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Sample records for improvisational music therapy

  1. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapymusic therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  2. Creativity and improvisation as therapeutic tools within music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaino, Concetta M

    2013-11-01

    The neuroscience of creativity and music improvisation is a fascinating topic and one with strong implications for clinical music therapy. Music therapists are trained to use musical improvisation as a means to bring their clients into deeper therapeutic relationship as well as free up any inhibitions or limitations that may block recovery. Could recent fMRI studies of jazz musicians showing areas of brain activation during music improvisation provide a new framework to understand underlying mechanisms at work with neurologically impaired individuals?

  3. Musical answerability : a theory on the relationship between music therapy improvisation and the phenomenon of action

    OpenAIRE

    Stensæth, Karette

    2007-01-01

    What is the relationship between music therapy improvisation and the phenomenon of action? This thesis seeks to build a theory on how actions manifest themselves in music therapy improvisation and how they are cultivated and thought about by music therapists. A video recorded excerpt of a music therapy improvisation with a multi-handicapped client is used in order to produce the empirical material, and the theoretical material includes discussions on relevant established theories. New theo...

  4. Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-07-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10) employed a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and toy play sessions, and DVD analysis of sessions. Improvisational music therapy produced markedly more and longer events of 'joy', 'emotional synchronicity' and 'initiation of engagement' behaviours in the children than toy play sessions. In response to the therapist's interpersonal demands, 'compliant (positive) responses' were observed more in music therapy than in toy play sessions, and 'no responses' were twice as frequent in toy play sessions as in music therapy. The results of this exploratory study found significant evidence supporting the value of music therapy in promoting social, emotional and motivational development in children with autism.

  5. Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint attention...... episodes. It was a randomized controlled study (n=10) employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and toy play sessions and using DVD analysis of sessions.   Improvisational music therapy produced markedly more and longer events of ‘joy...... play sessions than music therapy. The results of this exploratory study found significant evidence supporting the value of music therapy in promoting social, emotional and motivational development in children with autism....

  6. Graphic Notation as a Tool in Describing and Analyzing Music Therapy Improvisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    1993-01-01

    Presents graphic notation as the making of aural scores to memorise or analyse improvised music therapy processes, capturing also those aspectsthe usual music notation would not cover. An example in some detail is shown, the music taken from a well known Nordoff/Robbins recording. Training method...

  7. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja

    2016-01-01

    and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Objective: Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety...

  8. The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviours in Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah

    2006-01-01

    into unstructured and structured parts. There were four different types of dependent measurements; the Pervasive Developmental Disorder Behavior Inventory (PDDBI), the Early Social Communication Scales (ESCS), the Mother Play Intervention Profile (MPIP) and DVD analyses of selected session data. 10 children, all......This research investigated the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviours in children with autistic spectrum disorder. The study was designed to look at these behaviours in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and free play, and use both standardized...... male, age between 3-6 year old, with clear diagnoses of autistic spectrum disorder completed the trial. The overall results from the PDDBI, the ESCS and session analysis were generally in favour of music therapy over free play, indicating improvisational music therapy was more effective at improving...

  9. Emotional, Motivational and Interpersonal Responsiveness of Children with Autism in Improvisational Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10)…

  10. Emotional, Motivational and Interpersonal Responsiveness of Children with Autism in Improvisational Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10)…

  11. The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviors in Autistic Children: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized…

  12. The Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy on Joint Attention Behaviors in Autistic Children: A Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy and play sessions with toys, and using standardized…

  13. Reading the Music and Understanding the Therapeutic Process: Documentation, Analysis and Interpretation of Improvisational Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Parker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned primarily with the challenges of presenting clinical material from improvisational music therapy. My aim is to propose a model for the transcription of music therapy material, or “musicotherapeutic objects” (comparable to Bion’s “psychoanalytic objects”, which preserves the integrated “gestalt” of the musical experience as far as possible, whilst also supporting detailed analysis and interpretation. Unwilling to resort to use of visual documentation, but aware that many important indicators in music therapy are non-sounding, I propose a richly annotated score, where traditional music notation is integrated with graphic and verbal additions, in order to document non-sounding events. This model is illustrated within the context of a clinical case with a high functioning autistic woman. The four transcriptions, together with the original audio tracks, present significant moments during the course of music therapy, attesting to the development of the dyadic relationship, with reference to John Bowlby’s concept of a “secure base” as the most appropriate dynamic environment for therapy.

  14. The 'ripple effect': Towards researching improvisational music therapy in dementia care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicevic, Mercédès; Tsiris, Giorgos; Wood, Stuart; Powell, Harriet; Graham, Janet; Sanderson, Richard; Millman, Rachel; Gibson, Jane

    2015-09-01

    Increased interest in, and demand for, music therapy provision for persons with dementia prompted this study's exploration of music therapists' strategies for creating musical communities in dementia care settings, considering the needs and resources of people affected by dementia. Focus group discussions and detailed iterative study of improvisational music therapy work by six experienced practitioners clarify the contextual immediacy and socio-musical complexities of music therapy in dementia care homes. Music therapy's 'ripple effect', with resonances from micro (person-to-person musicking), to meso (musicking beyond 'session time') and macro level (within the care home and beyond), implies that all who are part of the dementia care ecology need opportunities for flourishing, shared participation, and for expanded self-identities; beyond 'staff', 'residents', or 'being in distress'. On such basis, managers and funders might consider an extended brief for music therapists' roles, to include generating and maintaining musical wellbeing throughout residential care settings.

  15. Common characteristics of improvisational approaches in music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Carpente, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Improvisational methods of music therapy have been increasingly applied in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over the past decades in many countries worldwide. Objective: This study aimed at developing treatment guidelines based on the most important...

