrated fluxes of Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo were also measured with collector probes at wall position. Reasonable quantitative agreement was found between the spectroscopic and collector probe measurements. The roles of sputtering, thermal evaporation and arcing in impurity production are evaluated based on the composition of the measured impurity flux.

  1. Metal impurity fluxes and plasma-surface interactions in EXTRAP T2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergsaaker, H; Brunsell, P R; Frassinetti, L; Drake, J R; Menmuir, S; Rachlew, E

    2008-01-01

    The EXTRAP T2R is a large aspect ratio Reversed Field Pinch device. The main focus of interest for the experiments is the active feedback control of resistive wall modes. With feedback it has been possible to prolong plasma discharges in T2R from about 20 ms to nearly 100 ms. In a series of experiments in T2R, in H- and D- plasmas with and without feedback, quantitative spectroscopy and passive collector probes have been used to study the flux of metal impurities. Time resolved spectroscopic measurements of Cr and Mo lines showed large metal release towards discharge termination without feedback. Discharge integrated fluxes of Cr, Fe, Ni and Mo were also measured with collector probes at wall position. Reasonable quantitative agreement was found between the spectroscopic and collector probe measurements. The roles of sputtering, thermal evaporation and arcing in impurity production are evaluated based on the composition of the measured impurity flux

  2. Calculation of forces acting on an impurity in a metal subjected to a temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerl, M.

    1966-01-01

    In a metal subject to a temperature gradient, an impurity is submitted to both an electrostatic force due to the thermoelectric field and a force due to the scattering of electrons and phonons by this point defect. The scattering of the electrons is treated using a semi-classical approach and a quantum mechanical method. The numerical computation for several impurities in Cu, Ag, and Au requires the knowledge of the resistivity cross-section. and of the thermoelectric power of the impurity in the metal. A tentative estimation of the force due to the phonon-scattering is given for the self-diffusion in Cu. However, the approximations of this calculation do not allow a good comparison with the force due to the electrons. (author) [fr

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence of metal-atom impurities in a neutral beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, C.F.; Pyle, R.V.; Sabetimani, Z.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1984-10-01

    The need to limit impurities in fusion devices to low levels is well known. We have investigated, by the technique of laser-induced fluorescence, the concentration of heavy-metal atoms in a neutral beam caused by their evaporation from the hot filaments in a conventional high-current multifilament hydrogen-ion source

  4. Influence of magnetic impurities on charge transport in diffusive-normal-metal/superconductor junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Inoue, J.; Asano, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Charge transport in the diffusive normal metal (DN)/insulator/s- and d-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of magnetic impurities in DN in the framework of the quasiclassical Usadel equations with the generalized boundary conditions. The cases of s- and d-wave superconducting

  5. The CVD graphene transfer procedure introduces metallic impurities which alter the graphene electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2014-01-07

    High quality graphene films can be fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using Ni and Cu as catalytic substrates. Such a synthesis procedure always requires a subsequent transfer process to be performed in order to eliminate the metallic substrate and transfer the graphene onto the desired surface. We show here that such a transfer process causes significant contamination of the graphene film with residual Fe and Ni metal impurities. Fe contamination derives from the use of Fe-based etching solutions to dissolve Ni (or Cu) substrates, while residual Ni (or Cu) is due to an incomplete metal substrate etching. The presence of these metallic impurities within the transferred graphene film affects tremendously its electrochemical behavior when adopted as an electrode material.

  6. Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl 4 . Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet

  7. A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-08

    Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

  8. A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, John M.; Narlesky, Joshua E.; Veirs, Douglas K.

    2012-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H 2 and O 2 were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

  9. Forensic investigation of plutonium metal: a case study of CRM 126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byerly, B.L.; Floyd Stanley; Khal Spencer; Colletti, Lisa; Garduno, Katherine; Kuhn, Kevin; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alex; Porterfield, Donivan; Jung Rim

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a certified plutonium metal reference material (CRM 126) with a known production history is examined using analytical methods that are commonly employed in nuclear forensics for provenancing and attribution. The measured plutonium isotopic composition and actinide assay are consistent with values reported on the reference material certificate. Model ages from U/Pu and Am/Pu chronometers agree with the documented production timeline. The results confirm the utility of these analytical methods and highlight the importance of a holistic approach for forensic study of unknown materials. (author)

  10. Effect of Impurities on the Josephson Current through Helical Metals: Exploiting a Neutrino Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Pouyan; Nair, V. P.

    2016-01-01

    In this Letter we study the effect of time-reversal symmetric impurities on the Josephson supercurrent through two-dimensional helical metals such as on a topological insulator surface state. We show that, contrary to the usual superconducting-normal metal-superconducting junctions, the suppression of the supercurrent in the superconducting-helical metal-superconducting junction is mainly due to fluctuations of impurities in the junctions. Our results, which are a condensed matter realization of a part of the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect for neutrinos, show that the relationship between normal state conductance and the critical current of Josephson junctions is significantly modified for Josephson junctions on the surface of topological insulators. We also study the temperature dependence of the supercurrent and present a two fluid model which can explain some of the recent experimental results in Josephson junctions on the edge of topological insulators.

  11. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D.; Pumera, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research. PMID:22826262

  12. Chemically reduced graphene contains inherent metallic impurities present in parent natural and synthetic graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Chua, Chun Kiang; Khezri, Bahareh; Sofer, Zdeněk; Webster, Richard D; Pumera, Martin

    2012-08-07

    Graphene-related materials are in the forefront of nanomaterial research. One of the most common ways to prepare graphenes is to oxidize graphite (natural or synthetic) to graphite oxide and exfoliate it to graphene oxide with consequent chemical reduction to chemically reduced graphene. Here, we show that both natural and synthetic graphite contain a large amount of metallic impurities that persist in the samples of graphite oxide after the oxidative treatment, and chemically reduced graphene after the chemical reduction. We demonstrate that, despite a substantial elimination during the oxidative treatment of graphite samples, a significant amount of impurities associated to the chemically reduced graphene materials still remain and alter their electrochemical properties dramatically. We propose a method for the purification of graphenes based on thermal treatment at 1,000 °C in chlorine atmosphere to reduce the effect of such impurities on the electrochemical properties. Our findings have important implications on the whole field of graphene research.

  13. Airborne Release of Particles in Overheating Incidents Involving Plutonium Metal and Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwendiman, L. C.; Mishima, J.; Radasch, C. A. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1968-12-15

    Ever-increasing utilization of nuclear fuels will result in wide-scale plutonium recovery processing, reconstitution of fuels, transportation, and extensive handling of this material. A variety of circumstances resulting in overheating and fires involving plutonium may occur, releasing airborne particles. This work describes the observations from a study in which the airborne release of plutonium and its compounds was measured during an exposure of the material of interest containing plutonium to temperatures which may result from fires. Aerosol released from small cylinders of metallic plutonium ignited in air at temperatures from 410 to 650 Degree-Sign C ranged from 3 x 10{sup -6} to 5 x 10{sup -5} wt%. Particles smaller than 15{mu}m in diameter represented as much as 0.03% of the total released. Large plutonium pieces weighing from 456 to 1770 g were ignited and allowed to oxidize completely in air with a velocity of around 500 cm/sec. Release rates of from 0.0045 to 0.032 wt% per hour were found. The median mass diameter of airborne material was 4 {mu}m. Quenching the oxidation with magnesium oxide sand reduced the release to 2.9 X 10{sup -4} wt% per hour. Many experiments were carried out in which plutonium compounds as powders were heated at temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 Degree-Sign C with several air flows. Release rates ranged from 5 x 10{sup -8} to 0.9 wt% per hour, depending upon the compound and the conditions imposed. The airborne release from boiling solutions of plutonium nitrate were roughly related to energy of boiling, and ranged from 4 x 10{sup -4} to 2 x 10{sup -1} % for the evaporation of 90% of the solution. The fraction airborne when combustibles contaminated with plutonium are burned is under study. The data reported can be used in assessing the consequences of off-standard situations involving plutonium and its compounds in fires. (author)

  14. Modeling of Diffusion of Plutonium in Other Metals and of Gaseous Species in Plutonium-Based Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, Bernard R.; Gayanath W. Fernando; Beiden, S.; Setty, A.; Sevilla, E.H.

    2004-01-01

    Establish standards for temperature conditions under which plutonium, uranium, or neptunium from nuclear wastes permeates steel, with which it is in contact, by diffusion processes. The primary focus is on plutonium because of the greater difficulties created by the peculiarities of face-centered-cubic-stabilized (delta) plutonium (the form used in the technology generating the waste)

  15. Electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCurry, L.E.; Moy, G.M.M.; Bowersox, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The electrochemistry of plutonium in molten halides is of technological importance as a method of purification of plutonium. Previous authors have reported that plutonium can be purified by electrorefining impure plutonium in various molten haldies. Work to eluciate the mechanism of the plutonium reduction in molten halides has been limited to a chronopotentiometric study in LiCl-KCl. Potentiometric studies have been carried out to determine the standard reduction potential for the plutonium (III) couple in various molten alkali metal halides. Initial cyclic voltammetric experiments were performed in molten KCL at 1100 K. A silver/silver chloride (10 mole %) in equimolar NaCl-KCl was used as a reference electrode. Working and counter electrodes were tungsten. The cell components and melt were contained in a quartz crucible. Background cyclic voltammograms of the KCl melt at the tungsten electrode showed no evidence of electroactive impurities in the melt. Plutonium was added to the melt as PuCl/sub 3/, which was prepared by chlorination of the oxide. At low concentrations of PuCl/sub 3/ in the melt (0.01-0.03 molar), no reduction wave due to the reduction of Pu(III) was observed in the voltammograms up to the potassium reduction limit of the melt. However on scan reversal after scanning into the potassium reduction limit a new oxidation wave was observed

  16. Study of interaction of uranium, plutonium and rare earth fluorides with some metal oxides in fluoric salt melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, V.F.; Novoselov, G.P.; Ulanov, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Interaction of plutonium, uranium, and rare-earth elements (REE) fluorides with aluminium and calcium oxides in melts of eutectic mixture LiF-NaF has been studied at 800 deg C by X-ray diffraction method. It has been shown that tetravalent uranium and plutonium are coprecipitated by oxides as a solid solution UO 2 -PuO 2 . Trivalent plutonium in fluorides melts in not precipitated in the presence of tetravalent uranium which can be used for their separation. REE are precipitated from a salt melt by calcium oxide and are not precipitated by aluminium oxide. Thus, aluminium oxide in a selective precipitator for uranium and plutonium in presence of REE. Addition of aluminium fluoride retains trivalent plutonium and REE in a salt melt in presence of Ca and Al oxides. The mechanism of interacting plutonium and REE trifluorides with metal oxides in fluoride melts has been considered

  17. Direct conversion of plutonium metal, scrap, residue, and transuranic waste to glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.; Malling, J.F.; Rudolph, J.

    1995-01-01

    A method for the direct conversion of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids to borosilicate glass has been invented. The process is called the Glass Material Oxidation and Dissolution System (GMODS). Traditional glass-making processes can convert only oxide materials to glass. However, many wastes contain complex mixtures of metals, ceramics, organics, and amorphous solids. Conversion of such mixtures to oxides followed by their conversion to glass is often impractical. GMODS may create a practical method to convert such mixtures to glass. Plutonium-containing materials (PCMS) exist in many forms, including metals, ceramics, organics, amorphous solids, and mixtures thereof. These PCMs vary from plutonium metal to filters made of metal, organic binders, and glass fibers. For storage and/or disposal of PCMS, it is desirable to convert PCMs to borosilicate glass. Borosilicate glass is the preferred repository waste form for high-level waste (HLW) because of its properties. PCMs converted to a transuranic borosilicate homogeneous glass would easily pass all waste acceptance and storage criteria. Conversion of PCMs to a glass would also simplify safeguards by conversion of heterogeneous PCMs to homogeneous glass. Thermodynamic calculations and proof-of-principle experiments on the GMODS process with cerium (plutonium surrogate), uranium, stainless steel, aluminum, Zircaloy-2, and carbon were successfully conducted. Initial analysis has identified potential flowsheets and equipment. Major unknowns remain, but the preliminary data suggests that GMODS may be a major new treatment option for PCMs

  18. An analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission compared with those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of the plasma impurity influx from alkali-metal coatings for fusion-reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWald, A.B.; Davidson, J.N.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that alkali-metal covered surfaces be applied to magnetic fusion devices as a means of controlling plasma impurity contamination and shielding the substrate from erosion. Monolayer films of alkali metals have been shown to sputter primarily as ions under particle bombardment. Thus, it is thought that a sheath potential and/or magnetic fields encountered by a sputtered ion will return the ion to the surface without entering the plasma. In this paper, we investigate the net wall impurity influx associated with coatings which exhibit substantial secondary ion emission as compared to those which sputter only as neutral atoms. Included in the analysis are sputtered substrate atoms. These are sometimes found to be a significant fraction of the total sputtering yield for low-Z alkali monolayers and affect the overall performance of such coatings. Estimates of the impurity influx made in the neighborhood of a sheath potential show that secondary-ion emitting coatings are effective as a means of inhibiting plasma impurity contamination and wall erosion

  20. Voltammetric determination of metal impurities on semiconductor surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyazeva, E.P.; Mokrousov, G.M.; Volkova, V.N.

    1995-01-01

    A modification of voltamperometric method used for analysis of semiconductor surfaces which make it possible to exclude a contact between surface and background solution. This technique is based on solubility of elemental metal forms in low melting electroconductor systems (e.g., in mercury. The voltampere characteristics of amalgams formed are then studied. The suggested method is simple, rapid, and makes it possible to perform a nondestructive qualitative analysis of the sample surface area measuring about 10 -3 cm -2 and more. 4 refs.; 2 figs

  1. Validation of KENO, ANISN and Hansen-Roach cross-section set on plutonium oxide and metal fuel system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tadakuni; Yumoto, Ryozo; Nakano, Koh.

    1980-01-01

    In the previous report, the authors discussed the validity of KENO, ANISN and Hansen-Roach 16 group cross-section set on the critical plutonium nitrate solution systems with various geometries, absorbers and neutron interactions. The purpose of the present report is to examine the validity of the same calculation systems on the homogeneous plutonium oxide and plutonium-uranium mixed oxide fuels with various density values. Eleven experiments adopted for validation are summarized. First six experiments were performed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory of Battelle Memorial Institute, and the remaining five at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The characteristics of core fuel are given, and the isotopic composition of plutonium, the relation between H/(Pu + U) atomic ratio and fuel density as compared with the atomic ratios of PuO 2 and mixed oxides in powder storage and pellet fabrication processes, and critical core dimensions and reflector conditions are shown. The effective multiplication factors were calculated with the KENO code. In case of the metal fuels with simple sphere geometry, additional calculations with the ANISN code were performed. The criticality calculation system composed of KENO, ANISN and Hansen-Roach cross-section set was found to be valid for calculating the criticality on plutonium oxide, plutonium-uranium mixed oxide, plutonium metal and uranium metal fuel systems as well as on plutonium solution systems with various geometries, absorbers and neutron interactions. There seems to remain some problems in the method for evaluating experimental correction. Some discussions foloow. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Theory of charge transport in diffusive normal metal/conventional superconductor point contacts in the presence of magnetic impurity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoyama, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Inoue, J.; Asano, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Charge transport in the diffusive normal metal/insulator/s-wave superconductor junctions is studied in the presence of the magnetic impurity for various situations, where we have used the Usadel equation with Nazarov's generalized boundary condition. It is revealed that the magnetic impurity

  3. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  4. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Lushchik, Ch. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shablonin, E.; Vasil’chenko, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic–covalent Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions ({sup 197}Au, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, fluence of 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} or Ce|{sub Al} – a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce{sup 3+} single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|{sub Lu}–Ce|{sub Al} or Cr{sup 3+}–Cr{sup 3+} in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  5. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin Munoz, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, F.

    1969-01-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs

  6. Determination of uranium and plutonium in metal conversion products from electrolytic reduction process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Heon; Suh, Moo Yul; Joe, Kih Soo; Sohn, Se Chul; Jee, Kwang Young; Kim, Won Ho

    2005-01-01

    Chemical characterization of process materials is required for the optimization of an electrolytic reduction process in which uranium dioxide, a matrix of spent PWR fuels, is electrolytically reduced to uranium metal in a medium of LiCl-Li 2 O molten at 650 .deg. C. A study on the determination of fissile materials in the uranium metal products containing corrosion products, fission products and residual process materials has been performed by controlled-potential coulometric titration which is well known in the field of nuclear science and technology. Interference of Fe, Ni, Cr and Mg (corrosion products), Nd (fission product) and LiCl molten salt (residual process material) on the determination of uranium and plutonium, and the necessity of plutonium separation prior to the titration are discussed in detail. Under the analytical condition established already, their recovery yields are evaluated along with analytical reliability

  7. Microstructure, impurity and metal cap effects on Cu electromigration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, C.-K.; Gignac, L. G.; Ohm, J.; Breslin, C. M.; Huang, E.; Bonilla, G.; Liniger, E.; Rosenberg, R. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Choi, S.; Simon, A. H. [IBM Microelectronic Division, Hopewell Junction, NY 12533 (United States)

    2014-06-19

    Electromigration (EM) lifetimes and void growth of pure Cu, Cu(Mn) alloy, and pure Cu damascene lines with a CoWP cap were measured as a function of grain structure (bamboo, near bamboo, and polycrystalline) and sample temperature. The bamboo grains in a bamboo-polycrystalline grained line play the key role in reducing Cu mass flow. The variation in Cu grain size distribution among the wafers was achieved by varying the metal line height and wafer annealing process step after electroplating Cu and before or after chemical mechanical polishing. The Cu grain size was found to have a large impact on Cu EM lifetime and activation energy, especially for the lines capped with CoWP. The EM activation energy for pure Cu with a CoWP cap from near-bamboo, bamboo-polycrystalline, mostly polycrystalline to polycrystalline only line grain structures was reduced from 2.2 ± 0.2 eV, to 1.7 ± 0.1 eV, to 1.5 ± 0.1 eV, to 0.72 ± 0.05 eV, respectively. The effect of Mn in Cu grain boundary diffusion was found to be dependent on Mn concentration in Cu. The depletion of Cu at the cathode end of the Cu(Mn) line is preceded by an incubation period. Unlike pure Cu lines with void growth at the cathode end and hillocks at the anode end of the line, the hillocks grew at a starting position roughly equal to the Blech critical length from the cathode end of the Cu(Mn) polycrystalline line. The effectiveness of Mn on Cu grain boundary migration can also be qualitatively accounted for by a simple trapping model. The free migration of Cu atoms at grain boundaries is reduced by the presence of Mn due to Cu-solute binding. A large binding energy of 0.5 ± 0.1 eV was observed.

  8. The role of metallic impurities in oxide semiconductors: first-principles calculations and PAC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errico, L.A.; Fabricius, G.; Renteria, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2004-08-01

    We report an ab-initio comparative study of the electric-field-gradient tensor (EFG) and structural relaxations introduced by acceptor (Cd) and donor (Ta) impurities when they replace cations in a series of binary oxides: TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, and In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Calculations were performed with the Full-Potential Linearized-Augmented Plane Waves method that allows us to treat the electronic structure and the atomic relaxations in a fully self-consistent way. We considered different charge states for each impurity and studied the dependence on these charge states of the electronic properties and the structural relaxations. Our results are compared with available data coming from PAC experiments and previous calculations, allowing us to obtain a new insight on the role that metal impurities play in oxide semiconductors. It is clear from our results that simple models can not describe the measured EFGs at impurities in oxides even approximately. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. The influence of alkali metal impurities on the uranium dioxide hydrofluorination reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponelis, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect alkali metal impurities (sodium and potassium) in the uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) feed material have on the conversion to uraniumtetrafluoride (UF 4 ) was examined. A direct correlation exists between impurity level and sintering with concomitant reduced conversion. The sintering mechanism is attributable to decreased specific surface area. The typical 'die-off' of reaction or conversion can be explained in terms of increased particle growth rather than an arbitray zero porosity function. Hydrofluorination temperatures varied from 250 to 650 degrees C using pellets varying in size from 0.42 mm to 10 mm. Scanning electron microscope photographs show clearly the particle or grain growth in the pellet as well as the increased size with impurity level. A new dimensionless constant, N KP , is defined to facilitate explanation of the reaction as a function of pellet radius. N KP is defined as the ratio of pellet diffusion resistance to particle diffusion resistance of the reacting HF gas. At high values of this number (N KP >40) the conversion is limited to the outer periphery of the pellet while at low values (N KP KP at higher reaction temperatures which means that the particle diffusion resistance increases with increasing impurity level and results in easier sintering of these materials. 53 refs., 206 figs., 94 tabs

  10. Export control guide: Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing and preparation of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The international Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, also referred to as the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), states in Article III, paragraph 2(b) that open-quotes Each State Party to the Treaty undertakes not to provide . . . equipment or material especially designed or prepared for the processing, use or production of special fissionable material to any non-nuclear-weapon State for peaceful purposes, unless the source or special fissionable material shall be subject to the safeguards required by this Article.close quotes This guide was prepared to assist export control officials in the interpretation, understanding, and implementation of export laws and controls relating to the international Trigger List for irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing equipment, components, and materials. The guide also contains information related to the production of plutonium metal. Reprocessing and its place in the nuclear fuel cycle are described briefly; the standard procedure to prepare metallic plutonium is discussed; steps used to prepare Trigger List controls are cited; descriptions of controlled items are given; and special materials of construction are noted. This is followed by a comprehensive description of especially designed or prepared equipment, materials, and components of reprocessing and plutonium metal processes and includes photographs and/or pictorial representations. The nomenclature of the Trigger List has been retained in the numbered sections of this document for clarity

  11. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in plutonium and its compounds; L'analyse spectrochimique des impuretes dans le plutonium et ses composes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffereau, M; Crehange, G; Deniaud, S; Leclainche, C [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    After a review of previous works, various powdered or wet analytical methods are studied. One tries to give an explanation for some phenomena. A detailed know-how of studied methods is given. Validity of results is discussed. Problem of impurities in alloys analysis and non spectroscopic elements determination is quickly reviewed. One concludes to the interest of the use of some particular methods and the necessity of basic studies in order to obtain best information. (author) [French] Apres une revue des travaux precedents on etudie les differentes methodes d'analyse soit sur poudre (oxyde), soit sur solution. On tente de donner une interpretation de certains phenomenes. On donne un mode d'emploi detaille des methodes etudiees, on envisage la validite des resultats. On passe en revue rapidement le probleme de l'analyse des impuretes dans les alliages et de la determination des elements non spectroscopiques. On conclut a l'interet de l'emploi de certaines methodes, et a la necessite d'etudes fondamentales en vue d'aboutir a une meilleure obtention des informations. (auteur)

  12. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in plutonium and its compounds; L'analyse spectrochimique des impuretes dans le plutonium et ses composes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buffereau, M.; Crehange, G.; Deniaud, S.; Leclainche, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    After a review of previous works, various powdered or wet analytical methods are studied. One tries to give an explanation for some phenomena. A detailed know-how of studied methods is given. Validity of results is discussed. Problem of impurities in alloys analysis and non spectroscopic elements determination is quickly reviewed. One concludes to the interest of the use of some particular methods and the necessity of basic studies in order to obtain best information. (author) [French] Apres une revue des travaux precedents on etudie les differentes methodes d'analyse soit sur poudre (oxyde), soit sur solution. On tente de donner une interpretation de certains phenomenes. On donne un mode d'emploi detaille des methodes etudiees, on envisage la validite des resultats. On passe en revue rapidement le probleme de l'analyse des impuretes dans les alliages et de la determination des elements non spectroscopiques. On conclut a l'interet de l'emploi de certaines methodes, et a la necessite d'etudes fondamentales en vue d'aboutir a une meilleure obtention des informations. (auteur)

  13. Determination of heavy metals impurities in low and medium atomic weight matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiano, Silvestre; Prado Souza, Rose M.G. do

    1997-01-01

    Heavy materials have a mass attenuation coefficient in the energy interval from 100 to 400 KeV substantially higher than those corresponding to light and medium atomic weight matrices. They also show, in the same energy range, a more pronounced energy variation of this parameter. In a few cases, this property can be used for the determination of the concentration of impurities constituted by heavy metals in a lighter matrix. An Ytterbium gamma-ray source, which has several energy peaks in the considered interval, is used to supply a number of energy pairs from which the density of impurities can be found without the use of reference materials. (author). 1 ref., 4 figs

  14. Role of oxygen in surface segregation of metal impurities in silicon poly- and bicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarray, E.; Deville, J.P.

    1987-07-01

    Metal impurities at surfaces of polycrystalline silicon ribbons have been characterized by surface sensitive methods. Oxygen and heat treatments were found to be a driving force for surface segregation of these impurities. To better analyse their influence and their possible incidence in gettering, model studies were undertaken on Czochralski grown silicon bicrystals. Two main factors of surface segregation have been studied: the role of an ultra-thin oxide layer and the effect of heat treatments. The best surface purification was obtained after an annealing process at 750/sup 0/C of a previously oxidized surface at 450/sup 0/C. This was related to the formation of SiO clusters, followed by a coalescence of SiO/sub 4/ units leading to the subsequent injection of silicon self-interstitials in the lattice.

  15. Stabilization of plutonium bearing residues at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronson, M.C.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (US DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has plutonium holdings including metal, oxide and residue materials, all of which need stabilization of some type. Residue materials include calcined ash, calcined precipitates, pyrochemical salts, glove box sweepings, metallurgical samples, graphite, and pyrochemical ceramic crucibles. These residues are typical of residues stored throughout the US DOE plutonium sites. The stabilization process selected for each of these residues requires data on chemical impurities, physical attributes, and chemical forms of the plutonium. This paper outlines the characterization and stabilization of LLNL ash residues, pyrochemical salts, and graphite

  16. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of dilute U impurities in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, S. K.; Cottenier, S.; Mishra, S. N.

    2016-05-01

    The electronic structure and magnetic moment of dilute U impurity in metallic hosts have been calculated from first principles. The calculations have been performed within local density approximation of the density functional theory using Augmented plane wave+local orbital (APW+lo) technique, taking account of spin-orbit coupling and Coulomb correlation through LDA+U approach. We present here our results for the local density of states, magnetic moment and hyperfine field calculated for an isolated U impurity embedded in hosts with sp-, d- and f-type conduction electrons. The results of our systematic study provide a comprehensive insight on the pressure dependence of 5f local magnetism in metallic systems. The unpolarized local density of states (LDOS), analyzed within the frame work of Stoner model suggest the occurrence of local moment for U in sp-elements, noble metals and f-block hosts like La, Ce, Lu and Th. In contrast, U is predicted to be nonmagnetic in most transition metal hosts except in Sc, Ti, Y, Zr, and Hf consistent with the results obtained from spin polarized calculation. The spin and orbital magnetic moments of U computed within the frame of LDA+U formalism show a scaling behavior with lattice compression. We have also computed the spin and orbital hyperfine fields and a detail analysis has been carried out. The host dependent trends for the magnetic moment, hyperfine field and 5f occupation reflect pressure induced change of electronic structure with U valency changing from 3+ to 4+ under lattice compression. In addition, we have made a detailed analysis of the impurity induced host spin polarization suggesting qualitatively different roles of f-band electrons on moment stability. The results presented in this work would be helpful towards understanding magnetism and spin fluctuation in U based alloys.

  17. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere : subcritical neutron and gamma measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  18. Determination of origin and intended use of plutonium metal using nuclear forensic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Jung H; Kuhn, Kevin J; Tandon, Lav; Xu, Ning; Porterfield, Donivan R; Worley, Christopher G; Thomas, Mariam R; Spencer, Khalil J; Stanley, Floyd E; Lujan, Elmer J; Garduno, Katherine; Trellue, Holly R

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear forensics techniques, including micro-XRF, gamma spectrometry, trace elemental analysis and isotopic/chronometric characterization were used to interrogate two, potentially related plutonium metal foils. These samples were submitted for analysis with only limited production information, and a comprehensive suite of forensic analyses were performed. Resulting analytical data was paired with available reactor model and historical information to provide insight into the materials' properties, origins, and likely intended uses. Both were super-grade plutonium, containing less than 3% 240 Pu, and age-dating suggested that most recent chemical purification occurred in 1948 and 1955 for the respective metals. Additional consideration of reactor modeling feedback and trace elemental observables indicate plausible U.S. reactor origin associated with the Hanford site production efforts. Based on this investigation, the most likely intended use for these plutonium foils was 239 Pu fission foil targets for physics experiments, such as cross-section measurements, etc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere: subcritical neutron and gamma measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  20. Mechanism of plutonium metal dissolution in HNO3-HF-N2H4 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karraker, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    An oxidation-reduction balance of the products of the dissolution of plutonium metal and alloys in HNO 3 -HF-N 2 H 4 solution shows that the major reactions during dissolution are the reduction of nitrate to NH 3 , N 2 and N 2 O by the metal, and the oxidation of H free radicals to NH 3 by N 2 H 4 . Reactions between HNO 3 and N 2 H 4 produce varying amounts of HN 3 . The reaction rate is greater for delta-Pu than alpha-Pu, and is increased by higher concentrations of HF and HNO 3 . The low yield of reduced nitrogen species indicates that nitrate is reduced on the metal surface without producing a significant concentration of species that react with N 2 H 4 . It is conjectured that intermediate Pu valences and electron transfer within the metal are involved. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Study of impurity composition of some compounds of refractory metals by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganov, L.K.; Dzhumakulov, D.T.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    The compounds of refractory transition metals find wide application in all fields of engineering, in particular in microelectronics to manufacture contact-barrier layers of thin-film current-conducting systems of silicon instruments, large and very large scale integrated circuits. Production of such materials is realted with the need to apply the analytical control methods that allow to determine a large number of elements with high reliability. The instrumental neutron-activation techniques have been developed to determine impurity composition of the following compounds: MoSi 2 , WSi 2 , TiB 2 , NbB 2 , TiC, NbC

  2. Electronic structures and magnetic properties of 3d and 4d transition-metal impurities in ferromagnetic Fe

    CERN Document Server

    Park, J H; Min, B I; Cho, H S

    2000-01-01

    Employing the self-consistent local approach, the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin orbital recursion method, we have investigated the electronic structures and the magnetic properties of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) impurities in ferromagnetic bcc Fe. In both 3d and 4d TM impurities, virtual bound states appear and are characterized by a high density of states in the energy spectrum. The characters of the states are studied by calculating the bond order between interaction orbitals. For early TM impurities, the states at the impurity sites have more antibonding characters, while the states at neighboring Fe sites have more bonding characters. For late TM impurities, the situation is reversed. late TM impurities of both the 3d and the 4d TM series have the same magnetic ordering as the host Fe atoms whereas early TM impurities have magnetic moments antiparallel to that of the host. As for the Mn impurity, an inward relaxation of neighboring Fe atoms stabilizes the antiferromagnetic ordering with respect to t...

  3. The plutonium challenge for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deal with the weapons-usable plutonium and with the possibilities of their managing. Russia has not disclosed the amount of plutonium produced, but various estimates indicate that the production was about 130 tonnes. Production has been curtailed in Russia; three dual-purpose reactors still produce weapons-grade plutonium - two at Tomsk-7 (renamed Seversk) and one at Krasnoyarsk-26 (renamed Zheleznogorsk Mining and Chemical Combine). In a 1994 United States-Russian agreement that has yet to enter into force, Russia agreed to close the remaining operating reactors by the year 2000. Treaties between the United States and Russia have already cut the number of nuclear warheads from more than 10,000 to about 6,000 under START 1, which has been ratified, and to about 3,500 under START 2, which still awaits approval. If Russia and the United States conclude START 3, that number could drop to between 2,000 and 2,500. On September 2, 1998, the Presidents of the United States and Russia signed the 'Joint statement of principles for Management and Disposition of Plutonium, Designated as No Longer Required for Defense Purposes.' In this joint statement the Presidents affirm the intention of each country to remove by stages approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium and to convert the nuclear weapons programs, and to convert this material so that it can never be used in nuclear weapons. These 100 tonne of plutonium must be managed in proper way such that it becomes neither a proliferation for an environmental risk. The United States has proposed that it manage it's 50 tonnes by a dual approach-once through MOX burning of a portion of the plutonium and immobilization in a ceramic matrix followed by en- casement in high level waste glass. Russia has proposed that it manage its full 50 tonnes by burning in a reactor. The MOX program in the United States would bum the cleaner plutonium metal and residues. Weapons components would be converted to plutonium oxide

  4. The Impact of Metallic Impurities on Minority Carrier Lifetime in High Purity N-type Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yohan

    Boron-doped p-type silicon is the industry standard silicon solar cell substrate. However, it has serious limitations: iron boron (Fe-B) pairs and light induced degradation (LID). To suppress LID, the replacement of boron by gallium as a p-type dopant has been proposed. Although this eliminates B-O related defects, gallium-related pairing with iron, oxygen, and carbon can reduce lifetime in this material. In addition resistivity variations are more pronounced in gallium doped ingots, however Continuous-Czochralski (c-Cz) growth technologies are being developed to overcome this problem. In this work lifetime limiting factors and resistivity variations have been investigated in this material. The radial and axial variations of electrically active defects were observed using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) these have been correlated to lifetime and resistivity variations. The DLTS measurements demonstrated that iron-related pairs are responsible for the lifetime variations. Specifically, Fe-Ga pairs were found to be important recombination sites and are more detrimental to lifetime than Fei. Typically n-type silicon has a higher minority carrier lifetime than p-type silicon with similar levels of contamination. That is because n-type silicon is more tolerant to metallic impurities, especially Fe. Also, it has no serious issues in relation to lifetime degradation, such as FeB pairs and light-induced degradation (LID). However, surface passivation of the p + region in p+n solar cells is much more problematic than the n+p case where silicon nitride provides very effective passivation of the cell. SiO2 is the most effective passivation for n type surfaces, but it does not work well on B-doped surfaces, resulting in inadequate performance. Al2O3 passivation layer suggested for B-doped emitters. With this surface passivation layer a 23.2 % conversion efficiency has been achieved. After this discovery n-type silicon is now being seriously considered for

  5. Plutonium peroxide precipitation: review and current research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    Increasing the HNO 3 concentration decreases the filtration time but increases the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. A compromise was therefore necessary. If a minimum plutonium concentration is required in the filtrate, the acidity could be lowered to 1.9M with an approximate doubling in the filtration time. The H 2 O 2 concentration has little effect on filtration time. However, the higher the H 2 O 2 concentration, the less plutonium lost to the filtrate. Concentrations higher than the 22 moles/mole Pu recommended (at least up to 30 molar which was the highest investigated) would be beneficial if reagent costs are not excessive and production capacity exists for destroying the excess H 2 O 2 in the filtrate. Although the effect is not large, filtration time is shorter and the plutonium concentration in the filtrate is lower if metallic impurities are present. The slowest rate of H 2 O 2 addition investigated gives a plutonium peroxide precipitate with the fastest filtration time. The rate of addition has very little effect on the plutonium concentration in the filtrate. The temperature has little effect on the filtration time. 14 0 C is recommended since decomposition of H 2 O 2 would be slower at 14 0 C than at 22 0 C (min. Pu content in the filtrate). The effect of digestion time on both the filtration time and the plutonium content in the filtrate is minor, so the shortest digestion time investigated is recommended

  6. Impurities determination in precious metals like rhodium, palladium and platinum by neutron activation without separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, S.; Piccot, D.; Pinte, G.

    1978-01-01

    The possibilities of the method explored using an installation of gamma or X ray spectrometry of good performance. The irradiations were realized in the reactors EL.3 (flux approximately 6.10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) and Osiris (flux > 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 ) of the CEN Saclay. In rhodium the presence of iridium limits the analysis possibilities. However gold, silver and platinum are easily determined, just as the other elements (As, Br, Cl, Co, Mn, Na, Sb). In platinum it is possible to determine the elements of long period, especially antimony, silver, cobalt, iridium, tantalum and zinc. As for palladium the principal impurities are gold, silver and ruthenium for what is of precious metals and particularly zinc among the other metals. For the three matrices considered the detection limits of a certain number of elements are indicated [fr

  7. Disposition of Uranium -233 (sup 233U) in Plutonium Metal and Oxide at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freiboth, Cameron J.; Gibbs, Frank E.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the position that the concentration of Uranium-233 ( 233 U) in plutonium metal and oxide currently stored at the DOE Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is well below the maximum permissible stabilization, packaging, shipping and storage limits. The 233 U stabilization, packaging and storage limit is 0.5 weight percent (wt%), which is also the shipping limit maximum. These two plutonium products (metal and oxide) are scheduled for processing through the Building 371 Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (PuSPS). This justification is supported by written technical reports, personnel interviews, and nuclear material inventories, as compiled in the ''History of Uranium-233 ( 233 U) Processing at the Rocky Flats Plant In Support of the RFETS Acceptable Knowledge Program'' RS-090-056, April 1, 1999. Relevant data from this report is summarized for application to the PuSPS metal and oxide processing campaigns

  8. Relative Humidity and the Susceptibility of Austenitic Stainless Steel to Stress Corrosion Cracking in an impure Plutonium Oxide Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapp, P.; Duffey, J.; Lam, P.; Dunn, K.

