WorldWideScience

Sample records for impure oxygenated compounds

  1. Behavior of oxygen impurities in tokamak. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharif, R N; Beket, A H [Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Aurhority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    Impurity transport in tokamak plasma is a subject of great importance in present day tokamak experiments. The transport of oxygen as an impurity element in small tokamak was studied theoretically. The viscosity coefficient of oxygen has been calculated in different approximation 13 and 21 moment approximation, taking into consideration {chi}>>1,{chi}{omega}{sub c} {tau}. It was found that in 21 moment approximation additional terms added to the perturbation from equilibrium leads to increase in viscosity coefficients than in 13 moments approximation. 9 figs.

  2. Evidence for neutral beam injected oxygen impurities in 2XIIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.P.; Moos, H.W.

    1978-01-01

    A series of experiments indicates that the principal source of impurities in the 2XIIB mirror confinement plasma experiment at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is oxygen in the neutral beams. The dependence of 0 II 539 A emissions on neutral beam current, spatial scans of oxygen emissions, impurity injection experiments, spectral scans of the 0 VI 1032 A line, and other experiments all support this conclusion

  3. Oxygen control systems and impurity purification in LBE: Learning from DEMETRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brissonneau, L., E-mail: laurent.brissonneau@cea.fr [CEA/DEN, Cadarache, DTN/STPA/LIPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Beauchamp, F.; Morier, O. [CEA/DEN, Cadarache, DTN/STPA/LIPC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Schroer, C.; Konys, J. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Institut fuer Materialforschung III, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Kobzova, A.; Di Gabriele, F. [NRI, UJV Husinec-Rez 130, Rez 25068 (Czech Republic); Courouau, J.-L. [CEA/DEN, Saclay, DPC/SCCME/LECNA, F-919191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-08-31

    Operating a system using Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) requires a control of the dissolved oxygen concentration to avoid corrosion of structural materials and oxide build-up in the coolant. Reliable devices are therefore needed to monitor and adjust the oxygen concentration and to remove impurities during operation. In this article, we describe the learning gained from experiments run in the framework of the DEMETRA project (IP-EUROTRANS 6th FP contract) on the oxygen supply in LBE and on impurity filtration and management in different European facilities. An oxygen control device should supply oxygen in LBE at sufficient rate to compensate loss by surface oxidation, otherwise local dissolution of oxide layers might lead to the loss of steel protection against dissolution. Oxygen can be supplied by gas phase H{sub 2}O or O{sub 2}, or by solid phase, PbO dissolution. Each of these systems has substantial advantages and drawbacks. Considerations are given on devices for large scale facilities. The management of impurities (lead oxides and corrosion products) is also a crucial issue as their presence in the liquid phase or in the aerosols is likely to impair the facility, instrumentation and mechanical devices. To avoid impurity build-up on the long-term, purification of LBE is required to keep the impurity inventory low by trapping oxide and metallic impurities in specific filter units. On the basis of impurities characterisation and experimental results gained through filtration tests in different loops, this paper gives a description of the state-of-art knowledge of LBE purification with different filter media. It is now understood that the nature and behaviour of impurities formed in LBE will change according to the operating modes as well as the method to propose to remove impurities. This experience can be used to validate the basis filtration process, define the operating procedures and evaluate perspectives for the design of purification units for long

  4. Impurities of oxygen in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, V.M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The electronic structure of oxygen complex defects in silicon, using molecular cluster model with saturation by watson sphere into the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method is studied. A systematic study of the simulation of perfect silicon crystal and an analysis of the increasing of atom number in the clusters are done to choose the suitable cluster for the calculations. The divacancy in three charge states (Si:V 2 + , Si:V 2 0 , Si:V 2 - ), of the oxygen pair (Si:O 2 ) and the oxygen-vacancy pair (Si:O.V) neighbours in the silicon lattice, is studied. Distortions for the symmetry were included in the Si:V 2 + and Si:O 2 systems. The behavior of defect levels related to the cluster size of Si:V 2 0 and Si:O 2 systems, the insulated oxygen impurity of silicon in interstitial position (Si:O i ), and the complexes involving four oxygen atoms are analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  5. Gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drugov, Yu.S.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of concentration, separation, detection in gas chromatographic determination of impurities of inorganic compounds including low-boiling gases, reactive gases, organometallic compounds, free metals, anions, etc. are reviewed. Methods of reaction gas chromatography for determining reactive gases, water, anions, metal chelates are considered in detail as well as methods of reaction-sorption concentration and reaction gas extraction. The application of gas chromatograpny ior anaiysis of water and atmosphere contamination, for determination of impurities in highly pure solid substances and gases is described

  6. Relationship of microstructure properties to oxygen impurities in nanocrystalline silicon photovoltaic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Wen, C.; Liu, H.; Li, Z. P.; Shen, W. Z.

    2013-03-01

    We have fully investigated the correlation of microstructure properties and oxygen impurities in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon photovoltaic films. The achievement has been realized through a series of different hydrogen dilution ratio treatment by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and ultraviolet-visible transmission techniques have been employed to characterize the physical structural characterization and to elucidate the structure evolution. The bonding configuration of the oxygen impurities was investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the Si-O stretching mode of infrared-transmission, indicating that the films were well oxidized in SiO2 form. Based on the consistence between the proposed structure factor and the oxygen content, we have demonstrated that there are two dominant disordered structure regions closely related to the post-oxidation contamination: plate-like configuration and clustered microvoids.

  7. The effect of oxygen impurity on the electronic and optical properties of calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadsetani, M.; Beiranvand, R.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic and optical properties of calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds in NaCl structure are studied using the band structure results obtained through the full potential linearized augmented palne wave method. Different linear relationships are observed between theoretical band gap and 1/a 2 (where a is lattice constant) for calcium, strontium and barium chalcogenide compounds with and without oxygen, respectively. An abnormal behavior of electronic and optical properties are found for compounds containing oxygen. These effects are ascribed to the special properties of Ca-O, Sr-O and Ba-O bonds, which are different from chemical bonds between Ca, Sr and Ba and other chalcogen atoms.

  8. Radiation losses from oxygen and iron impurities in a high temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, C.; Michelis, C. de; Mattioli, M.

    1976-06-01

    Radiation and ionization losses due to impurities present in a high temperature plasma have been calculated for a light element (oxygen), which is completely stripped in the core of existing Tokamak discharges, and a heavy one (iron), which is only partially stripped. Two extreme cases have been treated: in the first one coronal equilibrium is reached; the radiated power is then equal to the product of the electron density, the impurity density, and a function of the electron temperature; in the second one impurities recycle with a constant radial velocity v 0 in a background plasma; radiation and ionization losses are proportional to the impurity flux and are a decreasing function of the diffusion velocity. The results presented can be used to evaluate losses in a practical case [fr

  9. Control of oxygen impurity and hydrogen recycling in the compact helical system (CHS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, N.; Okamura, S.; Aoki, T.; Yamada, H.; Tsuzuki, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Iguchi, H.; Hosokawa, M.; Kaneko, O.; Kubo, S.; Morita, S.; Nishimura, K.; Sagara, A.; Shoji, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeiri, Y.; Takita, Y.; Amemiya, H.; Okazaki, K.; Oyama, Y.; Shimizu, K.; Yano, K.

    1990-01-01

    In order to reduce oxygen impurity and hydrogen recycling, ECR discharge cleaning with hydrogen, glow discharge with helium, and titanium gettering have been applied. The ECR discharge cleaning was found to be effective in reducing oxygen impurities in ECRH discharges. However, it was not sufficiently effective to give a wide operational density range in NBI heated discharges. Titanium gettering is essential for this purpose, and controllable discharges have been achieved in the density range 1-10x10 19 m -3 , with discharge length more than 850 ms with the aid of titanium gettering. Both helium-glow discharge and Ti gettering are useful to control hydrogen recycling even with a stainless steel wall. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of hydrogen and oxygen impurity levels on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Netterfield, R.P.; Martin, P.J.; Leistner, A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on surface analytical techniques used to quantify surface concentrations of impurities such as oxygen and hydrogen. The following analytical techniques were used: Rutherford and Backscattering, elastic recoil detection, time-of-flight SIMS, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results have shown a spread in thickness of oxide layer, ranging from unmeasurable to 1.6 nm. The data must be considered as preliminary at this stage, but give some insight into the suitability of the techniques and a general idea of the significance of impurities at the monolayer level. These measurements have been carried out on a small number of silicon surfaces both semiconductor grade <111> crystalline material and silicon which has been used in sphere fabrication. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Evaluation of hydrogen and oxygen impurity levels on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M J; Wielunski, L S; Netterfield, R P; Martin, P J; Leistner, A [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1997-12-31

    This paper reports on surface analytical techniques used to quantify surface concentrations of impurities such as oxygen and hydrogen. The following analytical techniques were used: Rutherford and Backscattering, elastic recoil detection, time-of-flight SIMS, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results have shown a spread in thickness of oxide layer, ranging from unmeasurable to 1.6 nm. The data must be considered as preliminary at this stage, but give some insight into the suitability of the techniques and a general idea of the significance of impurities at the monolayer level. These measurements have been carried out on a small number of silicon surfaces both semiconductor grade <111> crystalline material and silicon which has been used in sphere fabrication. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Instrumental neutron-activation determination of impurities in lead and titanium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, I L

    1980-01-01

    Instrumental neutron-activation analysis was used to determine 22 impurities in lead and titanium compounds (e.g. PbO, Pb/NO3/2, and TiO2) used as raw materials for ferroelectrics. Five elements (Al, V, Mn, Sc, and Se) were determined by short-lived isotopes and 17 elements were determined by long-lived isotopes. The detection limits were 7 x 10 to the -3rd to 2 x 10 to the -8th %. A substantial difference in concentrations of certain impurity elements has been found in different series of lead and titanium oxides of similar purity.

  13. Low-Z impurities in PLT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinnov, E.; Suckewer, S.; Bol, K.; Hawryluk, R.; Hosea, J.; Meservey, E.

    1977-11-01

    Low-Z impurities concentrations (oxygen and carbon) have been measured in different discharges in PLT. The contribution to Z/sub eff/, influx rates and radiation losses by oxygen and carbon were obtained. An inverse correlation was found between the low-Z impurity density (and also the edge ion temperature) and the high-Z impurity (tungsten) density. A one-dimensional computer transport model has been used to calculate the spatial profiles of different oxygen and carbon ionization states. This model predicts that fully stripped oxygen and carbon ions should exist near the plasma periphery

  14. Difference in oxygen impurity behavior between repetitive short discharges and one long discharge on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, M.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.

    2007-01-01

    Oxygen impurity behaviors of one long duration discharge and repetition of short duration discharges have been investigated in TRIAM-1M. In the former case, the OII line intensity divided by the line averaged electron density, which is considered as a monitor of oxygen concentration on the plasma facing surface (PFS), decreased with the time constant, τ d , of 30-50 s during the discharge due to the hydrogen flux to PFS. In the latter case, τ d is in the range of 70-600 s. There exists a big difference of global behavior of oxygen impurity between both cases. The difference seems to result from the absence or presence of the interval time between the discharges. The oxygen concentration on PFS increases during the interval time due to adsorption of H 2 O. The time constant of the increase in the oxygen concentration is evaluated to be about 5500 s from Langmuir adsorption isotherms analysis

  15. Determination of trace impurities in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parashar, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    Research work done at the National Physical Laboratory to develop new methods which are more specific and/or more sensitive has been reviewed. These methods are based on the use of existing facilities viz. atomic absorption spectrophotometry, uv-visible spectrophotometry, gas chromatography and conventional chemical methods. It is possible to determine impurities like boron at 5ppb level, phosphorus at 100 ppb and oxygen non-stoichiometry in 1:2:3 compounds with higher accuracy. Boron is determined spectrophotometrically by forming a complex with curcumin and phosphorus is determined indirectly by atomic absorption spectrophotometry by forming phosphomolybdate complex with antimony or bismuth which have 1:1 ratio with phosphorus in the complex. Gas chromatographic technique has been used to evaluate the oxygen non-stoichiometry in high temperature superconductors (1:2:3 compound) where the HTc sample is dissolved in dilute nitric acid in helium environment and the oxygen released is determined using thermal conductivity detector. (author). 19 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  16. Determination of oxygen impurity in high purity materials by charged particle activation analysis using alpha projectiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, D.P.; Pal, S.; Arunachalam, J.; Verma R.; Gangadharan, S.

    1992-01-01

    40 MeV α-particles have been used to determine oxygen impurity at ppm levels in silicon, copper, and stainless steel, through the radiochemical separation of 18 F from the matrix. The separation of 18 F has been carried out by two techniques, viz. distillation of H 2 SiF 6 and precipitation of KBF 4 and some modification has been applied in the separation, depending on the nature of interferences from the matrix. Instrumental approach was also carried out to determine the oxygen impurity at ≥ 100 ppm in Si matrix because this approach is not possible in Cu and stainless steel samples due to matrix activity. (author) 10 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs

  17. Investigation of oxygen impurity transport using the O4+ visible spectral line in the Aditya tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhuri, M.B.; Ghosh, J.; Banerjee, S.; Dey, Ritu; Manchanda, R.; Kumar, Vinay; Vasu, P.; Patel, K.M.; Atrey, P.K.; Shankara Joisa, Y.; Rao, C.V.S.; Tanna, R.L.; Raju, D.; Chattopadhyay, P.K.; Jha, R.; Gupta, C.N.; Bhatt, S.B.; Saxena, Y.C.

    2013-01-01

    Intense visible lines from Be-like oxygen impurity are routinely observed in the Aditya tokamak. The spatial profile of brightness of a Be-like oxygen spectral line (2p3p 3 D 3 –2p3d 3 F 4 ) at 650.024 nm is used to investigate oxygen impurity transport in typical discharges of the Aditya tokamak. A 1.0 m multi-track spectrometer (Czerny–Turner) capable of simultaneous measurements from eight lines of sight is used to obtain the radial profile of brightness of O 4+ spectral emission. The emissivity profile of O 4+ spectral emission is obtained from the spatial profile of brightness using an Abel-like matrix inversion. The oxygen transport coefficients are determined by reproducing the experimentally measured emissivity profiles of O 4+ , using a one-dimensional empirical impurity transport code, STRAHL. Much higher values of the diffusion coefficient compared with the neo-classical values are observed in both the high magnetic field edge region (D inboard max ∼30 m 2 s -1 ) and the low magnetic field edge region (D outboard max ∼45 m 2 s -1 ) of typical Aditya ohmic plasmas, which seems to be due to fluctuation-induced transport. The diffusion coefficient at the limiter radius in the low-field (outboard) region is typically ∼ twice as high as that at the limiter radius in the high-field (inboard) region. (paper)

  18. Topological phase, electronic, magnetic and optical properties of ScPdBi compound with Gd, Np and Cm impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narimani, Mitra; Nourbakhsh, Zahra, E-mail: z.nourbakhsh@sci.ui.ac.ir

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Gd, Np and Cm impurities induce the magnetic moment in ScPdBi compound. • ScPdBi compound with Gd, Np and Cm impurities has normal band order. • The ε(0) and R(0) increase by increasing the atomic number of X atom. - Abstract: The electronic, magnetic and optical properties of X-doped ScPdBi (X = Gd, Np, Cm) are investigated in the framework of density functional theory. The exchange-correlation potential is treated using generalized gradient approximation with Coulomb interaction parameter. The band order and energy band gap of X-doped ScPdBi are investigated by calculation of band structure. The effect of doping impurity on magnetic properties of ScPdBi compound is studied by calculation of total and partial magnetic moments of X-doped ScPdBi compound. Furthermore, the optical properties of X-doped ScPdBi are calculated and compared in the energy range of 0–25 eV.

  19. Using 3.05 MeV resonance for determination of oxygen impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkova, I.E.; Polyanskij, V.N.; Yatis, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    The method of determining oxygen impurities behind thin films using the isolated resonance in the 16 O(α, α) 16 O reaction at E=3.048 MeV with the width GITA approximately 20 keV, is considered. Cross section in resonance is σsUb(R) = 0.95 b apd it increases cross section of Rutherford scattering by the factor of 25. The conclusion is made on the possibility of using 3.048 MeV resonance when investigating Me-Si film structures

  20. Light impurity production in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A review is given of the different erosion processes of carbon materials with special emphasis on conditions relevant to plasma surface interactions. New results on the chemical erosion and radiation enhanced sublimation of boron-carbon layers are presented. The chemical hydrocarbon formation produced by the interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a carbon target has been investigated up to temperatures of 1500K using a Sniffer probe. The chemical interaction of the plasma with the carbon walls in TEXTOR is also analysed by measuring the hydrocarbon and CO and CO 2 partial pressures built up on the surrounding walls during the discharges. The recycling of oxygen impurities in an all carbon surrounding occurs predominantly in the form of CO and Co 2 molecules and the analysis of both neutral pressures during the discharges has been used as an additional diagnostic for the oxygen impurity situation in TEXTOR. These data are discussed in view of spectroscopic measurements on the influx of carbon and oxygen atoms from the walls and impurity line radiation. CD-band spectroscopy in addition is employed to identify the hydrocarbon chemical carbon erosion. Our present understanding of the oxygen impurity recycling and the oxygen sources are described. Particle induced release of CO molecules from the entire first wall is believed to be the dominant influx process of oxygen in the SOL of plasmas with carbon facing materials. The influence of coating the TEXTOR first wall with a boron-carbon film (B/C ≅1) on the light impurity behaviour is shown. (author)

  1. Role of oxygen in surface segregation of metal impurities in silicon poly- and bicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarray, E.; Deville, J.P.

    1987-07-01

    Metal impurities at surfaces of polycrystalline silicon ribbons have been characterized by surface sensitive methods. Oxygen and heat treatments were found to be a driving force for surface segregation of these impurities. To better analyse their influence and their possible incidence in gettering, model studies were undertaken on Czochralski grown silicon bicrystals. Two main factors of surface segregation have been studied: the role of an ultra-thin oxide layer and the effect of heat treatments. The best surface purification was obtained after an annealing process at 750/sup 0/C of a previously oxidized surface at 450/sup 0/C. This was related to the formation of SiO clusters, followed by a coalescence of SiO/sub 4/ units leading to the subsequent injection of silicon self-interstitials in the lattice.

  2. Trace impurity analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, W.J.; Edwards, D. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The desirability for long-term reliability of large scale helium refrigerator systems used on superconducting accelerator magnets has necessitated detection of impurities to levels of a few ppM. An analyzer that measures trace impurity levels of condensable contaminants in concentrations of less than a ppM in 15 atm of He is described. The instrument makes use of the desorption temperature at an indicated pressure of the various impurities to determine the type of contaminant. The pressure rise at that temperature yields a measure of the contaminant level of the impurity. A LN 2 cryogenic charcoal trap is also employed to measure air impurities (nitrogen and oxygen) to obtain the full range of contaminant possibilities. The results of this detector which will be in use on the research and development helium refrigerator of the ISABELLE First-Cell is described

  3. Vibrational modes of isolated substitution impurities in twelve compounds AN B8-N with the blende structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumelle, Pierre

    1979-01-01

    We have studied a particular point defect, the isolated substitution in twelve compounds CuCl, CuBr, CuI, ZnTe, CdTe, ZnS, ZnSe, GaAs, GaP, InSb, InP and GaSb. The model of the perfect lattice is a rigid ion model with eleven parameters. Infrared localized vibrational modes of impurities are observed in a series of samples. By comparison of these experimental results with the calculated values it is possible to determine the perturbation for each particular case. A relation obtained between a force constant of the perfect crystal and the force constant of the impurity suggests that no change is introduced by the isoelectronic impurities. (author) [fr

  4. Mechanisms of impurity diffusion in rutile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.; Sasaki, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tracer diffusion of 46 Sc, 51 Cr, 54 Mn, 59 Fe, 60 Co, 63 Ni, and 95 Zr, was measured as functions of crystal orientation, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure in rutile single crystals using the radioactive tracer sectioning technique. Compared to cation self-diffusion, divalent impurities (e.g., Co and Ni) diffuse extremely rapidly in TiO 2 and exhibit a large anisotropy in the diffusion behavior; divalent-impurity diffusion parallel to the c-axis is much larger than it is perpendicular to the c-axis. The diffusion of trivalent impurity ions (Sc and Cr) and tetravalent impurity ions (Zr) is similar to cation self-diffusion, as a function of temperature and of oxygen partial pressure. The divalent impurity ions Co and Ni apparently diffuse as interstitial ions along open channels parallel to the c-axis. The results suggest that Sc, Cr, and Zr ions diffuse by an interstitialcy mechanism involving the simultaneous and cooperative migration of tetravalent interstitial titanium ions and the tracer-impurity ions. Iron ions diffused both as divalent and as trivalent ions. 8 figures

  5. Impurity production and transport at limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the description and evaluation of experiments on the DITE tokamak. These are designed to characterise the processes involved in the production and transport of neutral and ionised impurities near carbon limiters. The need for good diagnostics in the scrape-off layer is highlighted. Langmuir probes are used to provide input data for models of impurity production at limiters. Observations of the radial profiles of carbon and oxygen impurities are compared with the code predictions. Changeover experiments involving hydrogen and helium plasmas are used as a means for investigating the role of the atomic physics and chemistry. The impurity control limiter (ICL) experiment is described which shows how geometry plays an important role in determining the spatial distributions of the neutral and ionised carbon. New diagnostics are required to study the flux and charge state distribution of impurities in the boundary. Preliminary results from an in-situ plasma ion mass-spectrometer are presented. The role of oxygen and the importance of evaluating the wall sources of impurity are emphasised. (orig.)

  6. Impurity transport in the Wendelstein VII-A stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Impurity radiation losses in net-current-free neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the Wendelstein W VII-A stellarator are the combined effect of particularly strong impurity sources and improved particle confinement as compared with ohmically heated tokamak-like plasma discharges. Experiments are described and conclusions are drawn about the impurity species, their origin and their transport behaviour. The impurity transport is modelled by a 1-D impurity transport and radiation code. The evolution of the total radiation in time and space deduced from soft-X-ray and bolometer measurements can be fairly well simulated by the code. Experimentally, oxygen was found to make the main contribution to the radiation losses. In the calculations, an influx of cold oxygen desorbed from the walls of the order of 10 13 -10 14 cm -2 .s -1 and a rate of fast injected oxygen corresponding to a 1% impurity content of the neutral beams in combination with neoclassical impurity transport leads to quantitative agreement between the simulation and the observed radiation. The transport of A1 trace impurities injected by the laser blow-off technique was experimentally studied by soft-X-ray measurements using a differential method allowing extraction of the time evolution of A1 XII, XIII radial profiles. These are compared with code predictions, together with additional spectroscopic measurements. The main features of the impurity transport are consistent with neoclassical predictions, which explain particularly the central impurity accumulation. Some details, however, seem to require additional 'anomalous' transport. Such an enhancement is correlated with distortions of the magnetic configuration around resonant magnetic surfaces. (author)

  7. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative.

  8. Investigation of a Plugging Meter for Measuring Impurity Content in Liquid Sodium (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Jong Man; Choi, Byoung Hae; Jeong, Ji Young; Lee, Yong Bum

    2010-01-01

    In a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), liquid sodium is subject to the formation of impurities by its high chemical reactivity with so many elements and common compounds used in nuclear reactor construction materials. The impurities are mainly in the form of hydrides, oxides, metallic compounds, metallic and carbon particles, which originate primarily from steam generator corrosion, moisture from system component surface, and leakage of air into the system. These are finally deposited in the form of the crystallization of sodium hydride (NaH) or sodium oxide (Na 2 O) at the cold points of the circuit, which may lead to the clogging of the narrowed sections or may damage the pump. Therefore, the sodium must be purified and analyzed in order to prevent from the detrimental influence. The analysis of hydrogen and oxygen is very important. There are many chemical methods for analyzing the impurities, but these methods are time-consuming, troublesome and contamination of samples from air and containers, that is the reason why the countries develop the instruments of impurity on-line measurement. The plugging meter is one of the most important on-line measuring instruments and it is a reliable instrument which has been widely used on sodium loops

  9. Defect-impurity interactions in irradiated germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleland, J.W.; James, F.J.; Westbrook, R.D.

    1975-07-01

    Results of experiments are used to formulate a better model for the structures of lattice defects and defect-impurity complexes in irradiated n-type Ge. Single crystals were grown by the Czochralski process from P, As, or Sb-doped melts, and less than or equal to 10 15 to greater than or equal to 10 17 oxygen cm -3 was added to the furnace chamber after approximately 1 / 3 of the crystal had been solidified. Hall coefficient and resistivity measurements (at 77 0 K) were used to determine the initial donor concentration due to the dopant and clustered oxygen, and infrared absorption measurements (at 11.7 μ) were used to determine the dissociated oxygen concentration. Certain impurity and defect-impurity interactions were then investigated that occurred as a consequence of selected annealing, quenching, Li diffusion, and irradiation experiments at approximately 300 0 K with 60 Co photons, 1.5 to 2.0 MeV electrons, or thermal energy neutrons. Particular attention was given to determining the electrical role of the irradiation produced interstitial and vacancy, and to look for any evidence from electrical and optical measurements of vacancy--oxygen, lithium--oxygen, and lithium--vacancy interactions. (U.S.)

  10. Simultaneous determination of oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and cadmium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaeda, K.; Kuriki, T.; Ohsawa, K.; Ishii, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Cadmium and its compounds were analysed for oxygen and cadmium by a modification of the Schutze-Unterzaucher method. Oxygen in some compounds such as cadmium oxide, nitrate and sulphate could not be determined by the usual method. The method of adding carbon was employed for the determination of total oxygen. Total oxygen could be determined by the addition of 5 mg of carbon to a sample boat and heating at 950 0 . The determination was also carried out by addition of naphthalene (2 mg). It was found that the cadmium powder and cadmium flake used contained ca. 1 and 0.15% oxygen, respectively. Oxygen and cadmium in cadmium and its compounds were simultaneously determined by the addition of 2 mg of naphthalene. Cadmium was determined colorimetrically by use of glyoxal-bis-(2-hydroxyanil). Oxygen and cadmium in the samples could be determined simultaneously with an average error of -0.02 and -0.22%, respectively. (author)

  11. Study of impurity composition of some compounds of refractory metals by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganov, L.K.; Dzhumakulov, D.T.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    The compounds of refractory transition metals find wide application in all fields of engineering, in particular in microelectronics to manufacture contact-barrier layers of thin-film current-conducting systems of silicon instruments, large and very large scale integrated circuits. Production of such materials is realted with the need to apply the analytical control methods that allow to determine a large number of elements with high reliability. The instrumental neutron-activation techniques have been developed to determine impurity composition of the following compounds: MoSi 2 , WSi 2 , TiB 2 , NbB 2 , TiC, NbC

  12. The role of Co impurities and oxygen vacancies in the ferromagnetism of Co-doped SnO2: GGA and GGA+U studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hongxia; Yan Yu; Mohammed, Y. Sh.; Du Xiaobo; Li Kai; Jin Hanmin

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure and ferromagnetic stability of Co-doped SnO 2 are studied using the first-principle density functional method within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and GGA+U schemes. The addition of effective U Co transforms the ground state of Co-doped SnO 2 to insulating from half-metallic and the coupling between the nearest neighbor Co spins to weak antimagnetic from strong ferromagnetic. GGA+U Co calculations show that the pure substitutional Co defects in SnO 2 cannot induce the ferromagnetism. Oxygen vacancies tend to locate near Co atoms. Their presence increases the magnetic moment of Co and induces the ferromagnetic coupling between two Co spins with large Co-Co distance. The calculated density of state and spin density distribution calculated by GGA+U Co show that the long-range ferromagnetic coupling between two Co spins is mediated by spin-split impurity band induced by oxygen vacancies. More charge transfer from impurity to Co-3d states and larger spin split of Co-3d and impurity states induced by the addition of U Co enhance the ferromagnetic stability of the system with oxygen vacancies. By applying a Coulomb U O on O 2 s orbital, the band gap is corrected for all calculations and the conclusions derived from GGA+U Co calculations are not changed by the correction of band gap.

  13. Oxygen stabilized rare-earth iron intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.P.; Malekzadeh, M.; Pickus, M.R.

    1975-10-01

    A new, oxygen-stabilized intermetallic compound was identified in sintered, pre-alloyed rare-earth iron powder samples. Its composition corresponds to formula R 12 Fe 32 O 2 and its crystal structure belongs to space group Im3m. The presence of these compounds was observed, so far, in several R--Fe--O systems, with R = Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, and Y

  14. Incorporation, diffusion and segregation of impurities in polycrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deville, J.P.; Soltani, M.L. (Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)); Quesada, J. (Laboratoire de Metallurgie-Chimie des Materiaux, E.N.S.A.I.S., 67 - Strasbourg (France))

    1982-01-01

    We studied by means of X-Ray photoelectron Spectroscopy the nature, distribution and, when possible, the chemical bond of impurities at the surface of polycrystalline silicon samples grown on a carbon ribbon. Besides main impurities (carbon and oxygen), always present at concentrations around their limit of solubility in silicon, metal impurities have been found: their nature varies from one sample to another. Their spatial distribution is not random: some are strictly confined at the surface (sodium), whereas others are in the superficial oxidized layer (calcium, magnesium) or localized at the oxide-bulk silicon interface (iron). Metal impurities are coming from the carbon ribbon and are incorporated to silicon during the growth process. It is not yet possible to give a model of diffusion processes of impurities since they are too numerous and interact one with the other. However oxygen seems to play a leading role in the spatial distribution of metal impurities.

  15. The impurity transport in HT-6M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wei; Wan Baonian; Xie Jikang

    2003-01-01

    The space-time profile of impurities has been measured with a multichannel visible spectroscopic detect system and UV rotation-mirror system in the HT-6M tokamak. An ideal impurity transport code has been used to simulate impurities (carbon and oxygen) behaviour during the OHM discharge. The profiles of impurities diffusion and convection coefficient, impurities ion densities in different ionized state, loss power density and effective charge number have been derived. The impurity behaviour during low-hybrid current drive has also been analyzed, the results show that the confinement of particles, impurities and energy has been improved, and emission power and effective charge number have been reduced

  16. The influence of optical parameters on impurity determinations by IR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    The important role of impurities in semiconductor materials is the subject of continuous research. The concentration of interstitial oxygen impurities in silicon are determined with the aid of infrared spectroscopy. The maximum absorption coefficient of the oxygen absorption peak, centered at 9,06 μm, is determined and the impurity concentration is then calculated using a calibration factor. This procedure was evaluated, paying particular attention to those optical parameters which may influence these impurity determinations. A thorough discussion of the theoretical and experimental aspects of infrared spectroscopy in general is followed by an overview of previous experimental work. This lead to some theoretical analysis regarding the influence of the index of refraction, the index of absorption and multiple reflections in the silicon wafer on impurity determinations. This lead to specific experimental investigations. The influence of the surface morphology of samples on impurity determinations was studied by determining the reflectance of silicon surfaces. It was established that the surface reflectance plays a role and that it must be taken into consideration for accurate impurity concentration determinations. The most accurate values for the absorption coefficient due to oxygen in silicon are calculated. This requires that the surface of the silicon wafers must be highly polished for the formula to be valid. Acceptable values for the absorption coefficient of damaged surfaces are obtained if the uncorrected formula is used. Experimental results may deviate as much as 32% from the real impurity concentration if the wrong formula is used to calculate the absorption coefficient of oxygen in silicon at 9,06 μm

  17. Study of resolution enhancement methods for impurities quantitative analysis in uranium compounds by XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Clayton P.; Salvador, Vera L.R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Ap. F.; Scapin, Marcos A., E-mail: clayton.pereira.silva@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CQMA/IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2011-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis is a technique widely used for the determination of both major and trace elements related to interaction between the sample and radiation, allowing direct and nondestructive analysis. However, in uranium matrices these devices are inefficient because the characteristic emission lines of elements like S, Cl, Zn, Zr, Mo and other overlap characteristic emission lines of uranium. Thus, chemical procedures to separation of uranium are needed to perform this sort of analysis. In this paper the deconvolution method was used to increase spectra resolution and correct the overlaps. The methodology was tested according to NBR ISO 17025 using a set of seven certified reference materials for impurities present in U3O8 (New Brunswick Laboratory - NBL). The results showed that this methodology allows quantitative determination of impurities such as Zn, Zr, Mo and others, in uranium compounds. The detection limits were shorter than 50{mu}g. g{sup -1} and uncertainty was shorter than 10% for the determined elements. (author)

  18. Study of resolution enhancement methods for impurities quantitative analysis in uranium compounds by XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Clayton P.; Salvador, Vera L.R.; Cotrim, Marycel E.B.; Pires, Maria Ap. F.; Scapin, Marcos A.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis is a technique widely used for the determination of both major and trace elements related to interaction between the sample and radiation, allowing direct and nondestructive analysis. However, in uranium matrices these devices are inefficient because the characteristic emission lines of elements like S, Cl, Zn, Zr, Mo and other overlap characteristic emission lines of uranium. Thus, chemical procedures to separation of uranium are needed to perform this sort of analysis. In this paper the deconvolution method was used to increase spectra resolution and correct the overlaps. The methodology was tested according to NBR ISO 17025 using a set of seven certified reference materials for impurities present in U3O8 (New Brunswick Laboratory - NBL). The results showed that this methodology allows quantitative determination of impurities such as Zn, Zr, Mo and others, in uranium compounds. The detection limits were shorter than 50μg. g -1 and uncertainty was shorter than 10% for the determined elements. (author)

  19. Impurity study of TMX using ultraviolet spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.; Strand, O.T.; Moos, H.W.; Fortner, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet (EUV) study of the emissions from intrinsic and injected impurities in TMX is presented. Two survey spectrographs were used to determine that the major impurities present were oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and titanium. Three absolutely-calibrated monochromators were used to measure the time histories and radial profiles of these impurity emissions in the central cell and each plug. Two of these instruments were capable of obtaining radial profiles as a function of time in a single shot

  20. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospieszczyk, A; Bay, H L; Bogen, P; Hartwig, H; Hintz, E; Koenen, L; Ross, G G; Rusbueldt, D; Samm, U; Schweer, B

    1987-02-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n/sub e/, of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers.

  1. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Bay, H.L.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Koenen, L.; Ross, G.G.; Rusbueldt, D.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    1987-01-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an 'all carbon' surrounding as a function of central density n e , of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers. (orig.)

  2. EUV impurity study of the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Chen, K.I.; Moos, H.W.; Marmar, E.S.

    1977-06-01

    The intensity of resonance line radiation from oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and molybdenum impurities has been measured in the high field (80 kG), high density (6 x 10 14 cm -3 ) discharges of the Alcator tokamak, using a 0.4 m normal incidence monochromator (300 to 1300 A) with its line of sight fixed along a major radius. The total light impurity concentrations were 2 x 10 -3 , 7 x 10 -4 , and 3 x 10 -3 at central electron densities of 4.5 x 10 13 cm -3 (burnout), 4.0 x 10 13 (low density plateau) and 6.0 x 10 14 (high density plateau). Both a simple model and a computer code which included Pfirsch-Schluter impurity diffusion were used to estimate oxygen influxes of 1.6 x 10 13 cm -2 sec -1 and 1.5 x 10 14 cm -2 sec -1 at the plasma edge in the low and high density emission plateaus. The resulting values of Z/sub eff/, including the contributions due to both the light impurities and molybdenum, were close to one. The power lost through the impurity line radiation accounted for approximately equal to 7 percent of the total ohmic input power at high densities

  3. Simulated impurity transport in LHD from MIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J.E. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    The impurity transport code MIST and atomic physics package LINES are used to calculate the time evolution of charge state density profiles, individual line emissivity profiles and total radiated power profiles for impurities in LHD plasmas. Three model LHD plasmas are considered; a high density, low temperature case, a low density, high temperature case and the initial LHD start-up plasma (500 kW ECH), using impurity transport coefficient profiles from Heliotron E. The elements oxygen, neon, scandium, iron, nickel and molybdenum are considered, both injected and in steady state. (author)

  4. EUV impurity study of the Alcator tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Chen, K.I.; Moos, H.W.; Marmar, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    The intensity of resonance line radiation from oxygen, nitrogen, carbon and molybdenum impurities has been measured in the high-field (80kG), high-density (6x10 14 cm -3 ) discharges of the Alcator Tokamak, using a 0.4-m normal-incidence monochromator (300-1300A) with its line of sight fixed along a major radius. Total light-impurity concentrations of a few tenths of a percent have been estimated by using both a simple model and a computer code which included Pfirsch-Schlueter impurity diffusion. The resulting values of Zsub(eff), including the contributions due to both the light impurities and molybdenum, were close to one. The power lost through the impurity line radiation from the lower ionization states accounted for approximately 10% of the total Ohmic input power at high densities. (author)

  5. Impurities in chromium deposits produced by electroplating and physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    Impurity contents in electrodeposited (hexavalent and trivalent) chromium deposits and physically vapor deposited (thermal evaporation, electron beam evaporation and rf-sputtering) were compared. Oxygen is the key impurity obtained in electrodeposited films but it can be minimized in hexavalent plating solutions by operating at high temperature, e. g., 85 C. Electrodeposits produced in trivalent chromium plating solutions and physically vapor deposited films have much higher oxygen contents than electrodeposits produced in hexavalent chromium solutions operated at temperatures around 85 C. Depending on the target material used for physically vapor deposited films, these films can also have high amounts of other impurities.

  6. Characterization of impurities in biogas before and after upgrading to vehicle fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Johansson, Ulrika [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Biogases produced by digesting organic wastes, residual sludge from waste water treatment, energy crops,byproducts from industry or in landfills contain impurities which can be harmful for components that will be in contact with the biogas during its utilization. In this project, the impurities present in biogases have been mapped out depending upon which feedstock is digested. P-cymene och D-limonene, two terpenes, have been found to be characteristics for biogases produced from the digestion of waste including household wastes while an 'oil' fraction containing alkanes with 9 to 13 carbon atoms is characteristic for biogases produced at waste water treatment plants. Ketones and sulfur compounds are found in biogases produced from the digestion of food industry wastes or energy crops. It was not possible to characterize impurities in biogases produced in farm plants digesting manure because not enough samples were analyzed from these plants. In order to understand the relation between the feedstock and the impurities present in the biogas, an extensive study on feedstock characterization must be conducted. One question to be answered is if these impurities only originate from the volatilization from the feedstock and in this case, why only these specific compounds are found at significant concentrations. In this study we have also studied how effective purification/upgrading techniques are to remove impurities that have been identified in biogases. En general comment is that the upgraded gas still contains a part of the characteristic impurities which have been identified for each feedstock at different levels of concentration depending on which technique has been used. The results show that activated carbon filters are more or less effective. Some of them can remove more than 90 % of the impurities while others remove less that 10 %. Results show also that the amine scrubber have very moderate effects on the impurities composition. In that case, the

  7. Isotopes of carbon and oxygen in the carbonate impurities of coal have potential as palaeoenvironmental indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhagen, B.T.; Falcon, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The nature and systematics of impurities such as carbonates need to be established in order to understand their provenance in coal seams with reference to mining, beneficiation and ultimately their elimination or reduction. To this end, mineralogical and carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotopic studies were undertaken on carbonate occurrences in coal from the eastern Transvaal highveld. Isotopic variations of considerable amplitude and individual values of extreme ''lightness'' are to be found in the carbonates in coal of the Witbank and adjacent basins. The observed isotopic ratios have a clear bearing on the nature and origins of the carbonates. 1 tab., 1 fig

  8. Atomic absorption determination of iron and copper impurities in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyukova, Yu.V.; Kravchenko, J.B.; Kucher, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    An extraction atomic absorption method for the determination of copper and iron impurities in rare earth compounds has been developed. The extraction separation of determined elements as hydroxy quinolinates with isobuthyl alcohol was used. It increased the sensitivity of these element determination and excluded the effect of the analysed sample. Cu, Te, Zn, Bi, Sn, In, Ga, Tl and the some other elements can be determined at pH 2.0-3.0 but rare earths are remained in an aqueous phase. The condition of the flame combustion does not change during the introduction of isobutyl extract but the sensitivity of the determination of the elements increased 2-3 times. The limit of Fe determination is 0.01 mg/ml and the limit of Cu determination is 0.014 mg/ml

  9. Identification of impurities in sodium and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbotin, B.I.; Voltchkov, L.G.; Kozlov, F.A.; Zagorulko, Yu.I.; Kuznetsov, E.K.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents some investigation results on sodium technology. In particular, a description is given of a calculation method for evaluation of sodium-cover gas-impurities equilibrium compositions as well as experimental results on development of methods for sodium sampling, equipment for non-metallic impurities (oxygen, hydrogen, carbon) constant control in sodium. The investigation results on sodium purification with cold traps are presented

  10. Experimental study of impurity production in the Tokapole II tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brickhouse, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    The release mechanism for low-Z impurities in Tokapole II has been characterized through impurity doping and isotopic exchange experiments. The desorption mechanism responsible for the low-Z impurity concentrations during the rise phase of the plasma current depends on the mass of the plasma ions. Doping with small amounts of any gas studied (H 2 , D 2 , He, N 2 , O 2 , Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) increases the early-time radiation of O, C, and N. For exotic gas doping this increase is linear with the dopant concentration, and proportional to the mass of the dopant, as expected for a momentum transfer process. Isotopic exchange experiments confirm the mass-dependence of oxygen production. A time-dependent coronal model is compared with the vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopic signals of the ionizing oxygen. The quantity sigma/tau (desorption cross section divided by particle confinement time) is determined to be 4 x 10 13 cm 2 /msec. The oxygen influx has a large peak early in the start-up

  11. Impurity effects in neutron-irradiated simple oxides: Implications for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, R.; Chen, Y.; Caceres, D.; Vergara, I.

    2006-01-01

    Radiation damage induced by neutron irradiation was studied in undoped MgO crystals and in MgO doped with either iron, hydrogen or lithium impurities. The oxygen-vacancy concentration produced by irradiation increases with neutron fluence. The net production rates resulting from irradiations with 14.8 MeV neutrons are about twice those produced by fission neutrons. In nominally pure crystals, the oxygen-vacancy concentration incurred by the fission-neutron irradiation is higher in crystals with a larger number of inherent impurities (such as iron) due to trapping of interstitials by impurities. Suppression of these defects is observed in MgO:H crystals and attributed to migration of oxygen vacancies to microcavities filled with H 2 gas. In MgO:Li crystals irradiated with neutron fluences below 10 18 n/cm 2 , most of the oxygen vacancies are camouflaged as hydride ions. Nanoindentation experiments show that hardness increases with neutron fluence and is independent of the presence of lithium in the crystal. Comparison between a neutron-irradiated and a thermochemically reduced crystal containing similar concentrations of oxygen vacancies shows that 70% of the neutron-irradiation hardening is produced by interstitials, 30% by oxygen vacancies and a negligible amount by higher-order point defects

  12. [Distribution and sources of oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in surface soil of Beijing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guang-Xiu; Zhang, Zhi-Huan; Peng, Xu-Yang; Zhu, Lei; Lu, Ling

    2011-11-01

    62 surface soil samples were collected from different environmental function zones in Beijing. Sulfur and oxygen heterocyclic aromatic compounds were detected by GC/MS. The objectives of this study were to identify the composition and distribution of these compounds, and discuss their sources. The results showed that the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soils mainly contained dibenzofuran, methyl- and C2-dibenzofuran series, dibenzothiophene, methyl-, C2- and C3-dibenzothiophene series and benzonaphthothiophene series. The composition and distribution of the oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil samples varied in the different environmental function zones, of which some factories and the urban area received oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds most seriously. In Beijing, the degree of contamination by oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the north surface soil was higher than that in the south. There were preferable linear correlations between the concentration of dibenzofuran series and fluorene series, as well as the concentration of dibenzothiophene series and dibenzofuran series. The oxygen and sulfur heterocyclic aromatic compounds in the surface soil were mainly derived from combustion products of oil and coal and direct input of mineral oil, etc. There were some variations in pollution sources of different environmental function zones.

  13. Contribution to the study of hydrogenated and oxygenated impurities in liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naud, G.

    1964-07-01

    This study is made up essentially of two parts. The first is devoted to the development of dosage methods for selectively determining the oxygenated and hydrogenated impurities present in sodium, that is the oxide, the hydride and the hydroxide. The second makes use of these methods for a study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 system, as well as of the related problem of the attack of pyrex glass by molten sodium. The conventional method for dosing oxygen by amalgamation was first adapted to the simultaneous measurement of the hydride. We then developed a method for dosing the total hydrogen by measuring successively the concentrations of gas present in the hydride and hydroxide form. This method is based on the thermal decomposition of the hydride and the reaction between sodium and the hydroxide. Our contribution to the study of the Na-H 2 -O 2 System consists first of all in the study of the reaction between hydrogen and sodium in the temperature range from 150 to 250 deg C and at a pressure of about 150 mm of mercury. The study of the thermal decomposition of the hydride in sodium was then studied. It was possible to make some qualitative observations concerning the reaction between sodium and sodium hydroxide. Finally some complementary tests made it possible to define the nature of the phenomena occurring during the attack of pyrex glass by sodium. (author) [fr

  14. Radiation effects on the behavior of carbon and oxygen impurities and the role of Ge in Czochralski grown Si upon annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londos, C. A.; Andrianakis, A.; Emtsev, V.; Ohyama, H.

    2009-01-01

    The annealing behavior of the oxygen and carbon impurities in Czochralski grown silicon (Cz-Si) was investigated in electron- and neutron-irradiated materials. The irradiated samples were subjected to isochronal anneals of up to ∼1000 deg. C, and the evolution of oxygen and carbon concentrations was monitored by means of infrared spectroscopy from the amplitudes of the 1106 and 605 cm -1 bands of the two impurities correspondingly. It was found that the electron irradiation does not affect the temperature of annealing of oxygen, although in the neutron-irradiated samples the oxygen band begins to decay in the spectra at a lower temperature than that in the nonirradiated samples. This behavior could be determined by supersaturation of vacancies mainly liberated from disordered regions in the latter material. This assists the oxygen aggregation process. Regarding carbon evolution, it was found that in the irradiated samples the annealing out of the 605 cm -1 band occurs at a lower temperature than that of the nonirradiated samples. Prior to the onset of decay of the 605 cm -1 band an inverse annealing stage was observed in the irradiated samples, indicating partial restoration of substitutional carbon. The general behavior was discussed with respect to the supersaturation of intrinsic defects, mainly self-interstitials. As a result, large C N (Si I ) M complexes are formed. There are two processes running in parallel: the recovery of substitutional carbon from carbon-related defects and C N (Si I ) M complexes and the transformation of C N (Si I ) M complexes to SiC-based precipitates. Noticeably, in electron-irradiated Ge-doped Si the inverse annealing stage of substitutional carbon is suppressed. Furthermore, our results showed that the Ge doping of Cz-Si of up to 2x10 20 cm -3 does not practically affect the temperature at which oxygen and carbon are completely lost in irradiated Cz-Si:Ge.

  15. Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, W.W.

    1977-01-01

    Bidentate organophosphorus compounds useful for extracting actinide elements from acidic nuclear waste solutions are purified of undesirable acidic impurities by contacting the compounds with ethylene glycol which preferentially extracts the impurities found in technical grade bidentate compounds

  16. Impurity investigations in the boundary layer of the DITE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, G.M.; Partridge, J.W.; Erents, S.K.; Sofield, C.J.; Ferguson, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    The results obtained in the present investigation show large fluctuations both during discharges and from one discharge to the next. The radial density gradient of impurities in the boundary is not large. It is clear that the density and in particular dn/dt can have a strong effect on the impurity level. However there are apparently a number of other factors causing changes in impurity level which have not been well controlled in the present experiments. Possibilities include flaking from the walls, and changes in the level of the light impurities, oxygen and carbon, in the discharges. (orig./RW)

  17. Divertor experiment for impurity control in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagami, Masayuki

    1979-04-01

    Divertor actions of controlling the impurities and the transport of impurity ions in the plasma have been investigated in the DIVA device. Following are the results: (1) The radial transport of impurity ions is not described only by neoclassical theory, but it is strongly influenced by anomalous process. Radial diffusion of impurity ions across the whole minor radius is well described by a neoclassical diffusion superposed by the anomalous diffusion for protons. Due to this anomalous process, which spreads the radial density profile of impurity ions, 80 to 90% of the impurity flux in the plasma outer edge is shielded even in a nondiverted discharge. (2) The divertor reduces the impurity flux entering the main plasma by a factor of 2 to 4. The impurity ions shielded by the scrape-off plasma are rapidly guided into the burial chamber with a poloidal excursion time roughly equal to that of the scrape-off plasma. (3) The divertor reduces the impurity ion flux onto the main vacuum chamber by guiding the impurity ions diffusing from the main plasma into the burial chamber, thereby reducing the plasma-wall interaction caused by diffusing impurity ions at the main vacuum chamber. The impurity ions produced in the burial chamber may flow back to the main plasma through the scrape-off layer. However, roughly only 0.3% of the impurity flux into the scrape-off plasma in the burial chamber penetrates into the main plasma due to the impurity backflow. (4) A slight cooling of the scrape-off plasma with light-impurity injection effectively reduces the metal impurity production at the first wall by reducing the potential difference between the plasma and the wall, thereby reducing the accumulation of the metal impurity in the discharge. Radiation cooling by low-Z impurities in the plasma outer edge, which may become an important feature in future large tokamaks both with and without divertor, is numerically evaluated for carbon, oxygen and neon. (author)

  18. Oxygen transfer rate identifies priming compounds in parsley cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Jana Viola; Schillheim, Britta; Mahr, Stefan; Reufer, Yannik; Sanjoyo, Sandi; Conrath, Uwe; Büchs, Jochen

    2015-11-25

    In modern agriculture, the call for an alternative crop protection strategy increases because of the desired reduction of fungicide and pesticide use and the continuously evolving resistance of pathogens and pests to agrochemicals. The direct activation of the plant immune system does not provide a promising plant protection measure because of high fitness costs. However, upon treatment with certain natural or synthetic compounds, plant cells can promote to a fitness cost-saving, primed state of enhanced defense. In the primed state, plants respond to biotic and abiotic stress with faster and stronger activation of defense, and this is often associated with immunity and abiotic stress tolerance. Until now, the identification of chemical compounds with priming-inducing activity (so-called plant activators) relied on tedious and invasive approaches, or required the late detection of secreted furanocoumarin phytoalexins in parsley cell cultures. Thus, simple, fast, straightforward, and noninvasive techniques for identifying priming-inducing compounds for plant protection are very welcome. This report demonstrates that a respiration activity-monitoring system (RAMOS) can identify compounds with defense priming-inducing activity in parsley cell suspension in culture. RAMOS relies on the quasi-continuous, noninvasive online determination of the oxygen transfer rate (OTR). Treatment of parsley culture cells with the known plant activator salicylic acid (SA), a natural plant defense signal, resulted in an OTR increase. Addition of the defense elicitor Pep13, a cell wall peptide of Phythophthora sojae, induced two distinctive OTR peaks that were higher in SA-primed cells than in unprimed cells upon Pep13 challenge. Both, the OTR increase after priming with SA and the Pep13 challenge were dose-dependent. Furthermore, there was a close correlation of a compound's activity to enhance the oxygen consumption in parsley cells and its capacity to prime Pep13-induced furanocoumarin

  19. Microlayer source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the summertime marine Arctic boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    Mungall, Emma L.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Lee, Alex K. Y.; Thomas, Jennie L.; Blais, Marjolaine; Gosselin, Michel; Miller, Lisa A.; Papakyriakou, Tim; Willis, Megan D.; Liggio, John

    2017-01-01

    A biogeochemical connection between the atmosphere and the ocean is demonstrated whereby a marine source of oxygenated volatile organic compounds is identified. Compounds of this type are involved in the formation of secondary organic aerosol, which remains one of the most poorly understood components of Earth’s climate system due in part to the diverse sources of its volatile organic compound precursors. This is especially the case for marine environments, where there are more oxygenated vol...

  20. Effect of impurity radiation on tokamak equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebut, P.H.; Green, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The energy loss from a tokamak plasma due to the radiation from impurities is of great importance in the overall energy balance. Taking the temperature dependence of this loss for two impurities characteristic of those present in existing tokamak plasmas, the condition for radial power balance is derived. For the impurities considered (oxygen and iron) it is found that the radiation losses are concentrated in a thin outer layer of the plasma and the equilibrium condition places an upper limit on the plasma paraticle number density in this region. This limiting density scales with mean current density in the same manner as is experimentally observed for the peak number density of tokamak plasmas. The stability of such equilibria is also discussed. (author)

  1. Spectroscopical studies of impurities in the belt pinch HECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singethan, J.

    1981-04-01

    In this paper UV-line-intensity measurements of impurities are presented, which have been performed in the belt-pinch HECTOR. From the line-intensities impurity concentrations and information on the radiation losses is be obtained. At temperatures below 100 eV, the energy loss due to line emission of oxygen and carbon impurities is one of the most important electron energy loss mechanisms. Thus the measurement and calculation of the radiation losses is of particular relevance. Furthermore the electron temperature time dependence can be obtained by comparing the line intensity time dependence with the solution of the respective rate equations. (orig./HT) [de

  2. Sodium sampling and impurities determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Docekal, J.; Kovar, C.; Stuchlik, S.

    1980-01-01

    Samples may be obtained from tubes in-built in the sodium facility and further processed or they are taken into crucibles, stored and processed later. Another sampling method is a method involving vacuum distillation of sodium, thus concentrating impurities. Oxygen is determined by malgamation, distillation or vanadium balance methods. Hydrogen is determined by the metal diaphragm extraction, direct extraction or amalgamation methods. Carbon is determined using dry techniques involving burning a sodium sample at 1100 degC or using wet techniques by dissolving the sample with an acid. Trace amounts of metal impurities are determined after dissolving sodium in ethanol. The trace metals are concentrated and sodium excess is removed. (M.S.)

  3. Determination of oxygen in uranium compounds using sulfur monochloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, G.; Besson, J.; Blum, P.L.; Tran-Van, Danh

    1964-01-01

    The authors have described in an other paper (Anal. Chim. Acta, in press) a method for oxygen determination in uranium compounds, in which the sample is attacked by sulfur monochloride. The present paper is concerned with the experimental aspects of the method: apparatus procedure. (authors) [fr

  4. Amount of impurity and its behavior in the STP-2 screw pinch tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, S.