  16. Improvisation, Adaptability, and Collaboration: Using AUMI in Community Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Finch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive Use Musical Instrument (AUMI is a digital instrument that facilitates independent music making for people with diverse ranges of mobility. Employing the camera tracking capabilities available on most digital devices, users with even very little voluntary mobility are able to create and perform music by controlling a visual cursor within adaptable parameters to trigger sounds. Instead of requiring players to conform to an instrument, AUMI’s flexibility enables it to adapt to divergent artistic impulses and individual bodies. Building on previous studies that examined AUMI in an educational setting (Oliveros et al. 2011 this article presents three case studies that explore AUMI’s use in a community music therapy context. In addition to assessing the instrument’s effectiveness in achieving specific music therapy goals, ethnographic research methods illuminated various socio-cultural implications of integrating digital instruments into a music therapy setting that challenge conventional notions of youth culture, independence, and collaboration. We conclude with a discussion of the notions of adaptability and universal design as they apply not only to AUMI’s functionality in the music therapy sessions, but also in view of the instrument's ongoing development.

  17. Intelligence and musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermelin, B; O'Connor, N; Lee, S; Treffert, D

    1989-05-01

    We investigated whether somebody with a severe mental impairment could not only remember and reproduce music, but was also able to generate it. Musical improvisation requires the ability to recognize constraints and also demands inventiveness. Musical improvisations on a traditional, tonal and also on a whole tone scale composition were produced by a mentally handicapped and by a normal control musician. It was found that not only the control but also the handicapped subject could improvise appropriately within structural constraints, although with the tonal music the idiot-savant showed some stylistic latitude. It is concluded that cognitive processes such as musical input analysis, decision making, and output monitoring are independent of general intellectual status.

  18. The effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in autistic children: A randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy a...... skills in children than play. Session analysis showed significantly more and lengthier events of eye contact and turn-taking in improvisational music therapy than play sessions. The implications of these findings are discussed further.......The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in pre-school children with autism. It was a randomized controlled study employing a single subject comparison design in two different conditions, improvisational music therapy...... and play sessions with toys, and using standardized tools and DVD analysis of sessions to evaluate behavioral changes in children with autism. The overall results indicated that improvisational music therapy was more effective at facilitating joint attention behaviors and non-verbal social communication...

  19. Improvisational music therapy in nonverbal communication of children with autism in the school context: randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gattino, Gustavo; Figueiredo, Felipe; de Souza, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can demonstrate better functioning to express and understand pre-verbal communication from interaction with music. In this sense, a randomized controlled trial (RCT) was developed to investigate the effects of improvisational music therapy on the p....... Although the present research did not present positive results for all outcomes, its results confirm the effectiveness of music therapy verified in previous RCTs and systematic reviews on music therapy and autism....

  20. Pluralism in contemporary improvised concert music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2002-01-01

    Pluralist musical practise in improvised music yield inspiring models of music as a medium for human co-existence. Active music therapy in its modern form came into being on the background of emancipative tendencies in the mid-sixties and on which questioned traditional concepts of authority....... In Western music cultures, both serious and popular, there was a strongly renewed interest in improvisation. Especially from around 1980, formerly clear boundaries between "serious" and "popular" were taken away as a result of these developments. Even though music therapists are often unaware of its...... existence, an improvised concert music has existed ever since in many cities and deserves our serious interest. Much valuable experience within the medium of free improvisation has been gained here, and a lot of music has been recorded on LP, cassette and CD. There is also a growing body of litterature...

  1. The effect of improvisational music therapy on the treatment of depression: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Punkanen Marko; Ala-Ruona Esa; Fachner Jörg; Gold Christian; Erkkilä Jaakko; Vanhala Mauno

    2008-01-01

    Background. Music therapy is frequently offered to individuals suffering from depression. Despite the lack of research into the effects of music therapy on this population, anecdotal evidence suggests that the results are rather promising. The aim of this study is to examine whether improvisational, psychodynamically orientated music therapy in an individual setting helps reduce symptoms of depression and improve other health-related outcomes. In particul...

  2. The effectiveness and influence of Vocal and Instrumental Improvisation in Music Therapy on children diagnosed with autism. Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Knapik-Szweda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a developmental disorder which is difficult to recognize and diagnose. The present study examines the effectiveness of music therapy intervention based on improvisational techniques with the elements of Creative Music Therapy by Paul Nordoff and Clive Robbins and improvisational techniques by Tony Wigram (such as imitating, frameworking, dialogues, holding on developmentl of children with Autism (two boys diagnosed with autism - case 1. and case 2, especially in verbal and nonverbal communication, disturbance behavior patterns, cognitive and social-emotional areas. The results indicate a positive outcome in two music therapy observing tools: Scale I Child – Therapist Relationship in Coactive Musical Experience Rating Form and Scale II Musical Communicativeness Rating Form. The tables indicate the intensity of interaction between the therapist and the subject during the music therapy process (including communication skills, cognitive skills and behavior patterns. The results of case 1 are indicated in Scale I and Scale II and show a significant effect of improvisational music therapy. The important findings from the analysis of behavior in the sessions were Stability and confidence in interpersonal musical relationship, Activity relationship developing, (scale 1.. The results of the case 2. show small changes in musical behavior when it comes to Stability and confidence in interpersonal musical relationship, but in Activity relationship developing the indicators show a lot of changes between sessions. The results of the research indicate that music therapy intervention has a positive outcome and may be an effective method to increase functioning of children with autism

  3. Core Themes in Music Therapy Clinical Improvisation: An Arts-Informed Qualitative Research Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anthony; Wimpenny, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Although clinical improvisation continues to be an important focus of music therapy research and practice, less attention has been given to integrating qualitative research in this area. As a result, this knowledge base tends to be contained within specific areas of practice rather than integrated across practices and approaches. This qualitative research synthesis profiles, integrates, and re-presents qualitative research focused on the ways music therapists and clients engage in, and make meaning from, clinical improvisation. Further, as a conduit for broadening dialogues, opening up this landscape fully, and sharing our response to the analysis and interpretation process, we present an arts-informed re-presentation of this synthesis. Following an eight-step methodological sequence, 13 qualitative studies were synthesized. This included reciprocal and refutational processes associated with synthesizing the primary studies, and additional steps associated with an arts-informed representation. Three themes, professional artistry, performing self, and meaning-making, are presented. Each theme is explored and exemplified through the selected articles, and discussed within a larger theoretical framework. An artistic re-presentation of the data is also presented. Music therapists use complex frameworks through which to engage clients in, and make meaning from, improvisational experiences. Artistic representation of the findings offers an added dimension to the synthesis process, challenging our understanding of representation, and thereby advancing synthesis methodology.