    2010-05-05

    Laboratory tests to investigate the corrosivity of moist plutonium oxide/chloride salt mixtures on 304L and 316L stainless steel coupons showed that corrosion occurred in selected samples. The tests exposed flat coupons for pitting evaluation and 'teardrop' stressed coupons for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation at room temperature to various mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride-bearing salts for periods up to 500 days. The exposures were conducted in sealed containers in which the oxide-salt mixtures were loaded with about 0.6 wt % water from a humidified helium atmosphere. Observations of corrosion ranged from superficial staining to pitting and SCC. The extent of corrosion depended on the total salt concentration, the composition of the salt and the moisture present in the test environment. The most significant corrosion was found in coupons that were exposed to 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 2 wt % chloride salt mixtures that contained calcium chloride and 0.6 wt% water. SCC was observed in two 304L stainless steel teardrop coupons exposed in solid contact to a mixture of 98 wt % PuO{sub 2}, 0.9 wt % NaCl, 0.9 wt % KCl, and 0.2 wt % CaCl{sub 2}. The cracking was associated with the heat-affected zone of an autogenous weld that ran across the center of the coupon. Cracking was not observed in coupons exposed to the headspace gas above the solid mixture, or in coupons exposed to other mixtures with either no CaCl{sub 2} or 0.92 wt% CaCl{sub 2}. SCC was present where the 0.6 wt % water content exceeded the value needed to fully hydrate the available CaCl{sub 2}, but was absent where the water content was insufficient. These results reveal the significance of the relative humidity in the austenitic stainless steels environment to their susceptibility to corrosion. The relative humidity in the test environment was controlled by the water loading and the concentration of the hydrating salts such as CaCl{sub 2}. For each salt or salt mixture there is a threshold

  9. Tunable reactivity of supported single metal atoms by impurity engineering of the MgO(001) support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pašti, Igor A; Johansson, Börje; Skorodumova, Natalia V

    2018-02-28

    Development of novel materials may often require a rational use of high price components, like noble metals, in combination with the possibility to tune their properties in a desirable way. Here we present a theoretical DFT study of Au and Pd single atoms supported by doped MgO(001). By introducing B, C and N impurities into the MgO(001) surface, the interaction between the surface and the supported metal adatoms can be adjusted. Impurity atoms act as strong binding sites for Au and Pd adatoms and can help to produce highly dispersed metal particles. The reactivity of metal atoms supported by doped MgO(001), as probed by CO, is altered compared to their counterparts on pristine MgO(001). We find that Pd atoms on doped MgO(001) are less reactive than on perfect MgO(001). In contrast, Au adatoms bind CO much more strongly when placed on doped MgO(001). In the case of Au on N-doped MgO(001) we find that charge redistribution between the metal atom and impurity takes place even when not in direct contact, which enhances the interaction of Au with CO. The presented results suggest possible ways for optimizing the reactivity of oxide supported metal catalysts through impurity engineering.

  10. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  11. Combined exposure of F344 rats to beryllium metal and plutonium-239 dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, G.L.; Carlton, W.W.; Rebar, A.H. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear weapons industry workers have the potential for inhalation exposures to plutonium (Pu) and other agents, such as beryllium (Be) metal. The purpose of this ongoing study is to investigate potential interactions between Pu and Be in the production of lung tumors in rats exposed by inhalation to particles of {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}, Be metal, or these agents in combination. Inhaled Pu deposited in the lung delivers high-linear-energy transfer, alpha-particle radiation and is known to induce pulmonary cancer in laboratory animals. Although the epidemiological evidence implicating Be in the induction of human lung cancer is weak and controversial, various studies in laboratory animals have demonstrated the pulmonary carcinogenicity of Be. As a result, Be is classified as a suspect human carcinogen in the United STates and as a demonstrated human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. This study is in progress.

  12. Spectrographic determination of impurities in magnesium metal; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas en magnesio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capdevila, C.; Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1979-07-01

    The spectrographic determination of trace quantities of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Hn, Mo, Ni and Si in magnesium metal is described. Samples are dissolved with HNO{sub 3} and calcinate into MgO. In order to avoid losses of boron NH{sub 4}OH is added to the nitric solution. Except for aluminium and chromium the analysis is performed through the use of the carrier distillation technique. These two impurities are determined by burning to completion the MgO. Among the compounds studied as carriers (AgCl, AgF, CsCl, CuF{sub 2}, KCl and SrF{sub 2}) AgCl allows, In general, the best volatilization efficiency. Lithium determination is achieved by using KC1 or CsCl. Detection limits, on the basis of MgO, are in the range 0,1 to 30 ppm, depending on the element. (Author) 8 refs.

  13. Nuclear prehistory influence on transfer velocity of 54Mn impurity 'hot' atoms in irradiated metallic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.

    2007-01-01

    Influence of nuclear prehistory on transfer velocity of 54 Mn impurity 'hot'-atoms - got by different nuclear channels: 56 Fe(d, α), 54 Fe(n,p) in irradiated metallic iron - is studied. Irradiation of targets were carried out in U-120 accelerator (energy range 7.3/5.3 MeV, deuteron beam current makes up 5 μA). Mean density of thermal neutron (WWR-M reactor) makes up 8.6·10 13 neutron·cm -2 ·s -1 . It is shown, that transfer velocity of 54 Mn 'hot' atoms is defining by rate of radiation damage of targets in the irradiation process at that a key importance has a bombarding particles type applied for radioactive label getting

  14. Pyrochemical reduction of uranium dioxide and plutonium dioxide by lithium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usami, T.; Kurata, M.; Inoue, T.; Sims, H.E.; Beetham, S.A.; Jenkins, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The lithium reduction process has been developed to apply a pyrochemical recycle process for oxide fuels. This process uses lithium metal as a reductant to convert oxides of actinide elements to metal. Lithium oxide generated in the reduction would be dissolved in a molten lithium chloride bath to enhance reduction. In this work, the solubility of Li 2 O in LiCl was measured to be 8.8 wt% at 650 deg. C. Uranium dioxide was reduced by Li with no intermediate products and formed porous metal. Plutonium dioxide including 3% of americium dioxide was also reduced and formed molten metal. Reduction of PuO 2 to metal also occurred even when the concentration of lithium oxide was just under saturation. This result indicates that the reduction proceeds more easily than the prediction based on the Gibbs free energy of formation. Americium dioxide was also reduced at 1.8 wt% lithium oxide, but was hardly reduced at 8.8 wt%

  15. Generalized Rate Theory for Void and Bubble Swelling and its Application to Plutonium Metal Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, P. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wolfer, W. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-10-16

    In the classical rate theory for void swelling, vacancies and self-interstitials are produced by radiation in equal numbers, and in addition, thermal vacancies are also generated at the sinks, primarily at edge dislocations, at voids, and at grain boundaries. In contrast, due to the high formation energy of self-interstitials for normal metals and alloys, their thermal generation is negligible, as pointed out by Bullough and Perrin. However, recent DFT calculations of the formation energy of self-interstitial atoms in bcc metals have revealed that the sum of formation and migration energies for self-interstitials atoms (SIA) is of the same order of magnitude as for vacancies. The ratio of the activation energies for thermal generation of SIA and vacancies is presented. For fcc metals, this ratio is around three, but for bcc metals it is around 1.5. Reviewing theoretical predictions of point defect properties in δ-Pu, this ratio could possibly be less than one. As a result, thermal generation of SIA in bcc metals and in plutonium must be taken into considerations when modeling the growth of voids and of helium bubbles, and the classical rate theory (CRT) for void and bubble swelling must be extended to a generalized rate theory (GRT).

  16. AN ELECTROLYTIC CIP-CLEANING PROCESS FOR REMOVING IMPURITIES FROM THE INNER SURFACE OF A METALLIC CONTAINER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The invention relates to a novel electrolytic process for removing impurities from the inner surface of a metallic container. The process is particularly useful for cleaning process reactors used for culturing microorganisms, and storage tanks used for storing metabolites formed in the process...... reactor, as well as containers for dairy products....

  17. First principles density functional calculation of magnetic moment and hyperfine fields of dilute transition metal impurities in Gd host

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanta, S.K.; Mishra, S.N.; Srivastava, S.K.

    2014-01-01

    We present first principles calculations of electronic structure and magnetic properties of dilute transition metal (3d, 4d and 5d) impurities in a Gd host. The calculations have been performed within the density functional theory using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave technique and the GGA+U method. The spin and orbital contributions to the magnetic moment and the hyperfine fields have been computed. We find large magnetic moments for 3d (Ti–Co), 4d (Nb–Ru) and 5d (Ta–Os) impurities with magnitudes significantly different from the values estimated from earlier mean field calculation [J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 320 (2008) e446–e449]. The exchange interaction between the impurity and host Gd moments is found to be positive for early 3d elements (Sc–V) while in all other cases an anti-ferromagnetic coupling is observed. The trends for the magnetic moment and hyperfine field of d-impurities in Gd show qualitative difference with respect to their behavior in Fe, Co and Ni. The calculated total hyperfine field, in most cases, shows excellent agreement with the experimental results. A detailed analysis of the Fermi contact hyperfine field has been made, revealing striking differences for impurities having less or more than half filled d-shell. The impurity induced perturbations in host moments and the change in the global magnetization of the unit cell have also been computed. The variation within each of the d-series is found to correlate with the d–d hybridization strength between the impurity and host atoms. - Highlights: • Detailed study of transition metal impurities in ferromagnetic Gd has been carried out. • The trends in impurity magnetic moment are qualitatively different from Fe, Co and Ni. • The variation within each of the d-series is found to correlate with the d–d hybridization strength between the impurity and host atoms. • Experimental trend in a hyperfine field has been reproduced successfully

  18. Treatment of plutonium contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafuma, J.

    1983-01-01

    Three kinds of plutonium contaminations were considered: skin contamination; contaminated wounds; contamination by inhalation. The treatment of these contaminations was studied for insoluble (oxide and metal forms) and soluble plutonium (complexes). The use of DTPA and therapeutic problems encountered with stable plutonium complexes were analyzed. The new possibilities of internal decontamination using Puchel and LICAM were evaluated [fr

  19. Plutonium, nuclear fuel; Le plutonium, combustible nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay aux Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires, Saclay

    1960-07-01

    A review of the physical properties of metallic plutonium, its preparation, and the alloys which it forms with the main nuclear metals. Appreciation of its future as a nuclear fuel. (author) [French] Apercu sur les proprietes physiques du plutonium metallique, sa preparation, ses alliages avec les principaux metaux nucleaires. Consideration sur son avenir en tant que combustible nucleaire. (auteur)

  20. Determination of uranium in plutonium--238 metal and oxide by differential pulse polarography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fawcett, N.C.

    1976-01-01

    A differential pulse polarographic method was developed for the determination of total uranium in 238 Pu metal and oxides. A supporting electrolyte of 0.5 M ascorbic acid in 0.15 N H 2 SO 4 was found satisfactory for the determination of 500 ppM or more of uranium in 10 mg or less of plutonium. A relative standard deviation of 0.27 to 4.3 percent was obtained in the analysis of samples ranging in uranium content from 0.65 to 2.79 percent. The limit of detection was 0.18 μg ml -1 . Peak current was a linear function of uranium concentration up to at least 100 μg ml -1 . Amounts of neptunium equal to the uranium content were tolerated. The possible interference of a number of other cations and anions were investigated

  1. Passive assay of plutonium metal plates using a fast-neutron multiplicity counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fulvio, A., E-mail: difulvio@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Shin, T.H.; Jordan, T.; Sosa, C.; Ruch, M.L.; Clarke, S.D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2017-05-21

    We developed a fast-neutron multiplicity counter based on organic scintillators (EJ-309 liquid and stilbene). The system detects correlated photon and neutron multiplets emitted by fission reactions, within a gate time of tens of nanoseconds. The system was used at Idaho National Laboratory to assay a variety of plutonium metal plates. A coincidence counting strategy was used to quantify the {sup 240}Pu effective mass of the samples. Coincident neutrons, detected within a 40-ns coincidence window, show a monotonic trend, increasing with the {sup 240}Pu-effective mass (in this work, we tested the 0.005–0.5 kg range). After calibration, the system estimated the {sup 240}Pu effective mass of an unknown sample ({sup 240}Pu{sub eff} >50 g) with an uncertainty lower than 1% in a 4-min assay time.

  2. Solution of the effective Hamiltonian of impurity hopping between two sites in a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jinwu

    1997-07-01

    We analyze in detail all the possible fixed points of the effective Hamiltonian of a nonmagnetic impurity hopping between two sites in a metal obtained by Moustakas and Fisher (MF). We find a line of non-Fermi liquid fixed points which continuously interpolates between the two-channel Kondo fixed point (2CK) and the one-channel, two-impurity Kondo (2IK) fixed point. There is one relevant direction with scaling dimension 12 and one leading irrelevant operator with dimension 32. There is also one marginal operator in the spin sector moving along this line. The marginal operator, combined with the leading irrelevant operator, will generate the relevant operator. For the general position on this line, the leading low-temperature exponents of the specific heat, the hopping susceptibility and the electron conductivity Cimp,χhimp,σ(T) are the same as those of the 2CK, but the finite-size spectrum depends on the position on the line. No universal ratios can be formed from the amplitudes of the three quantities except at the 2CK point on this line where the universal ratios can be formed. At the 2IK point on this line, σ(T)~2σu(1+aT3/2), no universal ratio can be formed either. The additional non-Fermi-liquid fixed point found by MF has the same symmetry as the 2IK, it has two relevant directions with scaling dimension 12, and is therefore also unstable. The leading low-temperature behaviors are Cimp~T,χhimp~lnT,σ(T)~2σu(1+aT3/2) no universal ratios can be formed. The system is shown to flow to a line of Fermi-liquid fixed points which continuously interpolates between the noninteracting fixed point and the two-channel spin-flavor Kondo fixed point discussed by the author previously. The effect of particle-hole symmetry breaking is discussed. The effective Hamiltonian in the external magnetic field is analyzed. The scaling functions for the physical measurable quantities are derived in the different regimes; their predictions for the experiments are given. Finally

  3. Chemical sensors for monitoring non-metallic impurities in liquid sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Jayaraman, V.; Rajan Babu, S.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for fast breeder reactors. Liquid sodium is highly compatible with structural steels when the concentration of dissolved non-metallic impurities such as oxygen and carbon are low. However, when their concentrations are above certain threshold limits, enhanced corrosion and mass transfer and carburization of the steels would occur. The threshold concentration levels of oxygen in sodium are determined by thermochemical aspects of various ternary oxides of Na-M-O systems (M alloying elements in steels) which take part in corrosion and mass transfer. Dissolved carbon also influences these threshold levels by establishing relevant carbide equilibria. An event of steam leak into sodium at the steam generator, if undetected at its inception itself, can lead to extensive wastage of the tubes of the steam generator and prolonged shutdown. Air ingress into the argon cover gas and leak of hydrocarbon oil used as cooling fluids of the shafts of the centrifugal pumps of sodium are the sources of oxygen and carbon impurities in sodium. Continuous monitoring of the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in sodium coolant will help identifying their ingress at inception itself. An electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaHBr-CaBr 2 hydride ion conducting solid electrolyte has been developed for detecting the steam leak during normal operating conditions of the reactor. A nickel diffuser based sensor system using thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and Pd-doped tin oxide thin film sensor has been developed for use during low power operations of the reactor or during its start up. For monitoring carbon in sodium, an electrochemical sensor with molten Na 2 CO 3 -LiCO 3 as the electrolyte and pure graphite as reference electrode has been developed. Yttria Doped Thoria (YDT) electrolyte based oxygen sensor is under development for monitoring dissolved oxygen levels in sodium. Fabrication, assembly, testing and performance of

  4. Sample pretreatment for the determination of metal impurities in silicon wafer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Kim, Y. H.; Yoo, H. D.; Lee, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The analytical results obtained by microwave digestion and acid digestion methods for sample pretreatment to determine metal impurities in silicon wafer by inductively coupled plasma--mass spectrometry(ICP-MS) were compared. In order to decompose the silicon wafer, a mixed solution of HNO 3 and HF was added to the sample and the metal elements were determined after removing the silicon matrix by evaporating silicon in the form of Si-F. The recovery percentages of Ni, Cr and Fe were found to be 95∼106% for both microwave digestion and acid digestion methods. The recovery percentage of Cu obtained by the acid digestion method was higher than that obtained by the microwave digestion method. For Zn, however, the microwave digestion method gave better result than the acid digestion method. Fe was added to a silicon wafer using a spin coater. The concentration of Fe in this sample was determined by ICP-MS, and the same results were obtained in the two pretreatment methods

  5. Purification process of uranium hexafluoride containing traces of plutonium fluoride and/or neptunium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, J.; Bethuel, L.; Carles, M.

    1983-01-01

    In this process impure uranium hexafluoride is contacted with a metallic fluoride chosen in the group containing lead fluoride PbF 2 , uranium fluorides UFsub(4+x) (0 3 at a temperature such as plutonium and/or neptunium are reduced and pure uranium hexafluoride is recovered. Application is made to uranium hexafluoride purification in spent fuel reprocessing [fr

  6. The spectrographic analysis of plutonium oxide or mixed plutonium oxide/uranium oxide fuel pellets by the dried residue technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarbo, G.J.; Faught, P.; Hildebrandt, B.

    1980-05-01

    An emission spectrographic method for the quantitative determination of metallic impurities in plutonium oxide and mixed plutonium oxide/uranium oxide is described. The fuel is dissolved in nitric acid and the plutonium and/or uranium extracted with tributyl phosphate. A small aliquot of the aqueous residue is dried on a 'mini' pyrolitic graphite plate and excited by high voltage AC spark in an oxygen atmosphere. Spectra are recorded in a region which has been specially selected to record simultaneously lines of boron and cadmium in the 2nd order and all the other elements of interest in the 1st order. Indium is used as an internal standard. The excitation of very small quantities of the uraniumm/plutonium free residue by high voltage spark, together with three separate levels of containment reduce the hazards to personnel and the environment to a minimum with limited effect on sensitivity and accuracy of the results. (auth)

  7. Some physico-chemical and radiation properties of plutonium-238 metal prepared by electrochemical amalgamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretrukhin, V.F. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 31 Leninsky Prospect, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vperet@ipc.rssi.ru; Rovny, S.I. [Production Association ' Mayak' , 31 Prospect Lenin, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region 456784 (Russian Federation); Maslennikov, A.G. [A.N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, 31 Leninsky Prospect, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ershov, V.V.; Chinenov, P.P.; Kapitonov, V.I.; Kuvaev, V.L. [Production Association ' Mayak' , 31 Prospect Lenin, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region 456784 (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-11

    Pu-238 metal was prepared by electrolytic amalgamation from Pu(III) acetate aqueous solution and by followed by the thermal decomposition of the Pu amalgam. The density, specific heat power, {gamma}-spectra, neutron flux, and corrosion kinetics in dry air at ambient temperature of the prepared {sup 238}Pu metal were measured. The neutron flux and {gamma}-spectra from {sup 238}Pu metal have been attributed to spontaneous and induced fission and to ({alpha},{alpha}'{gamma}), ({alpha},p{gamma}), and ({alpha},n{gamma}) nuclear reactions on light nuclei. The electrochemically prepared {sup 238}Pu metal was shown to generate fewer neutrons, produce less gamma radiation, and contains lower {sup 10}B, {sup 19}F, and {sup 28}Si impurities in comparison with biomedical {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}. The increase of neutron flux from the sample due to the reaction {sup 18}O({alpha},n{gamma}) {sup 21}Ne was shown to be proportional to the increase of the mass of the {sup 238}Pu metal with time due to corrosion in dry air. {sup 238}Pu metal corrosion rate maximum and average values (1.1 x 10{sup -2} and 4.7 x 10{sup -3} mg cm{sup -2} h{sup -1}, respectively) obtained in dry air were an order of magnitude higher than the rates published for {sup 239}Pu under similar experiment conditions. The difference between the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu metal corrosion rate and mechanism is proposed to be due to the greater radiation effects and temperature on the {sup 238}Pu surface.

  8. Evaluation of soft x-ray average recombination coefficient and average charge for metallic impurities in beam-heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hiroe, S.; Hulse, R.; Shimada, M.; Stratton, B.; von Goeler, S.

    1986-05-01

    The soft x-ray continuum radiation in TFTR low density neutral beam discharges can be much lower than its theoretical value obtained by assuming a corona equilibrium. This reduced continuum radiation is caused by an ionization equilibrium shift toward lower states, which strongly changes the value of the average recombination coefficient of metallic impurities anti γ, even for only slight changes in the average charge, anti Z. The primary agent for this shift is the charge exchange between the highly ionized impurity ions and the neutral hydrogen, rather than impurity transport, because the central density of the neutral hydrogen is strongly enhanced at lower plasma densities with intense beam injection. In the extreme case of low density, high neutral beam power TFTR operation (energetic ion mode) the reduction in anti γ can be as much as one-half to two-thirds. We calculate the parametric dependence of anti γ and anti Z for Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni impurities on neutral density (equivalent to beam power), electron temperature, and electron density. These values are obtained by using either a one-dimensional impurity transport code (MIST) or a zero-dimensional code with a finite particle confinement time. As an example, we show the variation of anti γ and anti Z in different TFTR discharges

  9. Determination of the magnetic impurities contribution to the nuclear relaxation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The renormalization group techniques developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem are applied, for the first time, to the calculation of nuclear spin relaxation rates in dilute magnetic alloys. A procedure that calculates the longitudinal relaxation time T 1 over the entire temperature range 0 B T 1 is derived; for distances R between the impurity and the nucleus large compared to the inverse Fermi momentum H f , the result is identical to Korringa's expression for the nuclear spin relaxation rate in the pure metal. For smaller k F R, T 1 increases and becomes infinite as k F R→0. A numerical approach, capable of calculating T 1 at finite temperatures, is presented and tested by calculating T 1 for T→0; the numerical results are in excellent agreement with the analytical expression discussed above. Only for k F R→ infinity do the results for T 1 at T=0 agree with those found by Roshen and Saam, who recently analysed this problem in the light of Nozieres's Fermi liquid theory. The reasons for the discrepancy for finite k F R are discussed. (author) [pt

  10. Effect of transition metal impurities on the strength of grain boundaries in vanadium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xuebang; Kong, Xiang-Shan; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S., E-mail: csliu@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-09-07

    Effects of 3d (Ti-Ni), 4d (Zr-Pd), and 5d (Hf-Pt) transition metal impurities on strength of two representative vanadium grain boundaries (GBs), symmetric Σ3(111) and asymmetric Σ5(210), were studied by first-principles calculations within the framework of the Rice-Wang thermodynamic model and within the computational tensile test. The desirable elements to increase the GB cohesion were predicted based on their segregation and strengthening behaviors across the different GB sites. It reveals that the elements Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta are good choices for the GB cohesion enhancers. In addition, the GB strengthening by solutes is sensitive to the GB structures. The elements Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni decrease the GB strength of the Σ3(111) GB but they can increase the cohesion of the Σ5(210) GB. Furthermore, the origin of Ti-induced change of the GB strength was uncovered by analyzing the atomic bonds and electronic structures as well as the tensile strength. This work provides a theoretical guidance to screen promising alloying elements in V-based materials with improved resistance to GB decohesion and also helps us to understand the formation mechanism of Ti-rich precipitates in the V-Cr-Ti alloys under neutron or ion irradiation environments.

  11. Surface segregation of the metal impurity to the (1 0 0) surface of fcc ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    good relation to the differences in surface energy between the impurity and host crystals ΔQ ..... mobile impurity are treated as movable discrete particles. ..... [64] J Siera, van Delft FCMJM, A D van Langeveld and B E Nieuwenhuys, Surf. Sci.

  12. Accurate determination of non-metallic impurities in high purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide using inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Xie, Hualin; Shi, Shuyun; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2018-06-01

    The content of non-metallic impurities in high-purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide (HPTMAH) aqueous solution has an important influence on the yield, electrical properties and reliability of the integrated circuit during the process of chip etching and cleaning. Therefore, an efficient analytical method to directly quantify the content of non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solutions is necessary. The present study was aimed to develop a novel method that can accurately determine seven non-metallic impurities (B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se) in an aqueous solution of HPTMAH by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The samples were measured using a direct injection method. In the MS/MS mode, oxygen and hydrogen were used as reaction gases in the octopole reaction system (ORS) to eliminate mass spectral interferences during the analytical process. The detection limits of B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se were 0.31, 0.48, 0.051, 0.27, 3.10, 0.008, and 0.005 μg L-1, respectively. The samples were analyzed by the developed method and the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was used for contrastive analysis. The values of these seven elements measured using ICP-MS/MS were consistent with those measured by SF-ICP-MS. The proposed method can be utilized to analyze non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solution. Table S2 Multiple potential interferences on the analytes. Table S3 Parameters of calibration curve and the detection limit (DL). Table S4 Results obtained for 25% concentration high-purity grade TMAH aqueous solution samples (μg L-1, mean ± standard deviation, n = 10).

  13. Dynamic and quasi-static simulation and analysis of the plutonium oxide/metal containers subject to 30-foot dropping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, C.; Miller, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    This analysis of the plutonium oxide/metal storage containers is in support of the design and testing project The results from the dynamic analysis show some important facts that have not been considered before. The internal bagless transfer can will have higher stress than the primary container. The quasi-static analysis provides a conservative solution. In both vertical upright drop (dynamic) and inclined upside down drop (quasi-static) the containers are structurally sound

  14. Preparation of plutonium fluoride to obtain metal of high purity; Preparation de fluorures de plutonium pour l'obtention de metal de haute purete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faugeras, P; Brut, A; Helou, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    In the process of treating irradiated uranium, plutonium can be separated from the majority of the fission products and from the uranium by TBP extraction cycles. The high purity necessary for metallurgical and nuclear physics experiments led us to consider more elaborate purification processes, and a specially adapted method of fluoride preparation. The first part of the paper describes purification cycles of plutonium in solution on ion exchange resins, and the results are given. The second part contains the description and results of the fluoride preparation method. (author) [French] Dans le processus du traitement de l'uranium irradie, les cycles d'extraction au TBP permettent la separation du plutonium de la majorite des produits de fission et de l'uranium. La haute purete exigee pour les experiences de metallurgie et de physique nucleaire nous a conduit a envisager des purifications plus poussee et un mode de confection des fluorures specialement adapte. La premiere partie de l'expose decrit et donne les resultats de cycles de purification du plutonium en solution sur des resines echangeuses d'ions. La seconde partie decrit et donne les resultats du mode de confection des fluorures. (auteur)

  15. Dosimetric optimization approach for activities of metal plutonium elaboration by calciothermy; Demarche d'optimisation dosimetrique des activites d'elaboration du plutonium metal par calciothermie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crovisier, Ph.; Brunetti, L.; Jourde, S.; Piot, J.; Valier Brasier, P. [CEA/DAMNA/DSTA - Service de Protection contre les Rayonnements- Centre de Valduc - 21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2008-07-01

    The authors present the activities performed within a new unit of a plutonium pyro-chemistry laboratory, report a dosimetric assessment of workstation in this unit, compare the data with those obtained with the previous installation, and report a study of the neutronic efficiency of biological protection shields (measurements of neutron spectra)

  16. Impurities in Antiferromagnetic Transition-Metal Oxides - Symmetry and Optical Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, John Emil, III

    considered. For example, simple rock-salt transition-metal oxides are quite different from the high temperature superconducting cuprates. A range of materials is studied here, in order to gain a greater understanding of optical transitions in highly-correlated systems. In this work, O vacancies are introduced in NiO, along with Fe impurities, to understand better the band filling in the insulating behavior observed experimentally. These results are compared with those of La2NiO4, La2CuO4, La2-xSr xNiO4, and La2-xSrxCuO4. to elucidate the mechanisms behind the symmetry breaking phenomena in the Sr doped systems. As it turns out, indeed, the x2 - y2 orbital in these materials plays a critical role in spatial charge distribution, magnetic, and spin densities which are coupled to the dopant position in the lattice. The in-depth study of electronic and optical properties of transition-metal oxides presented here provides theoretical characterization of the infamous pseudogap in the cuprates - one of the greatest mysteries of modern solid state physics. In addition, via Density Functional Perturbation Theory, the phonon coupling with charge-density wave is explored in La2-xSr xNiO4 and found to be the dominant contributing factor to the colossal dielectric constant.

  17. Determination of the impurities in some pure metals, alloys, ores, plants, and coating materials with emission spectrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, C N; Lee, S L; Tsai, H T

    1976-07-01

    There are many methods in the instrumental analysis. Among them, the emission spectrographic methods are developed and compiled in analyzing diverse samples. Semi-quantitative method is used widely in general samples, such as alloys, ores, sands, plants, coating materials--etc. However, in quantitative analysis, determination of the metallic impurities contents in the pure metals depends upon the matrix effect. It is necessary to convert to the form identically for unknown and standard alike. Though the technique may be different, all of these methods are easily prepared and applied on new materials.

  18. Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lav Tandon

    2000-05-01

    The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

  19. Plutonium air transportable package development using metallic filaments and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, J.D.; Neilsen, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    A new design concept for plutonium air transport packagings has been developed by the Transportation Systems Department and modeled by the Engineering Mechanics and Material Modelinc, Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The new concept resulted from an in-depth review (Allen et al., 1989) of existing, package design philosophies and limitations. This review indicated a need for a new package which could survive combinations of impact, fire, and puncture environments, and which could be scaled up or down to meet a wide range of requirements for various contents and regulations. This new design concept uses a very robust primary containment vessel with elastomeric seals for protection and confinement of an inner containment vessel with contents. An overpack consisting of multiple layers of plastically-deformable metallic wire mesh and high-tensile strength materials is placed around the containment vessels to provide energy absorption for the primary containment vessel as well as thermal protection. The use of intermittent layers with high-tensile strength results in a limiter which remains in place during accidental impact events and can be relied upon to provide subsequent puncture and fire protection. In addition, an outer shell around the energy absorbing material is provided for handling, and weather protection

  20. Evaluation of flooded 3 x3x3 arrays of plutonium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, M.; Rahnema, F.

    1997-01-01

    In the early 1980's, thirteen experiments using plutonium metal cylinders were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory. The experimental method consisted of flooding a 3 x3 x3 array with water until criticality was achieved. Ten of the thirteen experiments went critical while the other three remained subcritical upon full reflection. This paper evaluates these experiments to develop benchmark descriptions for validation of computational tools used by criticality safety specialists. Six of the ten critical experiments were found acceptable as benchmark experiments. Sensitivity studies were performed to find the effect of experimental limits and uncertainties on the k eff value. Analysis of the experiments was performed by MCNP with continuous energy ENDF/B-V cross section data. K eff values for all benchmark experiments were computed using MCNP with ENDF/B-V data, KENO-Va with Hansen Roach cross section, and KENO-Va with 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Although these experiments were flooded, KENO-Va calculations show that these were, in fact, fast systems. 3 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  1. Stop plutonium; Stop plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  2. Determination of the clean 4f peak shape in XPS for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrall, P. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.morrall@awe.co.uk; Roussel, P. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Jolly, L.; Brevet, A.; Delaunay, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2009-03-15

    Many of the interesting properties observed with plutonium are ascribed to the influence of 5f electrons, and to the degree of localisation observed within these electrons. Indeed, changes in 5f localisation are sensitively reflected in the final states observed in core-level photoemission measurements. However, when analysing the 4f manifold of elemental plutonium, it is essential to obtain spectra without the influence of oxidation, which can easily be misinterpreted as 5f localisation. The ideal method to extract elemental plutonium 4f spectra is to remove any influence of oxidation from the 'clean' plutonium data by careful measurement of the oxygen 1s region, and the subsequent subtraction of the unwanted oxide features. However, in order to achieve this objective it is essential to determine the relative sensitivity factor (RSF) for plutonium 4f and the precise shape of the 4f features from plutonium sesqui-oxide. In this paper, we report an experimental determination of the RSF for the plutonium 4f manifold using experimental data captured from two different Vacuum Generators spectrometers; an ESCALAB Mk II and an ESCALAB 220i.

  3. Solubility of Plutonium (IV) Oxalate During Americium/Curium Pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Approximately 15,000 L of solution containing isotopes of americium and curium (Am/Cm) will undergo stabilization by vitrification at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Prior to vitrification, an in-tank pretreatment will be used to remove metal impurities from the solution using an oxalate precipitation process. Material balance calculations for this process, based on solubility data in pure nitric acid, predict approximately 80 percent of the plutonium in the solution will be lost to waste. Due to the uncertainty associated with the plutonium losses during processing, solubility experiments were performed to measure the recovery of plutonium during pretreatment and a subsequent precipitation process to prepare a slurry feed for a batch melter. A good estimate of the plutonium content of the glass is required for planning the shipment of the vitrified Am/Cm product to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The plutonium solubility in the oxalate precipitation supernate during pretreatment was 10 mg/mL at 35 degrees C. In two subsequent washes with a 0.25M oxalic acid/0.5M nitric acid solution, the solubility dropped to less than 5 mg/mL. During the precipitation and washing steps, lanthanide fission products in the solution were mostly insoluble. Uranium, and alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal impurities were soluble as expected. An elemental material balance for plutonium showed that greater than 94 percent of the plutonium was recovered in the dissolved precipitate. The recovery of the lanthanide elements was generally 94 percent or higher except for the more soluble lanthanum. The recovery of soluble metal impurities from the precipitate slurry ranged from 15 to 22 percent. Theoretically, 16 percent of the soluble oxalates should have been present in the dissolved slurry based on the dilution effects and volumes of supernate and wash solutions removed. A trace level material balance showed greater than 97 percent recovery of americium-241 (from the beta dec

  4. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  5. Direct analysis of plutonium metal for gallium, iron, and nickel by energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramlet, H.L.; Doyle, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray secondary target method for routine determination of gallium, iron, and nickel in plutonium metal is described that has significant advantages over wet chemical analysis. Coupons requiring minimal preparation for analysis are produced as a breakaway tab on the plutonium ingot. All three elements are determined on the same coupon. Gallium is determined using an arsenic secondary target followed by iron and nickel using a zinc target. The analysis times are 5 minutes for gallium and 15 minutes for the combined iron and nickel. The method of analysis was evaluated in the range of from 0.5 to 1.5% gallium. Iron was investigated over the range of 67 to 3000 ppM and nickel from 64 to 110 ppM

  6. Properties of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new

  7. Properties of plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Jin Su; Yoon, Hwan Ki; Min, Kyung Sik; Kim, Hyun Tae; Ahn, Jong Sung; Kwag, Eon Ho; Ryu, Keon Joong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daeduk (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-01

    Plutonium has unique chemical and physical properties. Its uniqueness in use has led to rare publications, in Korea. This report covers physical aspects of phase change of metal plutonium, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, etc, chemical aspects of corrosion, oxidation, how to produce plutonium from spent fuels by describing various chemical treatment methods, which are currently used and were used in the past. It also contains characteristics of the purex reprocessing process which is the most widely used nowadays. And show processes to purify and metalize from recovered plutonium solution. Detection and analysis methods are introduced with key pints for handling, critical safety, toxicity, and effects on peoples. This report gives not only a general idea on what plutonium is, rather than deep technical description, but also basic knowledge on plutonium production and safeguards diversion from the view point of nonproliferation. 18 refs. (Author) .new.

  8. Magnetic-field dependence of impurity-induced muon depolarization in noble metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Cooke, D.W.; Dodds, S.A.; Richards, P.M.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Boekema, C.

    1983-01-01

    We have measured the magnetic-field dependence of the muon depolarization rate up to 5 kOe in AuGd (350 ppM), AgGd (340 ppM) and AgEr (300 ppM). A simple model which includes both dipolar and nearest-neighbor contact interactions between the muon and the magnetic impurity does not fit the data. An axial crystal-field interaction, arising from the electric-field gradient induced by the muon at the site of the impurity, is found to dominate the Hamiltonian, and may have a large effect on the field dependence

  9. Magnetic field dependence of impurity-induced muon depolarization in noble metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Heffner, R.H.; Hutson, R.L.; Leon, M.; Cooke, D.W.; Yaouanc, A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Dodds, S.A. (Rice Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Physics); Richards, P.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); MacLaughlin, D.E. (California Univ., Riverside (USA)); Boekema, C. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock (USA))

    1984-01-01

    The authors have measured the magnetic field dependence of the muon depolarization rate up to 5 kOe in AuGd (350 ppm), AgGd (340 ppm) and AgEr (300 ppm). A simple model which includes both dipolar and nearest-neighbor contact interactions between the muon and the magnetic impurity does not fit the data. An axial crystal-field interaction, arising from the electric field gradient induced by the muon at the site of the impurity, is found to dominate the Hamiltonian, and may have a large effect on the field dependence.