    1981-05-01

    Temporal and spatial evolution of oxygen spectral line intensities have been measured in the STP-2 screw pinch tokamak. The electron density and temperature as measured by Thomson scattering are of the order of 10 14 cm -3 and 10 eV, respectively. On the basis of these measurements, quasi-steady-state rate equations have been solved to give the OII and OIII ion densities. It is found that the density of oxygen impurity is about several percent of the electron density, and the impurity moves with the bulk plasma. It is confirmed that the impurity originates from the wall of the discharge tube during the initial phase of the discharge. (author)

  5. Recombination rates of hydrogen and oxygen over pure and impure plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, L.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term, safe storage of excess plutonium-bearing materials is required until stabilization and disposal methods are implemented or defined. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established a plan to address the stabilization, packing, and storage of plutonium-bearing materials from around the complex. The DOE's standard method, DOE-STD-3013-96 and its proposed revision, for stabilizing pure and impure actinide materials is by calcination in air followed by sealing the material in welded stainless steel containers. The 3013 standard contains and equation that predicts the total pressure buildup in the can over the anticipated storage time of 50 yr. This equation was meant to model a worst-case scenario to ensure that pressures would not exceed the strength of the container at the end of 50 yr. As a result, concerns about pressure generation in the storage cans, both absolute values and rates, have been raised with regard to rupture and dispersal of nuclear materials. Similar issues have been raised about the transportation of these materials around the complex. The purpose of this work is to provide a stronger technical basis for the 3013 standard by measuring the recombination rates of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures in contact with pure and impure plutonium oxides. The goal of these experiments was to determine whether the rate of recombination is faster than the rate of water radiolysis under controlled conditions. This was accomplished by using a calibrated pressure-volume-temperature apparatus to measure the recombination rates in a fixed volume as the gas mixture was brought into contact with oxide powders whose temperatures ranged from 50 to 300 C. These conditions were selected in order to bracket the temperature conditions expected in a typical storage can. In addition, a 2% H 2 /air mixture encompasses scenarios in which the cans are sealed in air, and over time various amounts of hydrogen are formed

  6. A Simple and Direct LC-MS Method for Determination of Genotoxic Impurity Hydroxylamine in Pharmaceutical compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Thangarathinam; Ramya, Mohandass; Srinivasan, Viswanathan; Xavier, N

    2017-08-01

    Hydroxylamine is a known genotoxic impurity compound that needs to be controlled down to ppm level in pharmaceutical processes. It is difficult to detect using conventional analytical techniques due to its physio-chemical properties like lack of chromophore, low molecular weight, absence of carbon atom and high polarity. In addition to that, analysis of the pharmaceutical samples encounters considerable obstruction from matrix components that greatly overshadow the response of hydroxylamine. This study describes a simple, sensitive and direct Liquid Chromatographic-Mass Spectrometric method (LC-MS) for detection of hydroxylamine in pharmaceutical compounds. The LC-MS method was detected up to 0.008 ppm of hydroxylamine with S/N > 3.0 and quantified up to 0.025 ppm of hydroxylamine with S/N ratio >10.0. This validated method can be applied as a generic method to detect the hydroxylamine for pharmaceutical process control and drug substance release. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Hopping conductivity via deep impurity states in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.P.; Messerer, M.A.; Omel'yanovskij, Eh.M.

    1984-01-01

    Hopping (epsilon 3 ) and Mott conductivities via deep impurity compounds with localization radius below 10 A have been studied using as an example Mn in InP. It is shown, that the existing theory of hopping conductivity in low-alloyed semiconductors with Na 3 << 1 can be Used for the case of deep centres as successfully as for the case of insignificant hydrogen-like impurities. Fundamental parameters of the theory: localization radius of wave function of deep impurities, state density near the Fermi level, mean hop length, are determined

  8. The impact of impurities on long-term PEMFC performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, Fernando H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lopes, Thiago [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sansinena, Jose - Maria [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kienitz, Brian [LLNL

    2009-06-23

    Electrochemical experimentation and modeling indicates that impurities degrade fuel cell performance by a variety of mechanisms. Electrokinetics may be inhibited by catalytic site poisoning from sulfur compounds and CO and by decreased local proton activity and mobility caused by the presence of foreign salt cations or ammonia. Cation impurity profiles vary with current density, valence and may change local conductivity and water concentrations in the ionomer. Nitrogen oxides and ammonia species may be electrochemically active under fuel cell operating conditions. The primary impurity removal mechanisms are electrooxidation and water fluxes through the fuel cell.

  9. Impurity sublattice localization in ZnO revealed by li marker diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarov, A.Yu.; Knutsen, K.E.; Neuvonen, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    Sublattice localization of impurities in compound semiconductors, e.g., ZnO, determines their electronic and optical action. Despite that the impurity position may be envisaged based on charge considerations, the actual localization is often unknown, limiting our understanding of the incorporation...... and possible doping mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that the preferential sublattice occupation for a number of impurities in ZnO can be revealed by monitoring Li diffusion. In particular, using ion implantation, the impurity incorporation into the Zn sublattice (holds for, B, Mg, P, Ag, Cd, and Sb...

  10. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  11. Choice of capillary electrophoresis systems for the impurity profiling of drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst, M.J; Somsen, G.W; de Jong, G.J.

    In order to develop a strategy for the impurity profiling of drugs, the possibilities of some capillary electrophoresis systems were investigated. A mixture containing a drug and some of its possible impurities has been used as a model problem. The test compounds were investigated by capillary zone

  12. Transport of impurities during H-mode pulses in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannella, R.; Gottardi, N.; Mompean, F.; Mori, H.; Pasini, D.; Stork, D.; Barnsley, R.; Hawkes, N.C.; Lawson, K.

    1990-01-01

    The transport of impurities during the H-mode is very different from that observed in the other regimes. This is clearly evident in the quiescent discharges where the confinement time of impurities τ I are measured in all the quiescent H-mode discharges in spite of the variety of impurity behavior observed corresponding to different plasma parameters and operating scenarios. The condition of the machine has an influence on the role played by the various impurities, but this does not seem to affect the flow patterns of these ions substantially. In particular oxygen, which was often detected as the dominant radiator, can be reduced to a negligible fraction by He conditioning of the carbon X-point tiles or limiters or by evaporating beryllium in the vacuum vessel. Nevertheless the behaviour of the residual impurities in otherwise similar discharges remains substantially unchanged. The transport patterns appear in fact to be affected by the plasma parameters and their profiles. In particular, two extreme transport regimes are presented in the following. These discharges have been modelled with the aid of a recently developed fully time-dependent impurity transport code using heuristic profiles for the impurity diffusion D and the convection velocity v. (author) 4 refs., 5 figs

  13. Radiation and impurity measurements in FRX-C/T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.; McKenna, K.F.; Rej, D.J.; Tuszewski, M.

    1984-01-01

    Translation of Field-Reversed Configurations (FRCs) in the FRX-C/T device has provided better diagnostic access for radiation measurements. It is observed that radiated power accounts for 7 +- 2% of the total power losses, indicating that thermal conduction accounts for about half of the losses. It was determined through impurity seeding experiments that the oxygen fraction is 0.6 +- 0.2% and that oxygen can account for most of the radiated power

  14. The effect of the controlled oxygen on the incineration of radio contaminated organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahata, Taneaki; Abe, Jiro; Hoshino, Akira.

    1982-02-01

    It is very important to resolve the method of safety storage and the reduction of volume of radio contaminated waste for utilization of atomic energies. Presently, the amounts of radio contaminated organic compounds such as ion exchange resin, vinyl chloride resin and so on are increased year by year. These compounds are very difficult to burning because of the occurrence of soot or flying ash, so that the waste are solidified using with cement or asphalt. But the burning of these compounds are most efficient method for reduction of volume of the wastes. The present work is an attempt to evaluate the effect of controlled oxygen on the incineration of these compounds, using by differential thermoelectrobalance. The given off gas from these compounds are mixture of hydrocarbon and free carbon examined by mass spectrography. As the result of this study, these compounds are decomposed perfectly under 5 - 10% of oxygen gas flow at about 650 0 C and the off gas from the compounds is disappeared contact with heated copper oxide without soot or flying ash. (author)

  15. Evaluation of determinative methods for sodium impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molinari, Marcelo; Guido, Osvaldo; Botbol, Jose; Ares, Osvaldo

    1988-01-01

    Sodium, universally accepted as heat transfer fluid in fast breeder reactors, requires a special technology for every operation involved in any applicable methodology, due to its well known chemical reactivity. The purpose of this work is: a) to study the sources and effects of chemical species which, as traces, accompany sodium used in the nuclear field; b) to classify, taking into account, the present requirements and resources of the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA), the procedures found in the literature for determination of the most important impurities which exist in experimental liquid sodium systems and c) to describe the principles of the methods and to evaluate them in order to make a selection. It was concluded the convenience to develop, as a first stage, laboratory procedures to determine carbon, oxygen, hydrogen and non-volatile impurities, which besides serving present needs, will be referential for direct methods with undeferred response. The latter are needed in liquid sodium experimental loops and require, primarily, more complex and extended development. Additionally, a description is made of experimental work performed up-to-now in this laboratory, consisting of a transfer device for sodium sampling and a sodium distillation device, adapted from a previous design, with associated vacuum and inert gas systems. It is intended as a separative technique for indirect determination of oxygen and non-volatile impurities. (Author) [es

  16. Study of the defects related to oxygen in Czochralski silicon destined to photovoltaic solar cells - Influence of isovalent impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanay, Florent

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the effects of two main defects related to oxygen, the boron-oxygen complexes (responsible for light-induced degradation of the carrier lifetime) and the thermal donors (among other things, responsible for variations of the conductivity), on the electric and photovoltaic properties of silicon. More precisely, the interactions of isovalent impurities, known for modifying the oxygen spatial distribution, with these defects were studied. Two experimental protocols were first developed to evaluate the light-induced degradation of the carrier lifetime in iron-rich silicon. Then, the introduction in silicon of germanium and tin in high quantity were shown not to significantly influence the conversion efficiency of the cells. However, contrary to recent studies from the literature, no reduction due to germanium co-doping or to tin co-doping of the light-induced degradation of the photovoltaic performances was observed. However carbon was shown to lead to a slowdown of the degradation due to boron-oxygen complexes. Moreover contrary to tin which has no influence on the thermal donor generation, germanium slows down their formation. An empirical expression has been proposed to take into account this effect for a large range of germanium concentrations. Eventually in highly doped and compensated silicon, the thermal donor generation is identical as in conventional silicon, which experimentally confirms that the thermal donor formation is limited by the electron density. (author) [fr

  17. Removal of sulfur compounds from diesel using ArF laser and oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, M A; Siddiqui, M N; Al-Hooshani, K

    2013-01-01

    A laser-based technique for deep desulfurization of diesel and other hydrocarbon fuels by removal of dimethyldibenzothiophene (DMDBT), a persistent sulfur contaminant in fuel oils has been developed. We report a selective laser excitation of DMDBT in diesel and model compounds such as n-hexane in a reaction chamber under oxygen environment where oxidative reactions can take place. ArF laser emitting at 193 nm was employed for excitation of oxygen and DMDBT, while for process optimization, the laser energy was varied from 50 to 200 mJ/cm(2). The laser-irradiated DMDBT solution under continuous oxygen flow was analyzed by UV absorption spectrometer to determine the photochemical oxidative degradation of DMDBT. In just 5 min of laser irradiation time, almost 95% DMDBT was depleted in a diesel containing 200 ppm of DMDBT. This article provides a new method for the removal of sulfur compounds from diesel by laser based photochemical process.

  18. Environment sensitive embedding energies of impurities, and grain boundary stability in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasko, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    Metalloid impurities have a very low solubility in tantalum, and therefore prefer to segregate at the grain boundaries (GBs). In order to analyze the energetics of the impurities on the tantalum GB, the LMTO calculations were performed on a simple 8-atom supercell emulating a typical (capped trigonal prism) GB environment. The so-called environment-sensitive embedding energies were calculated for hydrogen, boron, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulphur, as a function of the electron charge density due to the host atoms at the impurity site. The calculations showed that, at the electron density typical of a GB, carbon has the lowest energy (followed by Nitrogen and Boron) and thus would compete with the other impurities for the site on the GB, tending to displace them from the GB. The above energies were then used in a modified Finnis-Sinclair embedded atom approach for calculating the cohesive energies and the equilibrium interplanar distances in the vicinity of a (111) Σ3 tilt GB plane, both for the clean GB and that with an impurity. These distances were found to oscillate, returning to the value corresponding to the equilibrium spacing between (111) planes in bulk BCC tantalum by the 10th--12th plane off the GB. Carbon, nitrogen and boron somewhat dampen the deformation wave (making the oscillations less than in the clean GB), while oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur result in an increase of the oscillations. The cohesive energies follow the same trend, the GB with carbon being the most stable. Thus, carbon, nitrogen and boron may be thought of as being cohesion enhancers, while oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur result in decohesion effects

  19. Deep impurity levels in n-type copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The density of Nd 2-x Ce x CuO 4 monoparticle states was calculated by the method of precise diagonalization of multielectron hamiltonian of 6-zone model for CuO cluster. Emergence of a deep impurity state of a symmetry in the middle of dielectric slit, which is a mixture of d z 2-states of copper and a 1 -molecular orbital of oxygen, is shown. Fluctuation of parameters of p-d jump and energies of charge transfer provide additional fine impurity levels near the bottom of conductivity zone and ceiling of valency zone. 30 refs., 4 figs

  20. Models for impurity production and transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Models for the edge conditions which are commonly used in tokamak transport codes have been kept simple partly because of a lack of data. A report is presented on an improved model for the particle and energy balance of e - , H 1 + , H 1 0 , H 2 + , H 2 0 , O 0 , O/sup (1 yields 8) + / in the plasma scrape-off region. Experiments should yield the needed data in the near future, and allow one to test the model. The diffusion of impurities has been studied with a neoclassical model. The role of 'anomalous spreading' of the impurity distribution has been studied for the case of Fe. A model is presented for the expulsion of low-Z (oxygen) impurities for cases where q(0) greater than 1, but in which a large shear-free region is produced in the plasma core

  1. Classical confinement and outward convection of impurity ions in the MST RFP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Mirnov, V. V.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Caspary, K. J.; Chapman, B. E.; Parke, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Magee, R. M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Craig, D. [Physics Department, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois 60187 (United States); Fiksel, G. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Impurity ion dynamics measured with simultaneously high spatial and temporal resolution reveal classical ion transport in the reversed-field pinch. The boron, carbon, oxygen, and aluminum impurity ion density profiles are obtained in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] using a fast, active charge-exchange-recombination-spectroscopy diagnostic. Measurements are made during improved-confinement plasmas obtained using inductive control of tearing instability to mitigate stochastic transport. At the onset of the transition to improved confinement, the impurity ion density profile becomes hollow, with a slow decay in the core region concurrent with an increase in the outer region, implying an outward convection of impurities. Impurity transport from Coulomb collisions in the reversed-field pinch is classical for all collisionality regimes, and analysis shows that the observed hollow profile and outward convection can be explained by the classical temperature screening mechanism. The profile agrees well with classical expectations. Experiments performed with impurity pellet injection provide further evidence for classical impurity ion confinement.

  2. MICROBIAL DEGRADATION OF NITROGEN, OXYGEN AND SULFUR HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS: STUDIES WITH AQUIFER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for anaerobic biodegradation of 12 heterocyclic model compounds was studied. Nine of the model compounds were biotransformed in aquifer slurries under sulfate-reducing or methanogenic conditions. The nitrogen and oxygen heterocyclic compounds were more susceptible t...

  3. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2017-11-28

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  4. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Chen, Bingjie; Moshammer, Kai; Mohamed, Samah; Wang, Heng; Sioud, Salim; Raji, Misjudeen; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina; Hansen, Nils; Dagaut, Philippe; Leone, Stephen R.; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  5. Impurity engineering of Czochralski silicon used for ultra large-scaled-integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deren; Chen, Jiahe; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2009-01-01

    Impurities in Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) used for ultra large-scaled-integrated (ULSI) circuits have been believed to deteriorate the performance of devices. In this paper, a review of the recent processes from our investigation on internal gettering in Cz-Si wafers which were doped with nitrogen, germanium and/or high content of carbon is presented. It has been suggested that those impurities enhance oxygen precipitation, and create both denser bulk microdefects and enough denuded zone with the desirable width, which is benefit of the internal gettering of metal contamination. Based on the experimental facts, a potential mechanism of impurity doping on the internal gettering structure is interpreted and, a new concept of 'impurity engineering' for Cz-Si used for ULSI is proposed.

  6. Stability-indicating HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/MS impurity profiling of the anti-malarial drug lumefantrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Mathieu; Suleman, Sultan; Baert, Bram; Vangheluwe, Elien; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Jansen, Frans H; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2011-02-28

    Lumefantrine (benflumetol) is a fluorene derivative belonging to the aryl amino alcohol class of anti-malarial drugs and is commercially available in fixed combination products with β-artemether. Impurity characterization of such drugs, which are widely consumed in tropical countries for malaria control programmes, is of paramount importance. However, until now, no exhaustive impurity profile of lumefantrine has been established, encompassing process-related and degradation impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished pharmaceutical products (FPPs). Using HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/ion trap/MS, a comprehensive impurity profile was established based upon analysis of market samples as well as stress, accelerated and long-term stability results. In-silico toxicological predictions for these lumefantrine related impurities were made using Toxtree® and Derek®. Several new impurities are identified, of which the desbenzylketo derivative (DBK) is proposed as a new specified degradant. DBK and the remaining unspecified lumefantrine related impurities are predicted, using Toxtree® and Derek®, to have a toxicity risk comparable to the toxicity risk of the API lumefantrine itself. From unstressed, stressed and accelerated stability samples of lumefantrine API and FPPs, nine compounds were detected and characterized to be lumefantrine related impurities. One new lumefantrine related compound, DBK, was identified and characterized as a specified degradation impurity of lumefantrine in real market samples (FPPs). The in-silico toxicological investigation (Toxtree® and Derek®) indicated overall a toxicity risk for lumefantrine related impurities comparable to that of the API lumefantrine itself.

  7. Behaviour of impurities during the H-mode in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gianella, R.; Behringer, K.; Denne, B.; Gottardi, N.; Hellermann, M. von; Morgan, P.D.; Pasini, D.; Stamp, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    In additionally-heated tokamak discharges, the H-mode phases are reported to display, together with a better energy confinement, a longer global containment time for particles. In particular, steep gradients of electron density and temperature are sustained in the outer region of the plasma column. This enhanced performance is observed especially in discharges in which the activity of edge localized modes (ELMs) is low or absent. High confinement and accumulation of metallic impurities, which quickly give raise to terminal disruptions have been described under similar conditions. In JET H-modes very long impurity confinement times are also observed. However the experimental condition is somewhat more favourable since quiescent H-modes are obtained lasting much longer than the energy confinement times and the radiation from metals is generally negligible. The dominant impurities are normally carbon and oxygen, the latter generally accounting for half or more of the power radiated from the bulk plasma. During the X-point operation the effective influx of carbon into the discharge, which is normally in close correlation with that of deuterium, is substantially reduced while the influx of oxygen, whose production mechanisms is believed to be of a chemical nature, does not show significant variations. (author) 5 refs., 4 figs

  8. Single-site properties of U impurities doped in La2Zn17 (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H.; Anzai, K.; Takagi, S.

    1997-04-01

    Thermodynamic and transport properties of heavy Fermion (HF) U compounds show similar behavior to HF Ce compounds. Although most of the magnetic properties of HF Ce compounds can be qualitatively understood on the basis of the impurity Kondo model, no such consensus for HF U compounds has been reached. In addition to this, the single-site properties of U impurities are not understood so well, in contrast to the case of Ce impurities. Recent works for dilute U systems reported new features as are not seen in dilute Ce systems. We have investigated a dilute-U2Zn17 system of (La1-zUz)2Zn17 in order to reveal the single U ion site properties of this system by preparing single crystals. The impurity contributions to various physical quantities such as ρimp(T), χimp(T), and Cimp(T) can be scaled by the U concentration between z=0.025 and 0.05, and the system is considered as in the dilute limit still for z=0.05. The electrical resistivity shows the typical impurity-Kondo upturn at low temperatures. The electronic specific-heat coefficient is strongly enhanced (γimp≈1.5 J/K2 mole U) and about 4 times as large as that for dense U2Zn17. Suppressions of the Kondo effect by the magnetic field are seen in γimp(H) and magnetoresistance. The relatively large anisotropy in χimp(T) indicates an existence of the crystal field. These features of this system will be explained in terms of the Kondo effect in the presence of the crystal field.

  9. Change in detector properties caused by electronegative impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deptuch, M.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Mindur, B.

    2006-01-01

    Detector properties (energy resolution, gas gain, drift-time measurements) depend quite critically on the concentration of impurities. The most frequent impurities in the working gas are water vapour and oxygen. Systematic measurements of the detector properties as a function of both H 2 O vapour and O 2 concentration have been made. Ar/CO 2 (80/20) and Ar/CO 2 /CF 4 (70/10/20) have been selected as the working gases. The first mixture is commonly used, the second one is very promising due to its fastness. The concentration of H 2 O vapour and O 2 was varied from 0% to 1.9% and 3%, respectively

  10. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...

  11. Spectrochemical analysis of impurities in plutonium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffereau, M.; Crehange, G.; Deniaud, S.; Leclainche, C.

    1967-01-01

    After a review of previous works, various powdered or wet analytical methods are studied. One tries to give an explanation for some phenomena. A detailed know-how of studied methods is given. Validity of results is discussed. Problem of impurities in alloys analysis and non spectroscopic elements determination is quickly reviewed. One concludes to the interest of the use of some particular methods and the necessity of basic studies in order to obtain best information. (author) [fr

  12. Novel techniques of oxygen bleeding for polymer electrolyte fuel cells under impure anode feeding and poisoning condition: A computational study using OpenFOAM®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafttananian, M.; Ramiar, A.; Ranjbar, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Oxygen bleeding as a treatment of poisoned fuel cells is simulated. • Oxygen bleeding, depended on impurity concentration, has an optimize range. • Three novel techniques of oxygen bleeding are introduced. • The OBME parameter is introduced to compare oxygen bleeding methods. • Pulsating and sinusoidal methods lead to 2.74 and 1.74 effectiveness, respectively. - Abstract: PEM fuel cells fed by steam methane reformate (SMR) and water gas shift reformate (WGSR) are always subjected to catalyst poisoning due to trace amounts of carbon monoxide in the fuel stream. Air or oxygen bleeding are the most common, cost-effective and easy-to-implement methods of mitigation for such conditions. In the present work, important restrictions of oxygen bleeding and disadvantages of continuous constant O_2 bleeding are introduced. In order to simulating the problem, a mathematical model containing reaction kinetics, governing equations, boundary conditions and constitutive relations are presented and according to these, a comprehensive OpenFOAM transient multicomponent solver having the capability of simulating anode side of PEM fuel cell is developed, introduced and validated with existing experimental data. In addition, three novel methods of oxygen bleeding: namely pulsating, exponential and sinusoidal methods are introduced which are practical for both open-end and dead-end fuel cells. A quantitative criterion, Oxygen Bleeding Method Effectiveness (OBME), is also introduced to attain comparability of novel methods with continuous constant O_2 bleeding as common method. Results showed up to more than 5% increase in recovery ratio accompanied with up to 63% save in oxygen consumption.

  13. Identification and Structural Characterization of Unidentified Impurity in Bisoprolol Film-Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Mitrevska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the identification, structural characterization, and qualification of a degradation impurity of bisoprolol labeled as Impurity RRT 0.95. This degradation product is considered as a principal thermal degradation impurity identified in bisoprolol film-coated tablets. The impurity has been observed in the stress thermal degradation study of the drug product. Using HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS method, a tentative structure was assigned and afterwards confirmed by detailed structural characterization using NMR spectroscopy. The structure of the target Impurity RRT 0.95 was elucidated as phosphomonoester of bisoprolol, having relative molecular mass of 406 (positive ionization mode. The structural characterization was followed by qualification of Impurity RRT 0.95 using several different in silico methodologies. From the results obtained, it can be concluded that no new structural alerts have been generated for Impurity RRT 0.95 relative to the parent compound bisoprolol. The current study presents an in-depth analysis of the full characterization and qualification of an unidentified impurity in a drug product with the purpose of properly defining the quality specification of the product.

  14. Spectroscopic study of sources and control of impurities in TMX-U. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, T.L.; Allen, S.L.; Moos, H.W.

    1984-11-01

    Two absolutely calibrated euv instruments have been used to study the impurity characteristics in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U). One instrument is a spectrograph that measures the time histories of several impurity emission lines in a single plasma shot. The other instrument is a monochromator that measures time-resolved radial profiles of a particular impurity emission line. The common intrinsic impurities found in TMX-U are C, N, O, and Ti. It has been shown that a large fraction of oxygen and nitrogen in the plasma is associated with the neutral beams. The plasma wall is the main source of carbon. In general, the concentration of each of the impurities is low (<1%), and the power radiated by them is less than 10 kW, which is a small portion of the total input power to the plasma. The concentrations of the impurities can be reduced substantially by glow discharge cleaning and titanium gettering

  15. Variational method for magnetic impurities in metals: impurity pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oles, A M [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Stuttgart (Germany, F.R.); Chao, K A [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics and Measurement Technology

    1980-01-01

    Applying a variational method to the generalized Wolff model, we have investigated the effect of impurity-impurity interaction on the formation of local moments in the ground state. The direct coupling between the impurities is found to be more important than the interaction between the impurities and the host conduction electrons, as far as the formation of local moments is concerned. Under certain conditions we also observe different valences on different impurities.

  16. On the impact of isoelectric impurities on band bowing and disorder of compound semiconductors; Ueber den Einfluss von isoelektronischen Stoerstellen auf Bandbiegung und Unordnung in Verbindungshalbleitern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, Christian

    2012-03-16

    Isolectronic impurities and their impact on the properties of compound semiconductors is discussed in two systems: Nitrogen in Ga(As,P) quantum wells on the one hand and Sulfur and Selenium in bulk ZnTe. The properties are reduced to two experimentally observable aspects: Band Bowing, i.e. the non-linearity of the band gap of the compound semiconductor and disorder, i.e. in particular the formation of a strongly localized density of states beneath the fundamental band gap. Apart of the pure experimental studies an insight into the theoretical model of disorder-induced temperature dependent luminescence properties of the compound semiconductors by means of Monte Carlo Simulations is given.

  17. Assessment of Embrittlement of VHTR Structural Alloys in Impure Helium Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crone, Wendy; Cao, Guoping; Sridhara, Kumar

    2013-05-31

    The helium coolant in high-temperature reactors inevitably contains low levels of impurities during steady-state operation, primarily consisting of small amounts of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}, and N{sub 2} from a variety of sources in the reactor circuit. These impurities are problematic because they can cause significant long-term corrosion in the structural alloys used in the heat exchangers at elevated temperatures. Currently, the primary candidate materials for intermediate heat exchangers are Alloy 617, Haynes 230, Alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X. This project will evaluate the role of impurities in helium coolant on the stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in candidate alloys at elevated temperatures. The project team will: • Evaluate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack initiation and crack growth in the temperature range of 500-850°C in a prototypical helium environment. • Evaluate the effects of oxygen partial pressure on stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth in impure helium at 500°C, 700°C, and 850°C respectively. • Characterize the microstructure of candidate alloys after long-term exposure to an impure helium environment in order to understand the correlation between stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation, creep crack growth, material composition, and impurities in the helium coolant. • Evaluate grain boundary engineering as a method to mitigate stress-assisted grain boundary oxidation and creep crack growth of candidate alloys in impure helium. The maximum primary helium coolant temperature in the high-temperature reactor is expected to be 850-1,000°C.Corrosion may involve oxidation, carburization, or decarburization mechanisms depending on the temperature, oxygen partial pressure, carbon activity, and alloy composition. These corrosion reactions can substantially affect long-term mechanical properties such as crack- growth rate and fracture

  18. Electrochemical catalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds: a highly efficient method for production of hydrogen from bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Chen, Yaqiong; Song, Chongfu; Ye, Tongqi; Guo, Qingxiang; Zhu, Qingshi; Torimoto, Youshifumi; Li, Quanxin

    2008-11-07

    A novel approach to produce hydrogen from bio-oil was obtained with high carbon conversion (>90%) and hydrogen yield (>90%) at Tcatalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds over 18%NiO/Al(2)O(3) reforming catalyst; thermal electrons play important promoting roles in the decomposition and reforming of the oxygenated-organic compounds in the bio-oil.

  19. FP-LAPW Calculations of the EFG at Cd Impurities in Rutile SnO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errico, L. A.; Fabricius, G.; Renteria, M.

    2001-01-01

    We report an ab initio study of the electric-field gradient (EFG) at Cd impurities located at the cation site in the semiconductor SnO 2 (rutile phase). The study was performed with the WIEN97 implementation of the FP-LAPW method. In order to simulate the diluted Cd-impurity in the SnO 2 host and to calculate the electronic structure of the system we used a 72-atoms super-cell, studying the relaxation introduced by the impurity in the lattice. The free-relaxation process performed shows that the relaxations of the oxygen nearest-neighbors of the impurity are not isotropic. Our prediction for the EFG tensor are compared with experimental results and point-charge model predictions

  20. Synthesis and Identification of Selected Impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiqiang, Zhou [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    Non-active substances undesired, but often unavoidable compounds accompanying target active ingredients in various pesticide formulations have been synthesized for supporting product registration and evaluation of the total toxicological and physicochemical properties of formulated products. The synthesis and structural characterization of various impurities of pesticide active ingredients are described and illustrated by IR, NMR, GC and GC/MS data. (author)

  1. Impurity and particle recycling reduction by boronization in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashijima, S.; Sugie, T.; Kubo, H.; Tsuji, S.; Shimada, M.; Asakura, N.; Hosogane, N.; Kawano, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Itami, K.; Sakasai, A.; Shimizu, K.; Ando, T.; Saidoh, M.

    1995-01-01

    In JT-60U boronization using decaborane was carried out. Boronization reduced the oxygen impurity in OH discharges and shortened the wall conditioning after the vacuum vessel vent and consequently enabled JT-60U to produce clean plasmas easily except for NB heated plasmas. After boronization, particle recycling was reduced drastically in OH and NB discharges. High confinement plasmas were obtained including high β p mode and H-mode discharges. In the latest boronization part of divertor plates were replaced with B 4 C coated tiles with a B 4 C thickness similar 300 μm. After introducing B 4 C divertor tiles, an explosive generation of boron particles from the tiles was observed. By the combined effects of boronization with decaborane and boron generation from B 4 C tiles, oxygen impurity was so low that oxygen line signals were reduced to noise levels after the latest boronization. On the other hand, boron burst from the B 4 C tiles restricted the operation of JT-60U. ((orig.))

  2. Optimization and application of atmospheric pressure chemical and photoionization hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry for speciation of oxygen-containing compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acter, Thamina; Kim, Donghwi; Ahmed, Arif; Jin, Jang Mi; Yim, Un Hyuk; Shim, Won Joon; Kim, Young Hwan; Kim, Sunghwan

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a detailed investigation of the feasibility of optimized positive and negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry (MS) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) MS coupled to hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) for structural assignment of diverse oxygen-containing compounds. The important parameters for optimization of HDX MS were characterized. The optimized techniques employed in the positive and negative modes showed satisfactory HDX product ions for the model compounds when dichloromethane and toluene were employed as a co-solvent in APCI- and APPI-HDX, respectively. The evaluation of the mass spectra obtained from 38 oxygen-containing compounds demonstrated that the extent of the HDX of the ions was structure-dependent. The combination of information provided by different ionization techniques could be used for better speciation of oxygen-containing compounds. For example, (+) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with alcohol, ketone, or aldehyde substituents, while (-) APPI-HDX is sensitive to compounds with carboxylic functional groups. In addition, the compounds with alcohol can be distinguished from other compounds by the presence of exchanged peaks. The combined information was applied to study chemical compositions of degraded oils. The HDX pattern, double bond equivalent (DBE) distribution, and previously reported oxidation products were combined to predict structures of the compounds produced from oxidation of oil. Overall, this study shows that APCI- and APPI-HDX MS are useful experimental techniques that can be applied for the structural analysis of oxygen-containing compounds.

  3. Accelerated oxygen consumption by catecholamines in the presence of aromatic nitro and nitroso compounds. Implications and neurotoxicity of nitro compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, K.

    1981-01-01

    The interactions of catecholamines with nitro and nitroso compounds are studied in view of the possible involvement of catecholamine type neurotransmitters in neurotoxicity caused by hypoxic cell sensitizers. The data reported suggest that neurotoxicity of nitro compounds may be due to depletion of oxygen, catecholamines and ascorbate in nerve tissue with concomitant generation of toxic species such as hydroxyl, hydronitroxyl and superoxide free radicals as well as nitroso and quinonoid derivatives. 5 references, 1 figure

  4. The compositional study of nitrogen and oxygen compounds in products of heavy oil primary and secondary upgrading processes. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielowiec, J.

    1986-02-01

    The primary objective was to characterize nitrogen and oxygen compound types in the upgraded products derived from Athabasca bitumen. Nitrogen compounds, depending on their nature and concentrations, in charge stocks to catalytic processess (hydro-processes and reforming) can severely limit or poison the catalyst activity. Oxygen compounds are corrosive (especially naphthenic acids) and can promote gum formation as part of the deterioration of the hydrocarbons in the petroleum product. A secondary objective was to evaluate the advantages and limitations of in-house mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy methods for analyzing specific classes of polar compounds in naphthas, middle distillates, and gas oils. An analytical procedure that was based on the discrimination of polar compound classes using liquid chromatography followed by mass spectrometric analysis was tested. The chemical intelligence on the fractions obtained from Athabasca bitumen and its upgrading products has been advanced by determining structural characteristics of the nitrogen and oxygen components. This report describes the determination of the distributions of nitrogen and oxygen compounds in samples from various process streams. This procedure is capable of providing information useful for evaluating hydrodenitrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions.

  5. Impurities block the alpha to omega martensitic transformation in titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Richard G; Trinkle, Dallas R; Bouchet, Johann; Srinivasan, Srivilliputhur G; Albers, Robert C; Wilkins, John W

    2005-02-01

    Impurities control phase stability and phase transformations in natural and man-made materials, from shape-memory alloys to steel to planetary cores. Experiments and empirical databases are still central to tuning the impurity effects. What is missing is a broad theoretical underpinning. Consider, for example, the titanium martensitic transformations: diffusionless structural transformations proceeding near the speed of sound. Pure titanium transforms from ductile alpha to brittle omega at 9 GPa, creating serious technological problems for beta-stabilized titanium alloys. Impurities in the titanium alloys A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) suppress the transformation up to at least 35 GPa, increasing their technological utility as lightweight materials in aerospace applications. These and other empirical discoveries in technological materials call for broad theoretical understanding. Impurities pose two theoretical challenges: the effect on the relative phase stability, and the energy barrier of the transformation. Ab initio methods calculate both changes due to impurities. We show that interstitial oxygen, nitrogen and carbon retard the transformation whereas substitutional aluminium and vanadium influence the transformation by changing the d-electron concentration. The resulting microscopic picture explains the suppression of the transformation in commercial A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. In general, the effect of impurities on relative energies and energy barriers is central to understanding structural phase transformations.

  6. Fundamental studies on multicharged impurities of the Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardi, J. de; Geller, R.; Jacquot, B.; Jacquot, C.

    1979-11-01

    We describe Micromafios which is an Ion source delivering particles up to completely stripped Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen ions. The beams are utilized on an experiment device for cross section measurements enabling fondamental studies for Tokamak impurity ions. The source is a miniaturized Supermafios device where the minimum B configuration is obtained with Samarium Cobalt magnetized Ferrites and a solenoidal axial field [fr

  7. Electron attachment to oxygen, ozone and other compounds of atmospheric relevance as studied with ultra-high energy resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maerk, T.D.; Matejcik, S.; Kiendler, A.; Cicman, P.; Senn, G.; Skalny, J.; Stampfli, P.; Illenberger, E.; Chu, Y.; Stamatovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    The processes of electron attachment to oxygen, ozone, ozone/oxygen cluster and oxygen cluster as well as other compounds of atmospheric relevance (CF 2 Cl 2 , CHCl 3 and CCl 3 Br) were studied with ultra-high energy resolution crossed beam technique

  8. The interaction of impurity oxygen in silicon with vacancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanyan, A.A.; Babayan, S.A.; Eritsyan, G.N.; Kholodar, G.A.; Melkonyan, R.A.; Vinetskij, V.L.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon specimens irradiated with 50 MeV electrons, containing along with isolated oxygen atoms more complicated oxy-quasi-molecules of SiOsub(n) (n=1,2,3,...) type are investigated. At isochronal and isothermal annealing in the temperature range 300-350 deg C, besides the reaction of vacancy capturing by oxygen atoms with formation of A-centres, there occur more complicated reactions with participation of vacancies, A-centres, oxygen containing quasi-molecules, and a variety of sinks. The kinetics of the processing taking place at irradiation and annealing was studied with respect to the measurement of IR absorption spectra in the region 1-16 μm. A model is suggested to describe the observed processes that differ qualitatively from those taking place in specimens containing completely dissociated oxygen [ru

  9. Influence of oxygen partial pressure on defect concentrations and on oxygen diffusion in UO2+x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzi, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    The hyper-stoichiometric uranium dioxide (UO 2+x ) is stable over a wide range of temperature and compositions. Such variations of composition and the eventual presence of doping elements or impurities lead to a variation of anionic and electronic defect concentrations. Moreover, many properties of this material are affected by its composition modifications, in particular their atomic transport properties. Firstly we developed a point defect model to evaluate the dependence of the electronic and oxygen defect concentrations upon temperature, equilibrium oxygen partial pressure and impurity content. The physical constants of the model, in particular the equilibrium constants of the defect formation reactions were determined from deviation from stoichiometry and electrical conductivity measurements of literature. This work enabled us to interpret our measures of conductivity, oxygen chemical and self- diffusion coefficients. From a quantitative standpoint, the analysis of our experimental results allows to evaluate the oxygen interstitial diffusion coefficient but also its formation energy. Moreover, an estimate of oxygen di-interstitial formation energy is also provided. Presence of oxygen clusters leads oxygen self- and chemical diffusion to decrease. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy characterization shows the presence of the same defect in the entire deviation from stoichiometry studied, confirming the approach used to develop the model. (author) [fr

  10. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, C.

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T e and higher n e than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase

  11. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Claude [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low Te and higher ne than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  12. FP-LAPW Calculations of the EFG at Cd Impurities in Rutile SnO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errico, L. A.; Fabricius, G.; Renteria, M. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Instituto de Fisica La Plata (IFLP-CONICET) - Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas (Argentina)

    2001-11-15

    We report an ab initio study of the electric-field gradient (EFG) at Cd impurities located at the cation site in the semiconductor SnO{sub 2}(rutile phase). The study was performed with the WIEN97 implementation of the FP-LAPW method. In order to simulate the diluted Cd-impurity in the SnO{sub 2} host and to calculate the electronic structure of the system we used a 72-atoms super-cell, studying the relaxation introduced by the impurity in the lattice. The free-relaxation process performed shows that the relaxations of the oxygen nearest-neighbors of the impurity are not isotropic. Our prediction for the EFG tensor are compared with experimental results and point-charge model predictions.

  13. Effects of gas phase impurities on the topochemical-kinetic behaviour of uranium hydride development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J.; Brami, D.; Kremner, A.; Mintz, M.H.; Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba

    1988-01-01

    The hydriding kinetics of bulk uranium and U-0.1 wt.% Cr, in the presence of oxidizing gaseous impurities (oxygen and CO), were studied by combined rate measurements and metallographic examinations of partially reacted samples. The effect of the gaseous impurity (type and concentration) was examined metallographically, and the kinetic data were discussed in relation to these examinations. Below about 100 0 C the reaction of uranium with pure hydrogen consists of the following sequence of steps: (i) Surface nucleation; (ii) homogeneous growth (pitting); (iii) relatively fast lateral growth leading to the formation of a reaction front which penetrates into the sample at a constant rate. The effects of oxygen and CO on the hydriding kinetics were related to their abilities to block hydrogen penetration into the uranium. Thus, it was found that oxygen affects only the penetration through the oxide layer, whereas CO affects the penetration through both the oxide and hydride layers. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of cover gas impurities and their effects on the dry storage of LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, R.W.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1987-11-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) identify the sources of impurity gases in spent fuel storage casks; (2) identify the expected concentrations and types of reactive impurity gases from these sources over an operating lifetime of 40 years; and (3) determine whether these impurities could significantly degrade cladding or exposed fuel during this period. Four potential sources of impurity gases in the helium cover gas in operating casks were identified and evaluated. Several different bounding cases have been considered, where the reactive gas inventory is either assumed to be completely gettered by the cladding or where all oxygen is assumed to react completely with the exposed fuel. It is concluded that the reactive gas inventory will have no significant effect on the cladding unless all available oxygen reacts with the UO 2 fuel to produce U 3 O 8 at one or two cladding breaches. Based on Zircaloy oxidation data, the oxygen inventory in a fully loaded pressurized water reactor cask such as the Castor-V/21 will be gettered by the Zircaloy cladding in about 1 year if the peak cladding temperature within the task is ≥300 0 C. Only a negligible decrease in the thickness of the cladding would result. 24 refs., 4 tabs

  15. Photoluminescence and Raman studies for the confirmation of oxygen vacancies to induce ferromagnetism in Fe doped Mn:ZnO compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, J., E-mail: jayashree304@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Silicon Institute of Technology, Bhubaneswar 751024, Odisha (India); Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Mishra, D.K. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Institute of Technical Education and Research, Siksha ‘O’ Anusandhan University, Khandagiri Square, Bhubaneswar 751030, Odisha (India); Srinivasu, V.V. [Department of Physics, College of Science, Engineering and Technology, University of South Africa, Johannesburg 1710 (South Africa); Sahu, D.R. [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida (India); Roul, B.K. [Institute of Materials Science, Planetarium Building, Acharya Vihar, Bhubaneswar, Odisha (India)

    2015-05-15

    With a motivation to compare the magnetic property, we synthesised undoped, transition metal (TM) Mn doped and (Mn:Fe) co-doped ZnO ceramics in the compositions ZnO, Zn{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O and Zn{sub 0.96}(Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02})O. Systematic investigations on the structural, microstructural, defect structure and magnetic properties of the samples were performed. Low temperature as well as room temperature ferromagnetism has been observed for all our samples, however, enhanced magnetisation at room temperature has been noticed when ZnO is co-doped with Fe along with Mn. Particularly the sample with the composition Zn{sub 0.96}Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02}O showed a magnetisation value more than double of the sample with composition Zn{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O, indicating long range strong interaction between the magnetic impurities leading to higher ferromagnetic ordering. Raman and PL studies reveal presence of higher defects in form of oxygen vacancy clusters created in the sample due to Fe co doping. PL study also reveals enhanced luminescence efficiency in the co doped sample. Temperature dependent magnetisation study of this sample shows the spin freezing temperature around 39 K indicating the presence of small impurity phase of Mn{sub 2−x}Zn{sub x}O{sub 3} type. Electron Spin Resonance signal obtained supports ferromagnetic state in the co doped sample. Enhancement of magnetisation is attributed to interactions mediated by magnetic impurities through large number of oxygen vacancies created by Fe{sup 3+} ions forming bound magnetic polarons (BMP) and facilitating long range ferromagnetic ordering in the co- doped system. - Highlights: • Comparison of magnetic property of ZnO, Zn{sub 0.98}Mn {sub 0.02}O and Zn{sub 0.96}(Mn{sub 0.02}Fe{sub 0.02})O. • Observation of enhanced magnetisation at room temperature in (Mn,Fe) doped ZnO. • Raman and PL studies reveal presence of higher oxygen vacancy clusters. • Electron Spin Resonance signal supports

  16. Si-O compound formation by oxygen ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, E.; Wollschlaeger, K.; Kreissig, U.; Skorupa, W.; Schulze, D.; Finster, J.

    1985-01-01

    High dose oxygen ion implantation into silicon at 30 keV was performed to produce understoichiometric and stoichiometric surface oxide layers of approx. 160 nm thickness. The oxygen depth profile and oxide stoichiometry was determined by RBS and XPS. Si-O compound formation was found by IR spectroscopy and XPS in the unannealed samples as well as after target heating, furnace or flash lamp annealing. As implanted understoichiometric layers consist of random bonding like SiOsub(x) (O 2 after annealing. Unannealed stoichiometric layers are bond strained SiO 2 . The activation energies of demixing and of the annealing of bond strains are determined to 0.19 and 0.13 eV, respectively. The removing of bond strains occurs at temperatures >= 800 C in a time shorter than 1 s. The SiO 2 /Si transition region of unannealed stoichiometric layers consists of SiOsub(x) with an extent of about 10 nm. After annealing this extent diminishes to 0.8 to 1 nm in consequence of oxidation by excess oxygen from the overstoichiometric oxide region. This thickness is comparable with that of thermal oxide. (author)

  17. Structure and catalytic properties of metal β-diketonate complexes with oxygen-containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizel'skij, Yu.N.; Ishchenko, S.S.; Lipatova, T.Eh.

    1985-01-01

    The results of researches published in recent 15-20 years of complexes of metal β-diketonates (including Cr 3+ , VO 2+ , MoOΛ2 2+ , Co 3+ , Mn 3+ , Ni 2+ , Fe 3+ ) with oxygen-containing compounds (alcohols, glycols, phenols, hydroperoxides, aldehydes, esters, etc.) playing an important role in catalytic processes of oxidation, addition, polymerization and copolymerization are reviewed. Data on the nature of chemical bond of oxygen-containing reacting agents with metal β-diketonates, on structure of metal β-diketonate complexes with oxygen-containing reacting agents and thermodynamics of complexing as well as on activation of reacting agents in complexes and catalytic properties of metal β-diketonates are discussed. Stored materials make it possible to exercise directed control of metal β-diketonate activity

  18. Influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steel weldings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Savytsky

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the results of the research about the influence of the impurities on the depth of penetration with carbon steels weldings of different chemical composition are presented. These data suggest that presence of those impurities, such as sulphure and oxygen, in the steel, increases the depth of penetration to 1,3 - 1,5 times compared to welding refined steels. Applying activating fluxes for welding high tensile steels, provides an increase in the depth of penetration of 2 - 3 times.

  19. Oxygen consumption during mineralization of organic compounds in water samples from a small sub-tropical reservoir (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Santino Marcela Bianchessi da

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Assays were carried out to evaluate the oxygen consumption resulting from mineralization of different organic compounds: glucose, sucrose, starch, tannic acid, lysine and glycine. The compounds were added to 1 l of water sample from Monjolinho Reservoir. Dissolved oxygen and dissolved organic carbon were monitored during 20 days and the results were fitted to first order kinetics model. During the 20 days of experiments, the oxygen consumption varied from 4.5 mg.l-1 (tannic acid to 71.5 mg.l-1 (glucose. The highest deoxygenation rate (kD was observed for mineralization of tannic acid (0.321 day-1 followed by glycine, starch, lysine, sucrose and glucose (0.1004, 0.0504, 0.0486, 0.0251 and 0.0158 day-1, respectively. From theoretical calculations and oxygen and carbon concentrations we obtained the stoichiometry of the mineralization processes. Stoichiometric values varied from 0.17 (tannic acid to 2.55 (sucrose.

  20. Determination of impurities and degradation products from veterinary medicinal products by HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gabriela Oltean

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic or inorganic impurities in the veterinary medicinal product can derive from starting materials, manufacturing process, incomplete purification, inappropriate storage. The acceptable levels of impurities in pharmaceuticals are estimated by comparison with standard solutions, according to the appropriate monographs. Forced degradation studies determine the stability of the method of dosage for the active compounds and for the entire finished product under excessive accelerated degradation conditions. They also provide information on degradation pathways and selectivity of analytical methods applied. The information provided by the degradation studies on the active compound and finished pharmaceutical product should demonstrate the specificity of the analytical method regarding impurities. Forced degradation studies should demonstrate that the impurities and degradation products generated do not interfere with the active compound. The current forced degradation methods consist of acid hydrolysis, basic hydrolysis, oxidation, exposure of the medicinal product to temperature and light. HPLC methods are an integral analytical instrument for the analysis of the medicinal product. The HPLC method should be able to separate, detect and quantify various specific degradation products that can appear after manufacture or storage of the medicinal product, as well as new elements appearing after synthesis. FDA and ICH guidelines recommend the enclosure of the results, including the chromatograms specific to the forced degradation-subjected medicinal product, in the documentation for marketing authorization. Using HPLC methods in forced degradation studies on medicinal products provides relevant information on the method of determination for the formulation of the medicinal product, synthesis product, packaging methods and storage.

  1. Effects of oxygen and sulphydryl-containing compounds on irradiated transforming DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, K.D.; Harrop, H.A.; Michael, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Dithiothreitol (DTT), cysteamine, cysteine and glutathione all protect B. subtilis transforming DNA in a manner dependent on gassing conditions. In O 2 , the protection is consistent with the scavenging of OH radicals by the SH compounds, but in N 2 there is additional protection possibly due to hydrogen atom donation from the SH compound to radiation-induced DNA lesions, a process blocked by O 2 . This additional protection results in an increase in the ratio of inactivation in the absence and presence of oxygen with increasing SH concentration to a maximum followed by a decrease at high SH concentrations. The maximum value of the ratio and the SH concentration at which it occurs depend on the SH compound. In particular, GSH appears to be significantly less efficient in the hydrogen-donation repair reaction with transforming DNA than are the other three SH compounds. The existence is postulated of a damage fixation process occurring in the absence of O 2 , in competition with damage repair by SH compounds, at a rate not less than 300s -1 . Results demonstrate that the damage fixing reaction of O 2 with transforming DNA radicals proceeds 200-fold faster than the competing repair reaction by hydrogen-donation from DTT. (U.K.)

  2. Correlation between impurities, defects and cell performance in semicrystalline silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doolittle, W.A.; Rohatgi, A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that an in-depth analysis of Solarex CDS semicrystalline silicon has been performed and correlations between the efficiency and impurities, and defects present in the material have been made. Comparisons were made between cell performance and variations in interstitial oxygen, substitutional carbon, grain size, etch pit density, and trap location as a function of position in the ingot. The oxygen concentration was found to decrease with increasing distance from the bottom of the ingot while the carbon concentration as well as average grain size was found to increase. The best cell performance was obtained on wafers with minimum oxygen and maximum carbon (top). No correlation was found between etch pit density and cell performance. DLTS and JVT measurements revealed that samples with higher oxygen content (bottom) gave lower cell performance due to a large number of distributed states, possibly due to extended defects like oxygen precipitates. Low oxygen samples (top) showed predominately discrete states, improved cell performance and a doping dependent average trap density

  3. Modeling of the Microchemistry for Diffusion of Selected Impurities in Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J. R.; Bullock, J.S. IV

    2001-01-01

    Unalloyed metallic uranium used in some work done at Y-12 contains small quantities of impurities, the three most significant of which are carbon, iron, and silicon. During metallurgical processing, as the metal cools from a molten condition towards room temperature, the metallic matrix solution becomes supersaturated in each of the impurities whose concentration exceeds the solubility limit. Many impurity atoms form compounds with uranium that precipitate out of the solution, thus creating and growing inclusions. The objective of the present work is to study the distribution of impurity atoms about some of the inclusions, with a view toward examining the effect of the interaction between inclusions on the impurity atom distribution. The method used is time-dependent mass diffusion from the supersaturated solution to the surfaces of the inclusions. Micrographs of metal samples suggest that the inclusions form in successive stages. After each inclusion forms, it begins to draw impurity atoms from its immediate vicinity, thus altering the amounts and distributions of impurity atoms available for formation and growth of later inclusions. In the present work, a one-dimensional spherical approximation was used to simulate inclusions and their regions of influence. A first set of calculations was run to simulate the distribution of impurity atoms about the largest inclusions. Then, a second set of calculations was run to see how the loss of impurity atoms to the largest inclusions might affect the distribution of impurity atoms around the next stage of inclusions. Plots are shown for the estimated distributions of impurity atoms in the region of influence about the inclusions for the three impurities studied. The authors believe that these distributions are qualitatively correct. However, there is enough uncertainty about precisely when inclusions nucleate and begin to grow that one should not put too much reliance on the quantitative results. This work does provide a

  4. Ab-initio study of C and O impurities in uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno; Claisse, Antoine; Olsson, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Uranium nitride (UN) has been considered a potential fuel for Generation IV (GEN-IV) nuclear reactors as well as a possible new fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR), which would permit an extension of the fuel residence time in the reactor. Carbon and oxygen impurities play a key role in the UN microstructure, influencing important parameters such as creep, swelling, gas release under irradiation, compatibility with structural steel and coolants, and thermal stability. In this work, a systematic study of the electronic structure of UN containing C and O impurities using first-principles calculations by the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method is presented. In order to describe accurately the localized U 5f electrons, the DFT + U formalism was adopted. Moreover, to avoid convergence toward metastable states, the Occupation Matrix Control (OMC) methodology was applied. The incorporation of C and O in the N-vacancy is found to be energetically favorable. In addition, only for O, the incorporation in the interstitial position is energetically possible, showing some degree of solubility for this element in this site. The binding energies show that the pairs (C−N_v_a_c) and (O−N_v_a_c) interact much further than the other defects, which indicate the possible occurrence of vacancy drag phenomena and clustering of these impurities in grain boundaries, dislocations and free surfaces. The migration energy of an impurity by single N-vacancy show that C and O employ different paths during diffusion. Oxygen migration requires significantly lower energy than carbon. This fact is due to flexibility in the U−O chemical bonds, which bend during the diffusion forming a pseudo UO_2 coordination. On the other hand, C and N have a directional and inflexible chemical bond with uranium; always requiring the octahedral coordination. These findings provide detailed insight into how these impurities behave in the UN matrix, and can be of great interest for assisting the development

  5. Ab-initio study of C and O impurities in uranium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno; Claisse, Antoine; Olsson, Pär, E-mail: polsson@kth.se

    2016-09-15

    Uranium nitride (UN) has been considered a potential fuel for Generation IV (GEN-IV) nuclear reactors as well as a possible new fuel for Light Water Reactors (LWR), which would permit an extension of the fuel residence time in the reactor. Carbon and oxygen impurities play a key role in the UN microstructure, influencing important parameters such as creep, swelling, gas release under irradiation, compatibility with structural steel and coolants, and thermal stability. In this work, a systematic study of the electronic structure of UN containing C and O impurities using first-principles calculations by the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method is presented. In order to describe accurately the localized U 5f electrons, the DFT + U formalism was adopted. Moreover, to avoid convergence toward metastable states, the Occupation Matrix Control (OMC) methodology was applied. The incorporation of C and O in the N-vacancy is found to be energetically favorable. In addition, only for O, the incorporation in the interstitial position is energetically possible, showing some degree of solubility for this element in this site. The binding energies show that the pairs (C−N{sub vac}) and (O−N{sub vac}) interact much further than the other defects, which indicate the possible occurrence of vacancy drag phenomena and clustering of these impurities in grain boundaries, dislocations and free surfaces. The migration energy of an impurity by single N-vacancy show that C and O employ different paths during diffusion. Oxygen migration requires significantly lower energy than carbon. This fact is due to flexibility in the U−O chemical bonds, which bend during the diffusion forming a pseudo UO{sub 2} coordination. On the other hand, C and N have a directional and inflexible chemical bond with uranium; always requiring the octahedral coordination. These findings provide detailed insight into how these impurities behave in the UN matrix, and can be of great interest for assisting the

  6. Spectroscopic methods for detection of impurities in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashnikova, Natalia V.; Papiashvili, Nona; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Mark, Shlomo; Shilon, Guy; Khankin, Daniel; Kalisky, Yehoshua; Kalisky, Ofra; Parola, Abraham H.