  4. Improvisation: Thinking "and" Playing Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, David

    2013-01-01

    This article explores and contextualizes improvisation in music from an educational perspective. First, recent brain research that sees improvisation as a distinct cognitive activity is examined and used to illustrate the importance and uniqueness of this often ignored area of music learning. Next, the implications for the music classroom are…

  5. Improvisation: Thinking "and" Playing Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckstead, David

    2013-01-01

    This article explores and contextualizes improvisation in music from an educational perspective. First, recent brain research that sees improvisation as a distinct cognitive activity is examined and used to illustrate the importance and uniqueness of this often ignored area of music learning. Next, the implications for the music classroom are…

  6. Common Characteristics of Improvisational Approaches in Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Developing Treatment Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Carpente, John A; Elefant, Cochavit; Kim, Jinah; Gold, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Improvisational methods of music therapy have been increasingly applied in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) over the past decades in many countries worldwide. This study aimed at developing treatment guidelines based on the most important common characteristics of improvisational music therapy (IMT) with children affected by ASD as applied across various countries and theoretical backgrounds. After initial development of treatment principle items, a survey among music therapy professionals in 10 countries and focus group workshops with experienced clinicians in three countries were conducted to evaluate the items and formulate revised treatment guidelines. To check usability, a treatment fidelity assessment tool was subsequently used to rate therapy excerpts. Survey findings and feedback from the focus groups corroborated most of the initial principles for IMT in the context of children with ASD. Unique and essential principles include facilitating musical and emotional attunement, musically scaffolding the flow of interaction, and tapping into the shared history of musical interaction between child and therapist. Raters successfully used the tool to evaluate treatment adherence and competence. Summarizing an international consensus about core principles of improvisational approaches in music therapy for children with ASD, these treatment guidelines may be applied in diverse theoretical models of music therapy. They can be used to assess treatment fidelity, and may be applied to facilitate future research, clinical practice, and training. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Verticality and containment in song and improvisation: an application of schema theory to Nordoff-Robbins music therapy.

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    Aigen, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This study illustrates the use of a new musicological method for analyzing music in music therapy. It examines two pieces of clinical music through the constructs of schema theory. It begins with an argument for enhanced musical analysis in music therapy as a means of elevating the status of explanation in music therapy. Schema theory is introduced as a means of integrating musical with clinical concerns. Some basic ideas in schema theory are explained and the schemas of VERTICALITY and CONTAINER are presented as central ones in the analysis of music. Two transcriptions-one of a composed song and one of an improvisation-are examined in detail to illustrate how decisions in the temporal, melodic, and harmonic dimensions of the music are linked to specific clinical goals. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of this type of musicological analysis for explanatory theory in music therapy.

  8. Improvisation in Latin American Musics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behague, Gerard

    1980-01-01

    Improvisation implies a relative freedom to choose elements within stylistic norms of rules proper to a given culture. Improvisatory processes for music from several cultures are described. These cultures are: Indian, Spanish, African, and Afro-Cuban (rumba). A few resources focusing on improvisation in Latin American music are presented. (KC)

  9. Keywords in musical free improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2017-01-01

    This article presents some keywords and concepts concerning free improvised music and its recent developments drawing from ongoing bibliographical research. A radical pluralism stems from musicians' backgrounds and the mixtures and fusions of styles and idioms resulting from these mixtures....... Seemingly very different "performance-driven" and "playdriven" attitudes exist, even among musicians who share the practice of performing at concerts. New models of musical analysis aiming specifically at free improvised music provide strategical observations of interaction and structure....

  10. The effect of improvisational music therapy on the treatment of depression: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punkanen Marko

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Music therapy is frequently offered to individuals suffering from depression. Despite the lack of research into the effects of music therapy on this population, anecdotal evidence suggests that the results are rather promising. The aim of this study is to examine whether improvisational, psychodynamically orientated music therapy in an individual setting helps reduce symptoms of depression and improve other health-related outcomes. In particular, attention will be given to mediator agents, such as musical expression and interaction in the sessions, as well as to the explanatory potential of EEG recordings in investigating emotion related music perception of individuals with depression. Methods 85 adults (18–50 years of age with depression (ICD-10: F 32 or F33 will be randomly assigned to an experimental or a control condition. All participants will receive standard care, but the experimental group will be offered biweekly sessions of improvisational music therapy over a period of 3 months. A blind assessor will measure outcomes before testing, after 3 months, and after 6 months. Discussion This study aims to fill a gap in knowledge as to whether active (improvisational music therapy applied to people with depression improves their condition. For the first time in this context, the mediating processes, such as changes in musical expression and interaction during the course of therapy, will be objectively investigated, and it is expected that the results will provide new insights into these processes. Furthermore, the findings are expected to reveal whether music related emotional experiences, as measured by EEG, can be utilized in assessing a depressive client's improvement in the therapy. The size and the comprehensiveness of the study are sufficient for generalizing its findings to clinical practice as well as to further music therapy research. Trial registration ISRCTN84185937

  11. The effects of improvisational music therapy on joint attention behaviors in autistic children: A randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2008-01-01

    and play sessions with toys, and using standardized tools and DVD analysis of sessions to evaluate behavioral changes in children with autism. The overall results indicated that improvisational music therapy was more effective at facilitating joint attention behaviors and non-verbal social communication...