  10. The role of troublesome components in plutonium vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hong; Vienna, J.D.; Peeler, D.K.; Hrma, P.; Schweiger, M.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    One option for immobilizing surplus plutonium is vitrification in a borosilicate glass. Two advantages of the glass form are (1) high tolerance to feed variability and, (2) high solubility of some impurity components. The types of plutonium-containing materials in the United States inventory include: pits, metals, oxides, residues, scrap, compounds, and fuel. Many of them also contain high concentrations of carbon, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide. To vitrify plutonium-containing scrap and residues, it is critical to understand the impact of each component on glass processing and chemical durability of the final product. This paper addresses glass processing issues associated with these troublesome components. It covers solubility limits of chlorine, fluorine, phosphate, sulfate, and chromium oxide in several borosilicate based glasses, and the effect of each component on vitrification (volatility, phase segregation, crystallization, and melt viscosity). Techniques (formulation, pretreatment, removal, and/or dilution) to mitigate the effect of these troublesome components are suggested.

  11. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  12. Binding of Helium to Metallic Impurities in Tungsten; Experiments and Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, G.J. van der; Veen, A. van; Caspers, L.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    1985-01-01

    A W(100) single crystal was implanted with low doses Ag, Cu, Mn, Cr, Al or In. Subsequent heating to 1600 K removed all vacancies and left the implants in substitutional positions. Low energy He was injected, and binding of He to the substitutional impurities was observed. Binding energies were

  13. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  14. Metal impurities profile in a 450kg multi-crystalline silicon ingot by Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Hani; Sun, Gwang Min; Kim, Ji seok; Oh, Mok; Chung, Yong Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Kim, Sun Ha; Baek, Sung Yeol; Tuan, Hoang Sy Minh

    2014-01-01

    Metal impurities are harmful to multi-crystalline silicon solar cells. They reduce solar cell conversion efficiencies through increased carrier recombination. They are present as isolated point-like impurities or precipitates. This work is to study the concentration profiles of some metal impurities of the directionally solidified 450kg multi-crystalline silicon ingot grown for solar cell production. The concentration of such impurities are generally below 10 15 cm -3 , and as such cannot be detected by physical techniques such as secondary-ion-mass spectroscopy(SIMS). So, we have tried to apply Cold Neutron - Prompt Gamma ray Activation Analysis(CN-PGAA) at the HANARO reactor research. The impurity concentrations of Au, Mn, Pt, Mo of a photovoltaic grade multi-crystalline silicon ingot appear by segregation from the liquid to the solid phase in the central region of the ingot during the crystallization. In the impurities concentration of the bottom region is higher than middle region due to the solid state diffusion. Towards the top region the segregation impurities diffused, during cooling process

  15. Thermoluminescence induced by X-rays in silica materials with metallic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, D.; Gonzalez M, P.; Espinosa P, M.; Salas, P.; Castano, V.M.

    1999-01-01

    Diverse materials of silica with Fe, Cu, Mg, and Mn impurities were synthesized by the sol-gel method, using tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursor. The materials obtained were subjected to thermal treatment at 500, 700 and 1000 Centigrade also they were irradiated with X-ray generated by a X-ray diffractometer which is installed in the ININ. The thermoluminescent signal was analysed and correlated with the type of impurities that are present in the material and with the grade of crystallinity produced by the thermal treatment in them. In according to the results obtained these materials show a thermoluminescent signal which is influenced by the crystallinity grade. It was analysed the behavior of the response for different doses, with the purpose of utilizing them to quantify very intense fields of radiation. (Author)

  16. An inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) determination of boron and other trace impurities in aluminium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, S.S.; Patil, P.B.; Karanjikar, N.P.

    2002-01-01

    The optimisation and use of ICP-AES technique for the analysis of aluminium metal for B, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, Ti, V and Zn in the concentration range 5.0 to 50.0 ppm is described. The method involves the dissolution of aluminium metal in acqua-regia. The matrix aluminium solution (2mg/ml) is mixed with composite impurity solution in proper proportions, for getting the required set of standards. JY 1 metre Czerny-Turner Scanning monochromator is used to measure peak intensities corresponding to each analyte wavelength selected. The mean relative standard deviation (RSD) of the method for various elements is found to be 4.0% -2.0% in the concentration range studied. (author)

  17. Strain field due to transition metal impurities in Ni and Pd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1 2. 28 1 π. ¯h2r3 2. dH mr5. (44). In eqs (41) to (44), ∆φFE(r), ∆φc(r) and ∆φb(r) are impurity induced changes in the po- tential due to free electron, s–d hybridization and d-bandwidth contributions respectively. 3. Calculations and results. The above formalism is used to calculate the atomic displacements in Ni and Pd dilute.

  18. Plutonium storage criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, D. [Scientech, Inc., Germantown, MD (United States); Ascanio, X. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Department of Energy has issued a technical standard for long-term (>50 years) storage and will soon issue a criteria document for interim (<20 years) storage of plutonium materials. The long-term technical standard, {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides,{close_quotes} addresses the requirements for storing metals and oxides with greater than 50 wt % plutonium. It calls for a standardized package that meets both off-site transportation requirements, as well as remote handling requirements from future storage facilities. The interim criteria document, {open_quotes}Criteria for Interim Safe Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Solid Materials{close_quotes}, addresses requirements for storing materials with less than 50 wt% plutonium. The interim criteria document assumes the materials will be stored on existing sites, and existing facilities and equipment will be used for repackaging to improve the margin of safety.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of metallic impurity diffusion in liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yun; Takahashi, Minoru; Cavallotti, Carlo; Raos, Guido

    2018-04-01

    Corrosion of stainless steels by lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is an important problem which depends, amongst other things, on the diffusion of the steel components inside this liquid alloy. Here we present the results of classical molecular dynamics simulations of the diffusion of Fe and Ni within LBE. The simulations complement experimental studies of impurity diffusion by our group and provide an atomic-level understanding of the relevant diffusion phenomena. They are based on the embedded atom method (EAM) to represent many-body interactions among atoms. The EAM potentials employed in our simulations have been validated against ab initio density functional calculations. We show that the experimental and simulation results for the temperature-dependent viscosity of LBE and the impurity diffusion coefficients can be reconciled by assuming that the Ni and Fe diffuse mainly as nanoscopic clusters below 1300 K. The average Fe and Ni cluster sizes decrease with increasing the temperature and there is essentially single-atom diffusion at higher temperatures.

  20. Uranium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in uranium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 , particularly adapted for a low content. The method is quantitative for metallic impurities and qualitative for non metallic impurities [fr

  1. Plutonium fires; Incendies de plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mestre, E.

    1959-06-23

    The author reports an information survey on accidents which occurred when handling plutonium. He first addresses accidents reported in documents. He indicates the circumstances and consequences of these accidents (explosion in glove boxes, fires of plutonium chips, plutonium fire followed by filter destruction, explosion during plutonium chip dissolution followed by chip fire). He describes hazards associated with plutonium fires: atmosphere and surface contamination, criticality. The author gives some advices to avoid plutonium fires. These advices concern electric installations, the use of flammable solvents, general cautions associated with plutonium handling, venting and filtration. He finally describes how to fight plutonium fires, and measures to be taken after the fire (staff contamination control, atmosphere control)

  2. The determination of some impurities in zirconium metal by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.; Pearton, D.C.G.; Watterson, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes the work done on the development of an instrumental neutron-activation method for the analysis of impurities in reactor-grade zirconium. Nine samples were analysed, and the results were compared with those obtained by other techniques. No statistically significant differences were observed for ten of the twelve elements that could possibly be determined by instrumental neutron-activation analysis. Cadmium cannot be determined at the 0,5 p.p.m. level, and there is doubt about the comparative values recorded for aluminium. The precision of the measurement by direct instrumental neutron-activation analysis ranges from 1,4 per cent for tungsten to 17 per cent for chromium [af

  3. Studying metal impurities (Mn2+, Cu2+, Fe3+) in calcium phosphates by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskhakova, K.; Murzakhanov, F.; Mamin, G.; Putlyaev, V.; Klimashina, E.; Fadeeva, I.; Fomin, A.; Barinov, S.; Maltsev, A.; Bakhteev, S.; Yusupov, R.; Gafurov, M.; Orlinskii, S.

    2018-05-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaP) are exploited in many fields of science, including geology, chemistry, biology and medicine due to their abundance in the nature and presence in the living organism. Various analytical and biochemical methods are used for controlling their chemical content, structure, morphology, etc. Unfortunately, magnetic resonance techniques are usually not even considered as necessary tools for CaP inspection. Some aspects of application of the commercially realized electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) approaches for characterization of CaP powders and ceramics (including the nanosized materails) such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphates of biogenic and synthetic origins containing intrinsic impurities or intentional dopants are demonstrated. The key features and advantages of the EPR techniques for CaP based materials characterization that could compliment the data obtained with the recognized analytical methods are pointed out.

  4. Contamination smoke: a simulation of heavy metal containing aerosols from fires in plutonium glove boxes: part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buijs, K.; Chavane de Dalmassy, B.; Baumgaertner, E.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the dispersion of plutonium bearing aerosols during glove box fires on a laboratory scale has been, in part I of this work, focussed on fires of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA - the major glove box construction material) whose surfaces were contaminated with cerium-europium oxide powder as a substitute for plutonium-uranium oxide. The present part II completes the study with comparative fire experiments involving contaminated samples of various glove box materials burning in or exposed to the flames of the standardized 0.6 MW fire source previously developed. Beyond spreading of the Ce-Eu-oxide powder as mentioned above, the other important surface contamination process is used, i.e. deposition and subsequent drying of droplets from acid cerium-europium solutions. It is shown that, among the tested materials, and with the exception of synthetic glove rubber, burning PMMA spreads the most radioactive contamination. On the other hand, this potential risk is much lower for fires involving materials contaminated from solution deposition than from powder or pellets. Attempts to measure the airborne contaminant particle sizes did not yield conclusive results. They suggest, however, that contamination from solutions leads to smaller heavy-metal containing aerosol particles than contamination with powder

  5. Formation and Diffusion of Metal Impurities in Perovskite Solar Cell Material CH3NH3PbI3: Implications on Solar Cell Degradation and Choice of Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Wenmei; Yang, Dongwen; Li, Tianshu; Zhang, Lijun; Du, Mao-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Solar cells based on methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI 3 ) have shown remarkable progress in recent years and have demonstrated efficiencies greater than 20%. However, the long-term stability of MAPbI 3 -based solar cells has yet to be achieved. Besides the well-known chemical and thermal instabilities, significant native ion migration in lead halide perovskites leads to current-voltage hysteresis and photoinduced phase segregation. Recently, it is further revealed that, despite having excellent chemical stability, the Au electrode can cause serious solar cell degradation due to Au diffusion into MAPbI 3 . In addition to Au, many other metals have been used as electrodes in MAPbI 3 solar cells. However, how the external metal impurities introduced by electrodes affect the long-term stability of MAPbI 3 solar cells has rarely been studied. A comprehensive study of formation energetics and diffusion dynamics of a number of noble and transition metal impurities (Au, Ag, Cu, Cr, Mo, W, Co, Ni, Pd) in MAPbI 3 based on first-principles calculations is reported herein. The results uncover important general trends of impurity formation and diffusion in MAPbI 3 and provide useful guidance for identifying the optimal metal electrodes that do not introduce electrically active impurity defects in MAPbI 3 while having low resistivities and suitable work functions for carrier extraction.

  6. The properties of helium atoms and positrons as impurities in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendry, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    Topics covered include: (A) atoms in simple metals: (1) the highly repulsive e - /He interaction and its consequences for binding energies in simple metals; (2) binding energy calculations for jellium and their implications for validity of pair-potential He/M interactions; and (3) the need for experimental data on high negative binding energy systems: (B) low energy positrons in simple metals: (1) behaviour of the positron especially its range (< 100A); (2) consequences for experiments on voids; and (3) possibility for non-destructive depth profiling of defect concentration. (author)

  7. Buckling and reaction rate experiments in plutonium/uranium metal fuelled, graphite moderated lattices at temperatures up to 400 deg. C. Part I: Experimental techniques and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, D H; Clarke, W G; Gibson, M; Hobday, R; Hunt, C; Marshall, J; Puckett, B J; Symons, C R; Wass, T [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-07-15

    This report presents experimental measurements of bucklings, flux fine structure and fission rate distributions in graphite moderated lattices fuelled with plutonium/uranium metal at temperatures up to 400 deg. C in the sub-critical assemblies SCORPIO I and SCORPIO II. The experimental techniques employed are described in some detail. The accuracy of the experimental measurements appears to be adequate for testing methods of calculation being developed for the calculation of reactivity and temperature coefficient of reactivity for power reactors containing plutonium and uranium. (author) 26 refs, 17 tabs, 17 figs

  8. Stop plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This press document aims to inform the public on the hazards bound to the plutonium exploitation in France and especially the plutonium transport. The first part is a technical presentation of the plutonium and the MOX (Mixed Oxide Fuel). The second part presents the installation of the plutonium industry in France. The third part is devoted to the plutonium convoys safety. The highlight is done on the problem of the leak of ''secret'' of such transports. (A.L.B.)

  9. Physicochemical characterization of discrete weapons grade plutonium metal particles originating from the 1960 BOMARC incident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, James M.

    The goal of this research was to investigate the physicochemical properties of weapons grade plutonium particles originating from the 1960 BOMARC incident for the purpose of predicting their fate in the environment and to address radiation protection and nuclear security concerns. Methods were developed to locate and isolate the particles in order to characterize them. Physical, chemical, and radiological characterization was performed using a variety of techniques. And finally, the particles were subjected to a sequential extraction procedure, a series of increasingly aggressive reagents, to simulate an accelerated environmental exposure. A link between the morphology of the particles and their partitioning amongst environmental mechanisms was established.

  10. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of metallic impurities in coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.J.S.F. da.

    1983-06-01

    The Brazilian Energetic Alternative Program expects the reduction of our dependence on foreign energy sources, through replacing fuel oil by mineral coal. Its gasification by means of nuclear energy must be also considered. However, the intensive burning of coal leads to serious environmental problems. During its combustion the release, to atmosphere, of toxic elements such as As, Hg, Pb, Sb, Se, Cd, Zn and others is of great concern. Increase in atmospheric pollution will take place by burning increased amounts of coal. In addition, some of those elements are concentrated in fly ashes. The determination of impurities in coal is also important for the Figueiras Project in the Nuclebras Mineral Prospection Program. Hence, it is important to have reliable analytical methods which can monitor inorganic constituents at various stages of coal production and utilization. The atomic absorption spectrophotometry is a suitable analytical technique to determine pollutants in coal because it is sensitive, simple, economic and cover a large range of concentrations. The need of a previous treatment of the sample is overcome by using an acid attack (HNO 3 + HClO 4 + HF) which has proved to be rapid and efficient. (Author) [pt

  11. Analysis of impurities at trace levels in metallic niobium by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaro, D.I.T.; Vasconcellos, M.B.A.; Santos, C.

    1989-10-01

    The interest in obtaining niobium of high purity has increased due to the recent applications of this material in both vacuum and high temperature technologies and to its potential uses in the aeronautic and aerospacial industries and in the nuclear energy field. In the present work, a procedure of analysis of impurities in the parts per million level, in eletrolitic and non-eletrolitic niobium samples has been established. The method of neutron activation analysis followed by high resolution gamma ray spectrometry has been used. The elements Al, Na, Mn, Cl and In, in ppm level and Y, in the percentage level, were determined after irradiation from 1 to 20 minutes, under a thermal neutron flux of 10 11 n.cm -2 .s -1 at the IEA-Rl reactor of the IPEN-CNEN/SP. The γ-rays from the radioactive products were measured with a Ge(Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel analyzer. The elements Ta, Cr and W, in the parts per million level, were determined with irradiation of 8 hours under a thermal neutron flux of 10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 . (autor) [pt

  12. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, P.G.; Miner, F.J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution

  13. Characterisation and radiolysis of modified lithium orthosilicate pebbles with noble metal impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Zariņš, A.; Valtenbergs, O.

    2017-01-01

    Modified lithium orthosilicate (Li4SiO4) pebbles with additions of titanium dioxide (TiO2) are suggested as an alternative tritium breeding ceramic for the European solid breeder test blanket module. The noble metals – platinum (Pt), gold (Au) and rhodium (Rh), can be introduced into the modified...... Li4SiO4 pebbles during the melt-based process, due to the corrosion of Pt-Rh and Pt-Au alloy crucible components. In this study, the surface microstructure, chemical and phase composition of the modified Li4SiO4 pebbles with different contents of the noble metals was analysed. The influence...

  14. Tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide: a Potential Donor Impurity in the Organic Metal TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Bechgaard, Klaus; Jacobsen, Claus Schelde

    1979-01-01

    Tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide, which because of its size similarity with tetrathiafulvalene is a potential ‘donor impurity’ in the organic metal TTF–TCNQ, was prepared and characterized spectroscopically. Experiments in which tetrathiafulvalene S-oxide was purposely doped into TTF–TCNQ indicate, how...

  15. Plutonium microstructures. Part 2. Binary and ternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.M.; Bergin, J.B.

    1983-12-01

    This report is the second of three parts that exhibit illustrations of inclusions in plutonium metal from inherent and tramp impurities, of intermetallic and nonmetallic constituents from alloy additions, and of the effects of thermal and mechanical treatments. This part includes illustrations of the microstructures in binary cast alloys and a few selected ternary alloys that result from measured additions of diluent elements, and of the microconstituents that are characteristic of phase fields in extended alloy systems. Microhardness data are given and the etchant used in the preparation of each sample is described

  16. Spectrographic analysis of plutonium (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artaud, J.; Chaput, M.; Robichet, J.

    1960-01-01

    Various possibilities for the spectrographic determination of impurities in plutonium are considered. The application of the 'copper spark' method, of sparking on graphite and of fractional distillation in the arc are described and discussed in some detail (apparatus, accessories, results obtained). (author) [fr

  17. Laboratory-scale catalysis studies of uranium and plutonium fluorination reactions by solid metal-fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochel, R.C.

    1984-03-01

    Various catalysts were evaluated for their effect on the rate of fluorination of the tetrafluorides of uranium and plutonium to produce the hexafluorides. Results of this work show that CoF 3 and AgF 2 are more effective than NiF 2 for UF 4 fluorination, producing rate increases in the range of 150 to 300 compared to UF 4 and fluorine alone. The use of these three catalysts was also found effective in the fluorinations of PuO 2 /PuF 4 and pure PuF 4 . However, enhancements were less. NiF 2 produced the best increases which were 8.1 for PuO 2 /PuF 4 and 3.6 for PuF 4 . Experiments were conducted in a simple flow-loop. Even larger enhancements might be obtained with fluidized beds. Details of the apparatus, experiments, methods, and a discussion of results are presented

  18. Impurities determination of uranium metal flame spectrophotometry and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukihati.

    1978-01-01

    The atomic absorption flame spectrophotometry has been applied to the determination of chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel in the metal of uranium. The first step to be done is to dissolve the uranium sample in nitric acid and then the uranium is extracted by a tributylphosphate-carbon tetrachloride solution. The aqueous phase which contains the chromium, copper, iron, lead, manganese and nickel is aspirated into an airacetylene flame. The results of this method are compared with the results of emission spectrographic method. It is found that this technique is competative to other methods in the sense that it is quite fast and accurate. (author)

  19. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated

  20. Plutonium controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1980-01-01

    The toxicity of plutonium is discussed, particularly in relation to controversies surrounding the setting of radiation protection standards. The sources, amounts of, and exposure pathways of plutonium are given and the public risk estimated. (ACR)

  1. Evaluation of synthetic water-soluble metal-binding polymers with ultrafiltration for selective concentration of americium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.F.; Gibson, R.R.; Jarvinen, G.D.; Jones, M.M.; Lu, M.T.; Robison, T.W.; Schroeder, N.C.; Stalnaker, N.

    1997-01-01

    Routine counting methods and ICP-MS are unable to directly measure the new US Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory level for discharge waters containing alpha-emitting radionuclides of 30 pCi/L total alpha or the 0.05 pCi/L regulatory level for Pu or Am activity required for surface waters at the Rocky Flats site by the State of Colorado. This inability indicates the need to develop rapid, reliable, and robust analytical techniques for measuring actinide metal ions, particularly americium and plutonium. Selective separation or preconcentration techniques would aid in this effort. Water-soluble metal-binding polymers in combination with ultrafiltration are shown to be an effective method for selectively removing dilute actinide ions from acidic solutions of high ionic strength. The actinide-binding properties of commercially available water-soluble polymers and several polymers which have been reported in the literature were evaluated. The functional groups incorporated in the polymers were pyrrolidone, amine, oxime, and carboxylic, phosphonic, or sulfonic acid. The polymer containing phosphonic acid groups gave the best results with high distribution coefficients and concentration factors for 241 Am(III) and 238 Pu(III)/(IV) at pH 4 to 6 and ionic strengths of 0.1 to 4

  2. Toxicology of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bair, W.J.

    1974-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the toxicity of Pu in experimental animals. Of the several plutonium isotopes, only 238 Pu and 239 Pu have been studied well. Sufficient results have been obtained to show that the behavior of 238 Pu in biological systems and the resulting biological effects cannot be precisely predicted from studies of 239 Pu. This probably applies also to other radiologically important plutonium isotopes which have half-lives ranging from 45 days to 10 7 years and decay by β-emission, electron capture, and spontaneous fission, as well as by emission of α-particles. All the biological effects of plutonium described in this review are attributed to alpha-particle radiation emitted by the plutonium. However, since plutonium is a chemically active heavy metal, one cannot ignore the possibility of chemical toxicity of the low-specific-activity isotopes, 239 Pu, 242 Pu, and 244 Pu. The preponderance of our knowledge of plutonium toxicology has come from short-term studies of relatively high dosage levels in several animal species. The consequences of high-level internal exposures can be predicted with confidence in experimental animals and probably also in man. However, considering the care with which plutonium is handled in the nuclear industry, a high-level contamination event is unlikely. Considerably less is known about the long-term effects of low levels of contamination. (250 references) (U.S.)

  3. Determination of metallic impurities in raw materials for radioisotope production by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.; Alvarez, F.; Capdevila, C.

    1969-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry has been used for the determination of traces of calcium in scandium oxide, copper in zinc, iron in cobalt oxide, manganese In ferric oxide, nickel in copper and zinc in gallium oxide. The influences on the sensitivities arising from the hollow cathode currents, the gas pressures and the acid concentrations have been considered. A study of the interferences from the metallic matrices has also been performed, the interference due to the absorption of the manganese radiation by the atoms of iron being the most outstanding . In order to remove the interfering elements and increase sensitivity, pre-concentration methods have been tested. The addition methods has also been used. (Author) 14 refs

  4. Transition metal impurities in fluorides: Role of electronic structure of fluorine on spectroscopic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trueba, A.; Garcia-Fernandez, P.; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2011-01-01

    This work examines the relation between optical properties of a MF6q− complex (M=transition–metal cation) and the chemical bonding paying especial attention to the role played by the electronic structure of fluorine. A main goal of the present study is to understand why if the effective Racah...... parameters, B and C, as well as the cubic splitting parameter, 10Dq, all depend on the covalency nevertheless the latter one is much more sensitive to a hydrostatic pressure than the former ones. The analysis carried out in this work, together with the results of ab initio calculations on CrF63− embedded...... detail. At the same time the reasons avoiding its measurement from optical spectra are pointed out as well. The present results stress that the microscopic origin of an optical parameter like 10Dq can certainly be very subtle....

  5. Spectrographic determination of metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors; Determinacion espectrografica de impurezas metalicas en refrigerantes organicos para reactores nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Munoz, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, F

    1969-07-01

    A spectrochemical method for determining metallic impurities in organic coolants for nuclear reactors is given. The organic matter in solid samples is eliminated by controlled distillation and dry ashing in the presence of magnesium oxide as carrier. Liquid, samples are vacuum distillated. The residue is analyzed by carrier distillation and by total burning techniques. The analytical results are discussed and compared with those obtained destroying the organic matter without carrier and using the copper spark technique. (Author) 12 refs.

  6. Options for converting excess plutonium to feed for the MOX fuel fabrication facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, Joe A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Paul H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Psaras, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Joyce, Jr., Edward L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The storage and safekeeping of excess plutonium in the United States represents a multibillion-dollar lifecycle cost to the taxpayers and poses challenges to National Security and Nuclear Non-Proliferation. Los Alamos National Laboratory is considering options for converting some portion of the 13 metric tons of excess plutonium that was previously destined for long-term waste disposition into feed for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). This approach could reduce storage costs and security ri sks, and produce fuel for nuclear energy at the same time. Over the course of 30 years of weapons related plutonium production, Los Alamos has developed a number of flow sheets aimed at separation and purification of plutonium. Flow sheets for converting metal to oxide and for removing chloride and fluoride from plutonium residues have been developed and withstood the test oftime. This presentation will address some potential options for utilizing processes and infrastructure developed by Defense Programs to transform a large variety of highly impure plutonium into feedstock for the MFFF.

  7. Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, J.D.; Moya, J.L.; McClure, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.; Golliher, K.G.

    1992-01-01

    A new design concept for a Type B transport packaging for transporting plutonium and uranium has been developed by the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The new design came about following a review of current packagings, projected future transportation needs, and current and future regulatory requirements. United States packaging, regulations specified in Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations Parts 173.416 and 173.417 (for fissile materials) offer parallel paths under the heading of authorized Type B packages for the transport of greater than A 1 or A 2 quantities of radioactive material. These pathways are for certified Type B packagings and specification packagings. Consequently, a review was made of both type B and specification packages. A request for comment has been issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for proposed changes to Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. These regulations may therefore change in the near future. The principle proposed regulation change that would affect this type of package is the addition of a dynamic crush requirement for certain packagings. The US Department of Transportation (DOT) may also re-evaluate the specifications in 49 CFR that authorize the fabrication and use of specification packagings. Therefore, packaging, options were considered that will meet expected new regulations and provide shipment capability for the US Department of Energy well into the future

  8. Benchmark Analysis of Subcritical Noise Measurements on a Nickel-Reflected Plutonium Metal Sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Jesson Hutchinson

    2009-09-01

    Subcritical experiments using californium source-driven noise analysis (CSDNA) and Feynman variance-to-mean methods were performed with an alpha-phase plutonium sphere reflected by nickel shells, up to a maximum thickness of 7.62 cm. Both methods provide means of determining the subcritical multiplication of a system containing nuclear material. A benchmark analysis of the experiments was performed for inclusion in the 2010 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. Benchmark models have been developed that represent these subcritical experiments. An analysis of the computed eigenvalues and the uncertainty in the experiment and methods was performed. The eigenvalues computed using the CSDNA method were very close to those calculated using MCNP5; however, computed eigenvalues are used in the analysis of the CSDNA method. Independent calculations using KENO-VI provided similar eigenvalues to those determined using the CSDNA method and MCNP5. A slight trend with increasing nickel-reflector thickness was seen when comparing MCNP5 and KENO-VI results. For the 1.27-cm-thick configuration the MCNP eigenvalue was approximately 300 pcm greater. The calculated KENO eigenvalue was about 300 pcm greater for the 7.62-cm-thick configuration. The calculated results were approximately the same for a 5-cm-thick shell. The eigenvalues determined using the Feynman method are up to approximately 2.5% lower than those determined using either the CSDNA method or the Monte Carlo codes. The uncertainty in the results from either method was not large enough to account for the bias between the two experimental methods. An ongoing investigation is being performed to assess what potential uncertainties and/or biases exist that have yet to be properly accounted for. The dominant uncertainty in the CSDNA analysis was the uncertainty in selecting a neutron cross-section library for performing the analysis of the data. The uncertainty in the

  9. Steady-state fission gas behavior in uranium-plutonium-zirconium metal fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, W.G.; Wazzan, A.R.; Okrent, D.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of fission gas release and induced swelling in steady state irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels is developed and computer coded. The code is used to simulate, with fair success, some gas release and induced swelling data obtained under the IFR program. It is determined that fuel microstructural changes resulting from zirconium migration, anisotropic swelling, and thermal variations are major factors affecting swelling and gas release behavior. (orig.)

  10. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  11. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  12. Type B plutonium transport package development that uses metallic filaments and composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, J.D.; Moya, J.L.; McClure, J.D.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.; Golliher, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    A new package was developed for transporting Pu and U quantities that are currently carried in DOT-6M packages. It uses double containment with threaded closures and elastomeric seals. A composite overpack of metallic wire mesh and ceramic or quartz cloth insulation is provided for protection in accidents. Two prototypes were subjected to dynamic crush tests. A thermal computer model was developed and benchmarked by test results to predict package behavior in fires. The material performed isotropically in a global fashion. A Type B Pu transport package can be developed for DOE Pu shipments for less than $5000 if manufactured in quantity. 5 figs, 6 refs

  13. Validation of MCNP6 Version 1.0 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 Cross Section Library for Plutonium Metals, Oxides, and Solutions on the High Performance Computing Platform Moonlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Bryan Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gough, Sean T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-05

    This report documents a validation of the MCNP6 Version 1.0 computer code on the high performance computing platform Moonlight, for operations at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that involve plutonium metals, oxides, and solutions. The validation is conducted using the ENDF/B-VII.1 continuous energy group cross section library at room temperature. The results are for use by nuclear criticality safety personnel in performing analysis and evaluation of various facility activities involving plutonium materials.

  14. Oxygen potential of uranium--plutonium oxide as determined by controlled-atmosphere thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, G.C.

    1975-10-01

    The oxygen-to-metal atom ratio, or O/M, of solid solution uranium-plutonium oxide reactor fuel is a measure of the concentration of crystal defects in the oxide which affect many fuel properties, particularly, fuel oxygen potential. Fabrication of a high-temperature oxygen electrode, employing an electro-active tip of oxygen-deficient solid-state electrolyte, intended to confirm gaseous oxygen potentials is described. Uranium oxide and plutonium oxide O/M reference materials were prepared by in situ oxidation of high purity metals in the thermobalance. A solid solution uranium-plutonium oxide O/M reference material was prepared by alloying the uranium and plutonium metals in a yttrium oxide crucible at 1200 0 C and oxidizing with moist He at 250 0 C. The individual and solid solution oxides were isothermally equilibrated with controlled oxygen potentials between 800 and 1300 0 C and the equilibrated O/M ratios calculated with corrections for impurities and buoyancy effects. Use of a reference oxygen potential of -100 kcal/mol to produce an O/M of 2.000 is confirmed by these results. However, because of the lengthy equilibration times required for all oxides, use of the O/M reference materials rather than a reference oxygen potential is recommended for O/M analysis methods calibrations. (auth)

  15. On the origin of metal impurities in content of lava-like fuel-containing materials of Chornobyl NSC-Shelter object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mikhailov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Version of the origin of material metallic impurities in silicate matrix of lava-like fuel-containing masses (LFCM, which were formed during the Chernobyl Unit 4 accident, is presented. Based on comparative quantitative characteristics of observable mass ratios of iron, chromium and nickel in different LFCM clusters and potential sources of their appearance - metal structures, the degree of impact of various factors on the formation of metal components in Chernobyl corium (MCC was given. It was concluded that initial MCC composition was formed on the basis of 08X18H10T stainless steel melt, from which the elements of fuel channel structure and lower water pipelines were manufactured.

  16. Effect of compositional variation in plutonium on process shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.H.

    1997-11-01

    Radiation dose rate from plutonium with high 239 Pu content varies with initial nuclidic content, radioactive decay time, and impurity elemental content. The two idealized states of old plutonium and clean plutonium, whose initial compositions are given, provide approximate upper and lower bounds on dose rate variation. Whole-body dose rates were calculated for the two composition states, using unshielded and shielded plutonium spheres of varying density. The dose rates from these variable density spheres are similar to those from expanded plutonium configurations encountered during processing. The dose location of 40 cm from the sphere center is representative of operator standoff for direct handling of plutonium inside a glove box. The results have shielding implications for glove boxes with only structurally inherent shielding, especially for processing of old plutonium in an expanded configuration. Further reduction in total dose rate by using lead to reduce photon dose rate is shown for two density cases representing compact and expanded plutonium configurations

  17. Effect of compositional variation in plutonium on process shielding design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.H.

    1997-11-01

    Radiation dose rate from plutonium with high {sup 239}Pu content varies with initial nuclidic content, radioactive decay time, and impurity elemental content. The two idealized states of old plutonium and clean plutonium, whose initial compositions are given, provide approximate upper and lower bounds on dose rate variation. Whole-body dose rates were calculated for the two composition states, using unshielded and shielded plutonium spheres of varying density. The dose rates from these variable density spheres are similar to those from expanded plutonium configurations encountered during processing. The dose location of 40 cm from the sphere center is representative of operator standoff for direct handling of plutonium inside a glove box. The results have shielding implications for glove boxes with only structurally inherent shielding, especially for processing of old plutonium in an expanded configuration. Further reduction in total dose rate by using lead to reduce photon dose rate is shown for two density cases representing compact and expanded plutonium configurations.

  18. Investigation of separation factors of neptunium and plutonium in the process of mass transfer through liquid impregnated membranes with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.P.; Mikheeva, M.N.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetics of joint transfer of neptunium(6) and plutonium(4) through liquid membranes with di-2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid, depending on the concentration of the carrier, nature of reextracting agent and ratio of metal concentrations, was investigated. The optimal conditions for selective isolation of microimpurity of one of the elements from solutions of the other were determined. Solution of ammonium carbonate with carrier concentration of 0.1-0.2 mol/l can be expediently utilized as reextracting phase for neptunium impurity removal

  19. Effects of impurities in biodiesel-derived glycerol on growth and expression of heavy metal ion homeostasis genes and gene products in Pseudomonas putida LS46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jilagamazhi; Sharma, Parveen; Spicer, Vic; Krokhin, Oleg V; Zhang, Xiangli; Fristensky, Brian; Wilkins, John A; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2015-07-01

    Biodiesel production-derived waste glycerol (WG) was previously investigated as potential carbon source for medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (mcl-PHA) production by Pseudomonas putida LS46. In this study, we evaluated the effect of impurities in the WG on P. putida LS46 physiology during exponential growth and corresponding changes in transcription and protein expression profiles compared with cells grown on pure, reagent grade glycerol. High concentration of metal ions, such as Na(+), and numbers of heavy metals ion, such as copper, ion, zinc, were detected in biodiesel-derived WG. Omics analysis from the corresponding cultures suggested altered expression of genes involved in transport and metabolism of ammonia and heavy metal ions. Expression of three groups of heavy metal homeostasis genes was significantly changed (mostly upregulated) in WG cultures and included the following: copper-responded cluster 1 and 2 genes, primarily containing cusABC; two copies of copAB and heavy metal translocating P-type ATPase; Fur-regulated, TonB-dependent siderophore receptor; and several cobalt/zinc/cadmium transporters. Expression of these genes suggests regulation of intracellular concentrations of heavy metals during growth on biodiesel-derived glycerol. Finally, a number of genes involved in adapting to, or metabolizing free fatty acids and other nonheavy metal contaminants, such as Na(+), were also upregulated in P. putida LS46 grown on biodiesel-derived glycerol.

  20. Metal impurity transport control in JET H-mode plasmas with central ion cyclotron radiofrequency power injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valisa, M.; Carraro, L.; Predebon, I.

    2011-01-01

    The scan of ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH) power has been used to systematically study the pump out effect of central electron heating on impurities such as Ni and Mo in H-mode low collisionality discharges in JET. The transport parameters of Ni and Mo have been measured by introducing...