    2011-11-01

    Optical photoluminescence spectroscopic method for detection of impurities, hazardous materials, pesticides, and pollutants in water resources, both qualitatively and quantitatively, is presented. The method is based on synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) of organic aromatic compounds, or poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and is carried out by following simultaneously their excitation and emission spectra. The full excitation emission matrix (EEM) generated in this way provides a 2-D and 3-D fluorescence map of the tested sample and the diagonals through the axes origin provide the synchronous fluorescence spectra at a constant wavelengths differences between the emission and excitation wavelengths, thus enabling multitude components identification. This map contains all the relevant spectroscopic information of the tested sample, and serves as a unique "fingerprint" with a very specific and accurate identification. When compared with pre-determined spectra and calibration curves from a "databank", there is a one-toone correspondence between the image and the specific compound, and it can be identified accurately both qualitatively and quantitatively. This method offers several significant advantages, and it provides a sensitive (ppm detection level), accurate and simple spectroscopic tool to monitor impurities and pollutants in water. The design and performance of the spectrofluorimeter prototype, as well as the software development and analysis of chemical organic compounds and mixtures in water will be discussed in this paper.

  7. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molteni, Ugo; Bianchi, Federico; Klein, Felix; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Rossi, Michel J.; Dommen, Josef; Baltensperger, Urs

    2018-02-01

    Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs), such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) and ethylbenzene), as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl). We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  8. Formation of highly oxygenated organic molecules from aromatic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Molteni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs often dominate the urban atmosphere and consist to a large degree of aromatic hydrocarbons (ArHCs, such as benzene, toluene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes, e.g., from the handling and combustion of fuels. These compounds are important precursors for the formation of secondary organic aerosol. Here we show that the oxidation of aromatics with OH leads to a subsequent autoxidation chain reaction forming highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs with an O : C ratio of up to 1.09. This is exemplified for five single-ring ArHCs (benzene, toluene, o-/m-/p-xylene, mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and ethylbenzene, as well as two conjugated polycyclic ArHCs (naphthalene and biphenyl. We report the elemental composition of the HOMs and show the differences in the oxidation patterns of these ArHCs. A potential pathway for the formation of these HOMs from aromatics is presented and discussed. We hypothesize that AVOCs may contribute substantially to new particle formation events that have been detected in urban areas.

  9. Resolution of contradiction between in silico predictions and Ames test results for four pharmaceutically relevant impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, William C; Kenyon, Michelle O; Cheung, Jennifer R; Dugger, Robert W; Dobo, Krista L

    2017-12-01

    The ICH M7 Guideline requires low level control of mutagenic impurities in pharmaceutical products to minimize cancer risk in patients (ICHM7, 2014). Bacterial mutagenicity (Ames) data is generally used to determine mutagenic and possible carcinogenic potential of compounds. Recently, a publication on experiences of using two in silico systems to identify potentially mutagenic impurities highlighted the importance of performing a critical review of published Ames data utilized as part of a mutagenicity assessment of impurities (Greene et al., 2015). Four compounds (2-amino-5-hydroxybenzoic acid, 2-amino-3-chlorobenzoic acid, methyl 2-amino-4-chlorobenzoate and 4-morpholinopyridine) reported mutagenic were identified in a two system in silico assessment and expert review of the structuresas non-mutagenic. Likely reasons for mutagenicity could not be identified and the purity of the compounds tested was proposed. In the current investigation, the purest available sample of the four compounds was tested in an OECD-compliant Ames test. The compounds were all found to be non-mutagenic. Possible reasons for the discrepancy between previously reported and current results are discussed. Additionally, important points to consider when conducting an expert review of available Ames data are provided particularly in cases where reported Ames results are discrepant with a two system in silico assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemical impurity production under boronized wall conditions in TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The TEXTOR SNIFFER probe has been used to analyse the chemical impurity production under various plasma and boronized wall conditions. Methane formation has been observed to 0.6-1 x 10 -2 CH 4 /H at room temperature, increasing slightly with increasing density in the SOL. The hydrocarbon formation yields increase from R.T. to the maximum at about 500 o C by a factor of 1.5-2.5. Increasing the impact energy by biasing the graphite plate leads to a decrease of the hydrocarbon yield at room temperature but to an increase at 500 o C. Chemical CO formation due interaction of oxygen impurities with the graphite reaches ratios between 0.5 and 3 x 10 -2 CO/H,D increasing with increasing distance to the limiter edge. (author) 10 refs., 6 figs

  11. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio, Luis G., E-mail: luis.valerio@fda.hhs.gov [Science and Research Staff, Office of Pharmaceutical Science, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20993–0002 (United States); Cross, Kevin P. [Leadscope, Inc., 1393 Dublin Road, Columbus, OH, 43215–1084 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ► The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ► We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ► We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ► We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive

  12. Characterization and validation of an in silico toxicology model to predict the mutagenic potential of drug impurities*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valerio, Luis G.; Cross, Kevin P.

    2012-01-01

    Control and minimization of human exposure to potential genotoxic impurities found in drug substances and products is an important part of preclinical safety assessments of new drug products. The FDA's 2008 draft guidance on genotoxic and carcinogenic impurities in drug substances and products allows use of computational quantitative structure–activity relationships (QSAR) to identify structural alerts for known and expected impurities present at levels below qualified thresholds. This study provides the information necessary to establish the practical use of a new in silico toxicology model for predicting Salmonella t. mutagenicity (Ames assay outcome) of drug impurities and other chemicals. We describe the model's chemical content and toxicity fingerprint in terms of compound space, molecular and structural toxicophores, and have rigorously tested its predictive power using both cross-validation and external validation experiments, as well as case studies. Consistent with desired regulatory use, the model performs with high sensitivity (81%) and high negative predictivity (81%) based on external validation with 2368 compounds foreign to the model and having known mutagenicity. A database of drug impurities was created from proprietary FDA submissions and the public literature which found significant overlap between the structural features of drug impurities and training set chemicals in the QSAR model. Overall, the model's predictive performance was found to be acceptable for screening drug impurities for Salmonella mutagenicity. -- Highlights: ► We characterize a new in silico model to predict mutagenicity of drug impurities. ► The model predicts Salmonella mutagenicity and will be useful for safety assessment. ► We examine toxicity fingerprints and toxicophores of this Ames assay model. ► We compare these attributes to those found in drug impurities known to FDA/CDER. ► We validate the model and find it has a desired predictive performance.

  13. Phase transitions in ZnTe co-doped with Mg and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyukhin, V.A.; Sorokina, L.P. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, CINVESTAV-IPN, Av. IPN 2508, Mexico, D.F., 07360 (Mexico); Rodriguez de Santiago, M. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica Petrolera, IPN, Edif. 8, Mexico, D.F., 07738 (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    Self-assembling of 1O4Mg tetrahedral clusters in ZnTe isoelectronically co-doped with Mg and oxygen in the ultra dilute oxygen impurity limit is described by a phase diagram. The occurrence of 1O4Mg clusters is a result of the second-order transition. The final stage of self-assembling when all oxygen impurities are in 1O4Mg clusters has to be reached also as a result of the second-order transition at the temperature close to the temperature of the occurrence of these clusters. The conditions of these phase transitions are obtained. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  15. Use of electrothermal atomization for determining metallic impurities in nuclearly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrometry with electrothermal atomization was used for the determination of Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo and Ni as impurities in uranium oxide samples. The determinations were performed in solubilized samples both with and without uranium separation as well as in solid samples. (Author) [pt

  16. Carbon-14 studies on the role of oxygen-containing compounds in the reaction mechanism of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksoy, H.A.

    1975-01-01

    In this work the behaviour of organic oxygen compounds has been studied in the reaction mechanism of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using the tracer method. As an oxygen carrying tracer materials i-propanole (2- 14 C), acetone (2- 14 C) and ethanole (1- 14 C) have been added to the synthesis gas. The synthesis experiments are performed under standard conditions: The synthesis products are separated in suitable fractions and then studied by gas- and radio-gaschromatography. As a result the C-number distributions of the synthesis products are obtained as a function of concentration (weight %, mol %) and radioactivity (activity %). On this basis the relative molar activities have been calculated for certain compounds and fractions. Adding i-propanole- 14 C a great part of the tracer compound is transformed to acetone- 14 C, however adding acetone- 14 C to the synthesis gas a large amount of i-propanole- 14 C is produced. The main hydrocarbon reaction product from i-propanol and acetone is propane. Besides propane also propene is produced with equal molar radioactivity. This indicates that the formation of adsorbed oxygen compounds, as they may also be produced by chemisorption from alcohols or carbonyle compounds, is the first step in the formation of hydrocarbons by hydrogenolytic separation of oxygen. Comparing the results obtained with ethanole- 14 C and i-propanole- 14 C as a tacer material, for ethane an essentially lower molar activity is obtained when adding ethanole- 14 C compared with propane when adding i-propanole- 14 C. This corresponds with a particularly low desorption probability at the C 2 -hydrocarbon level. (orig./HK) [de

  17. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers derived from Mg-biquinoline-dicarboxy compound for efficient oxygen electroreduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Aiguo, E-mail: agkong@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China); Fan, Xiaohong; Chen, Aoling [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China); Zhang, Hengiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hebei Normal University for Nationalities, Chengde 067000 (China); Shan, Yongkui, E-mail: agkong@chem.ecnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China)

    2017-02-15

    An in-situ MgO-templating synthesis route was introduced to obtain the mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers by thermal conversion of new Mg-2,2′-biquinoline 4,4-dicarboxy acid coordination compound (Mg-DCA) microfibers. The investigated crystal structure of Mg-DCA testified that the assembling of Mg{sup 2+} and DCA through Mg-O coordination bond and hydrogen bond contributed to the formation of one-dimensional (1D) crystalline Mg-DCA microfibers. The nitrogen-doped carbons derived from the pyrolysis of Mg-DCA showed the well-defined microfiber morphology with high mesopore-surface area. Such mesoporous microfibers exhibited the efficient catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solutions with better stability and methanol-tolerance performance. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers with efficient oxygen electroreduction activity were prepared by thermal conversion of new Mg-biquinoline-based coordination compound microfibers.

  18. Effect of impurities in niobium on the growth of superconducting Nb/sub 3//Sn. [Al, Cu, Ge, Si, Sn, Zr impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekizawa, T

    1974-01-01

    In order to examine the possibility of reducing the heat treatment temperature in the manufacturing process of the superconducting intermetallic compounds wire or ribbon by the metallurgical bond method, tin cored specimens of niobium including a small amount of impurity (Al, Cu, Ge, Si, Sn and Zr) have been prepared, and the critical currents measured as a function of the heat treatment temperature and time. Experimental results are summarized as follows. (1) The effect of the impurity added into niobium is to stabilize the dislocation network cell structure in niobium, caused by the cold working, up to the forming temperature of Nb/sub 3/Sn. The stabilized dislocation network structure is considered to serve as diffusion pipes of the tin atom. As this diffusion (microscopic) is predominant over bulk diffusion (macroscopic), the cored specimen made of niobium including impurities has lower forming temperature of Nb/sub 3/Sn compared with the specimen made of pure niobium. (2) The critical current vs. heat treatment temperature characteristics show that the critical current peaks at 900/sup 0/C in the case of niobium including Si, while at 950/sup 0/C in the case of pure niobium. 6 references.

  19. Characterization of light element impurities in ultrathin silicon-on-insulator layers by luminescence activation using electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa-Toyota, Satoko; Tajima, Michio; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed light element impurities in ultrathin top Si layers of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers by luminescence activation using electron irradiation. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis under ultraviolet (UV) light excitation was performed on various commercial SOI wafers after the irradiation. We detected the C-line related to a complex of interstitial carbon and oxygen impurities and the G-line related to a complex of interstitial and substitutional carbon impurities in the top Si layer with a thickness down to 62 nm after electron irradiation. We showed that there were differences in the impurity concentration depending on the wafer fabrication methods and also that there were variations in these concentrations in the respective wafers. Xenon ion implantation was used to activate top Si layers selectively so that we could confirm that the PL signal under the UV light excitation comes not from substrates but from top Si layers. The present method is a very promising tool to evaluate the light element impurities in top Si layers. (author)

  20. Effect of micro-oxygenation on color and anthocyanin-related compounds of wines with different phenolic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-López, Marta; Pardo-Mínguez, Francisco; Schmauch, Gregory; Saucier, Cedric; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; López-Roca, Jose María; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2008-07-23

    Several factors may affect the results obtained when micro-oxygenation is applied to red wines, the most important being the moment of application, the doses of oxygen, and the wine phenolic characteristics. In this study, three red wines, made from Vitis vinifera var. Monastrell (2005 vintage) and with different phenolic characteristics, were micro-oxygenated to determine as to how this technique affected the formation of new pigments in the wines and their chromatic characteristics. The results indicated that the different wines were differently affected by micro-oxygenation. In general, the micro-oxygenated wines had a higher percentage of new anthocyanin-derived pigments, being that this formation is more favored in the wines with the highest total phenol content. These compounds, in turn, significantly increased the wine color intensity. The wine with the lowest phenolic content was less influenced by micro-oxygenation, and the observed evolution in the degree of polymerization of tannins suggested that it might have suffered overoxygenation.

  1. Biodegradation of Various Aromatic Compounds by Enriched Bacterial Cultures: Part B--Nitrogen-, Sulfur-, and Oxygen-Containing Heterocyclic Aromatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberoi, Akashdeep Singh; Philip, Ligy; Bhallamudi, S Murty

    2015-07-01

    Present study focused on the biodegradation of various heterocyclic nitrogen, sulfur, and oxygen (NSO) compounds using naphthalene-enriched culture. Target compounds in the study were pyridine, quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran. Screening studies were carried out using different microbial consortia enriched with specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and NSO compounds. Among different microbial consortia, naphthalene-enriched culture was the most efficient consortium based on high substrate degradation rate. Substrate degradation rate with naphthalene-enriched culture followed the order pyridine > quinoline > benzofuran > benzothiophene. Benzothiophene and benzofuran were found to be highly recalcitrant pollutants. Benzothiophene could not be biodegraded when concentration was above 50 mg/l. It was observed that 2-(1H)-quinolinone, benzothiophene-2-one, and benzofuran-2,3-dione were formed as metabolic intermediates during biodegradation of quinoline, benzothiophene, and benzofuran, respectively. Quinoline-N and pyridine-N were transformed into free ammonium ions during the biodegradation process. Biodegradation pathways for various NSO compounds are proposed. Monod inhibition model was able to simulate single substrate biodegradation kinetics satisfactorily. Benzothiophene and benzofuran biodegradation kinetics, in presence of acetone, was simulated using a generalized multi-substrate model.

  2. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: Effect of oxygen functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, Esther; Lemus, Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Palomar, José; Martin, María J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • HNO 3 oxidation incorporates a higher amount of functionalities than O 3 oxidation. • The loss of porosity is compensated by the massive incorporation of oxygen groups. • HNO 3 oxidation increases OH groups in AC and the ETM and DMS adsorption capacities. • The oxygen functional groups in the AC surface did not affect the DMDS adsorption. • COSMO-RS predicts the important role of OH groups for VSC adsorption. -- Abstract: The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions

  3. Adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds onto modified activated carbons: Effect of oxygen functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Esther, E-mail: esther@lequia.udg.cat [LEQUIA, Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia E-17071 (Spain); Lemus, Jesús [Universidad de Madrid, Sección de Ingeniería Química, Cantoblanco, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael [LEQUIA, Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia E-17071 (Spain); Palomar, José [Universidad de Madrid, Sección de Ingeniería Química, Cantoblanco, Madrid E-28049 (Spain); Martin, María J. [LEQUIA, Institute of the Environment, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, Girona, Catalonia E-17071 (Spain)

    2013-08-15

    Highlights: • HNO{sub 3} oxidation incorporates a higher amount of functionalities than O{sub 3} oxidation. • The loss of porosity is compensated by the massive incorporation of oxygen groups. • HNO{sub 3} oxidation increases OH groups in AC and the ETM and DMS adsorption capacities. • The oxygen functional groups in the AC surface did not affect the DMDS adsorption. • COSMO-RS predicts the important role of OH groups for VSC adsorption. -- Abstract: The effect of physical and chemical properties of activated carbon (AC) on the adsorption of ethyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide was investigated by treating a commercial AC with nitric acid and ozone. The chemical properties of ACs were characterised by temperature programme desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. AC treated with nitric acid presented a larger amount of oxygen functional groups than materials oxidised with ozone. This enrichment allowed a significant improvement on adsorption capacities for ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide but not for dimethyl disulphide. In order to gain a deeper knowledge on the effect of the surface chemistry of AC on the adsorption of volatile sulphur compounds, the quantum-chemical COSMO-RS method was used to simulate the interactions between AC surface groups and the studied volatile sulphur compounds. In agreement with experimental data, this model predicted a greater affinity of dimethyl disulphide towards AC, unaffected by the incorporation of oxygen functional groups in the surface. Moreover, the model pointed out to an increase of the adsorption capacity of AC by the incorporation of hydroxyl functional groups in the case of ethyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulphide due to the hydrogen bond interactions.

  4. Impurity-induced staggered polarization and antiferromagnetic order in spin-12 Heisenberg two-leg ladder compound SrCu2O3: Extensive Cu NMR and NQR studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsugi, S.; Tokunaga, Y.; Ishida, K.; Kitaoka, Y.; Azuma, M.; Fujishiro, Y.; Takano, M.

    1999-08-01

    We report characteristics of impurity-induced staggered polarization (IISP) and antiferromagnetic long-range order (AF-LRO) in the gapped spin-1/2 Heisenberg two-leg ladder compound SrCu2O3 (Sr123). We have carried out comprehensive NMR and NQR investigations on three impurity-doped systems, Sr(Cu1-xMx)2O3 (M=Zn, Ni) with xIISP along the leg was found to be much longer than ξ0/a in x=0.001 and 0.005. The notable result is that ξs/a that was found to be T independent is scaled to mean distances DAV=1/(2x) between the Zn and Ni impurities and DAV=1/x between the La impurities. When DAV=500 for x=0.001 (Zn doping), ξs/a~50 is estimated. The significantly broadened NQR spectrum has provided unambiguous evidence for the AF-LRO in the Zn and Ni doping (x=0.01 and 0.02). Rather uniform AF moments at the middle Cu sites between the impurities are estimated to be about 0.04μB at 1.4 K along the a axis. By assuming that exponential decay constants of AF moments are equivalent to ξs/a's for the IISP, the size of an AF moment next to the impurity is deduced as SAF~1/4. We propose that these exponential distributions of IISP and AF moments along the two-leg suggest that an interladder interaction is in a weakly coupled quasi-one-dimensional (WC-Q1D) regime. The formula of TN=J0exp(-DAV/(ξs/a)) based on the WC-Q1D model explains TN(exp)=3 K (x=0.01) and 5.8 K (x=0.02) quantitatively and predicts to be as small as TN=0.09 K for x=0.001 using J0=2000 K. On the other hand, there is no evidence of AF-LRO for the La doping (x=0.02 and 0.03) down to 1.4 K, nevertheless their ξs/a's are almost equivalent to those in the Zn and Ni doping (x=0.01 and 0.02). We remark that the Q1D-IISP is dramatically enhanced by the interladder interaction even though so weak, once the impurity breaks up the quantum coherence in the short-range resonating valence bond (RVB) state with the gap. On the one hand, we propose that TN is determined by a strength of the interladder interaction and a size

  5. VUV/XUV measurements of impurity emission in plasmas with liquid lithium surfaces on LTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritz, Kevin; Finkenthal, Michael; Stutman, Dan; Bell, Ronald E; Boyle, Dennis; Kaita, Robert; Kozub, Tom; Lucia, Matthew; Majeski, Richard; Merino, Enrique; Schmitt, John; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Clementson, Joel; Kubota, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    The VUV/XUV spectrum has been measured on the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) using a transmission grating imaging spectrometer (TGIS) coupled to a direct-detection x-ray charge-coupled device camera. TGIS data show significant changes in the ratios between the lithium and oxygen impurity line emission during discharges with varying lithium wall conditions. Lithium coatings that have been passivated by lengthy exposure to significant levels of impurities contribute to a large O/Li ratio measured during LTX plasma discharges. Furthermore, previous results have indicated that a passivated lithium film on the plasma facing components will function as a stronger impurity source when in the form of a hot liquid layer compared to a solid lithium layer. However, recent TGIS measurements of plasma discharges in LTX with hot stainless steel boundary shells and a fresh liquid lithium coating show lower O/Li impurity line ratios when compared to discharges with a solid lithium film on cool shells. These new measurements help elucidate the somewhat contradictory results of the effects of solid and liquid lithium on plasma confinement observed in previous experiments. (paper)

  6. Impurity diffusion in transition-metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    Intrinsic tracer impurity diffusion measurements in ceramic oxides have been primarily confined to CoO, NiO, and Fe 3 O 4 . Tracer impurity diffusion in these materials and TiO 2 , together with measurements of the effect of impurities on tracer diffusion (Co in NiO and Cr in CoO), are reviewed and discussed in terms of impurity-defect interactions and mechanisms of diffusion. Divalent impurities in divalent solvents seem to have a weak interaction with vacancies whereas trivalent impurities in divalent solvents strongly influence the vacancy concentrations and significantly reduce solvent jump frequencies near a trivalent impurity. Impurities with small ionic radii diffuse more slowly with a larger activation energy than impurities with larger ionic radii for all systems considered in this review. Cobalt ions (a moderate size impurity) diffuse rapidly along the open channels parallel to the c-axis in TiO 2 whereas chromium ions (a smaller-sized impurity) do not. 60 references, 11 figures

  7. Use of macrocycle- or hemisepulcrand-type poly(oxygen) compounds in nuclear hydrometallurgy. Study of the diluent effect: supra-molecular approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethmont, Valerie

    1997-01-01

    Liquid/liquid extraction has been used for many years to obtain high purity nuclear fuels (uranium salts and plutonium salts), notably with the Purex process which allows 99 per cent of uranium and plutonium contained by spent nuclear fuels to be recovered. This research thesis deals with the search for new and steadier extracting agents, and focuses on macro-cycle or hemisepulcrand type poly(oxygenated) compounds which have excellent properties in nuclear hydrometallurgy. The author thus first discusses the synthesis of oxygenated tripodands (bibliographical study and development of a catalytic method to synthesise ethers). Then, she reports the use of poly(oxygenated) compounds in liquid/liquid extraction, and the experimental study of the effect of the diluting agent by using a supramolecular approach [fr

  8. Chemical sensors for monitoring non-metallic impurities in liquid sodium coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Rajesh; Jayaraman, V.; Rajan Babu, S.; Sridharan, R.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2011-01-01

    Liquid sodium is the coolant of choice for fast breeder reactors. Liquid sodium is highly compatible with structural steels when the concentration of dissolved non-metallic impurities such as oxygen and carbon are low. However, when their concentrations are above certain threshold limits, enhanced corrosion and mass transfer and carburization of the steels would occur. The threshold concentration levels of oxygen in sodium are determined by thermochemical aspects of various ternary oxides of Na-M-O systems (M alloying elements in steels) which take part in corrosion and mass transfer. Dissolved carbon also influences these threshold levels by establishing relevant carbide equilibria. An event of steam leak into sodium at the steam generator, if undetected at its inception itself, can lead to extensive wastage of the tubes of the steam generator and prolonged shutdown. Air ingress into the argon cover gas and leak of hydrocarbon oil used as cooling fluids of the shafts of the centrifugal pumps of sodium are the sources of oxygen and carbon impurities in sodium. Continuous monitoring of the concentration of dissolved hydrogen, carbon and oxygen in sodium coolant will help identifying their ingress at inception itself. An electrochemical hydrogen sensor based on CaHBr-CaBr 2 hydride ion conducting solid electrolyte has been developed for detecting the steam leak during normal operating conditions of the reactor. A nickel diffuser based sensor system using thermal conductivity detector (TCD) and Pd-doped tin oxide thin film sensor has been developed for use during low power operations of the reactor or during its start up. For monitoring carbon in sodium, an electrochemical sensor with molten Na 2 CO 3 -LiCO 3 as the electrolyte and pure graphite as reference electrode has been developed. Yttria Doped Thoria (YDT) electrolyte based oxygen sensor is under development for monitoring dissolved oxygen levels in sodium. Fabrication, assembly, testing and performance of

  9. Formation of dust grains with impurities in red giant winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Carsten

    1994-01-01

    Among the several proposed carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (DIB's) are impurities in small dust grains, especially in iron oxide grains (Huffman 1977) and silicate grains (Huffman 1970). Most promising are single ion impurities since they can reproduce the observed band widths (Whittet 1992). These oxygen-rich grains are believed to originate mostly in the mass flows from red giants and in supernovae ejecta (e.g. Gehrz 1989). A question of considerable impact for the origin of DIB's is therefore, whether these grains are produced as mainly clean crystals or as some dirty materials. A formalism has been developed that allows tracking of the heterogeneous growth of a dust grain and its internal structure during the dust formation process. This formalism has been applied to the dust formation in the outflow from a red giant star.

  10. Influence of Ga vacancies, Mn and O impurities on the ferromagnetic properties of GaN micro- and nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, G.; Escudero, R.; Silva, R.; Herrera, M.

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of the influence of gallium vacancy (VGa) point defects on the ferromagnetic properties of GaN:Mn and GaN:Mn,O micro- and nanostructures. Results demonstrate that the generation of these point defects enhances the ferromagnetic signal of GaN:Mn microstructures, while incorporation of oxygen as an impurity inhibits this property. XPS measurements revealed that Mn impurities in ferromagnetic GaN:Mn samples mainly exhibit a valence state of 2+. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra from Mn-doped GaN samples displayed emissions centered at about 1.97 eV, attributed to transitions between the 4T1-6A1 states of the Mn2+ d orbitals, and emissions centered at 2.45 and 2.9 eV, associated with the presence of VGa. CL measurements also revealed a blue shift of the GaN band-edge emission generated by the expansion of the wurtzite lattice due to Mn incorporation, which was confirmed by XRD measurements. These latter measurements also revealed an amorphization of GaN:Mn due to the incorporation of oxygen as impurities. The GaN:Mn samples were synthesized by thermal evaporation of GaN and MnCO3 powders onto Ni0.8Cr0.2/Si(100) in a horizontal furnace operated at low vacuum. The residual air inside the system was used as a source of oxygen during the synthesis of Mn and O co-doped GaN nanostructures. Mn and O impurities were incorporated into the nanostructures at different concentrations by varying the growth temperature. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy, XRD, and XPS measurements confirmed that the obtained samples predominantly consisted of GaN.

  11. Search for impurities of counting gases in ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, T.

    1992-03-01

    In order to reach for the gas detectors applied at the ALADIN spectrometer of the GSI an as good as possible and timely remaining gas purity, a study on the kind and effects of impurities in different counting gases was performed. The gas purity was observed via the signal height of an α source after a drift path of the electrons of 50 cm. A steady decrease of the α-signals was measures, the steepness of which decreases slowly as function of the time. The half-life lies in the range of weeks, which lets conclude on a slow outgassing from the materials of the arrangement. By a gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy these impurities could be determined. Beside impurities by polar molecules as water and oxygen from the atmosphere, which are deposed in microscopical capillaries of the chamber materials and then outgassed in the samples after several days so-called softeners could be observed. Because these impurities in the arrangement at the ALADIN spectrometer cannot be avoided, a purification system in the flow-through operation was constructed and its effect tested. The gas quality can by this over several days be kept in the mean constant. In this dynamical process the fluctuations of the signal heights lie at ±0.7%. A ionization chamber as monitor for the gas purity was constructed and tested with different gas mixtures concerning observables like signal height and drift time. By this calibrated monitor in the experiment at the ALADIN spectrometer the gas quality can be independently determined. (orig.) [de

  12. Reducing treatment of coppersmelting slag: Thermodynamic analysis of impurities behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komkov, Alexey; Kamkin, Rostislav

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic mathematical model, describing behavior of Pb, Zn, and As during reducing slag cleaning in the Vanyukov furnace has been developed. Using a developed model, the influence of different factors, such as temperature, oxygen partial pressure, the ratio of the formed phases on the behavior of impurities, was analyzed. It was found that arsenic can significantly move to the bottom phase, and zinc can be significantly vaporized under conditions in the Vanyukov furnace.

  13. Integrable quantum impurity models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckle, H.P.

    1998-01-01

    By modifying some of the local L operators of the algebraic form of the Bethe Ansatz inhomogeneous one dimensional quantum lattice models can be constructed. This fact has recently attracted new attention, the inhomogeneities being interpreted as local impurities. The Hamiltonians of the so constructed one-dimensional quantum models have a nearest neighbour structure except in the vicinity of the local impurities which involve three-site interactions. The pertinent feature of these models is the absence of backscattering at the impurities: the impurities are transparent. (Copyright (1998) World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd)

  14. Ab initio study of the EFG tensor at Cd impurities in Sc2O3 semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, E.L.; Richard, D.; Errico, L.A.; Renteria, M.

    2009-01-01

    We present an ab initio study of diluted Cd impurities localized at both cation sites of the semiconductor Sc 2 O 3 . The electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at Cd impurities located at both cationic sites of the host structure was determined from the calculation of the electronic structure of the doped system. Calculations were performed with the full-potential augmented-plane wave plus local orbitals (APW+lo) method within the framework of the density functional theory. We studied the atomic structural relaxations and the perturbation of the electronic charge density induced by the impurities in the host system in a fully self-consistent way. We showed that the Cd impurity introduces an increase of 8% in the nearest oxygen neighbors bond-lengths, changing the EFG sign for probes located at the asymmetric cation site. The APW+lo predictions for the charged state of the Cd impurity were compared with EFG results existent in the literature, coming from time-differential γ-γ perturbed-angular-correlations experiments performed on 111 Cd-implanted Sc 2 O 3 powder samples. From the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, we can strongly suggest that the Cd acceptor impurities are ionized at room temperature. Finally, we showed that simple calculations like those performed within the point-charge model with antishielding factors do not correctly describe the problem of a Cd impurity in Sc 2 O 3 .

  15. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  16. Reduction of hydrocarbon impurities in 200 L/H helium liquefier-refrigerator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Arata

    1993-11-01

    A cryogenic system with the capacity of 200 1/h or 500 W at 4.4 K has been operated to develop the superconducting conductors and coils for the LHD. The system has contributed in various superconducting technologies along with the dc 75kA power supply and 10 MN mechanical testing machine, and completed the basic R and D works of the LHD. On the way of operating the cryogenic system, impurity densities of hydrocarbon gases in circulating helium gas became much larger than the expected values for this cryogenic system, so that the densities of some impurity gases were carefully monitored in reference to the operational conditions of circulating compressor by using a gas chromatography. Impurity gas densities of oxygen, nitrogen and ethane increased obviously, when the output capacity of the compressor was reduced. In a two-stage oil injected compression system with a variable stroke mechanism for a first stage, a reduction in the capacity of the first stage leads to a larger compression ratio for the second stage, and the temperature of the injected oil becomes higher. The production of the impurities in the helium might be caused by cracking a part of injected oil in the compressor. The compressor, therefore, was reconstructed such that the injection oil is supplied sufficiently and the compression ratio division becomes even for each stage. It was confirmed that the impurities are not produced now after modification. (author)

  17. Reduction of hydrocarbon impurities in 200 l/h helium liquefier-refrigerator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Mito, Toshiyuki; Nishimura, Arata; Takahata, Kazuya; Satoh, Sadao; Yamamoto, Junya; Yamamura, Hidemasa; Masuda, Kaoru; Kashihara, Shinichirou; Fukusada, Katsuaki

    1993-11-01

    A cryogenic system with the capacity of 200 l/h or 500 W at 4.4 K was developed in order to supply the superconducting conductors and coils of the LHD. As a by-product of operating the cryogenic system, the impurity densities of hydrocarbon gases in the circulating helium gas became much larger than the expected values for this cryogenic system. So much larger in fact, that it became necessary to carefully monitor the operational conditions of the circulating compressor by means of gas chromatography. Impurity gas densities of oxygen, nitrogen, and ethane increased significantly when the output capacity of the compressor was reduced. In a two-stage oil injected compression system, with a variable stroke mechanism for a first stage, a reduction in the capacity of the first stage leads to a larger compression ratio for the second stage, and the temperature of the injected oil becomes higher. The production of the impurities in the helium might be caused by decomposition of the injected oil in the compressor. The compressor, therefore, was reconstructed such that the injection oil is supplied sufficiently, and the compression ratio division becomes even for each stage. It was confirmed that the impurities were not produced after the modification.

  18. New approach to controlling impurity contamination of a plasma-gun-produced compact torus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of impurity ions, notably carbon and oxygen, has been determined to be a major factor limiting the lifetime of field-reversed plasma entities produced by coaxial plasma guns such as the Beta II gun at LLNL. Similar problems are encountered in other toroidal plasmas, e.g. those in tokamaks. However, the solution employed there, discharge cleaning, followed by initiation of the plasma at low density (where impurity radiation losses are exceeded by ohmic heating rates) is not applicable here. This note discusses a proposed means for drastically reducing the level of impurities. (These are believed to be evolved from the gun electrode surfaces as a result of thermal shock associated with UV emission from the gun plasma). The idea: take advantage of the UV pulse preferentially to release hydrogen from the electrode surfaces. These surfaces are to be coated with a few-micron-thick layer of titanium, outgassed by preheating and subsequently loaded with hydrogen

  19. Magnetic impurity effect on charge and magnetic order in doped La1.5Ca0.5CoO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigane, K.; Hiraka, H.; Tomiyasu, K.; Ohoyama, K.; Louca, D.; Yamada, K.

    2012-02-01

    Neutron scattering experiments were performed on single crystals of magnetic impurity doped cobalt oxides La1.5Ca0.5CoO4 to characterize the charge and spin orders. We newly found contrasting impurity effects. Two types of magnetic peaks are observed at q = (0.5,0,L) with L = half-integer and integer in La1.5Ca0.5CoO4, while magnetic peak at L = half-integer (integer) was only observed in Mn (Fe)-substituted sample. Although Mn and Fe impurities degrade charge and magnetic order, Cr impurity stabilizes the ordering at x = 0.5. Based on the crystal structural analysis of Cr doped sample, we found that the excess oxygen and change of octahedron around Co3+ were realized in Cr doped sample.

  20. Identification, characterization, and high-performance liquid chromatography quantification of process-related impurities in vonoprazan fumarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Cao, Na; Ma, Xingling; Xiong, Kaihe; Sun, Lili; Zou, Qiaogen

    2016-04-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of vonoprazan fumarate, a novel proton pump inhibitor drug revealed six impurities. These were identified by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Further, the structures of the impurities were confirmed by synthesis followed by characterization by mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of these data and knowledge of the synthetic scheme of vonoprazan fumarate, the previously unknown impurity was identified as 1-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1-(pyridin-3-ylsulfonyl)-1H-pyrrol-3-yl]-N-methyldimethylamine, which is a new compound. The possible mechanisms by which these impurities were formed were also discussed. A high-performance liquid chromatography method was optimized in order to separate, selectively detect, and quantify all process-related impurities of vonoprazan fumarate. The presented method has been validated in terms of linearity, limits of detection, and quantification, and response factors and, therefore, is highly suitable for routine analysis of vonoprazan fumarate related substances as well as stability studies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Isotope effects of trapped electron modes in the presence of impurities in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Dong, J. Q.; Sun, A. P.; Qu, H. P.; Lu, G. M.; He, Z. X.; He, H. D.; Wang, L. F.

    2016-04-01

    The trapped electron modes (TEMs) are numerically investigated in toroidal magnetized hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas, taking into account the effects of impurity ions such as carbon, oxygen, helium, tungsten and others with positive and negative density gradients with the rigorous integral eigenmode equation. The effects of impurity ions on TEMs are investigated in detail. It is shown that impurity ions have substantially-destabilizing (stabilizing) effects on TEMs in isotope plasmas for {{L}ez}\\equiv {{L}ne}/{{L}nz}>0 (TEM turbulences in hydrogenic isotope plasmas with and without impurities are performed. The relations between the maximum growth rate of the TEMs with respect to the poloidal wave number and the ion mass number are given in the presence of the impurity ions. The results demonstrate that the maximum growth rates scale as {γ\\max}\\propto Mi-0.5 in pure hydrogenic plasmas. The scale depends on the sign of its density gradient and charge number when there is a second species of (impurity) ions. When impurity ions have density profiles peaking inwardly (i.e. {{L}ez}\\equiv {{L}ne}/{{L}nz}>0 ), the scaling also depends on ITG parameter {ηi} . The maximum growth rates scale as {γ\\max}\\propto M\\text{eff}-0.5 for the case without ITG ({ηi}=0 ) or the ITG parameter is positive ({ηi}>0 ) but the impurity ion charge number is low (Z≤slant 5.0 ). However, when {ηi}>0 and the impurity ion charge number is moderate (Z=6.0-8.0 ), the scaling law is found as {γ\\max}\\propto M\\text{eff}-1.0 . Here, Z is impurity ion charge number, and the effective mass number, {{M}\\text{eff}}=≤ft(1-{{f}z}\\right){{M}i}+{{f}z}{{M}z} , with {{M}i} and {{M}Z} being the mass numbers of the hydrogenic and impurity ions, respectively, and {{f}z}=Z{{n}0z}/{{n}0e} being the charge concentration of impurity ions. In addition, with regard to the case of {{L}ez}<0 , the maximum growth rate scaling is {γ\\max}\\propto Mi-0.5 . The possible relations of the results

  2. Potentiometric microdetermination of cadmium in organic compounds after oxygen flask combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campiglio, A.

    1986-01-01

    The sample is burnt in an oxygen flask and the combustion products are absorbed in 1Μ HNO 3 . After removal of interfering gases by boiling, the solution is transfered to the titration cell and neutralized with NaOH in the presence of methyl red; cd(II) is finally titrated potentiometrically in a buffered 50% ethanolic medium with 0.01Μ sodium diethyldithiocarbamate in 50% ethanol. A silver/sulphide ion-selective electrode and a double junction referenceelectrode containing a 10% KNO 3 solution in 26% ethanol in the outer compartment are used in combination with a Titroprocessor to detect the end point. The results obtained are very accurate and reproducible: the maximum error does not exceed 0.09%, the recovery of cadmium is in the range 99.67 to 99.95% and the rel. standard deviation is 0.05%. The potentiometric titration with diethyldithiocarbamate, which is useful to determine small Cd(II) amounts down to 30μg (2μg ml -1 ), as well as the oxygen flask combustion of organic cadmium compounds are discussed. (Author)

  3. Methane impurity production in the fusion reactor environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.T.

    1984-11-01

    Fusion requires temperatures of the order of 10 8 degrees C. In order to attain the required temperature it will be essential to minimise the energy losses from the plasma. Impurities are a major cause of plasma cooling. Ionization of impurity species in the plasma leads to a subsequent decay and emission of radiation. The most common low Z contaminants to be consideed are water and methane produced by reaction of hydrogen isotopes with oxygen and carbon. This review focuses on the methane production problem. We will be concerned with the sources of carbon in the reactor and also with the reactivity of carbon with hydrogen molecules, atoms and ions and the synergistic effects which can arise from coincident fluxes of electrons and photons and the effects of radiation-induced damage of the materials involved. While the reactor first wall will provide the most hostile environment for methane producton, most of the reactions discussed can occur in breeder blankets and also in other tritium facilities such as fuel handling, purification and storage facilities

  4. THE EFFICIENCY OF IMPURITIES EXTRACTION DURING THE PROCESS OF ETHANOL EPURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Nikitina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The static model of the hydroselection column that describes the concentration variation of the main components was proposed. The purpose of this work is an optimization of the shared mixture input-position and evaluation of efficiency of the digestion and the impurity compound concentration during the epuration process. To this end, the author developed a static model of epuration columns, which allows to reveal the dependence of the degree of digestion and the degree of concentration of the main impurities in the column of the number of plates in each of these parts. It’s proved that with the increasing of theoretical plates number in the concentration part of the column the concentration effect tends to the limit value. The effects of the head impurities digestion increase indefinitely with the growth of exhausting part. The proportion of the output from the condenser impurities depends more from the digestion effect than from the condensation effect. The effect of alcohol cleaning from the fusel oil components depends strongly from the ratio of the number of plates in the digestion and concentration parts (the optimal ratio for isopropanol, isoamyl, butanol is 1.5, for the propanol, isobutanol is 0.45.

  5. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  6. Experimental investigation of the auto-ignition characteristics of oxygenated reference fuel compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Stephen Michael

    The increased use of biofuels presents an opportunity to improve combustion performance while simultaneously reducing greenhouse gases and pollutant emissions. This work focused on improving the fundamental understanding of the auto-ignition chemistry of oxygenated reference fuel compounds. A systematic study of the effects of ester structure on ignition chemistry was performed using the University of Michigan Rapid Compression Facility. The ignition properties of the ester compounds were investigated over a broad range of pressures (P=5-20 atm) and temperatures (T=850-1150 K) which are directly relevant to advanced combustion engine strategies. Ignition delay times for five esters were determined using the RCF. The esters were selected to systematically consider the chemical structure of the compounds. Three esters were saturated: methyl butanoate, butyl methanoate, and ethyl propanoate; and two were unsaturated: methyl crotonate and methyl trans-3-hexenoate. The unsaturated esters were more reactive than their saturated counterparts, with the largest unsaturated ester, methyl trans-3-hexenoate having the highest reactivity. Two isomers of the saturated esters, butyl methanoate and ethyl propanoate, were more reactive than the isomer methyl butanoate. The results are explained if we assume that butyl methanoate and ethyl propanoate form intermediate ring structures which decompose more rapidly than esters such as methyl butanoate, which do not form ring structures. Modeling studies of the reaction chemistry were conducted for methyl butanoate and ethyl propanoate, for which detailed mechanisms were available in the literature. The new experimental data indicated that literature rate coefficients for some of the methyl butanoate/HO2 reactions were too fast. Modifying these within the theoretical uncertainties for the reaction rates, led to excellent agreement between the model predictions and the experimental data. Comparison of the modeling results with the

  7. Numerical renormalization group calculation of impurity internal energy and specific heat of quantum impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, L.; Costi, T. A.

    2012-08-01

    We introduce a method to obtain the specific heat of quantum impurity models via a direct calculation of the impurity internal energy requiring only the evaluation of local quantities within a single numerical renormalization group (NRG) calculation for the total system. For the Anderson impurity model we show that the impurity internal energy can be expressed as a sum of purely local static correlation functions and a term that involves also the impurity Green function. The temperature dependence of the latter can be neglected in many cases, thereby allowing the impurity specific heat Cimp to be calculated accurately from local static correlation functions; specifically via Cimp=(∂Eionic)/(∂T)+(1)/(2)(∂Ehyb)/(∂T), where Eionic and Ehyb are the energies of the (embedded) impurity and the hybridization energy, respectively. The term involving the Green function can also be evaluated in cases where its temperature dependence is non-negligible, adding an extra term to Cimp. For the nondegenerate Anderson impurity model, we show by comparison with exact Bethe ansatz calculations that the results recover accurately both the Kondo induced peak in the specific heat at low temperatures as well as the high-temperature peak due to the resonant level. The approach applies to multiorbital and multichannel Anderson impurity models with arbitrary local Coulomb interactions. An application to the Ohmic two-state system and the anisotropic Kondo model is also given, with comparisons to Bethe ansatz calculations. The approach could also be of interest within other impurity solvers, for example, within quantum Monte Carlo techniques.

  8. Oxidation Kinetics of Chemically Vapor-Deposited Silicon Carbide in Wet Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of chemically vapor-deposited SiC in dry oxygen and wet oxygen (P(sub H2O) = 0.1 atm) at temperatures between 1200 C and 1400 C were monitored using thermogravimetric analysis. It was found that in a clean environment, 10% water vapor enhanced the oxidation kinetics of SiC only very slightly compared to rates found in dry oxygen. Oxidation kinetics were examined in terms of the Deal and Grove model for oxidation of silicon. It was found that in an environment containing even small amounts of impurities, such as high-purity Al2O3 reaction tubes containing 200 ppm Na, water vapor enhanced the transport of these impurities to the oxidation sample. Oxidation rates increased under these conditions presumably because of the formation of less protective sodium alumino-silicate scales.

  9. Impurity effect of iron(III) on the growth of potassium sulfate crystal in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Noriaki; Katagiri, Ken-ichi; Yokota, Masaaki; Sato, Akira; Yashiro, Hitoshi; Itai, Kazuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Growth rates of the {1 1 0} faces of a potassium sulfate crystal were measured in a flow cell in the presence of traces of impurity Fe(III) (up to 2 ppm) over the range of pH=2.5-6.0. The growth rate was significantly suppressed by the impurity. The effect became stronger as the impurity concentration was increased and at pH5 it finally disappeared completely. The concentration and supersaturation effects on the impurity action were reasonably explained with a model proposed by Kubota and Mullin [J. Crystal Growth, 152 (1995) 203]. The surface coverage of the active sites by Fe(III) is estimated to increase linearly on increasing its concentration in solution in the range examined by growth experiments. The impurity effectiveness factor is confirmed to increase inversely proportional to the supersaturation as predicted by the model. Apart from the discussion based on the model, the pH effect on the impurity action is qualitatively explained by assuming that the first hydrolysis product of aqua Fe(III) complex compound, [Fe(H 2O) 5(OH)] 2+, is both growth suppression and adsorption active, but the second hydrolysis product, [Fe(H 2O) 4(OH) 2] +, is only adsorption active.

  10. DETECTING LOW-LEVEL SYNTHESIS IMPURITIES IN MODIFIED PHOSPHOROTHIOATE OLIGONUCLEOTIDES USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY – HIGH RESOLUTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikcevic, Irena; Wyrzykiewicz, Tadeusz K.; Limbach, Patrick A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary An LC-MS method based on the use of high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS) for profiling oligonucleotides synthesis impurities is described. Oligonucleotide phosphorothioatediesters (phosphorothioate oligonucleotides), in which one of the non-bridging oxygen atoms at each phosphorus center is replaced by a sulfur atom, are now one of the most popular oligonucleotide modifications due to their ease of chemical synthesis and advantageous pharmacokinetic properties. Despite significant progress in the solid-phase oligomerization chemistry used in the manufacturing of these oligonucleotides, multiple classes of low-level impurities always accompany synthetic oligonucleotides. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry has emerged as a powerful technique for the identification of these synthesis impurities. However, impurity profiling, where the entire complement of low-level synthetic impurities is identified in a single analysis, is more challenging. Here we present an LC-MS method based the use of high resolution-mass spectrometry, specifically Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTIRCMS or FTMS). The optimal LC-FTMS conditions, including the stationary phase and mobile phases for the separation and identification of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides, were found. The characteristics of FTMS enable charge state determination from single m/z values of low-level impurities. Charge state information then enables more accurate modeling of the detected isotopic distribution for identification of the chemical composition of the detected impurity. Using this approach, a number of phosphorothioate impurities can be detected by LC-FTMS including failure sequences carrying 3′-terminal phosphate monoester and 3′-terminal phosphorothioate monoester, incomplete backbone sulfurization and desulfurization products, high molecular weight impurities, and chloral, isobutyryl, and N3 (2-cyanoethyl) adducts

  11. Positron annihilation in superconducting 123 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, M.; Manuel, A.A.; Erb, A.

    1998-01-01

    After a brief review of the theory of angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (ACAR), the authors illustrate experimental principles and give examples of successful determination of electron momentum density (EMD) and of positron lifetime in solids. The central question which the authors try to answer concerns the contribution of positron spectroscopy to the knowledge and understanding of the new high temperature superconducting oxides. They find that in these oxides also, partially filled bands exist and they can observe parts of their Fermi surface and measure lifetimes in accordance with band theoretical calculations. There are characteristic differences, however. The intensity of the anisotropy of the ACAR signal is below theoretical expectation and signals depend on sample preparation. Recent studies by the Geneva group have concerned dependence of the signals on impurities, on oxygen content and on the thermal history of preparation. Of particular interest are correlations between the variations of these signals and between the variations of structural and transport properties in these substances. Besides deliberate additions of impurities, the Geneva group also reports progress in the preparations of samples of highest purity (barium zirconate crucibles). The alloy series Pr x Y 1-x Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ is of special interest because of exceptional transport properties. The recent positron results on these materials will be presented and commented in the light of theoretical models and in the light of the reported superconductivity of the Pr-compound

  12. Evidence of sub-10 nm aluminum-oxygen precipitates in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moutanabbir, Oussama; Isheim, Dieter; Mao, Zugang; Seidman, David N

    2016-01-01

    In this research, ultraviolet laser-assisted atom-probe tomography (APT) was utilized to investigate precisely the behavior at the atomistic level of aluminum impurities in ultrathin epitaxial silicon layers. Aluminum atoms were incorporated in situ during the growth process. The measured average aluminum concentration in the grown layers exceeds by several orders of magnitude the equilibrium bulk solubility. Three-dimensional atom-by-atom mapping demonstrates that aluminum atoms precipitate in the silicon matrix and form nanoscopic precipitates with lateral dimensions in the 1.3 to 6.2 nm range. These precipitates were found to form only in the presence of oxygen impurity atoms, thus providing clear evidence of the long-hypothesized role of oxygen and aluminum-oxygen complexes in facilitating the precipitation of aluminum in a silicon lattice. The measured average aluminum and oxygen concentrations in the precipitates are ∼10 ± 0.5 at.% and ∼4.4 ± 0.5 at.%, respectively. This synergistic interaction is supported by first-principles calculations of the binding energies of aluminum-oxygen dimers in silicon. The calculations demonstrate that there is a strong binding between aluminum and oxygen atoms, with Al-O-Al and O-Al-Al as the energetically favorable sequences corresponding to precipitates in which the concentration of aluminum is twice as large as the oxygen concentration in agreement with APT data. (paper)

  13. Impurity solitons with quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Torres, Juan P-; Torner, Lluis

    1998-01-01

    We fmd families of solitary waves mediated by parametric mixing in quadratic nonlinear media that are localized at point-defect impurities. Solitons localized at attractive impurities are found to be dynamically stable. It is shown that localization at the impurity modifies strongly the soliton...

  14. Evaluation of the performance of high temperature conversion reactors for compound-specific oxygen stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzfeld, Kristina L; Gehre, Matthias; Richnow, Hans-Hermann

    2017-05-01

    In this study conversion conditions for oxygen gas chromatography high temperature conversion (HTC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) are characterised using qualitative mass spectrometry (IonTrap). It is shown that physical and chemical properties of a given reactor design impact HTC and thus the ability to accurately measure oxygen isotope ratios. Commercially available and custom-built tube-in-tube reactors were used to elucidate (i) by-product formation (carbon dioxide, water, small organic molecules), (ii) 2nd sources of oxygen (leakage, metal oxides, ceramic material), and (iii) required reactor conditions (conditioning, reduction, stability). The suitability of the available HTC approach for compound-specific isotope analysis of oxygen in volatile organic molecules like methyl tert-butyl ether is assessed. Main problems impeding accurate analysis are non-quantitative HTC and significant carbon dioxide by-product formation. An evaluation strategy combining mass spectrometric analysis of HTC products and IRMS 18 O/ 16 O monitoring for future method development is proposed.