  12. Feasibility of a Trial on Improvisational Music Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Bieleninik, Łucja; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    To conduct generalizable, rigorously designed, adequately powered trials investigating music therapy and other complex interventions, it is essential that study procedures are feasible and acceptable for participants. To date, only limited evidence on feasibility of trial designs and strategies to facilitate study implementation is available in the music therapy literature. Using data from a subsample of a multi-center RCT on improvisational music therapy (IMT) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), this study aims to evaluate feasibility of study procedures, evaluate safety, document concomitant treatment, and report consistency of individuals' trends over time in chosen outcome measures. Children with ASD aged between 4 years, 0 months, and 6 years, 11 months, were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: one (low intensity) vs. three weekly IMT sessions (high intensity) for five months vs. standard care. Feasibility was evaluated by examining recruitment, implementation of study conditions, assessment procedures, blinding, and retention; we also evaluated safety, concomitant treatment, and consistency of changes in standardized scales completed by blinded assessors and parents before and 5 months after randomization. Within this subsample (n = 15), recruitment rates, session attendance in the high-intensity condition, and consistency between outcome measures were lower than expected. Session attendance in the low-intensity and control conditions, treatment fidelity, measurement completion, blinding, retention, and safety met a priori thresholds for feasibility. By discussing strategies to improve recruitment and to minimize potential burden on study participants, referrers, and researchers, this study helps build knowledge about designing and implementing trials successfully. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Emotional communicability in improvised music: the case of music therapists.

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    Gilboa, Avi; Bodner, Ehud; Amir, Dorit

    2006-01-01

    Musical improvisation is considered an efficient way to express emotions in music therapy. We examined the ability of music therapists (MTs) to convey emotions and their ability to accurately decode the emotional content of musical improvisations. Twenty-one MTs improvised on emotions they found difficult or easy to express in life, using or not using an emotional imagery technique. Fifty-five judges, some being MTs others nontherapists, evaluated the emotional content of the improvisations. Results showed that neither experience in therapy, nor musicianship or gender of the improviser were connected to emotional communicability (EC). Emotions that were reported as easy to express in life were communicated more accurately than those difficult to express in life. Emotional imagery did not facilitate and, to some extent, hindered emotional communicability. Some emotions were found to be difficult to express (e.g., anger) in comparison to others (e.g., happiness). MTs decoded the emotional content of the improvisations more accurately than nontherapists. Implications for the practical musical and emotional training of music therapists are discussed.

  14. Randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy's effectiveness for children with autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geretsegger Monika

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has suggested that music therapy may facilitate skills in areas typically affected by autism spectrum disorders such as social interaction and communication. However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. The aim of this study is to determine effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorders. An additional aim of the study is to examine if variation in dose of treatment (i.e., number of music therapy sessions per week affects outcome of therapy, and to determine cost-effectiveness. Methods/Design Children aged between 4;0 and 6;11 years who are diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions. Parents of all participants will receive three sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months. In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity or three sessions (high-intensity per week. Generalised effects of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well generalisable to clinical practice. Addressing the issue of dose variation, this study's results will also provide information on the relevance of session

  15. Randomised controlled Trial of Improvisational Music therapy's Effectiveness for children with Autism spectrum disorders (TIME-A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika; Holck, Ulla; Gold, Christian

    2012-01-01

    design with first interim look at N = 235 will ensure both power and efficiency. Discussion Responding to the need for more rigorously designed trials examining the effectiveness of music therapy in autism spectrum disorders, this pragmatic trial sets out to generate findings that will be well...... sessions of parent counselling (at 0, 2, and 5 months). In addition, children randomised to the two intervention groups will be offered individual, improvisational music therapy over a period of five months, either one session (low-intensity) or three sessions (high-intensity) per week. Generalised effects...... of music therapy will be measured using standardised scales completed by blinded assessors (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, ADOS) and parents (Social Responsiveness Scale, SRS) before and 2, 5, and 12 months after randomisation. Cost effectiveness will be calculated as man years. A group sequential...

  16. Improvisational Practices in Elementary General Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenhagen, Lisa M.; Whitcomb, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Despite historic and ongoing support for the inclusion of improvisation in the elementary general music curriculum, music educators consistently report challenges with implementation of improvisational activities in their classes. This study was designed to examine (a) the extent to which improvisational activities were occurring in the…

  17. The neuroscience of musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Roger E

    2015-04-01

    Researchers have recently begun to examine the neural basis of musical improvisation, one of the most complex forms of creative behavior. The emerging field of improvisation neuroscience has implications not only for the study of artistic expertise, but also for understanding the neural underpinnings of domain-general processes such as motor control and language production. This review synthesizes functional magnetic resonance imagining (fMRI) studies of musical improvisation, including vocal and instrumental improvisation, with samples of jazz pianists, classical musicians, freestyle rap artists, and non-musicians. A network of prefrontal brain regions commonly linked to improvisatory behavior is highlighted, including the pre-supplementary motor area, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and dorsal premotor cortex. Activation of premotor and lateral prefrontal regions suggests that a seemingly unconstrained behavior may actually benefit from motor planning and cognitive control. Yet activation of cortical midline regions points to a role of spontaneous cognition characteristic of the default network. Together, such results may reflect cooperation between large-scale brain networks associated with cognitive control and spontaneous thought. The improvisation literature is integrated with Pressing's theoretical model, and discussed within the broader context of research on the brain basis of creative cognition.

  18. Improvisation as a Way of Knowing Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jens Skou

    -based classes put together with little or no regard to instrumentation and genre with a strong focus on analysis, artistic reflection and evaluation of the individual output. The author examines improvisation as an adaptation to and transformation of the world, and the possibility of a methodology......This paper examines improvisation and points to improvisational practice as the central transforming force in music and the educational practice of the Rhythmic Music Conservatory (RMC). In less than 25 years RMC has radically changed its education methodology from one based on jazz and African...... of improvisation in popular music that can inform the construction of meaningful and relevant popular music programs based on music improvisation is discussed. The author argues for a need to critically examine the tacit auxiliary hypotheses that seem to govern our understanding of musical improvisation through...