  1. Evaluation of the neutron self-interrogation approach for assay of plutonium in high materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, P.A.; Menlove, H.O.; Fife, K.W.; West, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The pyrochemical scrap recovery processes, designed to extract impurities from plutonium metal and compounds, generate a variety of plutonium-laden residues consisting of high (α,n) matrices of varying chemical composition, and often containing grams to tens of grams of americium. For such materials, multiplication corrections based on real neutron coincidence count rate, R, and total neutron count rate, T, measurements cannot be applied because of the large, unknown, and variable (α,n) component in the total neutron emission rate. A study of the prototype self-interrogation assay method is in progress at the Los Alamos plutonium facility. In the self-interrogation approach, the assay signature R(IF)/T is a function of effective fissile plutonium content, where R(IF) is the induced fission component of the measured reals rate, and T is the measured, (α,n)-dominated totals rate. The present study includes a calibration effort using standards consisting of mixtures of PuO 2 and PuF 4 in a salt-strip matrix. The neutron measurements of the standards and the process materials have been performed at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The precision and accuracy of the self-interrogation method applied to pyrochemical residues is examined in this study

  2. Divertor experiment for impurity control in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagami, Masayuki

    1979-04-01

    Divertor actions of controlling the impurities and the transport of impurity ions in the plasma have been investigated in the DIVA device. Following are the results: (1) The radial transport of impurity ions is not described only by neoclassical theory, but it is strongly influenced by anomalous process. Radial diffusion of impurity ions across the whole minor radius is well described by a neoclassical diffusion superposed by the anomalous diffusion for protons. Due to this anomalous process, which spreads the radial density profile of impurity ions, 80 to 90% of the impurity flux in the plasma outer edge is shielded even in a nondiverted discharge. (2) The divertor reduces the impurity flux entering the main plasma by a factor of 2 to 4. The impurity ions shielded by the scrape-off plasma are rapidly guided into the burial chamber with a poloidal excursion time roughly equal to that of the scrape-off plasma. (3) The divertor reduces the impurity ion flux onto the main vacuum chamber by guiding the impurity ions diffusing from the main plasma into the burial chamber, thereby reducing the plasma-wall interaction caused by diffusing impurity ions at the main vacuum chamber. The impurity ions produced in the burial chamber may flow back to the main plasma through the scrape-off layer. However, roughly only 0.3% of the impurity flux into the scrape-off plasma in the burial chamber penetrates into the main plasma due to the impurity backflow. (4) A slight cooling of the scrape-off plasma with light-impurity injection effectively reduces the metal impurity production at the first wall by reducing the potential difference between the plasma and the wall, thereby reducing the accumulation of the metal impurity in the discharge. Radiation cooling by low-Z impurities in the plasma outer edge, which may become an important feature in future large tokamaks both with and without divertor, is numerically evaluated for carbon, oxygen and neon. (author)

  3. Plutonium controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofman, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    If the world chooses to seek a solution to the energy dilemma through nuclear energy, the element plutonium will become an article of commerce to be handled in quantities of thousands of tonnes annually. Plutonium is a uniquely potent inhalation carcinogen, the potential induction of lung cancer dwarfing other possible toxic effects. For reasons to be presented here, it is the author's opinion that plutonium's carcinogenicity has been very seriously underestimated. If one couples the corrected carcinogenicity with the probable degree of industrial containment of the plutonium, it appears that the commercialization of a plutonium-based energy economy is not an acceptable option for society. Sagan's statement that ''the experience of 30 years supports the contention that plutonium can be used safely'' is manifestly indefensible. No meaningful epidemiological study of plutonium-exposed workers for that 30-year period has ever been done. Since thousands of those possibly exposed have left the industry and are not even available to follow-up, it is doubtful that any meaningful study of ''the experience of 30 years'' will ever be accomplished

  4. Plutonium solubilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puigdomnech, I.; Bruno, J.

    1991-02-01

    Thermochemical data has been selected for plutonium oxide, hydroxide, carbonate and phosphate equilibria. Equilibrium constants have been evaluated in the temperature range 0 to 300 degrees C at a pressure of 1 bar to T≤100 degrees C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. Measured solubilities of plutonium that are reported in the literature for laboratory experiments have been collected. Solubility data on oxides, hydroxides, carbonates and phosphates have been selected. No solubility data were found at temperatures higher than 60 degrees C. The literature solubility data have been compared with plutonium solubilities calculated with the EQ3/6 geochemical modelling programs, using the selected thermodynamic data for plutonium. (authors)

  5. Effects of grain morphology, microstructure and dispersed metal cocatalyst on the photoreduction of water over impurity-doped LaInO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhanasekaran, P.; Gupta, N.M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Grain morphology, doping of an impurity, microstructure, and metal/oxide contacts play a crucial role in the photocatalytic water decomposition activity of metal dispersed LaInO 3 . Highlights: ► LaInO 3 displays two-step H 2 evolution from UV-induced photoreduction of pure water. ► Preparation-controlled particle morphology plays a key role in photoactivity. ► Doping-induced activity enhancement relates to inter-bandgap charge trapping states. ► Dispersion and metal/oxide contacts may govern the performance of a cocatalyst. -- Abstract: The single phase lanthanum indates doped with Ga (for La) and N (for O), i.e. La 1−x Ga x InO 3 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) and LaInO 1−y N y (y ∼ 0.6), exhibit significant activity for photoreduction of water; the yield of H 2 produced depending on dopant, excitation source, and addition of a sacrificial reagent. The two-step H 2 evolution observed for this reaction corresponds with the two distinct absorbance regimes displayed by these materials, one in UV-region due to bandgap excitation and the other in visible region arising from the transitions involving sub-bandgap donor or acceptor energy states. The photocatalytic activity of these d 10 metal oxides increases on coating with a metal/metal oxide co-catalyst, gold exhibiting superior activity to Pt and NiO, irrespective of excitation source and sample composition. The preparation-controlled particle morphology, doping-induced lattice imperfections, and metal/semiconductor hetero-junctions are envisaged to play a key role in the absorption characteristics and photocatalytic water reduction activity of metal/LaInO 3 nanocomposites.

  6. Determination of plutonium in soils by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storms, H.A.; Carlson, D.C.; Hunter, F.F.

    1974-01-01

    A procedure is described in which mass spectrometry is utilized for the determination of plutonium in soils. Using this procedure we have measured plutonium isotopic compositions at concentrations as low as 2 x 10 -14 grams Pu per gram soil. A thermal ionization source with canoe-shaped rhenium filament, is utilized in the mass spectrometer. The plutonium, when loaded onto the filament, is contained in a single Dowex-1 resin bead which is about 350 micrometers in diameter. Concentrating the plutonium within this single bead is a key step in the procedure and produces a relatively clean plutonium fraction. The resin bead also serves as an effective diffusion barrier such that the plutonium is prevented from being removed with the lower boiling impurities. The Pu remains in the bead until the temperature is sufficiently high for efficient production of Pu + ions. Plutonium ionization efficiencies as high as 2.5 percent have been measured

  7. Methods of obtaining an inert atmosphere for plutonium metal treatment installations; Modes d'obtention d'une atmosphere inerte dans les installations d'elaboration du plutonium metallique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riolfo, R; Barbier, M

    1962-07-01

    Plutonium is a very pyrophoric metal (heat of combustion: 253 kCal/mole). The operations and manipulations involved in its treatment have thus to be carried out in an inert atmosphere. Several methods designed to eliminate the oxygen from the manipulation chamber have been tried: absorption by titanium - zirconium or copper turnings, or bubbling through potassium pyrogallate. They are not satisfactory. The reaction C + O{sub 2} -> CO{sub 2} has been chosen. Graphite is used. By this method, which is flexible and which has a negligible cost price, it is possible to absorb O{sub 2} within a wide range of concentrations (from 0.1 to 20 per cent) at a temperature 600 - 800 deg C compatible with the use of a conventional material. This report describes the trials carried out, the method selected and experimented, with the experimental details, the results obtained, and the extension of the method for a slightly different use. (authors) [French] Le plutonium est un metal tres pyrophorique (chaleur de combustion 253 kCal/mole). Les operations et manipulations qui decoulent de son elaboration doivent donc s'effectuer sous atmosphere inerte. Plusieurs methodes, dont le but etait d'eliminer l'oxygene de l'enceinte d'elaboration ont ete essayees: absorption par des copeaux de titane-zirconium, de cuivre, ou barbotage sur le pyrogallate de potasse. Elles n'ont pas donne satisfaction. La reaction C + O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2} a ete retenue. On utilise le graphite. D'une tres grande souplesse d'utilisation, d'un prix de revient nul, il permet d'absorber l'oxygene dans une fourchette etendue de concentration (0,1 a 20 pour cent) a une temperature (600 a 800 degres C) compatible avec l'emploi d'un materiel classique. Cet expose decrit les essais effectues, la methode retenue et experimentee, le mode operatoire, les resultats obtenus, et l'extension de la methode a un probleme legerement different. (auteurs)

  8. Certification of a plutonium dioxide reference material for elemental analyses (EC-NRM 210)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Duigou, Y.

    1990-01-01

    A new EC plutonium reference material is made available in the form of 5g samples of plutonium dioxide powder. Before weighing the material must be calcined at 1 250 0 C for two hours. The plutonium content (880.26 ± 0.44) g.kg -1 has been derived from plutonium measurements performed by three different laboratories each applying a different oxydo-reductive method. The results of the plutonium measurement, the statistical evaluation of the uncertainty of the plutonium content together with information on the impurities present in the material are given in the report

  9. Determination of trace impurities in uranium-transition metal alloy fuels by ICP-MS using extended common analyte internal standardization (ECAIS) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhijit; Deb, S.B.; Nagar, B.K.; Saxena, M.K.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical methodology was developed for the determination of eight trace impurities viz, Al, B, Cd, Co, Cu, Mg, Mn and Ni in three different uranium-transition metal alloy fuels (U-Me; Me = Ti, Zr and Mo) employing inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The well known common analyte internal standardization (CAIS) chemometric technique was modified and then employed to minimize and account for the matrix effect on analyte intensity. Standard addition of analytes to the pure synthetic U-Me sample solutions and subsequently their ≥ 94% recovery by the ICP-MS measurement validates the proposed methodology. One real sample of each of these alloys was analyzed by the developed analytical methodology and the %RSD observed was in the range of 5-8%. The method detection limits were found to be within 4-10 μg L -1 . (author)

  10. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterbentz, J.W.; Olsen, C.S.; Sinha, U.P.

    1993-06-01

    This study is in response to a request by the Reactor Panel Subcommittee of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) to evaluate the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing conventional or advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs and in low temperature/pressure LWR designs that might be developed for plutonium disposal. Three plutonium-based fuel forms (oxides, aluminum metallics, and carbides) are evaluated for neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and material and compatibility issues. For the carbides, only the fabrication technologies are addressed. Viable plutonium oxide fuels for conventional or advanced LWRs include plutonium-zirconium-calcium oxide (PuO 2 -ZrO 2 -CaO) with the addition of thorium oxide (ThO 2 ) or a burnable poison such as erbium oxide (Er 2 O 3 ) or europium oxide (Eu 2 O 3 ) to achieve acceptable neutronic performance. Thorium will breed fissile uranium that may be unacceptable from a proliferation standpoint. Fabrication of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuels is well established; however, fabrication of plutonium-based oxide fuels will require further development. Viable aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels for a low temperature/pressure LWR include plutonium aluminide in an aluminum matrix (PuAl 4 -Al) with the addition of a burnable poison such as erbium (Er) or europium (Eu). Fabrication of low-enriched plutonium in aluminum-plutonium metallic fuel rods was initially established 30 years ago and will require development to recapture and adapt the technology to meet current environmental and safety regulations. Fabrication of high-enriched uranium plate fuel by the picture-frame process is a well established process, but the use of plutonium would require the process to be upgraded in the United States to conform with current regulations and minimize the waste streams

  11. CONVERSION OF PLUTONIUM TRIFLUORIDE TO PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, S.; Davidson, N.R.

    1957-09-10

    A large proportion of the trifluoride of plutonium can be converted, in the absence of hydrogen fluoride, to the tetrafiuoride of plutonium. This is done by heating plutonium trifluoride with oxygen at temperatures between 250 and 900 deg C. The trifiuoride of plutonium reacts with oxygen to form plutonium tetrafluoride and plutonium oxide, in a ratio of about 3 to 1. In the presence of moisture, plutonium tetrafluoride tends to hydrolyze at elevated temperatures and therefore it is desirable to have the process take place under anhydrous conditions.

  12. Aqueous Chloride Operations Overview: Plutonium and Americium Purification/Recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, David Bryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Skidmore, Bradley Evan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    Acqueous Chloride mission is to recover plutonium and americium from pyrochemical residues (undesirable form for utilization and storage) and generate plutonium oxide and americium oxide. Plutonium oxide is recycled into Pu metal production flowsheet. It is suitable for storage. Americium oxide is a valuable product, sold through the DOE-OS isotope sales program.

  13. Plutonium (Pu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This pedagogical document presents the properties and uses of plutonium: where does it come from, the history of its discovery, its uses and energy content, its recycling and reuse in MOX fuels, its half-life, toxicity and presence in the environment. (J.S.)

  14. Zirconium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass specrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in zirconium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 but particularly adapted for low contents. The method is quantitative only if a reference sample is available (metallic impurities) [fr

  15. Moessbauer Studies of Implanted Impurities in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were performed on implanted radioactive impurities in semiconductors and metals. Radioactive isotopes (from the ISOLDE facility) decaying to a Moessbauer isotope were utilized to investigate electronic and vibrational properties of impurities and impurity-defect structures. This information is inferred from the measured impurity hyperfine interactions and Debye-Waller factor. In semiconductors isoelectronic, shallow and deep level impurities have been implanted. Complex impurity defects have been produced by the implantation process (correlated damage) or by recoil effects from the nuclear decay in both semiconductors and metals. Annealing mechanisms of the defects have been studied. \\\\ \\\\ In silicon amorphised implanted layers have been recrystallized epitaxially by rapid-thermal-annealing techniques yielding highly supersaturated, electrically-active donor concentrations. Their dissolution and migration mechanisms have been investigated in detail. The electronic configuration of Sb donors...

  16. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2004-01-01

    Impurity behaviour in JET internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges with reversed shear has been investigated. Metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the main ion density profile. The accumulation is due to inwardly directed drift velocities inside the ITB radius. The strength of the impurity peaking increases with the impurity charge and is low for the low-Z elements C and Ne. Transport calculations show that the observed behaviour is consistent with dominant neoclassical impurity transport inside the ITB. In some cases, MHD events in the core flatten the radial profile of the metallic impurity. (author)

  17. Pyrochemical investigations into recovering plutonium from americium extraction salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fife, K.W.; West, M.H.

    1987-05-01

    Progress into developing a pyrochemical technique for separating and recovering plutonium from spent americium extraction waste salts has concentrated on selective chemical reduction with lanthanum metal and calcium metal and on the solvent extraction of americium with calcium metal. Both techniques are effective for recovering plutonium from the waste salt, although neither appears suitable as a separation technique for recycling a plutonium stream back to mainline purification processes. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document offers chemical, metallurgical and economical information on the plutonium, a hard white radioelement. It deals also on the plutonium formation in the earth, the plutonium use in the nuclear industry, the plutonium in the environment and the plutonium toxicity. (A.L.B.)

  19. Plutonium in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madic, C.

    1994-01-01

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases

  20. The influence of a nuclear prehistory on transport rate of impurity ''hot'' atoms 111In, 114mIn and 115mIn in the irradiated metal cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, I.E.; Lazarev, V.V.; Orlov, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    In our previous publications it was shown, that the velocity of migration of radioactive microimpurities (formed as a result of a nuclear change) in irradiated in metals is instituted by a nuclear prehistory. In the present work this problem was explored in detail. The selected system '' cadmium - impurity atoms of indium '' is unique for such experiments: it is possible to gain the same impurity ''hot'' atoms ( 111 In, 114m In and 115m In) via different ''nuclear channels'' and to explore their behavior depending on a nuclear prehistory. (orig.)

  1. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinchin, G.H.

    1967-01-01

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of 240 Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  2. Physics of Plutonium Recycling in Thermal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinchin, G. H. [Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1967-09-15

    A substantial programme of experimental reactor physics work with plutonium fuels has been carried out in the UK; the purpose of this paper is to review the experimental and theoretical work, with emphasis on plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. Although the main incentive for some of the work may have been to study plutonium build-up in uranium-fuelled reactors, it is nevertheless relevant to plutonium recycling and no distinction is drawn between build-up and enrichment studies. A variety of techniques have been for determining reactivity, neutron spectrum and reaction rates in simple assemblies of plutonium-aluminium fuel with water, graphite and beryllia moderators. These experiments give confidence in the basic data and methods of calculation for near-homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and moderator. In the practical case of plutonium recycling it is necessary to confirm that satisfactory predictions can be made for heterogeneous lattices enriched with plutonium. In this field, experiments have been carried out with plutonium-uranium metal and oxide-cluster fuels in graphite-moderated lattices and in SGHW lattices, and the effects of {sup 240}Pu have been studied by perturbation measurements with single fuel elements. The exponential and critical experiments have used tonne quantities of fuel with plutonium contents ranging from 0.25 to 1.2% and the perturbation experiments have extended both the range of plutonium contents and the range of isotopic compositions of plutonium. In addition to reactivity and reactivity coefficients, such as the temperature coefficients, attention has been concentrated on relative reaction rate distributions which provide evidence for variations of neutron spectrum. .Theoretical comparisons, together with similar comparisons for non-uniform lattices, establish the validity of methods of calculation which have been used to study the feasibility of plutonium recycling in thermal reactors. (author)

  3. Chemical and Radiochemical Composition of Thermally Stabilized Plutonium Oxide from the Plutonium Finishing Plant Considered as Alternate Feedstock for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Jones, Susan A.

    2005-01-01

    Eighteen plutonium oxide samples originating from the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site were analyzed to provide additional data on the suitability of PFP thermally stabilized plutonium oxides and Rocky Flats oxides as alternate feedstock to the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). Radiochemical and chemical analyses were performed on fusions, acid leaches, and water leaches of these 18 samples. The results from these destructive analyses were compared with nondestructive analyses (NDA) performed at PFP and the acceptance criteria for the alternate feedstock. The plutonium oxide materials considered as alternate feedstock at Hanford originated from several different sources including Rocky Flats oxide, scrap from the Remote Mechanical C-Line (RMC) and the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF), and materials from other plutonium conversion processes at Hanford. These materials were received at PFP as metals, oxides, and solutions. All of the material considered as alternate feedstock was converted to PuO2 and thermally stabilized by heating the PuO2 powder at 950 C in an oxidizing environment. The two samples from solutions were converted to PuO2 by precipitation with Mg(OH)2. The 18 plutonium oxide samples were grouped into four categories based on their origin. The Rocky Flats oxide was divided into two categories, low- and high-chloride Rocky Flats oxides. The other two categories were PRF/RMC scrap oxides, which included scrap from both process lines and oxides produced from solutions. The two solution samples came from samples that were being tested at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory because all of the plutonium oxide from solutions at PFP had already been processed and placed in 3013 containers. These samples originated at the PFP and are from plutonium nitrate product and double-pass filtrate solutions after they had been thermally stabilized. The other 16 samples originated from thermal stabilization batches before canning at

  4. Plutonium uniqueness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A standard is suggested against which the putative uniqueness of plutonium may be tested. It is common folklore that plutonium is unique among the chemical elements because its four common oxidation states can coexist in the same solution. Whether this putative uniqueness appears only during transit to equilibrium, or only at equilibrium, or all of the time, is not generally made clear. But while the folklore may contain some truth, it cannot be put to test until some measure of 'uniqueness' is agreed upon so that quantitative comparisons are possible. One way of measuring uniqueness is as the magnitude of the product of the mole fractions of the element at equilibrium. A 'coexistence index' is defined and discussed. (author)

  5. Direct reduction of plutonium from dicesium hexachloroplutonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averill, W.A.; Boyd, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant produces dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) primarily as a reagent in the molten salt extraction of americium from plutonium metal. DCHP is precipitated from aqueous chloride solutions derived from the leaching of process residues with a high degree of selectivity. DCHP is a chloride salt of plutonium, while the traditional aqueous precipitate is a hydrated oxide. Plutonium metal preparation from the oxide involves either the conversion of oxide to a halide followed by metallothermic reduction or direct reduction of the oxide using a flux. Either method generates at least three times as much radioactively contaminated waste as metal produced. Plutonium concentration by DCHP precipitation, however, produces a chloride salt that can be reduced using calcium metal at a temperature of approximately 1000K. In this paper the advantages and limitations of this process are discussed

  6. Plutonium story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1981-09-01

    The first nuclear synthesis and identification (i.e., the discovery) of the synthetic transuranium element plutonium (isotope 238 Pu) and the demonstration of its fissionability with slow neutrons (isotope 239 Pu) took place at the University of California, Berkeley, through the use of the 60-inch and 37-inch cyclotrons, in late 1940 and early 1941. This led to the development of industrial scale methods in secret work centered at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory and the application of these methods to industrial scale production, at manufacturing plants in Tennessee and Washington, during the World War II years 1942 to 1945. The chemical properties of plutonium, needed to devise the procedures for its industrial scale production, were studied by tracer and ultramicrochemical methods during this period on an extraordinarily urgent basis. This work, and subsequent investigations on a worldwide basis, have made the properties of plutonium very well known. Its well studied electronic structure and chemical properties give it a very interesting position in the actinide series of inner transition elements

  7. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium fluoride reduction slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Rayburn, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    A process was developed for the pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from residues resulting from the PuF 4 reduction process. The process involves crushing the CaF 2 slag and dissolving it at 800 0 C in a CaCl 2 solvent. The plutonium, which exists either as finely divided metal or as incompletely reduced fluoride salt, is reduced to metal and/or allowed to coalesce as a massive button in the bottom of the reaction crucible. The recovery of plutonium in a 1-day cycle averaged 96%; all of the resulting residues were discardable

  8. TiO2/bone composite materials for the separation of heavy metal impurities from waste water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakroury, G.; Labib, Sh.; Abou El-Nour, F. H.

    2012-09-01

    Pure bone material obtained from cow meat, as apatite-rich material, and TiO2-bone composite materials are prepared and studied to be used for heavy metal ions separation from waste water solutions. Meat wastes are chemically and thermally treated to control their microstructure in order to prepare the composite materials that fulfill all the requirements to be used as selective membranes with high performance, stability and mechanical strength. The prepared materials are analyzed using Hg-porosimetry for surface characterization, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) for elemental analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) for chemical composition investigation. Structural studies are performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). Microstructural properties are studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and specific surface area studies are performed using Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) method. XRD studies show that multiphase structures are obtained as a result of 1h sintering at 700-1200 °C for both pure bone and TiO2-bone composite materials. The factors affecting the transport of different heavy metal ions through the selected membranes are determined from permeation flux measurements. It is found that membrane pore size, membrane surface roughness and membrane surface charge are the key parameters that control the transport or rejection of heavy metal ions through the selected membranes.

  9. Phenomenology of uranium-plutonium homogenization in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The uranium and plutonium cations distribution in mixed oxide fuels (U 1-y Pu y )O 2 with y ≤ 0.1 has been studied in laboratory with industrial fabrication methods. Our experiences has showed a slow cations migration. In the substoichiometry (UPu)O 2-x the diffusion is in connection with the plutonium valence which is an indicator of the oxidoreduction state of the crystal lattice. The plutonium valence is in connection with the oxygen ion deficit in order to compensate the electrical charge. The oxygen ratio of the solid depends of the oxygen partial pressure prevailing at the time of product elaboration but it can be modified by impurities. These impurities permit to increase or decrease the fuel characteristics and performances. An homogeneity analysis methodology is proposed, its objective is to classify the mixed oxide fuels according to the uranium and plutonium ions distribution [fr

  10. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-15

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

  11. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility

  12. Contribution to the study of metallic impurities diffusion in a polymer film (KAPTON) under and out of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, N.

    1995-01-01

    The main topic of this work is the diffusion behaviour in the polymer film Kapton, under and out of irradiation, of metallic coatings with different reactivity (copper, nickel, titanium) deposited by sputtering. The analysis of diffusion profiles has been performed by backscattering spectrometry, which, in association with cross-section microscopy, allows to connect the diffusion behaviour to the microscopic structure of the metal/Kapton interface. Generally speaking, the study under thermal annealing shows the importance of peculiarities of commercials polymers. In particular, additional elements they contain are liable to modify their surface characteristics and, as a consequence, diffusion. So, unlike observations in model polyimides, we show that even weakly reactive metals do not diffuse inside the polymer. Besides, there exists an energy threshold of Ar + used for sputtering, above which copper layers become very stable and so come up to industry's expectation. The study under irradiation gives evidence for copper diffusion under irradiation, resulting in 15 mn mean radius spherical clusters inside the modified polymer. This fast diffusion is shown to be due to the concomitant effect of nuclear collisions and temperature. This study is also the opportunity to show dramatic radiation-induced effects in Kapton, more particularly a large modification of mechanical and optical properties with the loss of more volatile elements (H, N,O). With regard to methodology, this study shows the strong ambiguity in the RBS spectrum interpretation in the case of lateral non-uniformity, and we propose a model giving access to the statistical distribution of the non-uniform property of the target. (author). 262 refs., 99 figs., 8 appends

  13. Process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremanns, R.H.; Vandersteene, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention concerns a process for recovery of plutonium from fabrication residues of mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide in the form of PuO 2 . Mixed fuels consisting of uranium oxide and plutonium oxide are being used more and more. The plants which prepare these mixed fuels have around 5% of the total mass of fuels as fabrication residue, either as waste or scrap. In view of the high cost of plutonium, it has been attempted to recover this plutonium from the fabrication residues by a process having a purchase price lower than the price of plutonium. The problem is essentially to separate the plutonium, the uranium and the impurities. The residues are fluorinated, the UF 6 and PuF 6 obtained are separated by selective absorption of the PuF 6 on NaF at a temperature of at least 400 0 C, the complex obtained by this absorption is dissolved in nitric acid solution, the plutonium is precipitated in the form of plutonium oxalate by adding oxalic acid, and the precipitated plutonium oxalate is calcined

  14. Modified titrimetric determination of plutonium using photometric end-point detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baughman, W.J.; Dahlby, J.W.

    1980-04-01

    A method used at LASL for the accurate and precise assay of plutonium metal was modified for the measurement of plutonium in plutonium oxides, nitrate solutions, and in other samples containing large quantities of plutonium in oxidized states higher than +3. In this modified method, the plutonium oxide or other sample is dissolved using the sealed-reflux dissolution method or other appropriate methods. Weighed aliquots, containing approximately 100 mg of plutonium, of the dissolved sample or plutonium nitrate solution are fumed to dryness with an HC1O 4 -H 2 SO 4 mixture. The dried residue is dissolved in dilute H 2 SO 4 , and the plutonium is reduced to plutonium (III) with zinc metal. The excess zinc metal is dissolved with HCl, and the solution is passed through a lead reductor column to ensure complete reduction of the plutonium to plutonium (III). The solution, with added ferroin indicator, is then titrated immediately with standardized ceric solution to a photometric end point. For the analysis of plutonium metal solutions, plutonium oxides, and nitrate solutions, the relative standard deviation are 0.06, 0.08, and 0.14%, respectively. Of the elements most likely to be found with the plutonium, only iron, neptunium, and uranium interfere. Small amounts of uranium and iron, which titrate quantitatively in the method, are determined by separate analytical methods, and suitable corrections are applied to the plutonium value. 4 tables, 4 figures

  15. Plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material

  16. SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, A.G.; Smith, F.

    1959-08-25

    A method is described for separating plutonium from uranium and fission products by treating a nitrate solution of fission products, uranium, and hexavalent plutonium with a relatively water-insoluble fluoride to adsorb fission products on the fluoride, treating the residual solution with a reducing agent for plutonium to reduce its valence to four and less, treating the reduced plutonium solution with a relatively insoluble fluoride to adsorb the plutonium on the fluoride, removing the solution, and subsequently treating the fluoride with its adsorbed plutonium with a concentrated aqueous solution of at least one of a group consisting of aluminum nitrate, ferric nitrate, and manganous nitrate to remove the plutonium from the fluoride.

  17. Disposing of the world's excess plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormick, J.M.; Bullen, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    The authors undertake three key objectives in addressing the issue of plutonium disposition at the end of the Cold War. First, the authors estimate the total global inventory of plutonium both from weapons dismantlement and civil nuclear power reactors. Second, they review past and current policy toward handling this metal by the US, Russia, and other key countries. Third, they evaluate the feasibility of several options (but especially the vitrification and mixed oxide fuel options announced by the Clinton administration) for disposing of the increasing amounts of plutonium available today. To undertake this analysis, the authors consider both the political and scientific problems confronting policymakers in dealing with this global plutonium issue. Interview data with political and technical officials in Washington and at the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna, Austria, and empirical inventory data on plutonium from a variety of sources form the basis of their analysis

  18. Sodium sampling and impurities determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, J.; Kovar, C.; Stuchlik, S.

    1980-01-01

    Samples may be obtained from tubes in-built in the sodium facility and further processed or they are taken into crucibles, stored and processed later. Another sampling method is a method involving vacuum distillation of sodium, thus concentrating impurities. Oxygen is determined by malgamation, distillation or vanadium balance methods. Hydrogen is determined by the metal diaphragm extraction, direct extraction or amalgamation methods. Carbon is determined using dry techniques involving burning a sodium sample at 1100 degC or using wet techniques by dissolving the sample with an acid. Trace amounts of metal impurities are determined after dissolving sodium in ethanol. The trace metals are concentrated and sodium excess is removed. (M.S.)

  19. Selecting a plutonium vitrification process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jouan, A. [Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    1996-05-01

    Vitrification of plutonium is one means of mitigating its potential danger. This option is technically feasible, even if it is not the solution advocated in France. Two situations are possible, depending on whether or not the glass matrix also contains fission products; concentrations of up to 15% should be achievable for plutonium alone, whereas the upper limit is 3% in the presence of fission products. The French continuous vitrification process appears to be particularly suitable for plutonium vitrification: its capacity is compatible with the required throughout, and the compact dimensions of the process equipment prevent a criticality hazard. Preprocessing of plutonium metal, to convert it to PuO{sub 2} or to a nitric acid solution, may prove advantageous or even necessary depending on whether a dry or wet process is adopted. The process may involve a single step (vitrification of Pu or PuO{sub 2} mixed with glass frit) or may include a prior calcination step - notably if the plutonium is to be incorporated into a fission product glass. It is important to weigh the advantages and drawbacks of all the possible options in terms of feasibility, safety and cost-effectiveness.

  20. Rapid limit tests for metal impurities in pharmaceutical materials by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy using wavelet transform filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhantsev, Sergey; Li, Xiang; Kauffman, John F

    2011-02-01

    We introduce a new method for analysis of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra based on continuous wavelet transform filters, and the method is applied to the determination of toxic metals in pharmaceutical materials using hand-held XRF spectrometers. The method uses the continuous wavelet transform to filter the signal and noise components of the spectrum. We present a limit test that compares the wavelet domain signal-to-noise ratios at the energies of the elements of interest to an empirically determined signal-to-noise decision threshold. The limit test is advantageous because it does not require the user to measure calibration samples prior to measurement, though system suitability tests are still recommended. The limit test was evaluated in a collaborative study that involved five different hand-held XRF spectrometers used by multiple analysts in six separate laboratories across the United States. In total, more than 1200 measurements were performed. The detection limits estimated for arsenic, lead, mercury, and chromium were 8, 14, 20, and 150 μg/g, respectively.

  1. Preparation standardisation and use of plutonium nitrate reference solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.L.; Drummond, J.L.

    1981-07-01

    A procedure is described for the purification of a plutonium nitrate solution in nitric acid for use as a plutonium master standard. Anion exchange chromatography followed by oxalate precipitation is used to purify the plutonium and the residual cationic impurities are analysed by emission spectroscopy. The plutonium content is accurately and precisely measured by two independent methods, namely by gravimetry as PuO 2 at 1250 0 C and by ceric oxidation, ferrous reduction and dichromate titration. Full details of the purification procedure are given, with recommended methods for storing and using the standard solution. It is concluded that such a solution is the most satisfactory reference material, available for plutonium analysis for reprocessing plants, and is adequately related to other, internationally accepted, standard reference materials. (author)

  2. Alternative technical summary report for direct disposition in deep boreholes: Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound canisters, Version 4.0. Fissile Materials Disposition Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1996-08-23

    This report summarizes and compares the Immobilized and Direct Beep Borehole Disposition Alternatives. The important design concepts, facility features and operational procedures are briefly described, and a discussion of the issues that affect the evaluation of each alternative against the programmatic assessment criteria that have been established for selecting the preferred alternatives for plutonium disposition.

  3. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide powders and pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium Sample Handling 8 to 10 Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Ceric Sulfate Titration Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Nitrogen by Distillation Spectrophotometry Using Nessler Reagent 11 to 18 Carbon (Total) by Direct Combustion–Thermal Conductivity 19 to 30 Total Chlorine and Fluorine by Pyrohydrolysis 31 to 38 Sulfur by Distillation Spectrophotometry 39 to 47 Plutonium Isotopic Analysis by Mass Spectrometry Rare Earth Elements by Spectroscopy 48 to 55 Trace Elements by Carrier–Distillation Spectroscopy 56 to 63 Impurities by ICP-AES Impurity Elements by Spark-Source Mass Spectrography 64 to 70 Moisture by the Coulomet...

  4. PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION PROCESS EMPLOYING THORIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CARRIER

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.L.

    1959-04-28

    The separation and purification of plutonium from the radioactive elements of lower atomic weight is described. The process of this invention comprises forming a 0.5 to 2 M aqueous acidffc solution containing plutonium fons in the tetravalent state and elements with which it is normally contaminated in neutron irradiated uranium, treating the solution with a double thorium compound and a soluble pyrophosphate compound (Na/sub 4/P/sub 2/O/sub 7/) whereby a carrier precipitate of thorium A method is presented of reducing neptunium and - trite is advantageous since it destroys any hydrazine f so that they can be removed from solutions in which they are contained is described. In the carrier precipitation process for the separation of plutonium from uranium and fission products including zirconium and columbium, the precipitated blsmuth phosphate carries some zirconium, columbium, and uranium impurities. According to the invention such impurities can be complexed and removed by dissolving the contaminated carrier precipitate in 10M nitric acid, followed by addition of fluosilicic acid to about 1M, diluting the solution to about 1M in nitric acid, and then adding phosphoric acid to re-precipitate bismuth phosphate carrying plutonium.

  5. Zirconolite glass-ceramics for plutonium immobilization: The effects of processing redox conditions on charge compensation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingjie, E-mail: yzx@ansto.gov.au; Gregg, Daniel J.; Kong, Linggen; Jovanovich, Miodrag; Triani, Gerry

    2017-07-15

    Zirconolite glass-ceramic samples doped with plutonium have been prepared via hot isostatic pressing. The effects of processing redox and plutonium loadings on plutonium valences, the presence of cation vacancies, zirconolite phase compositions, microstructures and durability have been investigated. Either tetravalent or trivalent plutonium ions may be incorporated on the Ca-site of CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} zirconolite with the Ca-site cation vacancies and the incorporation of Al{sup 3+} ions on the Ti-site for charge compensation. Plutonium and gadolinium (as a neutron absorber) are predominantly partitioned in zirconolite phases leading to the formation of chemically durable glass-ceramics suitable for the immobilization of impure plutonium wastes arising from the nuclear fuel cycle. - Highlights: •Plutonium validations of zirconolite glass-ceramics. •Effects of processing redox and plutonium loading. •Zirconolite phase compositions and plutonium valences. •Cation vacancies and chemical durability.

  6. Plutonium production and utilization forecasts in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijtink, B.

    1976-01-01

    The planned accelerated growth of nuclear energy generation in the near future will lead to a large production of plutonium in the thermal reactors. Therefore, up to 1985, the major part of the available plutonium will be plutonium recovered from spent uranium-metal, particularly in the United Kingdom and in France. Because of the low demand for fuelling the fast breeder reactors within the near future, a surplus of fissile plutonium will be accumulated in Europe. Even if the planned availability of the oxide reprocessing capacity will be delayed with two or three years, a plutonium surplus will still exist in Europe, e.g.; in 1985: 25-20 tons. On longer term, up to 2000, the plutonium production in thermal reactors will be sufficient to meet the estimated demand for fast breeder reactors at their commercial introduction foreseen for the nineties. That means that all the plutonium surplus needs not to be stocked for use in fast breeder reactors later on but could be recycled in thermal reactors. The magnitude of the available fissionable materials give an idea of the importance to promote, on an industrial scale, the plutonium recycling technology

  7. Plutonium-239

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammerich, Marc; Frot, Patricia; Gambini, Denis-Jean; Gauron, Christine; Moureaux, Patrick; Herbelet, Gilbert; Lahaye, Thierry; Pihet, Pascal; Rannou, Alain

    2014-06-01

    This sheet belongs to a collection which relates to the use of radionuclides essentially in unsealed sources. Its goal is to gather on a single document the most relevant information as well as the best prevention practices to be implemented. These sheets are made for the persons in charge of radiation protection: users, radioprotection-skill persons, labor physicians. Each sheet treats of: 1 - the radio-physical and biological properties; 2 - the main uses; 3 - the dosimetric parameters; 4 - the measurement; 5 - the protection means; 6 - the areas delimitation and monitoring; 7 - the personnel classification, training and monitoring; 8 - the effluents and wastes; 9 - the authorization and declaration administrative procedures; 10 - the transport; and 11 - the right conduct to adopt in case of incident or accident. This sheet deals specifically with Plutonium-239

  8. Spectrographic analysis of plutonium (1960); L'analyse spectrographique du plutonium (1960)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artaud, J; Chaput, M; Robichet, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    Various possibilities for the spectrographic determination of impurities in plutonium are considered. The application of the 'copper spark' method, of sparking on graphite and of fractional distillation in the arc are described and discussed in some detail (apparatus, accessories, results obtained). (author) [French] On examine diverses possibilites pour le dosage spectrographique des impuretes dans le plutonium. On decrit et discute plus particulierement de l'application des methodes 'copper spark', de l'etincelage sur graphite et de la distillation fractionnee dans l'arc (montages, accessoires, resultats obtenus). (auteur)

  9. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, Mary Patricia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pKas and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pKa = 5.94, logβ120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pKa = 9.34, logβ120 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ120 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods.