  15. Effect of heat treatment and impurity concentration on some mechanical properties V-15Cr-5Ti alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, B.A.; Kestel, B.J.; Diercks, D.R.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of heat treatment and O, N, C, Si, and S impurity level on the yield strength, ductility, and fracture mode for specimens from four different heats of the V-15Cr-5Ti alloy are presented. The heat treatments for the alloy consisted of annealing as-rolled material for one hour at either 950, 1050, 1125, or 1200 0 C. The total oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon impurity concentration ranged from 400 to 1200 wppm. The Si concentration ranged from 300 to 1050 wppm, and the S concentration ranged from 440 to 1100 wppm. The yield strength and ductility for the alloy, regardless of impurity concentration, exhibited minimum and maximum values, respectively, for the 1125 0 C anneal. The primary mode of failure for the tensile specimens was transgranular fracture

  16. Determination of oxygen in uranium compounds using sulfur monochloride; Dosage de l'oxygene dans les composes de l'uranium par la methode au monochlorure de soufre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudin, G; Besson, J; Blum, P L; Tran-Van, Danh [Commisariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    The authors have described in an other paper (Anal. Chim. Acta, in press) a method for oxygen determination in uranium compounds, in which the sample is attacked by sulfur monochloride. The present paper is concerned with the experimental aspects of the method: apparatus procedure. (authors) [French] Les auteurs ont decrit dans une autre publication (Anal. Chim. Acta) a paraitre, une methode de dosage de l'oxygene dans les composes de l'uranium par attaque par le monochlorure de soufre, La presente note a pour but d'en preciser les techniques experimentale: appareillage, mode operatoire. (auteurs)

  17. Influences of impurities on iodine removal efficiency of silver alumina adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Funabashi, Kiyomi [Hitachi, Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Kondo, Yoshikazu [Hitachi, Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    Silver impregnated alumina adsorbent (AgA), which was developed for iodine removal from off-gas of nuclear power and reprocessing plants has been tested laying emphasis on investigation of the influences gaseous impurities have on adsorbent chemical stability and iodine removal efficiency. The influences of the major impurities such as nitrogen oxides and water vapor were checked on the chemical state of impregnated silver compound (AgNO{sub 3}) and decontamination factor (DF) value. At 150{degrees}C, a forced air flow with 1.5% nitrogen oxide (NO/NO{sub 2}=1/1) reduced silver nitrate to metallic silver, whereas pure air and air with 1.5% NO{sub 2} had no effect on the chemical state of silver. Metallic silver showed a lower DF value for methyl iodide in pure air (without impurities) than silver nitrate and the lower DF of metallic silver was improved when impurities were added. At 40{degrees}C, a forced air flow with 1.5% nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) increased the AgA weight by about 20%, which was caused by the adsorption of nitric acid solution on the AgA surface. AgA with l0wt% silver showed higher weight increase than that with 24wt% silver which had lower porosity. Adsorption of acid solution lowered the DF value, which would be due to the hindrance of contact between methyl iodide and silver. The influences of other gaseous impurities were also investigated and AgA showed superior characteristics at high temperatures. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  18. Impurity-generated non-Abelions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simion, G.; Kazakov, A.; Rokhinson, L. P.; Wojtowicz, T.; Lyanda-Geller, Y. B.

    2018-06-01

    Two classes of topological superconductors and Majorana modes in condensed matter systems are known to date: one in which disorder induced by impurities strongly suppresses topological superconducting gap and is detrimental to Majorana modes, and another where Majorana fermions are protected by a disorder-robust topological superconductor gap. Observation and control of Majorana fermions and other non-Abelions often requires a symmetry of an underlying system leading to a gap in the single-particle or quasiparticle spectra. In semiconductor structures, impurities that provide charge carriers introduce states into the gap and enable conductance and proximity-induced superconductivity via the in-gap states. Thus a third class of topological superconductivity and Majorana modes emerges, in which topological superconductivity and Majorana fermions appear exclusively when impurities generate in-gap states. We show that impurity-enabled topological superconductivity is realized in a quantum Hall ferromagnet, when a helical domain wall is coupled to an s -wave superconductor. As an example of emergence of topological superconductivity in quantum Hall ferromagnets, we consider the integer quantum Hall effect in Mn-doped CdTe quantum wells. Recent experiments on transport through the quantum Hall ferromagnet domain wall in this system indicated a vital role of impurities in the conductance, but left unresolved the question whether impurities preclude generation of Majorana fermions and other non-Abelions in such systems in general. Here, solving a general quantum-mechanical problem of impurity bound states in a system of spin-orbit coupled Landau levels, we demonstrate that impurity-induced Majorana modes emerge at boundaries between topological and conventional superconducting states generated in a domain wall due to proximity to an s superconductor. We consider both short-range disorder and a smooth random potential. The phase diagram of the system is defined by

  19. Phonon-impurity relaxation and acoustic wave absorption in yttrium-aluminium garnet crystals with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.N.; Kotelyanskij, I.M.; Medved', V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental results of investigations of the influence of substitution impurities in the yttrium-aluminium garnet lattice on absorption of high-frequency acoustic waves are presented. It is shown that the phonon-impurity relaxation processses affect at most the wave absorption and have resonance character when the acoustic wave interacts with the thermal phonon group in the vicinity of the perturbed part of the phonon spectrum caused by the impurity. The differences of time values between inelastic and elastic thermal phonons relaxations determined from the data on longitudinal and shear waves in pure and impurity garnet crystals are discussed

  20. [Optimization of solid-phase extraction for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-quan; Li, Feng-min; Wu, Qian-yuan; Hu, Hong-ying

    2013-05-01

    A concentration method for enrichment of toxic organic compounds in water samples has been developed based on combined solid-phase extraction (SPE) to reduce impurities and improve recoveries of target compounds. This SPE method was evaluated in every stage to identify the source of impurities. Based on the analysis of Waters Oasis HLB without water samples, the eluent of SPE sorbent after dichloromethane and acetone contributed 85% of impurities during SPE process. In order to reduce the impurities from SPE sorbent, soxhlet extraction of dichloromethane followed by acetone and lastly methanol was applied to the sorbents for 24 hours and the results had proven that impurities were reduced significantly. In addition to soxhlet extraction, six types of prevalent SPE sorbents were used to absorb 40 target compounds, the lgK(ow) values of which were within the range of 1.46 and 8.1, and recovery rates were compared. It was noticed and confirmed that Waters Oasis HLB had shown the best recovery results for most of the common testing samples among all three styrenedivinylbenzene (SDB) polymer sorbents, which were 77% on average. Furthermore, Waters SepPak AC-2 provided good recovery results for pesticides among three types of activated carbon sorbents and the average recovery rates reached 74%. Therefore, Waters Oasis HLB and Waters SepPak AC-2 were combined to obtain a better recovery and the average recovery rate for the tested 40 compounds of this new SPE method was 87%.

  1. The influence of impurities on the discharge behaviour in SPICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meer, A.F.G. van der.

    1981-10-01

    Discharges in the screw pinch SPICA can be produced in a small range of filling pressures and bias field values. The experimentally observed lower limit of 6 mtorr for the filling pressure is explained by the onset of MHD instabilities and by imperfect implosion at low values of the filling pressure at high values of the bias field. In the accessible parameter regime, discharges can be produced with densities of the order of 5x10 21 m -3 and temperatures between 30 and 80 eV, which show gross stability for 200 μs, albeit not reproducible. In this density and temperature range discharges can easily become dominated by energy losses due to impurity radiation. An investigation of the temperature decay and the impurity concentration shows that, in spite of the quartz liner, this is not the case under normal operating conditions and that the energy containment time is of the order of 200 μs. The temperature decay rate, measured by means of Thomson scattering, is only 0.15 eV/μs, whereas from the intensity ratio of the 15.0 nm 2s 2 S - 3p 2 p 0 and the 103.2 nm 2s 2 S - 2p 2 P 0 OVI emission lines a decay rate of 0.3 eV/μs is derived. From absolute intensity measurements an oxygen concentration is derived. Besides oxygen, also silicon and nitrogen are present in the discharge. The nitrogen concentration that follows from absolute intensity measurements is in fair agreement with estimates based on an analysis of the background gas. The silicon concentration has not been measured directly, but it is estimated to be less than half the oxygen concentration since the wall material is quartz (SiO 2 ) and part of the oxygen originates from the background gas, mainly as a constituent of water vapour

  2. Graphene plasmons: Impurities and nonlocal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; Wenger, Tobias; Kinaret, Jari; Fogelström, Mikael

    2018-02-01

    This work analyzes how impurities and vacancies on the surface of a graphene sample affect its optical conductivity and plasmon excitations. The disorder is analyzed in the self-consistent Green's function formulation and nonlocal effects are fully taken into account. It is shown that impurities modify the linear spectrum and give rise to an impurity band whose position and width depend on the two parameters of our model, the density and the strength of impurities. The presence of the impurity band strongly influences the electromagnetic response and the plasmon losses. Furthermore, we discuss how the impurity-band position can be obtained experimentally from the plasmon dispersion relation and discuss this in the context of sensing.

  3. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed

  4. The impurity transport in HT-6B tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Rong; Xie Jikang; Li Linzhong; He Yexi; Wang Shuya; Deng Chuanbao; Li Guoxiang; Qiu Lijian

    1992-06-01

    The quasi-stationary profiles of the impurity ionization stages in HT-6B tokamak were determined by monitoring the VUV (vacuum ultraviolet) and visible line emissions from impurities. An impurity transport code was set up. The impurity transport coefficients and other parameters of impurities in that device were simulated and determined. From the measurement of impurity emission profiles and simulation analysis, it is concluded that the impurity confinement is improved and the impurity recycling is reduced by the slow magnetic compression. Some characteristics of impurity transport in that device are also discussed

  5. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Cecconello, M.; Gravestijn, R. M.; Hedqvist, A.; Pégourié, B.; Schunke, B.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum-ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O4+ (Be-like) and C3+ Li-like.

  6. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Gravestijn, R.M.; Hedqvist, A.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O 4+ (Be-like) and C 3+ (Li-like)

  7. Study on growth of highly pure uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira; Suzuki, Kenji.

    1992-01-01

    We developed the systems for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. Chemical analysis of the purified uranium was performed using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The problem that emission spectra of the uranium conceal those of analyzed impurities was settled by extraction of the uranium using tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP). The result shows that some metallic impurities such as Pb, Mn, Cu etc. evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of rod with molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained highly purified uranium metal of 99.99 % up with regard to metallic impurities. Using the purified uranium, we attempted to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  8. Impurity gettering in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A process for impurity gettering in a semiconductor substrate or device such as a silicon substrate or device. The process comprises hydrogenating the substrate or device at the back side thereof with sufficient intensity and for a time period sufficient to produce a damaged back side. Thereafter, the substrate or device is illuminated with electromagnetic radiation at an intensity and for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the back side and alloy with a metal there present to form a contact and capture the impurities. The impurity gettering process also can function to simultaneously passivate defects within the substrate or device, with the defects likewise diffusing to the back side for simultaneous passivation. Simultaneously, substantially all hydrogen-induced damage on the back side of the substrate or device is likewise annihilated. Also taught is an alternate process comprising thermal treatment after hydrogenation of the substrate or device at a temperature of from about 500.degree. C. to about 700.degree. C. for a time period sufficient to cause the impurities to diffuse to the damaged back side thereof for subsequent capture by an alloying metal.

  9. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  10. Synthesis of Heteroaromatic Compounds by Oxidative Aromatization Using an Activated Carbon/Molecular Oxygen System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Hayashi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of heteroaromatic compounds, such as substituted pyridines, pyrazoles, indoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-substituted imidazoles, 2-arylbenzazoles and pyrimidin-2(1H-ones are synthesized by oxidative aromatization using the activated carbon and molecular oxygen system. Mechanistic study focused on the role of activated carbon in the synthesis of 2-arylbenzazoles is also discussed. In the final section, we will disclose the efficient synthesis of substituted 9,10-anthracenes via oxidative aromatization.

  11. Impurity-induced moments in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaliullin, G.; Kilian, R.; Krivenko, S.; Fulde, P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the effect of a nonmagnetic impurity in a two-dimensional spin liquid in the spin-gap phase, employing a drone-fermion representation of spin-1/2 operators. The properties of the local moment induced in the vicinity of the impurity are investigated and an expression for the nuclear-magnetic-resonance Knight shift is derived, which we compare with experimental results. Introducing a second impurity into the spin liquid an antiferromagnetic interaction between the moments is found when the two impurities are located on different sublattices. The presence of many impurities leads to a screening of this interaction as is shown by means of a coherent-potential approximation. Further, the Kondo screening of an impurity-induced local spin by charge carriers is discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  12. Ab initio study of the EFG tensor at Cd impurities in Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, E.L.; Richard, D. [Departamento de Fisica and IFLP (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Errico, L.A. [Departamento de Fisica and IFLP (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Noroeste Bonaerense (UNNOBA), Monteagudo 2772, Pergamino, CP 2700 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Renteria, M., E-mail: renteria@fisica.unlp.edu.a [Departamento de Fisica and IFLP (CONICET-UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-10-01

    We present an ab initio study of diluted Cd impurities localized at both cation sites of the semiconductor Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The electric-field-gradient (EFG) tensor at Cd impurities located at both cationic sites of the host structure was determined from the calculation of the electronic structure of the doped system. Calculations were performed with the full-potential augmented-plane wave plus local orbitals (APW+lo) method within the framework of the density functional theory. We studied the atomic structural relaxations and the perturbation of the electronic charge density induced by the impurities in the host system in a fully self-consistent way. We showed that the Cd impurity introduces an increase of 8% in the nearest oxygen neighbors bond-lengths, changing the EFG sign for probes located at the asymmetric cation site. The APW+lo predictions for the charged state of the Cd impurity were compared with EFG results existent in the literature, coming from time-differential gamma-gamma perturbed-angular-correlations experiments performed on {sup 111}Cd-implanted Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder samples. From the excellent agreement between theory and experiment, we can strongly suggest that the Cd acceptor impurities are ionized at room temperature. Finally, we showed that simple calculations like those performed within the point-charge model with antishielding factors do not correctly describe the problem of a Cd impurity in Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  13. Impurities in uranium process solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boydell, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    Several uranium purification circuits are presented in tabular form together with the average major impurity levels associated with each. The more common unit operations in these circuits, namely strong- and weak-base ion-exchange, solvent extraction and the precipitation of impurities are then discussed individually. Particular attention is paid to the effect and removal of impurities in each of these four unit operations. (author)

  14. Synthesis, characterization, and properties of peroxo-based oxygen-rich compounds for potential use as greener high energy density materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Nipuni-Dhanesha Horadugoda

    One main aspect of high energy density material (HEDM) design is to obtain greener alternatives for HEDMs that produce toxic byproducts. Primary explosives lead azide, lead styphnate, and mercury fulminate contain heavy metals that cause heavy metal poisoning. Leaching of the widely used tertiary explosive NH4ClO4 into groundwater has resulted in human exposure to ClO4-- ions, which cause disruptions of thyroid related metabolic pathways and even thyroid cancer. Many research efforts to find replacements have gained little success. Thus, there is a need for greener HEDMs. Peroxo-based oxygen-rich compounds are proposed as a potential new class of greener HEDMs due to the evolution of CO2 and/or CO, H2O, and O 2 as the main decomposition products. Currently, triacetone triperoxide (TATP), diacetone diperoxide (DADP), hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), and methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) are the only well-studied highly energetic peroxides. However, due to their high impact and friction sensitivities, low thermal stabilities, and low detonation velocities they have not found any civil or military HEDM applications. In this dissertation research, we have synthesized and fully characterized four categories of peroxo-based compounds: tert-butyl peroxides, tert-butyl peroxy esters, hydroperoxides, and peroxy acids to perform a systematic study of their sensitivities and the energetic properties for potential use as greener HEDMs. tert-Butyl peroxides were not sensitive to impact, friction, or electrostatic spark. Hence, tert-butyl peroxides can be described as fairly safe peroxo-based compounds to handle. tert-Butyl peroxy esters were all surprisingly energetic (4896--6003 m/s), despite the low oxygen and nitrogen contents. Aromatic tert -butyl peroxy esters were much lower in impact and friction sensitivities with respect to the known peroxo-based explosives. These are among the first low sensitivity peroxo-based compounds that can be categorized as secondary

  15. Determination of U and Impurities Elements in The Uranium Tetra Fluoride by Potentiometric and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometric Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putro Kasino, P

    1998-01-01

    The determination of u and impurities contents in the Uranium tetra fluoride (UF 4 )has been carried out by potentiometric titration using modified 'Davies-Gray' and atomic absorption spectrophotometric methods. Dissolution process of the powder sample using saturated Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 solution introduced to determine UF 4 compound content in the UF 4 sample. The uranium Content in the obtained filtrate is analyzed by potentiometric. The impurities content is determined by ato-Mic absorption spectrophotometric using ammonium oxalate powder in introducing of the sample preparation. The experiment covered the observation on influence of stirring time of UF 4 sample dissolution in respect to separate UF 4 from its impurities in determination of uranium content. Also the effects of Ammonium Oxalate added and agitating time were observed deal with the sample preparation for the determination of Impurities content.The analysis result found that UF 4 content was 96.15 ± 0.04% the relative station 0.7%. However the best impurities determination was achieved by addition of ammonium oxalate powder and 15 Minutes of agitation time at temperature of 800 0 C

  16. Minute Impurities Contribute Significantly to Olfactory Receptor Ligand Studies: Tales from Testing the Vibration Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, M; Münch, D; Haase, A; Skoulakis, E; Turin, L; Galizia, C G

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have attempted to test the vibrational hypothesis of odorant receptor activation in behavioral and physiological studies using deuterated compounds as odorants. The results have been mixed. Here, we attempted to test how deuterated compounds activate odorant receptors using calcium imaging of the fruit fly antennal lobe. We found specific activation of one area of the antennal lobe corresponding to inputs from a specific receptor. However, upon more detailed analysis, we discovered that an impurity of 0.0006% ethyl acetate in a chemical sample of benzaldehyde-d 5 was entirely responsible for a sizable odorant-evoked response in Drosophila melanogaster olfactory receptor cells expressing dOr42b. Without gas chromatographic purification within the experimental setup, this impurity would have created a difference in the responses of deuterated and nondeuterated benzaldehyde, suggesting that dOr42b be a vibration sensitive receptor, which we show here not to be the case. Our results point to a broad problem in the literature on use of non-GC-pure compounds to test receptor selectivity, and we suggest how the limitations can be overcome in future studies.

  17. Neo-classical impurity transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, T.E.

    The neo-classical theory for impurity transport in a toroidal plasma is outlined, and the results discussed. A general account is given of the impurity behaviour and its dependence on collisionality. The underlying physics is described with special attention to the role of the poloidal rotation

  18. Measuring and controlling method for organic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Motohiro; Igarashi, Hiroo

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns measurement and control for organic impurities contained in ultrapurified water for use in a nuclear power plant. A specimen containing organic impurities leached out of anionic exchange resins and cationic exchange resins is introduced to an organic material decomposing section to decompose organic impurities into organic carbon and other decomposed products. Sulfate ions, nitrate ions, nitrite ions and carbon dioxide are produced by the decomposition of the organic impurities. As a next step, carbon dioxide in the decomposed products is separated by deaerating with a nitrogen gas or an argon gas and then a TOC concentration is measured by a non-dispersion-type infrared spectrometer. Further, a specimen from which carbon dioxide was separated is introduced to a column filled with ion exchange resins and, after concentrating inorganic ion impurities, the inorganic ion impurities are identified by using a measuring theory of an ion chromatographic method of eluting and separating inorganic ion impurities and detecting them based on the change of electroconductivity depending on the kinds of the inorganic ion impurities. Organic impurities can be measured and controlled, to improve the reliability of water quality control. (N.H.)

  19. Dynamical impurity problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class

  20. Dynamical impurity problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kivelson, S.A. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    In the past few years there has been a resurgence of interest in dynamical impurity problems, as a result of developments in the theory of correlated electron systems. The general dynamical impurity problem is a set of conduction electrons interacting with an impurity which has internal degrees of freedom. The simplest and earliest example, the Kondo problem, has attracted interest since the mid-sixties not only because of its physical importance but also as an example of a model displaying logarithmic divergences order by order in perturbation theory. It provided one of the earliest applications of the renormalization group method, which is designed to deal with just such a situation. As we shall see, the antiferromagnetic Kondo model is controlled by a strong-coupling fixed point, and the essence of the renormalization group solution is to carry out the global renormalization numerically starting from the original (weak-coupling) Hamiltonian. In these lectures, we shall describe an alternative route in which we identify an exactly solvable model which renormalizes to the same fixed point as the original dynamical impurity problem. This approach is akin to determining the critical behavior at a second order phase transition point by solving any model in a given universality class.

  1. Study of apical oxygen atoms in a spin-ladder cuprate compound by X-ray absorption spectroscopy near the Cu K edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatterer, C.J.; Eustache, B.; Collin, L.; Beuran, C.F.; Partiot, C.; Germain, P.; Xu, X.Z.; Lagues, M. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs; Michalowicz, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France)]|[LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France); Moscovici, J. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Desordonnes, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 avenue du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Deville Cavellin, C. [CNRS, Paris (France). Surfaces et Supraconducteurs]|[Laboratoire d`Electronique, Universite Paris XII Val-de-Marne, 61 av. du general de Gaulle, 94010, Creteil Cedex (France); Traverse, A. [LURE, Universite Paris Sud, 91405, Orsay Cedex (France)

    1997-04-01

    The structure of high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate compounds is based on CuO{sub 2} planes alternating with blocks that behave as charge reservoirs. The apical oxygen atoms which belong to these reservoirs are suspected to play a role in the mechanism of superconductivity. It thus seems necessary to measure the amount of apical oxygen atoms in various compounds, as a function of the superconducting properties. Polarisation dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements were performed near the Cu K-edge on three types of phases. We collected information about the neighbourhood of the copper atom in the cuprate planes and in the direction perpendicular to these planes. Two of these phases have well known structures: Bi2212 in which copper atoms are on a pyramidal site and infinite layer phase, a square planar cuprate without apical oxygen. We used the obtained results as reference data to study a new copper-rich phase related to the spin-ladder series. (orig.)

  2. Strain effects on point defects and chain-oxygen order-disorder transition in 123 cuprate compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Haibin; Welch, David O.; Wong-Ng, Winnie

    2004-01-01

    The energetics of Schottky defects in 123 cuprate superconductor series RBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (where R=lanthandies) and YA 2 Cu 3 O 7 (A=alkali earths), were found to have unusual relations if one considers only the volumetric strain. Our calculations reveal the effect of nonuniform changes of interatomic distances within the R-123 structures, introduced by doping homovalent elements, on the Schottky defect formation energy. The energy of formation of Frenkel pair defects, which is an elementary disordering event, in 123 compounds can be substantially altered under both stress and chemical doping. Scaling the oxygen-oxygen short-range repulsive parameter using the calculated formation energy of Frenkel pair defects, the transition temperature between orthorhombic and tetragonal phases is computed by quasichemical approximations (QCA's). The theoretical results illustrate the same trend as the experimental measurements in that the larger the ionic radius of R, the lower the orthorhombic/tetragonal phase transition temperature. This study provides strong evidence of the strain effects on order-disorder transition due to oxygens in the CuO chain sites

  3. Anelastic relaxation peaks in single crystals of zirconium-oxygen alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Sprungmann, K.W.; Atrens, A.; Rosinger, H.E.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1977-01-01

    Relaxations of the compliances S 11 -S 12 and S 44 have been observed in single crystals of zirconium-oxygen alloys tested in flexure and in torsion respectively. The relaxations are attributed to the stress-induced reorientation of substitutional impurity atoms (s) paired with interstitial oxygen atoms (i). The results demonstrate that the jump of the interstitial parallel to the basal plane dominates in the reorientation of the s-i pair

  4. Identification and characterization of potential impurities of donepezil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Reddy, K V S R; Moses Babu, J; Kumar, P Anil; Chandrashekar, E R R; Mathad, Vijayavitthal T; Eswaraiah, S; Reddy, M Satyanarayana; Vyas, K

    2004-09-03

    Five unknown impurities ranging from 0.05 to 0.2% in donepezil were detected by a simple isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These impurities were isolated from crude sample of donepezil using isocratic reversed-phase preparative high performance liquid chromatography. Based on the spectral data (IR, NMR and MS), the structures of these impurities were characterised as 5,6-dimethoxy-2-(4-pyridylmethyl)-1-indanone (impurity I), 4-(5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-2-indenylmethyl) piperidine (impurity II), 2-(1-benzyl-4-piperdylmethyl)-5,6-dimethoxy-1-indanol (impurity III) 1-benzyl-4(5,6-dimethoxy-2,3-dihydro-1H-2-indenylmethyl) piperidine (impurity IV) and 1,1-dibenzyl-4(5,6-dimethoxy-1-oxo-2,3-dihydro-2H-2-indenylmethyl)hexahydropyridinium bromide (impurity V). The synthesis of these impurities and their formation was discussed.

  5. Magnetic hyperfine field at a Cd impurity diluted in RCo{sub 2} at finite temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, A.L. de, E-mail: alexandre.oliveira@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Nilópolis – RJ (Brazil); Chaves, C.M., E-mail: cmch@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, N.A. de [Instituto de Física Armando Dias Tavares, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Troper, A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-06-15

    The local magnetic moments and the magnetic hyperfine fields at an s–p Cd impurity diluted in inter-metallic Laves phase compounds RCo{sub 2} (R=Gd, Tb) at finite temperatures are calculated. For other rare earth elements (light or heavy) the pure compounds display a magnetic first order transition and are not describable by our formalism. The host has two coupled lattices (R and Co) both having itinerant d electrons but only the rare earth lattice has localized f electrons. They all contribute to the magnetization of the host and also to the local moment and to the magnetic hyperfine field at the impurity. The investigation of magnetic hyperfine field in these materials then provides valuable information on the d-itinerant electrons and also on the localized (4f) magnetic moments. For the d–d electronic interaction we use the Hubbard–Stratonovich identity thus allowing the employment of functional integral in the static saddle point approximation. Our model reproduces quite well the experimental data. - Highlights: • A functional integral method in the static limit, producing site disorder, is used. • The site disorder is treated with the coherent potential approximation (CPA) • A Friedel sum rule gives a self-consistency condition for the impurity energy. • The experimental curve of hyperfine fields×temperature is very well reproduced.

  6. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  7. Chemical modifications and stability of phosphorene with impurities: a first principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalov, D W; Rudenko, A N; Prishchenko, D A; Mazurenko, V G; Katsnelson, M I

    2015-06-21

    We perform a systematic first-principles study of phosphorene in the presence of typical monovalent (hydrogen and fluorine) and divalent (oxygen) impurities. The results of our modeling suggest a decomposition of phosphorene into weakly bonded one-dimensional (1D) chains upon single- and double-side hydrogenation and fluorination. In spite of a sizable quasiparticle band gap (2.29 eV), fully hydrogenated phosphorene was found to be dynamically unstable. In contrast, complete fluorination of phosphorene gives rise to a stable structure, which is an indirect gap semiconductor with a band gap of 2.27 eV. We also show that fluorination of phosphorene from the gas phase is significantly more likely than hydrogenation due to the relatively low energy barrier for the dissociative adsorption of F2 (0.19 eV) compared to H2 (2.54 eV). At low concentrations, monovalent impurities tend to form regular atomic rows of phosphorene, though such patterns do not seem to be easily achievable due to high migration barriers (1.09 and 2.81 eV for H2 and F2, respectively). Oxidation of phosphorene is shown to be a qualitatively different process. Particularly, we observe instability of phosphorene upon oxidation, leading to the formation of disordered amorphous-like structures at high concentrations of impurities.

  8. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  9. Construction and test of a box system for operations with air-sensitive and radioactive compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenstler, K.; Betzl, K.; Grosser, H.J.; Furkert, W.; Novotny, D.

    1985-06-01

    A system of mechanical components has been develoed, which can be used to design inert atmosphere boxes as well as radioactive boxes. The advantage in comparison with known designs consists in the modular construction principle which permits variable dimensions. Standard parts (flanges, bushings, air locks and so on) possess a uniform size. The system for the maintenance of a high-purity atmosphere in the box has been improved, decreasing the level of oxygen and water vapour below 10 vpm. The low impurity level in the inert atmosphere is attained by means of continuous circulation of the gases through a purification system. The usefulness of the boxes for handling air-sensitive and radioactive compounds has been tested over a period of some years. (author)

  10. Impurity Induced Phase Competition and Supersolidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Madhuparna; Ganesh, R.

    2017-12-01

    Several material families show competition between superconductivity and other orders. When such competition is driven by doping, it invariably involves spatial inhomogeneities which can seed competing orders. We study impurity-induced charge order in the attractive Hubbard model, a prototypical model for competition between superconductivity and charge density wave order. We show that a single impurity induces a charge-ordered texture over a length scale set by the energy cost of the competing phase. Our results are consistent with a strong-coupling field theory proposed earlier in which superconducting and charge order parameters form components of an SO(3) vector field. To discuss the effects of multiple impurities, we focus on two cases: correlated and random distributions. In the correlated case, the CDW puddles around each impurity overlap coherently leading to a "supersolid" phase with coexisting pairing and charge order. In contrast, a random distribution of impurities does not lead to coherent CDW formation. We argue that the energy lowering from coherent ordering can have a feedback effect, driving correlations between impurities. This can be understood as arising from an RKKY-like interaction, mediated by impurity textures. We discuss implications for charge order in the cuprates and doped CDW materials such as NbSe2.

  11. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickenheim, B. R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bibler, N. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hay, M. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-08

    This document has been revised due to recent information that the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments contains both formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in earlier revisions. Additional data concerning the properties of glycolic acid have also been added to this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in Technical Grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.033 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H2 and cause an adverse effect in the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process. It has been cited that glycolic acid

  12. On impurities transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozhanskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    Transport of impurity ions is analitically analized in the case when main plasma is in plateau or banana regimes but impurity ions - in the Pfirsch-Schlutter mode. It is shown that in the large region of parameters the impUrity transport represents a drift in a p oloidal electric field, averaged from magnetic surface with provision for disturbance of concentration on it. Therefore, transport velocity does not depend on Z value and impurity type, as well as collision frequency both in the plateau and banana regimes. A value of flows is determined by the value of poloidal rotation velocity. At the rotation velocity corresponding to the electric field directed from the centre to periphery impurities are thrown out of a discharge, in the reverse case the flow is directed inside. Refusal from the assumption that Zsub(eff) > approximately 2, does not considerably change the results of work. The approach developed in the process of work can be applied to the case when impurity ions are in the plateau or banana modes

  13. Peroxide organometallic compounds and their transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Brilkina, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given experimental works on synthesis and reactions of peroxide organometallic compounds. Reactions have been considered of organometallic compounds with oxygen and organic peroxides which result in formation of both peroxide and non-peroxide products. Possible routes and mechanisms of chemical transformations of peroxide organometallic compounds have been discussed. Reactions of organometallic compounds with oxygen and peroxides have been considered

  14. Quantum phase transitions in multi-impurity and lattice Kondo systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejati, Ammar

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to provide a detailed development of a self-consistent perturbative renormalization group (RG) method to investigate the quantum phases and quantum phase transitions of multi-impurity Kondo systems (e.g., two impurities or a lattice of impurities). The essence of the RG method is an extension of the standard ''poor man's scaling'' by including the dynamical effects of the magnetic fluctuations in the Kondo vertex. Such magnetic fluctuations arise due to the indirect carrier-mediated exchange interaction (RKKY interaction) between the impurities and compete with the Kondo effect to determine the ground-state. The aim is to take the most 'economic' route and avoid intensive numerical computations as far as possible. In general, it is shown in detail how a relatively small amount of such magnetic fluctuations can suppress and ultimately, destroy the Kondo-screened phase in a universal manner, and without incurring a magnetic instability in the system. The renormalization group method and its extensions are further applied to several distinct experimental realization of the multi-impurity Kondo effect; namely, Kondo adatoms studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy, a highly-tunable double-quantum-dot system based on semiconducting heterostructures, and finally, the heavy fermionic compounds as Kondo lattices. We demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative agreement of the RG theory with the experimental findings, which supports the validity of the method. In the case of Kondo lattices, we further include the possibility of a magnetic ordering in the lattice to see whether a magnetic ordering can happen simultaneously with or before the Kondo breakdown (or even prevent it altogether). In the last chapter, we consider the fate of the local moments in the absence of full Kondo screening while Kondo fluctuations are still present. This partially-screened phase needs itself an extensive study

  15. Quantum phase transitions in multi-impurity and lattice Kondo systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nejati, Ammar

    2017-01-16

    The main purpose of this dissertation is to provide a detailed development of a self-consistent perturbative renormalization group (RG) method to investigate the quantum phases and quantum phase transitions of multi-impurity Kondo systems (e.g., two impurities or a lattice of impurities). The essence of the RG method is an extension of the standard ''poor man's scaling'' by including the dynamical effects of the magnetic fluctuations in the Kondo vertex. Such magnetic fluctuations arise due to the indirect carrier-mediated exchange interaction (RKKY interaction) between the impurities and compete with the Kondo effect to determine the ground-state. The aim is to take the most 'economic' route and avoid intensive numerical computations as far as possible. In general, it is shown in detail how a relatively small amount of such magnetic fluctuations can suppress and ultimately, destroy the Kondo-screened phase in a universal manner, and without incurring a magnetic instability in the system. The renormalization group method and its extensions are further applied to several distinct experimental realization of the multi-impurity Kondo effect; namely, Kondo adatoms studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy, a highly-tunable double-quantum-dot system based on semiconducting heterostructures, and finally, the heavy fermionic compounds as Kondo lattices. We demonstrate the qualitative and quantitative agreement of the RG theory with the experimental findings, which supports the validity of the method. In the case of Kondo lattices, we further include the possibility of a magnetic ordering in the lattice to see whether a magnetic ordering can happen simultaneously with or before the Kondo breakdown (or even prevent it altogether). In the last chapter, we consider the fate of the local moments in the absence of full Kondo screening while Kondo fluctuations are still present. This partially-screened phase needs itself an extensive study

  16. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of oxygenated and unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, James E.; Lam, Chun Ho; Saffron, Christopher M.; Miller, Dennis J.

    2018-04-24

    A process and related electrode composition are disclosed for the electrocatalytic hydrogenation and/or hydrodeoxygenation of organic substrates such as biomass-derived bio-oil components by the production of hydrogen atoms on a catalyst surface followed by the reaction of the hydrogen atoms with the organic reactants. Biomass fast pyrolysis-derived bio-oil is a liquid mixture containing hundreds of organic compounds with chemical functionalities that are corrosive to container materials and are prone to polymerization. A high surface area skeletal metal catalyst material such as Raney Nickel can be used as the cathode. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation and/or hydrodeoxygenation convert the organic substrates under mild conditions to reduce coke formation and catalyst deactivation. The process converts oxygen-containing functionalities and unsaturated bonds into chemically reduced forms with an increased hydrogen content. The process is operated at mild conditions, which enables it to be a good means for stabilizing bio-oil to a form that can be stored and transported using metal containers and pipes.

  17. Cobalt and magnesium impurity diffusion in Ni1-δO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussetta, H.; Tabet, N.; Monty, C.

    1992-01-01

    Co and Mg diffusion coefficients have been measured in NiO as a function of temperature at constant oxygen partial pressures p O2 =0.21 atm and 10 -4 atm and as a function of psub(O 2 ) at T=1 245degC. The results are well represented by the relations: D Mg (cm 2 s -1 )≅1.45x10 -2 p O2 (atm) 0.172 exp[-2.58 (eV)/kt]; D Co (cm 2 s -1 )≅5.15x10 -2 p O2 (atm) 0.175 exp[-2.54 (eV)/kT]. Analyzing these results by comparison to nickel self-diffusion and to data on vacancy/impurity binding enthalpies, on correlation factors and on migration enthalpies, leads to a detailed analysis of the impurity/vancancy interactions. It shows that cobalt and magnesium interact rather tightly with V Ni '' during the exchange jumps and practically no when they are in stable positions. (orig.)

  18. Investigations of impurity control in JET using fuelling, and interpretation of experiments using the LIM impurity code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondhalekar, A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Inhibition of contamination of the plasma core in JET by edge impurities during high power heating of deuterium plasmas in limiter configuration using fuelling is demonstrated. By injecting deuterium gas during heating, in the presence of a much larger recycling deuterium flux, a reduction of more than a factor of 2 was effected in n z (0)/Φ z , the ratio of central impurity density to impurity influx at the plasma edge. The reduction in n z (0) was obtained without much effect on peak electron temperature and density. Reduction of plasma contamination by gas fuelling was observed also when hot spots formed on the limiter, a condition that without simultaneous gas fuelling culminated in runaway plasma contamination. Detailed analysis of the experiments is undertaken with the purpose of identifying the processes by which plasma contamination was inhibited, employing standard limiter plasma contamination modelling. Processes which might produce the observed impurity inhibiting effects of gas injection include: (a) reduction in impurity production at the limiter; (b) increase in impurity screening in the scrape-off layer; (c) increase in radial impurity transport at the plasma edge; (d) increase in average deuteron flow velocity to the limiter along the scrape-off layer. These are examined in detail using the Monte Carlo limiter impurity transport code LIM. Bearing in mind that uncertainties exist both in the choice of appropriate modelling assumptions to be used and in the measurement of required edge plasma parameters, changes in n z (0)/Φ z by a factor of 2 are at the limit of the present modelling capability. However, comparison between LIM code simulations and measurements of plasma impurity content indicate that the standard limiter plasma contamination model may not be adequate and that other processes need to be added in order to be able to describe the experiments in JET. (author). 24 refs, 2 figs, 8 tabs

  19. Void growth suppression by dislocation impurity atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weertman, J.; Green, W.V.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed calculation is given of the effect of an impurity atmosphere on void growth under irradiation damage conditions. Norris has proposed that such an atmosphere can suppress void growth. The hydrostatic stress field of a dislocation that is surrounded by an impurity atmosphere was found and used to calculate the change in the effective radius of a dislocation line as a sink for interstitials and vacancies. The calculation of the impurity concentration in a Cottrell cloud takes into account the change in hydrostatic pressure produced by the presence of the cloud itself. It is found that void growth is eliminated whenever dislocations are surrounded by a condensed atmosphere of either oversized substitutional impurity atoms or interstitial impurity atoms. A condensed atmosphere will form whenever the average impurity concentration is larger than a critical concentration

  20. Moessbauer Studies of Implanted Impurities in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were performed on implanted radioactive impurities in semiconductors and metals. Radioactive isotopes (from the ISOLDE facility) decaying to a Moessbauer isotope were utilized to investigate electronic and vibrational properties of impurities and impurity-defect structures. This information is inferred from the measured impurity hyperfine interactions and Debye-Waller factor. In semiconductors isoelectronic, shallow and deep level impurities have been implanted. Complex impurity defects have been produced by the implantation process (correlated damage) or by recoil effects from the nuclear decay in both semiconductors and metals. Annealing mechanisms of the defects have been studied. \\\\ \\\\ In silicon amorphised implanted layers have been recrystallized epitaxially by rapid-thermal-annealing techniques yielding highly supersaturated, electrically-active donor concentrations. Their dissolution and migration mechanisms have been investigated in detail. The electronic configuration of Sb donors...

  1. Isolation, structural determination, synthesis and quantitative determination of impurities in Intron-A, leached from a silicone tubing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tze-Ming; Pramanik, Birendra; Aslanian, Robert; Gullo, Vincent; Patel, Mahesh; Cronin, Bart; Boyce, Chris; McCormick, Kevin; Berlin, Mike; Zhu, Xiaohong; Buevich, Alexei; Heimark, Larry; Bartner, Peter; Chen, Guodong; Pu, Haiyan; Hegde, Vinod

    2009-02-20

    Investigation of unexpected levels of impurities in Intron product has revealed the presence of low levels of impurities leached from the silicone tubing (Rehau RAU-SIK) on the Bosch filling line. In order to investigate the effect of these compounds (1a, 1b and 2) on humans, they were isolated identified and synthesized. They were extracted from the tubing by stirring in Intron placebo at room temperature for 72 h and were enriched on a reverse phase CHP-20P column, eluting with gradient aqueous ACN and were separated by HPLC. Structural elucidation of 1a, 1b and 2 by MS and NMR studies demonstrated them to be halogenated biphenyl carboxylic acids. The structures were confirmed by independent synthesis. Levels of extractable impurities in first filled vials of actual production are estimated to be in the range of 0.01-0.55 microg/vial for each leached impurity. Potential toxicity of these extractables does not represent a risk for patients under the conditions of clinical use.

  2. Determination of Degradation Products of Cyclobenzaprine Hydrochloride, Lidocaine and Piroxicam in a Semi-Topical Formulation: MS-MS Confirmation of Unknown Impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Grigoriu, Ioana Cezara; Cioroiu, Mona Elisabeta; Niculaua, Marius; Lupuleasa, Roxana; Lazar, Mihai Ioan

    2016-07-01

    Association of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, piroxicam and lidocaine in a topical formulation is one of the newest innovations in the pharmaceutical formulary field. In this study, a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed for the establishment of the impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, lidocaine and piroxicam in the semisolid topical formulation. In this study, we not only determined 2,6-dimethylaniline, 2-pyrydilamine but also specified impurities of cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (dibenzosuberenone, amitriptyline, carbinole, cyclobenzaprine N-oxide and anthrachinone). The target compounds were determined using a mobile phase that consisted of a mixture of phosphate buffer (0.025 M; pH 6.2)-acetonitrile-methanol (60 : 13 : 27, v/v/v). A minimum of three supplementary possible degradation products were determined. Using mass spectrometry, the unspecified impurities were identified and the use of correlation matrices permitted the association with the possible source compounds. The chromatographic conditions were qualified and validated according to ICH guideline requirements to confirm specificity, linearity, accuracy and precision. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Investigation of correlations in some chemical impurities and isotope ratios for nuclear forensic purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, M.; Mayer, K.; Nicholl, A.; Horta, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) has worked in the area of nuclear forensic science since 1992 when the first seized sample was analysed. From the beginning the analytical tools for seized materials were adapted from safeguards measurements and from materials science. Especially in the view of the origin determination the spectrum of parameters to be taken into account had to be widened. In addition to the development of a comprehensive database on nuclear materials for power reactor fuels, experimental investigations were started to identify characteristic parameters. These systematic investigations comprised the development of methodologies for age determination of Pu and highly enriched uranium, surface roughness determination of UO 2 pellets and n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) measurements in uranium oxides. However, a more profound understanding on the nature of the characteristic chemical impurities and their propagation throughout the entire process appeared necessary in particular for uranium materials. Therefore a systematic research programme was launched in order to better understand which chemical impurities might be considered as characteristic for the origin of the base material. On the other hand some impurities are introduced intentionally during the processing of the material. These impurities might be characteristic for the process used or for the plant where the material was processed. We carried out impurity measurements on uranium ores, on intermediate products (Ammoniumdiuranate or yellow cake) and on (natural) uranium oxides, hence 'vertically' throughout the process in individual facilities. n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) ratio measurements have been proven to provide useful additional information on the geographic origin of the materials. We therefore investigated the n( 18 O)/n( 16 O) isotope ratios in these different compounds, in order to obtain further experimental evidence for a consistent set of materials reportedly originating from the same

  4. Influence of oxygen impurity atoms on defect clusters and radiation hardening in neutron-irradiated vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, R.; Wechsler, M.S.

    1975-01-01

    Single crystal TEM samples and polycrystalline tensile samples of vanadium containing 60-640 wt ppm oxygen were irradiated at about 100 0 C to about 1.3 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (E greater than 1 MeV) and post-irradiation annealed up to 800 0 C. The defect cluster density increased and the average size decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. Higher oxygen concentrations caused the radiation hardening and radiation-anneal hardening to increase. The observations are consistent with the nucleation of defect clusters by small oxygen or oxygen-point defect complexes and the trapping of oxygen at defect clusters upon post-irradiation annealing

  5. Impurity Correction Techniques Applied to Existing Doping Measurements of Impurities in Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, J. V.; Sun, J. P.; Zhang, J. T.; Deng, X. L.

    2017-01-01

    Impurities represent the most significant source of uncertainty in most metal fixed points used for the realization of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). There are a number of different methods for quantifying the effect of impurities on the freezing temperature of ITS-90 fixed points, many of which rely on an accurate knowledge of the liquidus slope in the limit of low concentration. A key method of determining the liquidus slope is to measure the freezing temperature of a fixed-point material as it is progressively doped with a known amount of impurity. Recently, a series of measurements of the freezing and melting temperature of `slim' Zn fixed-point cells doped with Ag, Fe, Ni, and Pb were presented. Here, additional measurements of the Zn-X system are presented using Ga as a dopant, and the data (Zn-Ag, Zn-Fe, Zn-Ni, Zn-Pb, and Zn-Ga) have been re-analyzed to demonstrate the use of a fitting method based on Scheil solidification which is applied to both melting and freezing curves. In addition, the utility of the Sum of Individual Estimates method is explored with these systems in the context of a recently enhanced database of liquidus slopes of impurities in Zn in the limit of low concentration.

  6. Determination of Cyclam as Impurity in 99mTc-CTMP Using Radio electrophoresis Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isti Daruwati; Misyetti; Maula Eka Sriyani; Teguh Hafiz AW

    2009-01-01

    Labelled compound of CTMP that are used for bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals must have to fulfill the standard requirements, such as have high radiochemical purity. CTMP compounds was in house synthesized from cyclam and formaldehyde in an acidic condition (conc. HCl) using Mannich methods. Impurities in CTMP product are the residue of cyclam, phosphoric acid, formaldehyde and hydrochloric acid. Formaldehyde and hydrochloride acid in the aqueous form is easily removed through the rinse process in the synthesis, while cyclam in the solid phase could be mix with CTMP. Therefore the impurities of cyclam in 99m Tc-CTMP must be determined. With nuclear technique, the determination of cyclam could be assessed simultaneously with labelled of CTMP with technetium-99m. Separation of 99m Tc-CTMP and 99m Tc-cyclam in solution was conducted with radio-electrophoresis method simultaneously. The radiochemical purity for both radiolabelled compound was determined by paper chromatography. The purity of radiolabelled 99m Tc-CTMP from cyclam was determined using electrophoresis method. The result show that the amount of cyclam in CTMP can be determined simultaneously using nuclear techniques with the labeling of 99m Tc-CTMP. Electrophoresis method can separated 99m Tc-cyclam, 99m Tc-CTMP, 99m TcO4 and 99m Tc-reduced with limit quantitation of cyclam until 0,4% w/w. (author)

  7. Impurity energy level in the Haldane gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Lu Yu

    1995-11-01

    An impurity bond J' in a periodic 1D antiferromagnetic spin 1 chain with exchange J is considered. Using the numerical density matrix renormalization group method, we find an impurity energy level in the Haldane gap, corresponding to a bound state near the impurity bond. When J' J. The impurity level appears only when the deviation dev = (J'- J)/J' is greater than B c , which is close to 0.3 in our calculation. (author). 15 refs, 4 figs

  8. Multi-impurity polarons in a dilute Bose-Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D H; Timmermans, Eddy

    2011-01-01

    We describe the ground state of a large, dilute, neutral atom Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) doped with N strongly coupled mutually indistinguishable, bosonic neutral atoms (referred to as ‘impurity’) in the polaron regime where the BEC density response to the impurity atoms remains significantly smaller than the average density of the surrounding BEC. We find that N impurity atoms with N ≠ 1 can self-localize at a lower value of the impurity-boson interaction strength than a single impurity atom. When the ‘bare’ short-range impurity-impurity repulsion does not play a significant role, the self-localization of multiple bosonic impurity atoms into the same single particle orbital (which we call co-self-localization) is the nucleation process of the phase separation transition. When the short-range impurity-impurity repulsion successfully competes with co-self-localization, the system may form a stable liquid of self-localized single impurity polarons. (paper)

  9. Collision of impurities with Bose–Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingua, F.; Lepori, L.; Minardi, F.; Penna, V.; Salasnich, L.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum dynamics of impurities in a bath of bosons is a long-standing problem in solid-state, plasma, and atomic physics. Recent experimental and theoretical investigations with ultracold atoms have focused on this problem, studying atomic impurities immersed in an atomic Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) and for various relative coupling strengths tuned by the Fano‑Feshbach resonance technique. Here, we report extensive numerical simulations on a closely related problem: the collision between a bosonic impurity consisting of a few 41K atoms and a BEC of 87Rb atoms in a quasi one-dimensional configuration and under a weak harmonic axial confinement. For small values of the inter-species interaction strength (regardless of its sign), we find that the impurity, which starts from outside the BEC, simply causes the BEC cloud to oscillate back and forth, but the frequency of oscillation depends on the interaction strength. For intermediate couplings, after a few cycles of oscillation the impurity is captured by the BEC, and strongly changes its amplitude of oscillation. In the strong interaction regime, if the inter-species interaction is attractive, a local maximum (bright soliton) in the BEC density occurs where the impurity is trapped; if, instead, the inter-species interaction is repulsive, the impurity is not able to enter the BEC cloud and the reflection coefficient is close to one. However, if the initial displacement of the impurity is increased, the impurity is able to penetrate the cloud, leading to the appearance of a moving hole (dark soliton) in the BEC.

  10. Characterization of molecular and elemental impurities in tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streusand, B.J.; Yost, V.E.; Govorchin, S.W.; Fry, R.C.; Padula, F.J.; Hughes, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of WF 6 is a very difficult process because of the reactivity of the compound, the low detection limits required by its use in semiconductor processing, and by the presence of large amounts of tungsten in the analyte. It is not possible to perform elemental analysis with low detection limits directly on WF 6 or on hydrolyzed WF 6 . However, it is possible to remove the interfering tungsten by physical and chemical separation techniques. This paper discusses how the analysis of molecular impurities in WF 6 may be accomplished directly in the gas phase by infrared spectroscopy and by gas chromatography

  11. Determination of impurities in zirconium by emission spectrograph method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simbolon, S.; Masduki, B.; Aryadi

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of B, Cd, Si and Cr elements in zirconium oxide was carried out. Zirconium oxide was made by precipitating zirconium solution with oxalic acid and calcination was at temperature 900 oC for four hours. Silver chloride compound as much as 10% was used as a distillation carrier and 7 step filtration was used to reduce the impurities element spectra having high density. It was found that B concentration is between 3.80 and 7.44 ppm, Cd less then 0.5 ppm, Si between 74.38-150.33 ppm and Cr between 19.90-45.76 ppm. (author)

  12. Determination of Impurities of Atrazine by HPLP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canping, Pan [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University Beijing (China)

    2009-07-15

    The determination of the main impurities of the herbicide atrazine by GC/FID, GC/MS and LC/MS is described. The most relevant technical impurities were synthesized and characterized by IR and UV spectroscopy as well. The impurity profiles of different technical grade formulated products were tested and the typical impurities identified. (author)

  13. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  14. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena; Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M.; Mombrú, Alvaro W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism

  15. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  16. Impurity bound states in mesoscopic topological superconducting loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yan-Yan; Zha, Guo-Qiao; Zhou, Shi-Ping

    2018-06-01

    We study numerically the effect induced by magnetic impurities in topological s-wave superconducting loops with spin-orbit interaction based on spin-generalized Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. In the case of a single magnetic impurity, it is found that the midgap bound states can cross the Fermi level at an appropriate impurity strength and the circulating spin current jumps at the crossing point. The evolution of the zero-energy mode can be effectively tuned by the located site of a single magnetic impurity. For the effect of many magnetic impurities, two independent midway or edge impurities cannot lead to the overlap of zero modes. The multiple zero-energy modes can be effectively realized by embedding a single Josephson junction with impurity scattering into the system, and the spin current displays oscillatory feature with increasing the layer thickness.

  17. Hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.F.

    2007-01-01

    The ground state binding energy and the average interparticle distances for a hydrogenic impurity in double quantum dots with Gaussian confinement potential are studied by the variational method. The probability density of the electron is calculated, too. The dependence of the binding energy on the impurity position is investigated for GaAs quantum dots. The result shows that the binding energy has a minimum as a function of the distance between the two quantum dots when the impurity is located at the center of one quantum dot or at the center of the edge of one quantum dot. When the impurity is located at the center of the two dots, the binding energy decreases monotonically

  18. Models for impurity effects in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, J.T.

    1980-03-01

    Models for impurity effects in tokamaks are described with an emphasis on the relationship between attainment of high β and impurity problems. We briefly describe the status of attempts to employ neutral beam heating to achieve high β in tokamaks and propose a qualitative model for the mechanism by which heavy metal impurities may be produced in the startup phase of the discharge. We then describe paradoxes in impurity diffusion theory and discuss possible resolutions in terms of the effects of large-scale islands and sawtooth oscillations. Finally, we examine the prospects for the Zakharov-Shafranov catastrophe (long time scale disintegration of FCT equilibria) in the context of present and near-term experimental capability

  19. Role of metal ion impurities in generation of oxygen gas within anodic alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, K. [Keio Univ., Yokohama (Japan). Chemical Lab.; Habazaki, H. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering; Skeldon, P.; Thompson, G.E.; Wood, G.C. [University of Manchester Inst. of Science and Technology (United Kingdom). Corrosion and Protection Centre

    2002-07-01

    The generation of oxygen gas within an amorphous anodic alumina film is reported. The film was formed by anodizing aluminum, which was first electropolished and then chemically polished in CrO{sub 3}-H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} solution, in sodium tungstate electrolyte. The procedure results in incorporation of mobile Cr{sup 3+} species, from the chemical polishing film, and mobile W{sup 6+} species, from the electrolyte, into the amorphous structure. The tungsten species are present in the outer 27% of the film thickness, while Cr{sup 6+} species occupy a thin layer within the tungsten-containing region. Above the Cr{sup 3+} containing layer, a band develops that contains oxygen bubbles of a few nanometres size. The oxygen is generated by oxidation of O{sup 2-} ions of the alumina. A mechanism of oxygen generation within the alumina is proposed based on the electronic band structure of the oxide, modified by the Cr{sup 3+} and W{sup 6+} species, and on the ionic transport processes during oxide growth. (author)

  20. Defect engineering: reduction effect of hydrogen atom impurities in HfO2-based resistive-switching memory devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seonghyun; Park, Jubong; Jung, Seungjae; Lee, Wootae; Shin, Jungho; Hwang, Hyunsang; Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Choi, Godeuni

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we propose a new and effective methodology for improving the resistive-switching performance of memory devices by high-pressure hydrogen annealing under ambient conditions. The reduction effect results in the uniform creation of oxygen vacancies that in turn enable forming-free operation and afford uniform switching characteristics. In addition, H + and mobile hydroxyl (OH − ) ions are generated, and these induce fast switching operation due to the higher mobility compared to oxygen ions. Defect engineering, specifically, the introduction of hydrogen atom impurities, improves the device performance for metal–oxide-based resistive-switching random access memory devices. (paper)

  1. Device for removing impurities from liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naito, Kesahiro; Yokota, Norikatsu; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ishida, Tomio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To attain highly reliable and efficient impurity removal by forming temperature distribution the impurity removing device thereby providing the function of corrosion product trap, nuclear fission product trap and cold trap under the conditions suitable to the impurity removing materials. Constitution: The impurity removing device comprises a container containing impurity removing fillers. The fillers comprise material for removing corrosion products, material for removing nuclear fission products and material for removing depositions from liquid sodium. The positions for the respective materials are determined such that the materials are placed under the temperature conditions easy to attain their function depending on the temperature distribution formed in the removing device, whereby appropriate temperature condition is set to each of the materials. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. Separation and recovery of Cm from Cm-Pu mixed oxide samples containing Am impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirokazu Hayashi; Hiromichi Hagiya; Mitsuo Akabori; Yasuji Morita; Kazuo Minato

    2013-01-01

    Curium was separated and recovered as an oxalate from a Cm-Pu mixed oxide which had been a 244 Cm oxide sample prepared more than 40 years ago and the ratio of 244 Cm to 240 Pu was estimated to 0.2:0.8. Radiochemical analyses of the solution prepared by dissolving the Cm-Pu mixed oxide in nitric acid revealed that the oxide contained about 1 at% of 243 Am impurity. To obtain high purity curium solution, plutonium and americium were removed from the solution by an anion exchange method and by chromatographic separation using tertiary pyridine resin embedded in silica beads with nitric acid/methanol mixed solution, respectively. Curium oxalate, a precursor compound of curium oxide, was prepared from the purified curium solution. 11.9 mg of Cm oxalate having some amounts of impurities, which are 243 Am (5.4 at%) and 240 Pu (0.3 at%) was obtained without Am removal procedure. Meanwhile, 12.0 mg of Cm oxalate (99.8 at% over actinides) was obtained with the procedure including Am removals. Both of the obtained Cm oxalate sample were supplied for the syntheses and measurements of the thermochemical properties of curium compounds. (author)

  3. Impurities in semiconductors: total energy and infrared absorption calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yndurain, F.