  19. Informal Music Learning, Improvisation and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ruth; Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores firstly the sense in which improvisation might be conceived of as an informal music education process and, secondly, the effects of a course in free improvisation on student teachers' perceptions in relation to themselves as musicians, music as a school subject and children as musicians. The results of a study conducted in two…

  20. Musical Improvisation Behavior of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flohr, John W.

    Musical improvisation behavior of 4-, 6-, and 8-year-old children who played Orff xylophones during ten 15-minute sessions is described in this paper. Each session involved three improvisatory phases. Phase I consisted of free exploration; Phase II consisted of short verbally stimulated musical tasks (two imitation and six improvisational tasks);…

  1. Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: The TIME-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieleninik, Lucja; Geretsegger, Monika; Mössler, Karin; Assmus, Jörg; Thompson, Grace; Gattino, Gustavo; Elefant, Cochavit; Gottfried, Tali; Igliozzi, Roberta; Muratori, Filippo; Suvini, Ferdinando; Kim, Jinah; Crawford, Mike J; Odell-Miller, Helen; Oldfield, Amelia; Casey, Órla; Finnemann, Johanna; Carpente, John; Park, A-La; Grossi, Enzo; Gold, Christian

    2017-08-08

    Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents' concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child's focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14.08 to 13.23 in the music therapy group and from 13.49 to 12.58 in the standard care group (mean difference, 0

  2. Clinical improvisation and the universe of musical idioms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2001-01-01

    (please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training...... and with the creation of open compositions as well, which allow for improvisation in the playing process. The author discusses the relativity of musical idioms and points to the endeavours in new and experimental music to again connect music to everyday life and make it accessible for everybody. Parameter concepts......, which are focused upon one after another in practical exercises, and which can be used in analysing improvisations, are explained. Quotation aspects receive special attention and are seen as resulting from an inherent pluralism in the musical language. Through accepting this situation and through...

  3. Moments of resonance in musical improvisation with persons with severe dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coomans, Anke

    that benefit from a non-verbal approach. The findings of the study provide insights in the role of musical improvisation for the occurrence of moments of resonance in music therapy with persons with severe dementia. The reader is led through the characteristics of musical improvisation and the specifics...

  4. Control Improvisation with Application to Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    Control Improvisation with Application to Music Alexandre Donze Sophie Libkind Sanjit A. Seshia David Wessel Electrical Engineering and Computer...to Music 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...domain of music . More speci cally, we consider the scenario of generating a monophonic Jazz melody (solo) on a given song harmonization. The music is

  5. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  6. The effectiveness and influence of Vocal and Instrumental Improvisation in Music Therapy on children diagnosed with autism. Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knapik-Szweda, Sara

    2015-01-01

    .... The results indicate a positive outcome in two music therapy observing tools: Scale I Child – Therapist Relationship in Coactive Musical Experience Rating Form and Scale II Musical Communicativeness Rating Form...

  7. Clinical improvisation and the universe of musical idioms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2001-01-01

    (please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training and with the cr......(please choose Danish language to see a German summary) The music therapy education at Aalborg University, Denmark, takes five years of full-time study to accomplish and contains many special disciplines. One of these is called intuitive music. It deals with improvisation training...... conscious working with this aspect the author believes that the problem of relativity can be mastered. At the end of the article, the parameter view is illustrated with a clinical example....

  8. Novice Music Teachers Learning to Improvise in an Improvisation Professional Development Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filsinger, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    With the intent of improving music improvisation pedagogy, the purpose of this research was to examine experiences of six novice music teachers and a professional development facilitator in an eight-week Improvisation Professional Development Workshop (IPDW). The research questions were: 1. How do teachers learn to improvise within the context of…

  9. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  10. Being together – Exploring the modulation of affect in improvisational music therapy with a man in a persistent vegetative state – a qualitative single case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Schmid

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role of affective expression and modulation as a means of communication in improvisational music therapy with a 44-year-old man living in a persistent vegetative state. Within a practice-based approach two vignettes from music therapy illustrate the regulation of the intensity of affect in an interpersonal relationship. Perspectives from modern attachment theory, developmental psychology, and embodiment research will be introduced and discussed, to theoretically frame and embed the practical work. It is suggested that the bodily-emotional situatedness of the man and the music therapist form the area of exchange for a non-verbal, affect-driven communication. In this way, playing with the affect is the main topic for the encounter, promoting self-organizational processes in both individuals involved.

  11. Young Pianists Exploring Improvisation Using Interactive Music Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Victoria; Triantafyllaki, Angeliki; Anagnostopoulou, Xristina

    2015-01-01

    The use of music technology in the enhancement of young pianists' musical improvisations has been scarcely explored in instrumental music teaching and learning research. In the present study, 19 piano pupils aged 6-10 from the UK and Greece used an interactive improvisation system called Musical Interaction Relying On Reflexion (MIROR)-Impro for…

  12. Music Improvisation and Composition in the General Music Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guderian, Lois Veenhoven

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an approach to general music where assignments in music improvisation and composition are embedded into the curriculum, that is, creative assignments are given as an outgrowth of curriculum content and directly related to instruction and activities in conceptual learning and skill development in the classroom. Such an…

  13. Play Fluency in Music Improvisation Games for Novices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a collaborative music game for two pen tablets is studied in order to see how two people with no professional music background negotiated musical improvisation. In an initial study of what it is that constitutes play fluency in improvisation, a music game has been designed and evalu......In this paper a collaborative music game for two pen tablets is studied in order to see how two people with no professional music background negotiated musical improvisation. In an initial study of what it is that constitutes play fluency in improvisation, a music game has been designed...... suggestions for how o direct future designs of collaborative music improvisation games towards ways of mutual play....