  10. Coordination chemistry of two heavy metals: I, Ligand preferences in lead(II) complexation, toward the development of therapeutic agents for lead poisoning: II, Plutonium solubility and speciation relevant to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.P.

    1993-11-01

    The coordination chemistry and solution behavior of the toxic ions lead(II) and plutonium(IV, V, VI) have been investigated. The ligand pK a s and ligand-lead(II) stability constants of one hydroxamic acid and four thiohydroaxamic acids were determined. Solution thermodynamic results indicate that thiohydroxamic acids are more acidic and slightly better lead chelators than hydroxamates, e.g., N-methylthioaceto-hydroxamic acid, pK a = 5.94, logβ 120 = 10.92; acetohydroxamic acid, pK a = 9.34, logβ l20 = 9.52. The syntheses of lead complexes of two bulky hydroxamate ligands are presented. The X-ray crystal structures show the lead hydroxamates are di-bridged dimers with irregular five-coordinate geometry about the metal atom and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. Molecular orbital calculations of a lead hydroxamate and a highly symmetric pseudo octahedral lead complex were performed. The thermodynamic stability of plutonium(IV) complexes of the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO), and two octadentate derivatives of DFO were investigated using competition spectrophotometric titrations. The stability constant measured for the plutonium(IV) complex of DFO-methylterephthalamide is logβ 110 = 41.7. The solubility limited speciation of 242 Pu as a function of time in near neutral carbonate solution was measured. Individual solutions of plutonium in a single oxidation state were added to individual solutions at pH = 6.0, T = 30.0, 1.93 mM dissolved carbonate, and sampled over intervals up to 150 days. Plutonium solubility was measured, and speciation was investigated using laser photoacoustic spectroscopy and chemical methods

  11. Solubility of plutonium dioxide aerosols, in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, G.J.; Kanapilly, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Solubility of plutonium aerosols is an important parameter in establishing risk estimates for industrial workers who might accidentally inhale these materials and in evaluating environmental health impacts associated with Pu. In vitro solubility of industrial plutonium aerosols in a simulated lung fluid is compared to similar studies with ultrafine aerosols from laser ignition of delta phase plutonium metal and laboratory-produced spherical particles of 238 PuO 2 and 239 PuO 2 . Although relatively insoluble, industrial plutonium-mixed oxide aerosols were much more soluble than laboratory-produced plutonium dioxide particles. Chain agglomerate aerosols from laser ignition of metallic Pu indicated in vitro dissolution half-times of 10 and 50 days for activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) of 0.7 and 2.3 μm, respectively. Plutonium-containing mixed oxide aerosols indicated dissolution half-times of 40 to 500 days for particles formed by industrial powder comminution and blending. Centerless grinding of fuel pellets yielded plutonium-containing aerosols with dissolution half-times of 1200 to 8000 days. All mixed oxide particles were in the size range 1.0 μm to 2.5 μm AMAD

  12. Plutonium speciation affected by environmental bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neu, M.P.; Icopini, G.A.; Boukhalfa, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plutonium has no known biological utility, yet it has the potential to interact with bacterial cellular and extracellular structures that contain metal-binding groups, to interfere with the uptake and utilization of essential elements, and to alter cell metabolism. These interactions can transform plutonium from its most common forms, solid, mineral-adsorbed, or colloidal Pu(IV), to a variety of biogeochemical species that have much different physico-chemical properties. Organic acids that are extruded products of cell metabolism can solubilize plutonium and then enhance its environmental mobility, or in some cases facilitate plutonium transfer into cells. Phosphate- and carboxylate-rich polymers associated with cell walls can bind plutonium to form mobile biocolloids or Pu-laden biofilm/mineral solids. Bacterial membranes, proteins or redox agents can produce strongly reducing electrochemical zones and generate molecular Pu(III/IV) species or oxide particles. Alternatively, they can oxidize plutonium to form soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) complexes. This paper reviews research on plutonium-bacteria interactions and closely related studies on the biotransformation of uranium and other metals. (orig.)

  13. Safe disposal of surplus plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, W. L.; Naz, S.; Lutze, W.; Busch, R.; Prinja, A.; Stoll, W.

    2001-06-01

    About 150 tons of weapons grade and weapons usable plutonium (metal, oxide, and in residues) have been declared surplus in the USA and Russia. Both countries plan to convert the metal and oxide into mixed oxide fuel for nuclear power reactors. Russia has not yet decided what to do with the residues. The US will convert residues into a ceramic, which will then be over-poured with highly radioactive borosilicate glass. The radioactive glass is meant to provide a deterrent to recovery of plutonium, as required by a US standard. Here we show a waste form for plutonium residues, zirconia/boron carbide (ZrO 2/B 4C), with an unprecedented combination of properties: a single, radiation-resistant, and chemically durable phase contains the residues; billion-year-old natural analogs are available; and criticality safety is given under all conceivable disposal conditions. ZrO 2/B 4C can be disposed of directly, without further processing, making it attractive to all countries facing the task of plutonium disposal. The US standard for protection against recovery can be met by disposal of the waste form together with used reactor fuel.

  14. The plutonium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.; Ang, K.P.

    1975-01-01

    The quantities of plutonium and other fuel actinides have been calculated for equilibrium fuel cycles for 1000-MW water reactors fueled with slightly enriched uranium, water reactors fueled with plutonium and natural uranium, fast-breder reactors, gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium and highly enriched uranium, and gas-cooled reactors fueled with thorium, plutonium and recycled uranium. The radioactivity quantities of plutonium, americium and curium processed yearly in these fuel cycles are greatest for the water reactors fueled with natural uranium and recycled plutonium. The total amount of actinides processed is calculated for the predicted future growth of the U.S. nuclear power industry. For the same total installed nuclear power capacity, the introduction of the plutonium breeder has little effect upon the total amount of plutonium in this century. The estimated amount of plutonium in the low-level process wastes in the plutonium fuel cycles is comparable to the amount of plutonium in the high-level fission product wastes. The amount of plutonium processed in the nuclear fuel cycles can be considerably reduced by using gas-cooled reactors to consume plutonium produced in uranium-fueled water reactors. These, and other reactors dedicated for plutonium utilization, could be co-located with facilities for fuel reprocessing ad fuel fabrication to eliminate the off-site transport of separated plutonium. (author)

  15. The handling of plutonium hexafluoride (1962); Manipulation de l'hexafluorure de plutonium (1962)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berard, Ph [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-11-15

    The major problem posed in this work is the instability of plutonium hexafluoride. The influence of various factors on the decomposition of the fluoride has been studied: physical aspect of the walls, nature of the metal and its pretreatment, influence of the temperature. A means of detecting plutonium-239 in a metallic apparatus by {gamma}-ray counting has been developed; the sensitivity is of the order of half a milligram, but the precision is very low (about 50 per cent). Yields of over 95 per cent have been obtained for the transfer of plutonium during the preparation and sublimation of the hexafluoride. This study confirms the possibility of using plutonium hexafluoride for the extraction of plutonium from irradiated fuel elements by a dry method. (author) [French] Le probleme majeur de cette etude a ete l'instabilite de l'hexafluorure de plutonium. Nous avons etudie l'influence de divers facteurs sur la decomposition de l'hexafluorure: aspect physique des parois, nature du metal et de son pretraitement, influence de la temperature. Nous avons mis au point un mode de detection du plutonium-239 dans un appareillage metallique par comptage du rayonnement {gamma}; la sensibilite est de l'ordre du demi-milligramme, mais la precision est tres faible (50 pour cent environ). Nous avons obtenu des rendements depassant 95 pour cent dans le transfert du plutonium au cours de la fabrication et de la sublimation de l'hexafluorure. Cette etude confirme la possibilite d'utiliser l'hexafluorure de plutonium dans l'extraction du plutonium des combustibles irradies par voie seche. (auteur)

  16. Destructive analysis capabilities for plutonium and uranium characterization at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Lav; Kuhn, Kevin J.; Drake, Lawrence R.; Decker, Diana L.; Walker, Laurie F.; Colletti, Lisa M.; Spencer, Khalil J.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Herrera, Jaclyn A.; Wong, Amy S.

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL) Actinide Analytical Chemistry (AAC) group has been in existence since the Manhattan Project. It maintains a complete set of analytical capabilities for performing complete characterization (elemental assay, isotopic, metallic and non metallic trace impurities) of uranium and plutonium samples in different forms. For a majority of the customers there are strong quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) objectives including highest accuracy and precision with well defined uncertainties associated with the analytical results. Los Alamos participates in various international and national programs such as the Plutonium Metal Exchange Program, New Brunswick Laboratory's (NBL' s) Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program (SME) and several other inter-laboratory round robin exercises to monitor and evaluate the data quality generated by AAC. These programs also provide independent verification of analytical measurement capabilities, and allow any technical problems with analytical measurements to be identified and corrected. This presentation will focus on key analytical capabilities for destructive analysis in AAC and also comparative data between LANL and peer groups for Pu assay and isotopic analysis.

  17. Reclamation of plutonium from pyrochemical processing residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Gray, J.H.; Holcomb, H.P.; Chostner, D.F.

    1987-04-01

    Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have jointly developed a process to recover plutonium from molten salt extraction residues. These NaCl, KCL, and MgCl 2 residues, which are generated in the pyrochemical extraction of 241 Am from aged plutonium metal, contain up to 25 wt % dissolved plutonium and up to 2 wt % americium. The overall objective was to develop a process to convert these residues to a pure plutonium metal product and discardable waste. To meet this objective a combination of pyrochemical and aqueous unit operations was used. The first step was to scrub the salt residue with a molten metal (aluminum and magnesium) to form a heterogeneous ''scrub alloy'' containing nominally 25 wt % plutonium. This unit operation, performed at RFP, effectively separated the actinides from the bulk of the chloride salts. After packaging in aluminum cans, the ''scrub alloy'' was then dissolved in a nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid - mercuric nitrate solution at SRP. Residual chloride was separated from the dissolver solution by precipitation with Hg 2 (NO 3 ) 2 followed by centrifuging. Plutonium was then separated from the aluminum, americium and magnesium using the Purex solvent extraction system. The 241 Am was diverted to the waste tank farm, but could be recovered if desired

  18. Simulation and control synthesis for a pulse column separation system for plutonium--uranium recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCutcheon, E.B.

    1975-05-01

    Control of a plutonium-uranium partitioning column was studied using a mathematical model developed to simulate the dynamic response and to test postulated separation mechanisms. The column is part of a plutonium recycle flowsheet developed for the recovery of plutonium and uranium from metallurgical scrap. In the first step of the process, decontamination from impurities is achieved by coextracting plutonium and uranium in their higher oxidation states. In the second step, reduction of the plutonium to a lower oxidation state allows partitioning of the plutonium and uranium. The use of hydroxylamine for the plutonium reduction in this partitioning column is a unique feature of the process. The extraction operations are carried out in pulse columns. (U.S.)

  19. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from calcium fluoride reduction slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, D.C.

    A pyrochemical method of recovering finely dispersed plutonium metal from calcium fluoride reduction slag is claimed. The plutonium-bearing slag is crushed and melted in the presence of at least an equimolar amount of calcium chloride and a few percent metallic calcium. The calcium chloride reduces the melting point and thereby decreases the viscosity of the molten mixture. The calcium reduces any oxidized plutonium in the mixture and also causes the dispersed plutonium metal to coalesce and settle out as a separate metallic phase at the bottom of the reaction vessel. Upon cooling the mixture to room temperature, the solid plutonium can be cleanly separated from the overlying solid slag, with an average recovery yield on the order of 96 percent.

  20. EXAFS and XANES analysis of plutonium and cerium edges from titanate ceramics for fissile materials disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortner, J. A.; Kropf, A. J.; Bakel, A. J.; Hash, M. C.; Aase, S. B.; Buck, E. C.; Chamerlain, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    We report x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra from the plutonium L III edge and XANES from the cerium L II edge in prototype titanate ceramic hosts. The titanate ceramics studied are based upon the hafnium-pyrochlore and zirconolite mineral structures and will serve as an immobilization host for surplus fissile materials, containing as much as 10 weight % fissile plutonium and 20 weight % (natural or depleted) uranium. Three ceramic formulations were studied: one employed cerium as a ''surrogate'' element, replacing both plutonium and uranium in the ceramic matrix, another formulation contained plutonium in a ''baseline'' ceramic formulation, and a third contained plutonium in a formulation representing a high-impurity plutonium stream. The cerium XANES from the surrogate ceramic clearly indicates a mixed III-IV oxidation state for the cerium. In contrast, XANES analysis of the two plutonium-bearing ceramics shows that the plutonium is present almost entirely as Pu(IV) and occupies the calcium site in the zirconolite and pyrochlore phases. The plutonium EXAFS real-space structure shows a strong second-shell peak, clearly distinct from that of PuO 2 , with remarkably little difference in the plutonium crystal chemistry indicated between the baseline and high-impurity formulations

  1. Technical report for generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can be dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C

  2. Plutonium oxide dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Several processing options for dissolving plutonium oxide (PuO 2 ) from high-fired materials have been studied. The scoping studies performed on these options were focused on PuO 2 typically generated by burning plutonium metal and PuO 2 produced during incineration of alpha contaminated waste. At least two processing options remain applicable for dissolving high-fired PuO 2 in canyon dissolvers. The options involve solid solution formation of PuO 2 With uranium oxide (UO 2 ) and alloying incinerator ash with aluminum. An oxidative dissolution process involving nitric acid solutions containing a strong oxidizing agent, such as cerium (IV), was neither proven nor rejected. This uncertainty was due to difficulty in regenerating cerium (IV) ions during dissolution. However, recent work on silver-catalyzed dissolution of PuO 2 with persulfate has demonstrated that persulfate ions regenerate silver (II). Use of persulfate to regenerate cerium (IV) or bismuth (V) ions during dissolution of PuO 2 materials may warrant further study

  3. Plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traube, K.

    1984-01-01

    The author expresses his opinion on the situation, describes the energy-economic setting, indicates the alternatives: fuel reprocessing or immediate long-term storage, and investigates the prospects for economic utilization of the breeder reactors. All the facts suggest that the breeder reactor will never be able to stand economic competition with light-water reactors. However, there is no way to prove the future. It is naive to think that every doubt could and must be removed before stopping the development of breeder reactors - and thus also the reprocessing of the fuel of light-water reactors. On the basis of the current state of knowledge an unbiased cost-benefit-analysis can only lead to the recommendation to stop construction immediately. But can 'experts', who for years or even decades have called for and supported the development of breeder reactors be expected to make an unbiased analysis. Klaus Traube strikes the balance of the state Germany's nuclear economy is in: although there is no chance of definitively abandoning that energy-political cul-de-sac, no new adventures must be embarked upon. Responsible handling of currently used nuclear technology means to give up breeder technology and waive plutonium economy. It is no supreme technology with the aid of which structural unemployment or any other economic problem could be solved. (orig.) [de

  4. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. Volume 2 contains the appendices to the report and describe the following: Federal Register notices; contractor nondisclosure statement; adjunct melter

  5. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  6. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism

  7. Plutonium Finishing Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Plutonium Finishing Plant, also known as PFP, represented the end of the line (the final procedure) associated with plutonium production at Hanford.PFP was also...

  8. Plutonium biokinetics in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popplewell, D.; Ham, G.; McCarthy, W.; Lands, C.

    1994-01-01

    By using an 'unusual' isotope it is possible to carry out experiments with plutonium in volunteers at minimal radiation dose levels. Measurements have been made of the gut transfer factor and the urinary excretion of plutonium after intravenous injection. (author)

  9. Plutonium in uranium deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.; Aguilar, R.; Attrep, M. Jr.; Roensch, F.

    1992-01-01

    Plutonium-239 (t 1/2 , 24,100 yr) is one of the most persistent radioactive constituents of high-level wastes from nuclear fission power reactors. Effective containment of such a long-lived constituent will rely heavily upon its containment by the geologic environment of a repository. Uranium ore deposits offer a means to evaluate the geochemical properties of plutonium under natural conditions. In this paper, analyses of natural plutonium in several ores are compared to calculated plutonium production rates in order to evaluate the degree of retention of plutonium by the ore. The authors find that current methods for estimating production rates are neither sufficiently accurate nor precise to provide unambiguous measures of plutonium retention. However, alternative methods for evaluating plutonium mobility are being investigated, including its measurement in natural ground waters. Preliminary results are reported and establish the foundation for a comprehensive characterization of plutonium geochemistry in other natural environments

  10. Plutonium Training Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wolkov, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report was created to examine the current state of plutonium training in the United States and to discover ways in which to ensure that the next generation of plutonium workers are fully qualified.

  11. Method to manufacture a nuclear fuel from uranium-plutonium monocarbide or uranium-plutonium mononitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauth, A.; Mueller, N.

    1977-01-01

    Pure uranium carbide or nitride is converted with plutonium oxide and carbon (all in powder form) to uranium-plutonium monocarbide or mononitride by cold pressing and sintering at about 1600 0 C. Pure uranium carbide or uranium nitride powder is firstly prepared without extensive safety measures. The pure uranium carbide or nitride powder can also be inactivated by using chemical substances (e.g. stearic acid) and be handled in air. The sinterable uranium carbide or nitride powder (or also granulate) is then introduced into the plutonium line and mixed with a nonstoichiometrically adjusted, prereacted mixture of plutonium oxide and carbon, pressed to pellets and reaction sintered. The surface of the uranium-plutonium carbide (higher metal content) can be nitrated towards the end of the sinter process in a stream of nitrogen. The protective layer stabilizes the carbide against the water and oxygen content in air. (IHOE) [de

  12. Optimization and plutonium equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    The sequential simplex method has been used to estimate the extent of disproportionation of tetravalent plutonium in dilute acid. A method for simulating potentiometric titrations is proposed, and this method suggests that the stoichiometric end point and the inflection point may not always correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium. A possible characteristic equation for the nitrite-plutonium reaction is illustrated, and the method of proportional equations is extended to the iron-plutonium reaction

  13. Incorporation, diffusion and segregation of impurities in polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, J.P.; Soltani, M.L. (Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Quesada, J. (Laboratoire de Metallurgie-Chimie des Materiaux, E.N.S.A.I.S., 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1982-01-01

    We studied by means of X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy the nature, distribution and, when possible, the chemical bond of impurities at the surface of polycrystalline silicon samples grown on a carbon ribbon. Besides main impurities (carbon and oxygen), always present at concentrations around their limit of solubility in silicon, metal impurities have been found: their nature varies from one sample to another. Their spatial distribution is not random: some are strictly confined at the surface (sodium), whereas others are in the superficial oxidized layer (calcium, magnesium) or localized at the oxide-bulk silicon interface (iron). Metal impurities are coming from the carbon ribbon and are incorporated to silicon during the growth process. It is not yet possible to give a model of diffusion processes of impurities since they are too numerous and interact one with the other. However oxygen seems to play a leading role in the spatial distribution of metal impurities.

  14. Magnetic states of single impurity in disordered environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Ponedilok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged and magnetic states of isolated impurities dissolved in amorphous metallic alloy are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the system under study is the generalization of Anderson impurity model. Namely, the processes of elastic and non-elastic scattering of conductive electrons on the ions of a metal and on a charged impurity are included. The configuration averaged one-particle Green's functions are obtained within Hartree-Fock approximation. A system of self-consistent equations is given for calculation of an electronic spectrum, the charged and the spin-polarized impurity states. Qualitative analysis of the effect of the metallic host structural disorder on the observed values is performed. Additional shift and broadening of virtual impurity level is caused by a structural disorder of impurity environment.

  15. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques with liquid photographic emulsion and cellulose nitrate track-etch film are being used to investigate the spatial distribution of inhaled plutonium in the lungs of beagle dogs exposed to cigarette smoke or to the plutonium aerosol only. More plutonium than expected was detected on the inner surfaces of bronchi, and particles were observed beneath the bronchial mucosa. 2 figures, 2 tables

  16. Optimizing Plutonium stock management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niquil, Y.; Guillot, J.

    1997-01-01

    Plutonium from spent fuel reprocessing is reused in new MOX assemblies. Since plutonium isotopic composition deteriorates with time, it is necessary to optimize plutonium stock management over a long period, to guarantee safe procurement, and contribute to a nuclear fuel cycle policy at the lowest cost. This optimization is provided by the prototype software POMAR

  17. Analysis and characterization of plutonium in pyrochemical salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, John M.; Phillips, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of hydrogen produced during salt-catalyzed hydrolysis of plutonium in pyrochemical salt residues show that the metal is present in concentrations of 10 ± 5 mass%. The analytical method is based on stoichiometric reaction of metal with water to form plutonium monoxide monohydride (PuOH) and hydrogen. Results of a kinetic model developed to describe the observed time dependence of the hydrolysis rate shows that metal is present predominately as particles with essentially spherical geometries and diameters near 1 mm. The presence of smaller metallic particles cannot be verified or excluded. Plutonium concentrations measured for residues stored in different configurations suggest that a sizable fraction of the metal has oxidized during storage. Application of the hydrolysis method in determining concentrations and dimensions of metallic plutonium in other nuclear waste forms is proposed

  18. Uranium plutonium oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, C.M.; Leggett, R.D.; Weber, E.T.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium plutonium oxide is the principal fuel material for liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR's) throughout the world. Development of this material has been a reasonably straightforward evolution from the UO 2 used routinely in the light water reactor (LWR's); but, because of the lower neutron capture cross sections and much lower coolant pressures in the sodium cooled LMFBR's, the fuel is operated to much higher discharge exposures than that of a LWR. A typical LMFBR fuel assembly is shown. Depending on the required power output and the configuration of the reactor, some 70 to 400 such fuel assemblies are clustered to form the core. There is a wide variation in cross section and length of the assemblies where the increasing size reflects a chronological increase in plant size and power output as well as considerations of decreasing the net fuel cycle cost. Design and performance characteristics are described

  19. Plutonium economy. Plutonium-Wirtschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traube, K

    1984-01-01

    The author expresses his opinion on the situation, describes the energy-economic setting, indicates the alternatives: fuel reprocessing or immediate long-term storage, and investigates the prospects for economic utilization of the breeder reactors. All the facts suggest that the breeder reactor will never be able to stand economic competition with light-water reactors. However, there is no way to prove the future. It is naive to think that every doubt could and must be removed before stopping the development of breeder reactors - and thus also the reprocessing of the fuel of light-water reactors. On the basis of the current state of knowledge an unbiased cost-benefit-analysis can only lead to the recommendation to stop construction immediately. But can 'experts', who for years or even decades have called for and supported the development of breeder reactors be expected to make an unbiased analysis. Klaus Traube strikes the balance of the state Germany's nuclear economy is in: although there is no chance of definitively abandoning that energy-political cul-de-sac, no new adventures must be embarked upon. Responsible handling of currently used nuclear technology means to give up breeder technology and waive plutonium economy. It is no supreme technology with the aid of which structural unemployment or any other economic problem could be solved.

  20. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Couture, P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Morris, W.

    1987-01-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Z eff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n met /n e ≅ 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm 3 , consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft X-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6x10 10 and 10x10 10 particles/cm 2 s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3x10 12 and 1x10 12 particles/cm 2 s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained. (orig.)

  1. The first metallurgical tests on plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, E.; Abramson, R.; Anselin, F.; Monti, H.

    1958-01-01

    Metallic plutonium was first prepared in France in January 1956, as soon as we had access to quantities of the order of several grams of plutonium, which had been extracted from the rods of the pile EL2 at Saclay. Since up to the present this reactor, of thermal power 2 000 kW, has been our only source of plutonium, we have so far only worked on experimental quantities sufficient for the basic tests but not for tests on a scale of possible applications. It is this work, carried out during this phase of preliminary research, which is described below. With the starting up of the plutonium extraction plant at Marcoule, where the reactor G1 has been operating at power for more than a year, we shall go on next to a another order of magnitude which will allow the manufacture and experimentation of prototype fuel elements. (author) [fr

  2. The plutonium society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mez, L.; Richter, M.

    1981-01-01

    The lectures of an institute are reported on, which took place between 25th and 27th January 1980 in Berlin. The subsequent public panel discussion with representations from the political parties is then documentated in a few press-reports. The themes of the 8 lectures are: views and facts on plutonium, plutonium as an energy resource, military aspects of the production of plutonium, economic aspects of the plutonium economy, the position of the trade unions on the industrial reconversion, the alleged inevitability of a plutonium society and the socio-political alternatives and perspectives of nuclear waste disposal. (UA) [de

  3. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel

  4. Diffusion in the uranium - plutonium system and self-diffusion of plutonium in epsilon phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, M.

    1967-07-01

    A survey of uranium-plutonium phase diagram leads to confirm anglo-saxon results about the plutonium solubility in α uranium (15 per cent at 565 C) and the uranium one in ζ phase (74 per cent at 565 C). Interdiffusion coefficients, for concentration lower than 15 per cent had been determined in a temperature range from 410 C to 640 C. They vary between 0.2 and 6 10 12 cm 2 s -1 , and the activation energy between 13 and 20 kcal/mole. Grain boundary, diffusion of plutonium in a uranium had been pointed out by micrography, X-ray microanalysis and α autoradiography. Self-diffusion of plutonium in ε phase (bcc) obeys Arrhenius law: D = 2. 10 -2 exp -(18500)/RT. But this activation energy does not follow empirical laws generally accepted for other metals. It has analogies with 'anomalous' bcc metals (βZr, βTi, βHf, U γ ). (author) [fr

  5. Influence of the rate of filtration of a complexly alloyed nickel melt through a foam-ceramic filter on the sulfur impurity content in the metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, V. V.; Min, P. G.; Folomeikin, Yu. I.; Vadeev, V. E.

    2015-06-01

    The article discusses the possibility of additional refining of a complexly alloyed nickel melt from a sulfur impurity by decreasing the filtration rate during the passage of the melt through a foam-ceramic filter. The degree of sulfur removal from the melt is shown to depend on its content in the alloy and the melt filtration rate.

  6. The use of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, W.

    1980-01-01

    The use of plutonium as a vital energy source producing maximum economic benefit with minimum proliferation risks is discussed. Having considered the production of plutonium, several possible plutonium fuel cycle options are identified and the economic value to be attached to plutonium for each examined. It is shown how the use of plutonium in fast reactors gives an opportunity for a non-proliferation policy not available when plutonium is used only in thermal reactors. From the technical considerations reviewed concerning plutonium and fast reactors it is shown that an economic regime involving international trade in spent thermal reactor fuel is possible which benefits equally those countries with fast reactors and those without and also assists in avoiding the proliferation of nuclear weapons. (U.K.)

  7. 75 FR 41850 - Amended Notice of Intent to Modify the Scope of the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... and packaging capabilities, including direct metal oxidation, to fulfill plutonium storage..., disassemble nuclear weapons pits (a weapons component) and convert the plutonium metal to an oxide form for fabrication into mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) reactor fuel in the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility...

  8. Plutonium in nature; Le plutonium dans la nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madic, C.

    1994-12-31

    Plutonium in nature comes from natural sources and anthropogenic ones. Plutonium at the earth surface comes principally from anthropogenic sources. It is easily detectable in environment. The plutonium behaviour in environment is complex. It seems necessary for the future to reduce releases in environment, to improve predictive models of plutonium behaviour in geosphere, to precise biological impact of anthropogenic plutonium releases.

  9. Robotic sample preparation for radiochemical plutonium and americium analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalnaker, N.; Beugelsdijk, T.; Thurston, A.; Quintana, J.

    1985-01-01

    A Zymate robotic system has been assembled and programmed to prepare samples for plutonium and americium analyses by radioactivity counting. The system performs two procedures: a simple dilution procedure and a TTA (xylene) extraction of plutonium. To perform the procedures, the robotic system executes 11 unit operations such as weighing, pipetting, mixing, etc. Approximately 150 programs, which require 64 kilobytes of memory, control the system. The system is now being tested with high-purity plutonium metal and plutonium oxide samples. Our studies indicate that the system can give results that agree within 5% at the 95% confidence level with determinations performed manually. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Integrable quantum impurity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckle, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    By modifying some of the local L operators of the algebraic form of the Bethe Ansatz inhomogeneous one dimensional quantum lattice models can be constructed. This fact has recently attracted new attention, the inhomogeneities being interpreted as local impurities. The Hamiltonians of the so constructed one-dimensional quantum models have a nearest neighbour structure except in the vicinity of the local impurities which involve three-site interactions. The pertinent feature of these models is the absence of backscattering at the impurities: the impurities are transparent. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  11. Verification station for Sandia/Rockwell Plutonium Protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, N.; Hastings, R.D.; Henry, C.N.; Millegan, D.R.

    1979-04-01

    A verification station has been designed to confirm the presence of plutonium within a container module. These container modules [about 13 cm (5 in.) in diameter and 23 cm (9 in.) high] hold sealed food-pack cans containing either plutonium oxide or metal and were designed by Sandia Laboratories to provide security and continuous surveillance and safety. After the plutonium is placed in the container module, it is closed with a solder seal. The verification station discussed here is used to confirm the presence of plutonium in the container module before it is placed in a carousel-type storage array inside the plutonium storage vault. This measurement represents the only technique that uses nuclear detectors in the plutonium protection system

  12. Models for impurity effects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    Models for impurity effects in tokamaks are described with an emphasis on the relationship between attainment of high β and impurity problems. We briefly describe the status of attempts to employ neutral beam heating to achieve high β in tokamaks and propose a qualitative model for the mechanism by which heavy metal impurities may be produced in the startup phase of the discharge. We then describe paradoxes in impurity diffusion theory and discuss possible resolutions in terms of the effects of large-scale islands and sawtooth oscillations. Finally, we examine the prospects for the Zakharov-Shafranov catastrophe (long time scale disintegration of FCT equilibria) in the context of present and near-term experimental capability

  13. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  14. Practical and highly sensitive elemental analysis for aqueous samples containing metal impurities employing electrodeposition on indium-tin oxide film samples and laser-induced shock wave plasma in low-pressure helium gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Pardede, Marincan; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Idris, Nasrullah; Jobiliong, Eric; Suyanto, Hery; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Tjia, May On; Lie, Tjung Jie; Lie, Zener Sukra; Kurniawan, Davy Putra; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2015-09-01

    We have conducted an experimental study exploring the possible application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for practical and highly sensitive detection of metal impurities in water. The spectrochemical measurements were carried out by means of a 355 nm Nd-YAG laser within N2 and He gas at atmospheric pressures as high as 2 kPa. The aqueous samples were prepared as thin films deposited on indium-tin oxide (ITO) glass by an electrolysis process. The resulting emission spectra suggest that concentrations at parts per billion levels may be achieved for a variety of metal impurities, and it is hence potentially feasible for rapid inspection of water quality in the semiconductor and pharmaceutical industries, as well as for cooling water inspection for possible leakage of radioactivity in nuclear power plants. In view of its relative simplicity, this LIBS equipment offers a practical and less costly alternative to the standard use of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for water samples, and its further potential for in situ and mobile applications.

  15. Precipitation of plutonium oxalate from homogeneous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, V.K.; Pius, I.C.; Subbarao, M.; Chinnusamy, A.; Natarajan, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    A method for the precipitation of plutonium(IV) oxalate from homogeneous solutions using diethyl oxalate is reported. The precipitate obtained is crystalline and easily filterable with yields in the range of 92-98% for precipitations involving a few mg to g quantities of plutonium. Decontamination factors for common impurities such as U(VI), Am(III) and Fe(III) were determined. TGA and chemical analysis of the compound indicate its composition as Pu(Csub(2)Osub(4))sub(2).6Hsub(2)O. Data are obtained on the solubility of the oxalate in nitric acid and in mixtures of nitric acid and oxalic acid of varying concentrations. Green PuOsub(2) obtained by calcination of the oxalate has specifications within the recommended values for trace foreign substances such as chlorine, fluorine, carbon and nitrogen. (author)

  16. Thermoluminescence induced by X-rays in silica materials with metallic impurities; Termoluminiscencia inducida por los rayos X en materiales de silice con impurezas metalicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza A, D.; Gonzalez M, P.; Espinosa P, M. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Salas, P.; Castano, V.M. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Laboratorio Juriquilla, A.P. 1-1010, C.P. 76001, Queretaro (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    Diverse materials of silica with Fe, Cu, Mg, and Mn impurities were synthesized by the sol-gel method, using tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursor. The materials obtained were subjected to thermal treatment at 500, 700 and 1000 Centigrade also they were irradiated with X-ray generated by a X-ray diffractometer which is installed in the ININ. The thermoluminescent signal was analysed and correlated with the type of impurities that are present in the material and with the grade of crystallinity produced by the thermal treatment in them. In according to the results obtained these materials show a thermoluminescent signal which is influenced by the crystallinity grade. It was analysed the behavior of the response for different doses, with the purpose of utilizing them to quantify very intense fields of radiation. (Author)

  17. Plutonium Finishing Plant safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) previously known as the Plutonium Process and Storage Facility, or Z-Plant, was built and put into operation in 1949. Since 1949 PFP has been used for various processing missions, including plutonium purification, oxide production, metal production, parts fabrication, plutonium recovery, and the recovery of americium (Am-241). The PFP has also been used for receipt and large scale storage of plutonium scrap and product materials. The PFP Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) was prepared by WHC to document the hazards associated with the facility, present safety analyses of potential accident scenarios, and demonstrate the adequacy of safety class structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and operational safety requirements (OSRs) necessary to eliminate, control, or mitigate the identified hazards. Documented in this Safety Evaluation Report (SER) is DOE's independent review and evaluation of the PFP FSAR and the basis for approval of the PFP FSAR. The evaluation is presented in a format that parallels the format of the PFP FSAR. As an aid to the reactor, a list of acronyms has been included at the beginning of this report. The DOE review concluded that the risks associated with conducting plutonium handling, processing, and storage operations within PFP facilities, as described in the PFP FSAR, are acceptable, since the accident safety analyses associated with these activities meet the WHC risk acceptance guidelines and DOE safety goals in SEN-35-91

  18. Civil plutonium management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicard, B.; Zaetta, A.

    2004-01-01

    During 1960 and 1970 the researches on the plutonium recycling in fast neutrons reactors were stimulated by the fear of uranium reserves diminishing. At the beginning of 1980, the plutonium mono-recycling for water cooled reactors is implementing. After 1990 the public opinion concerning the radioactive wastes management and the consequences of the disarmament agreements between Russia and United States, modified the context. This paper presents the today situation and technology associated to the different options and strategical solutions of the plutonium management: the plutonium use in the world, the neutronic characteristics, the plutonium effect on the reactors characteristics, the MOX behavior in the reactors, the MOX fabrication and treatment, the possible improvements to the plutonium use, the concepts performance in a nuclear park. (A.L.B.)

  19. World status report: plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dircks, W.

    1992-01-01

    In a recent speech in Japan, the Deputy Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said that the economic case for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel had been severely eroded. An edited version of the speech is given. The changed prospects for nuclear energy is given as the reason why the demand for plutonium has declined sharply. The oil crisis of the 1970s reduced the demand for electric power and the economic justification for the use of recycled plutonium. The stockpile of isolated plutonium is growing rapidly giving rise to worries about its security. From this point of view, isolated plutonium is best kept in reactor fuel not separated out. In this connection the IAEA has offered to help in the storage of plutonium so that vigorous safety and security requirements are met. In Japan there is a debate about the plutonium which is dependent on the future of the fast breeder reactor programme. (UK)

  20. Trace impurity analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.J.; Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The desirability for long-term reliability of large scale helium refrigerator systems used on superconducting accelerator magnets has necessitated detection of impurities to levels of a few ppM. An analyzer that measures trace impurity levels of condensable contaminants in concentrations of less than a ppM in 15 atm of He is described. The instrument makes use of the desorption temperature at an indicated pressure of the various impurities to determine the type of contaminant. The pressure rise at that temperature yields a measure of the contaminant level of the impurity. A LN 2 cryogenic charcoal trap is also employed to measure air impurities (nitrogen and oxygen) to obtain the full range of contaminant possibilities. The results of this detector which will be in use on the research and development helium refrigerator of the ISABELLE First-Cell is described

  1. Standard test method for plutonium assay by plutonium (III) diode array spectrophotometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes the determination of total plutonium as plutonium(III) in nitrate and chloride solutions. The technique is applicable to solutions of plutonium dioxide powders and pellets (Test Methods C 697), nuclear grade mixed oxides (Test Methods C 698), plutonium metal (Test Methods C 758), and plutonium nitrate solutions (Test Methods C 759). Solid samples are dissolved using the appropriate dissolution techniques described in Practice C 1168. The use of this technique for other plutonium-bearing materials has been reported (1-5), but final determination of applicability must be made by the user. The applicable concentration range for plutonium sample solutions is 10–200 g Pu/L. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropria...