    1987-01-01

    A new method to calculate the electronic structure of infinite nonperiodic system is discussed. The calculations are performed using atomic pseudopotentials and a basis of atomic Gaussiam wave functions. The Hartree-Fock self consistent equations are solved in the cluster-Bethe lattice system. Electron correlation is partially included in second order pertubation approximation. The formalism is applied to hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Total energy calculations of finite clusters of silicon atom in the presence of impurities, are also presented. The results show how atomic oxygen breaks the covalent silicon silicon bond forming a local configuration similar to that of SiO 2 . Calculations of the infrared absorption due to the presence of atomic oxygen in cristalline silicon are presented. The Born Hamiltonian to calculate the vibrational modes of the system and a simplied model to describe the infrared absorption mechanism are used. The interstitial and the the substitutional cases are considered and analysed. The position of the main infrared absorption peak, their intensities and their isotope shifts are calculated. The results are satisfactory agreement with the available data. (author) [pt

  4. Solid-state characterization and impurities determination of fluconazol generic products marketed in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourichi, Houda; Brik, Youness; Hubert, Philipe; Cherrah, Yahia; Bouklouze, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of quality control based in physicochemical characterization and impurities determination of three samples of fluconazole drug substances marketed in Morocco. These samples were supplied by different pharmaceuticals companies. The sample A, as the discovered product, was supplied by Pfizer, while samples B and C (generics), were manufactured by two different Indian industries. Solid-state characterization of the three samples was realized with different physicochemical methods as: X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier-transformation infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry. High performance liquid chromatography was used to quantify the impurities in the different samples. The results from the physicochemical methods cited above, showed difference in polymorph structure of the three drug substances. Sample A consisted in pure polymorph III, sample B consisted in pure polymorph II, sample C consisted in a mixture of fluconazole Form III, form II and the monohydrate. This result was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry. Also it was demonstrated that solvents used during the re-crystallization step were among the origins of these differences in the structure form. On the other hand, the result of the stability study under humidity and temperature showed that fluconazole polymorphic transformation could be owed to the no compliance with the conditions of storage. The HPLC analysis of these compounds showed the presence of specific impurities for each polymorphic form, and a possible relationship could be exist between impurities and crystalline form of fluconazole. PMID:29403776

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE: Oxygen diffusion and precipitation in Czochralski silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, R. C.

    2000-06-01

    The objective of this article is to review our understanding of the properties of oxygen impurities in Czochralski silicon that is used to manufacture integrated circuits (ICs). These atoms, present at a concentration of ~1018 cm-3, occupy bond-centred sites (Oi) in as-grown Si and the jump rate between adjacent sites defines `normal' diffusion for the temperature range 1325 - 330 °C. Anneals at high temperatures lead to the formation of amorphous SiO2 precipitates that act as traps for fast diffusing metallic contaminants, such as Fe and Cu, that may be inadvertently introduced at levels as low as 1011 cm-3. Without this `gettering', there may be severe degradation of fabricated ICs. To accommodate the local volume increase during oxygen precipitation, there is parallel generation of self-interstitials that diffuse away and form lattice defects. High temperature (T > 700 °C) anneals are now well understood. Details of lower temperature processes are still a matter of debate: measurements of oxygen diffusion into or out of the Si surface and Oi atom aggregation have implied enhanced diffusion that has variously been attributed to interactions of Oi atoms with lattice vacancies, self-interstitials, metallic elements, carbon, hydrogen impurities etc. There is strong evidence for oxygen-hydrogen interactions at T continue to decrease as the size of future device features decreases below the lower end of the sub-micron range, currently close to 0.18 µm.

  6. Magnetic states of single impurity in disordered environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Ponedilok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged and magnetic states of isolated impurities dissolved in amorphous metallic alloy are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the system under study is the generalization of Anderson impurity model. Namely, the processes of elastic and non-elastic scattering of conductive electrons on the ions of a metal and on a charged impurity are included. The configuration averaged one-particle Green's functions are obtained within Hartree-Fock approximation. A system of self-consistent equations is given for calculation of an electronic spectrum, the charged and the spin-polarized impurity states. Qualitative analysis of the effect of the metallic host structural disorder on the observed values is performed. Additional shift and broadening of virtual impurity level is caused by a structural disorder of impurity environment.

  7. Measurement of impurity emission profiles in CHS Plasma using AXUV photodiode arrays and VUV bandpass filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, C.; Peterson, B.J.; Ida, K.

    2004-01-01

    We have designed a compact and low-cost diagnostic system for spatiotemporal distributions of specific vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission lines from impurities in Compact Helical System (CHS) plasmas. The system consists of 20 channel absolute extreme ultraviolet photodiode arrays combined with interchangeable thin foil filters which have passbands in the VUV region. A compact mounting module which contains all the components including an in-vacuum preamplifier for immediate current-voltage conversion has been designed and successfully fabricated. A preliminary measurement with a single module using an aluminum foil filter has been carried out for monitoring the behavior of oxygen impurity in CHS, and initial results have been obtained. Two identical modules equipped with Versa Module European bus-based analog-digital converters will be available for future tomographic measurements

  8. Mobile impurities in ferromagnetic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantian, Adrian; Schollwoeck, Ulrich; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Recent work has shown that mobile impurities in one dimensional interacting systems may exhibit behaviour that differs strongly from that predicted by standard Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory, with the appearance of power-law divergences in the spectral function signifying sublinear diffusion of the impurity. Using time-dependent matrix product states, we investigate a range of cases of mobile impurities in systems beyond the analytically accessible examples to assess the existence of a new universality class of low-energy physics in one-dimensional systems. Correspondence: Adrian.Kantian@unige.ch This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  9. Impurity effects on ionic-liquid-based supercapacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Kun; Lian, Cheng; Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small amounts of an impurity may affect the key properties of an ionic liquid and such effects can be dramatically amplified when the electrolyte is under confinement. Here the classical density functional theory is employed to investigate the impurity effects on the microscopic structure and the performance of ionic-liquid-based electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors. Using a primitive model for ionic species, we study the effects of an impurity on the double layer structure and the integral capacitance of a room temperature ionic liquid in model electrode pores and find that an impurity strongly binding to the surface of a porous electrode can significantly alter the electric double layer structure and dampen the oscillatory dependence of the capacitance with the pore size of the electrode. Meanwhile, a strong affinity of the impurity with the ionic species affects the dependence of the integral capacitance on the pore size. Up to 30% increase in the integral capacitance can be achieved even at a very low impurity bulk concentration. As a result, by comparing with an ionic liquid mixture containing modified ionic species, we find that the cooperative effect of the bounded impurities is mainly responsible for the significant enhancement of the supercapacitor performance.

  10. Impurity effects on ionic-liquid-based supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Lian, Cheng; Henderson, Douglas; Wu, Jianzhong

    2017-02-01

    Small amounts of an impurity may affect the key properties of an ionic liquid and such effects can be dramatically amplified when the electrolyte is under confinement. Here the classical density functional theory is employed to investigate the impurity effects on the microscopic structure and the performance of ionic-liquid-based electrical double-layer capacitors, also known as supercapacitors. Using a primitive model for ionic species, we study the effects of an impurity on the double layer structure and the integral capacitance of a room temperature ionic liquid in model electrode pores and find that an impurity strongly binding to the surface of a porous electrode can significantly alter the electric double layer structure and dampen the oscillatory dependence of the capacitance with the pore size of the electrode. Meanwhile, a strong affinity of the impurity with the ionic species affects the dependence of the integral capacitance on the pore size. Up to 30% increase in the integral capacitance can be achieved even at a very low impurity bulk concentration. By comparing with an ionic liquid mixture containing modified ionic species, we find that the cooperative effect of the bounded impurities is mainly responsible for the significant enhancement of the supercapacitor performance.

  11. Growth of anodic oxide films on oxygen-containing niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habazaki, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: habazaki@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Ogasawara, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Konno, H. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Shimizu, K. [University Chemical Laboratory, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Asami, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Saito, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nagata, S. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Skeldon, P. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-20

    The present study is directed at understanding of the influence of oxygen in the metal on anodic film growth on niobium, using sputter-deposited niobium containing from about 0-52 at.% oxygen, with anodizing carried out at high efficiency in phosphoric acid electrolyte. The findings reveal amorphous anodic niobia films, with no significant effect of oxygen on the field strength, transport numbers, mobility of impurity species and capacitance. However, since niobium is partially oxidized due to presence of oxygen in the substrate, less charge is required to form the films, hence reducing the time to reach a particular film thickness and anodizing voltage. Further, the relative thickness of film material formed at the metal/film interface is increased by the incorporation of oxygen species into the films from the substrate, with an associated altered depth of incorporation of phosphorus species into the films.

  12. Interactions of impurities with a moving grain boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, C L [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-01-01

    Most theories developed to explain interaction of impurities with a moving grain boundary involve a uniform excess impurity concentration distributed along a planar grain boundary. As boundary velocity increases, the excess impurities exert a net drag force on the boundary until a level is reached whereat the drag force no longer can balance the driving force and breakaway of the boundary from these impurities occurs. In this investigation, assumptions of a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are relaxed by allowing both forward and lateral diffusion of impurities in the vicinity of a grain boundary. It is found that the two usual regions (drag of impurities by, and breakaway of a planar grain boundary) are separated by an extensive region wherein a uniform lateral impurity profile and a planar grain boundary shape are unstable. It is suspected that, in this unstable region, grain boundaries assume a spectrum of more complex morphologies and that elucidation of these morphologies can provide the first definitive description of the breakaway process and insight to more complex phenomena such as solid-solution strengthening, grain growth and secondary recrystallization.

  13. Lattice dynamics of impurity clusters : application to pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandralekha Devi, N.; Behera, S.N.

    1979-01-01

    A general solution is obtained for the lattice dynamics of a cluster of n-impurity atoms using the double-time Green's function formalism. The cluster is characterized by n-mass defect and m-force constant change parameters. It is shown that this general solution for the Green's function for the n-impurity cluster can also be expressed in terms of the Green's function for the (n-1)-impurity cluster. As an application, the cluster impurity modes for a pair are calculated using the Debye model for the host lattice dynamics. The splitting of the high frequency local modes and nearly zero frequency resonant modes due to pairs show an oscillatory behaviour on varying the distance of separation between the two impurity atoms. These oscillations are most prominent for two similar impurities and get damped for two dissimilar impurities or if one of the impurities produces a force constant change. The predictions of the calculation provide qualitative explanation of the data obtained from the infrared measurements of the resonant modes in mixed crystal system of KBrsub(1-c)Clsub(c):Lisup(+) and KBrsub(1-c)Isub(c):Lisup(+). (author)

  14. Uranium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in uranium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 , particularly adapted for a low content. The method is quantitative for metallic impurities and qualitative for non metallic impurities [fr

  15. Fluid and gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, H; Skyman, A; Strand, P

    2011-01-01

    Impurity transport coefficients due to ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode and trapped-electron mode turbulence are calculated using profile data from dedicated impurity injection experiments at JET. Results obtained with a multi-fluid model are compared with quasi-linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic...... simulation results obtained with the code GENE. The sign of the impurity convective velocity (pinch) and its various contributions are discussed. The dependence of the impurity transport coefficients and impurity peaking factor −∇nZ/nZ on plasma parameters such as impurity charge number Z, ion logarithmic...

  16. Time evolution of dissolved oxygen and redox conditions in a HLW repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.; Bruno, J.

    1994-02-01

    The evolution of oxygen in a HLW repository has been studied using presently available geochemical background information. The important processes affecting oxygen migration in the near-field include diffusion and oxidation of pyrite and dissolved Fe(II). The evaluation of time scales of oxygen decrease is carried out with 1. an analytical approach involving the coupling of diffusion and chemical reaction, 2. a numerical geochemical approach involving the application of a newly developed diffusion-extended version of the STEADYQL code. Both approaches yield consistent rates of oxygen decrease and indicate that oxidation of pyrite impurities in the clay is the dominant process. The results obtained fRom geochemical modelling are interpreted in terms of evolution of redox conditions. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of the major geochemical and physical parameters is performed. These results indicate that the uncertainties associated with reactive pyrite surface area impose the overall uncertainties of prediction of time scales. Thus, the obtained time of decrease to 1% of initial O 2 concentrations range between 7 and 290 years. The elapsed time at which the transition to anoxic conditions occurs is estimated to be within the same time range. Additional experimental information on redox sensitive impurities in the envisioned buffer and backfill material would further constrain the evaluated time scales. 41 refs

  17. A validated stability-indicating UPLC method for desloratadine and its impurities in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Dantu Durga; Satyanarayana, N V; Malleswara Reddy, A; Sait, Shakil S; Chakole, Dinesh; Mukkanti, K

    2010-02-05

    A novel stability-indicating gradient reverse phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic (RP-UPLC) method was developed for the determination of purity of desloratadine in presence of its impurities and forced degradation products. The method was developed using Waters Aquity BEH C18 column with mobile phase containing a gradient mixture of solvents A and B. The eluted compounds were monitored at 280nm. The run time was 8min within which desloratadine and its five impurities were well separated. Desloratadine was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. Desloratadine was found to degrade significantly in oxidative and thermal stress conditions and stable in acid, base, hydrolytic and photolytic degradation conditions. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, thus proved the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision and robustness. This method was also suitable for the assay determination of desloratadine in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  18. SIMS study of oxygen diffusion in monoclinic HfO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael P.; De Souza, Roger A.

    2018-01-01

    The diffusion of oxygen in dense ceramics of monoclinic HfO2 was studied by means of (18O/16O) isotope exchange annealing and subsequent determination of isotope depth profiles by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Anneals were performed in the temperature range of 573 ≤T /K ≤ 973 at an oxygen partial pressure of p O2=200 mbar . All measured isotope profiles exhibited two features: the first feature, closer to the surface, was attributed mainly to slow oxygen diffusion in an impurity silicate phase; the second feature, deeper in the sample, was attributed to oxygen diffusion in bulk monoclinic HfO2 . The activation enthalpy of oxygen tracer diffusion in bulk HfO2 was found to be ΔHD∗≈0.5 eV .

  19. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  20. Process and system for removing impurities from a gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Gunnar; Knowlton, Teddy Merrill; Findlay, John George; Schlather, Jerry Neal; Turk, Brian S

    2014-04-15

    A fluidized reactor system for removing impurities from a gas and an associated process are provided. The system includes a fluidized absorber for contacting a feed gas with a sorbent stream to reduce the impurity content of the feed gas; a fluidized solids regenerator for contacting an impurity loaded sorbent stream with a regeneration gas to reduce the impurity content of the sorbent stream; a first non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive an impurity loaded sorbent stream from the absorber and transport the impurity loaded sorbent stream to the regenerator at a controllable flow rate in response to an aeration gas; and a second non-mechanical gas seal forming solids transfer device adapted to receive a sorbent stream of reduced impurity content from the regenerator and transfer the sorbent stream of reduced impurity content to the absorber without changing the flow rate of the sorbent stream.

  1. Impurity control in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchi, J.L.

    1980-06-01

    The control of impurities in TFTR will be a particularly difficult problem due to the large energy and particle fluxes expected in the device. As part of the TFTR Flexibility Modification (TEM) project, a program has been implemented to address this problem. Transport code simulations are used to infer an impurity limit criterion as a function of the impurity atomic number. The configurational designs of the limiters and associated protective plates are discussed along with the consideration of thermal and mechanical loads due to normal plasma operation, neutral beams, and plasma disruptions. A summary is given of the materials-related research, which has been a collaborative effort involving groups at Argonne National Laboratory, Sandia Laboratories, and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Conceptual designs are shown for getterng systems capable of regenerating absorbed tritium. Research on this topic by groups at the previously mentioned laboratories and SAES Research Laboratory is reviewed

  2. Impurity profiling of liothyronine sodium by means of reversed phase HPLC, high resolution mass spectrometry, on-line H/D exchange and UV/Vis absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggenthaler, M; Grass, J; Schuh, W; Huber, C G; Reischl, R J

    2017-09-05

    For the first time, a comprehensive investigation of the impurity profile of the synthetic thyroid API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) liothyronine sodium (LT 3 Na) was performed by using reversed phase HPLC and advanced structural elucidation techniques including high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS) and on-line hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Overall, 39 compounds were characterized and 25 of these related substances were previously unknown to literature. The impurity classification system recently developed for the closely related API levothyroxine sodium (LT 4 Na) could be applied to the newly characterized liothyronine sodium impurities resulting in a wholistic thyroid API impurity classification system. Furthermore, the mass-spectrometric CID-fragmentation of specific related substances was discussed and rationalized by detailed fragmentation pathways. Moreover, the UV/Vis absorption characteristics of the API and selected impurities were investigated to corroborate chemical structure assignments derived from MS data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Local chemistry of Al and P impurities in silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Stokbro, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The local structure around Al and P impurities in silica is investigated using density-functional theory. Two distinct cases are considered: impurities substituting for a Si atom in alpha quartz, and impurities implanted in a stoichiometric alpha-quartz crystal. Both impurity elements are found t...

  4. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.; Giroud, C.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2004-01-01

    Impurity behaviour in JET internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges with reversed shear has been investigated. Metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the main ion density profile. The accumulation is due to inwardly directed drift velocities inside the ITB radius. The strength of the impurity peaking increases with the impurity charge and is low for the low-Z elements C and Ne. Transport calculations show that the observed behaviour is consistent with dominant neoclassical impurity transport inside the ITB. In some cases, MHD events in the core flatten the radial profile of the metallic impurity. (author)

  5. Self-sustaining thin films as a means of reducing first wall erosion and plasma impurity influx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    Neutral impurities ejected from Tokamak wall and limiter surfaces may travel several cm before being ionized very quickly upon entering the plasma edge. The influence of the unipolar sheath potential is exerted only within a very short distance of the surface and has no effect on neutral impurity atoms within a very short distance of the surface and has no effect on neutral impurity atoms which are subsequently ionized by charge-exchange collisions or electron impact ionization. However, secondary ions emanating from the limiter surfaces with kinetic energies less than the sheath potential will have essentially zero probability of traveling more than a few Debye lengths before being redeposited. Similarly, secondary ions originating at the first wall are redeposited as a result of the deflection produced by the magnetic field. Impurity influx resulting from sputtering would therefore be substantially reduced for surfaces which produce a very high ion/neutral ratio when sputtered. It has been previously shown that the high secondary ion yield associated with the alkali metal potassium does not apply to the bulk metal but pertains to ionic compounds and thin (mono-layer) films. Two processes are discussed as a means of producing these films in a self-sustaining manner compatible with the fusion reactor environment. (orig.)

  6. Local order dependent impurity levels in alloy semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris

    1981-01-01

    We develop a one band/may sites model for an isoelectronic impurity in a semiconductor alloy. The cluster-Bethe-lattice approximation is used to study the dependence of the impurity energy level upon the short range order (SRO) of the alloy. The Kikuchi parametrization is used to describe the latter. We take into account diagonal disorder only, with possible off-diagonal relaxation around the impurity site. All the inequivalent clusters of the impurity site and its first nearest neighbours are considered, thus including the important short range alloy potential fluctuations. Results are presented for the local density of impurity states, for different degrees of SRO in the alloy. (Author) [pt

  7. Carburization of austenitic alloys by gaseous impurities in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, G.Y.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-03-01

    The carburization behavior of Alloy 800H, Inconel Alloy 617 and Hastelloy Alloy X in helium containing various amounts of H 2 , CO, CH 4 , H 2 O and CO 2 was studied. Corrosion tests were conducted in a temperature range from 649 to 1000 0 C (1200 to 1832 0 F) for exposure time up to 10,000 h. Four different helium environments, identified as A, B, C, and D, were investigated. Concentrations of gaseous impurities were 1500 μatm H 2 , 450 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 50 μatm H 2 O for Environment A; 200 μatm H 2 , 100 μatm CO, 20 μatm CH 4 , 50 μatm H 2 O and 5 μatm CO 2 for Environment B; 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 2 O for Environment C; and 500 μatm H 2 , 50 μatm CO, 50 μatm CH 4 and 1.5 μatm H 2 O for Environment D. Environments A and B were characteristic of high-oxygen potential, while C and D were characteristic of low-oxygen potential. The results showed that the carburization kinetics in low-oxygen potential environments (C and D) were significantly higher, approximately an order of magnitude higher at high temperatures, than those in high-oxygen potential environments (A and B) for all three alloys. Thermodynamic analyses indicated no significant differences in the thermodynamic carburization potential between low- and high-oxygen potential environments. It is thus believed that the enhanced carburization kinetics observed in the low-oxygen potential environments were related to kinetic effects. A qualitatively mechanistic model was proposed to explain the enhanced kinetics. The present results further suggest that controlling the oxygen potential of the service environment can be an effective means of reducing carburization of alloys

  8. Achieving improved ohmic confinement via impurity injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1991-01-01

    Improved Ohmic Confinement (IOC) was obtained in ASDEX after a modification of the divertors that allowed a larger (deuterium and impurity) backflow from the divertor chamber. The quality of IOC depended crucially on the wall conditions, i.e. IOC was best for uncovered stainless steels walls and vanished with boronization. Furthermore, IOC was found only in deuterium discharges. These circumstances led to the idea that IOC correlates with the content of light impurities in the plasma. To substantiate this working hypothesis, we present observations in deuterium discharges with boronized wall conditions into which various impurities have been injected with the aim to induce IOC conditions. Firstly, the plasma behaviour in typical IOC discharges is characterized. Secondly, injection experiments with the low-Z impurities nitrogen and neon as well as with the high-Z impurities argon and krypton are discussed. Then, we concentrate on optimized neon puffing that yields the best confinement results which are similar to IOC conditions. Finally, these results are compared with eperiments in other tokamaks and some conclusions are drawn about the effects of the impurity puffing on both, the central and the edge plasma behaviour. (orig.)

  9. Oxygenated heterocyclic compounds to differentiate Citrus spp. essential oils through metabolomic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jerome; Liberto, Erica; Beolor, Jean-Claude; Brevard, Hugues; Bicchi, Carlo; Rubiolo, Patrizia

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to characterise and discriminate 44 authenticated commercial samples of citrus essential oils (EO) from seven species (bergamot, lemon, bigarade, orange, mandarin, grapefruit, lime) by analysing the non-volatile oxygenated heterocyclic compounds (OHC) by UHPLC/TOF-HRMS, multivariate data analysis (PCA, PLS-DA) and metabolomic strategies; the OHC fraction includes coumarins, furocoumarins, and polymethoxylated flavonoids. Two different approaches were adopted: (i) targeted profiling based on quantifying 18 furocoumarins and coumarins, some of which are regulated by law, and (ii) targeted fingerprinting based on 140 OHCs reported in citrus essential oils, from which 38 discriminant markers were defined. This approach correctly discriminated the Citrus species; its "sensitivity" to relatively low adulteration rate (10%) was highly satisfactory. The proposed method is complementary to that of analysing the citrus EO volatile part by GC techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of impurities on the crystallization of dextrose monohydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markande, Abhay; Nezzal, Amale; Fitzpatrick, John; Aerts, Luc; Redl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The effects of impurities on dextrose monohydrate crystallization were investigated. Crystal nucleation and growth kinetics in the presence of impurities were studied using an in-line focused beam reflectance monitoring (FBRM) technique and an in-line process refractometer. Experimental data were obtained from runs carried out at different impurity levels between 4 and 11 wt% in the high dextrose equivalent (DE) syrup. It was found that impurities have no significant influence on the solubility of dextrose in water. However, impurities have a clear influence on the nucleation and growth kinetics of dextrose monohydrate crystallization. Nucleation and growth rate were favored by low levels of impurities in the syrup.

  11. Striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Xianjun

    2011-01-01

    Research Highlights: → We investigate striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs). → For the single-impurity and two-impurity cases, modulated checkerboard pattern and stripe-like structures are induced. → When more magnetic impurities are inserted, more complex modulated structures could be induced, including rectilinear and right-angled stripes and quantum-corral-like structures. → Impurities could induce complex striped morphologies in DSCs. - Abstract: We study striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping by self-consistently solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations based on the t - t' - U - V model. For the single-impurity case, it is found that the stable ground state is a modulated checkerboard pattern. For the two-impurity case, the stripe-like structures in order parameters are induced due to the impurity-pinning effect. The modulations of DSC and charge orders share the same period of four lattice constants (4a), which is half the period of modulations in the coexisting spin order. Interestingly, when three or more impurities are inserted, the impurities could induce more complex striped morphologies due to quantum interference. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  12. A calibration to predict the concentrations of impurities in plutonium oxide by prompt gamma analysis: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Foster, Lynn A.; Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Murray, Roy E. IV

    2009-01-01

    Over 5,500 containers of excess plutonium-bearing materials have been packaged for long-term storage following the requirements of DOE-STD- 3013. Knowledge of the chemical impurities in the packaged materials is important because certain impurities, such as chloride salts, affect the behavior of the material in storage leading to gas generation and corrosion when sufficient moisture also is present. In most cases, the packaged materials are not well characterized, and information about the chemical impurities is limited to knowledge of the material's processing history. The alpha-particle activity from the plutonium and americium isotopes provides a method of nondestructive self-interrogation to identify certain light elements through the characteristic, prompt gamma rays that are emitted from alpha-particle-induced reactions with these elements. Gamma-ray spectra are obtained for each 3013 container using a highresolution, coaxial high-purity germanium detector. These gamma-ray spectra are scanned from 800 to 5,000 keV for characteristic, prompt gamma rays from the detectable elements, which include lithium, beryllium, boron, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, chlorine, and potassium. The lower limits of detection for these elements in a plutonium-oxide matrix increase with atomic number and range from 100 or 200 ppm for the lightest elements such as lithium and beryllium, to 19,000 ppm for potassium. The peak areas from the characteristic, prompt gamma rays can be used to estimate the concentration of the light-element impurities detected in the material on a semiquantitative basis. The use of prompt gamma analysis to assess impurity concentrations avoids the expense and the risks generally associated with performing chemical analysis on radioactive materials. The analyzed containers are grouped by impurity content, which helps to identify high-risk containers for surveillance and in sorting materials before packaging.

  13. Study on defects and impurities in cast-grown polycrystalline silicon substrates for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafune, K.; Sasaki, T.; Wakabayashi, F.; Terada, Y.; Ohshita, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.

    2006-01-01

    We focused on the defects and impurities in polycrystalline silicon substrates, which deteriorate solar cell efficiency. Comparison of the minority carrier lifetime with the grain size showed that the region with short minority carrier lifetimes did not correspond to the region with small grains. Conversely, the minority carrier lifetime decreased as the etch-pit density (EPD) increased, suggesting that the minority carrier lifetime is strongly affected by the EPD. Electron beam induced current measurements revealed that a combination of grain boundaries and point defects had high recombination activity. Regarding impurities, the interstitial oxygen concentration was relatively low compared with that in a Czochralski-grown silicon substrate, the total carbon concentration exceeded the solubility limit of silicon melt. X-ray microprobe fluorescence measurements revealed a large amount of iron in the regions where there were many etch-pits and grain boundaries with etch-pits. X-ray absorption near edge spectrum analysis revealed trapped iron in the form of oxidized iron

  14. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    ash or the deposits that form. In particular, detailed nitrogen and sulphur chemistry was investigated by combustion tests in a laboratory-scale facility. Oxidant staging, in order to reduce NO formation, turned out to work with similar effectiveness as for conventional air combustion. With regard to sulphur, a considerable increase in the SO2 concentration was found, as expected. However, the H2S concentration in the combustion atmosphere increased as well. Further results were achieved with a pilot-scale test facility, where acid dew points were measured and deposition probes were exposed to the combustion environment. Besides CO2 and water vapour, the flue gas contains impurities like sulphur species, nitrogen oxides, argon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The CO2 liquefaction is strongly affected by these impurities in terms of the auxiliary power requirement and the CO2 capture rate. Furthermore, the impurity of the liquefied CO2 is affected as well. Since the requirements on the liquid CO2 with regard to geological storage or enhanced oil recovery are currently undefined, the effects of possible flue gas treatment and the design of the liquefaction plant are studied over a wide range.

  15. The oxycoal process with cryogenic oxygen supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Alfons; Scheffknecht, Günter

    2009-09-01

    ash or the deposits that form. In particular, detailed nitrogen and sulphur chemistry was investigated by combustion tests in a laboratory-scale facility. Oxidant staging, in order to reduce NO formation, turned out to work with similar effectiveness as for conventional air combustion. With regard to sulphur, a considerable increase in the SO2 concentration was found, as expected. However, the H2S concentration in the combustion atmosphere increased as well. Further results were achieved with a pilot-scale test facility, where acid dew points were measured and deposition probes were exposed to the combustion environment. Besides CO2 and water vapour, the flue gas contains impurities like sulphur species, nitrogen oxides, argon, nitrogen, and oxygen. The CO2 liquefaction is strongly affected by these impurities in terms of the auxiliary power requirement and the CO2 capture rate. Furthermore, the impurity of the liquefied CO2 is affected as well. Since the requirements on the liquid CO2 with regard to geological storage or enhanced oil recovery are currently undefined, the effects of possible flue gas treatment and the design of the liquefaction plant are studied over a wide range.

  16. On the tin impurity in the thermoelectric compound ZnSb: Charge-carrier generation and compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofieva, L. V., E-mail: lprokofieva496@gmail.com; Konstantinov, P. P.; Shabaldin, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The technique for measuring the Hall coefficient and electrical conductivity in the thermal cycling mode is used to study the effect of the Sn impurity on the microstructure and properties of pressed ZnSb samples. Tin was introduced as an excess component (0.1 and 0.2 at %) and as a substitutional impurity for Zn and Sb atoms in a concentration of (2–2.5) at % The temperature dependences of the parameters of lightly doped samples are fundamentally like similar curves for ZnSb with 0.1 at % of Cu. The highest Hall concentration, 1.4 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –3} at 300 K, is obtained upon the introduction of 0.1 at % of Sn; the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit attains its maximum value of 0.85 at 660 K. The experimental data are discussed under the assumption of two doping mechanisms, which are effective in different temperature ranges, with zinc vacancies playing the decisive role of acceptor centers. In two ZnSb samples with SnSb and ZnSn additives, the charge-carrier compensation effect is observed; this effect depends on temperature and markedly changes with doping type. As in p-type A{sup IV}–B{sup VI} materials with a low Sn content, hole compensation can be attributed to atomic recharging Sn{sup 2+} → Sn{sup 4+}. Types of compensating complexes are considered.

  17. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  18. Superconductivity in copper-oxygen compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackl, Rudi [Walther-Meissner-Inst. der Bayerischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The discovery of superconductors on copper-oxygen basis in 1986 was one of the most celebrated events in condensed matter physics. The maximal transition temperature T{sub c} close to 150 K was observed in HgBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8+{delta}} at high pressure. In spite of enormous progress in both the experimental knowledge and theoretical understanding, the origin of the high T{sub c} remains elusive. Although the materials properties require unexpectedly complicated technical solutions several applications have been commercialized. (orig.)

  19. Impurity screening of scrape-off plasma in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tani, Keiji; Nakamura, Hiroo

    1981-11-01

    Impurity screening effect of a scrape-off layer has been studied in a tokamak, based on a simple model of wall-released impurity behavior. Wall-sputtered impurities are stopped effectively by the scrape-off plasma for a medium-Z or high-Z wall system while major part of impurities enters the main plasma in a low-Z wall system. The screening becomes inefficient with increase of scrape-off plasma temperature. Successive multiplication of recycling impurities in the scrape-off layer is large for a high-Z wall and is enhanced by a rise of scrape-off plasma temperature. The stability of plasma-wall interaction is determined by a multiplication factor of recycling impurities. (author)

  20. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Couture, P.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Takahashi, H.; Gammel, G.; Morris, W.

    1987-01-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Z eff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n met /n e ≅ 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm 3 , consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft X-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6x10 10 and 10x10 10 particles/cm 2 s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3x10 12 and 1x10 12 particles/cm 2 s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained. (orig.)

  1. Investigations on organogermanium compounds XII. Reactions of trialkylgermylalkalimetal compounds in hexamethylphosphoric triamide (HMPT) with some inorganic and organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulten, E.J.; Noltes, J.G.

    1971-01-01

    Trialkylgermyl alkali metal compounds in HMPT have been found to be highly reactive nucleophiles. Reactions with some inorganic and organic compounds, such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, inorganic and orgaanic halides, aldehydes, ketones, epoxides and lactones are described. Several new

  2. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Nabyendu, E-mail: nabyendudas@gmail.com; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-28

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  3. Impurity induced resistivity upturns in underdoped cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Nabyendu; Singh, Navinder

    2016-01-01

    Impurity induced low temperature upturns in both the ab-plane and the c-axis dc-resistivities of cuprates in the pseudogap state have been observed in experiments. We provide an explanation of this phenomenon by incorporating impurity scattering of the charge carriers within a phenomenological model proposed by Yang, Rice and Zhang. The scattering between charge carriers and the impurity atom is considered within the lowest order Born approximation. Resistivity is calculated within Kubo formula using the impurity renormalized spectral functions. Using physical parameters for cuprates, we describe qualitative features of the upturn phenomena and its doping evolution that coincides with the experimental findings. We stress that this effect is largely due to the strong electronic correlations.

  4. Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks. [Neoclassical transport theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawryluk, R.J.; Suckewer, S.; Hirshman, S.P.

    1978-10-01

    Low Z impurity transport in tokamaks was simulated with a one-dimensional impurity transport model including both neoclassical and anomalous transport. The neoclassical fluxes are due to collisions between the background plasma and impurity ions as well as collisions between the various ionization states. The evaluation of the neoclassical fluxes takes into account the different collisionality regimes of the background plasma and the impurity ions. A limiter scrapeoff model is used to define the boundary conditions for the impurity ions in the plasma periphery. In order to account for the spectroscopic measurements of power radiated by the lower ionization states, fluxes due to anomalous transport are included. The sensitivity of the results to uncertainties in rate coefficients and plasma parameters in the periphery are investigated. The implications of the transport model for spectroscopic evaluation of impurity concentrations, impurity fluxes, and radiated power from line emission measurements are discussed.

  5. First-Principles Study on the Structural and Electronic Properties of N Atoms Doped-Rutile TiO2 of Oxygen Vacancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Liang Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For the propose of considering the actual situation of electronic neutral, a simulation has been down on the basis of choosing the position of dual N and researching the oxygen vacancy. It is found that the reason why crystal material gets smaller is due to the emergence of impurity levels. By introducing the oxygen vacancy to the structure, the results show that while the oxygen vacancy is near the two nitrogen atoms which have a back to back position, its energy gets the lowest level and its structure gets the most stable state. From its energy band structure and density, the author finds that the impurity elements do not affect the migration of Fermi level while the oxygen vacancy has been increased. Instead of that, the conduction band of metal atoms moves to the Fermi level and then forms the N-type semiconductor material, but the photocatalytic activity is not as good as the dual N-doping state.

  6. Lattice location of impurities in semiconductors: a RBS/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kringhoj, P. [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1993-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are two well established and characterised techniques. Over the last three decades RBS/channeling measurements has been performed to extract the substitutional fraction of impurities in both elemental and compound semiconductors. However, due to the limitation of RBS, only elements heavier than the host crystal can be examined (except for a few elements, where a nuclear reaction or a resonance can be used). In silicon this limitation is acceptable, due to the low mass of Si, but in the III-V compounds (e.g. InP), the technique is limited to a few elements of hardly no technological or fundamental interest. One can overcome this by combining RBS/channeling with PIXE, where PIXE is applied to detect elements with a mass lower than the host crystal. In the present work, the lattice location of Ge in InP has been studied and compared to the group-III impurity Ga, and the group-VI impurity Se which is known to be a donor. The (RBS)/channeling technique has been used to detect not only the substitutional fraction, but also the relative population of the two sublattices. The half-width is approximately equal to the characteristic angle, {psi}{sub 1}. The channeling data obtained indicate that all three dopants are located exclusively on substitutional sites and that Ga is occuping the In position, Se theP position and that Ge is distributed equally between both sublattices. 6 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  7. Lattice location of impurities in semiconductors: a RBS/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kringhoj, P [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Physical Sciences

    1994-12-31

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS)/channeling and proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are two well established and characterised techniques. Over the last three decades RBS/channeling measurements has been performed to extract the substitutional fraction of impurities in both elemental and compound semiconductors. However, due to the limitation of RBS, only elements heavier than the host crystal can be examined (except for a few elements, where a nuclear reaction or a resonance can be used). In silicon this limitation is acceptable, due to the low mass of Si, but in the III-V compounds (e.g. InP), the technique is limited to a few elements of hardly no technological or fundamental interest. One can overcome this by combining RBS/channeling with PIXE, where PIXE is applied to detect elements with a mass lower than the host crystal. In the present work, the lattice location of Ge in InP has been studied and compared to the group-III impurity Ga, and the group-VI impurity Se which is known to be a donor. The (RBS)/channeling technique has been used to detect not only the substitutional fraction, but also the relative population of the two sublattices. The half-width is approximately equal to the characteristic angle, {psi}{sub 1}. The channeling data obtained indicate that all three dopants are located exclusively on substitutional sites and that Ga is occuping the In position, Se theP position and that Ge is distributed equally between both sublattices. 6 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  8. Control Strategy for Small Molecule Impurities in Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hai H; Ihle, Nathan; Jones, Michael T; Kelly, Kathleen; Kott, Laila; Raglione, Thomas; Whitlock, Scott; Zhang, Qunying; Zheng, Jie

    2018-04-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are an emerging class of biopharmaceuticals. As such, there are no specific guidelines addressing impurity limits and qualification requirements. The current ICH guidelines on impurities, Q3A (Impurities in New Drug Substances), Q3B (Impurities in New Drug Products), and Q6B (Specifications: Test Procedures and Acceptance Criteria for Biotechnological/Biological Products) do not adequately address how to assess small molecule impurities in ADCs. The International Consortium for Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development (IQ) formed an impurities working group (IWG) to discuss this issue. This white paper presents a strategy for evaluating the impact of small molecule impurities in ADCs. This strategy suggests a science-based approach that can be applied to the design of control systems for ADC therapeutics. The key principles that form the basis for this strategy include the significant difference in molecular weights between small molecule impurities and the ADC, the conjugation potential of the small molecule impurities, and the typical dosing concentrations and dosing schedule. The result is that exposure to small impurities in ADCs is so low as to often pose little or no significant safety risk.

  9. Impurity transport in internal transport barrier discharges on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dux, R.

    2002-01-01

    In JET plasmas with internal transport barrier (ITB) the behaviour of metallic and low-Z impurities (C, Ne) was investigated. In ITB discharges with reversed shear, the metallic impurities accumulate in cases with too strong peaking of the density profile, while the concentration of low-Z elements C and Ne is only mildly peaked. The accumulation might be so strong, that the central radiation approximately equals the central heating power followed by a radiative collapse of the transport barrier. The radial location with strong impurity gradients (convective barrier) was identified to be situated inside (not at!) the heat flux barrier. Calculations of neo-classical transport were performed for these discharges, including impurity-impurity collisions. It was found, that the observed Z-dependence of the impurity peaking and the location of the impurity 'barrier' can be explained with neo-classical transport. ITB discharges with monotonic shear show less inward convection and seem to be advantageous with respect to plasma purity. (author)

  10. Experimental comparison among hydrocarbon and oxygenated compounds for their elimination by three-way automotive catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, J.M.; Prigent, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Many hydrocarbon species are present in automotive exhaust gases, and three-way Pt-Rh catalysts are commonly used for their elimination. However, most published work on individual hydrocarbon conversion concerns their oxidation in simulated exhaust gases with excess oxygen. This paper reports that this study was therefore undertaken to determine the reactivity of saturated alkanes, olefins, acetylene, aromatics, alcohols or various other oxygenated compounds in steady state conditions with synthetic exhaust gases near stoichiometry. In a first series of measurements, conversion rates were determined as a function of temperature at stoichiometry. The partial pressure effect of O 2 , NO and H 2 O was then determined at constant temperature in the region of catalyst light-off. NO and mainly O 2 were shown to have a negative effect on the first terms of saturated alkane conversion under lean conditions. Water vapor has a positive effect in rich conditions (without SO 2 ), but is more pronounced for Pt-Rh than for a Pt catalyst. Finally, the role played by SO 2 in hydrocarbon conversion was evaluated

  11. Microscopic models of impurities in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assali, L.V.C.

    1985-01-01

    The study of electronic structure of insulated and complex puntual impurities in silicon responsible by the appearing of deep energy levels in the forbiden band of semiconductor, is presented. The molecular cluster model with the treatment of surface orbitals by Watson sphere within the formalism of Xα multiple scattering method, was used. The electronic structures of three clusters representative of perfect silicon crystal, which were used for the impurity studies, are presented. The method was applied to analyse insulated impurities of substitutional and interstitial hydrogen (Si:H and Si:H i ), subtitutional and interstitial iron in neutral and positive charge states (Si:Fe 0 , + , Si:Fe 0 , + ) and substitutional gold in three charge states(Si,Au - , 0 , + ). The thetraedic interstitial defect of silicon (Si:Si i ) was also studied. The complex impurities: neighbour iron pair in the lattice (Si:Fe 2 ), substitutional gold-interstitial iron pair (Si:Au s Fe) and substitutional boron-interstitial hydrogen pair (Si:B s H i ), were analysed. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Observations of long impurity confinement times in the ISX tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrell, K H; Wong, S K; Muller, III, C H; Hacker, M P [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (USA); Ketterer, H E; Isler, R C; Lazarus, E A [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1981-08-01

    The transport of small amounts of silicon and aluminium injected into plasmas in the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) tokamak is studied. By monitoring the time behaviour of ultra-violet spectral lines emitted by various charge states of those impurities and comparing this behaviour to the predictions of a multi-species impurity transport code, it is found that both impurity penetration times and impurity containment times are consistent with neoclassical predictions. The observed impurity containment times, which are greater than three times the energy containment time, are consistent with the inward convection predicted by neoclassical theory.

  13. Numerical studies of impurities in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1982-09-01

    The coupled partial differential equations used to describe the behavior of impurity ions in magnetically confined controlled fusion plasmas require numerical solution for cases of practical interest. Computer codes developed for impurity modeling at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory are used as examples of the types of codes employed for this purpose. These codes solve for the impurity ionization state densities and associated radiation rates using atomic physics appropriate for these low-density, high-temperature plasmas. The simpler codes solve local equations in zero spatial dimensions while more complex cases require codes which explicitly include transport of the impurity ions simultaneously with the atomic processes of ionization and recombination. Typical applications are discussed and computational results are presented for selected cases of interest

  14. Nature, distribution, and effects upon vegetation of atmospheric impurities in and near an industrial town

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowther, C; Ruston, A G

    1911-01-01

    The investigtions recorded constitute a rough survey of the influence of atmospheric impurities upon the growth of plants. They do show clearly that this influence, even outside the towns, may under certain conditions have appreciable bearing upon farm economy. The atmosphere in and around a large industrial city such as Leeds is relatively highly charged with impurities, many of which exert a marked deleterious effect upon plant growth. The impurities are most abundant in the industrial quarters of the city, but are disseminated over very large areas, especially in the direction of the prevailing winds. The rain falling through such a polluted atmosphere becomes notably rich in suspended matters, chlorides, sulphates (often also other sulphur compounds, such as SO/sub 2/), nitrogenous compounds (notably ammonia) and free acid. The suspended matters in the air impede the growth of plants not only by their deposition upon the leaves and consequent hindrance to the free passage of gases into and out of the leaves, but also by reducing the intensity of illumination of the leaves, such reduction amounting in the worst case investigated to fully 40 per cent of the maximum light available. The presence of free acid in the atmosphere exercises a detrimental influence upon plant growth: (a) by direct action upon the leaves indirectly by reducing the activity not only of the necessary ammoniacal fermentation of the soil humus, but even more of the beneficial nitrifying and nitrogen-fixing organisms in the soil. The experiment with the perennial meadow grass, timothy, indicates that with the continued application to the soil of acid rain the produce becomes distinctly poorer in protein and richer in crude fiber, and consequently less nutritious.

  15. Multiscaling Dynamics of Impurity Transport in Drift-Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittency effects and the associated multiscaling spectrum of exponents are investigated for impurities advection in tokamak edge plasmas. The two-dimensional Hasagawa-Wakatani model of resistive drift-wave turbulence is used as a paradigm to describe edge tokamak turbulence. Impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma turbulent flow. The use of the extended self-similarity technique shows that the structure function relative scaling exponent of impurity density and vorticity follows the She-Leveque model. This confirms the intermittent character of the impurities advection in the turbulent plasma flow and suggests that impurities are advected by vorticity filaments

  16. Influence of Isovalent Impurity Ge on Nucleation and Morphology of Supersaturated Oxygen Precipitate in CZSi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of Ge in CZSi on the density and the rate of nucleation of supersaturated oxygen precipitation at lower annealing temperatures were examined.It is discovered that rod-like precipitation was suppressed when annealing at 700℃,but Ge has no effect on the morphology and the growth of oxygen precipitation at annealing temperatures more than 900℃.The results indicated that Ge neither acted as center of nucleation nor was involved in oxygen precipitation and its defect.

  17. The monitoring of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon in the sodium circuits of the PFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.; Morrison, N.S.; Robertson, C.M.; Trevillion, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reviews the instrumentation available for monitoring oxygen, hydrogen, tritium and carbon impurity levels on the primary and secondary circuits of PFR. Circuit oxygen levels measured using electrochemical oxygen meters are compared to estimates from circuit plugging meters. The data are interpreted in the light of information from cold trap temperatures. Measurements of secondary circuit hydrogen levels using both the sodium and gas phase hydrogen detection equipment are compared to estimates of circuit hydrogen levels from plugging meters and variations in sodium phase hydrogen levels during power operation are discussed. (author)

  18. Toroidal asymmetries in divertor impurity influxes in NSTX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Scotti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Toroidal asymmetries in divertor carbon and lithium influxes were observed in NSTX, due to toroidal differences in surface composition, tile leading edges, externally-applied three-dimensional (3D fields and toroidally-localized edge plasma modifications due to radio frequency heating. Understanding toroidal asymmetries in impurity influxes is critical for the evaluation of total impurity sources, often inferred from measurements with a limited toroidal coverage. The toroidally-asymmetric lithium deposition induced asymmetries in divertor lithium influxes. Enhanced impurity influxes at the leading edge of divertor tiles were the main cause of carbon toroidal asymmetries and were enhanced during edge localized modes. Externally-applied 3D fields led to strike point splitting and helical lobes observed in divertor impurity emission, but marginal changes to the toroidally-averaged impurity influxes. Power coupled to the scrape-off layer SOL plasma during radio frequency (RF heating of H-mode discharges enhanced impurity influxes along the non-axisymmetric divertor footprint of flux tubes connecting to plasma in front of the RF antenna.

  19. Study by photoluminescence of centers associated to oxygen and carbon in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazrak, A.

    1984-12-01

    Results on analysis of luminescence of impurities in silicon are examined. Then in chapter 5, p. 76 to 91, irradiation of silicon by electrons is studied, interaction of defects created and diffusion, influence of carbon, oxygen and doping materials, annealing at 450 0 C, photoluminescence spectra are investigated [fr

  20. Design and application of new type of oxygen supplier for water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... The main pollutants or impurities in the wastewater come from human ... This air pump system was used to control both oxygen and air flow at a capacity of up to ... a PVC pipe (0.05 x 0.04 m) and contained zeolite type 5 A.

  1. A Neat Trick Using Oxalic Acid Dihydrate and Potassium Permanganate and Other Experiments with Small Organic Amine or Oxygenated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelland, Malcolm A.

    2011-01-01

    Solid potassium permanganate (KMnO[subscript 4]) is shown to react in a variety of ways with small organic amines or oxygenated compounds depending on whether they are liquids or solids and whether water is present. In particular, its reaction with solid oxalic acid dihydrate can be initiated by the moisture in one's breath, making an intriguing…

  2. Impurities and conductivity in a D-wave superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balatsky, A.V.

    1994-01-01

    Impurity scattering in the unitary limit produces low energy quasiparticles with anisotropic spectrum in a two-dimensional d-wave superconductor. The authors describe a new quasi-one-dimensional limit of the quasiparticle scattering, which might occur in a superconductor with short coherence length and with finite impurity potential range. The dc conductivity in a d-wave superconductor is predicted to be proportional to the normal state scattering rate and is impurity-dependent. They show that quasi-one-dimensional regime might occur in high-T c superconductors with Zn impurities at low temperatures T approx-lt 10 K

  3. On impurity handling in high performance stellarator/heliotron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burhenn, R.; Feng, Y.; Ida, K.

    2008-10-01

    The Large Helical Device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X, under construction) are experiments specially designed to demonstrate long pulse (quasi steady-state) operation, which is an intrinsic property of Stellarators and Heliotrons. Significant progress was made in establishment of high performance plasmas. A crucial point is the increasing impurity confinement towards high density as observed at several machines (TJ-II, W7-AS, LHD) which can lead to impurity accumulation and early pulse termination by radiation collapse at high density. In addition, theoretical predictions for non-axisymmetric configurations prognosticate the absence of impurity screening by ion temperature gradients in standard ion root plasmas. Nevertheless, scenarios were found where impurity accumulation was successfully avoided in LHD and/or W7-AS by the onset of drag forces in the high density and low temperature scrape-off-layer, the generation of magnetic islands at the plasma boundary and to a certain degree also by ELMs, flushing out impurities and reducing the net-impurity influx into the core. Additionally, a reduction of impurity core confinement was observed in the W7-AS High Density H-mode (HDH) regime and by application of sufficient ECRH heating power. The exploration of such purification mechanisms is a demanding task for successful steady-state operation. The impurity transport at the plasma edge/SOL was identified to play a major role for the global impurity behaviour in addition to the core confinement. (author)

  4. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Pilaniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH, the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA, and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs. The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are - reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas-liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid-liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC-Mass Spectroscopy (MS, LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research.

  5. Striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xian-Jun

    2011-05-01

    We study striped morphologies induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping by self-consistently solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations based on the t - t‧ - U - V model. For the single-impurity case, it is found that the stable ground state is a modulated checkerboard pattern. For the two-impurity case, the stripe-like structures in order parameters are induced due to the impurity-pinning effect. The modulations of DSC and charge orders share the same period of four lattice constants (4 a), which is half the period of modulations in the coexisting spin order. Interestingly, when three or more impurities are inserted, the impurities could induce more complex striped morphologies due to quantum interference. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  6. Oxygen enhancement of groundwater using an oxygen releasing compound in a funnel-and-gate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D G

    1994-01-01

    ORC is a fine white MgO[sub 2] powder treated with a patented process so that a slow, relatively steady release of oxygen occurs when the powder is in contact with water. Recent work suggests ORC could potentially be used to increase the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of ground water, thereby enhancing the biodegradation of dissolved phase contaminants such as benzene and toluene from gasoline spills. Field and laboratory tests were performed to evaluate the oxygen release characteristics of ORC when mixed with filter sand and exposed to groundwater from an aquifer in Ontario. Quasi steady state oxygen release rates of 0.013-0.030 and 0.030 mg O[sub 2]/d per g of ORC were determined from the column and field tests respectively. The column tests indicated that steady state oxygen release conditions from the ORC required ca 90 d after initial contact with water, but field data indicated that oxygen release rate may continue to decrease. Falling head permeameter tests indicated that a maximum drop in hydraulic conductivity occurred within the first 48 h of exposure of ORC to water. Both laboratory and field studies indicated that ORC-contacted water increased in pH. Field studies further suggested an inverse correlation between pH increases and the ability of ORC to enhance DO concentration of ground water. The use of ORC in a funnel-and-gate scheme appears to be an effective means of increasing the DO concentration in ground water, thereby stimulating the in-situ bioremediation of many organic contaminants. 30 refs., 17 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Thermodynamic properties of copper compounds with oxygen and hydrogen from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Johansson, B. (Applied Materials Physics, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-02-15

    We employ quantum-mechanical calculations (based on density functional theory and linear response theory) in order to test the mechanical and chemical stability of several solid-state configurations of Cu1+, Cu2+, O2-, H1-, and H1+ ions. We begin our analysis with cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O, cuprite structure), cupric oxide (CuO, tenorite structure), and cuprous hydride (CuH, wurtzite and sphalerite structures) whose thermodynamic properties have been studied experimentally. In our calculations, all these compounds are found to be mechanically stable configurations. Their formation energies calculated at T = 0 K (including the energy of zero-point and thermal motion of the ions) and at room temperature are in good agreement with existing thermodynamic data. A search for other possible solid-state conformations of copper, hydrogen, and oxygen ions is then performed. Several candidate structures for solid phases of cuprous oxy-hydride (Cu{sub 4}H{sub 2}O) and cupric hydride (CuH{sub 2}) have been considered but found to be dynamically unstable. Cuprous oxy-hydride is found to be energetically unstable with respect to decomposition onto cuprous oxide and cuprous hydride. Metastability of cuprous hydroxide (CuOH) is established in our calculations. The free energy of CuOH is calculated to be some 50 kJ/mol higher than the average of the free energies of Cu{sub 2}O and water. Thus, cuprite Cu{sub 2}O is the most stable of the examined Cu(I) compounds

  8. Thermodynamic properties of copper compounds with oxygen and hydrogen from first principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzhavyi, P.A.; Johansson, B.