  14. Dramaturgical and Music-Theoretical Approaches to Improvisation Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huovinen, Erkki; Tenkanen, Atte; Kuusinen, Vesa-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess the relative merits of two approaches to teaching musical improvisation: a music-theoretical approach, focusing on chords and scales, and a "dramaturgical" one, emphasizing questions of balance, variation and tension. Adult students of music pedagogy, with limited previous experience in improvisation,…

  15. Developing Musical Creativity through Improvisation in the Large Performance Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Improvisation is an ideal way to develop musical creativity in ensemble settings. This article describes two prominent theoretical frameworks related to improvisation. Next, based on research with developing and expert improvisers, it discusses how to sequence improvisatory activities so that students feel accomplished at every step. Finally, the…

  16. Symbolic Interactionism in Music Education: Eight Strategies for Collaborative Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Augusto

    2013-01-01

    Learning improvisation in music is often treated as the process of gaining skills to spontaneously perform within the conventions of a style. Alternatively, learning improvisation can offer musicians a place to explore sound as it happens in free improvisation. Within the school setting, the former approach is commonly used in the jazz programs,…

  17. What makes a good musical improviser? An expert view on improvisational expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Iwan; Kirschner, Paul A.; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Wopereis, I. G. J. H., Kirschner, P. A., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2012). What makes a good musical improviser? An expert view on improvisational expertise. In E. King & E. Himonides (Eds.), Abstracts: SEMPRE 40th anniversary conference (p. 166). London, UK: International Music Education Research

  18. Something in the Air: Journeys of Self-Actualization in Musical Improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Ahonen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this qualitative, abductive, and phenomenological inquiry was to develop categories based on participants' perceptions of their improvisation and listening experiences. As using improvised music in clinical music therapy is an important method, this study expanded the knowledge of and language needed to describe this very sensitive and insightful communication process. If there is something in the air—what is it and is it something significant? Research questions included: 1. What kind of process is experienced when one improvises with an unknown person in an unfamiliar musical style? 2. What is in the air during live interactive improvisation? 3. What are the links between processes of self-actualization and peak experiences introduced by Abraham Maslow (1968 and the experiences described by the participants regarding their live improvised/interactive musical processes? The data of this study consisted of two audio-taped improvisations, three interviews, and the written reflections of six participants who participated in interactive live improvisation sessions. Ferrara's method was adapted for the data collection and analysis. Research results are presented in the form of descriptive categories which give a clearer picture of what happens during the process of musical improvisation.

  19. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, F.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting talented group improvisation. It addresses the question which interface is needed to generate collectives with collective talent. Inspired by Pask's Conversation Theory, the author has developed a t...

  20. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting t

  1. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting

  2. Collective Talent : A Study of Improvisational Group Performance in Music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de Jacqueline B.

    2006-01-01

    Improvised music performance offers remarkable and dramatic examples of the talented ways in which group members can interact and inspire each other. Such musical sessions can serve as examples of improvised performance of groups in general. This thesis reports on ways of initiating and supporting t

  3. Free Improvisation: What It Is, and Why We Should Apply It in Our General Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknafs, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Improvisation, the third content standard for the National Standards for Music Education (Music Educators National Conference, 1994), has received less attention from music teachers. This article advocates for more improvisation specifically free improvisation in general music classrooms. The nature of free improvisation, and its evolution in the…

  4. Skipping the tracks. The experience of musical improvisation online

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Zanetti

    2016-01-01

    The present article aims at analyzing the social and ontological effects of listening music online, with particular attention to the artistic practice of improvisation. In the first paragraph, I will briefly explain the essential concepts which ontology of music has traditionally counted on, and I will suggest an alternative theoretical approach, that I define as ontology of musical act. Then I will investigate the relation between recording practices and improvisation. In the final paragraph...

  5. Skipping the tracks. The experience of musical improvisation online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zanetti

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims at analyzing the social and ontological effects of listening music online, with particular attention to the artistic practice of improvisation. In the first paragraph, I will briefly explain the essential concepts which ontology of music has traditionally counted on, and I will suggest an alternative theoretical approach, that I define as ontology of musical act. Then I will investigate the relation between recording practices and improvisation. In the final paragraph I will compare some features of musical recordings (suggested by Andrew Kania with those of technological devices that allow us to listen music online.

  6. The model of counterpoint improvisation and the methods of improvisation in popular music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Fulara

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article consists of two parts. The first, more general, contains a description of the phenomena associated with improvisation, especially guitar, detailing the execution issues facing the improviser. Two points of view are presented: the first, more detailed, describes the elements of music and its importance in the process of improvisation, the second - more general - speaks of phenomena which cannot be described or analyzed in a simple way, or that are different for each track. These include the interaction between team members, expressing emotions through music and research problem of searching for one's own voice in art. Moreover, this section contains a description of three very different approaches to guitar improvisation. The first is the use of a tonal center (enriched with dominant tensions; the second method (used in fusion music is to combine the harmony of the composition with relevant scales; the third (typical for bebop music is based on the strict use of improvised chord sounds without the use of scales. The second section of the text provides a description of a specific type of polyphonic improvisation with the use of two-handed tapping on the guitar. This model stands in contrast to the three previously described ways of understanding guitar improvisation. The system is based on methods used in both the Renaissance and Baroque polyphony (among others in the leading Cantus Firmus melody or the counterpoint rules as well as on assumptions of one voice bebop improvisation (the use of leading sound solutions specific to natural foursounds. This description refers back to the first part of the article, grouping issues around the individual elements of a musical work. This section contains notes and observations collected during the eight years the author spent searching for his own musical way.

  7. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  8. Teaching Improvisation in Elementary General Music: Facing Fears and Fostering Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Improvisation is a vital part of an elementary general music education. While some music teachers successfully include improvisation in music instruction, others have fears and face challenges when attempting improvisational activities in the classroom. This article acknowledges obstacles facing music educators when attempting to incorporate…

  9. Psychodynamic Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinah Kim

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces and explores the basic principles of psychodynamic approaches in music therapy. Music is used as a means to explore both conscious and unconscious issues as well as the internal world of the individuals involved in music therapy. However, the focus of therapy is on therapeutic relationship, especially the dynamics of transference and counter-transference between the client and the music therapist. Musical experiences, such as music listening, songs, and improvisation, can be used to facilitate the therapeutic processes, and to achieve individualized therapeutic goals. When clinically appropriate, verbal processing might play as crucial a role as the musical processing. Practitioners of psychodynamic approaches often strive to gain meaning and in-depth understandings from therapeutic experiences, and the approach is therefore suitable for individuals who are ready to work through their personal issues within a therapeutic relationship. Various approaches and techniques have been developed in psychotherapy as well as in music therapy. Perhaps the only commonality in these approaches is that psychodynamic thinking informs the direction of the therapy and therapeutic processes. Clinical vignettes will be introduced within the article to highlight a triadic dynamic—the client, the music therapist, and the music—in order to illustrate the core aspects of psychodynamic music therapy.