  2. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, D.

    1996-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE's stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities

  3. PLUTONIUM-ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; Waber, J.T.

    1960-08-30

    A series of nuclear reactor fuel alloys consisting of from about 5 to about 50 at.% zirconium (or higher zirconium alloys such as Zircaloy), balance plutonium, and having the structural composition of a plutonium are described. Zirconium is a satisfactory diluent because it alloys readily with plutonium and has desirable nuclear properties. Additional advantages are corrosion resistance, excellent fabrication propenties, an isotropie structure, and initial softness.

  4. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Because cigarette smokers constitute a large fraction of the population, a synergistic effect of plutonium and cigarette smoke might influence estimates of the health risk for plutonium and other transuranics released to the environment

  5. Plutonium vulnerability issues at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, E.; Templeton, D.W.; Tholen, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford, Washington Site was operated to produce plutonium (Pu) metal and oxide for national defense purposes. Due to the production requirements and methods utilized to meet national needs and the abrupt shutdown of the plant in the late 1980s, the plant was left in a condition that poses a risk of radiation exposure to plant workers, of accidental radioactive material release to the environment, and of radiation exposure to the public. In early 1994, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to determine the best methods for cleaning out and stabilizing Pu materials in the PFP was started. While the EIS is being prepared, a number of immediate actions have been completed or are underway to significantly reduce the greatest hazards in the PFP. Recently, increased attention his been paid to Pu risks at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities resulting in the Department-wide Plutonium Vulnerability Assessment and a recommendation by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) for DOE to develop integrated plans for managing its nuclear materials

  6. Probing phonons in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Joe; Krisch, M.; Farber, D.; Occelli, F.; Schwartz, A.; Chiang, T.C.; Wall, M.; Boro, C.; Xu, Ruqing

    2010-01-01

    Plutonium (Pu) is well known to have complex and unique physico-chemical properties. Notably, the pure metal exhibits six solid-state phase transformations with large volume expansions and contractions along the way to the liquid state: α → β → γ → (delta) → (delta)(prime) → (var e psilon) → liquid. Unalloyed Pu melts at a relatively low temperature ∼640 C to yield a higher density liquid than that of the solid from which it melts, (Figure 1). Detailed understanding of the properties of plutonium and plutonium-based alloys is critical for the safe handling, utilization, and long-term storage of these important, but highly toxic materials. However, both technical and and safety issues have made experimental observations extremely difficult. Phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) are key experimenta l data to the understanding of the basic properties of Pu materials such as: force constants, sound velocities, elastic constants, thermodynamics, phase stability, electron-phonon coupling, structural relaxation, etc. However, phonon dispersion curves (PDCs) in plutonium (Pu) and its alloys have defied measurement for the past few decades since the discovery of this element in 1941. This is due to a combination of the high thermal-neutron absorption cross section of plutonium and the inability to grow the large single crystals (with dimensions of a few millimeters) necessary for inelastic neutron scattering. Theoretical simulations of the Pu PDC continue to be hampered by the lack of suitable inter -atomic potentials. Thus, until recently the PDCs for Pu and its alloys have remained unknown experimentally and theoretically. The experimental limitations have recently been overcome by using a tightly focused undulator x-ray micro-beam scattered from single -grain domains in polycrystalline specimens. This experimental approach has been applied successfully to map the complete PDCs of an fcc d-Pu-Ga alloy using the high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS

  7. Perspective on plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is intended as a brief overview on the element plutonium. Plutonium is the first primarily man-made element to play a significant role not only in technological development, but also in the economic growth of many countries. The importance of plutonium centers around its enormous energy making it ideal for wide-scale use in reactors, while the nuclear industry continues to work toward improving safety and efficiency of plutonium as a reactor fuel politicians and the public still debate over the safety and benefits of nuclear power. (30 refs.)

  8. Therapy of metal poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindenbaum, A.

    1975-01-01

    The following studies were conducted: physical character of lead acetate and other toxic metal compounds as related to tissue distribution, toxicity, and therapeutic removal; interactions of monomeric plutonium with specific components of mouse liver and skeleton; metabolism and therapeutic decorporation of plutonium in mice and dogs; comparative studies of tissue distribution of plutonium isotopes; and microdistribution of monomeric and polymeric plutonium in beagle liver and bone

  9. Helium impurities in a PNP-primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, M.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of impurities to be expected have been defined in consideration of recent findings concerning the rates of infiltration and formation and the reaction mechanisms of the impurity components in the circuit. The data obtained correspond with the requirements on the metallic high-temperature components as well as with the requirements of limited graphite corrosion. (DG) [de

  10. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 1: Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, D.L.; Sauerbrun, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate dispositioning options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) assisted NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the dispositioning options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. Additionally, the INEL investigated the feasibility of using plutonium fuels (without uranium) for disposal in existing light water reactors and provided a preconceptual analysis for a reactor specifically designed for destruction of weapons-grade plutonium. This four-volume report was prepared for NAS to document the findings of these studies. Volume 2 evaluates 12 plutonium dispositioning options. Volume 3 considers a concept for a low-temperature, low-pressure, low-power-density, low-coolant-flow-rate light water reactor that quickly destroys plutonium without using uranium or thorium. This reactor concept does not produce electricity and has no other mission than the destruction of plutonium. Volume 4 addresses neutronic performance, fabrication technology, and fuel performance and compatibility issues for zirconium-plutonium oxide fuels and aluminum-plutonium metallic fuels. This volumes gives summaries of Volumes 2--4

  11. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

  12. Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S.

    1993-06-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition

  13. Standard practice for preparation and dissolution of plutonium materials for analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 This practice is a compilation of dissolution techniques for plutonium materials that are applicable to the test methods used for characterizing these materials. Dissolution treatments for the major plutonium materials assayed for plutonium or analyzed for other components are listed. Aliquants of the dissolved samples are dispensed on a weight basis when one of the analyses must be highly reliable, such as plutonium assay; otherwise they are dispensed on a volume basis. 1.2 The treatments, in order of presentation, are as follows: Procedure Title Section Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Hydrochloric Acid 9.1 Dissolution of Plutonium Metal with Sulfuric Acid 9.2 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxide by the Sealed-Reflux Technique 9.3 Dissolution of Plutonium Oxide and Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides by Sodium Bisulfate Fusion 9.4 Dissolution of Uranium-Plutonium Mixed Oxides and Low-Fired Plutonium Oxide in Beakers 9.5 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be re...

  14. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume I: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    At the conclusion of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (DOE) stopped plutonium processing for nuclear weapons production. Facilities used for that purpose now hold significant quantities of plutonium in various forms. Unless properly stored and handled, plutonium can present environment, safety and health (ES ampersand H) hazards. Improperly stored plutonium poses a variety of hazards. When containers or packaging fail to fully protect plutonium metal from exposure to air, oxidation can occur and cause packaging failures and personnel contamination. Contamination can also result when plutonium solutions leak from bottles, tanks or piping. Plutonium in the form of scrap or residues generated by weapons production are often very corrosive, chemically reactive and difficult to contain. Buildings and equipment that are aging, poorly maintained or of obsolete design contribute to the overall problem. Inadvertent accumulations of plutonium of any form in sufficient quantities within facilities can result in nuclear criticality events that could emit large amounts of radiation locally. Contamination events and precursors of criticality events are causing safety and health concerns for workers at the Department's plutonium facilities. Contamination events also potentially threaten the public and the surrounding environment

  15. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to determine whether cigarette smoking increases the probability of plutonium-induced lung cancer. Initial experiments, designed to characterize the effect of chronic cigarette smoke exposure on pulmonary clearance of plutonium aerosols, are described

  16. Plutonium valence state distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1974-01-01

    A calculational method for ascertaining equilibrium valence state distributions of plutonium in acid solutions as a function of the plutonium oxidation number and the solution acidity is illustrated with an example. The method may be more practical for manual use than methods based upon polynomial equations. (T.G.)

  17. Plutonium production in a remote cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddux, E.P.; Purcell, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Production of 239 Pu metal has traditionally been carried out in glovebox enclosures for protection of operating personnel and the environment. With the advent of more stringent federal regulations for protecting personnel, the environment, and security of special nuclear materials, it is proposed that plutonium be processed in a totally remote environment using automated work stations and robotic materials transfer and equipment maintenance. At the Savannah River Plant, the existing plutonium production facility is a batch-type glovebox operation built in the 1950s. A viable alternative to restoration of the existing glovebox operation is to provide a facility that uses remote cell operation

  18. Automatic titrator for high precision plutonium assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, D.D.; Hollen, R.M.

    1986-01-01

    Highly precise assay of plutonium metal is required for accountability measurements. We have developed an automatic titrator for this determination which eliminates analyst bias and requires much less analyst time. The analyst is only required to enter sample data and start the titration. The automated instrument titrates the sample, locates the end point, and outputs the results as a paper tape printout. Precision of the titration is less than 0.03% relative standard deviation for a single determination at the 250-mg plutonium level. The titration time is less than 5 min

  19. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Shipments of plutonium occasionally pass around the Cape coastal waters on its way to Japan from Europe. This invariably leads to a great deal of speculation of the dangers involved and of the extreme toxicity of plutonium, with the media and environmental groups claiming that (a) plutonium is the most toxic substance known to man, and that (b) a few kilograms of plutonium ground finely and dispersed in the atmosphere could kill every human being on earth. Comparisons with other poisons are drawn, e.g. common inorganic chemicals and biological agents. The original scare around the extraordinary toxicity of Pu seems to have started in 1974 with the claims of Tamplin and Cochran's hot particle theory about plutonium lodging in the sensitive portions of the lungs in small concentrated aggregates where they are much more effective in producing cancers. This theory, however, is regarded as thoroughly discredited by the experts in the field of radiotoxicity. 8 refs

  20. Plutonium roundtable discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penneman, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The roundtable discussion began with remarks by the chairman who pointed out the complicated nature of plutonium chemistry. Judging from the papers presented at this symposium, he noticed a pattern which indicated to him the result of diminished funding for investigation of basic plutonium chemistry and funding focused on certain problem areas. Dr. G.L. silver pointed to plutonium chemists' erroneous use of a simplified summary equation involving the disproportionation of Pu(EV) and their each of appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his appreciation of alpha coefficients. To his charges, Dr. J.T. Bell spoke in defense of the chemists. This discussion was followed by W.W. Schulz's comments on the need for experimental work to determine solubility data for plutonium in its various oxidation states under geologic repository conditions. Discussion then turned to plutonium pyrachemical process with Dana C. Christensen as the main speaker. This paper presents edited versions of participants' written version

  1. Plutonium storage phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szempruch, R.

    1995-12-01

    Plutonium has been produced, handled, and stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities since the 1940s. Many changes have occurred during the last 40 years in the sources, production demands, and end uses of plutonium. These have resulted in corresponding changes in the isotopic composition as well as the chemical and physical forms of the processed and stored plutonium. Thousands of ordinary food pack tin cans have been used successfully for many years to handle and store plutonium. Other containers have been used with equal success. This paper addressees the exceptions to this satisfactory experience. To aid in understanding the challenges of handling plutonium for storage or immobilization the lessons learned from past storage experience and the necessary countermeasures to improve storage performance are discussed

  2. Chemical species of plutonium in Hanford radioactive tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Large quantities of radioactive wastes have been generated at the Hanford Site over its operating life. The wastes with the highest activities are stored underground in 177 large (mostly one million gallon volume) concrete tanks with steel liners. The wastes contain processing chemicals, cladding chemicals, fission products, and actinides that were neutralized to a basic pH before addition to the tanks to prevent corrosion of the steel liners. Because the mission of the Hanford Site was to provide plutonium for defense purposes, the amount of plutonium lost to the wastes was relatively small. The best estimate of the amount of plutonium lost to all the waste tanks is about 500 kg. Given uncertainties in the measurements, some estimates are as high as 1,000 kg (Roetman et al. 1994). The wastes generally consist of (1) a sludge layer generated by precipitation of dissolved metals from aqueous wastes solutions during neutralization with sodium hydroxide, (2) a salt cake layer formed by crystallization of salts after evaporation of the supernate solution, and (3) an aqueous supernate solution that exists as a separate layer or as liquid contained in cavities between sludge or salt cake particles. The identity of chemical species of plutonium in these wastes will allow a better understanding of the behavior of the plutonium during storage in tanks, retrieval of the wastes, and processing of the wastes. Plutonium chemistry in the wastes is important to criticality and environmental concerns, and in processing the wastes for final disposal. Plutonium has been found to exist mainly in the sludge layers of the tanks along with other precipitated metal hydrous oxides. This is expected due to its low solubility in basic aqueous solutions. Tank supernate solutions do not contain high concentrations of plutonium even though some tanks contain high concentrations of complexing agents. The solutions also contain significant concentrations of hydroxide which competes with other

  3. Investigation on the attribute detection of plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Suping; Hao Fanhua; Gong Jian; Wu Huailong; Hu Guangchun; Hu Yongbo

    2006-01-01

    A long-term detection of the 871 keV gamma-ray emitted from two PuO 2 samples (100 g recovered powder and 8 g pure powder) has been conduced with a high resolution HPGe spectrometer in a lead-shielded chamber. An on-site detection of the 871 keV gamma-ray emitted from 200 g recovered PuO 2 powder has also been performed. Although the 871 keV peak can be observed in all 3 samples, other characteristic gamma-rays related to the existence of oxygen are not seen. The 871 keV peak is absent in spectra acquired from metal plutonium samples, which can answer whether the plutonium material in a sealed container is metal plutonium or plutonium oxide, i.e. the 871 keV gamma-ray can be an evidence for the absence of metal plutonium. The 871 keV peak is strong in the spectrum of 200 g recovered PuO 2 sample. A software of plutonium abundance and age analysis developed by ourselves can identify the 871 keV peak from a spectrum of 10 min. If the system is appropriately improved, it can be used to detect attribute of plutonium oxide through identifying 871 keV gamma-ray peak. (authors)

  4. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  5. The veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation has been made of the veining phenomenon in unalloyed plutonium. The surface markings, or veins, which are sometimes seen on α-phase plutonium samples, arise as a result of the β→α transformation. As far as is known, this veining is unrivalled in its scale and form as compared with the solid state surface transformation effects shown by any other metal. The phenomenon has been explained by the application of the Le Chatelier principle to the phase change. In this instance, the large (10%) volume contraction associated with the β→α reaction and the anisotropy of the nonoclinic α-phase structure, account for the fact that the veins are so prominent in plutonium. On the basis of the proposed model, the veins can only form at temperatures where the transformation mechanism is non-martensitic. (Auth.)

  6. Review of major plutonium pyrochemical technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, W.S.; Navratil, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The past twenty years have seen significant growth in the development and application of pyrochemical technology for processing of plutonium. For particular feedstocks and specific applications, non-aqueous high-temperature processes offer key advantages over conventional hydrometallurgical systems. Major processes in use today include: (1) direct oxide reduction for conversion of PuO 2 to metal, (2) molten salt extraction for americium removal from plutonium, (3) molten salt electrorefining for Pu purification, and (4) hydriding to remove plutonium from host substrates. This paper reviews current major pyrochemical processes from the classical calcination-hydrofluorination-bomb reduction sequence through new techniques under development. Each process is presented and brief descriptions of production equipment are given. 47 references, 5 figures

  7. Criticality of mixtures of plutonium and high enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grolleau, E.; Lein, M.; Leka, G.; Maidou, B.; Klenov, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a criticality evaluation of moderated homogeneous plutonium-uranium mixtures. The fissile media studied are homogeneous mixtures of plutonium and high enriched uranium in two chemical forms: aqueous mixtures of metal and mixtures of nitrate solutions. The enrichment of uranium considered are 93.2wt.% 235 U and 100wt.% 235 U. The 240 Pu content in plutonium varies from 0wt.% 240 Pu to 12wt.% 240 Pu. The critical parameters (radii and masses of a 20 cm water reflected sphere) are calculated with the French criticality safety package CRISTAL V0. The comparison of the calculated critical parameters as a function of the moderator-to-fuel atomic ratio shows significant ranges in which high enriched uranium systems, as well as plutonium-uranium mixtures, are more reactive than plutonium systems. (author)

  8. Electrochemical studies on plutonium in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourges, G.; Lambertin, D.; Rochefort, S.; Delpech, S.; Picard, G.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical studies on plutonium have been supporting the development of pyrochemical processes involving plutonium at CEA. The electrochemical properties of plutonium have been studied in molten salts - ternary eutectic mixture NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 , equimolar mixture NaCl-KCl and pure CaCl 2 - and in liquid gallium at 1073 K. The formal, or apparent, standard potential of Pu(III)/Pu redox couple in eutectic mixture of NaCl-KCl-BaCl 2 at 1073 K determined by potentiometry is equal to -2.56 V (versus Cl 2 , 1 atm/Cl - reference electrode). In NaCl-KCl eutectic mixture and in pure CaCl 2 the formal standard potentials deduced from cyclic voltammetry are respectively -2.54 V and -2.51 V. These potentials led to the calculation of the activity coefficients of Pu(III) in the molten salts. Chronoamperometry on plutonium in liquid gallium using molten chlorides - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl/KCl - led to the determination of the activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga, log γ = -7.3. This new data is a key parameter to assess the thermodynamic feasibility of a process using gallium as solvent metal. By comparing gallium with other solvent metals - cadmium, bismuth, aluminum - gallium appears to be, with aluminum, more favorable for the selectivity of the separation at 1073 K of plutonium from cerium. In fact, compared with a solid tungsten electrode, none of these solvent liquid metals is a real asset for the selectivity of the separation. The role of a solvent liquid metal is mainly to trap the elements

  9. Determination of plutonium in nuclear fuel materials by controlled potential coulometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambolikar, A.S.; Pillai, Jisha S.; Sharma, M.K.; Kamat, J.V.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of Pu content in nuclear fuel materials is an important requirement for the purpose of chemical quality control, nuclear material accounting and process control. Biamperometry and potentiometry techniques are widely employed for the determination of Pu. These redox electroanalytical based methods are capable of meeting the requirements of high accuracy and precision using milligram amounts of the analyte. However, use of chemical reagents to carry out redox reactions in these methodologies generates radioactive liquid waste which needs to be processed to recover plutonium. In coulometric technique, change in the oxidation state of an electro active species is carried out by charge transfer on an electrode surface, hence chemical reagents as well as chemical standards required for the redox titration based methods are eliminated and analytical waste generated is free from metallic impurities. Therefore the determination of Pu in nuclear fuel materials by coulometry is an attractive option. In view of this, controlled potential coulometric methods have been developed in our laboratory for variety of applications at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle. In the early stage of coulometry developments in our laboratory, coulometers procured from EG and G Princeton Applied Research Corporation were employed. After prolong use, these instruments were showing ageing and hence indigenously built controlled potential coulometer was procured. Performance evaluation studies of these coulometers were reported from our laboratory for the determination of uranium and plutonium in working chemical assay standards. In this paper, we present studies carried out on the determination of plutonium in Pu-alloy and (U, Pu) C samples employing the same indigenous coulometer

  10. Long-term plutonium storage: Design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkey, D.D.; Wood, W.T.; Guenther, C.D.

    1994-01-01

    An important part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Complex Reconfiguration (WCR) Program is the development of facilities for long-term storage of plutonium. The WCR design goals are to provide storage for metals, oxides, pits, and fuel-grade plutonium, including material being held as part of the Strategic Reserve and excess material. Major activities associated with plutonium storage are sorting the plutonium inventory, material handling and storage support, shipping and receiving, and surveillance of material in storage for both safety evaluations and safeguards and security. A variety of methods for plutonium storage have been used, both within the DOE weapons complex and by external organizations. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of proposed storage concepts based upon functional criteria. The concepts discussed include floor wells, vertical and horizontal sleeves, warehouse storage on vertical racks, and modular storage units. Issues/factors considered in determining a preferred design include operational efficiency, maintenance and repair, environmental impact, radiation and criticality safety, safeguards and security, heat removal, waste minimization, international inspection requirements, and construction and operational costs

  11. A Graphite Isotope Ratio Method: A Primer on Estimating Plutonium Production in Graphite Moderated Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesh, Christopher J.

    2004-01-01

    The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is a technique used to estimate the total plutonium production in a graphite-moderated reactor. The cumulative plutonium production in that reactor can be accurately determined by measuring neutron irradiation induced isotopic ratio changes in certain impurity elements within the graphite moderator. The method does not require detailed knowledge of a reactor's operating history, although that knowledge can decrease the uncertainty of the production estimate. The basic premise of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method is that the fluence in non-fuel core components is directly related to the cumulative plutonium production in the nuclear fuel

  12. The plutonium danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, W. de

    1983-01-01

    Nobody can ignore the fact that plutonium is potentially very dangerous and the greatest danger concerning it lies in the spreading of nuclear weapons via nuclear energy programmes. The following seven different attitudes towards this problem are presented and discussed: 1) There is no connection between peaceful and military applications; 2) The problem cannot be prevented; 3) A technical solution must be found; 4) plutonium must be totally inaccessible to countries involved in acquiring nuclear weapons; 5) The use of plutonium for energy production should only occur in one multinational centre; 6) Dogmas in the nuclear industry must be enfeebled; 7) All developments in this area should stop. (C.F.)

  13. Automation of plutonium spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, J.J.; Boisde, G.; Goujon de Beauvivier, M.; Chevalier, G.; Isaac, M.

    1980-01-01

    Instrumentation was designed and constructed for automatic control of plutonium by molecular absorption spectrophotometry, on behalf of the reprocessing facilities, to meet two objectives: on-line measurement, of the valency state of plutonium, on by-pass, with the measured concentration covering the process concentration range up to a few mg.l -1 ; laboratory measurement of plutonium adjusted to valency VI, with operation carried out using a preparative system meeting the required containment specifications. For this two objectives, the photometer, optical cell connections are made by optical fibers resistant to β, γ radiation. Except this characteristic the devices are different according to the quality required for result [fr

  14. Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This Plutonium Vulnerability Management Plan describes the Department of Energy's response to the vulnerabilities identified in the Plutonium Working Group Report which are a result of the cessation of nuclear weapons production. The responses contained in this document are only part of an overall, coordinated approach designed to enable the Department to accelerate conversion of all nuclear materials, including plutonium, to forms suitable for safe, interim storage. The overall actions being taken are discussed in detail in the Department's Implementation Plan in response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1. This is included as Attachment B

  15. Plutonium Plant, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, J.S.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The journey of Indian nuclear fuel reprocessing started with the commissioning of Plutonium Plant (PP) at Trombay on 22"n"d January, 1965 with an aim to reprocess the spent fuel from research reactor CIRUS. The basic process chosen for the plant was Plutonium Uranium Reduction EXtraction (PUREX) process. In seventies, the plant was subjected to major design modifications and replacement of hardware, which later met the additional demand from research reactor DHRUVA. The augmented plutonium plant has been operating since 1983. Experience gained from this plant was very much helpful to design future reprocessing plant in the country

  16. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurt, D. [Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE`s stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities.

  17. Cigarette smoke and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filipy, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to obtain experimental data that are directly applicable to resolving the question of whether cigarette smokers are at greater risk than nonsmokers to potential health effects of inhaled plutonium. Progress was made on two fronts during the past year. The autoradiographic technique developed from detection of plutonium on the interior surface of pulmonary airways (Annual Report, 1978) has been adapted to routine use in examining tracheas and bronchi of rats. Also, dogs exposed to cigarette smoke for over a year after inhalation of plutonium were killed and necropsied

  18. The first metallurgical tests on plutonium; Premiers essais metallurgiques sur le plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grison, E; Abramson, R; Anselin, F; Monti, H [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Metallic plutonium was first prepared in France in January 1956, as soon as we had access to quantities of the order of several grams of plutonium, which had been extracted from the rods of the pile EL2 at Saclay. Since up to the present this reactor, of thermal power 2 000 kW, has been our only source of plutonium, we have so far only worked on experimental quantities sufficient for the basic tests but not for tests on a scale of possible applications. It is this work, carried out during this phase of preliminary research, which is described below. With the starting up of the plutonium extraction plant at Marcoule, where the reactor G1 has been operating at power for more than a year, we shall go on next to a another order of magnitude which will allow the manufacture and experimentation of prototype fuel elements. (author) [French] La premiere elaboration de plutonium metallique en France fut faite en janvier 1956, des que nous pumes disposer de quantites de plutonium de l'ordre de quelques grammes, qui avaient ete retires des barreaux de la pile EL2 de Saclay. Ce reacteur, d'une puissance thermique de 2 000 kW, ayant ete jusqu'a present notre seule source de plutonium, nous n'avons encore travaille que sur des quantites experimentales suffisantes pour les essais de base, mais non pour des essais a l'echelle d'applications possibles. Ce sont les travaux effectues pendant cette phase de recherches preliminaires qui seront evoques ci-dessous. Avec la mise eu route de l'usine d'extraction de plutonium de Marcoule, ou le reacteur G1 fonctionne en puissance depuis plus d'un an, nous allons passer prochainement a un autre ordre de grandeur, qui nous permettra la fabrication et l'experimentation d'elements combustibles prototypes. (auteur)

  19. Recommended plutonium release fractions from postulated fires. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report was written at the request of EG ampersand G Rocky Flats, Inc. in support of joint emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) by EG ampersand G and the State of Colorado. The intent of the report is to provide the State of Colorado with an independent assessment of any respirable plutonium releases that might occur in the event of a severe fire at the plant. Fire releases of plutonium are of interest because they have been used by EG ampersand G to determine the RFP emergency planning zones. These zones are based on the maximum credible accident (MCA) described in the RFP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) of 1980, that MCA is assumed to be a large airplane crashing into a RFP plutonium building.The objective of this report was first, to perform a worldwide literature review of relevant release experiments from 1960 to the present and to summarize those findings, and second, to provide recommendations for application of the experimental data to fire release analyses at Rocky Flats. The latter step requires translation between experimental and expected RFP accident parameters, or ''scaling.'' The parameters of particular concern are: quantities of material, environmental parameters such as the intensity of a fire, and the physico-chemical forms of the plutonium. The latter include plutonium metal, bulk plutonium oxide powder, combustible and noncombustible wastes contaminated with plutonium oxide powder, and residues from plutonium extraction processes

  20. Plutonium spectrophotometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Cassaniti, P.; Orosco, E.H.

    1990-01-01

    Plutonium ions in solution have absorption spectra so different that it is possible to use them for analytical purposes. Detailed studies have been performed in nitric solutions. Some very convenient methods for the determination of plutonium and its oxidation states, especially the ratios Pu(III):Pu(IV) and Pu(IV):Pu(VI) in a mixture of both, have been developed. These methods are described in this paper, including: a) Absorption spectra for plutonium (III), (IV), (VI) and mixtures. b) Relative extinction coefficients for the above mentioned species. c) Dependences of the relative extinction coefficients on the nitric acid concentration and the plutonium VI deviation from the Beer-Lambert law. The developed methods are simple and rapid and then, suitable in process control. Accuracy is improved when relative absorbance measurements are performed or controlled the variables which have effect on the spectra and extinction coefficients. (Author) [es

  1. French plutonium management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2002-01-01

    The French plutonium management program is summarized in this paper. The program considers nuclear generation as a major component of national electric power supply and includes the reprocessing of the spent fuel. (author)

  2. Learning more about plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This digest brochure explains what plutonium is, where it comes from, how it is used, its recycling into Mox fuel, its half life, historical discovery, its presence in the environment, toxicity and radioactivity. (J.S.)

  3. Plutonium safe handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tvehlov, Yu.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract, prepared on the basis of materials of the IAEA new leadership on the plutonium safe handling and its storage (the publication no. 9 in the Safety Reports Series), aimed at presenting internationally acknowledged criteria on the radiation danger evaluation and summarizing the experience in the safe management of great quantities of plutonium, accumulated in the nuclear states, is presented. The data on the weapon-class and civil plutonium, the degree of its danger, the measures for provision of its safety, including the data on accident radiation consequences with the fission number 10 18 , are presented. The recommendations, making it possible to eliminate the super- criticality danger, as well as ignition and explosion, to maintain the tightness of the facility, aimed at excluding the radioactive contamination and the possibility of internal irradiation, to provide for the plutonium security, physical protection and to reduce irradiation are given [ru

  4. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-03-17

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished.

  5. Plutonium recovery from spent reactor fuel by uranium displacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A process is described for separating uranium values and transuranic values from fission products containing rare earth values when the values are contained together in a molten chloride salt electrolyte. A molten chloride salt electrolyte with a first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is contacted with both a solid cathode and an anode having values of uranium and fission products including plutonium. A voltage is applied across the anode and cathode electrolytically to transfer uranium and plutonium from the anode to the electrolyte while uranium values in the electrolyte electrolytically deposit as uranium metal on the solid cathode in an amount equal to the uranium and plutonium transferred from the anode causing the electrolyte to have a second ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride. Then the solid cathode with the uranium metal deposited thereon is removed and molten cadmium having uranium dissolved therein is brought into contact with the electrolyte resulting in chemical transfer of plutonium values from the electrolyte to the molten cadmium and transfer of uranium values from the molten cadmium to the electrolyte until the first ratio of plutonium chloride to uranium chloride is reestablished

  6. Quantitative analysis of carbon in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefevre, Chantal.

    1979-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a method for the determination of carbon traces (20 to 400 ppm) in plutonium. The development of a carbon in plutonium standard is described, then the content of this substance is determined and its validity as a standard shown by analysis in two different ways. In the first method used, reaction of the metal with sulphur and determination of carbon as carbon sulphide, the following parameters were studied: influence of excess reagent, surface growth of samples in contact with sulphur, temperature and reaction time. The results obtained are in agreement with those obtained by the conventional method of carbon determination, combustion in oxygen and measurement of carbon in the form of carbon dioxide. Owing to the presence of this standard we were then able to study the different parameters involved in plutonium combustion so that the reaction can be made complete: temperature reached during combustion, role of flux, metal surface in contact with oxygen and finally method of cleaning plutonium samples [fr

  7. Impurity control in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The control of impurities in TFTR will be a particularly difficult problem due to the large energy and particle fluxes expected in the device. As part of the TFTR Flexibility Modification (TEM) project, a program has been implemented to address this problem. Transport code simulations are used to infer an impurity limit criterion as a function of the impurity atomic number. The configurational designs of the limiters and associated protective plates are discussed along with the consideration of thermal and mechanical loads due to normal plasma operation, neutral beams, and plasma disruptions. A summary is given of the materials-related research, which has been a collaborative effort involving groups at Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Conceptual designs are shown for getterng systems capable of regenerating absorbed tritium. Research on this topic by groups at the previously mentioned laboratories and SAES Research Laboratory is reviewed

  8. Determination of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions - Gravimetric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a precise and accurate gravimetric method for determining the concentration of plutonium in pure plutonium nitrate solutions and reference solutions, containing between 100 and 300 g of plutonium per litre, in a nitric acid medium. The weighed portion of the plutonium nitrate is treated with sulfuric acid and evaporated to dryness. The plutonium sulfate is decomposed and formed to oxide by heating in air. The oxide is ignited in air at 1200 to 1250 deg. C and weighed as stoichiometric plutonium dioxide, which is stable and non-hygroscopic

  9. Plutonium in coniferous forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantavaara, A.; Kostiainen, E.

    2002-01-01

    Our aim was to study the uptake of plutonium by trees, undervegetation and some wild foods. The ratio of 238 Pu/ 239,240 Pu in soil samples was determined for comparisons of the fallout origin. In twelve years the Chernobyl derived plutonium has not reached the mineral soil. This refers to a very slow downward migration in podsolic soil. The study confirmed also the low Pu uptake by vegetation and an insignificant contribution to human doses through wild foods. (au)

  10. Diffusion in the uranium - plutonium system and self-diffusion of plutonium in epsilon phase; Diffusion dans le systeme uranium-plutonium et autodiffusion du plutonium epsilon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuy, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-Aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A survey of uranium-plutonium phase diagram leads to confirm anglo-saxon results about the plutonium solubility in {alpha} uranium (15 per cent at 565 C) and the uranium one in {zeta} phase (74 per cent at 565 C). Interdiffusion coefficients, for concentration lower than 15 per cent had been determined in a temperature range from 410 C to 640 C. They vary between 0.2 and 6 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, and the activation energy between 13 and 20 kcal/mole. Grain boundary, diffusion of plutonium in a uranium had been pointed out by micrography, X-ray microanalysis and {alpha} autoradiography. Self-diffusion of plutonium in {epsilon} phase (bcc) obeys Arrhenius law: D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp -(18500)/RT. But this activation energy does not follow empirical laws generally accepted for other metals. It has analogies with 'anomalous' bcc metals ({beta}Zr, {beta}Ti, {beta}Hf, U{sub {gamma}}). (author) [French] Une etude du diagramme d'equilibre uranium-plutonium conduit a confirmer les resultats anglo-saxons relatifs a la solubilite du plutonium dans l'uranium {alpha} (15 pour cent a 565 C) et de l'uranium dans la phase {zeta} (74 pour cent a 565 C). Les coefficients de diffusion chimique, pour des concentrations inferieures a 15 pour cent ont ete determines a des temperatures comprises entre 410 et 640 C. Ils se situent entre 0.2 et 6. 10{sup 12} cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. L'energie d'activation varie entre 13 et 20 kcal/mole. La diffusion intergranulaire du plutonium dans l'uranium a a ete mise en evidence par micrographie, microanalyse X et autoradiographie {alpha}. L' autodiffusion du plutonium {beta} cubique centree obeit a la loi d'Arrhenius D = 2. 10{sup -2} exp - (18500)/RT. Son energie d'activation n'obeit pas aux lois empiriques generalement admises pour les autres metaux. Elle possede des analogies avec les cubiques centres ''anormaux'' (Zr{beta}, Ti{beta}, Hf{beta}, U{gamma}). (auteur)

  11. Los Alamos DP West Plutonium Facility decontamination project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garde, R.; Cox, E.J.; Valentine, A.M.

    1982-01-01

    The DP West Plutonium Facility operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, was decontaminated between April 1978 and April 1981. The facility was constructed in 1944 to 1945 to produce plutonium metal and fabricate parts for nuclear weapons. It was continually used as a plutonium processing and research facility until mid-1978. Decontamination operations included dismantling and removing gloveboxes and conveyor tunnels; removing process systems, utilities, and exhaust ducts; and decontaminating all remaining surfaces. This report describes glovebox and conveyor tunnel separations, decontamination techniques, health and safety considerations, waste management procedures, and costs of the operation

  12. Chemical separation of plutonium from air filters and preparation of filaments for resonance ionization mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhardt, K.; Erdmann, N.; Funk, H.; Herrmann, G.; Naehler, A.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.

    1995-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS) is used for the determination of plutonium in environmental samples. A chemical procedure based on an ion-exchange technique for the separation of plutonium from a polycarbonate filter is described. The overall yield is about 60% as determined by α-particle spectroscopy. A technique for the subsequent preparation of samples for RIMS measurements is developed. Plutonium is electrode-posited as hydroxide and covered with a thin metallic layer. While heating such a sandwich filament the plutonium hydroxide is reduced to the metal and an atomic beam is evaporated from the surface, as required for RIMS. copyright American Institute of Physics 1995

  13. Separation of trace uranium from plutonium for subsequent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1980-08-01

    Trace uranium quantities are separated from plutonium metal and plutonium oxide for subsequent analysis. Samples are dissolved in hydrobromic acid or a hydrobromic acid-hydrofluoric acid mixture. The U(VI)-halide complex is separated from nonsorbed Pu(III) on an anion exchange column using sequential washes of 9M HBr, a 0.1M HI-12M HCl mixture and 0.1M HCl

  14. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. Investigation on the influence of metal ion impurities on the complexation behavior of generator produced {sup 90}Y with bifunctional chelators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Usha; Gamre, Naresh; Dash, Ashutosh [Isotope Applications and Radiopharmaceuticals Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-05-01

    The {sup 90}Sr/ {sup 90}Y generator is the exclusive source of 'no carrier added' {sup 90}Y for targeted therapy. However, the concomitant presence of trace metals diminishes the complexation of {sup 90}Y with bifunctional chelators (BFCs). A systematic investigation was performed to evaluate the influence of trace metals on the complexation of {sup 90}Y (from an electrochemical generator) with BFCs such as p-SCN-Bn-PCTA, p-SCN-Bn-DTPA and p-SCN-Bn-DOTA. Our study indicates that while p-SCN-Bn-DTPA was least affected by most of the trace metals studied, p-SCN-Bn-PCTA was most sensitive to their presence and hence could be the ligand of choice for assessing the chemical purity of generator derived {sup 90}Y. (author)

  16. Dynamical impurity problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class

  17. Dynamical impurity problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  18. Plutonium-236 traces determination in plutonium-238 by α spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M.L.; Pottier, R.; Berger, R.