    2010-02-01

    We employ quantum-mechanical calculations (based on density functional theory and linear response theory) in order to test the mechanical and chemical stability of several solid-state configurations of Cu 1+ , Cu 2+ , O 2- , H 1- , and H 1+ ions. We begin our analysis with cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O, cuprite structure), cupric oxide (CuO, tenorite structure), and cuprous hydride (CuH, wurtzite and sphalerite structures) whose thermodynamic properties have been studied experimentally. In our calculations, all these compounds are found to be mechanically stable configurations. Their formation energies calculated at T = 0 K (including the energy of zero-point and thermal motion of the ions) and at room temperature are in good agreement with existing thermodynamic data. A search for other possible solid-state conformations of copper, hydrogen, and oxygen ions is then performed. Several candidate structures for solid phases of cuprous oxy-hydride (Cu 4 H 2 O) and cupric hydride (CuH 2 ) have been considered but found to be dynamically unstable. Cuprous oxy-hydride is found to be energetically unstable with respect to decomposition onto cuprous oxide and cuprous hydride. Metastability of cuprous hydroxide (CuOH) is established in our calculations. The free energy of CuOH is calculated to be some 50 kJ/mol higher than the average of the free energies of Cu 2 O and water. Thus, cuprite Cu 2 O is the most stable of the examined Cu(I) compounds

  9. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  10. Study of structure modification influence of polymer matrix on the impurity centers luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akylbaev, Zh.S.; Karitskay, S.G.; Nikitina, L.A.; Kobzev, G.I.

    2002-01-01

    Data on study of influence of polymer matrix structure change on impurity centers fluorescence are cited. In the capacity of polymer matrix the polyvinyl butyryl (PVB) serves, and as fluorescence centers the dye molecules the crystal violet (CV) are serving. Computerized simulation of processes of PVB matrixes structuring under the oxygen action from air, produced under annealing of the film at thermal treatment of liquid polymer. Calculation of KV spectral lines wave length under optimization of the dye-polymer system is carried out by the Mm+ molecular mechanics method, and then by semi-empiric method ZINDO1

  11. Impurity dependence of superconductivity in niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laa, C.

    1984-04-01

    Jump temperatures, the critical fields Hsubc and Hsubc 2 and specific heats were measured on niobium samples where the impurity content was systematically varied by loading with nitrogen. Quantities could thus be extrapolated to lattice perfection and absolute purity. Comparisons with theories were made and some parameters extracted. Agreement was found with Gorkov theory for small impurities. A new value of the Ginsburg-Landau parameter Ko was determined to be just above 1/sqrt2 which proves that niobium is an elementary Type II semiconductor. By comparisons with the BCS and the CLAC theory the values of the mean Fermi velocity, the London penetration depth, the BCS coherence length and the impurity parameter were extracted. (G.Q.)

  12. Impurity-induced states in superconducting heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong E.; Rossi, Enrico; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2018-04-01

    Heterostructures allow the realization of electronic states that are difficult to obtain in isolated uniform systems. Exemplary is the case of quasi-one-dimensional heterostructures formed by a superconductor and a semiconductor with spin-orbit coupling in which Majorana zero-energy modes can be realized. We study the effect of a single impurity on the energy spectrum of superconducting heterostructures. We find that the coupling between the superconductor and the semiconductor can strongly affect the impurity-induced states and may induce additional subgap bound states that are not present in isolated uniform superconductors. For the case of quasi-one-dimensional superconductor/semiconductor heterostructures we obtain the conditions for which the low-energy impurity-induced bound states appear.

  13. Determination of assay and impurities of gamma irradiated chloramphenicol in eye ointment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, L.; Altorfer, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    A sample preparation method was developed to isolate chloramphenicol and its radiolytic products from an oily ointment base. The isolation method suspended the eye ointment in n-hexane at 45 deg C, and isolated the target compounds as residue by centrifugation. It was found that the main element to ensure a satisfactory isolation was keeping the sample solution at 45 deg C during sample preparation. Linearity, precision, accuracy and suitability of the method were confirmed valid for both assay and impurity tests. This isolation method was ideal for assay, unique for extraction of unexpected and complex radiolysis products, and had a number of advantages compared to the pretreatment methods described in the United States Pharmacopoeia and British Pharmacopoeia, in terms of accuracy, precision, and easy handling. The effect of γ-irradiation on chloramphenicol eye ointment was studied by HPLC-DAD, after applying the developed sample preparation method. The present assay and impurity test methods with HPLC-DAD were confirmed to be suitable for irradiated chloramphenicol in eye ointment. (author)

  14. Interpretation of plasma impurity deposition probes. Analytic approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangeby, P. C.

    1987-10-01

    Insertion of a probe into the plasma induces a high speed flow of the hydrogenic plasma to the probe which, by friction, accelerates the impurity ions to velocities approaching the hydrogenic ion acoustic speed, i.e., higher than the impurity ion thermal speed. A simple analytic theory based on this effect provides a relation between impurity fluxes to the probe Γimp and the undisturbed impurity ion density nimp, with the hydrogenic temperature and density as input parameters. Probe size also influences the collection process and large probes are found to attract a higher flux density than small probes in the same plasma. The quantity actually measured, cimp, the impurity atom surface density (m-2) net-deposited on the probe, is related to Γimp and thus to nimp by taking into account the partial removal of deposited material caused by sputtering and the redeposition process.

  15. The screening of charged impurities in bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wenjing; Li, Lain-Jong

    2010-01-01

    Positively charged impurities were introduced into a bilayer graphene (BLG) transistor by n-doping with dimethylformamide. Subsequent exposure of the BLG device to moisture resulted in a positive shift of the Dirac point and an increase of hole mobility, suggesting that moisture could reduce the scattering strength of the existing charged impurities. In other words, moisture screened off the 'effective density' of charged impurities. At the early stage of moisture screening the scattering of hole carriers is dominated by long-range Coulomb scatter, but an alternative scattering mechanism should also be taken into consideration when the effective density of impurities is further lowered on moisture exposure.

  16. Collective impurity effects in the Heisenberg triangular antiferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryasin, V S; Zhitomirsky, M E

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice doped with nonmagnetic impurities. Two nontrivial effects resulting from collective impurity behavior are predicted. The first one is related to presence of uncompensated magnetic moments localized near vacancies as revealed by the low-temperature Curie tail in the magnetic susceptibility. These moments exhibit an anomalous growth with the impurity concentration, which we attribute to the clustering mechanism. In an external magnetic field, impurities lead to an even more peculiar phenomenon lifting the classical ground-state degeneracy in favor of the conical state. We analytically demonstrate that vacancies spontaneously generate a positive biquadratic exchange, which is responsible for the above degeneracy lifting

  17. Impurity profiling of a chemical weapon precursor for possible forensic signatures by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggard, Jamin C; Wahl, Jon H; Synovec, Robert E; Mong, Gary M; Fraga, Carlos G

    2010-01-15

    In this report we present the feasibility of using analytical and chemometric methodologies to reveal and exploit the chemical impurity profiles from commercial dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) samples to illustrate the type of forensic information that may be obtained from chemical-attack evidence. Using DMMP as a model compound of a toxicant that may be used in a chemical attack, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC x GC/TOF-MS) to detect and identify trace organic impurities in six samples of commercially acquired DMMP. The GC x GC/TOF-MS data was analyzed to produce impurity profiles for all six DMMP samples using 29 analyte impurities. The use of PARAFAC for the mathematical resolution of overlapped GC x GC peaks ensured clean spectra for the identification of many of the detected analytes by spectral library matching. The use of statistical pairwise comparison revealed that there were trace impurities that were quantitatively similar and different among five of the six DMMP samples. Two of the DMMP samples were revealed to have identical impurity profiles by this approach. The use of nonnegative matrix factorization indicated that there were five distinct DMMP sample types as illustrated by the clustering of the multiple DMMP analyses into five distinct clusters in the scores plots. The two indistinguishable DMMP samples were confirmed by their chemical supplier to be from the same bulk source. Sample information from the other chemical suppliers supported the idea that the other four DMMP samples were likely from different bulk sources. These results demonstrate that the matching of synthesized products from the same source is possible using impurity profiling. In addition, the identified impurities common to all six DMMP samples provide strong evidence that basic route information can be obtained from impurity profiles. Finally, impurities that may be unique to the sole bulk manufacturer of DMMP were

  18. On neoclassical impurity transport in stellarator geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García-Regaña, J M; Kleiber, R; Beidler, C D; Turkin, Y; Maaßberg, H; Helander, P

    2013-01-01

    The impurity dynamics in stellarators has become an issue of moderate concern due to the inherent tendency of the impurities to accumulate in the core when the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field points radially inwards (ion root regime). This accumulation can lead to collapse of the plasma due to radiative losses, and thus limit high performance plasma discharges in non-axisymmetric devices. A quantitative description of the neoclassical impurity transport is complicated by the breakdown of the assumption of small E × B drift and trapping due to the electrostatic potential variation on a flux surface Φ-tilde compared with those due to the magnetic field gradient. This work examines the impact of this potential variation on neoclassical impurity transport in the Large Helical Device heliotron. It shows that the neoclassical impurity transport can be strongly affected by Φ-tilde . The central numerical tool used is the δf particle in cell Monte Carlo code EUTERPE. The Φ-tilde used in the calculations is provided by the neoclassical code GSRAKE. The possibility of obtaining a more general Φ-tilde self-consistently with EUTERPE is also addressed and a preliminary calculation is presented. (paper)

  19. The impact of hydrogen and oxidizing impurities in chemical vapor deposition of graphene on copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubak, Saman

    Graphene, the single-atom layer of carbon, has attracted scientists and technologists due to its outstanding physical and opto/electronic properties. The use of graphene in practical applications requires a reliable and cost-effective method to produce large area graphene films with low defects and controlled thicknesses. Direct growth of graphene using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper, in which carbonaceous gaseous species react with the metal substrate in the presence of hydrogen at high temperatures (850-1100° C), led to high coverage of high quality graphene, opening up a promising future for methods of this type and a large step towards commercial realization of graphene products. The present thesis deals with the synthesis of graphene via low pressure CVD (LP-CVD) on copper catalyst using methane as the carbon precursor. The focus is mainly on the determination of the role of hydrogen and oxidizing impurities during graphene formation with an ultimate purpose: to elucidate a viable and reproducible method for the production of high quality graphene films compatible with industrial manufacturing processes. The role of molecular hydrogen in graphene CVD is explored in the first part of the thesis. Few studies claimed that molecular hydrogen etches graphene films on copper by conducting annealing experiments. On the other hand, we speculated that this graphene etching reaction is due to the presence of trace amount of oxygen in the furnace atmosphere. Thus, we took another approach and designed systematic annealing experiments to investigate the role of hydrogen in the etching reaction of graphene on copper foils. No evidence of graphene etching on copper was observed when purified ultra high purity (UHP) hydrogen was used at 825 °C and 500 mTorr. Nevertheless, graphene films exposed to the unpurified UHP hydrogen were etched due to the presence of oxidizing impurities. Our results show that hydrogen is not responsible for graphene etching reaction

  20. Scattering of waves by impurities in precompressed granular chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Alejandro J; Yasuda, Hiromi; Kim, Eunho; Kevrekidis, P G; Porter, Mason A; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-05-01

    We study scattering of waves by impurities in strongly precompressed granular chains. We explore the linear scattering of plane waves and identify a closed-form expression for the reflection and transmission coefficients for the scattering of the waves from both a single impurity and a double impurity. For single-impurity chains, we show that, within the transmission band of the host granular chain, high-frequency waves are strongly attenuated (such that the transmission coefficient vanishes as the wavenumber k→±π), whereas low-frequency waves are well-transmitted through the impurity. For double-impurity chains, we identify a resonance-enabling full transmission at a particular frequency-in a manner that is analogous to the Ramsauer-Townsend (RT) resonance from quantum physics. We also demonstrate that one can tune the frequency of the RT resonance to any value in the pass band of the host chain. We corroborate our theoretical predictions both numerically and experimentally, and we directly observe almost complete transmission for frequencies close to the RT resonance frequency. Finally, we show how this RT resonance can lead to the existence of reflectionless modes in granular chains (including disordered ones) with multiple double impurities.

  1. Spin-1 two-impurity Kondo problem on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerdt, A.; Žitko, R.; Feiguin, A. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present an extensive study of the two-impurity Kondo problem for spin-1 adatoms on a square lattice using an exact canonical transformation to map the problem onto an effective one-dimensional system that can be numerically solved using the density matrix renormalization group method. We provide a simple intuitive picture and identify the different regimes, depending on the distance between the two impurities, Kondo coupling JK, longitudinal anisotropy D , and transverse anisotropy E . In the isotropic case, two impurities on opposite (the same) sublattices have a singlet (triplet) ground state. However, the energy difference between the triplet ground state and the singlet excited state is very small and we expect an effectively fourfold-degenerate ground state, i.e., two decoupled impurities. For large enough JK the impurities are practically uncorrelated forming two independent underscreened states with the conduction electrons, a clear nonperturbative effect. When the impurities are entangled in an RKKY-like state, Kondo correlations persist and the two effects coexist: the impurities are underscreened, and the dangling spin-1 /2 degrees of freedom are responsible for the interimpurity entanglement. We analyze the effects of magnetic anisotropy in the development of quasiclassical correlations.

  2. Breatherlike impurity modes in discrete nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennig, D.; Rasmussen, Kim; Tsironis, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a disordered generalized discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing both diagonal and nondiagonal nonlinear terms. The equation models a Linear host lattice doped with nonlinear impurities. We find different types of impurity states that form itinerant...

  3. Analysis of residual products in benzyl chloride used for the industrial synthesis of quaternary compounds by liquid chromatography with diode-array detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Blanco, M C; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2009-02-01

    In industrial and pharmaceutical processes, the study of residual products becomes essential to guarantee the quality of compounds and to eliminate or minimize toxic residual products. Knowledge about the origin of impurities (raw materials, processes, the contamination of industrial plants, etc.) is necessary in preventive treatment and in the control of a product's lifecycle. Benzyl chloride is used as raw material to synthesize several quaternary ammonium compounds, such as benzalkonium chloride, which may have pharmaceutical applications. Benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, toluene, chloro derivatives of toluene, and dibenzyl ether are compounds that may be found as impurities in technical benzyl chloride. We proposed a high-performance liquid chromatography method for the separation of these compounds, testing two stationary phases with different dimensions and particle sizes, with the application of photodiode array-detection. The linearity for four possible impurities (benzaldehyde, toluene, alpha,alpha-dichlorotoluene, and 2-chlorotoluene) ranged from 0.1 to 10 microg/mL, limits of detection from 11 to 34 ng/mL, and repeatability from 1% to 2.9% for a 0.3-1.2 microg/mL concentration range. The method was applied to samples of technical benzyl chloride, and alpha,alpha-dichlorotoluene and benzaldehyde were identified by spectral analysis and quantitated. The selection of benzyl chloride with lower levels of impurities is important to guarantee the reduction of residual products in further syntheses.

  4. Quantum one dimensional spin systems. Disorder and impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunel, V.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis presents three studies that are respectively the spin-1 disordered chain, the non magnetic impurities in the spin-1/2 chain and the reaction-diffusion process. The spin-1 chain of weak disorder is performed by the Abelian bosonization and the renormalization group. This allows to take into account the competition between the disorder and the interactions and predicts the effects of various spin-1 anisotropy chain phases under many different disorders. A second work uses the non magnetic impurities as local probes of the correlations in the spin-1/2 chain. When the impurities are connected to the chain boundary, the author predicts a temperature dependence of the relaxation rate (1/T) of the nuclear spin impurities, different from the case of these impurities connected to the whole chain. The last work deals with one dimensional reaction-diffusion problem. The Jordan-Wigner transformation allows to consider a fermionic field theory that critical exponents follow from the renormalization group. (A.L.B.)

  5. Lanthanide 4f-electron binding energies and the nephelauxetic effect in wide band gap compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Employing data from luminescence spectroscopy, the inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6, A) in Eu 2+/3+ impurities together with the 5d-centroid energy shift ϵ c (1,3+,A) in Ce 3+ impurities in 40 different fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, oxide, sulfide, and nitride compounds has been determined. This work demonstrates that the chemical environment A affects the two energies in a similar fashion; a fashion that follows the anion nephelauxetic sequence F, O, Cl, Br, N, I, S, Se. One may then calculate U(6, A) from well established and accurate ϵ c (1,3+,A) values which are then used as input to the chemical shift model proposed in Dorenbos (2012) [19]. As output it provides the chemical shift of 4f-electron binding energy and therewith the 4f-electron binding energy relative to the vacuum energy. In addition this method provides a tool to routinely establish the binding energy of electrons at the top of the valence band (work function) and the bottom of the conduction band (electron affinity) throughout the entire family of inorganic compounds. How the electronic structure of the compound and lanthanide impurities therein change with type of compound and type of lanthanide is demonstrated. -- Highlights: ► A relationship between 5d centroid shift and 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy is established. ► Information on the absolute 4f-electron binding energy of lanthanides in 40 compounds is provided. ► A new tool to determine absolute binding energies of electrons in valence and conduction bands is demonstrated

  6. Impurity injection into tokamak plasmas by erosion probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Bakos, J.S.; Buerger, G.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.

    1987-08-01

    Exposing special erosion probes into the edge plasma of MT-1 the impurities Li and Ti were released and contaminated the plasma. By the use of collector probes the torodial transport of these impurities were investigated. The results indicate a preferential impurity flow into codirection of the plasma current. However, the asymmetric component of this flow is much larger than expected from the toroidal drift correlated to the plasma current. (author)

  7. EDGAR CO2 purity. Type and quantities of impurities related to CO2 point source and capture technology. A Literature study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walspurger, S.; Van Dijk, H.A.J. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is an important tool that will contribute significantly to CO2 emissions abatement both in power and industrial sectors. Capture technologies as well as transport and distribution infrastructure development need to be carried out to ensure efficient CO2 separation and safe transport to storage sites. This study aimed at identifying, and when possible quantifying, the impurities present in CO2 streams resulting from various CO2 capture plants, such that challenges in development of appropriate materials and cleaning technologies for future CCS infrastructure may be anticipated. In its first part, the study provides a description of the characteristics of the different CO2 capture technologies with respect to their response to different type and quantity of impurities, striving for describing realistic combinations of point sources and capture technologies. Composition of CO2 gaseous streams was found to be highly dependent upon the type of CO2 point source and the removal technology selected. In most of the capture processes, most impurities concentration may be minimised by fine tuning of process operation. However plant economics eventually govern the impurity level in the CO2 stream. For mature technologies such as absorption by chemical or physical solvents lower impurity levels were found to be theoretically quite low, but when energy spent for regeneration is lowered, or when second generation capture with lower energy requirement are considered, the impurity level in CO2 stream increases. Accordingly, the report also addresses the conditioning technologies that are available or need to be developed for removal of traces elements such as mercury, volatile compounds and other condensable and points at technologies to be developed, especially in the sulphur compounds removal from CO2. In its final part the report addresses the quantification of future specification and concludes based on literature study that pipeline

  8. Influences of residual oxygen impurities, cubic indium oxide grains and indium oxy-nitride alloy grains in hexagonal InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yodo, T.; Nakamura, T.; Kouyama, T.; Harada, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the influences of residual oxygen (O) impurities, cubic indium oxide (β-In 2 O 3 ) grains and indium oxy-nitride (InON) alloy grains in 200 nm-thick hexagonal (α)-InN crystalline films grown on Si(111) substrates by electron cyclotron resonance plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Although β-In 2 O 3 grains with wide band-gap energy were formed in In film by N 2 annealing, they were not easily formed in N 2 -annealed InN films. Even if they were not detected in N 2 -annealed InN films, the as-grown films still contained residual O impurities with concentrations of less than 0.5% ([O]≤0.5%). Although [O]∝1% could be estimated by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed in N 2 -annealed InN films, [O]≤0.5% could not be measured by it. However, we found that they can be qualitatively measured by investigating In 2 O 3 grains formed by H 2 annealing with higher reactivity with InN and O 2 , using X-ray diffraction and PL spectroscopy. In this paper, we discuss the formation mechanism of InON alloy grains in InN films. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  9. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  10. Impurity effects in the electrothermal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimura, A.; Azevedo, M.T. de

    1982-01-01

    A 'impure' plasma model is proposed based on the homogeneous hydrogen plasma used in the theory formulated by Tomimura and Haines to explain the electrothermal instable mode growth with the wave vector perpendicular to the applied magnetic field. The impurities are introduced implicitly in the transport coefficients of the two-fluid model through a effective charge number Z sub(eff). (Author) [pt

  11. Magnetic behavior of binary intermetallic compound YPd{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Abhishek [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block-JD, Sector-III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Mazumdar, Chandan [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)], E-mail: chandan.mazumdar@saha.ac.in; Ranganathan, R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2009-05-12

    We report the results of detailed magnetic studies on binary rare-earth-transition metal compound YPd{sub 3}. The results of temperature and magnetic field dependent DC-magnetic measurements along with the results of powder X-ray diffraction measurement and electrical transport have been discussed. The X-ray data suggest a well-defined ordered crystal lattice, free from any detectable impurity phase. Magnetization data exhibits predominant diamagnetic character at higher fields. However, the compound exhibits anomalous behavior at low fields.

  12. Transport and re-deposition of limiter-released metal impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claasen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1983-01-01

    The transport parallel B-vector and re-deposition of limiter- (or divertor-target-)released metal impurities in a given counter-streaming scrape-off layer plasma is studied analytically by using a kinetic approach. Electron impact ionization, Coulomb collisions with the hydrogen ions, and impurity ion acceleration in a pre-sheath electric field are accounted for. The friction and electric-field forces provide the driving forces for impurity re-cycling in front of the limiter. Both hydrogen ion sputtering and self-sputtering are included (the latter for impurity emission perpendicular to the limiter surface). The analytical formulas are numerically evaluated for the example of sputtered iron impurities, assuming a simple model for a scrape-off layer plasma in contact with a stainless-steel poloidal ring limiter. (author)

  13. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2014-05-08

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  14. Impurity concentration limits and activation in fusion reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchetti, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines waste management problems related to impurity activation in first-wall, shield, and magnet materials for fusion reactors. Definitions of low activity based on hands-on recycling, remote recycling, and shallow land burial waste management criteria are discussed. Estimates of the impurity concentration in low-activation materials (elementally substituted stainless steels and vanadium alloys) are reported. Impurity activation in first-wall materials turns out to be critical after a comparison of impurity concentration limits and estimated levels. Activation of magnet materials is then considered: Long-term activity is not a concern, while short-term activity is. In both cases, impurity activation is negligible. Magnet materials, and all other less flux-exposed materials, have no practical limitation on impurities in terms of induced radioactivity

  15. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian; Berloff, Natalia G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  16. The origin of metal impurities in DIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, Kazumi; Sengoku, Seio; Maeda, Hikosuke; Ohtsuka, Hideo; Yamamoto, Shin

    1978-10-01

    The origin of metal impurities in DIVA (JFT-2a Tokamak) has been studied experimentally. Three processes of metal impurity release from the first wall were identified; i.e. ion sputtering, evaporation, and arcing. Among of these, ion sputtering is the predominant process in the quiet phase of the discharge, which is characterized by no spikes in the loop voltage and no localized heat flux concentrations on the first wall. ''Cones'' formation due to the sputtering is observed on the gold protection plate (guard limiter) exposed to about 10,000 discharges by scanning electron micrograph. In the SEM photographs, the spacial distribution of cones on the shell surface due to the ion sputtering coincides with the spacial distribution of intensity of Au-I line radiation. Gold is the dominant metal impurity in DIVA. The honeycomb structure can decrease release of the metal impurity. (author)

  17. Study by nuclear techniques of the impurity-defect interaction in implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thome, Lionel.

    1978-01-01

    The properties of out equilibrium alloys formed by impurity implantation are strongly influenced by radiation damage created during implantation. This work presents a study, via hyperfine interaction and lattice location experiments, of the impurity-defect interaction in ion implanted metals. When the impurity and defect concentrations in the implanted layer are small, i.e. when impurities are uniformly recoil implanted in the whole crystal volume following a nuclear reaction (Aq In experiments), the impurity interacts with its own damage cascade. In this case, a vacancy is found to be trapped by a fraction of impurities during an athermal process. The value of this fraction does not seem to depend critically on impurity and host. When the impurity and defect concentrations are such that defect cascades interact, i.e. when impurities are implanted with an isotope separator (Fe Yb experiments), the observed impurity-vacancy (or vacancy cluster) interactions depend then strongly on the nature of impurity and host. An empirical relation, which indicates the importance of elastic effects, has been found between the proportion of impurities interacting with defects and the difference between impurity and host atom radii. At implantation temperature such that vacancies are mobile, the impurity-defect interaction depends essentially on vacancy migration. A model based on chemical kinetics has been developed to account for the variation with temperature of measured quantities [fr

  18. Impurity dynamics in stellarator W7-AS plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igitkhanov, Yuri; Beidler, Craig D.; Burhenn, Reiner; Polunovsky, Eduard; Yamazaki, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    Numerical efforts to understand the neoclassical transport of impurities in stellarator plasmas have been undertaken. The new code solves the radial continuity equations for each ionization stage of the impurity ions for given background plasma profiles and magnetic configuration. An analytic description of the neoclassical transport coefficients based on numerical results from the DKES (Drift Kinetic Equation Solver) code and monoenergetic Monte-Carlo calculation (C.D. Beidler et al., EPS 1994), is here applied for impurity transport coefficients. The transition between the different charge states due to the ionization and recombination in balance equation is described by using the ADAS (Atomic Data and Analysis Structure) database. The impurity behavior in some typical discharges from W7-AS with moderate (NC) and improved energy confinement (HDH) has been considered. It is shown that the spatial distribution results from the competition between the radial electric field and the thermal force (which together produce a convective flux), and the diffusive term, which flattens the radial impurity distribution. The impurity ions are localized at the radial position where the convective flux goes through zero. It is also shown that for typical stellarator discharges there is no pronounced temperature screening effect as in tokamak plasmas. (author)

  19. A Singlet Oxygen Photogeneration and Luminescence Study of Unsymmetrically Substituted Mesoporphyrinic Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Sousa Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a series of new unsymmetrically substituted mesoporphyrins: 5-(2-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-phenyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TPPOHO, 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-phenyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TPPOHM, 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-phenyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TPPOHP, 5-(2-hydroxyphenyl-10,15,20-tris-butyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TBPOHO, and their parent nonsubstituted compounds, respectively, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-phenyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TPP and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-butyl-21,23-H-porphyrin (TBP. Several photophysical studies were carried out to access the influence of the unsymmetrical substitution at the porphyrinic macrocycle on porthyrin's photophysical properties, especially porthyrin's efficiency as singlet oxygen sensitizers. The quantum yields of singlet oxygen generation were determined in benzene (ΦΔ(TPP = 0.66 ± 0.05; ΦΔ(TPPOHO = 0.69 ± 0.04; ΦΔ(TPPOHM = 0.62 ± 0.04; ΦΔ(TPPOHP = 0.73 ± 0.03; ΦΔ(TBP = 0.76 ± 0.03; ΦΔ(TBPOHO = 0.73 ± 0.02 using the 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21,23-H-porphine (ΦΔ(TPP = 0.66 and Phenazine (ΦΔ(Phz = 0.83 as reference compounds. Their fluorescence quantum yields were found to be (Φf(TPPOHO = 0.10 ± 0.04; Φf(TPPOHM = 0.09 ± 0.03; Φf(TPPOHP = 0.13 ± 0.02; Φf(TBP = 0.08 ± 0.03 and Φf(TBPOHO = 0.08 ± 0.02 using 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21,23-H-porphine as reference Φf(TPP = 0.13. Singlet state lifetimes were also determined in the same solvent. All the porphyrins presented very similar fluorescence lifetimes (mean values of τS (with O2, air equilibrated = 9.6 ± 0.3 nanoseconds and (without O2, argon purged = 10.1 ± 0.6 nanoseconds, resp.. The phosphorescence emission was found to be negligible for this series of unsymmetrically substituted mesoporphyrins, but an E-type, thermally activated, delayed fluorescence process was proved to occur at room temperature.

  20. Bonding in Sulfur-Oxygen Compounds-HSO/SOH and SOO/OSO: An Example of Recoupled Pair π Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Beth A; Takeshita, Tyler Y; Woon, David E; Dunning, Thom H

    2013-10-08

    The ground states (X(2)A″) of HSO and SOH are extremely close in energy, yet their molecular structures differ dramatically, e.g., re(SO) is 1.485 Å in HSO and 1.632 Å in SOH. The SO bond is also much stronger in HSO than in SOH: 100.3 kcal/mol versus 78.8 kcal/mol [RCCSD(T)-F12/AVTZ]. Similar differences are found in the SO2 isomers, SOO and OSO, depending on whether the second oxygen atom binds to oxygen or sulfur. We report generalized valence bond and RCCSD(T)-F12 calculations on HSO/SOH and OSO/SOO and analyze the bonding in all four species. We find that HSO has a shorter and stronger SO bond than SOH due to the presence of a recoupled pair bond in the π(a″) system of HSO. Similarly, the bonding in SOO and OSO differs greatly. SOO is like ozone and has substantial diradical character, while OSO has two recoupled pair π bonds and negligible diradical character. The ability of the sulfur atom to form recoupled pair bonds provides a natural explanation for the dramatic variation in the bonding in these and many other sulfur-oxygen compounds.

  1. Spectrographic determination of impurities in magnesium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capdevila, C.; Diaz-Guerra, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    The spectrographic determination of trace quantities of Al, B, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Hn, Mo, Ni and Si in magnesium metal is described. Samples are dissolved with HNO 3 and calcinate into MgO. In order to avoid losses of boron NH 4 OH is added to the nitric solution. Except for aluminium and chromium the analysis is performed through the use of the carrier distillation technique. These two impurities are determined by burning to completion the MgO. Among the compounds studied as carriers (AgCl, AgF, CsCl, CuF 2 , KCl and SrF 2 ) AgCl allows, In general, the best volatilization efficiency. Lithium determination is achieved by using KC1 or CsCl. Detection limits, on the basis of MgO, are in the range 0,1 to 30 ppm, depending on the element. (Author) 8 refs

  2. Impurity and trace tritium transport in tokamak edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity or minority species, as for example tritium, is investigated in drift-Alfven edge turbulence. The full effects of perpendicular and parallel convection are kept for the impurity species. The impurity density develops a granular structure with steep gradients...... and locally exceeds its initial values due to the compressibility of the flow. An approximate decomposition of the impurity flux into a diffusive part and an effective convective part (characterized by a pinch velocity) is performed and a net inward pinch effect is recovered. The pinch velocity is explained...

  3. Impurities in radioactive solutions for gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, J.U.

    1990-01-01

    The absolute and relative methods for radioactive sources calibration, like 4 Πβ-γ and 4Πγ ionization chamber respectively, allows to reach 0,1% of exactiness in activity measurement, but cannot distinguish radioactive impurities that interfere in the activity. Then, one of the problems associated to a quality control of calibrated sources furnished to users is the identification and quantification of the impurities. In this work, a routine technical procedure, using the facilities of gamma spectrometry method that allows to identify and to determine the impurities relative contribution to the source main radionuclide activity, is described. (author) [pt

  4. Separation and determination of synthetic impurities of difloxacin by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Nageswara; Nagaraju, V

    2004-11-19

    A simple and rapid reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method for separation and determination of process-related impurities of difloxacin (DFL) was developed. The separation was achieved on a reversed-phase C(18) column using methanol-water-acetic acid (78:21.9:0.1, v/v/v) as a mobile solvent at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min at 28 degrees C using UV detection at 230 nm. It was linear over a range of 0.03 x 10(-6) to 1.60 x 10(-6)g for process related impurities and 0.05 x 10(-6) to 2.40 x 10(-6)g for difloxacin. The detection limits were 0.009 x 10(-6) to 0.024 x 10(-6)g for all the compounds examined. The recoveries were found to be in the range of 97.6-102.0% for impurities as well as difloxacin. The precision and robustness of the method were evaluated. It was used for not only quality assurance, but also monitoring the synthetic reactions involved in the process development work of difloxacin. The method was found to be specific, precise and reliable for the determination of unreacted levels of raw materials, intermediates in the reaction mixtures and the finished products of difloxacin.

  5. Moving discrete breathers in a Klein-Gordon chain with an impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas, J; Palmero, F; Archilla, J F R; Romero, F R

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the influence of an impurity in the evolution of moving discrete breathers in a Klein-Gordon chain with non-weak nonlinearity. Three different types of behaviour can be observed when moving breathers interact with the impurity: they pass through the impurity continuing their direction of movement; they are reflected by the impurity; they are trapped by the impurity, giving rise to chaotic breathers, as their Fourier power spectra show. Resonance with a breather centred at the impurity site is conjectured to be a necessary condition for the appearance of the trapping phenomenon. This paper establishes a difference between the resonance condition of the non-weak nonlinearity approach and the resonance condition with the linear impurity mode in the case of weak nonlinearity

  6. Parallel processing for a 1-D time-dependent solution to impurity rate equations for fusion plasma simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1990-01-01

    In fusion plasmas impurities such as carbon, oxygen or nickel can contaminate the plasma and cause degradation of the performance of a fusion device through radiation. However, impurities can also be used as diagnostics to obtain information about a plasma through spectroscopic experiments which can then be used in plasma modeling and simulations. In the past, serial algorithms have been described for either the time dependent or steady state problem. In this paper, we describe a parallel procedure adopted to solve the time-dependent problem. It can be shown that for the steady state problem a parallel procedure would not be a useful application of parallelization because a few seconds of the Central Processing Unit time on a CRAY-XMP or IBM 3090/600S would suffice to obtain the solution, while this is not the case for the time-dependent problem. In order to study the effects of low Z and high Z impurities on the final state of a plasma, time-dependent solutions are necessary. For purposes of diagnostics and comparisons with experiments, a fast turn around time of the simulations would be advantageous. We have implemented a parallel algorithm on and IBM 3090/600S and tested its performance for a typical set of fusion plasma parameters. 4 refs., 1 tab

  7. Impact of Increasing Levels of Oxygen Consumption on the Evolution of Color, Phenolic, and Volatile Compounds of Nebbiolo Wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozziello, Maurizio; Torchio, Fabrizio; Piano, Federico; Giacosa, Simone; Ugliano, Maurizio; Bosso, Antonella; Rolle, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Since the end of the last century, many works have been carried out to verify the effect of controlled oxygen intake on the chemical and organoleptic characteristics of red wines. In spite of the large number of studies on this subject, oxygen remains a cutting-edge research topic in oenology. Oxygen consumption leads to complex and not univocal changes in wine composition, sometimes positive such as color stabilization, softening of mouthfeel, increase of aroma complexity. However, the variability of these effects, which depend both on the oxygenation conditions and the composition of the wine, require more efforts in this research field to effectively manage wine oxygen exposure. The present study is focused on the evolution of the chemical composition of four different Nebbiolo wines, each of them added with 4 different doses of oxygen (7, 14, 21, and 28 mg/L total intake) during the first month of storage. In this perspective, the evolution over time of wine color and polyphenols was studied. Acetaldehyde, glyceraldehyde and glyoxylic acid were quantified by HPLC. These compounds can play a role in wine aging creating condensed colored and stable products involving anthocyanins with or without tannins. Moreover, some volatile aldehydes correlated with oxidized olfactory notes, including methional and (E)-2-alkenals, have been quantified by GC-MS. Overall, during storage a decrease of color intensity, total and free anthocyanins and an increase in polymeric pigments (in particular the contribution to the red color of pigments not-bleachable by SO 2 or dTAT%) and some minor aldehydes was observed. Nevertheless, the differences in color parameters between the samples with different doses of oxygen were modest. These evidences were in contrast with an evident and detectable increase of free acetaldehyde content at increasing doses of oxygen measured after 60 days of storage. The effect of oxygen on color and production of SO 2 non-bleachable pigments during aging

  8. Impact of Increasing Levels of Oxygen Consumption on the Evolution of Color, Phenolic, and Volatile Compounds of Nebbiolo Wines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrozziello, Maurizio; Torchio, Fabrizio; Piano, Federico; Giacosa, Simone; Ugliano, Maurizio; Bosso, Antonella; Rolle, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Since the end of the last century, many works have been carried out to verify the effect of controlled oxygen intake on the chemical and organoleptic characteristics of red wines. In spite of the large number of studies on this subject, oxygen remains a cutting-edge research topic in oenology. Oxygen consumption leads to complex and not univocal changes in wine composition, sometimes positive such as color stabilization, softening of mouthfeel, increase of aroma complexity. However, the variability of these effects, which depend both on the oxygenation conditions and the composition of the wine, require more efforts in this research field to effectively manage wine oxygen exposure. The present study is focused on the evolution of the chemical composition of four different Nebbiolo wines, each of them added with 4 different doses of oxygen (7, 14, 21, and 28 mg/L total intake) during the first month of storage. In this perspective, the evolution over time of wine color and polyphenols was studied. Acetaldehyde, glyceraldehyde and glyoxylic acid were quantified by HPLC. These compounds can play a role in wine aging creating condensed colored and stable products involving anthocyanins with or without tannins. Moreover, some volatile aldehydes correlated with oxidized olfactory notes, including methional and (E)-2-alkenals, have been quantified by GC-MS. Overall, during storage a decrease of color intensity, total and free anthocyanins and an increase in polymeric pigments (in particular the contribution to the red color of pigments not-bleachable by SO2 or dTAT%) and some minor aldehydes was observed. Nevertheless, the differences in color parameters between the samples with different doses of oxygen were modest. These evidences were in contrast with an evident and detectable increase of free acetaldehyde content at increasing doses of oxygen measured after 60 days of storage. The effect of oxygen on color and production of SO2 non-bleachable pigments during aging

  9. Defect-impurity interactions in ion-implanted metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turos, A.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of defect-impurity interactions in metals is presented. When point defects become mobile they migrate towards the sinks and on the way can be captured by impurity atoms forming stable associations so-called complexes. In some metallic systems complexes can also be formed athermally during ion implantation by trapping point defects already in the collision cascade. An association of a point defect with an impurity atom leads to its displacement from the lattice site. The structure and stability of complexes are strongly temperature dependent. With increasing temperature they dissociate or grow by multiple defect trapping. The appearance of freely migrating point defects at elevated temperatures, due to ion bombardment or thermal annealing, causes via coupling with defect fluxes, important impurity redistribution. Because of the sensitivity of many metal-in-metal implanted systems to radiation damage the understanding of this processes is essential for a proper interpretation of the lattice occupancy measurements and the optimization of implantation conditions. (author)

  10. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pickenheim, B. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); BIBLER, N. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    This document has been revised to add analytical data for fresh, 1 year old, and 4 year old glycolic acid as recommended in Revision 2 of this document. This was needed to understand the concentration of formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid, impurities present in the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments. Based on this information, the concentration of these impurities did not change during storage. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in the first two versions of this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends.

  11. Complexity of Quantum Impurity Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2017-12-01

    We give a quasi-polynomial time classical algorithm for estimating the ground state energy and for computing low energy states of quantum impurity models. Such models describe a bath of free fermions coupled to a small interacting subsystem called an impurity. The full system consists of n fermionic modes and has a Hamiltonian {H=H_0+H_{imp}}, where H 0 is quadratic in creation-annihilation operators and H imp is an arbitrary Hamiltonian acting on a subset of O(1) modes. We show that the ground energy of H can be approximated with an additive error {2^{-b}} in time {n^3 \\exp{[O(b^3)]}}. Our algorithm also finds a low energy state that achieves this approximation. The low energy state is represented as a superposition of {\\exp{[O(b^3)]}} fermionic Gaussian states. To arrive at this result we prove several theorems concerning exact ground states of impurity models. In particular, we show that eigenvalues of the ground state covariance matrix decay exponentially with the exponent depending very mildly on the spectral gap of H 0. A key ingredient of our proof is Zolotarev's rational approximation to the {√{x}} function. We anticipate that our algorithms may be used in hybrid quantum-classical simulations of strongly correlated materials based on dynamical mean field theory. We implemented a simplified practical version of our algorithm and benchmarked it using the single impurity Anderson model.

  12. Impurity and particle control for INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.

    1985-02-01

    The INTOR impurity control system studies have been focused on the development of an impurity control system which would be able to provide the necessary heat removal and He pumping while satisfying the requirements for (1) minimum plasma contamination by impurities, (2) reasonable component lifetime (approx. 1 year), and (3) minimum size and cost. The major systems examined were poloidal divertors and pumped limiters. The poloidal divertor was chosen as the reference option since it offered the possibility of low sputtering rates due to the formation of a cool, dense plasma near the collector plates. Estimates of the sputtering rates associated with pumped limiters indicated that they would be too high for a reasonable system. Development of an engineering design concept was done for both the poloidal divertor and the pumped limiter

  13. Phase compatibilities of YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type structure in quintenary systems Y-Ba-Cu-O-X (impurity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, P.; Fjellvag, H.; Kjekshus, A.

    1990-01-01

    Electrical transport properties of the oxidic high T(sub c) superconductors are significantly affected by the presence of minor amounts of various elements adventing as impurities, e.g., from the chemical environment during manufacturing. YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) is prone to an extinction of the superconductivity on (partial) substitution of all four elemental components. E.g., Pr (for Y), La (for Ba), Zn (for Cu) or peroxygroup (for O) substituents will alter some of the superconductivity preconditions, like mixed valence state in Cu3O7/O(9-delta) network or structural distortion of the network. Although various pseudoternary chemical equilibrium phase diagrams of the Y(O)-Ba(O)-Cu(O) system now are available, no consensus is generally shown, however, this is partly due to lack of compatible definitions of the equilibrium conditions. Less information is available about the phase compatibilities in the appropriate quaternary phase diagram (including oxygen) and virtually no information exists about any pentenary phase diagrams (including one impurity). Unfortunately, complexity of such systems, stemming both from number of quaternary or pentenary compounds and from visualizing the five-component phase system, limits this presentation to more or less close surroundings of the YBa2Cu3O(9-delta) type phase in appropriate pseudoquaternary or pseudopseudoternary diagrams, involving Y-Ba-Cu and O, O-CO2, alkaline metals, Mg and alkaline earths, and Sc and most of the 3-d and 4-f elements. The systems were investigated by means of x ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and chemical analytical methods on samples prepared by sol-gel technique from citrates. The superconductivity was characterized by measuring the diamagnetic susceptibility by SQUID.

  14. Stability and electronic properties of oxygen-doped ZnS polytypes: DFTB study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Ilya S.; Vorokh, Andrey S.; Enyashin, Andrey N.

    2018-06-01

    Synthesis from aqueous solutions is an affordable method for fabrication of II-VI semiconductors. However, application of this method often imposes a disorder of crystal lattice, manifesting as a rich variety of polytypes arising from wurtzite and zinc blende phases. The origin of this disordering still remains debatable. Here, the influence of the most likely impurity at water environment - substitutional oxygen - on the polytypic equilibrium of zinc sulphide is studied by means of density-functional tight-binding method. According to calculations, the inclusion of such oxygen does not affect the polytypic equilibrium. Apart of thermodynamic stability, the electronic and elastic properties of ZnS polytypes are studied as the function of oxygen distribution.

  15. Scaling laws for trace impurity confinement: a variational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; Haas, F.A.

    1990-01-01

    A variational approach is outlined for the deduction of impurity confinement scaling laws. Given the forms of the diffusive and convective components to the impurity particle flux, we present a variational principle for the impurity confinement time in terms of the diffusion time scale and the convection parameter, which is a non-dimensional measure of the size of the convective flux relative to the diffusive flux. These results are very general and apply irrespective of whether the transport fluxes are of theoretical or empirical origin. The impurity confinement time scales exponentially with the convection parameter in cases of practical interest. (orig.)

  16. Zirconium analysis. Impurities determination by spark mass specrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Determination of impurities in zirconium, suitable for atomic content greater than 10 -8 but particularly adapted for low contents. The method is quantitative only if a reference sample is available (metallic impurities) [fr

  17. Isospin impurity and super-allowed β transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, H.; Van Giai Nguyen; Suzuki, T.

    1999-01-01

    We study the effect of isospin impurity on the super-allowed Fermi β decay using microscopic HF and RPA (or TDA) model taking into account CSB and CIB interactions. It is found that the isospin impurity of N = Z nuclei gives enhancement of the sum rule of Fermi transition probabilities. On the other hand, the super-allowed transitions between odd-odd J = 0 nuclei and even-even J = 0 nuclei are quenched because on the cancellation of the isospin impurity effects of mother and daughter nuclei. An implication of the calculated Fermi transition rate on the unitarity of Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix is also discussed. (authors)

  18. Analysis of pharmaceutical impurities using multi-heartcutting 2D LC coupled with UV-charged aerosol MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kelly; Li, Yi; Tsang, Midco; Chetwyn, Nik P

    2013-09-01

    To overcome challenges in HPLC impurity analysis of pharmaceuticals, we developed an automated online multi-heartcutting 2D HPLC system with hyphenated UV-charged aerosol MS detection. The first dimension has a primary column and the second dimension has six orthogonal columns to enhance flexibility and selectivity. The two dimensions were interfaced by a pair of switching valves equipped with six trapping loops that allow multi-heartcutting of peaks of interest in the first dimension and also allow "peak parking." The hyphenated UV-charged aerosol MS detection provides comprehensive detection for compounds with and without UV chromophores, organics, and inorganics. It also provides structural information for impurity identification. A hidden degradation product that co-eluted with the drug main peak was revealed by RP × RP separation and thus enabled the stability-indicating method development. A poorly retained polar component with no UV chromophores was analyzed by RP × hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography separation with charged aerosol detection. Furthermore, using this system, the structures of low-level impurities separated by a method using nonvolatile phosphate buffer were identified and tracked by MS in the second dimension. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Dynamics of impurities in the scrape-off layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangeby, P.C.; Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon

    1988-01-01

    Impurity modelling of the Scrape-Off Layer, SOL, is reviewed. Simple analytic models are sometimes adequate for relating central impurity levels to edge plasma conditions and for explaining the patterns of net erosion/deposition found on limiters. More sophisticated approaches, which are also necessary, are categorized and reviewed. A plea is made for the acquisition of a more comprehensive data base of edge plasma properties since reliable impurity modelling appears to be dependent on more extensive use of experimental input. (author)

  20. The optimisation of limiter geometry to reduce impurity influx in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, G.F.; McCracken, G.M.; Sewell, P.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Stangeby, P.C.; Pitcher, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional limiters are designed to withstand large power loadings and hence are constructed with surfaces at grazing angles to the toroidal magnetic field. As a result any impurities released from the limiter surface are projected towards the centre of the plasma and are poorly screened from it. The impurity control limiter (ICL), an alternative concept which has an inverted geometry is discussed. The ICL shape is designed to direct the impurities towards the wall. Results are presented from a two-dimensional neutral particle code which maps the ionisation of carbon physically sputtered by deuterons from a carbon limiter. This ionisation source is coupled to a one-dimensional impurity transport code which calculates the implied central impurity density. The results demonstrate that the ICL achieves impurity control in two ways. Firstly, many of the sputtered impurities directed towards the wall are not ionised and return to the wall as neutrals. Secondly, much of the ionisation which does occur is located in the scrape-off layer. Here there is a strong ion sink which may also be enhanced by the flow of hydrogenic ions entraining impurity ions created close to the limiter surface. We conclude that a reduction in central impurity density of a factor of 10 is possible in a Tokamak such as DITE provided that the limiter is the main source of impurities. (author)

  1. The application of structure-based assessment to support safety and chemistry diligence to manage genotoxic impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients during drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobo, Krista L; Greene, Nigel; Cyr, Michelle O; Caron, Stéphane; Ku, Warren W

    2006-04-01

    Starting materials and intermediates used to synthesize pharmaceuticals are reactive in nature and may be present as impurities in the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) used for preclinical safety studies and clinical trials. Furthermore, starting materials and intermediates may be known or suspected mutagens and/or carcinogens. Therefore, during drug development due diligence need be applied from two perspectives (1) to understand potential mutagenic and carcinogenic risks associated with compounds used for synthesis and (2) to understand the capability of synthetic processes to control genotoxic impurities in the API. Recently, a task force comprised of experts from pharmaceutical industry proposed guidance, with recommendations for classification, testing, qualification and assessing risk of genotoxic impurities. In our experience the proposed structure-based classification, has differentiated 75% of starting materials and intermediates as mutagenic and non-mutagenic with high concordance (92%) when compared with Ames results. Structure-based assessment has been used to identify genotoxic hazards, and prompted evaluation of fate of genotoxic impurities in API. These two assessments (safety and chemistry) culminate in identification of genotoxic impurities known or suspected to exceed acceptable levels in API, thereby triggering actions needed to assure appropriate control and measurement methods are in place. Hypothetical case studies are presented demonstrating this multi-disciplinary approach.

  2. Spectrochemical carriers and the matrix effect: contribution to the spectrographic analysis study of general impurities at trace level in nuclearly pure thorium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lordello, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of twenty spectrochemical carriers related to the volatilization behavior of twenty seven general impurities from thorium oxide matrices was studied by means of the moving plate technique. Each carrier was employed in three different concentrations, 2%, 4% and 6%. The relative areas of the volatilization curves have been used for comparing the results. Many experiments were also done to demonstrate the 'matrix effect' in samples having the same chemical composition. The importance of chemical and physical treatments, prior and during the preparation of the thorium oxide, was investigated through a large number of samples by submitting them to spectrochemical analysis. Thorium nitrate and two different thorium oxalate samples, one of which dried in a medium of pH 10, were ignited to ThO 2 according to a temperature versus time program. The presence of nitric acid in thorium nitrate solutions was also studied in connection with the matrix effect. A carrier-distillation method for the determination of twenty five trace elements in thorium compounds was also suggested. Several types of standards had been investigated but the best results were achieved with those prepared from thorium nitrate solutions. Some elements can be determined only by standards synthesized by the dry-mixing technique. The suggested carriers are: 2% NaF (for Ba, Cr, Mg, Sn, V, Cu, Ti, Sr, Mn, Al, Pb, Bi, Ca, Ag, Be, Sb, As, Si, and B), 4% NaCl (for Cd, Co, Fe, Zn and Ni) and 4% KCi (for Na). The method fulfils the requirements of sensitivity for the analysis of trace elements in nuclear grade thorium compounds. (Author) [pt

  3. Anomalous temperature behavior of Sn impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskel, D.; Shechter, H.; Stern, E.A.; Newville, M.; Yacoby, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Sn impurities in Pb and Ag hosts have been investigated by Moessbauer effect and in Pb by x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) studies. The Sn atoms are dissolved up to at least 2 at. % in Pb and up to at least 8 at. % in Ag for the temperature ranges investigated. The concentration limit for Sn-Sn interactions is 1 at. % for Pb and 2 at. % for Ag as determined experimentally by lowering the Sn concentration until no appreciable change occurs in the Moessbauer effect. XAFS measurements verify that the Sn impurities in Pb are dissolved and predominantly at substitutional sites. For both hosts the temperature dependence of the spectral intensities of isolated Sn impurities below a temperature T 0 is as expected for vibrating about a lattice site. Above T 0 the Moessbauer spectral intensity exhibits a greatly increased rate of drop-off with temperature without appreciable broadening. This drop-off is too steep to be explained by ordinary anharmonic effects and can be explained by a liquidlike rapid hopping of the Sn, localized about a lattice site. Higher-entropy-density regions of radii somewhat more than an atomic spacing surround such impurities, and can act as nucleation sites for three-dimensional melting

  4. Electrical resistivity of liquid iron with high concentration of light element impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, F.; Steinle-Neumann, G.

    2017-12-01

    The Earth's outer core mainly consists of liquid iron, enriched with several weight percent of lighter elements, such as silicon, oxygen, sulfur or carbon. Electrical resistivities of alloys of this type determine the stability of the geodynamo. Both computational and experimental results show that resistivites of Fe-based alloys deviate significantly from values of pure Fe. Using optical conductivity values computed with the Kubo-Greenwood formalism for DFT-based molecular dynamics results, we analyze the high-P and T behavior of resitivities for Fe-alloys containing various concentrations of sulfur, oxygen and silicon. As the electron mean free path length in amorphous and liquid material becomes comparable to interatomic distances at high P and T, electron scattering is expected to be dominated by the short-range order, rather than T-dependent vibrational contributions, and we describe such correlations in our results. In analogy to macroscopic porous media, we further show that resistivity of a liquid metal-nonmetal alloy is determined to first order by the resistivity of the metallic matrix and the volume fraction of non-metallic impurities.

  5. Interaction of ring dark solitons with ring impurities in Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Jukui

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of ring dark solitons/vortexes with the ring-shaped repulsive and attractive impurities in two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates is investigated numerically. Very rich interaction phenomena are obtained, i.e., not only the interaction between the ring soliton and the impurity, but also the interaction between vortexes and the impurity. The interaction characters, i.e., snaking of ring soliton, quasitrapping or reflection of ring soliton and vortexes by the impurity, strongly depend on initial ring soliton velocity, impurity strength, initial position of ring soliton and impurity. The numerical results also reveal that ring dark solitons/vortexes can be trapped and dragged by an adiabatically moving attractive ring impurity

  6. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  7. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahner, C.T.; Shoun, R.R.; McDowell, W.J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl[(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl[(dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)[(diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl]phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl 4 as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen [(diethylcarbamoyl)methyl]-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions

  8. Impurity incorporation, deposition kinetics, and microstructural evolution in sputtered Ta films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitacre, Jay Fredric

    pressure of 1 x 10--6 Torr had grains less than 10 nm in diameter and significant amorphous content Calculated radial distribution functions show a significant increase in average inter-atomic spacing in films grown using higher base pressures and Ar pressures. The amorphous content in the films was determined via comparison between ideal crystalline diffraction patterns and actual data. Thinner films grown at higher Ar pressures had relatively greater amorphous content. Real-time process control using the in-situ diffractometer was also demonstrated. The effects observed are discussed in the context of previous theories and experiments that document room-temperature sputter film growth. The changes in film microstructure observed were impurity mediated. Specifically, oxygen desorbed from the chamber walls during growth were incorporated into the film and subsequently limited grain development and texturing. A second phase consisting of amorphous Ta2O5 formed between the grain nuclei. Adatom kinetics played a role in determining surface morphology: at low Ar pressures (2 mTorr) significant adatom kinetic energies served to flattened the film surface, though impurity levels dominated grain development even in these conditions.