  10. Improvisation and co-expression in explorative digital music systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie Skriver

    action, collaboration and musical expression it was possible to narrow down the interesting moments where co-expression happens in music improvisation. The qualitative video microanalysis of player communication and ongoing negotiation of musical expression informed the quantitative analysis of logged...... simultaneous and contrasting play forms. However, results from the quantitative analysis also show that players applied their social skills to the musical context: they were able to adapt quickly to each others’ changes in tempo and they were very flexible in terms of the distribution of musical roles. Duets...... were most successful in their engagement in musical relationships when they introduced each other to short, repeated and slightly varied phrases. Furthermore results from the qualitative analysis show that players were very creative in their improvisation of musical content. Most duets managed...

  11. Pedagogical applications of cognitive research on musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the implementation of educational activities involving musical improvisation that is based on a review of the literature on the psychology of music. Psychology of music is a complex field of research in which quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed involving participants ranging from novices to expert performers. The cognitive research has been analyzed to propose a pedagogical approach to the development of processes rather than products that focus on an expert's use of improvisation. The intention is to delineate a reflective approach that goes beyond the mere instruction of some current practices of teaching improvisation in jazz pedagogy. The review highlights that improvisation is a complex, multidimensional act that involves creative and performance behaviors in real-time in addition to processes such as sensory and perceptual encoding, motor control, performance monitoring, and memory storage and recall. Educational applications for the following processes are outlined: anticipation, use of repertoire, emotive communication, feedback, and flow. These characteristics are discussed in relation to the design of a pedagogical approach to musical improvisation based on reflection and metacognition development.

  12. Pedagogical applications of cognitive research on musical improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a model for the implementation of educational activities involving musical improvisation that is based on a review of the literature on the psychology of music. Psychology of music is a complex field of research in which quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed involving participants ranging from novices to expert performers. The cognitive research has been analyzed to propose a pedagogical approach to the development of processes rather than products that focus on an expert’s use of improvisation. The intention is to delineate a reflective approach that goes beyond the mere instruction of some current practices of teaching improvisation in jazz pedagogy. The review highlights that improvisation is a complex, multidimensional act that involves creative and performance behaviors in real-time in addition to processes such as sensory and perceptual encoding, motor control, performance monitoring, and memory storage and recall. Educational applications for the following processes are outlined: anticipation, use of repertoire, emotive communication, feedback, and flow. These characteristics are discussed in relation to the design of a pedagogical approach to musical improvisation based on reflection and metacognition development. PMID:26029147

  13. Pedagogical applications of the cognitive research on music improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIchele eBiasutti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for the implementation of educational activities involving musical improvisation that is based on a review of the literature on the psychology of music. Psychology of music is a complex field of research in which quantitative and qualitative methods have been employed involving participants ranging from novices to expert performers. The cognitive research has been analyzed to propose a pedagogical approach to the development of processes rather than products that focus on an expert’s use of improvisation. The intention is to delineate a reflective approach that goes beyond the mere instruction of some current practices of teaching improvisation in jazz pedagogy. The review highlights that improvisation is a complex, multidimensional act that involves creative and performance behaviors in real-time in addition to processes such as sensory and perceptual encoding, motor control, performance monitoring, and memory storage and recall. Educational applications for the following processes are outlined: anticipation, use of repertoire, emotive communication, feedback and flow. These characteristics are discussed in relation to the design of a pedagogical approach to musical improvisation based on reflection and metacognition development.

  14. A study on Improvisation in a Musical performance using Multifractal Detrended Cross Correlation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shankha; Banerjee, Archi; Patranabis, Anirban; Banerjee, Kaushik; Sengupta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Dipak

    2016-11-01

    MFDFA (the most rigorous technique to assess multifractality) was performed on four Hindustani music samples played on same 'raga' sung by the same performer. Each music sample was divided into six parts and 'multifractal spectral width' was determined for each part corresponding to the four samples. The results obtained reveal that different parts of all the four sound signals possess spectral width of widely varying values. This gives a cue of the so called 'musical improvisation' in all music samples, keeping in mind they belong to the bandish part of the same raga. Formal compositions in Hindustani raga are juxtaposed with the improvised portions, where an artist manoeuvers his/her own creativity to bring out a mood that is specific for that particular performance, which is known as 'improvisation'. Further, this observation hints at the association of different emotions even in the same bandish of the same raga performed by the same artist, this interesting observation cannot be revealed unless rigorous non-linear technique explores the nature of musical structure. In the second part, we applied MFDXA technique to explore more in-depth about 'improvisation' and association with emotion. This technique is applied to find the degree of cross-correlation (γx) between the different parts of the samples. Pronounced correlation has been observed in the middle parts of the all the four samples evident from higher values of γx ​whereas the other parts show weak correlation. This gets further support from the values of spectral width from different parts of the sample - width of those parts is significantly different from other parts. This observation is extremely new both in respect of musical structure of so called improvisation and associated emotion. The importance of this study in application area of cognitive music therapy is immense.

  15. The causal inference of cortical neural networks during music improvisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaogeng; Crüts, Björn; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2014-01-01

    We present an EEG study of two music improvisation experiments. Professional musicians with high level of improvisation skills were asked to perform music either according to notes (composed music) or in improvisation. Each piece of music was performed in two different modes: strict mode and "let-go" mode. Synchronized EEG data was measured from both musicians and listeners. We used one of the most reliable causality measures: conditional Mutual Information from Mixed Embedding (MIME), to analyze directed correlations between different EEG channels, which was combined with network theory to construct both intra-brain and cross-brain networks. Differences were identified in intra-brain neural networks between composed music and improvisation and between strict mode and "let-go" mode. Particular brain regions such as frontal, parietal and temporal regions were found to play a key role in differentiating the brain activities between different playing conditions. By comparing the level of degree centralities in intra-brain neural networks, we found a difference between the response of musicians and the listeners when comparing the different playing conditions.