    1969-01-01

    Two methods are described in this report for the determination of plutonium-236 traces in plutonium-238 by a spectrometry using semi-conductor detectors. The first method involves a direct comparison of the areas under the peaks of the α spectra of plutonium-236 and plutonium-238. The electrolytic preparation of the sources is carried out after preliminary purification of the plutonium. The second method makes it possible to determine the 236 Pu/ 238 Pu ratio by comparing the areas of the α peaks of uranium-232 and uranium-234, which are the decay products of the two plutonium isotopes respectively. The uranium in the source, also deposited by electrolysis, is separated from a 1 mg amount of plutonium either by a T.L.A. extraction, or by the use of ion-exchange resins. The report ends with a discussion of the results obtained with plutonium of two different origins. (authors) [fr

  19. Dry sample storage system for an analytical laboratory supporting plutonium processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treibs, H.A.; Hartenstein, S.D.; Griebenow, B.L.; Wade, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Special Isotope Separation (SIS) plant is designed to provide removal of undesirable isotopes in fuel grade plutonium by the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. The AVLIS process involves evaporation of plutonium metal, and passage of an intense beam of light from a laser through the plutonium vapor. The laser beam consists of several discrete wavelengths, tuned to the precise wavelength required to ionize the undesired isotopes. These ions are attracted to charged plates, leaving the bulk of the plutonium vapor enriched in the desired isotopes to be collected on a cold plate. Major portions of the process consist of pyrochemical processes, including direct reduction of the plutonium oxide feed material with calcium metal, and aqueous processes for purification of plutonium in residues. The analytical laboratory for the plant is called the Material and Process Control Laboratory (MPCL), and provides for the analysis of solid and liquid process samples

  20. Quantitative spectrographic analysis of impurities in antimonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, J. de; Gomes, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    An emission spectrographic method is describe for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Be, Bi, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ga, Ni, Pb, Sn, Si, and Zn in high purity antimony metal. The metal sample ia dissolved in nitric acid(1:1) and converted tp oxide by calcination at 900 0 C for one hour. The oxide so obtained is mixed with graphite, which is used as a spectroscopic buffer, and excited by a direct current arc. Many parameters are studied optimum conditions are selected for the determination of the impurities mentioned. The spectrum is photographed in the second order of a 15.000 lines per inch grating and the most sensitive lines for the elements are selected. The impurities are determined in the concentration range of 1 - 0,01% with a precision of approximately 10% [pt

  1. Thermodynamic criteria for the removal of impurities from end-of-life magnesium alloys by evaporation and flux treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehito Hiraki, Osamu Takeda, Kenichi Nakajima, Kazuyo Matsubae, Shinichiro Nakamura and Tetsuya Nagasaka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the possibility of removing impurities during magnesium recycling with pyrometallurgical techniques has been evaluated by using a thermodynamic analysis. For 25 different elements that are likely to be contained in industrial magnesium alloys, the equilibrium distribution ratios between the metal, slag and gas phases in the magnesium remelting process were calculated assuming binary systems of magnesium and an impurity element. It was found that calcium, gadolinium, lithium, ytterbium and yttrium can be removed from the remelted end-of-life (EoL magnesium products by oxidization. Calcium, cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, lithium, plutonium, sodium, strontium and yttrium can be removed by chlorination with a salt flux. However, the other elements contained in magnesium alloy scrap are scarcely removed and this may contribute toward future contamination problems. The third technological option for the recycling of EoL magnesium products is magnesium recovery by a distillation process. Based on thermodynamic considerations, it is predicted that high-purity magnesium can be recovered through distillation because of its high vapor pressure, yet there is a limit on recoverability that depends on the equilibrium vapor pressure of the alloying elements and the large energy consumption. Therefore, the sustainable recycling of EoL magnesium products should be an important consideration in the design of advanced magnesium alloys or the development of new refining processes.

  2. Thermodynamic criteria for the removal of impurities from end-of-life magnesium alloys by evaporation and flux treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraki, Takehito; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nagasaka, Tetsuya; Takeda, Osamu; Nakajima, Kenichi; Nakamura, Shinichiro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the possibility of removing impurities during magnesium recycling with pyrometallurgical techniques has been evaluated by using a thermodynamic analysis. For 25 different elements that are likely to be contained in industrial magnesium alloys, the equilibrium distribution ratios between the metal, slag and gas phases in the magnesium remelting process were calculated assuming binary systems of magnesium and an impurity element. It was found that calcium, gadolinium, lithium, ytterbium and yttrium can be removed from the remelted end-of-life (EoL) magnesium products by oxidization. Calcium, cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, lithium, plutonium, sodium, strontium and yttrium can be removed by chlorination with a salt flux. However, the other elements contained in magnesium alloy scrap are scarcely removed and this may contribute toward future contamination problems. The third technological option for the recycling of EoL magnesium products is magnesium recovery by a distillation process. Based on thermodynamic considerations, it is predicted that high-purity magnesium can be recovered through distillation because of its high vapor pressure, yet there is a limit on recoverability that depends on the equilibrium vapor pressure of the alloying elements and the large energy consumption. Therefore, the sustainable recycling of EoL magnesium products should be an important consideration in the design of advanced magnesium alloys or the development of new refining processes.

  3. Thermodynamic criteria for the removal of impurities from end-of-life magnesium alloys by evaporation and flux treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, Takehito; Matsubae, Kazuyo; Nagasaka, Tetsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Takeda, Osamu [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Nakajima, Kenichi [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Nakamura, Shinichiro, E-mail: hiraki@material.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Economics, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, the possibility of removing impurities during magnesium recycling with pyrometallurgical techniques has been evaluated by using a thermodynamic analysis. For 25 different elements that are likely to be contained in industrial magnesium alloys, the equilibrium distribution ratios between the metal, slag and gas phases in the magnesium remelting process were calculated assuming binary systems of magnesium and an impurity element. It was found that calcium, gadolinium, lithium, ytterbium and yttrium can be removed from the remelted end-of-life (EoL) magnesium products by oxidization. Calcium, cerium, gadolinium, lanthanum, lithium, plutonium, sodium, strontium and yttrium can be removed by chlorination with a salt flux. However, the other elements contained in magnesium alloy scrap are scarcely removed and this may contribute toward future contamination problems. The third technological option for the recycling of EoL magnesium products is magnesium recovery by a distillation process. Based on thermodynamic considerations, it is predicted that high-purity magnesium can be recovered through distillation because of its high vapor pressure, yet there is a limit on recoverability that depends on the equilibrium vapor pressure of the alloying elements and the large energy consumption. Therefore, the sustainable recycling of EoL magnesium products should be an important consideration in the design of advanced magnesium alloys or the development of new refining processes.

  4. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. This volume includes background information; purpose of and need for the proposed action; alternatives for disposition of surplus weapons useable plutonium; and

  5. Interim Storage of Plutonium in Existing Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodsmall, T.D.

    1999-01-01

    reactor building. The storage life is projected to be ten years to allow the preparation of APSF. DOE has stipulated that there be no credible release during storage, since there are no design features in place to mitigate a release of plutonium (i.e. HEPA filters, facility containment boundaries, etc.). This mandate has presented most of the significant challenges to the safety analysis team. The shipping packages are designed to withstand certain accidents and conditions, but in order to take credit for these the storage environment must be strictly controlled. Damages to the packages from exposure to fire, dropping, crushing and other impact accidents have been analyzed, and appropriate preventative design features have been incorporated. Other efforts include the extension of the shipping life (roughly two years) to a suitable storage life of ten years. These issues include the effects of internal pressure increases, seal degradation and the presence of impurities. A process known as the Container Qualification Program has been conducted to address these issues. The KAMS project will be ready to receive the first shipment from Rocky Flats in January 2000. No credible design basis scenarios resulting in the release of plutonium exist. This work has been useful in the effort to provide a safer disposition of plutonium, but also the lessons learned and techniques established by the team will help with the analysis of future facility modifications.'

  6. Impurity solitons with quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Torres, Juan P-; Torner, Lluis

    1998-01-01

    We fmd families of solitary waves mediated by parametric mixing in quadratic nonlinear media that are localized at point-defect impurities. Solitons localized at attractive impurities are found to be dynamically stable. It is shown that localization at the impurity modifies strongly the soliton...

  7. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    These analytical procedures are designed to show whether a given material meets the purchaser's specifications as to plutonium content, effective fissile content, and impurity content. The following procedures are described in detail: plutonium by controlled-potential coulometry; plutonium by amperometric titration with iron(II); free acid by titration in an oxalate solution; free acid by iodate precipitation-potentiometric titration method; uranium by Arsenazo I spectrophotometric method; thorium by thorin spectrophotometric method; iron by 1,10-phenanthroline spectrophotometric method; chloride by thiocyanate spectrophotometric method; fluoride by distillation-spectrophotometric method; sulfate by barium sulfate turbidimetric method; isotopic composition by mass spectrometry; americium-241 by extraction and gamma counting; americium-241 by gamma counting; gamma-emitting fission products, uranium, and thorium by gamma-ray spectroscopy; rare earths by copper spark spectrochemical method; tungsten, niobium (columbium), and tantalum by spectrochemical method; simple preparation by spectrographic analysis for general impurities

  8. Investigation on the influence of metal ion impurities on the complexation behavior of generator produced {sup 90}Y with different bifunctional chelators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Usha; Gamre, Naresh; Chakravarty, Rubel; Pillai, Maroor Raghavan Ambikalmajan; Dash, Ashutosh [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India). Radiopharmaceuticals Div.

    2014-07-01

    While the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator is the exclusive source of obtaining 'no carrier added' {sup 90}Y for targeted therapy, the presence of trace metals in the radiolabeling solutions poses a serious challenge owing to their ability to diminish the {sup 90}Y complexation yields with bifunctional chelators (BFCs). p-SCN-Bn-PCTA is a novel ligand having faster complexation kinetics with a number of radiometals. In this work, a systematic investigation was performed to evaluate the chelating ability of p-SCN-Bn-PCTA for {sup 90}Y and the influence of trace metal ions on it's complexation with {sup 90}Y in comparison to p-SCN-Bn-DTPA and p-SCN-Bn-DOTA using {sup 90}YCl{sub 3} obtained from an electrochemical generator. Results from our study indicate that while p-SCN-Bn-PCTA gave very good radiolabeling yields with {sup 90}Y when the reaction was carried out by heating for few minutes, it was most sensitive to the presence of trace metals, especially Fe(III). An independent and useful observation is that p-SCN-Bn-PCTA could be considered as the ligand of choice for assessing the chemical purity of generator derived {sup 90}Y.

  9. METHOD OF PRODUCING PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, W.B.; Smith, R.C.

    1959-12-15

    A process is presented for preparing plutonium tetrafluoride from plutonium(IV) oxalate. The oxalate is dried and decomposed at about 300 deg C to the dioxide, mixed with ammonium bifluoride, and the mixture is heated to between 50 and 150 deg C whereby ammonium plutonium fluoride is formed. The ammonium plutonium fluoride is then heated to about 300 deg C for volatilization of ammonium fluoride. Both heating steps are preferably carried out in an inert atmosphere.

  10. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.

    2002-01-01

    In JET plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) the behaviour of metallic and low-Z impurities (C, Ne) was investigated. In ITB discharges with reversed shear, the metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the density profile, while the concentration of low-Z elements C and Ne is only mildly peaked. The accumulation might be so strong, that the central radiation approximately equals the central heating power followed by a radiative collapse of the transport barrier. The radial location with strong impurity gradients (convective barrier) was identified to be situated inside (not at!) the heat flux barrier. Calculations of neo-classical transport were performed for these discharges, including impurity-impurity collisions. It was found, that the observed Z-dependence of the impurity peaking and the location of the impurity 'barrier' can be explained with neo-classical transport. ITB discharges with monotonic shear show less inward convection and seem to be advantageous with respect to plasma purity. (author)

  11. Aqueous Solution Chemistry of Plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Things I have learned working with plutonium: Chemistry of plutonium is complex; Redox equilibria make Pu solution chemistry particularly challenging in the absence of complexing ligands; Understanding this behavior is key to successful Pu chemistry experiments; There is no suitable chemical analog for plutonium.

  12. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  13. Physics of plutonium recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The commercial recycling of plutonium as PuO 2 /UO 2 mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel is an established practice in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) in several countries, the main motivation being the consumption of plutonium arising from spent fuel reprocessing. Although the same motivating factors apply in the case of boiling water reactors (BWRs), they have lagged behind PWRs for various reasons, and MOX utilisation in BWRs has been implemented in only a few reactors to date. One of the reasons is that the nuclear design of BWR MOX assemblies (or bundles) is more complex than that of PWR assemblies. Recognizing the need and the timeliness to address this issue at the international level, the OECD/NEA Working Party on the Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles (WPPR) conducted a physics code benchmark test for a BWR assembly. This volume reports on the benchmark results and conclusions that can be drawn from it. (authors)

  14. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  15. Sensitivity of graphene flakes and nanorings to impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-Ukrainskaya Str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the influence of impurity on the graphene flakes and nanorings conductance. Based on the jumping Hamiltonian for graphene electrons with its direct diagonalization, we obtain the density of states. Further, the tunneling current is calculated for the following contacts: graphene flake-metal, graphene flake-quantum dots, graphene nanoring-quantum dots. We analyze the effect of the flake dimensions and the positions of the adsorbed molecule of impurity on the characteristic properties of the tunneling current.

  16. Identification of impurities in sodium and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, B.I.; Voltchkov, L.G.; Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Kuznetsov, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents some investigation results on sodium technology. In particular, a description is given of a calculation method for evaluation of sodium-cover gas-impurities equilibrium compositions as well as experimental results on development of methods for sodium sampling, equipment for non-metallic impurities (oxygen, hydrogen, carbon) constant control in sodium. The investigation results on sodium purification with cold traps are presented

  17. Potentiometric titration of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    In the potentiometric titration of plutonium(III), it has been customary to take the equivalence point as the inflection point on a plot of potential vs. volume of titrant. It have not been, however, demonstrated, that the stoichiometric end point corresponds to the inflection point. Suggestions are made according to which these points may not correspond in the potentiometric titration of plutonium(III), as these titrations are ordinarily concluded in a period of time which is short compared to the time required for valence state rearrangement through disproportionation. (T.G.)

  18. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  19. Pyrophoric potential of plutonium-containing salt residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haschke, John M.; Fauske, Hans K.; Phillips, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    Ignition temperatures of plutonium and the pyrophoric potential of plutonium-containing pyrochemical salt residues are determined from differential thermal analysis (DTA) data and by modeling of thermal behavior. Exotherms observed at 90-200 deg. C for about 30% of the residues are attributed to reaction of plutonium with water from decomposition of hydrated salts. Exotherms observed near 300 deg. C are consistent with ignition of metal particles embedded in the salt. Onset of self-sustained reaction at temperatures as low as 90 deg. C is not precluded by these results and heat-balance models are developed and applied in predicting the static ignition point of massive metal and in evaluating salt pyrophoricity. Results show that ambient temperatures in excess of 200 deg. C are required for ignition of salt residues and that the most reactive salts cannot ignite at low temperatures because diffusion of oxidant to embedded metal is limited by low salt porosity

  20. Activity coefficients of plutonium and cerium in liquid gallium at 1073 K: Application to a molten salt/solvent metal separation concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambertin, David; Ched'homme, Severine; Bourges, Gilles; Sanchez, Sylvie; Picard, Gerard S.

    2005-01-01

    Activity coefficients in liquid metal and salt phases are important parameters for predicting the separation efficiency of reductive extraction or electrochemical pyrochemical processes. The electrochemical properties of Ce and Pu in gallium metal and chlorides media - CaCl 2 and equimolar NaCl-KCl - have been studied at 1073 K. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry show the thermodynamic feasibility of using gallium as solvent metal for pyrochemical processes involving Pu and Ce. The activity coefficient of Pu in liquid Ga (log(γ Pu,Ga ) = -7.3 ± 0.5) is deduced from the results and is a basis of assessing the potential for using liquid metals in pyrochemical separation of actinides and lanthanides. Evaluation of literature data for Al, Bi and Cd suggests that Ga is most favorable for selective separation of Pu from Ce near 1073 K

  1. Pyrochemical processes for the recovery of weapons grade plutonium either as a metal or as PuO2 for use in mixed oxide reactor fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colmenares, C.A.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Bronson, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    The authors have developed two processes for the recovery of weapons grade Pu, as either Pu metal or PuO 2 , that are strictly pyrochemical and do not produce any liquid waste. Large amounts of Pu metal (up to 4 kg.), in various geometric shapes, have been recovered by a hydride/dehydride/casting process (HYDEC) to produce metal ingots of any desired shape. The three processing steps are carried out in a single compact apparatus. The experimental technique and results obtained will be described. The authors have prepared PuO 2 powders from weapons grade Pu by a process that hydrides the Pu metal followed by the oxidation of the hydride (HYDOX process). Experimental details of the best way to carry out this process will be presented, as well as the characterization of both hydride and oxide powders produced

  2. Plutonium isotopes in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, E.

    1977-12-01

    Determination of plutonium and americium by ion exchange and alpha-spectrometry. Deposition of global fall-out and accumulated area-content of 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu and 241 Am in central Sweden (62.3 deg N, 12.4 deg E), by using the lichen species Cladonia alpestris as bioindicator. Retention and distribution of plutonium in carpets of lichen and soil. Transfer of plutonium from lichen to reindeer and man. Absorbed dose in reindeer and man from plutonium. Basic studies of plutonium and americium in the western Mediterranean surface waters, with emphases on particulate form of the transuranics. (author)

  3. Surplus plutonium disposition draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Part B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS). DOE's disposition strategy allows for both the immobilization of surplus plutonium and its use as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of the immobilized plutonium and MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a geologic repository. The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement analyzes alternatives that would use the immobilization approach (for some of the surplus plutonium) and the MOX fuel approach (for some of the surplus plutonium); alternatives that would immobilize all of the surplus plutonium; and the No Action Alternative. The alternatives include three disposition facilities that would be designed so that they could collectively accomplish disposition of up to 50 metric tons (55 tons) of surplus plutonium over their operating lives: (1) the pit disassembly and conversion facility would disassemble pits (a weapons component) and convert the recovered plutonium, as well as plutonium metal from other sources, into plutonium dioxide suitable for disposition; (2) the immobilization facility would include a collocated capability for converting nonpit plutonium materials into plutonium dioxide suitable for immobilization and would be located at either Hanford or SRS. DOE has identified SRS as the preferred site for an immobilization facility; (3) the MOX fuel fabrication facility would fabricate plutonium dioxide into MOX fuel. This volume has chapters on environmental consequences; environmental regulations, permits, and consultations; a glossary; list of preparers; distribution list

  4. Compositions of airborne plutonium-bearing particles from a plutonium finishing operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.M. Jr.

    1976-11-01

    The elemental composition of 111 plutonium-bearing particles was determined (using an electron microprobe) as part of a program to investigate the origin and behavior of the long-lived transuranic radionuclides released from fuel reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Plant. These particles, collected from wet-cabinet and room-air exhausts from the plutonium finishing operation (JB-Line), were between 0.4 and 36 μm in diameter. Ninety-nine of the particles were found to be aggregates of various minerals and metals, six were quartz, and six were small (less than 2-μm-diameter) pieces of iron oxide. Collectively, these particles contained less minerals and more metals than natural dusts contain. The metallic constituents included elements normally not found in dusts, e.g., chromium, nickel, copper, and zinc. Concentrations of aluminum and iron exceeded those normally found in minerals. Elemental concentrations in individual particles covered a wide range: one 2-μm-diameter particle contained 97 percent NiO, a 9-μm-diameter particle contained 72 percent Cr 2 O 3 . Although the particles were selected because they produced plutonium fission tracks, the plutonium concentration was too low to be estimated by microprobe analysis in all but a 1-μm-diameter particle. This plutonium-bearing particle contained 73 percent PuO 2 by weight in combination with Fe 2 O 3 and mica; its activity was estimated at 0.17 pCi of 239 Pu

  5. Investigation of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andryushin, V.G.; Belov, V.A.; Galaktionov, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, P.B.; Matyukha, V.A.; Shmidt, V.S.

    1982-01-01

    Deposition processes of plutonium (4) hydroxoformates in the system Pu(NO 3 ) 4 -HNO 3 -HCoOH-N6 4 OH-H 2 O have been studied in pH range 0.2-10.7 at total plutonium concentration in the system 100 g/l. It is shown that under the conditions plutonium (4) hydrolysis takes place with the formation of hydroxoformates. A local maximum of plutonium (4) hydroxoformate solubility in the range pH=3.8-4.8, which is evidently conditioned by the formation of soluble formate complex of plutonium in the region, is pointed out. The basic plutonium (4) formates of the composition PuOsub(x)(OH)sub(y)(COOH)sub(4-2x-y)xnHsub(2)O, where 1,3 >=x >= 0.7, 1.7 >= y >= 1.0 and n=1.5-7.0, are singled out, their thermal stability being studied. Density of the crystals and plutonium dioxide, formed during their thermal decomposition, is measured. It is established that for plutonium (4) hydroxoformates common regularities of the influence of salt composition (OH - -, CHOO - - and H 2 O-group numbers in the mulecule) on position of temperature decomposition effects and on the density of compounds, which have been previously found during the study of thorium and plutonium hydroxosalts are observed. It is shown that the density of plutonium dioxide decreases with the increase of hydration and hydrolysis degree of the initial plutonium hydroxoformate

  6. Aerosol generation by oxidation and combustion of plutonium and its compounds: literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1987-09-01

    Generation of aerosols by oxidation or combustion is one of the greatest risks due to plutonium. A review is made of the most interesting documents available on this topic. Following a brief study of plutonium oxydation conditions, characteristics of aerosols generated by accidents of fires involving metallic Pu and some of its compounds are assessed. Nuclear weapons are not included in this review [fr

  7. Gas generation over plutonium oxides in the 94-1 shelf-life surveillance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, J.M.; Harradine, D.M.; Hill, D.D.; McFarlan, James T.; Padilla, D.D.; Prenger, F. Coyne; Veirs, D.K.; Worl, L.A.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is embarking upon a program to store large quantities of plutonium-bearing materials for up to fifty years. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Shelf Life Project was established to bound the behavior of plutonium-bearing material meeting the DOE 3013 Standard. The shelf life study monitors temperature, pressure and gas composition over oxide materials in a limited number of large-scale 3013 inner containers and in many small-scale containers. For the large-scale study, baseline plutonium oxides, oxides exposed to high-humidity atmospheres, and oxides containing chloride salt impurities are planned. The first large-scale container represents a baseline and contains dry plutonium oxide prepared according to the 3013 Standard. This container has been observed for pressure, temperature and gas compositional changes for less than a year. Results indicate that no detectable changes in pressure and gas composition are observed.

  8. International plutonium policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    As any other fissile material, the plutonium raises several utilization problems, particularly as far as diversion by sub-national groups or proliferation are concerned. The purpose of this paper is to show that these problems can be given reasonable solutions avoiding over penalties on energy production

  9. Plutonium safety training course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moe, H.J.

    1976-03-01

    This course seeks to achieve two objectives: to provide initial safety training for people just beginning work with plutonium, and to serve as a review and reference source for those already engaged in such work. Numerous references have been included to provide information sources for those wishing to pursue certain topics more fully. The first part of the course content deals with the general safety approach used in dealing with hazardous materials. Following is a discussion of the four properties of plutonium that lead to potential hazards: radioactivity, toxicity, nuclear properties, and spontaneous ignition. Next, the various hazards arising from these properties are treated. The relative hazards of both internal and external radiation sources are discussed, as well as the specific hazards when plutonium is the source. Similarly, the general hazards involved in a criticality, fire, or explosion are treated. Comments are made concerning the specific hazards when plutonium is involved. A brief summary comparison between the hazards of the transplutonium nuclides relative to 239 Pu follows. The final portion deals with control procedures with respect to contamination, internal and external exposure, nuclear safety, and fire protection. The philosophy and approach to emergency planning are also discussed

  10. Atomic spectrum of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaise, J.; Fred, M.; Gutmacher, R.G.

    1984-08-01

    This report contains plutonium wavelengths, energy level classifications, and other spectroscopic data accumulated over the past twenty years at Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The primary purpose was term analysis: deriving the energy levels in terms of quantum numbers and electron configurations, and evaluating the Slater-Condon and other parameters from the levels

  11. Plutonium: An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condit, R.H.

    1993-10-01

    This report is a summary of the history and properties of plutonium. It presents information on the atoms, comparing chemical and nuclear properties. It looks at the history of the atom, including its discovery and production methods. It summarizes the metallurgy and chemistry of the element. It also describes means of detecting and measuring the presence and quantity of the element

  12. Plutonium Disposition by Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.; DiSabatino, A.; Mitchell, M.

    2000-01-01

    The ultimate goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize between 17 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons-usable plutonium materials in waste forms that meet the ''spent fuel'' standard and are acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. Using the ceramic can-in-canister technology selected for immobilization, surplus plutonium materials will be chemically combined into ceramic forms which will be encapsulated within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2008 and be completed within 10 years. In support of this goal, the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) is conducting development and testing (D and T) activities at four DOE laboratories under the technical leadership of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Savannah River Site has been selected as the site for the planned Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). The D and T effort, now in its third year, will establish the technical bases for the design, construction, and operation of the U. S. capability to immobilize surplus plutonium in a suitable and cost-effective manner. Based on the D and T effort and on the development of a conceptual design of the PIP, automation is expected to play a key role in the design and operation of the Immobilization Plant. Automation and remote handling are needed to achieve required dose reduction and to enhance operational efficiency

  13. Plutonium cores of zenith

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barclay, F R; Cameron, I R; Drageset, A; Freemantle, R G; Wilson, D J

    1965-03-15

    The report describes a series of experiments carried out with plutonium fuel in the heated zero power reactor ZENITH, with the aim of testing current theoretical methods, with particular reference to excess reactivity, temperature coefficients, differential spectrum and reaction rate distributions. Two cores of widely different fissile/moderator atom ratios were loaded in order to test the theory under significantly varied spectrum conditions.

  14. Plutonium and textbooks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium is not characterized by equilibrium constants alone. At least one conservation principle is necessary. Textbook descriptions of plutonium chemistry that are based on two-reaction-product disproportionation equations, or do not recognize the conservation principles, are incomplete and potentially misleading. (author)

  15. Japan's plutonium economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, M.M.

    1994-01-01

    Japan's plutonium economy is based on the most efficient use of nuclear energy, as envisioned under the Atoms for Peace program of the 1950s and 1960s. The nuclear pioneers assumed that all nations would want to take full advantage of atomic energy, recycling waste into new fuel to derive as much energy as possible from this resource

  16. Transport of plutonium nitrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This leaflet discusses the subject under the headings: why do we need plutonium; why must we transport it; what action is carried out; how is it moved; what are the risks. The transport of the material in specially designed containers, from Dounreay in Caithness by road and sea to Sellafield in Cumbria, is described. (U.K.)

  17. Boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in GeC nanoribbons: A first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhuo; Li, Yangping, E-mail: liyp@nwpu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhengtang

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. • The impurities could result in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR. • The impurities turns the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR into semiconductor. • The impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR. • The impurities could introduce magnetic moments into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory we investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of substitutional boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in germanium carbide (GeC) nanoribbons. Hydrogen terminated GeC ribbons with armchair and zigzag edges are considered here. We observed that all three impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. In addition, the electronic band structures of the doped systems indicate that (i) the impurities could introduce impurity bands in the band gap and resulting in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR, (ii) the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR turns into semiconductor because of the incorporation of the impurities, (iii) the impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR and even introduce magnetic moment into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR.

  18. Preconceptual design for separation of plutonium and gallium by ion exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    The disposition of plutonium from decommissioned nuclear weapons, by incorporation into commercial UO 2 -based nuclear reactor fuel, is a viable means to reduce the potential for theft of excess plutonium. This fuel, which would be a combination of plutonium oxide and uranium oxide, is referred to as a mixed oxide (MOX). Following power generation in commercial reactors with this fuel, the remaining plutonium would become mixed with highly radioactive fission products in a spent fuel assembly. The radioactivity, complex chemical composition, and large size of this spent fuel assembly, would make theft difficult with elaborate chemical processing required for plutonium recovery. In fabricating the MOX fuel, it is important to maintain current commercial fuel purity specifications. While impurities from the weapons plutonium may or may not have a detrimental affect on the fuel fabrication or fuel/cladding performance, certifying the effect as insignificant could be more costly than purification. Two primary concerns have been raised with regard to the gallium impurity: (1) gallium vaporization during fuel sintering may adversely affect the MOX fuel fabrication process, and (2) gallium vaporization during reactor operation may adversely affect the fuel cladding performance. Consequently, processes for the separation of plutonium from gallium are currently being developed and/or designed. In particular, two separation processes are being considered: (1) a developmental, potentially lower cost and lower waste, thermal vaporization process following PuO 2 powder preparation, and (2) an off-the-shelf, potentially higher cost and higher waste, aqueous-based ion exchange (IX) process. While it is planned to use the thermal vaporization process should its development prove successful, IX has been recommended as a backup process. This report presents a preconceptual design with material balances for separation of plutonium from gallium by IX

  19. Detection and measurement of gamma-ray self-attenuation in plutonium residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prettyman, T.H.; Foster, L.A.; Estep, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    A new method to correct for self-attenuation in gamma-ray assays of plutonium is presented. The underlying assumptions of the technique are based on a simple but accurate physical model of plutonium residues, particularly pyrochemical salts, in which it is assumed that the plutonium is divided into two portions, each of which can be treated separately from the standpoint of gamma-ray analysis: a portion that is in the form of plutonium metal shot; and a dilute portion that is mixed with the matrix. The performance of the technique is evaluated using assays of plutonium residues by tomographic gamma scanning at the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility. The ability of the method to detect saturation conditions is examined

  20. Plutonium immobilization plant using ceramic in existing facilities at the Savannah River site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiSabatino, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) accepts plutonium (Pu) from pit conversion and from non-pit sources, and through a ceramic immobilization process converts the plutonium into an immobilized form that can be disposed of in a high level waste (HLW) repository. This immobilization process is shown conceptually in Figure 1-1. The objective is to make an immobilized form, suitable for geologic disposal, in which the plutonium is as inherently unattractive and inaccessible as the plutonium in spent fuel from commercial reactors. The ceramic immobilization alternative presented in this report consists of first converting the surplus material to an oxide, followed by incorporating the plutonium oxide into a titanate-based ceramic material that is placed in metal cans

  1. Plutonium Elastic Moduli, Electron Localization, and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migliori, Albert; Mihut-Stroe, Izabella; Betts, Jon B.

    2008-01-01

    In almost all materials, compression is accompanied naturally by stiffening. Even in materials with zero or negative thermal expansion, where warming is accompanied by volume contraction it is the volume change that primarily controls elastic stiffness. Not so in the metal plutonium. In plutonium, alloying with gallium can change the sign of thermal expansion, but for the positive thermal- expansion monoclinic phase as well as the face-centered-cubic phase with either sign of thermal expansion, and the orthorhombic phase, recent measurements of elastic moduli show soften on warming by an order of magnitude more than expected, the shear and compressional moduli track, and volume seems irrelevant. These effects point toward a novel mechanism for electron localization, and have important implication for the pressure dependence of the bulk compressibility. (authors)

  2. Studies and manufacture of plutonium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussy, P.; Mustelier, J.P.; Pascard, R.

    1964-01-01

    The studies carried out at the C.E.A. on the properties of fast neutron reactor fuels, the manufacture of fuel elements and their behaviour under irradiation are broadly outlined. The metal fuels studied are the ternary alloys U Pu Mo, U Pu Nb, U Pa Ti, U Pa Zr, the ceramic fuels being mixed uranium and plutonium oxides, carbides and nitrides obtained by sintering. Results are given on the manufacture of uranium fuel elements containing a small proportion of plutonium, used in a critical experiment, and on the first experiments in the manufacture of fuel elements for the reactor Rapsodie. Finally the results of irradiation tests carried out on the prototype fuel pins for Rapsodie are described. (authors) [fr

  3. Modeling of the Microchemistry for Diffusion of Selected Impurities in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. R.; Bullock, J.S. IV

    2001-01-01

    Unalloyed metallic uranium used in some work done at Y-12 contains small quantities of impurities, the three most significant of which are carbon, iron, and silicon. During metallurgical processing, as the metal cools from a molten condition towards room temperature, the metallic matrix solution becomes supersaturated in each of the impurities whose concentration exceeds the solubility limit. Many impurity atoms form compounds with uranium that precipitate out of the solution, thus creating and growing inclusions. The objective of the present work is to study the distribution of impurity atoms about some of the inclusions, with a view toward examining the effect of the interaction between inclusions on the impurity atom distribution. The method used is time-dependent mass diffusion from the supersaturated solution to the surfaces of the inclusions. Micrographs of metal samples suggest that the inclusions form in successive stages. After each inclusion forms, it begins to draw impurity atoms from its immediate vicinity, thus altering the amounts and distributions of impurity atoms available for formation and growth of later inclusions. In the present work, a one-dimensional spherical approximation was used to simulate inclusions and their regions of influence. A first set of calculations was run to simulate the distribution of impurity atoms about the largest inclusions. Then, a second set of calculations was run to see how the loss of impurity atoms to the largest inclusions might affect the distribution of impurity atoms around the next stage of inclusions. Plots are shown for the estimated distributions of impurity atoms in the region of influence about the inclusions for the three impurities studied. The authors believe that these distributions are qualitatively correct. However, there is enough uncertainty about precisely when inclusions nucleate and begin to grow that one should not put too much reliance on the quantitative results. This work does provide a

  4. Use of plutonium for power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The panel reviewed available information on various aspects of plutonium utilization, such as physics of plutonium, technology of plutonium fuels in thermal and fast reactors, behaviour of plutonium fuel under reactor irradiation, technological and economic aspects of plutonium fuel cycle. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Impurities in uranium process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Several uranium purification circuits are presented in tabular form together with the average major impurity levels associated with each. The more common unit operations in these circuits, namely strong- and weak-base ion-exchange, solvent extraction and the precipitation of impurities are then discussed individually. Particular attention is paid to the effect and removal of impurities in each of these four unit operations. (author)

  6. Sludge stabilization at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This Environmental Assessment evaluates the proposed action to operate two laboratory-size muffle furnaces in glovebox HC-21C, located in the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The muffle furnaces would be used to stabilize chemically reactive sludges that contain approximately 25 kilograms (55 pounds) of plutonium by heating to approximately 500 to 1000 degrees C (900 to 1800 degrees F). The resulting stable powder, mostly plutonium oxide with impurities, would be stored in the PFP vaults. The presence of chemically reactive plutonium-bearing sludges in the process gloveboxes poses a risk to workers from radiation exposure and limits the availability of storage space for future plant cleanup. Therefore, there is a need to stabilize the material into a form suitable for long-term storage. This proposed action would be an interim action, which would take place prior to completion of an Environmental Impact Statement for the PFP which would evaluate stabilization of all plutonium-bearing materials and cleanout of the facility. However, only 10 percent of the total quantity of plutonium in reactive materials is in the sludges, so this action will not limit the choice of reasonable alternatives or prejudice the Record of Decision of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Environmental Impact Statement

  7. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Pilaniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH, the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA, and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs. The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are - reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas-liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid-liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC-Mass Spectroscopy (MS, LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research.

  8. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nass, R. [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage.

  9. Plutonium Finishing Plant. Interim plutonium stabilization engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.J.; Gallucci, R.H.; Garrett, S.M.K.; Geeting, J.G.H.; Goheen, R.S.; Molton, P.M.; Templeton, K.J.; Villegas, A.J.; Nass, R.

    1995-08-01

    This report provides the results of an engineering study that evaluated the available technologies for stabilizing the plutonium stored at the Plutonium Finishing Plant located at the hanford Site in southeastern Washington. Further processing of the plutonium may be required to prepare the plutonium for interim (<50 years) storage. Specifically this document provides the current plutonium inventory and characterization, the initial screening process, and the process descriptions and flowsheets of the technologies that passed the initial screening. The conclusions and recommendations also are provided. The information contained in this report will be used to assist in the preparation of the environmental impact statement and to help decision makers determine which is the preferred technology to process the plutonium for interim storage

  10. Some Thermodynamic Features of Uranium-Plutonium Nitride Fuel in the Course of Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusinkevich, A. A.; Ivanov, A. S.; Belov, G. V.; Skupov, M. V.