  9. Effects of impurities on radiation damage in InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, M.; Ando, K.

    1986-01-01

    Strong impurity effects upon introduction and annealing behavior of radiation-induced defects in InP irradiated with 1-MeV electrons have been found. The main defect center of 0.37-eV hole trap H4 in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect, is annealed even at room temperature. Its annealing rate is found to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the preirradiation carrier concentration in InP. Moreover, the density of the hole trap H5 (E/sub v/+0.52 eV) in p-InP, which must be due to a point defect--impurity complex, increases with increase in the InP carrier concentration. These results suggest that the radiation-induced defects in InP must recover through long-range diffusion mediated by impurity atoms. A model is proposed in which point defects diffuse to sinks through impurities so as to disappear or bind impurities so as to form point defect--impurity complexes. In addition to the long-range diffusion mechanism, the possibility of charge-state effects responsible for the thermal annealing of radiation-induced defects in InP is also discussed

  10. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities in Oseltamivir Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Kumar Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three known impurities in oseltamivir phosphate bulk drug at level 0.1% (ranging from 0.05-0.1% were detected by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. These impurities were preliminarily identified by the mass number of the impurities. Different experiments were conducted and finally the known impurities were synthesized and characterized.

  11. Memory and Perfection in Ferroelastic Inclusion Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollingsworth, M.; Peterson, M.; Rush, J.; Brown, M.; Abel, M.; Black, A.; Dudley, M.; Raghothamachar, B.; Werner-Zwanziger, U.

    2005-01-01

    In a series of ferroelastic urea inclusion compounds (UICs), in which domain reorientation occurs upon application of an external anisotropic force, introduction of a relaxive impurity that disrupts a specific hydrogen-bonding network transforms a plastic (irreversible) domain-switching process into one that exhibits a striking memory effect and 'rubber-like behavior', a form of pseudoelasticity. As expected for a highly cooperative process, the ferroelastic response to the impurity concentration exhibits a critical threshold. Through synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT) of crystals under stress, videomicroscopy of spontaneous repair during crystal growth, acoustomechanical relaxation of daughter domains, kinetic measurements of spontaneous domain reversion, and solid-state 2 H NMR of labeled guests, this work shows how relaxive impurities lower the barrier to domain switching and how differences in perfection between mother and daughter domains provide the driving force for the memory effects. Although the interfacial effects implicated here are different from the volume effects that operate in certain shape memory materials, the twinning and defect phenomena responsible for the rubber-like behavior and memory effects should be generally applicable to domain switching in ferroelastic and ferroelectric crystals and to other solid-state processes

  12. Radiative losses and electron cooling rates for carbon and oxygen plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchand, R.; Bonnin, X.

    1992-01-01

    Radiative losses and electron cooling rates are calculated for carbon and oxygen ions under conditions relevant to fusion plasmas. Both rates are calculated with the most recent recommended atomic data. A modified coronal model which includes the effects of metastable states is described and used to calculate the rates. Comparisons with other approaches are also discussed. (author). 36 ref, figs

  13. Spectroscopic studies of carbon impurities in PISCES-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Y.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Conn, R.W.; Pospieszczyk, A.

    1989-08-01

    The graphite used for the limiter of the tokamak reactor produces carbon-containing molecular impurities as a result of the interactions with the edge plasma. The behavior of these molecular impurities has been studied using emission spectroscopy. The present study includes: finding molecular bands and atomic lines in the visible spectral range which can be used for the study of the molecular impurities, studying the breakup processes of the molecular impurities on their way from the source into the plasma, developing a spectroscopic diagnostic method for the absolute measurement of the molecular impurity flux resulting from graphite erosion. For these studies, carbon-containing molecules such as CH 4 , C 2 H 2 , C 2 H 4 , and CO 2 were injected into the tokamak-boundary,like plasma generated by PISCES-A. The spectrograms of these gases were taken. Many useful bands and lines were determined from the spectrograms. The breakup processes of these gases were studied by observing the spatial profiles of the emission of the molecules and their radicals for different plasma conditions. For the absolute measurement of the eroded molecular impurity flux, the photon efficiency of the lines and bands were found by measuring the absolute number of the emitted photons and injected gas molecules. The chemical sputtering yield of graphite by hydrogen plasma was spectroscopically measured using the previously obtained photon efficiencies. It showed good agreement with results obtained by weight loss measurements. 16 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  14. Oscillations of quantum transport through double-AB rings with magnetic impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yingfang; Liang, J-Q

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the effect of impurity scattering on the quantum transport through double AB rings in the presence of spin-flipper in the middle lead in terms of one-dimensional quantum waveguide theory. The electron interacts with the impurity through the exchange interaction leading to spin-flip scattering. Transmissions in the spin-flipped and non-spin-flipped channels are calculated explicitly. It is found that the overall transmission and the conductance are distorted due to the impurity scattering. The extent of distortion not only depends on the strength of the impurity potential but also on the impurity position. Moreover, the transmission probability and the conductance are modulated by the magnetic flux, the size of the ring and the impurity potential strength as well

  15. Investigation of impurity defects in α-iron by molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.

    1986-01-01

    Investigation of the configuration of impurity defects in α-iron by the molecular dynamics method is presented. The Jhonson model potential has been used to calculate the interaction of matrix atoms. The impurity-matrix atom interaction is described by the same form of the potential shifted along the axis of interatomic distances for a definite value. The correspondence between the shift value and change in the radius of the impurity defect is established on the basis of calculation of the relaxation volume. Possible configurations of the impurity - interstitial matrix atom complexes are obtained for the given model of the impurity defect, dimensional boundaries of possible transitions between different configurations are determined. Formation and bound energies, relaxation volumes of impurity defects are calculated

  16. Anomalous diffusion, clustering, and pinch of impurities in plasma edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priego, M.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity particles in plasma edge turbulence is investigated. The impurities are modeled as a passive fluid advected by the electric and polarization drifts, while the ambient plasma turbulence is modeled using the two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani paradigm for resistive...... drift-wave turbulence. The features of the turbulent transport of impurities are investigated by numerical simulations using a novel code that applies semi-Lagrangian pseudospectral schemes. The diffusive character of the turbulent transport of ideal impurities is demonstrated by relative...... orientation determined by the charge of the impurity particles. Second, a radial pinch scaling linearly with the mass-charge ratio of the impurities is discovered. Theoretical explanation for these observations is obtained by analysis of the model equations. (C) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  17. Depolarization of diffusing spins by paramagnetic impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schillaci, M.E.; Hutson, R.L.; Heffner, R.H.; Leon, M.; Dodds, S.A.; Estle, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    We study the depolarization of diffusing spins (muons) interacting with dilute paramagnetic impurities in a solid using a simple computational model which properly treats the muon motion and preserves correct muon-impurity distances. Long-range (dipolar) and nearest-neighbor (contact) interactions are treated together. Diffusion parameters are deduced and model comparisons made for AuGd (300 ppm). (orig.)

  18. Regeneration of volatile compounds in Fuji apples following ultra low oxygen atmosphere storage and its effect on sensory acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altisent, Rosa; Graell, Jordi; Lara, Isabel; López, Luisa; Echeverría, Gemma

    2008-09-24

    The aim of this work was to assess whether extra time spent under AIR conditions after storage in an ultra low oxygen (ULO) atmosphere could allow the regeneration of volatile compound emission without negatively affecting quality parameters and the consumer acceptability of Fuji apples. Fruits were stored for 19 and 30 weeks at 1 degrees C and 92% RH under ULO atmosphere conditions (1 kPa O 2:1 kPa CO 2) or under ULO conditions followed by different periods (2 and 4 weeks) in cold AIR atmosphere (ULO + 2w or ULO + 4w, respectively). Standard quality and emission of volatile compounds were analyzed after storage plus 1 and 7 days at 20 degrees C. Sensory attributes and acceptability were also determined after 7 days at 20 degrees C. The extra period of 30 weeks in an AIR atmosphere after ULO storage resulted in an increase in the concentration of the compounds that most contribute to the flavor of Fuji apples. These fruits were relatively well accepted by consumers despite a slight decline in firmness and acidity.

  19. Innovative sludge pretreatment technology for impurity separation using micromesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaojie; Han, Xiaomeng; Zang, Lili; Wu, Zhichao

    2018-05-23

    In order to reduce the impacts on sludge treatment facilities caused by impurities such as fibers, hairs, plastic debris, and coarse sand, an innovative primary sludge pretreatment technology, sludge impurity separator (SIS), was proposed in this study. Non-woven micromesh with pore size of 0.40 mm was used to remove the impurities from primary sludge. Results of lab-scale tests showed that impurity concentration, aeration intensity, and channel gap were the key operation parameters, of which the optimized values were below 25 g/L, 0.8 m 3 /(m 2  min), and 2.5 cm, respectively. In the full-scale SIS with treatment capacity of 300 m 3 /day, over 88% of impurities could be removed from influent and the cleaning cycle of micromesh was more than 16 days. Economic analysis revealed that the average energy consumption was 1.06 kWh/m 3 treated sludge and operation cost was 0.6 yuan/m 3 treated sludge.

  20. Carbon impurity transport around limiters in the DITE tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; Stangeby, P.C.; Goodall, D.H.J.; Matthews, G.F.; McCracken, G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of impurity ions originating at the limiter in a tokamak is critically dependent on the location of the ion in the boundary plasma. In the confined plasma, just inboard of the limiter, impurity ions will disperse freely into the discharge whilst in the scrape-off layer the pre-sheath plasma flow and the associated ambipolar electric field may tend to sweep impurities back to the limiter surface. In this paper we have studied, both by experiment and by theory, the transport of carbon impurity ions in the vicinity of the limiter. By comparing experimental measurements of the spatial distributions of impurities around the limiter with that predicted from a Monte Carlo computer code it appears that the parallel dispersal on closed field lines in the confined plasma is consistent with classical transport processes and that in the scrape-off layer the dispersal is indeed impeded by the pre-sheath plasma flow. (orig.)

  1. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  2. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0141 INTERACTIONS OF ULTRACOLD IMPURITY PARTICLES WITH BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES Georg Raithel UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final...SUBTITLE Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0453 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0453 Reporting Period: 8/15/2010 to 2/14

  3. Kondo Effect of U Impurities in Dilute (YU)2Zn17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeru; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Anzai, Kousuke

    2001-10-01

    Extending previous work on single-site properties of U ions in (LaU)2Zn17, we have investigated, from ρ(T), χ(T) and Cp(T) on single crystals, (Y1-xUx)2Zn17 with x=0.025 and 0.050, which has almost the same unit-cell volume as an antiferromagnetic heavy-electron compound U2Zn17. Remarkable features in the dilute-impurity limit have been clarified, which include Kondo behavior of ρ(T), large and almost isotropic χimp(T), and strongly enhanced Cimp(T)/T with gigantic γimp=2.02 2.05 J/K2·mole-U as T→0 due to a low characteristic energy-scale of the system. It is shown that gross features of the data are explained in terms of the conventional Kondo effect in the presence of the crystal field with the U3+ \\varGamma6 doublet ground state. It is also shown that the variation of γ with the unit-cell volume in related systems is not explained as a volume effect on TK and that even the behavior of fictitious “paramagnetic” U2Zn17 is not described as a collection of U impurities in dilute (YU)2Zn17.

  4. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on conductivity behaviour of needle crystals of iodine and oxygen doped niobium-sulphur compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balla, D.D.; Bondarenko, A.V.; Obolenskij, M.A.; Beletskij, V.I.; Chashka, Kh.B.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of the hydrostatic pressures up to 11 kbar on conductivity behaviour of the needle crystal of iodine and oxygen doped niobium-sulphur compounds were studied in the temperature range 4.2-300 K. It is shown that in the temperature range 110-300 K conductivity is thermal activated (P=1 bar). Below 110 K the Mott characteristic is observed. Under hydrostatic pressure the deviations from Mott characteristic occurs. The analysis of data suggested that crystals are doped semiconductors

  5. Influence of Oxygenated Compounds on Reaction Products in a Microwave Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Assembly for Post-Processing of Sabatier Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, J. Matthew; Abney, Morgan B.

    2012-01-01

    The state-of-the-art Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) was delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) in April 2010. The system is designed to accept carbon dioxide from the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly and hydrogen from the Oxygen Generation Assembly. The two gases are reacted in the CRA in a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane. Venting of methane results in an oxygen resupply requirement of about 378 lbs per crew member per year. If the oxygen is supplied as water, the total weight for resupply is about 476 lb per crew member per year. For long-term missions beyond low Earth orbit, during which resupply capabilities will be further limited, recovery of hydrogen from methane is highly desirable. For this purpose, NASA is pursuing development of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) capable of recovering hydrogen from methane. Under certain conditions, water vapor and carbon dioxide (nominally intended to be separated from the CRA outlet stream) may be present in the PPA feed stream. Thus, testing was conducted in 2010 to determine the effect of these oxygenated compounds on PPA performance, particularly the effect of inlet carbon dioxide and water variations on the PPA product stream. This paper discusses the test set-up, analysis, and results of this testing.

  6. Impurity production and acceleration in CTIX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchenauer, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)], E-mail: dabuche@sandia.gov; Clift, W.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS-9161, P.O. Box 969, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Klauser, R.; Horton, R.D. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Howard, S.J. [General Fusion Inc., Burnaby, BC V5A 3H4 (Canada); Brockington, S.J. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, VA 20151 (United States); Evans, R.W.; Hwang, D.Q. [CTIX Group, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    The Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX) produces a high density, high velocity hydrogen plasma that maintains its configuration in free space on a MHD resistive time scale. In order to study the production and acceleration of impurities in the injector, several sets of silicon collector probes were exposed to spheromak-like CT's exiting the accelerator. Elemental analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy indicated the presence of O, Al, Fe, and Cu in films up to 200 A thickness (1000 CT interactions). Using a smaller number of CT interactions (10-20), implantation of Fe and Cu was measured by Auger depth profiling. The amount of impurities was found to increase with accelerating voltage and number of CT interactions while use of a solenoidal field reduced the amount. Comparison of the implanted Fe and Cu with TRIM simulations indicated that the impurities were traveling more slowly than the hydrogen CT.

  7. Atomistic modeling of an impurity element and a metal-impurity system: pure P and Fe-P system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won-Seok; Lee, Byeong-Joo; Kim, Nack J

    2012-01-01

    An interatomic potential for pure phosphorus, an element that has van der Waals, covalent and metallic bonding character, simultaneously, has been developed for the purpose of application to metal-phosphorus systems. As a simplification, the van der Waals interaction, which is less important in metal-phosphorus systems, was omitted in the parameterization process and potential formulation. On the basis of the second-nearest-neighbor modified embedded-atom method (2NN MEAM) interatomic potential formalism applicable to both covalent and metallic materials, a potential that can describe various fundamental physical properties of a wide range of allotropic or transformed crystalline structures of pure phosphorus could be developed. The potential was then extended to the Fe-P binary system describing various physical properties of intermetallic compounds, bcc and liquid alloys, and also the segregation tendency of phosphorus on grain boundaries of bcc iron, in good agreement with experimental information. The suitability of the present potential and the parameterization process for atomic scale investigations about the effects of various non-metallic impurity elements on metal properties is demonstrated. (paper)

  8. Recirculation of Chilean copper smelting dust with high impurities contents to the smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). EcoTopia Science Inst.; Montenegro, V. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Dust generated during the copper smelting process is generally stabilized using hydrometallurgical methods as it contains high concentrations of arsenic. In this laboratory study, dust was recirculated during the smelting process in order to recover more copper and decrease dust emissions while recovering more copper. The behaviour of impurities and their influence on matte quality was also investigated. Industrial matte, flue dust, slag, and copper concentrates from a Chilean smelter were used as test materials. Dust recirculation tests were conducted in a simulated electric furnace. Off-gases were collected in a reaction tube, and the condensed volatile matter, slag, and matte phases were analyzed for their elemental content by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The distribution of arsenic (As); antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were investigated by varying the amounts of dust recirculating to the smelting stage with 21 per cent of the oxygen. Results showed that distributions of all analyzed elements increased with recirculation. It was concluded that copper can be recovered using the dust recirculation technique. However, impurities may limit the efficacy of the dust recirculation process. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  9. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM) 2 Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(Ph) 2 leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(η 2 -C 6 H 4 ) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO 2 and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe 3 ) 4 Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs

  10. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  11. Impact of Increasing Levels of Oxygen Consumption on the Evolution of Color, Phenolic, and Volatile Compounds of Nebbiolo Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Petrozziello

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the last century, many works have been carried out to verify the effect of controlled oxygen intake on the chemical and organoleptic characteristics of red wines. In spite of the large number of studies on this subject, oxygen remains a cutting-edge research topic in oenology. Oxygen consumption leads to complex and not univocal changes in wine composition, sometimes positive such as color stabilization, softening of mouthfeel, increase of aroma complexity. However, the variability of these effects, which depend both on the oxygenation conditions and the composition of the wine, require more efforts in this research field to effectively manage wine oxygen exposure. The present study is focused on the evolution of the chemical composition of four different Nebbiolo wines, each of them added with 4 different doses of oxygen (7, 14, 21, and 28 mg/L total intake during the first month of storage. In this perspective, the evolution over time of wine color and polyphenols was studied. Acetaldehyde, glyceraldehyde and glyoxylic acid were quantified by HPLC. These compounds can play a role in wine aging creating condensed colored and stable products involving anthocyanins with or without tannins. Moreover, some volatile aldehydes correlated with oxidized olfactory notes, including methional and (E-2-alkenals, have been quantified by GC-MS. Overall, during storage a decrease of color intensity, total and free anthocyanins and an increase in polymeric pigments (in particular the contribution to the red color of pigments not-bleachable by SO2 or dTAT% and some minor aldehydes was observed. Nevertheless, the differences in color parameters between the samples with different doses of oxygen were modest. These evidences were in contrast with an evident and detectable increase of free acetaldehyde content at increasing doses of oxygen measured after 60 days of storage. The effect of oxygen on color and production of SO2 non-bleachable pigments

  12. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  13. Impurity-induced tuning of quantum-well States in spin-dependent resonant tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalitsov, Alan; Coho, A; Kioussis, Nicholas; Vedyayev, Anatoly; Chshiev, M; Granovsky, A

    2004-07-23

    We report exact model calculations of the spin-dependent tunneling in double magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of impurities in the well. We show that the impurity can tune selectively the spin channels giving rise to a wide variety of interesting and novel transport phenomena. The tunneling magnetoresistance, the spin polarization, and the local current can be dramatically enhanced or suppressed by impurities. The underlying mechanism is the impurity-induced shift of the quantum well states (QWSs), which depends on the impurity potential, impurity position, and the symmetry of the QWS. Copyright 2004 The American Physical Society

  14. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Emanuel; Werner, Philipp; Fuchs, Sebastian; Surer, Brigitte; Pruschke, Thomas; Troyer, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo impurity solvers are algorithms that sample the partition function of an impurity model using diagrammatic Monte Carlo techniques. The present paper describes codes that implement the interaction expansion algorithm originally developed by Rubtsov, Savkin, and Lichtenstein, as well as the hybridization expansion method developed by Werner, Millis, Troyer, et al. These impurity solvers are part of the ALPS-DMFT application package and are accompanied by an implementation of dynamical mean-field self-consistency equations for (single orbital single site) dynamical mean-field problems with arbitrary densities of states. Program summaryProgram title: dmft Catalogue identifier: AEIL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEIL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: ALPS LIBRARY LICENSE version 1.1 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 899 806 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 32 153 916 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Operating system: The ALPS libraries have been tested on the following platforms and compilers: Linux with GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher), and Intel C++ Compiler (icc version 7.0 and higher) MacOS X with GNU Compiler (g++ Apple-version 3.1, 3.3 and 4.0) IBM AIX with Visual Age C++ (xlC version 6.0) and GNU (g++ version 3.1 and higher) compilers Compaq Tru64 UNIX with Compq C++ Compiler (cxx) SGI IRIX with MIPSpro C++ Compiler (CC) HP-UX with HP C++ Compiler (aCC) Windows with Cygwin or coLinux platforms and GNU Compiler Collection (g++ version 3.1 and higher) RAM: 10 MB-1 GB Classification: 7.3 External routines: ALPS [1], BLAS/LAPACK, HDF5 Nature of problem: (See [2].) Quantum impurity models describe an atom or molecule embedded in a host material with which it can exchange electrons. They are basic to nanoscience as

  15. Impurity transport calculations for the limiter shadow region of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1981-01-01

    Impurity transport calculations are presented for the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with a poloidal ring limiter. The theory is based on the drift-kinetic equations for the impurity ions in their different ionization states. It is developed in the limit of low impurity concentrations under due consideration of electron impact ionization, Coulomb collisions with hydrogen ions streaming onto a neutralizing surface, a convection along the magnetic field, and a radial drift. The background plasma and the impurity sources at the walls enter the theory as input parameters. Numerical results are given for the radial profiles of density, temperature, particle flux, and energy flux of wall-released impurity ions as well as for the screening efficiency of the scrape-off layer neglecting impurity re-emission from the limiter. (author)

  16. Radiation-chemical disinfection of dissolved impurities and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrukhin, N.V.; Putilov, A.V.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation-chemical neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities formed in the production processes of different materials, while modern plants being in use, is considered. For the first time the processes of deep industrial waste detoxication and due to this peculiarities of practically thorough neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities are considered. Attention is paid to devices and economic factors of neutralization of dissolved toxic impurities. The role of radiation-chemical detoxication for environment protection is considered

  17. [Impurity removal technology of Tongan injection in liquid preparation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-fang; Wang, Xiu-hai; Bai, Wei-rong; Kang, Xiao-dong; Liu, Jun-chao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively remove the invalid impurities in Tongan injection, optimize the optimal parameters of the impurity removal technology of liquid mixing process, in this paper, taking Tongan injection as the research object, with the contents of celandine alkali, and sinomenine, solids reduction efficiency, and related substances inspection as the evaluation indexes, the removal of impurities and related substances by the combined process of refrigeration, coction and activated carbon adsorption were investigated, the feasibility of the impurity removal method was definited and the process parameters were optimized. The optimized process parameters were as follows: refrigerated for 36 h, boiled for 15 min, activated carbon dosage of 0.3%, temperature 100 degrees C, adsorption time 10 min. It can effectively remove the tannin, and other impurities, thus ensure the quality and safety of products.

  18. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented

  19. Thermally and photostimulated charge transfer on impurities and intrinsic defects in YAlO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, V.A.; Bulka, G.P.; Vanshtejn, D.I.

    1989-01-01

    Methods of ESR and thermostimulated luminescence (TSL) were used to study thermo- and photostimulated change of valent state of impurity ions of iron, chromium and oxygen centers in YAlO 3 (YA). On the basis of recovery of ESR O 2 - intensity after pulsed irradiation it was established, that autolocalized holes (ALH) were mobile above 150 K with 0.54 eV activation energy. It is proposed that decay of autolocalized excitons (ALE) in YA is conditioned by thermal mobility of the hole component of ALE. Relationship of TSL with ESL data and results of high-temperature annealing of crystals in vacuum and in the air is discussed

  20. First Principles Calculations of Oxygen Adsorption on the UN(001) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhukovskii, Yuri F.; Bocharov, Dmitry; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Evarestov, Robert; Bandura, A.V.

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication, handling and disposal of nuclear fuel materials require comprehensive knowledge of their surface morphology and reactivity. Due to unavoidable contact with air components (even at low partial pressures), UN samples contain considerable amount of oxygen impurities affecting fuel properties. In this study we focus on reactivity of the energetically most stable (001) substrate of uranium nitride towards the atomic oxygen as one of initial stages for further UN oxidation. The basic properties of O atoms adsorbed on the UN(001) surface are simulated here combining the two first principles calculation methods based on the plane wave basis set and that of the localized orbitals.

  1. A gravimetric method for the determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides by addition of alkaline earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujino, Takeo; Tagawa, Hiroaki; Adachi, Takeo; Hashitani, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    A simple gravimetric determination of oxygen in uranium oxides and ternary uranium oxides is described. In alkaline earth uranates which are formed by heating in air at 800-1100 0 C, uranium is in the hexavalent state over certain continuous ranges of alkaline earth-to-uranium ratios. Thus, if an alkaline earth uranate or a compound containing an alkaline earth element, e.g. MgO, is mixed with the oxide sample and heated in air under suitable conditions, oxygen can be determined from the weight change before and after the reaction. The standard deviation of the O:U ratio for a UOsub(2+x) test sample is +-0.0008-0.001, if a correction is applied for atmospheric moisture absorbed during mixing. (Auth.)

  2. Synthesis of o,p-EDDHA and its detection as the main impurity in o,o-EDDHA commercial iron chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gallego, Mar; Sierra, Miguel A; Alcázar, Roberto; Ramírez, Pedro; Piñar, Carmen; Mancheño, María José; García-Marco, Sonia; Yunta, Felipe; Lucena, Juan José

    2002-10-23

    Ethylenediamine-N,N'bis(o-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (o,o-EDDHA) is one of the most efficient iron chelates employed to relieve iron chlorosis in plants. However, the presence of positional isomers of EDDHA in commercial iron chelates has been recently demonstrated, and among them, it has been claimed that ethylenediamine-N(o-hydroxyphenylacetic)-N'(p-hydroxyphenylacetic) acid (o,p-EDDHA) is the main impurity present in EDDHA fertilizers. Here we report the preparation of o,p-EDDHA, a compound whose synthesis had not been previously reported. The synthetic o,p-EDDHA is able to form ferric complexes, and it has been used as a standard in the analysis of the impurities of commercial iron fertilizers. The presence of o,p-EDDHA/Fe(3+) in commercial samples has been unambiguously demonstrated by HPLC.

  3. Identification and control of unspecified impurity in trimetazidine dihydrochloride tablet formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefri; Puspitasari, A. D.; Talpaneni, J. S. R.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    Trimetazidine dihydrochloride is an anti-ischemic metabolic agent which is used as drug for angina pectoris treatment. The drug substance monograph is available in European Pharmacopoeia and British Pharmacopoeia, while the drug product monograph is not available in any of the pharmacopoeias. During development of trimetazidine dihydrochloride tablet formulation, we found increase of an unspecified impurity during preliminary stability study. The unspecified impurity was identified by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and the molecular weight obtained was matching with the molecular weight of N-formyl trimetazidine (m/z 295). Further experiments were performed to confirm the suspected result by injecting the impurity standard and spiking formic acid into the drug substance. The retention time of N-formyl trimetazidine was similar to the unspecified impurity in drug product. Even spiking of formic acid into drug substance showed that the suspected impurity increased with increasing concentration of formic acid. The proposed mechanism of impurity formation is via amidation of piperazine moiety of trimetazidine by formic acid which present as residual solvent in tablet binder used in the formulation. Subsequently, the impurity in our product was controlled by choosing the primary packaging which could minimize the formation of impurity.

  4. Investigation of the impurity transport in the ASDEX tokamak by spectroscopical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, K.W.

    1990-12-01

    Plasma impurities: a central problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion; magnetic plasma confinement in a Tokamak; methods to the determination of plasma impurity transport coefficients - by temporally modulated gas admission; the transport equation for impurities; neoclassical and anomalous transport; harmonic analysis of time-dependent signals; solutions of the transport equation; experimental equipment and measurements; measuring results - consistency of simple transport models with radial phase measurements; linearity of the transport processes; plasma disturbance by impurity injection; determination of the diffusion coefficient by simplified transport models; comparison of transport models for impurities and background plasma; measurements of the impurity transport at the plasma edge by high modulation frequencies. (AH)

  5. Impurity effects of hydrogen isotope retention on boronized wall in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji; Ashikawa, Naoko; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Sagara, Akio

    2010-11-01

    The impurity effect on hydrogen isotopes retention in the boron film deposited in LHD was evaluated by means of XPS and TDS. It was found that the impurity concentrations in boron film were increased after H-H main plasma exposure in LHD. The ratio of hydrogen retention trapped by impurity to total hydrogen retention during H-H main plasma exposure was reached to 70%, although that of deuterium retention by impurity in D 2 + implanted LHD-boron film was about 35%. In addition, the dynamic chemical sputtering of hydrogen isotopes with impurity as the form of water and / or hydrocarbons was occurred by energetic hydrogen isotopes irradiation. It was expected that the enhancement of impurity concentration during plasma exposure in LHD would induce the dynamic formation of volatile molecules and their re-emission to plasma. These facts would prevent stable plasma operation in LHD, concluding that the dynamic impurity behavior in boron film during plasma exposure is one of key issues for the steady-state plasma operation in LHD. (author)

  6. Thermal conductivity of bulk GaN—Effects of oxygen, magnesium doping, and strain field compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Roland B.; Anaya, Julian; Kuball, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of oxygen doping (n-type) and oxygen (O)-magnesium (Mg) co-doping (semi-insulating) on the thermal conductivity of ammonothermal bulk GaN was studied via 3-omega measurements and a modified Callaway model. Oxygen doping was shown to significantly reduce thermal conductivity, whereas O-Mg co-doped GaN exhibited a thermal conductivity close to that of undoped GaN. The latter was attributed to a decreased phonon scattering rate due the compensation of impurity-generated strain fields as a result of dopant-complex formation. The results have great implications for GaN electronic and optoelectronic device applications on bulk GaN substrates

  7. Role of defects on the electronic and magnetic properties of CrAs, CrSe and CrSb zinc-blende compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanakis, I.; Pouliasis, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    We present an extended study of single impurity atoms and atomic swaps in half-metallic CrAs, CrSb and CrSe zinc-blende compounds. Although the perfect alloys present a rather large gap in the minority-spin band, all defects under study, with the exception of void impurities at Cr and sp sites and Cr impurities at sp sites (as long as no swap occurs), induce new states within the gap. The Fermi level can be pinned within these new minority states depending on the lattice constant used for the calculations and the electronegativity of the sp atoms. Although these impurity states are localized in space around the impurity atoms and very fast we regain the bulk behavior, their interaction can lead to wide bands within the gap and thus loss of the half-metallic character

  8. Effect of suprathermal electrons on the impurity ionization state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochando, M A; Medina, F; Zurro, B; McCarthy, K J; Pedrosa, M A; Baciero, A; Rapisarda, D; Carmona, J M; Jimenez, D

    2006-01-01

    The effect of electron cyclotron resonance heating induced suprathermal electron tails on the ionization of iron impurities in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated. The behaviour of plasma emissivity immediately after injection provides evidence of a spatially localized 'shift' towards higher charge states of the impurity. Bearing in mind that the non-inductive plasma heating methods generate long lasting non-Maxwellian distribution functions, possible implications on the deduced impurity transport coefficients, when fast electrons are present, are discussed

  9. Impurity levels: corrections to the effective mass approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentosela, F.

    1977-07-01

    Some rigorous results concerning the effective mass approximation used for the calculation of the impurity levels in semiconductors are presented. Each energy level is expressed as an asymptotic series in the inverse of the dielectric constant K, in the case where the impurity potential is 1/μ

  10. Effect of annealing and impurity concentration on the TL characteristics of nanocrystalline Mn-doped CaF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahare, P.D.; Singh, Manveer; Kumar, Pratik

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline samples of Mn-doped CaF 2 were synthesized by chemical coprecipitation method. The impurity concentration was varied in the range of 0.5–4.0 mol%. The structure of the synthesized material was confirmed using powder XRD analysis. TEM images of the nanoparticles show their size occurring mostly in the range of 35–40 nm, with clusters of some impurity phases formed on annealing of the material at higher temperatures. Detailed studies on TL showed that the structures of glow curves depend on Mn concentrations and annealing temperatures. Optimization of the concentration and annealing temperature showed that the sample (doped with 3.0 mol% and annealed at 673 K) has almost a single dosimetric glow peak appearing at around 492 K. EPR and PL spectra were further studied to understand the reasons for changes in the glow curve structures. All detailed studies on TL, PL and EPR showed that the changes in glow curve structures are caused not only by the stress connected with the difference in ionic radii of host Ca 2+ and the guest impurity Mn 3+ /Mn 2+ , but are also governed by other reasons, like diffusion of atmospheric oxygen and formation of impurity aggregates, such as, MnO 2 , Mn 3 O 4 , etc. This is true not only for nanocrystalline CaF 2 :Mn but could also be so for the bulk CaF 2 :Mn (TLD-400) and would thus help in understanding complex glow curve structure, high fading and the loss of reusability on annealing beyond 673 K. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline material CaF 2 :Mn is prepared by simple coprecipitation method. • The material is studied by XRD, TEM, ESR, TL and PL techniques. • High impurity concentrations give rise to clusters causing material instability. • Changes in ESR and PL and glow curve structures are studied and explained. • Better characteristics than the bulk make the nanophosphor useful for dosimetry

  11. Damping of elastic waves in crystals with impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemanov, V.V.; Petrov, A.V.; Akhmedzhanov, F.R.; Nasyrov, A.N.

    1979-01-01

    Elastic wave damping and thermal conductivity of NaCl-NaBr and Y 3 AL 5 O 12 crystals with Er impurity has been examined. The experimental results on a decrease in elastic wave damping in such crystals are analyzed in the framework of the Ahiezer damping theory. The measurements were made in the frequency range of 300-1500 MHz in propagation of longitudinal and transverse elastic waves along the [100] and [110] directions. At 10 % concentration of erbium impurity the transverse wave damping decreases by a factor of three, and for longitudinal waves by a factor of two in NaBr:Cl crystals, and by approximately 10 and 30 % for NaBr:Cl and Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Er crystals, respectively. In Y 3 Al 5 O 12 crystals, unlike NaCl-NaBr crystals, no noticeable anisotropy of damping is observed. The transVerse wave damping in impurity crystals has been shown to increase significantly with decreasing temperature and increasing the impurity concentration

  12. Investigation of impurity-helium solid phase decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boltnev, R.E.; Gordon, E.B.; Krushinskaya, I.N.; Martynenko, M.V.; Pel'menev, A.A.; Popov, E.A.; Khmelenko, V.V.; Shestakov, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    The element composition of the impurity-helium solid phase (IHSP), grown by injecting helium gas jet, involving Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe atoms and N 2 molecules, into superfluid helium, has been studied. The measured stoichiometric ratios, S = N H e / N I m, are well over the values expected from the model of frozen together monolayer helium clusters. The theoretical possibility for the freezing of two layers helium clusters is justified in the context of the model of IHSP helium subsystem, filled the space between rigid impurity centers. The process of decomposition of impurity-helium (IH)-samples taken out of liquid helium in the temperature range 1,5 - 12 K and the pressure range 10-500 Torr has been studied. It is found that there are two stages of samples decomposition: a slow stage characterized by sample self cooling and a fast one accompanied by heat release. These results suggest, that the IHSP consists of two types of helium - weakly bound and strongly bound helium - that can be assigned to the second and the first coordination helium spheres, respectively, formed around heavy impurity particles. A tendency for enhancement of IHSP thermo stability with increasing the impurity mass is observed. Increase of helium vapor pressure above the sample causes the improvement of IH sample stability. Upon destruction of IH samples, containing nitrogen atoms, a thermoluminescence induced by atom recombination has been detected in the temperature region 3-4,5 K. This suggests that numerous chemical reactions may be realized in solidified helium

  13. Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence-spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husinsky, W.R.

    1980-08-01

    Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local, time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler - broadened absorbtion spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10 6 atoms/cm 3 with a velocity resolution of 600 m/sec (0.1 eV) have been achieved. Techniques for exciting plasma particles (H,D) will also be discussed

  14. Orbit effects on impurity transport in a rotating plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, very high ion temperature plasmas were first produced in TFTR with co-injecting neutral beams in low current, low density plasmas. This mode of operation is called the energetic ion mode in which the plasma rotates at very high speed. It was found that heavy impurities injected into these plasmas diffused out very quickly. In this paper, the authors calculate the impurity ion orbits in a rotating tokamak plasma based on the equation of motion in the frame that rotates with the plasma. It is shown that heavy particles in a rotating plasma can drift away from magnetic surfaces significantly faster. Particle orbits near the surface of a rotating tokamak are also analyzed. During impurity injection experiments, freshly ionized impurities near the plasma surface are essentially stationary in the laboratory frame and they are counter-rotating in the plasma frame with co-beam injection. The results are substantiated by numeral particle simulation. The computer code follows the impurity guiding center positions by integrating the equation of motion with the second order predictor-corrector method

  15. Resonant scattering on impurities in the quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurvitz, A.

    1994-06-01

    We developed a new approach to carrier transport between the edge states via resonant scattering on impurities, which is applicable both for short and long range impurities. A detailed analysis of resonant scattering on a single impurity is performed. The results used for study of the inter-edge transport by multiple resonant hopping via different impurities' site. We found the total conductance can be obtained from an effective Schroedinger equation with constant diagonal matrix elements in the Hamiltonian, where the complex non-diagonal matrix elements are the amplitudes of a carrier hopping between different impurities. It is explicitly shown how the complex phase leads to Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in the total conductance. Neglecting the contribution of self-crossing resonant-percolation trajectories, we found that the inter-edge carrier transport is similar to propagation in one-dimensional system with off-diagonal disorder. Then we demonstrated that each Landau band has an extended state Ε Ν , while all other states are localized, and the localization length behaves as L - 1 Ν (Ε) ∼ (Ε - Ε Ν ) 2 . (author)

  16. A validated stability-indicating LC method for the separation of enantiomer and potential impurities of Linezolid using polar organic mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana Raju, T; Vishweshwari Kutty, O; Ganesh, V; Yadagiri Swamy, P

    2012-08-01

    Although a number of methods are available for evaluating Linezolid and its possible impurities, a common method for separation if its potential impurities, degradants and enantiomer in a single method with good efficiency remain unavailable. With the objective of developing an advanced method with shorter runtimes, a simple, precise, accurate stability-indicating LC method was developed for the determination of purity of Linezolid drug substance and drug products in bulk samples and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of its impurities and degradation products. This method is capable of separating all the related substances of Linezolid along with the chiral impurity. This method can also be used for the estimation of assay of Linezolid in drug substance as well as in drug product. The method was developed using Chiralpak IA (250 mm×4.6 mm, 5 μm) column. A mixture of acetonitrile, ethanol, n-butyl amine and trifluoro acetic acid in 96:4:0.10:0.16 (v/v/v/v) ratio was used as a mobile phase. The eluted compounds were monitored at 254 nm. Linezolid was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guidelines with respect to specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, linearity, accuracy, robustness and system suitability.

  17. Characterization of transport properties in uranium dioxide: the case of the oxygen auto-diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraczkiewicz, M.; Baldinozzi, G.

    2008-01-01

    Point defects in uranium dioxide which control the transport phenomena are still badly known. The aim of this work is to show how in carrying out several experimental techniques, it is possible to demonstrate both the existence and to determine the nature (charge and localization) of predominant defects responsible of the transport phenomena in a fluorite-type structure oxide. The oxygen diffusion in the uranium dioxide illustrates this. In the first part of this work, the accent is put on the electric properties of uranium dioxide and more particularly on the variation laws of the electric conductivity in terms of temperature, of oxygen potential and of the impurities amounts present in the material. These evolutions are connected to point and charged complex defects models and the pertinence of these models is discussed. Besides, it is shown how the electric conductivity measurements can allow to define oxygen potential domains in which the concentrations in electronic carriers are controlled. This characterization being made, it is shown that the determination of the oxygen intrinsic diffusion coefficient and particularly its dependence to the oxygen potential and to the amount of impurity, allows to determine the main defect responsible to the atomic diffusion as well as its nature and its charge. In the second part, the experimental techniques to determine the oxygen diffusion coefficient are presented: there are the isotopic exchange technique for introducing the tracer in the material, and two techniques to characterize the diffusion profiles (SIMS and NRA). Examples of preliminary results are given for mono and polycrystalline samples. At last, from this methodology on uranium dioxide, studies considered to quantify the thermal and physicochemical effects are presented. Experiments considered with the aim to characterize the radiation diffusion in uranium dioxide are presented too. (O.M.)

  18. Harmful situations, impure people: an attribution asymmetry across moral domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroff, Alek; Young, Liane

    2015-03-01

    People make inferences about the actions of others, assessing whether an act is best explained by person-based versus situation-based accounts. Here we examine people's explanations for norm violations in different domains: harmful acts (e.g., assault) and impure acts (e.g., incest). Across four studies, we find evidence for an attribution asymmetry: people endorse more person-based attributions for impure versus harmful acts. This attribution asymmetry is partly explained by the abnormality of impure versus harmful acts, but not by differences in the moral wrongness or the statistical frequency of these acts. Finally, this asymmetry persists even when the situational factors that lead an agent to act impurely are stipulated. These results suggest that, relative to harmful acts, impure acts are linked to person-based attributions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Lithium Oxysilicate Compounds Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apblett, Christopher A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coyle, Jaclyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the structure and composition of lithium silicate thin films deposited by RF magnetron co-sputtering is investigated. Five compositions ranging from Li2Si2O5 to Li8SiO6 were confirmed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and structure analysis on the evolution of non-bridging oxygens in the thin films was conducted with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that non-bridging oxygens (NBOs) increased as the silicate network breaks apart with increasing lithium content which agrees with previous studies on lithium silicates. Thin film impurities were examined with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (TOFSIMS) and traced back to target synthesis. This study utilizes a unique synthesis technique for lithium silicate thin films and can be referred to in future studies on the ionic conductivity of lithium silicates formed on the surface of silicon anodes in lithium ion batteries.

  20. Impurity strength and impurity domain modulated frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear response properties of doped quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Nirmal Kumar [Department of Physics, Suri Vidyasagar College, Suri, Birbhum 731 101, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2011-08-15

    We explore the pattern of frequency-dependent linear and second non-linear optical responses of repulsive impurity doped quantum dots harmonically confined in two dimensions. The dopant impurity potential chosen assumes a Gaussian form and it is doped into an on-center location. The quantum dot is subject to a periodically oscillating external electric field. For some fixed values of transverse magnetic field strength ({omega}{sub c}) and harmonic confinement potential ({omega}{sub 0}), the influence of impurity strength (V{sub 0}) and impurity domain ({xi}) on the diagonal components of the frequency-dependent linear ({alpha}{sub xx} and {alpha}{sub yy}) and second non-linear ({gamma}{sub xxxx} and {gamma}{sub yyyy}) responses of the dot are computed through a linear variational route. The investigations reveal that the optical responses undergo enhancement with increase in both V{sub 0} and {xi} values. However, in the limitingly small dopant strength regime one observes a drop in the optical responses with increase in V{sub 0}. A time-average rate of energy transfer to the system is often invoked to support the findings. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in GeC nanoribbons: A first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhuo; Li, Yangping, E-mail: liyp@nwpu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhengtang

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • The impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. • The impurities could result in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR. • The impurities turns the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR into semiconductor. • The impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR. • The impurities could introduce magnetic moments into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR. - Abstract: Using first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory we investigated the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of substitutional boron, nitrogen, and nickel impurities in germanium carbide (GeC) nanoribbons. Hydrogen terminated GeC ribbons with armchair and zigzag edges are considered here. We observed that all three impurities preferentially substitutes the Ge atom at the ribbon edge. In addition, the electronic band structures of the doped systems indicate that (i) the impurities could introduce impurity bands in the band gap and resulting in a reduction of the band gap of 7-AGeCNR, (ii) the metallic behavior of 4-ZGeCNR turns into semiconductor because of the incorporation of the impurities, (iii) the impurities could change the magnetic moment of 4-ZGeCNR and even introduce magnetic moment into the non-magnetic 7-AGeCNR.

  2. Low oxygen saturation and severe anemia in compound heterozygous Hb Louisville [β42(CD1)Phe→Leu] and Hb La Desirade [β129(H7)Ala→Val].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamseng, Parin; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Trachoo, Objoon; Yimniam, Walaiporn; Panthan, Bhakbhoom; Jittorntam, Paisan; Niparuck, Pimjai; Sanguanwit, Pitsucha; Wananukul, Winai; Jindadamrongwech, Sumalee

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the cause(s) of a Thai male proband presenting low oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO 2 ) and severe anemia. As Hb variant was suspected, Hb typing was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis, and subsequently Hb variant was identified by DNA sequencing. Complete blood counts were performed using automated blood cell counter and oxygen saturation was measured by pulse oximetry. Proband was compound heterozygous for Hb Louisville [β42(CD1)Phe→Leu] and Hb La Desirade [β129(H7)Ala→Val]. Of the proband's two sons, one was compound heterozygous for Hb Louisville and Hb E and the other for Hb La Desirade and Hb E. The former son had similar clinical features and laboratory findings with those of the proband while the latter showed had no abnormal clinical manifestations. This the first report of compound heterozygosity of Hb Louisville and Hb La Desirade in an individual of Southeast Asian ethnicity. Hb variant identification is crucial for genetic counseling and appropriate treatment in regions where hemoglobinopathies are common.

  3. Characterization of intermittency of impurity turbulent transport in tokamak edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    The statistical properties of impurity transport of a tokamak edge plasma embedded in a dissipative drift-wave turbulence are investigated using structure function analysis. The impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma flow. Two cases of impurity advection are studied and compared: A decaying impurities case (given by a diffusion-advection equation) and a driven case (forced by a mean scalar gradient). The use of extended self-similarity enables us to show that the relative scaling exponent of structure functions of impurity density and vorticity exhibit similar multifractal scaling in the decaying case and follows the She-Leveque model. However, this property is invalidated for the impurity driven advection case. For both cases, potential fluctuations are self-similar and exhibit a monofractal scaling in agreement with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan theory for two-dimensional turbulence. These results obtained with a passive scalar model agree also with test-particle simulations.

  4. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  5. Modeling of impurity transport in the core plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of computer modeling of impurity transport in the core region of controlled thermonuclear fusion plasmas. The atomic processes of importance in these high temperature plasmas and the numerical formulation of the model are described. Selected modeling examples are then used to highlight some features of the physics of impurity behavior in large tokamak fusion devices, with an emphasis on demonstrating the sensitivity of such modeling to uncertainties in the rate coefficients used for the atomic processes. This leads to a discussion of current requirements and opportunities for generating the improved sets of comprehensive atomic data needed to support present and future fusion impurity modeling studies

  6. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  7. Nitrogen, oxygen or sulfur containing heterocyclic compounds as analgesic drugs used as modulators of the nitroxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salat, Kinga; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Librowski, Tadeusz

    2013-03-01

    Numerous lines of evidence suggest that heterocyclic compounds used as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-migraine agents can be potent regulators of the nitroxidative stress and targeting free nitrogen and oxygen radicals is a very promising strategy for future pain management. Both classical analgesics (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioid drugs) and many analgesic adjuvants, including desipramine, duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, escitalopram, phenytoin or carbamazepine and α-lipoic acid can modulate the balance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in the mammalian tissues and these properties of drugs such as indomethacin, meloxicam, tenoxicam, valdecoxib or some metabolites of analgesic drugs formed by the activity of tissue peroxidases may contribute to their clinical efficacy and drug-related toxic effects, including gastrointestinal ulcers, hepatic failure, agranulocytosis, aplastic anemia, neutropenia, opiate-induced hyperalgesia and tolerance. The antioxidant capacities of novel heterocyclic compounds, including the compounds acting either by prevention of formation or catalyzed decomposition of peroxynitrite anion (ONOO-), namely the peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts or as superoxide (O2 •-)-scavengers which are the functional mimetics of superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes (SODm), as well as the derivatives of 6-nitro-3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl-Nacylhydrazone (LASSBio-881) or γ-butyrolactone (LPP1, BM113, BM113A, BM138 and BM138A) are also discussed as potent and promising future heterocyclic analgesics.

  8. Tokamak impurity-control techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review is given of the impurity-control functions in tokamaks, their relative merits and disadvantages and some prominent edge-interaction-control techniques, and there is a discussion of a new proposal, the particle scraper, and its potential advantages. (author)

  9. Distribution of impurity elements in slag-silicon equilibria for oxidative refining of metallurgical silicon for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, M.D.; Barati, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    The possibility of refining metallurgical grade silicon to a high-purity product for solar cell applications by the slagging of impurity elements was investigated. Distribution coefficients were determined for B, Ca, Mg, Fe, K and P between magnesia or alumina saturated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO-MgO-SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-BaO-SiO{sub 2} slags and silicon at 1500 C. The partitioning of the impurity elements between molten silicon and slag was examined in terms of basicity and oxygen potential of the slag, with particular focus on the behaviour of boron and phosphorus. The experimental results showed that both of these aspects of slag chemistry have a significant influence on the distribution coefficient of B and P. Increasing the oxygen potential by additions of silica was found to increase the distribution coefficients for both B and P. Increasing the basicity of the slag was not always effective in achieving high removal of these elements from silicon as excess amounts of basic oxides lower the activity of silica and consequently the oxygen potential. The extent of this effect is such that increasing basicity can lead to a decrease in distribution coefficient. Increasing lime in the slag increased distribution coefficients for B and P, but this counterbalancing effect was such that distributions were the lowest in barium-containing slags, despite barium oxide being the most basic of the fluxes used in this study. The highest removal efficiencies achieved were of the order of 80% and 90% for B and P, respectively. It was demonstrated that for the removal of B and P from metallurgical-grade silicon to solar-grade levels, a slag mass about 5 times the mass of silicon would be required. (author)

  10. Influence of the impurity-defect and impurity-impurity interactions on the crystalline silicon solar cells conversion efficiency; Influence des interactions impurete-defaut et impurete-impurete sur le rendement de conversion des cellules photovoltaiques au silicium cristallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, S

    2007-05-15

    This study aims at understanding the influence of the impurity - defect interaction on the silicon solar cell performances. We studied first the case of single-crystalline silicon. We combined numerical simulations and experimental data providing new knowledge concerning metal impurities in silicon, to quantify the evolution of the conversion efficiency with the impurity concentration. Mainly due to the gettering effects, iron appears to be quite well tolerated. It is not the case for gold, diffusing too slowly. Hydrogenation effects were limited. We transposed then this study toward multi-crystalline silicon. Iron seems rather well tolerated, due to the gettering effects but also due to the efficiency of the hydrogenation. When slow diffusers are present, multi crystalline silicon is sensitive to thermal degradation. n-type silicon could solve this problem, this material being less sensitive to metal impurities. (author)

  11. Oxygen diffusion in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.J.; Routbort, J.L.

    1992-07-01

    The cuprate superconductors are fascinating not only because of their technical promise, but also because of their structures, especially the anisotropy of the crystal lattice. There are some structural similarities among these compounds, but also significant differences. Measurements of the oxygen tracer diffusion coefficients have been carried out as a function of temperature, oxygen partial pressure, crystal orientation, and doping in the La-Sr-Cu-0, Y-Ba-Cu-0, and Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-0 systems. These measurements have revealed a variety of defect mechanisms operating in these compounds; the exact nature of the mechanism depends on the details of the structure

  12. Impurity states in two - and three-dimensional disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.F. da; Fabbri, M.

    1984-01-01

    We investigate the microscopic structure of the impurity states in two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3d) disordered systems. A cluster model is outlined for the donor impurity density of states (DIDS) of doped semiconductors. It is shown that the impurity states are very sensitive to a change in the dimensionality of the system, i.e from 3D to 2D system. It is found that all eigenstates become localized in 2D disordered system for a large range of concentration. (Author) [pt

  13. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  14. Impurity states in two-and three-dimensional disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.F. da; Fabbri, M.

    1984-04-01

    The microscopic structure of the impurity states in two-and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) disordered systems is investigated. A cluster model is outlined for the donor impurity density of states (DIDS) of doped semiconductors. It is shown that the impurity states are very sensitive to a change in the dimensionality of the system, i.e., from 3D to 2D system. It is found that all eigenstates become localized in 2D disordered system for a large range of concentration. (Author) [pt

  15. Effect of HEH[EHP] impurities on the ALSEP solvent extraction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holfeltz, Vanessa E. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Campbell, Emily L. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Peterman, Dean R. [Aqueous Separations and Radiochemistry Department, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID, USA; Standaert, Robert F. [Biosciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Department of Biochemistry & amp, Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA; Biology & amp, Soft Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Shull Wollan Center — a Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Paulenova, Alena [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA; Lumetta, Gregg J. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA; Levitskaia, Tatiana G. [Nuclear Chemistry and Engineering Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA

    2017-12-20

    In solvent extraction processes, organic phase impurities can negatively impact separation factors, hydrolytic performance, and overall system robustness. This affects the process-level viability of a separation concept and necessitates knowledge of the behavior and mechanisms to control impurities in the solvent. The most widespread way through which impurities are introduced into a system is through impure extractants and/or diluents used to prepare the solvent, and often development of new purification schemes to achieve the desired level of purity is needed. In this work, the acidic extractant, 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (HEH[EHP])—proposed for application in extractive processes aimed at separating trivalent minor actinides from lanthanides and other fission products—is characterized with respect to its common impurities and their impact on Am(III) stripping in the Actinide Lanthanide SEParation (ALSEP) system. To control impurities in HEH[EHP], existing purification technologies commonly applied for the acidic organophosphorus reagents are reviewed, and a new method specific to HEH[EHP] purification is presented.

  16. Tight-Binding Description of Impurity States in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Adame, F.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory textbooks in solid state physics usually present the hydrogenic impurity model to calculate the energy of carriers bound to donors or acceptors in semiconductors. This model treats the pure semiconductor as a homogeneous medium and the impurity is represented as a fixed point charge. This approach is only valid for shallow impurities…

  17. Accurate determination of non-metallic impurities in high purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide using inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Xie, Hualin; Shi, Shuyun; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2018-06-01

    The content of non-metallic impurities in high-purity tetramethylammonium hydroxide (HPTMAH) aqueous solution has an important influence on the yield, electrical properties and reliability of the integrated circuit during the process of chip etching and cleaning. Therefore, an efficient analytical method to directly quantify the content of non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solutions is necessary. The present study was aimed to develop a novel method that can accurately determine seven non-metallic impurities (B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se) in an aqueous solution of HPTMAH by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry (ICP-MS/MS). The samples were measured using a direct injection method. In the MS/MS mode, oxygen and hydrogen were used as reaction gases in the octopole reaction system (ORS) to eliminate mass spectral interferences during the analytical process. The detection limits of B, Si, P, S, Cl, As, and Se were 0.31, 0.48, 0.051, 0.27, 3.10, 0.008, and 0.005 μg L-1, respectively. The samples were analyzed by the developed method and the sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SF-ICP-MS) was used for contrastive analysis. The values of these seven elements measured using ICP-MS/MS were consistent with those measured by SF-ICP-MS. The proposed method can be utilized to analyze non-metallic impurities in HPTMAH aqueous solution. Table S2 Multiple potential interferences on the analytes. Table S3 Parameters of calibration curve and the detection limit (DL). Table S4 Results obtained for 25% concentration high-purity grade TMAH aqueous solution samples (μg L-1, mean ± standard deviation, n = 10).

  18. BWR water chemistry impurity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ljungberg, L.G.; Korhonen, S.; Renstroem, K.; Hofling, C.G.; Rebensdorff, B.

    1990-03-01

    Laboratory studies were made on the effect of water impurities on environmental cracking in simulated BWR water of stainless steel, low alloy steel and nickel-base alloys. Constant elongation rate tensile (CERT) tests were run in simulated normal water chemistry (NWC), hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), or start-up environment. Sulfate, chloride and copper with chloride added to the water at levels of a fraction of a ppM were found to be extremely deleterious to all kinds of materials except Type 316 NG. Other detrimental impurities were fluoride, silica and some organic acids, although acetic acid was beneficial. Nitrate and carbon dioxide were fairly inoccuous. Corrosion fatigue and constant load tests on compact tension specimens were run in simulated normal BWR water chemistry (NWC) or hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), without impurities or with added sulfate or carbon dioxide. For sensitized Type 304 SS in NWC, 0.1 ppM sulfate increased crack propagation rates in constant load tests by up to a factor of 100, and in fatigue tests up to a factor of 10. Also, cracking in Type 316 nuclear grade SS and Alloy 600 was enhanced, but to a smaller degree. Carbon dioxide was less detrimental than sulfate. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  19. STM tunneling through a quantum wire with a side-attached impurity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwapinski, T.; Krawiec, M.; Jalochowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    The STM tunneling through a quantum wire (QW) with a side-attached impurity (atom, island) is investigated using a tight-binding model and the non-equilibrium Keldysh Green function method. The impurity can be coupled to one or more QW atoms. The presence of the impurity strongly modifies the local density of states of the wire atoms, thus influences the STM tunneling through all the wire atoms. The transport properties of the impurity itself are also investigated mainly as a function of the wire length and the way it is coupled to the wire. It is shown that the properties of the impurity itself and the way it is coupled to the wire strongly influence the STM tunneling, the density of states and differential conductance

  20. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  1. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Jia; Li Yingying; Shi Yuejiang; Wang Fudi; Zhang Wei; Lv Bo; Huang Juan; Wan Baonian; Zhou Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200∼750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Dα/Hα line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system. (magnetically confined plasma)

  2. Properties of magnetic impurities embedded into an anisotropic Heisenberg chain with spin gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.

    2000-01-01

    We consider a U(1)-invariant model consisting of the integrable anisotropic easy-axis Heisenberg chain of arbitrary spin S embedding an impurity of spin S'. The host chain has a spin gap for all values of S. The ground state properties and the elementary excitations of the host are studied as a function of the anisotropy and the magnetic field. The impurity is located on a link of the chain and interacts only with both neighboring sites. The coupling of the impurity to the lattice can be tuned by the impurity rapidity p 0 (usually playing the role of the Kondo coupling). The impurity model is then integrable as a function of two continuous parameters (the anisotropy and the impurity rapidity) and two discrete variables (the spins S and S'). The Bethe ansatz equations are derived and used to obtain the magnetization of the impurity. The impurity magnetization is non-universal as a function of p 0 . For small fields the impurity magnetization is determined by the spin gap and the van Hove singularity of the rapidity band. For an overcompensated impurity (S'< S) at intermediate fields there is a crossover to non-Fermi-liquid behavior remnant from the suppressed quantum critical point

  3. Impurity production and transport at the JET belt limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, C.S.; McCracken, G.M.; Strangeby, P.C.; Toronto Univ., ON; Summers, D.D.R.

    1989-01-01

    Under certain operating conditions in JET the impurity content of the discharge can be high, thus reducing the fusion reaction rate through the dilution of the hydrogenic fuel. The dilution in most discharges is predominantly due to carbon impurities. In order to understand how carbon impurities are produced and transported into the plasma, detailed measurements with interference filters centered on intense spectral lines of the low ionization states of carbon (C I, C II, C III) as well as the fuel species (Dα) and helium (He I). (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  4. Behavior of arsenic impurity at antimony electric precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.N.; Rakhmanov, A.

    2001-01-01

    In the paper the arsenic impurity electrochemical behavior and it purification from antimony by electric precipitation out of fluoride solutions was studied. For this the arsenic sample with mass 0.003-0.006 g has been irradiated at the WWR-SM nuclear reactor during 3-5 hour in the thermal neutron flux 10 13 n/cm 2 s, after 24 h keeping the sample has being dissolved in the concentrated nitric acid, and then it has been evaporated several times with distillation water addition up to wet precipitation state. It is shown, that arsenic impurity behavior character in the antimony electric precipitation out to fluoride electrolyte depends on the electrolyte content, electrolysis conditions, arsenic valency state in arsenic impurity existence in the five-valency state its joint electric reduction with antimony is practically not observing. In the case the arsenic being in three-valency state, it joint electric reduction with antimony is taking place. In this time the electrolytic antimony contents arsenic impurities less in dozen time than initial material

  5. Quenching of overcompensated Kondo impurities via channel asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlottmann, P.; Lee, K.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a spin-1/2 impurity interacting with conduction electrons in two different orbital channels via an isotropic spin exchange. The exchange is the same for both channels, but a crystalline field breaks the symmetry between the orbital channels. This corresponds to a splitting of the conduction electron Γ 8 into two doublets in the quadrupolar Kondo effect and to the application of an external magnetic field in the electron assisted tunneling of an atom in a double-well potential. We study the ground-state properties of the impurity as a function of the magnetic and crystalline fields. The crystalline field quenches the critical behavior of the overcompensated fixed point: The impurity ground state is a singlet. (orig.)

  6. A one-dimensional plasma and impurity transport model for reversed field pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasingam, R.

    1991-11-01

    In this thesis a one-dimensional (1-D) plasma and impurity transport model is developed to address issues related to impurity behavior in Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) fusion plasmas. A coronal non-equilibrium model is used for impurities. The impurity model is incorporated into an existing one dimensional plasma transport model creating a multi-species plasma transport model which treats the plasma and impurity evolution self-consistently. Neutral deuterium particles are treated using a one-dimensional (slab) model of neutral transport. The resulting mode, RFPBI, is then applied to existing RFP devices such as ZT-40M and MST, and also to examine steady state behavior of ZTH based on the design parameters. A parallel algorithm for the impurity transport equations is implemented and tested to determine speedup and efficiency

  7. Computers in the investigation of the impurity content of high-purity materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, Yu.B.; Yan'kov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency of the concept of data banks for the accumulation and processing of information is now generally acknowledged. In scientific investigations not only bibliographic but also factual data banks are becoming more and more prevalent. In this article, the authors consider the possibilities of providing a data bank on high-purity materials for the study of impurity contents. Also in this paper, the authors distinguish the following groups of problems that arise in the study of impurity composition and presents examples of their proposed solutions to these problems: the analysis of error and the determination of the most probably value of impurity concentration; the estimation of average properties of impurity composition with respect to groups of impurities and samples, and the forecast of the complete impurity composition

  8. Impurity binding energy for δ-doped quantum well structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Calculations are made for the case of not so big impurity concentrations, when impurity bands are not .... Blom et al (2003), but our data correspond qualitatively to Bastard's .... 0113U000612 and by Ukrainian Ministry of Education and Science ...

  9. Summary of IAEA technical committee meeting on impurity control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Kimitaka.

    1989-03-01

    Presentations given in the IAEA technical committee meeting on impurity control (held in JAERI from 13 to 15 February, 1989) are summarized, putting the emphasis on the physics modelling of the plasma related to the impurity production and confinement. (author)

  10. Purification of simple substances by distillation with impurity hydrothermal oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnik, O.N.; Nisel'son, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    A possibility of applying distillation method in water vapours for purification of simple substances from impurities is studied. Based on thermodynamic analysis of interaction processes in E-H 2 O system, conducted using a computer, it is as certained that SS, Se, Te, As, Cd, Hg can be purified from the majority of the impurities analysed by distillation in a water vapour flow. Behaviour of Zn, C, Ge, Al, Sb characteristic impurities under cadmium, arsenic and tellurium distillation is studied. Experiments on cadmium, arsenic and tellurium purification have confirmed, that distillation with hydrothermal oxidation of Zn, C, Ge impurities sometimes appears to be a more effective method as compared to distillation in a hydrogen flow

  11. The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalili, Seifollah [Department of Chemistry, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1618, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sjalili@nano.ipm.ac.ir; Majidi, Roya [Department of Physics, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-10-01

    The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO is investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local-orbitals method based on density functional theory. The electronic band structures and density of states of MgO in the presence of Ca, Li, and Na impurities were calculated. It is found that increasing the amount of Ca impurity decreases the energy band gap and increases the width of the upper part of the valence band. Some of the considered impurities (Li and Na) change the electronic properties of MgO extensively.

  12. The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Majidi, Roya

    2008-01-01

    The effect of impurities on the electronic properties of MgO is investigated using the full potential linearized augmented plane-wave plus local-orbitals method based on density functional theory. The electronic band structures and density of states of MgO in the presence of Ca, Li, and Na impurities were calculated. It is found that increasing the amount of Ca impurity decreases the energy band gap and increases the width of the upper part of the valence band. Some of the considered impurities (Li and Na) change the electronic properties of MgO extensively

  13. Device for separating, purifying and recovering nuclear fuel material, impurities and materials from impurity-containing nuclear fuel materials or nuclear fuel containing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Ryuichi; Kamei, Yoshinobu; Watanabe, Tsuneo; Tanaka, Shigeru.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To separate, purify and recover nuclear fuel materials, impurities and materials with no formation of liquid wastes. Constitution: Oxidizing atmosphere gases are introduced from both ends of a heating furnace. Vessels containing impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing material are continuously disposed movably from one end to the other of the heating furnace. Then, impurity oxides or material oxides selectively evaporated from the impurity-containing nuclear fuel substances or nuclear fuel substance-containing materials are entrained in the oxidizing atmosphere gas and the gases are led out externally from a discharge port opened at the intermediate portion of the heating furnace, filters are disposed to the exit to solidify and capture the nuclear fuel substances and traps are disposed behind the filters to solidify and capture the oxides by spontaneous air cooling or water cooling. (Sekiya, K.)

  14. Helium impurities in a PNP-primary coolant circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, M.

    1981-01-01

    The concentration of impurities to be expected have been defined in consideration of recent findings concerning the rates of infiltration and formation and the reaction mechanisms of the impurity components in the circuit. The data obtained correspond with the requirements on the metallic high-temperature components as well as with the requirements of limited graphite corrosion. (DG) [de

  15. Determining factors for the presence of impurities in selectively collected biowaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig-Ventosa, Ignasi; Freire-González, Jaume; Jofra-Sora, Marta

    2013-05-01

    The presence of impurities in biodegradable waste (biowaste) causes problems with the management of waste, among which are additional costs derived from the need to improve pre-treatment of biowaste, loss of treatment capacity and the difficulty selling treated biowaste as compost owing to its low quality. When treated biowaste is used for soil conditioning it can also cause soil pollution. Understanding the reasons why impurities are in biowaste and the factors affecting the percentage of impurities present can be used to determine ways to minimise these negative effects. This article attempts to identify the main causes for the presence of impurities in biowaste. In order to do so, it carries out an empirical analysis of the level of impurities in biowaste from municipal waste collection in two steps. First, a bivariate analysis focuses on significant correlations between the presence of impurities and several variables. Second, the construction of an explanatory model based on the significant relations obtained in the first step, and on literature research, are used to check the stated hypothesis. The estimates demonstrate that the collection system, the global levels of separate collection, the urban density of the municipality and the requirement to use compostable bags may be the main drivers of impurity levels in biowaste.

  16. Understanding of impurity behavior in SST-1 plasmas using visible spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manchanda, Ranjana; Ramaiya, Nilam; Chowdhuri, Malay Bikas; Banerjee, Santanu; Ghosh, Joydeep

    2015-01-01

    Studies of impurity behavior in SST-1 plasma have been carried out using visible spectroscopic systems installed on the tokomak. This has been carried out using a low resolution and broadband survey spectrometer covering a 350-900 nm wavelength range, 0.5 m visible spectrometer having 600 and 1200 grooves/mm grating coupled with CCD camera and interference filter and photomultiplier (PMT) tube based systems. Temporal evolution of the hydrogen (H α , H β ) and impurities emissions like, C II, C III, O I, O II, O III, O V and a visible Continuum at 536.0 nm have been monitored using the PMT based system to understand impurity charge state evolution during plasma discharges. All systems are absolutely calibrated for impurity influx and plasma parameter estimations. Observed spectral lines in the visible range have been identified to recognize the presence of various impurities in the SST-1 plasmas. Comparison of impurities emission has been made for different plasma currents and toroidal magnetic fields. An analysis has been carried out to understand the impurities activities in plasmas of SST-1 tokomak in presence and absence of installed plasma facing components (PFC). Significantly higher carbon emissions have been observed indicating higher carbon content in the plasma with graphite PFCs installed. (author)

  17. Quasiparticle Properties of a Mobile Impurity in a Bose-Einstein Condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rasmus Søgaard; Levinsen, Jesper; Bruun, Georg M

    2015-10-16

    We develop a systematic perturbation theory for the quasiparticle properties of a single impurity immersed in a Bose-Einstein condensate. Analytical results are derived for the impurity energy, effective mass, and residue to third order in the impurity-boson scattering length. The energy is shown to depend logarithmically on the scattering length to third order, whereas the residue and the effective mass are given by analytical power series. When the boson-boson scattering length equals the boson-impurity scattering length, the energy has the same structure as that of a weakly interacting Bose gas, including terms of the Lee-Huang-Yang and fourth order logarithmic form. Our results, which cannot be obtained within the canonical Fröhlich model of an impurity interacting with phonons, provide valuable benchmarks for many-body theories and for experiments.

  18. A validated stability-indicating LC method for the separation of enantiomer and potential impurities of Linezolid using polar organic mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Satyanarayana Raju

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Although a number of methods are available for evaluating Linezolid and its possible impurities, a common method for separation if its potential impurities, degradants and enantiomer in a single method with good efficiency remain unavailable. With the objective of developing an advanced method with shorter runtimes, a simple, precise, accurate stability-indicating LC method was developed for the determination of purity of Linezolid drug substance and drug products in bulk samples and pharmaceutical dosage forms in the presence of its impurities and degradation products. This method is capable of separating all the related substances of Linezolid along with the chiral impurity. This method can also be used for the estimation of assay of Linezolid in drug substance as well as in drug product. The method was developed using Chiralpak IA (250 mm×4.6 mm, 5 μm column. A mixture of acetonitrile, ethanol, n-butyl amine and trifluoro acetic acid in 96:4:0.10:0.16 (v/v/v/v ratio was used as a mobile phase. The eluted compounds were monitored at 254 nm. Linezolid was subjected to the stress conditions of oxidative, acid, base, hydrolytic, thermal and photolytic degradation. The degradation products were well resolved from main peak and its impurities, proving the stability-indicating power of the method. The developed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision, linearity, accuracy, robustness and system suitability. Keywords: HPLC, Linezolid, Validation, Polar organic mode, Stability-indicating

  19. Parametric dependences of impurity transport in the Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parisot, Th.

    2007-09-01

    During this Ph.D. work, a full setup of tools for an experimental investigation of impurity transport has been developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. It includes a laser blow-off system for metallic impurity injections and developments for ITC (Impurity Transport Code), a transport code which allows the extraction of the experimental impurity transport coefficients (diffusion and convection velocity). This tool has been used to perform and analyse several experiments, to evidence parametric dependences of impurity transport. In a first experiment, a confinement time law for nickel in Tore Supra has been obtained as a function of collisionality ν * and normalized Larmor radius ρ * . Then the impurity charge Z role has been investigated in various conditions: ohmic regime with or without sawteeth, and sawtooth less L-mode with LH power. No Z effect is observed, consistently with theoretical predictions, whether neoclassical (NCLASS) or for turbulent transport with both non linear gyro-fluid (TRB) and quasilinear gyrokinetic (QuaLiKiz) simulations. An exception is found for LH heated plasmas where the confinement time seems to decrease for the heaviest impurities. This is not explained by any model available. The observed transport is close to neoclassical between sawtooth relaxations, in the centre (r q-1 ) of ohmic plasmas, turbulent outside. Without sawteeth, it is turbulent in the whole plasma, for ohmic or L mode discharges. The profile shape of the diffusion coefficient is here qualitatively different, with a stronger and deeper transition between the low diffusion central region and a more turbulent peripheral region for LH heated plasmas. (author)

  20. Organic impurity profiling of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) synthesised from catechol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, Erin; Shimmon, Ronald; McDonagh, Andrew M

    2015-03-01

    This work examines the organic impurity profile of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) that has been synthesised from catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), a common chemical reagent available in industrial quantities. The synthesis of MDMA from catechol proceeded via the common MDMA precursor safrole. Methylenation of catechol yielded 1,3-benzodioxole, which was brominated and then reacted with magnesium allyl bromide to form safrole. Eight organic impurities were identified in the synthetic safrole. Safrole was then converted to 3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl-2-propanone (MDP2P) using two synthetic methods: Wacker oxidation (Route 1) and an isomerisation/peracid oxidation/acid dehydration method (Route 2). MDMA was then synthesised by reductive amination of MDP2P. Thirteen organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 1 and eleven organic impurities were identified in MDMA synthesised via Route 2. Overall, organic impurities in MDMA prepared from catechol indicated that synthetic safrole was used in the synthesis. The impurities also indicated which of the two synthetic routes was utilised. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Microscopic origin of the 1.3 G0 conductance observed in oxygen-doped silver quantum point contacts

    KAUST Repository

    Tu, Xingchen

    2014-11-21

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. Besides the peak at one conductance quantum, G0, two additional features at ∼0.4 G0 and ∼1.3 G0 have been observed in the conductance histograms of silver quantum point contacts at room temperature in ambient conditions. In order to understand such feature, here we investigate the electronic transport and mechanical properties of clean and oxygen-doped silver atomic contacts by employing the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, unlike clean Ag single-atom contacts showing a conductance of 1 G0, the low-bias conductance of oxygen-doped Ag atomic contacts depends on the number of oxygen impurities and their binding configuration. When one oxygen atom binds to an Ag monatomic chain sandwiched between two Ag electrodes, the low-bias conductance of the junction always decreases. In contrast, when the number of oxygen impurities is two and the O-O axis is perpendicular to the Ag-Ag axis, the transmission coefficients at the Fermi level are, respectively, calculated to be 1.44 for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes and 1.24 for that with Ag(100) electrodes, both in good agreement with the measured value of ∼1.3 G0. The calculated rupture force (1.60 nN for the junction with Ag(111) electrodes) is also consistent with the experimental value (1.66 ± 0.09 nN), confirming that the measured ∼1.3 G0 conductance should originate from Ag single-atom contacts doped with two oxygen atoms in a perpendicular configuration.

  2. Spectroscopic impurity survey in Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttenschoen, Birger; Burhenn, Rainer; Thomsen, Henning [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Biel, Wolfgang; Assmann, Jochen; Hollfeld, Klaus-Peter [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: the Wendelstein 7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    The High Efficiency eXtreme ultraviolet Overview Spectrometer (HEXOS) has been developed specifically for impurity identification and survey purposes on the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator. This spectrometer system, consisting of four individual spectrometers, covers the wavelength range between λ=2.5 nm and λ=160 nm, observing the intense resonance lines of relevant Mg-, Na-, Be- and Li-like impurity ions as well as the high-Z W/Ta quasi-continua. During the first operation phase of W7-X, commissioning of HEXOS was finished by providing an in-situ wavelength calibration. The permanently acquired spectra are evaluated to monitor the overall impurity content in the plasma, and serve as an indicator for unintended plasma-wall contact possibly leading to machine damage. HEXOS results from the first operation phase of W7-X are presented and discussed with respect to future scientific exploitation of the available data.

  3. Magnetic impurity coupled to interacting conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, T.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a magnetic impurity which interacts by hybridization with a system of weakly correlated electrons and determine the energy of the ground state by means of a 1/N f expansion. The correlations among the conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard Hamiltonian and are treated to the lowest order in the interaction strength. We find that their effect on the Kondo temperature, T K , in the Kondo limit is twofold: first, the position of the impurity level is shifted due to the reduction of charge fluctuations, which reduces T K . Secondly, the bare Kondo exchange coupling is enhanced as spin fluctuations are enlarged. In total, T K increases. Both corrections require intermediate states beyond the standard Varma-Yafet ansatz. This shows that the Hubbard interaction does not just provide quasiparticles, which hybridize with the impurity, but also renormalizes the Kondo coupling. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. Influence of impurities on the surface morphology of the TIBr crystal semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Robinson A. dos; Silva, Julio B. Rodrigues da; Martins, Joao F.T.; Ferraz, Caue de M.; Costa, Fabio E. da; Mesquita, Carlos H. de; Hamada, Margarida M.; Gennari, Roseli F.

    2013-01-01

    The impurity effect in the surface morphology quality of TlBr crystals was evaluated, aiming a future application of these crystals as room temperature radiation semiconductor detectors. The crystals were purified and grown by the Repeated Bridgman technique. Systematic measurements were carried out for determining the stoichiometry, structure orientation, surface morphology and impurity of the crystal. A significant difference in the crystals impurity concentration was observed for almost all impurities, compared to those found in the raw material. The crystals wafer grown twice showed a surface roughness and grains which may be due to the presence of impurities on the surface, while those obtained with crystals grown three times presented a more uniform surface: even though, a smaller roughness was still observed. It was demonstrated that the impurities affect strongly the surface morphology quality of crystals. (author)

  5. Stacking change in MoS2 bilayers induced by interstitial Mo impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Natalia; Rosales, Luis; Orellana, Pedro A; Ayuela, Andrés; González, Jhon W

    2018-02-01

    We use a theoretical approach to reveal the electronic and structural properties of molybdenum impurities between MoS 2 bilayers. We find that interstitial Mo impurities are able to reverse the well-known stability order of the pristine bilayer, because the most stable form of stacking changes from AA' (undoped) into AB' (doped). The occurrence of Mo impurities in different positions shows their split electronic levels in the energy gap, following octahedral and tetrahedral crystal fields. The energy stability is related to the accommodation of Mo impurities compacted in hollow sites between layers. Other less stable configurations for Mo dopants have larger interlayer distances and band gaps than those for the most stable stacking. Our findings suggest possible applications such as exciton trapping in layers around impurities, and the control of bilayer stacking by Mo impurities in the growth process.

  6. Magnetic and superconducting order in some random pseudobinary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongen, J.C.M. van.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a study on the magnetic and superconducting ordering phenomena in some random pseudobinary compounds. In the investigations ternary systems are utilised in which two of the elements form a binary intermetallic compound, e.g. PdH, GdCu and YCo 2 . A third element is then randomly substituted into one of the sublattices without changing the basic intermetallic compound structure. In chapter II a study is presented on the Kondo effect and spin-glass freezing of the magnetic impurities Cr, Mn, and Fe in superconducting palladium hydride. Chapter III contains a study on crystal structure transformations and magnetic ordering phenomena in GdCusub(1-x)Gasub(x) and related pseudobinary compounds. In Chapter IV experiments on the magnetic properties and the electrical resistivity of the transition metal Laves phase compounds Y(Cosub(1-x)Fesub(x)) 2 , Y(Irsub(1-x)Fesub(x)) 2 and Hf(Cosub(1-x)Fesub(x)) 2 are described. (Auth.)

  7. Phase transition in one Josephson junction with a side-coupled magnetic impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Qi; Jiang, Cui; Yi, Guang-Yu; Gong, Wei-Jiang

    2018-04-01

    This work focuses on one Josephson junction with a side-coupled magnetic impurity. And then, the Josephson phase transition is theoretically investigated, with the help of the exact diagonalization approach. It is found that even in the absence of intradot Coulomb interaction, the magnetic impurity can efficiently induce the phenomenon of Josephson phase transition, which is tightly related to the spin correlation manners (i.e., ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic) between the impurity and the junction. Moreover, the impurity plays different roles when it couples to the dot and superconductor, respectively. This work can be helpful in describing the influence of one magnetic impurity on the supercurrent through the Josephson junction.

  8. On the radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities on snowpack evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Tuzet, F.; Lafaysse, M.; Arnaud, L.; Picard, G.; Lejeune, Y.; Lamare, M.; Morin, S.; Voisin, D.; Di Mauro, B.

    2017-12-01

    The presence of light absorbing impurities in snow strongly decreases snow reflectance leading to an increase in the amount of solar energy absorbed by the snowpack. This effect is also known as impurities direct radiative effect. The change in the amount of energy absorbed by the snowpack modifies the temperature profile inside the snowpack and in turn snow metamorphism (impurities indirect radiative effects). In this work, we used the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus with an explicit representation of snow light-absorbing impurities content (Tuzet et al., 2017) fed by medium-resolution ALADIN-Climate atmospheric model to represent dust and black carbon atmospheric deposition fluxes. The model is used at two sites: Col de Porte (medium elevation site in the French Alps) and Torgnon (high elevation site in the Italian Alps). The simulations are compared to in-situ observations and used to quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow melt rate and timing. The respective parts of the direct and indirect radiative effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow are also computed for the two sites, emphasizing the need to account for the interactions between snow metamorphism and LAI radiative properties, to accurately predict the effects of light-absorbing impurities in snow. Moreover, we describe how automated hyperspectral reflectance can be used to estimate effective impurities surface content in snow. Finally we demonstrate how these reflectances measurements either from in situ or satellite data can be used via an assimilation scheme to constrain snowpack ensemble simulations and better predict the snowpack state and evolution.

  9. Steady-state organization of binary mixtures by active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Gilhøj, Henriette; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    The structural reorganization of a phase-separated binary mixture in the presence of an annealed dilution of active impurities is studied by computer-simulation techniques via a simple two-dimensional lattice-gas model. The impurities, each of which has two internal states with different affinity...

  10. FY 1974 report on the results of the Sunshine Project. Study on a system to refine/transport/store hydrogen and the safety technology (Investigational study of behavior of trace impurities in the liquefaction process); 1974 nendo suiso no seisei, yuso, chozo system oyobi hoan gijutsu ni kansuru kenkyu seika hokokusho. Ekika katei ni okeru biryo fujunbutsu no kyodo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-28

    Hydrogen gas as material is produced mostly by steam reforming of hydrocarbons, and includes a considerable amount of impurities such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen. The concentration of impurities in the refined gas is approximately 1ppm. In the liquefaction process of hydrogen liquefaction plant, the gases entering the low temperature portion near the free expansion valve (J-T valve) are mostly oxygen and nitrogen. When oxygen is solidified, attached, accumulated near J-T valve, it incurs a possibility of exploding for reason of impact force, etc. by contact with the valve portion. A mixture of hydrogen and oxygen ignites at the minimum value of approximately 0.02 milli-joule, and therefore it has great danger of explosion. As viewed from a point of danger prevention, there is a possibility of explosion when the hydrogen-oxidizing agent mixture is formed. Accordingly, it is necessary to conduct an experiment for confirming the explosion at J-T valve portion. From viewpoints of prevention of explosion accident and running operation, it is necessary to experimentally grasp the definite allowable oxygen concentration. Further, it is necessary to establish a technology to continuously and accurately measure the concentration of trace impurities in hydrogen gas. (NEDO)

  11. Prevention of serious impurity penetration into water-steam circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgmann, F.; Bursik, A.; Flunkert, F.; Nieder, R.

    1977-01-01

    In consequence of reports from several power Plants concerning heavy damages due to penetrations of impurities into the water-steam circuit, the VGB Sub-Committee 'Water Chemistry in Thermal Power Plants' has established a working group to check-up how serious impurity penetration can be avoided. The lecture describes possible danger points. Suitable technical arrangements for the avoidance of penetrations, and possibilities for monitoring will be discussed. Penetration of impurities cannot be avoided with absolute reliability, even when the recommended arrangements and usual monitoring are realized. Additional measures for the protection of water steam circuits will be suggested. (orig.) [de

  12. Impurity effects on the magnetic ordering in chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, R.S.

    1992-05-01

    It is well-known that impurities profoundly alter the magnetic properties of chromium. While vanadium impurities suppress the Neel temperature T N , manganese impurities enhanced T N substantially. As evidenced by neutron scattering experiments, doping with as little as 0.2% vanadium changes the transition from weakly first order to second order. Young and Sokoloff explained that the first-order transition in pure chromium is caused by a charge-density wave which is the second harmonic of the spin-density wave. By examining the subtle balance between the spin-density and charge- density wave terms in the mean-field free energy, we find that the first-order transition is destroyed when the vanadium concentration exceeds about 0.15%, in agreement with experiments

  13. Impurity Effects in Electroplated-Copper Solder Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan Lee

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper (Cu electroplating is a mature technology, and has been extensively applied in microelectronic industry. With the development of advanced microelectronic packaging, Cu electroplating encounters new challenges for atomic deposition on a non-planar substrate and to deliver good throwing power and uniform deposit properties in a high-aspect-ratio trench. The use of organic additives plays an important role in modulating the atomic deposition to achieve successful metallic coverage and filling, which strongly relies on the adsorptive and chemical interactions among additives on the surface of growing film. However, the adsorptive characteristic of organic additives inevitably results in an incorporation of additive-derived impurities in the electroplated Cu film. The incorporation of high-level impurities originating from the use of polyethylene glycol (PEG and chlorine ions significantly affects the microstructural evolution of the electroplated Cu film, and the electroplated-Cu solder joints, leading to the formation of undesired voids at the joint interface. However, the addition of bis(3-sulfopropyl disulfide (SPS with a critical concentration suppresses the impurity incorporation and the void formation. In this article, relevant studies were reviewed, and the focus was placed on the effects of additive formula and plating parameters on the impurity incorporation in the electroplated Cu film, and the void formation in the solder joints.

  14. UO2 Fuel pellet impurities, pellet surface roughness and n(18O)/n(16O) ratios, applied to nuclear forensic science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajo, L.

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, law enforcement has faced the problem of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic science is a new branch of science that enables the identification of seized nuclear material. The identification is not based on a fixed scheme, but further identification parameters are decided based on previous identification results. The analysis is carried out by using traditional analysis methods and applying modern measurement technology. The parameters are generally not unambiguous and not self-explanatory. In order to have a full picture about the origin of seized samples, several identification parameters should be used together and the measured data should be compared to corresponding data from known sources. A nuclear material database containing data from several fabrication plants is installed for the purpose. In this thesis the use of UO 2 fabrication plant specific parameters, fuel impurities, fuel pellet surface roughness and oxygen isotopic ratio in UO 2 were investigated for identification purposes in nuclear forensic science. The potential use of these parameters as 'fingerprints' is discussed for identification purposes of seized nuclear materials. Impurities of the fuel material vary slightly according to the fabrication method employed and a plant environment. Here the impurities of the seized UO 2 were used in order to have some clues about the origin of the fuel material by comparing a measured data to nuclear database information. More certainty in the identification was gained by surface roughness of the UO 2 fuel pellets, measured by mechanical surface profilometry. Categories in surface roughness between a different fuel element type and a producer were observed. For the time oxygen isotopic ratios were determined by Thermal Ionisation Mass Speckometry (TIMS). Thus a TIMS measurement method, using U 16 O + and U 18 0 + ions, was developed and optimised to achieve precise oxygen isotope ratio measurements for the

  15. Two-dimensional impurity transport calculations for a high recycling divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    Two dimensional analysis of impurity transport in a high recycling divertor shows asymmetric particle fluxes to the divertor plate, low helium pumping efficiency, and high scrapeoff zone shielding for sputtered impurities

  16. Evaluation of leachable behavior from ion exchange resins effects of organic impurities on BWR water chemistry. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Yusaku; Ohsumi, Katsumi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Matsui, Tsuneo

    1999-01-01

    The elution rate of leachables from ion exchange resin, which is used in condensate demineralizers and is one of several major sources of organic compounds in BWR cooling water, was measured. Properties of the leachables and elution rate depended on the kind of ion exchange resin and the years of use. The organic compounds elution rate of cation exchange resin was constant for 5 years and the molecular weight of these leachables was low. After 5 years, the elution rate increased and leachables consisted of organic compounds of high molecular weights of several thousand. The elution rate of anion exchange resin decreased yearly. The difference in the elution behavior was attributed to a dependence on oxidation degradation promoted by transition metal catalysis. The cation exchange resin included absorbed transition metal, while the anion exchange resin did not. An empirical formula showing the time dependence of the elution rate of organic compounds was derived. The formula was judged to be appropriate based on simulations of an actual BWR plant and comparisons of impurity concentrations with actual reactor water data. (author)

  17. Oxygen potential of uranium--plutonium oxide as determined by controlled-atmosphere thermogravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, G.C.

    1975-10-01

    The oxygen-to-metal atom ratio, or O/M, of solid solution uranium-plutonium oxide reactor fuel is a measure of the concentration of crystal defects in the oxide which affect many fuel properties, particularly, fuel oxygen potential. Fabrication of a high-temperature oxygen electrode, employing an electro-active tip of oxygen-deficient solid-state electrolyte, intended to confirm gaseous oxygen potentials is described. Uranium oxide and plutonium oxide O/M reference materials were prepared by in situ oxidation of high purity metals in the thermobalance. A solid solution uranium-plutonium oxide O/M reference material was prepared by alloying the uranium and plutonium metals in a yttrium oxide crucible at 1200 0 C and oxidizing with moist He at 250 0 C. The individual and solid solution oxides were isothermally equilibrated with controlled oxygen potentials between 800 and 1300 0 C and the equilibrated O/M ratios calculated with corrections for impurities and buoyancy effects. Use of a reference oxygen potential of -100 kcal/mol to produce an O/M of 2.000 is confirmed by these results. However, because of the lengthy equilibration times required for all oxides, use of the O/M reference materials rather than a reference oxygen potential is recommended for O/M analysis methods calibrations. (auth)

  18. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and... degradation of less than 10 percent in a 30-day period. (b) Contaminants and impurities. The presence in any...

  19. Effects of electronically neutral impurities on muonium in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clawson, C.W.; Crowe, K.M.; Haller, E.E.; Rosenblum, S.S.; Brewer, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    Low-temperature measurements of muonium parameters in various germanium crystals have been performed. We have measured crystals with different levels of neutral impurities, with and without dislocations, and with different annealing histories. The most striking result is the apparent trapping of Mu by silicon impurities in germanium

  20. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on small oxygen-related clusters in silicon: LVM studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murin, L.I.; Lindstroem, J.L.; Misiuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    Local vibrational mode (LVM) spectroscopy is used to explore the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HP) on the formation of small oxygen-related clusters (dimers, trimers, thermal donors, and C-O complexes) at 450 deg. C and 650 deg. C in Cz-Si crystals with different impurity content and prehistory. It is found, in agreement with previous studies, that HP enhances the oxygen clustering in Cz-Si at elevated temperatures. The effect of HP is related mainly to enhancement in the diffusivity of single oxygen atoms and small oxygen aggregates. HP does not noticeably increase the binding energies of the most simple oxygen related complexes like O 2i , C s O ni . The biggest HP effect on the thermal double donor (TDDs) generation is revealed in hydrogenated samples. Heat-treatment of such samples at 450 deg. C under HP results in extremely high TDD introduction rates as well as in a strong increase in the concentration of the first TDD species

  1. Surface acoustic wave oxygen pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transducer for the measurement of absolute gas-state oxygen pressure from pressures of less than 100 Pa to atmospheric pressure (1.01 x 10(exp 5) Pa) is based on a standard surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The piezoelectric material of the SAW device is coated with a compound which will selectively and reversibly bind oxygen. When oxygen is bound by the coating, the mass of the coating increases by an amount equal to the mass of the bound oxygen. Such an increase in the mass of the coating causes a corresponding decrease in the resonant frequency of the SAW device.

  2. Impurities in Drug Products and Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kątny, M; Frankowski, M

    2017-05-04

    Analytical methods should be selective and fast. In modern times, scientists strive to meet the criteria of green chemistry, so they choose analytical procedures that are as short as possible and use the least toxic solvents. It is quite obvious that the products intended for human consumption should be characterized as completely as possible. The safety of a drug is dependent mainly on the impurities that it contains. High pressure liquid chromatography and ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography have been proposed as the main techniques for forced degradation and impurity profiling. The aim of this article was to characterize the relevant classification of drug impurities and to review the methods of impurities determination for atorvastatin (ATV) and duloxetine (DLX) (both in active pharmaceutical ingredients and in different dosage forms). These drugs have an impact on two systems of the human body: cardiac and nervous. Simple characteristics of ATV and DLX, their properties and specificity of action on the human body, are also included in this review. The analyzed pharmaceuticals-ATV (brand name Lipiron) and DLX (brand name Cymbalta)-were selected for this study based on annual rankings prepared by Information Medical Statistics.

  3. High-frequency EPR of surface impurities on nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zaili; Stepanov, Viktor; Takahashi, Susumu

    Diamond is a fascinating material, hosting nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect centers with unique magnetic and optical properties. There have been many reports that suggest the existence of paramagnetic impurities near surface of various kinds of diamonds. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigation of mechanically crushed nanodiamonds (NDs) as well as detonation NDs revealed g 2 like signals that are attributed to structural defects and dangling bonds near the diamond surface. In this presentation, we investigate paramagnetic impurities in various sizes of NDs using high-frequency (HF) continuous wave (cw) and pulsed EPR spectroscopy. Strong size dependence on the linewidth of HF cw EPR spectra reveals the existence of paramagnetic impurities in the vicinity of the diamond surface. We also study the size dependence of the spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times (T1 and T2) of single substitutional nitrogen defects in NDs Significant deviations from the temperature dependence of the phonon-assisted T1 process were observed in the ND samples, and were attributed to the contribution from the surface impurities. This work was supported by the Searle Scholars Program and the National Science Foundation (DMR-1508661 and CHE-1611134).

  4. Self-consistent gyrokinetic modeling of neoclassical and turbulent impurity transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estève, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Breton, S.; Donnel, P.; Asahi, Y.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ehrlacher, C.; Emeriau, C.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Gillot, C.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.

    2018-03-01

    Trace impurity transport is studied with the flux-driven gyrokinetic GYSELA code (Grandgirard et al 2016 Comput. Phys. Commun. 207 35). A reduced and linearized multi-species collision operator has been recently implemented, so that both neoclassical and turbulent transport channels can be treated self-consistently on an equal footing. In the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime that is probably relevant for tungsten, the standard expression for the neoclassical impurity flux is shown to be recovered from gyrokinetics with the employed collision operator. Purely neoclassical simulations of deuterium plasma with trace impurities of helium, carbon and tungsten lead to impurity diffusion coefficients, inward pinch velocities due to density peaking, and thermo-diffusion terms which quantitatively agree with neoclassical predictions and NEO simulations (Belli et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 015015). The thermal screening factor appears to be less than predicted analytically in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime, which can be detrimental to fusion performance. Finally, self-consistent nonlinear simulations have revealed that the tungsten impurity flux is not the sum of turbulent and neoclassical fluxes computed separately, as is usually assumed. The synergy partly results from the turbulence-driven in-out poloidal asymmetry of tungsten density. This result suggests the need for self-consistent simulations of impurity transport, i.e. including both turbulence and neoclassical physics, in view of quantitative predictions for ITER.

  5. Effect of oxygen on the properties of Y-Ba-CuO ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoshkalenko, V.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Klimenko, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The samples of Y-Ba-CuO ceramics 60x60x60 mm 3 in size were synthesized and investigated with provision for their impurity content, crystallography, superconductive and magnetic properties. The conditions of low temperature thermal treatments, as compared to the sintering ones, are offered that result in degradation of superconductive properties due to partial oxygen removal and their subsequent recovery. The mechanism of copper spin-paramagnetism growth in oxygen-deficient samples is discussed. The intensity of narrow (∼ 3 mrad half-width) component observed in the angular distribution of annihilation photons of partially de-oxygenized sample is found to increase in a constant magnetic field, suggesting the formation of positronium-like states. The intense CuOEH + 2 emission line is shown to be present in the spectra of superconductive samples, while it is absent in the non-superconductive state

  6. Influence of impurities on silicide contact formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazdaev, Kh.R.; Meermanov, G.B.; Kazdaev, R.Kh.

    2002-01-01

    Research objectives of this work are to investigate the influence of light impurities implantation on peculiarities of the silicides formation in molybdenum monocrystal implanted by silicon, and in molybdenum films sputtered on silicon substrate at subsequent annealing. Implantation of the molybdenum samples was performed with silicon ions (90 keV, 5x10 17 cm -2 ). Phase identification was performed by X ray analysis with photographic method of registration. Analysis of the results has shown the formation of the molybdenum silicide Mo 3 Si at 900 deg. C. To find out the influence of impurities present in the atmosphere (C,N,O) on investigated processes we have applied combined implantation. At first, molybdenum was implanted with ions of the basic component (silicon) and then -- with impurities ions. Acceleration energies (40keV for C, 45 keV for N and 50 keV for O) were chosen to obtain the same distribution profiles for basic and impurities ions. Ion doses were 5x10 17 cm -2 for Si-ions and 5x10 16 cm -2 - for impurities. The most important results are reported here. The first, for all three kinds of impurities the decreased formation temperatures of the phase Mo 3 Si were observed; in the case of C and N it was ∼100 deg. and in the case of nitrogen - ∼200 deg. Further, simultaneously with the Mo 3 Si phase, the appearance of the rich-metal phase Mo 5 Si 3 was registered (not observed in the samples without additional implantation). In case of Mo/Si-structure, the implantation of the impurities (N,O) was performed to create the peak concentration (∼4at/%) located in the middle of the molybdenum film (∼ 150nm) deposited on silicon substrate. Investigation carried out on unimplanted samples showed the formation of the silicide molybdenum MoSi 2 , observed after annealing at temperatures 900/1000 deg. C, higher than values 500-600 deg. C reported in other works. It is discovered that electrical conductivity of Mo 5 Si 3 -films synthesized after impurities

  7. Mechanistic Study of Oxygen Atom Transfer Catalyzed by Rhenium Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, Xiaopeng [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Two ionic and one neutral methyl(oxo)rhenium(V) compounds were synthesized and structurally characterized. They were compared in reactivity towards the ligands triphenylphosphane, pyridines, pyridine N-oxides. Assistance from Broensted bases was found on ligand displacement of ionic rhenium compounds as well as nucleophile assistance on oxidation of all compounds. From the kinetic data, crystal structures, and an analysis of the intermediates, a structural formula of PicH+3- and mechanisms of ligand displacement and oxidation were proposed.

  8. Spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faenov, A.; Marchand, R.; Tawara, H.; Vainshtein, L.; Wiese, W.

    1992-01-01

    This Working Group Report briefly reviews and summarizes the available spectroscopic and electron-ion collision data for plasma impurities. Included are lithium, neon, and argon, which, although they are not plasma impurities per se, are introduced into the plasma through the application of diagnostic techniques. 32 refs, 2 tabs

  9. Plasma impurity-control studies in CTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, magnetized coaxial gun generated Compact Toroids (CTs) have exhibited magnetic field and density lifetimes of about 250 to 350 μs and electron temperatures of about 10 eV. In recent experiments, after hydrogen discharge cleaning the gun and flux conserver surfaces, the lifetimes have been extended to 550 μs. This improvement in lifetime, together with spectroscopic and bolometric measurements, are consistent with the interpretation that the CT plasma losses are impurity dominated and that discharge cleaning is reducing the impurities. Details of these measurements are described as well as successful experiments which led to a more open flux conserver

  10. Plasma impurity-control studies in CTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.W.; Henins, I.; Hoida, H.W.; Jarboe, T.R.; Linford, R.K.; Marshall, J.; Sherwood, A.R.; Tuszewski, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the past, magnetized coaxial gun generated Compact Toroids (CTs) have exhibited magnetic field and density lifetimes of about 250 to 350 ..mu..s and electron temperatures of about 10 eV. In recent experiments, after hydrogen discharge cleaning the gun and flux conserver surfaces, the lifetimes have been extended to 550 ..mu..s. This improvement in lifetime, together with spectroscopic and bolometric measurements, are consistent with the interpretation that the CT plasma losses are impurity dominated and that discharge cleaning is reducing the impurities. Details of these measurements are described as well as successful experiments which led to a more open flux conserver.

  11. Impurity penetration and transport during VH-mode on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lippmann, S.I.; Evans, T.E.; Jackson, G.L.; West, W.P.

    1992-05-01

    A new modeling effort is made in order to understand the observed relatively low levels of impurity contamination during the VH-mode phase on DIII-D, as compared to those observed during the H-mode phase of selected discharges. The key element is the inclusion of the real 2-D flux surface geometry in the prediction of impurity penetration of sputtered atoms through the scrape-off layer into the core plasma. Of the elements which determine the impurity content in the plasma: sputtering yield, penetration, and core transport, the penetration through the scrape-off layer is found to be the most determinative factor. The low impurity content in VH-mode is attributed to the development of a scrape-off layer with higher density and temperature properties than those normally obtained in H-mode

  12. Optimization of uranium carbide fabrication by carbothermic reduction with limited oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raveu, Gaelle

    2014-01-01

    Mixed carbides (U, Pu)C, are good fuel candidate for generation IV reactors because of their high fissile atoms density and excellent thermal properties for economical (more compact and efficient cores) and safety reasons (high melting margin). UC can be imagine as a surrogate material ror R and D studies on (U,Pu)C fuel behavior, because of their similar structures. The carbothermic reaction was used because it is the most studied and now consider for industrial process. However, it involves powders manipulation: in air, carbide can strongly react at room temperature and under controlled atmosphere it can absorb impurities. An inerted installation under Ar, BaGCARA, was therefore used. Process improvements were carried out, including the sintering atmosphere in order to evaluate the impact on the sample purity (about oxygen content). The original method by ion beam analysis was used to determine the surface composition (oxygen in-depth profiles in the first microns and stoichiometry). This oxygen analysis was set for the first time in carbonaceous materials. XRD analysis showed the formation of an intermediate compound during the carbothermic reaction and a better crystallization of the samples fabricated in BaGCARA. They also have a better microstructure, density, and visual appearance if compared to former samples. Vacuum sintering leads to a denser UC with fewer second phases if compared to Ar, Ar/H 2 or controlled PC atmospheres. However, it was not possible to analyze carbides without air contact which may impact their lattice parameter and lead to their deterioration. When the carbide is initially free of oxygen, it oxidizes faster, more intensely and heterogeneously. The mechanical stress induced between the grains lead to fracturing the material, to corrosion cracking and then a de-bonding of the material. A study of oxidation mechanisms would be interesting to validate and understand the evolution of the material in contact with oxygen. A study of the

  13. Improvements in or relating to calcining reducible compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus is described for calcining compounds of uranium compounds to temperatures of up to about 1000 0 C to produce UO 2 powders of uniform quality and having an oxygen content of less than 2.2 atoms of oxygen per atom of uranium. The apparatus comprises discharge and cooling means having an inlet end operatively joined with an air tight seal to a rotating Kiln to receive hot UO 2 powder therefrom without contact with air. (author)

  14. Separation and characterization of unknown impurities and isomers in flomoxef sodium by LC-IT-TOF MS and study of their negative-ion fragmentation regularities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xu; Wang, Fan; Li, Jiani; Shan, Weiguang; Zhu, Bingqi; Wang, Jian

    2017-06-05

    Thirteen unknown impurities in flomoxef sodium were separated and characterized by liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution ion trap/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-IT-TOF MS)with positive and negative modes of electrospray ionization method for further improvement of official monographs in pharmacopoeias. The fragmentation patterns of impurities in flomoxef in the negative ion mode were studied in detail, and new negative-ion fragmentation regularities were discovered. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Kromasil C18 column (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm). The mobile phase consisted of (A) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (84:16, v/v) and (B) ammonium formate aqueous solution (10mM)-methanol (47:53, v/v). In order to determine the m/z values of the molecular ions and formulas of all detected impurities, full scan LC-MS in both positive and negative ion modes was firstly executed to obtain the m/z value of the molecules. Then LC-MS 2 and LC-MS 3 were carried out on target compounds to obtain as much structural information as possible. Complete fragmentation patterns of impurities were studied and used to obtain information about the structures of these impurities. Structures of thirteen unknown degradation products in flomoxef sodium were deduced based on the high resolution MS n data with both positive and negative modes. The forming mechanisms of degradation products in flomoxef sodium were also studied. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A New Platform for Profiling Degradation-Related Impurities Via Exploiting the Opportunities Offered by Ion-Selective Electrodes: Determination of Both Diatrizoate Sodium and Its Cytotoxic Degradation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riad, Safaa M; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K; Fawaz, Esraa M; Shehata, Mostafa A

    2018-05-01

    Although the ultimate goal of administering active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is to save countless lives, the presence of impurities and/or degradation products in APIs or formulations may cause harmful physiological effects. Today, impurity profiling (i.e., the identity as well as the quantity of impurity in a pharmaceutical) is receiving critical attention from regulatory authorities. Despite the predominant use of spectroscopic and chromatographic methods over electrochemical methods for impurity profiling of APIs, this work investigates the opportunities offered by electroanalytical methods, particularly, ion-selective electrodes (ISEs), for profiling degradation-related impurities (DRIs) compared with conventional spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. For a meaningful comparison, diatrizoate sodium (DTA) was chosen as the anionic X-ray contrast agent based on its susceptibility to deacetylation into its cytotoxic and mutagenic degradation product, 3,5-diamino-2,4,6 triiodobenzoic acid (DTB). This cationic diamino compound can be also detected as an impurity in the final product because it is used as a synthetic precursor for the synthesis of DTA. In this study, four novel sensitive and selective sensors for the determination of both DTA and its cytotoxic degradation products are presented. Sensors I and II were developed for the determination of the anionic drug, DTA, and sensors III and IV were developed for the determination of the cationic cytotoxic impurity. The use of these novel sensors not only provides a stability-indicating method for the selective determination of DTA in the presence of its degradation product, but also permits DRI profiling. Moreover, a great advantage of these proposed ISE systems is their higher sensitivity for the quantification of DTB relative to other spectroscopic and chromatographic methods, so it can measure trace amounts of DTB impurities in DTA bulk powder and pharmaceutical formulation without a need for

  16. Surface Characterization of Impurities in Superconducting Niobium for Radio Frequency (RF) Cavities used in Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Prateek

    absorption/desorption of hydrogen and that hydrogen does not diffuse in the oxide. Subsequent ion implantation of hydrogen in an anodized niobium sample thus provided a quantification factor of hydrogen in niobium oxide, which was used to obtain an estimate of the hydrogen concentration in niobium. This estimate was found to be 40% atomic H in a non heat treated niobium sample. Such high levels of hydrogen observed in Nb before heat treatment ensures that is the main contributor to cavity degradation. TEM analysis was performed to study the effect of heat treatment on the surface oxide thickness of niobium. Results showed a continuous oxide layer with a sharp metal-oxide interface. No significant changes in the oxide thickness were seen after heat treatment. Time of Flight (TOF)-SIMS imaging was used to characterize the grain boundaries of large grain niobium bicrystals, since it was believed that impurity segregation at the grain boundaries of Nb might deteriorate cavity performance. Images showed segregation of carbon at the grain boundaries after 800°C heat treatment of the samples, while no segregation of hydrogen and oxygen were seen for both non heat treated and heat treated samples. An important aspect of this study was the record-performance improvement of the 1400°C heat treated cavity, which showed a 200% increase in the cavity efficiency. SIMS analysis of the surface of this sample showed high levels of titanium, down to 1im depth, and it is speculated that this Ti might be responsible for high performance of the cavity by affecting the distribution of impurities within the penetration depth.

  17. Studies of impurity recycling by the collector probe technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.; Grote, H.; Herrmann, A.; Laux, M.; Pech, P.; Reiner, H.D.; Wolff, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to study recycling effects of the nonintrinsic impurity Li discharges with and without LiD-pellet injection were investigated. The observed maximum impurity level of Li in the SOL plasma of discharges without injection reaches less than 10% of that observed in discharges with injection. The measurements offer the possibility to distinguish between influxes from the wall and those which reach the collector probe via the core plasma. The time evolution, orientation and radial dependence of the impurity fluxes are characteristic features of their origin. The consideration of all these features facilitates a better understanding of collector probe measurements in the SOL-plasma. (orig.)

  18. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Xianjun; Gong Changde; Zhou Yuan

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t ' -U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8a or 4a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  19. Patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xian-Jun; Gong, Chang-De; Zhou, Yuan

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the modulated patterns induced by magnetic impurities in d-wave superconductors (DSCs) near optimal doping based on the t-t-U-V model. Modulated checkerboard patterns with periodicity of eight or four lattice constants (8 a or 4 a) in the spin-, charge- and DSC orders are observed. Moreover, the checkerboard modulation in the spin order appear to be robust against parameter changes, which is consistent with neutron-scattering experiments. For the two-impurity case, a modulated stripe-like spin order with periodicity 8 a is induced, which coexists with the DSC order. Further experiments of magnetic impurity substitution in DSCs are expected to check these results.

  20. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... of the impurity. Transforming the equation to the noninertial frame of reference coupled with the center of mass we investigate the soliton behavior in the close vicinity of the impurity. With the help of the lens transformation we show that the soliton width is governed by an Ermakov-Pinney equation. We also...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....