    2017-12-01

    Calculation studies on the effect of carbon and oxygen impurities on the chemical and phase compositions of nitride uranium-plutonium fuel in the course of burnup are performed using the IVTANTHERMO code. It is shown that the number of moles of UN decreases with increasing burnup level, whereas UN1.466, UN1.54, and UN1.73 exhibit a considerable increase. The presence of oxygen and carbon impurities causes an increase in the content of the UN1.466, UN1.54 and UN1.73 phases in the initial fuel by several orders of magnitude, in particular, at a relatively low temperature. At the same time, the presence of impurities abruptly reduces the content of free uranium in unburned fuel. Plutonium in the considered system is contained in form of Pu, PuC, PuC2, Pu2C3, and PuN. Plutonium carbides, as well as uranium carbides, are formed in small amounts. Most of the plutonium remains in the form of nitride PuN, whereas unbound Pu is present only in the areas with a low burnup level and high temperatures.

  11. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) [SEC 1 THRU 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ULLAH, M K

    2001-02-26

    The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is located on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. The DOE Richland Operations (DOE-RL) Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) is with Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH). Westinghouse Safety Management Systems (WSMS) provides management support to the PFP facility. Since 1991, the mission of the PFP has changed from plutonium material processing to preparation for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D). The PFP is in transition between its previous mission and the proposed D and D mission. The objective of the transition is to place the facility into a stable state for long-term storage of plutonium materials before final disposition of the facility. Accordingly, this update of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) reflects the current status of the buildings, equipment, and operations during this transition. The primary product of the PFP was plutonium metal in the form of 2.2-kg, cylindrical ingots called buttoms. Plutonium nitrate was one of several chemical compounds containing plutonium that were produced as an intermediate processing product. Plutonium recovery was performed at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) and plutonium conversion (from a nitrate form to a metal form) was performed at the Remote Mechanical C (RMC) Line as the primary processes. Plutonium oxide was also produced at the Remote Mechanical A (RMA) Line. Plutonium processed at the PFP contained both weapons-grade and fuels-grade plutonium materials. The capability existed to process both weapons-grade and fuels-grade material through the PRF and only weapons-grade material through the RMC Line although fuels-grade material was processed through the line before 1984. Amounts of these materials exist in storage throughout the facility in various residual forms left from previous years of operations.

  12. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospieszczyk, A; Bay, H L; Bogen, P; Hartwig, H; Hintz, E; Koenen, L; Ross, G G; Rusbueldt, D; Samm, U; Schweer, B

    1987-02-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n/sub e/, of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers.

  13. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Bay, H.L.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Koenen, L.; Ross, G.G.; Rusbueldt, D.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    1987-01-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n e , of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers. (orig.)

  14. Flexible process options for the immobilisation of residues and wastes containing plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.W.A.; Moricca, S.A.; Day, R. A.; Begg, B. D.; Scales, C. R.; Maddrell, E. R.; Eilbeck, A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Residues and waste streams containing plutonium present unique technical, safety, regulatory, security, and socio-political challenges. In the UK these streams range from lightly plutonium contaminated materials (PCM) through to residue s resulting directly from Pu processing operations. In addition there are potentially stocks of Pu oxide powders whose future designation may be either a waste or an asset, due to their levels of contamination making their reuse uneconomic, or to changes in nuclear policy. While waste management routes exist for PCM, an immobilisation process is required for streams containing higher levels of Pu. Such a process is being developed by Nexia Solutions and ANSTO to treat and immobilise Pu waste and residues currently stored on the Sellafield site. The characteristics of these Pu waste streams are highly variable. The physical form of the Pu waste ranges from liquids, sludges, powders/granules, to solid components (e.g., test fuels), with the Pu present as an ion in solution, as a salt, metal, oxide or other compound. The chemistry of the Pu waste streams also varies considerably with a variety of impurities present in many waste streams. Furthermore, with fissile isotopes present, criticality is an issue during operations and in the store or repository. Safeguards and security concerns must be assessed and controlled. The process under development, by using a combination of tailored waste form chemistry combined with flexible process technology aims to develop a process line to handle a broad range of Pu waste streams. It aims to be capable of dealing with not only current arisings but those anticipated to arise as a result of future operations or policy changes. (authors)

  15. Gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugov, Yu.S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of concentration, separation, detection in gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds including low-boiling gases, reactive gases, organometallic compounds, free metals, anions, etc. are reviewed. Methods of reaction gas chromatography for determining reactive gases, water, anions, metal chelates are considered in detail as well as methods of reaction-sorption concentration and reaction gas extraction. The application of gas chromatograpny ior anaiysis of water and atmosphere contamination, for determination of impurities in highly pure solid substances and gases is described

  16. Internal stresses in α-plutonium during deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    Internal stresses were measured in fine grained (2 μm) and coarse grained (20 μm) α-plutonium. In the fine grained metal the internal stress sigmasub(i), which was interpreted as the stress driving recovery processes near grain boundaries, was weakly dependent on applied stress, sigmasub(a). The effective stress, sigmasub(e) = sigma sub(a) - sigmasub(i), which is the stress to move dislocations, increased nearly 1:1 with applied stress, especially at high applied stresses. The strain rate obeyed the relation epsilon=K(T)sigmasub(e)sup(n) where K(T) is a temperature dependent term and n approximately = 3. The recovery rate in fine grained α-plutonium during creep was concluded to be very sensitive to internal stress. The internal stress in α-plutonium with 20 μm grain size was much higher than in the finer grain metal. (Auth.)

  17. Recovery of plutonium from electrorefining anode heels at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.; Gray, L.W.; Karraker, D.G.

    1987-03-01

    In a joint effort, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), Savannah River Plant (SRP), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) have developed two processes to recover plutonium from electrorefining anode heel residues. Aqueous dissolution of anode heel metal was demonstrated at SRL on a laboratory scale and on a larger pilot scale using either sulfamic acid or nitric acid-hydrazine-fluoride solutions. This direct anode heel metal dissolution requires the use of a geometrically favorable dissolver. The second process developed involves first diluting the plutonium in the anode heel residues by alloying with aluminum. The alloyed anode heel plutonium can then be dissolved using a nitric acid-fluoride-mercury(II) solution in large non-geometrically favorable equipment where nuclear safety is ensured by concentration control

  18. Influence of impurities on silicide contact formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Meermanov, G.B.; Kazdaev, R.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    Research objectives of this work are to investigate the influence of light impurities implantation on peculiarities of the silicides formation in molybdenum monocrystal implanted by silicon, and in molybdenum films sputtered on silicon substrate at subsequent annealing. Implantation of the molybdenum samples was performed with silicon ions (90 keV, 5x10 17 cm -2 ). Phase identification was performed by X ray analysis with photographic method of registration. Analysis of the results has shown the formation of the molybdenum silicide Mo 3 Si at 900 deg. C. To find out the influence of impurities present in the atmosphere (C,N,O) on investigated processes we have applied combined implantation. At first, molybdenum was implanted with ions of the basic component (silicon) and then -- with impurities ions. Acceleration energies (40keV for C, 45 keV for N and 50 keV for O) were chosen to obtain the same distribution profiles for basic and impurities ions. Ion doses were 5x10 17 cm -2 for Si-ions and 5x10 16 cm -2 - for impurities. The most important results are reported here. The first, for all three kinds of impurities the decreased formation temperatures of the phase Mo 3 Si were observed; in the case of C and N it was ∼100 deg. and in the case of nitrogen - ∼200 deg. Further, simultaneously with the Mo 3 Si phase, the appearance of the rich-metal phase Mo 5 Si 3 was registered (not observed in the samples without additional implantation). In case of Mo/Si-structure, the implantation of the impurities (N,O) was performed to create the peak concentration (∼4at/%) located in the middle of the molybdenum film (∼ 150nm) deposited on silicon substrate. Investigation carried out on unimplanted samples showed the formation of the silicide molybdenum MoSi 2 , observed after annealing at temperatures 900/1000 deg. C, higher than values 500-600 deg. C reported in other works. It is discovered that electrical conductivity of Mo 5 Si 3 -films synthesized after impurities

  19. Chemistry of plutonium revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connick, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    In 1941 one goal of the Manhattan Project was to unravel the chemistry of the synthetic element plutonium as rapidly as possible. In this paper the work carried out at Berkeley from the spring of 1942 to the summer of 1945 is described briefly. The aqueous chemistry of plutonium is quite remarkable. Important insights were obtained from tracer experiments, but the full complexity was not revealed until macroscopic amounts (milligrams) became available. Because processes for separation from fission products were based on aqueous solutions, such solution chemistry was emphasized, particularly precipitation and oxidation-reduction behavior. The latter turned out to be unusually intricate when it was discovered that two more oxidation states existed in aqueous solution than had previously been suspected. Further, an equilibrium was rapidly established among the four aqueous oxidation states, while at the same time any three were not in equilibrium. These and other observations made while doing a crash study of a previously unknown element are reported

  20. International plutonium policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-12-01

    The need to distinguish between diversion by sub-national groups and by governments is clearly stated. The paper identifies the international safeguards measures which already exist for the handling of plutonium. It proposes that the implementation of Article XII A5 of the IAEA statute concerning the international storage of plutonium could be an important additional measure. The paper also mentions the concept of using confinement as a complimentary safeguards measure and identifies the PIPEX concept. In addition, greater use is proposed of containment and surveillance procedures. The multiplication of small reprocessing plants spread over many countries is perceived as a proliferation risk. Other means such as co-location of reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities are relevant to diversion by sub-national groups

  1. Strategies for the plutonium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouain, D.M.; Lima, J.O.V.; Sakamoto, L.H.

    1981-11-01

    A review of the activities involving plutonium (its recycle, utilization and technological status and perspectives) is done. These informations are useful for an economic viability study for the plutonium utilization in thermal reactors (recycling) and in fast breeders reactor (FBR), trying to collect the major number of informations about these subjects. The initial phase describes the present status and projections of plutonium accumulation and requirements. Then, the technological process are described and some strategies are analyzed. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Plutonium in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, A.

    2001-01-01

    The first volume of the new series, Radioactivity in the Environment, focuses on the environmental occurrence, the speciation, the behaviour, the fate, the applications and the health consequences of that much-feared and much-publicised element, plutonium. Featuring a collection of selected, peer-reviewed, up-to-date papers by leading researchers in the field, this work provides a state-of-the-art description of plutonium in the environment. This title helps to explain where present frontiers are drawn in our continuing efforts to understand the science of environmental plutonium and will help to place widespread concerns into perspective. As a whole this new book series on environmental radioactivity addresses, at academic research level, the key aspects of this socially important and complex interdisciplinary subject. Presented objectively and with the ultimate authority gained from the many contributions by the world's leading experts, the negative and positive consequences of having a radioactive world around us will be documented and given perspective. refs

  3. F. Biological hazards of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Plutonium is an unavoidable result of present nuclear power programmes. Its predominant isotopes are extremely long-lived and very toxic if absorbed in the body. In view of the increasing potential for plutonium and man to come into contact, the consequences of any plutonium release into the environment should be scientifically examined. This report is an attempt to place in one document a fully referenced account of the on-going work in many areas. There are three sections. Part 1 deals with the amounts of plutonium available in the fuel cycle, its properties and the probability of routine or accidental release. Part 2 examines the ways in which plutonium can reach man, in particular through food chains or inhalation. Part 3 details the biological effects of plutonium once it is absorbed into the body, assesses the amounts likely to be harmful and discusses the adequacy of present standards for plutonium burdens. There are two appendices. The likely differences between Pu-239, the most studied isotope, and other plutonium isotopes or transuranic nuclides are outlined in Appendix A. Appendix B contains a fuller account of the ways in which the fate of ingested or inhaled plutonium have been determined

  4. Plutonium in the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, N.V.; Linder, P.W.; Wade, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The shipping of plutonium from Europe to Japan around the Cape is a contentious issue which has raised public concern that South Africa may be at risk to plutonium exposure should an accident occur. The paper describes the containers in which the plutonium (in the form of plutonium oxide, PuO 2 ) is housed and consequences of the unlikely event of these becoming ruptured. Wind-borne pollution is considered not to be a likely scenario, with the plutonium oxide particles more likely to remain practically insoluble and sediment. Plutonium aqueous and environmental chemistry is briefly discussed. Some computer modelling whereby plutonium oxide is brought into contact with seawater has been performed and the results are presented. The impact on marine organisms is discussed in terms of studies performed at marine dump sites and after the crash of a bomber carrying nuclear warheads in Thule, Greenland in 1968. Various pathways from the sea to land are considered in the light of studies done at Sellafield, a reprocessing plant in the United Kingdom. Some recent debates in the popular scientific press, such as that on the leukemia cluster at Sellafield, are described. Plutonium biochemistry and toxicity are discussed as well as medical histories of workers exposed to plutonium. 35 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  5. Neo-classical impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, T.E.

    The neo-classical theory for impurity transport in a toroidal plasma is outlined, and the results discussed. A general account is given of the impurity behaviour and its dependence on collisionality. The underlying physics is described with special attention to the role of the poloidal rotation

  6. Universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for FBR mixed uranium and plutonium carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Takahashi, Ichiro; Watanabe, Hitoshi

    1978-10-01

    A universal high-temperature heat treatment furnace for LMFBR advanced fuels was installed in Plutonium Fuel Laboratory, Oarai Research Establishment. Design, construction and performance of the apparatus are described. With the apparatus, heat treatment of the fuel under a controlled gas atmosphere and quenching of the fuel with blowing helium gas are possible. Equipment to measure impurity gas release of the fuel is also provided. Various plutonium enclosure techniques, e.g., a gas line filter with new exchange mechanics, have been developed. In performance test, results of the enclosure techniques are described. (author)

  7. Impurity study experiment proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    ISX is a modest tokamak which emphasizes the production of a predictable test plasma, experimental flexibility, ease of assembly and disassembly, and good diagnostic access. Its plasma models the outer cooler layers in EPR like plasmas. In addition, provisions will be made for long discharge times which may be necessary to observe some impurity effects. These machine characteristics will enable one to study the collisional transport of impurities in the plasma, perform systematic studies of wall and limiter materials and geometries, study methods of cleaning the walls, and develop and test new diagnostic techniques. ISX will employ water-cooled copper coils to produce a maximum toroidal magnetic field of 20 kG at the plasma axis, which is 77 cm from the major axis. The plasma minor radius will be about 15 cm, and the maximum plasma current will be 100 kA which will be induced by an iron core transformer with a capability of up to 0.9 volt-sec for long discharges. An aspect ratio of five and the modest magnetic field permit a design with ample space for thick wall structures such as honeycomb walls. The ''picture frame'' toroidal field coil provides additional space, while removable coil top sections allow easy replacement of the vacuum chamber. The 72-turn toroidal field coil is grouped into 24 sections for increased access. Absence of a conducting shell and placement of the vertical field and transformer primary coils away from the plasma allow easy viewing of the plasma and good diagnostic access. (U.S.)

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of plutonium with chlorophosphonazo III in n-pentanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saponara, N.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1982-03-01

    Microgram amounts of plutonium are measured spectrophotometrically as the plutonium-chlorophosphonazo III complex after extraction into n-pentanol from 1.5 M HCl. The relative standard deviation is 1.5% for the range of 2.5 to 17.5 μg. The tolerance is excellent for many metals and nonmetals present in nuclear fuel-cycle materials. A preceding anion-exchange-column separation increases tolerance for certain metals and nonmetals

  9. Review of operating experience at the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Facility, 1963-1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, L.J.; Morgan, A.N.

    1981-12-01

    This report reviews the operation of the Los Alamos Plutonium Electrorefining Plant at Technical Area 21 for the period 1964 through 1977. During that period, approximately 1568 kg of plutonium metal, > 99.95% pure, was produced in 653 runs from 1930 kg of metal fabrication scrap, 99% pure. General considerations of the electrorefining process and facility operation and recommendations for further improvement of the process are discussed

  10. Impurity Correction Techniques Applied to Existing Doping Measurements of Impurities in Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J. V.; Sun, J. P.; Zhang, J. T.; Deng, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities represent the most significant source of uncertainty in most metal fixed points used for the realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There are a number of different methods for quantifying the effect of impurities on the freezing temperature of ITS-90 fixed points, many of which rely on an accurate knowledge of the liquidus slope in the limit of low concentration. A key method of determining the liquidus slope is to measure the freezing temperature of a fixed-point material as it is progressively doped with a known amount of impurity. Recently, a series of measurements of the freezing and melting temperature of `slim' Zn fixed-point cells doped with Ag, Fe, Ni, and Pb were presented. Here, additional measurements of the Zn-X system are presented using Ga as a dopant, and the data (Zn-Ag, Zn-Fe, Zn-Ni, Zn-Pb, and Zn-Ga) have been re-analyzed to demonstrate the use of a fitting method based on Scheil solidification which is applied to both melting and freezing curves. In addition, the utility of the Sum of Individual Estimates method is explored with these systems in the context of a recently enhanced database of liquidus slopes of impurities in Zn in the limit of low concentration.

  11. Plutonium oxides and uranium and plutonium mixed oxides. Carbon determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of carbon in plutonium oxides and uranium plutonium mixed oxides, suitable for a carbon content between 20 to 3000 ppm. The sample is roasted in oxygen at 1200 0 C, the carbon dioxide produced by combustion is neutralized by barium hydroxide generated automatically by coulometry [fr

  12. Spectrophotometric determination of zinc in impure solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Hernandez, B.; Reyes Tamaral, A.

    1972-01-01

    A dithizone colorimetric method is described for determining zinc concentrations of 0.001 to 5 g/l in aqueous solutions from Rio Tinto Mines, containing copper, iron and other impurities. Citrate, cyanide and bis-2hydroxyethyl)-dithiocarbamate are added to the aqueous sample of masking several metals, and zinc is extracted at pH 5 with a solution of dithizone in carbon tetrachloride. Excess of dithizone is removed with sodium sulphide, and optical density of zinc dithionate in organic solution is measured at 5.35 nm. Calibration curves obey Beer's law up to 0.5 micro Zn/ml. (Author) 5 refs

  13. Review Of Plutonium Oxidation Literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korinko, P.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of plutonium oxidation literature was conducted. The purpose of the review was to ascertain the effect of oxidation conditions on oxide morphology to support the design and operation of the PDCF direct metal oxidation (DMO) furnace. The interest in the review was due to a new furnace design that resulted in oxide characteristics that are different than those of the original furnace. Very little of the published literature is directly relevant to the DMO furnace operation, which makes assimilation of the literature data with operating conditions and data a convoluted task. The oxidation behavior can be distilled into three regimes, a low temperature regime (RT to 350 C) with a relatively slow oxidation rate that is influenced by moisture, a moderate temperature regime (350-450 C) that is temperature dependent and relies on more or less conventional oxidation growth of a partially protective oxide scale, and high temperature oxidation (> 500 C) where the metal autocatalytically combusts and oxidizes. The particle sizes obtained from these three regimes vary with the finest being from the lowest temperature. It is surmised that the slow growth rate permits significant stress levels to be achieved that help break up the oxides. The intermediate temperatures result in a fairly compact scale that is partially protective and that grows to critical thickness prior to fracturing. The growth rate in this regime may be parabolic or paralinear, depending on the oxidation time and consequently the oxide thickness. The high temperature oxidation is invariant in quiescent or nearly quiescent conditions due to gas blanketing while it accelerates with temperature under flowing conditions. The oxide morphology will generally consist of fine particles ( 250 (micro)m). The particle size ratio is expected to be < 5%, 25%, and 70% for fine, medium and large particles, respectively, for metal temperatures in the 500-600 C range.

  14. Chemical speciation of plutonium in the radioactive waste burial ground at the Savannah River Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1978-08-01

    The plutonium chemical species in two types of samples from the Savannah River Plant burial ground for radioactive waste were identified. Samples analyzed were water and sediment from burial ground monitoring well C-17 and soil from an alpha waste burial trench. Soluble plutonium in the monitoring well was less than 12A in diameter, was cationic, and contained about 43% Pu(VI) and 25% Pu(IV). The equilibrium distribution coefficient (K /sub d/) for soluble plutonium from the well water (pH 7) to burial ground soil was about 60. Soil plutonium from the waste trench was not cation-exchanged; 78% of the soil plutonium was associated with metallic oxides in the soil. Approximately 9% of the Pu was contained in the crystalline soil matrix. Thus, about 87% of the plutonium in the soil was in a relatively immobile form. Ion-exchangeable and organic acid forms of plutonium amounted to only about 2.5% each. The bulk of the plutonium now on burial ground soils will be immobile except for movement of soil particles containing plutonium. 6 tables

  15. High-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oetting, F.L.

    1979-01-01

    The high-temperature enthalpies of plutonium monocarbide and plutonium sesquicarbide have been determined with a copper-block calorimeter of the isoperibol type. The experimental enthalpy data, which was measured relative to 298 K, covered the temperature range from 400 to 1500 K. The calculation of the temperature rise of the calorimeter takes into account the added heat evolution from the radioactive decay of the plutonium samples. These enthalpy results, combined with the heat capacity and entropy of the respective carbide at 298 K available from the literature, has made it possible to generate tables of thermodynamic functions for the plutonium carbides. The behavior of the heat capacity of both of the plutonium carbides, i.e., a relatively steep increase in the heat capacity as the temperature increases, may be attributed to a premelting effect with the formation of vacancies within the crystal lattice although a theoretical treatment of this phenomenon is not given

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two

  17. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly 2139 Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase 239 Pu containing 5.9 wt-% 240 Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal

  18. Redox Bias in Loss on Ignition Moisture Measurement for Relatively Pure Plutonium-Bearing Oxide Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, P. G.; Stakebake, J. L.; Cooper, T. D.

    2002-01-01

    This paper evaluates potential analytical bias in application of the Loss on Ignition (LOI) technique for moisture measurement to relatively pure (plutonium assay of 80 wt.% or higher) oxides containing uranium that have been stabilized according to stabilization and storage standard DOE-STD-3013-2000 (STD- 3013). An immediate application is to Rocky Flats (RF) materials derived from high-grade metal hydriding separations subsequently treated by multiple calcination cycles. Specifically evaluated are weight changes due to oxidation/reduction of multivalent impurity oxides that could mask true moisture equivalent content measurement. Process knowledge and characterization of materials representing complex-wide materials to be stabilized and packaged according to STD-3013, and particularly for the immediate RF target stream, indicate that oxides of uranium, iron and gallium are the only potential multivalent constituents expected to be present above 0.5 wt.%. The evaluation show s that of these constituents, with few exceptions, only uranium oxides can be present at a sufficient level to produce weight gain biases significant with respect to the LOI stability test. In general, these formerly high-value, high-actinide content materials are reliably identifiable by process knowledge and measurement. Significant bias also requires that UO2 components remain largely unoxidized after calcination and are largely converted to U3O8 during LOI testing at only slightly higher temperatures. Based on well-established literature, it is judged unlikely that this set of conditions will be realized in practice. We conclude that it is very likely that LOI weight gain bias will be small for the immediate target RF oxide materials containing greater than 80 wt.% plutonium plus a much smaller uranium content. Recommended tests are in progress to confirm these expectations and to provide a more authoritative basis for bounding LOI oxidation/reduction biases. LOI bias evaluation is more

  19. Purification of alkali metal nitrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorucci, Louis C.; Gregory, Kevin M.

    1985-05-14

    A process is disclosed for removing heavy metal contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises mixing the impure nitrates with sufficient water to form a concentrated aqueous solution of the impure nitrates, adjusting the pH of the resulting solution to within the range of between about 2 and about 7, adding sufficient reducing agent to react with heavy metal contaminants within said solution, adjusting the pH of the solution containing reducing agent to effect precipitation of heavy metal impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified aqueous solution of alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified solution of alkali metal nitrates may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrate suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of alkali metal nitrates.

  20. Determination of plutonium in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Masanobu

    1978-01-01

    Past and present methods of determining the amount of plutonium in the environment are summarized. Determination of the amount of plutonium in uranium ore began in 1941. Plutonium present in polluted environments due to nuclear explosions, nuclear power stations, etc. was measured in soil and sand in Nagasaki in 1951 and in ash in Bikini in 1954. Analytical methods of measuring the least amount of plutonium in the environment were developed twenty years later. Many studies on and reviews of these methods have been reported all over the world, and a standard analytical procedure has been adopted. A basic analytical method of measurement was drafted in Japan in 1976. The yield, treatment of samples, dissolution, separation, control of measurable ray sources determination by α spectrometry, cross-check determination, and treatment of samples containing hardly soluble plutonium were examined. At present, the amount of plutonium can be determined by all of these methods. The presence of plutonium was studied further, and the usefulness of determination of the plutonium isotope ratio is discussed. (Kumagai, S.)

  1. Work surface for soluble plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    A three-dimensional work surface for aqueous plutonium is illustrated. It is constructed by means of estimating work as a function of the ambient pH and redox potential in a plutonium solution. The surface is useful for illustrating the chemistry of disproportionation reactions. Work expressions are easier to use than work integrals. (author)

  2. The economics of plutonium recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.

    1977-11-01

    The individual cost components and the total fuel cycle costs for natural uranium and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide fuel cycles for CANDU-PHW reactors are discussed. A calculation is performed to establish the economic conditions under which plutonium recycle would be economically attractive. (auth)

  3. Plutonium Round Robin Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudder, G.B.; Herbillon, G.H.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The goal of nuclear forensics is to develop a preferred approach to illicit trafficking investigations. This approach must be widely understood and acceptable as credible. The principle objectives of the Round Robin Test are to prioritize the forensic techniques and methods, evaluate attribution capabilities, and examine the utility of database. The Plutonium Round Robin has made a tremendous contribution to fulfilling these goals through a collaborative learning experience that resulted from the outstanding efforts of the six participating international laboratories. A prioritize list of techniques and methods has been developed based on this exercise. Future work will focus on a Highly Enriched Round Robin and extent to which the techniques and methods can be generalized. The Plutonium Round Robin demonstrated a rather high level of capability to determine the important characteristics of the materials and processes using analytical methods. When this capability to was combined with the appropriate knowledge and database, it resulted in a demonstrated capability to attribute the source of the materials to a specific nuclear fuel, reactor, and reprocessing facility. A number of shortfalls were also identified in our current capabilities. These included alternative dating techniques. Light Water Reactor discrimination techniques, and the lack of a comprehensive network of data/knowledge bases. The result of the Round Robin will be used to develop guidelines or a 'recommended protocol' to be made available to the interested authorities and countries to use in real cases. The poster will present a summary of the results of the Plutonium Round Robin and describe the plans the subsequent Highly Enriched Uranium Round Robin Test. (author)

  4. Lewis base binding affinities and redox properties of plutonium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldham, Susan M.; Schake, Ann R.; Burns, Carol J.; Morgan, Arthur N. III; Schnabel, Richard C.; Warner, Benjamin P.; Costa, David A.; Smith, Wayne H.

    2000-01-01

    As part of the actinide molecular science competency development effort, the initial goal of this work is to synthesize and investigate several series of complexes, varying by actinide metal, ligand set, and oxidation state. We are examining the reactivity of plutonium and neptunium organometallic complexes to elucidate fundamental chemical parameters of the metals. These reactions will be compared to those of the known corresponding uranium complexes in order to recognize trends among the actinide elements and to document differences in chemical behavior

  5. PROCESS FOR RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES FROM IMPURE SOLUTIONS THEREOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, S.B.

    1959-11-01

    A process is presented for the recovery of uraninm values from impure solutions which are obtained, for example, by washing residual uranium salt or uranium metal deposits from stainless steel surfaces using an aqueous or certain acidic aqueous solutions. The solutions include uranyl and oxidized iron, chromium, nickel, and copper ions and may contain manganese, zinc, and silver ions. In accordance with one procedure. the uranyl ions are reduced to the uranous state, and the impurity ions are complexed with cyanide under acidic conditions. The solution is then treated with ammonium hydroxide or alkali metal hydroxide to precipitate uranous hydroxide away from the complexed impurity ions in the solution. Alternatively, an excess of alkali metal cyanide is added to the reduced solution until the solution becomes sufficiently alkaline for the uranons hydroxide to precipitate. An essential feature in operating the process is in maintaining the pH of the solution sufficiently acid during the complexing operation to prevent the precipitation of the impurity metal hydroxides.

  6. Using Biomolecules to Separate Plutonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolski, Jarrod

    Used nuclear fuel has traditionally been treated through chemical separations of the radionuclides for recycle or disposal. This research considers a biological approach to such separations based on a series of complex and interdependent interactions that occur naturally in the human body with plutonium. These biological interactions are mediated by the proteins serum transferrin and the transferrin receptor. Transferrin to plutonium in vivo and can deposit plutonium into cells after interacting with the transferrin receptor protein at the cell surface. Using cerium as a non-radioactive surrogate for plutonium, it was found that cerium(IV) required multiple synergistic anions to bind in the N-lobe of the bilobal transferrin protein, creating a conformation of the cerium-loaded protein that would be unable to interact with the transferrin receptor protein to achieve a separation. The behavior of cerium binding to transferrin has contributed to understanding how plutonium(IV)-transferrin interacts in vivo and in biological separations.

  7. Cycle downstream: the plutonium question

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zask, G.; Rome, M.; Delpech, M.

    1998-01-01

    This day, organized by the SFEN, took place at Paris the 4 june 1998. Nine papers were presented. They take stock on the plutonium physics and its utilization as a nuclear fuel. This day tried to bring information to answer the following questions: do people have to keep the plutonium in the UOX fuel or in the MOX fuel in order to use it for future fast reactors? Do people have to continue obstinately the plutonium reprocessing in the MOX for the PWR type reactors? Will it be realized a underground disposal? Can it be technically developed plutonium incinerators and is it economically interesting? The plutonium physics, the experimental programs and the possible solutions are presented. (A.L.B.)

  8. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  9. Plutonium storage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This Spanish study gives a more detailed analysis of a possible store for plutonium oxide. The capacity of the store is assumed to be 30 t Pu and the minimum storage time 2 years. The study includes a general description of the store and its design philosophy; comments on the quality and properties of the material stored; a detailed criticality study and comments on gas and heat generation and shielding requirements; and a brief cost evaluation. Costs are estimated to be about $110/kg PuO 2 /year

  10. Mixed ligand chelate therapy for plutonium and toxic metals from energy power production. Final report, April 15, 1977-October 14, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, J.

    1980-01-01

    The results of experiments are summarized on the ability of combinations of chelating agents to modify the genotoxicity or tissue distributions. The mutagenicities of Cr and of chelating agents were determined. The metals described in the report are Pu(IV), Cd(II), Cr(III), and Cr(VI). Accurate measurements were made of the ability of CaNa 2 EDTA, CaNa 3 DTPA, and DMPS to reduce mortality in mice given doses (i.p.) of CdCl 2 well above the 100% lethal level. The efficacy in terms of the mmoles/kg needed to reduce the mortality was: DTPA > EDTA > DMPS. The combination of DTPA + DMPS proved most promising though little evidence for mixed complex formation was noted. Potentiometric titration studies the case of Pu(IV) a few combinations proved effective, but only when given shortly after Pu administration and then only in the liver but not the skeleton. It is recommended that metabolically stable chelating agents be used in combinations, especially for those combinations which may form very stable mixed ligand chelates

  11. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  12. Plutonium storage thermal analysis (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, S.J.; Lee, S.Y.; Schaade, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal modeling of plutonium metal ingots stored in food pack cans provides information useful for performing stored material safety evaluations. Four storage can geometries were modeled, and several conclusions can be made from the 14 cases analyzed. The ingot temperature increased from 7 degrees F to 12 degrees F (depending on can configuration) per additional watt of power. Including internal convection lowers computed ingot temperatures by 70 degrees F. Accounting for the heat flow through the bottom of the cans to the storage rack lowered computed ingot temperatures by an additional 70 degrees F to 80 degrees F. In the rimmed can systems storing ingots with a power of 10.35 watts, the ingot temperature varies from 190 degrees F to 213 degrees F. Including a plastic bag between the inner and outer can increases the ingot temperature by 15 degrees F. Adding a label to the outer can side reduces the outer can side temperature by 13 degrees F. Changes in ambient temperature affect the outer can temperatures more than the ingot temperature by a factor of 3. Similarly, a 5 degrees F drop in outer can temperature due to increased convection lowered the ingot temperature by only 2 degrees F

  13. Physics of plutonium recycling: volume V. Plutonium recycling in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    As part of a programme proposed by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Recycling (WPPR) to evaluate different scenarios for the use of plutonium, fast reactor physics benchmarks were developed. In this report, the multi-recycle performance of the metal-fuelled benchmark is evaluated. Benchmark results assess the reactor performance and toxicity behaviour in a closed nuclear fuel cycle for a parametric variation of the conversion ratio between 0.5 and 1.0. Results indicate that a fast burner reactor closed fuel cycle can be utilised to significantly reduce the radiotoxicity originating in the LWR cycle which would otherwise be destined for burial. (Author). tabs., figs., refs

  14. Reduction of uranium and plutonium oxides by aluminum. Application to the recycling of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallay, J.

    1968-01-01

    A process for treating plutonium oxide calcined at high temperatures (1000 to 2000 deg. C) with a view to recovering the metal consists in the reduction of this oxide dissolved in a mixture of aluminium, sodium and calcium fluorides by aluminium at about 1180 deg. C. The first part of the report presents the results of reduction tests carried out on the uranium oxides UO 2 and U 3 O 8 ; these are in agreement with the thermodynamic calculations of the exchange reaction at equilibrium. The second part describes the application of this method to plutonium oxides. The Pu-Al alloy obtained (60 per cent Pu) is then recycled in an aqueous medium. (author) [fr

  15. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  16. The toxicity of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsden, D.; Johns, T.F.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to recent publications concerned with the radiotoxicity of inhaled insoluble Pu compounds. The publications are a paper by Thorne and Vennart (Nature 263:555 (1976)), a report entitled 'The Toxicity of Plutonium', (London (HMSO), 1975), and the 'Sixth Report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution', (Cmnd. 6618, London (HMSO), 1976). Thorne and Vennart concluded that the previously accepted value for the maximum permissible annual intake (MPAI) of such compounds may be too high by a factor of about five, and a similar conclusion was reached in the other two publications. It is thought by the present authors that the methods which have been used to suggest new values for the MPAI are unduly pessimistic for high-fired PuO 2 ; calculations have been based on the lung model of ICRP Publication 19 'The Metabolism of Compounds of Plutonium and the Other Actinides', (International Commission of Radiological Protection, 1972). This involves concluding that the risks to bone and liver are comparable to those for lung. This is discussed and it is thought that the previously established idea that the lung is the critical organ remains substantially correct for the case of high-fired PuO 2 . (U.K.)

  17. Preliminary safety evaluation for the plutonium stabilization and packaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapley, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    This Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) describes and analyzes the installation and operation of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (SPS) at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The SPS is a combination of components required to expedite the safe and timely storage of Plutonium (Pu) oxide. The SPS program will receive site Pu packages, process the Pu for storage, package the Pu into metallic containers, and safely store the containers in a specially modified storage vault. The location of the SPS will be in the 2736- ZB building and the storage vaults will be in the 2736-Z building of the PFP, as shown in Figure 1-1. The SPS will produce storage canisters that are larger than those currently used for Pu storage at the PFP. Therefore, the existing storage areas within the PFP secure vaults will require modification. Other modifications will be performed on the 2736-ZB building complex to facilitate the installation and operation of the SPS

  18. The controlled-potential coulometric determination of plutonium based upon cerium oxidation and the Pu022+/Pu4+ valency change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.; Crossley, D.; Venkataramana, P.

    1977-09-01

    Conditions have been established enabling plutonium to be oxidised quantitatively to the hexavalent state in the working compartment of a controlled-potential coulometric cell using electrogenerated ceric ion or excess ceric nitrate. The excess ceric ion is reduced in situ electrochemically without reduction of the hexavalent plutonium. The plutonium is then determined controlled-potential coulometrically by reduction to Pu 3+ followed by oxidation to Pu 4+ . The first oxidation step is conducted in molar nitric acid solution containing sulphamic acid but the coulometric determination step is conducted in molar sulphuric acid solution. The results obtained in the coulometric determination step were less satisfactory following oxidation with electrogenerated ceric ion rather than with chemically added ceric nitrate. Using the recommended conditions, 6 mg quantities of plutonium can be determined with an accuracy of 100.06% and a precision of 0.12% (coefficient of variation). The behaviour of chromium, manganese and vanadium impurity is reported. (author)

  19. Studies of the conversion-chemistry of plutonium and uranium in the nitrate- and carbonate-systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, G.; Steinhauser, M.; Boehm, M.

    1988-01-01

    A novel type construction of an autoclave for dissolving of plutonium dioxide in concentrated nitric acid (without any admixtures) has been developed. This process allows the dissolving of batches with high oxide/acid ratio and yields plutonium-solutions of high concentration. The tests for separation of plutonium- and, respectively, uranium-process-solutions from Am-241 and other interfering impurities are described. The time-factor for the oxidation-reaction of plutonium in nitric acid with ozone has been optimized. Important data on the solubility-behavior of plutonyl(VI)- and of pure Pu(IV)-nitrates have been gained. The majority of the precipitates, occuring in theses reactions, were characterized. (orig.) [de

  20. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...