  16. The causal inference of cortical neural networks during music improvisations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogeng Wan

    Full Text Available We present an EEG study of two music improvisation experiments. Professional musicians with high level of improvisation skills were asked to perform music either according to notes (composed music or in improvisation. Each piece of music was performed in two different modes: strict mode and "let-go" mode. Synchronized EEG data was measured from both musicians and listeners. We used one of the most reliable causality measures: conditional Mutual Information from Mixed Embedding (MIME, to analyze directed correlations between different EEG channels, which was combined with network theory to construct both intra-brain and cross-brain networks. Differences were identified in intra-brain neural networks between composed music and improvisation and between strict mode and "let-go" mode. Particular brain regions such as frontal, parietal and temporal regions were found to play a key role in differentiating the brain activities between different playing conditions. By comparing the level of degree centralities in intra-brain neural networks, we found a difference between the response of musicians and the listeners when comparing the different playing conditions.

  17. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...... music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive...

  18. Improvisation and the self-organization of multiple musical bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley eWalton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding everyday behavior relies heavily upon understanding our ability to improvise, how we are able to continuously anticipate and adapt in order to coordinate with our environment and others. Here we consider the ability of musicians to improvise, where they must spontaneously coordinate their actions with co-performers in order to produce novel musical expressions. Investigations of this behavior have traditionally focused on describing the organization of cognitive structures. The focus, here, however, is on the ability of the time-evolving patterns of inter-musician movement coordination as revealed by the mathematical tools of complex dynamical systems to provide a new understanding of what potentiates the novelty of spontaneous musical action. We demonstrate this approach through the application of cross wavelet spectral analysis, which isolates the strength and patterning of the behavioral coordination that occurs between improvising musicians across a range of nested time-scales. Revealing the sophistication of the previously unexplored dynamics of movement coordination between improvising musicians is an important step towards understanding how creative musical expressions emerge from the spontaneous coordination of multiple musical bodies.

  19. A Technique to Introduce Keyboard Improvisation in General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jim

    2006-01-01

    All the general music books the author has seen teach the pentatonic scale, and achieve success with it, by having students play only on the piano's black keys. The trick to preventing this exercise from sounding simplistic or uninteresting is to teach improvisation in the A-flat Dorian mode. Using A-flat as the tonal center puts that center right…

  20. Neurophysiological correlates of musical creativity: The example of improvisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skirtach I.A.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the turn of this century, a substantial body of research has been published on the neuroscience of creativity. Now, it is necessary to study the neurophysiological correlates in true-to-life, professionally specific situations. The aim of our empirical research was to study the neurophysiological correlates of musical improvisation, a spontaneous creative activity. The participants were 136 right-handed practicing musicians aged 19 to 36 (102 males and 34 females, divided into two groups—professionals (56 people and amateurs (80 people. EEG signals were recorded in a resting state (eyes closed and during three types of internal musical activity (perceiving, mentally reproducing, and mentally improvising from 21 scalp electrodes according to the International 10-20 System. For statistical analysis, we used ANOVA and post hoc analysis. For the main neurophysiological correlates of musical creativity, we revealed higher values of EEG spectral power in the delta band and the dominance of long-distance functional cortical connections in the high-frequency bands. Variable neurophysiological correlates were differentiated according to emotions and the professional level of the musicians. The distinguishing EEG pattern in the professional musicians during improvisation was the predominant activation of the left- hemisphere cortical regions simultaneously with high interhemispheric integration in the high-frequency band along the “creativity axis.” The revealed neurophysiological correlates of musical creativity during improvisation included basic and variable components and were characterized by a specific frequency-spatial organization of bioelectric cortical activity in the musicians.

  1. Improvisation and the self-organization of multiple musical bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Ashley E.; Richardson, Michael J.; Langland-Hassan, Peter; Chemero, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Understanding everyday behavior relies heavily upon understanding our ability to improvise, how we are able to continuously anticipate and adapt in order to coordinate with our environment and others. Here we consider the ability of musicians to improvise, where they must spontaneously coordinate their actions with co-performers in order to produce novel musical expressions. Investigations of this behavior have traditionally focused on describing the organization of cognitive structures. The focus, here, however, is on the ability of the time-evolving patterns of inter-musician movement coordination as revealed by the mathematical tools of complex dynamical systems to provide a new understanding of what potentiates the novelty of spontaneous musical action. We demonstrate this approach through the application of cross wavelet spectral analysis, which isolates the strength and patterning of the behavioral coordination that occurs between improvising musicians across a range of nested time-scales. Revealing the sophistication of the previously unexplored dynamics of movement coordination between improvising musicians is an important step toward understanding how creative musical expressions emerge from the spontaneous coordination of multiple musical bodies. PMID:25941499

  2. Improvisation and the self-organization of multiple musical bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Ashley E; Richardson, Michael J; Langland-Hassan, Peter; Chemero, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Understanding everyday behavior relies heavily upon understanding our ability to improvise, how we are able to continuously anticipate and adapt in order to coordinate with our environment and others. Here we consider the ability of musicians to improvise, where they must spontaneously coordinate their actions with co-performers in order to produce novel musical expressions. Investigations of this behavior have traditionally focused on describing the organization of cognitive structures. The focus, here, however, is on the ability of the time-evolving patterns of inter-musician movement coordination as revealed by the mathematical tools of complex dynamical systems to provide a new understanding of what potentiates the novelty of spontaneous musical action. We demonstrate this approach through the application of cross wavelet spectral analysis, which isolates the strength and patterning of the behavioral coordination that occurs between improvising musicians across a range of nested time-scales. Revealing the sophistication of the previously unexplored dynamics of movement coordination between improvising musicians is an important step toward understanding how creative musical expressions emerge from the spontaneous coordination of multiple musical bodies.

  3. Impaired Maintenance of Interpersonal Synchronization in Musical Improvisations of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrien Foubert

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Borderline personality disorder (BPD is a serious and complex mental disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 5.9%, characterized by pervasive difficulties with emotion regulation, impulse control, and instability in interpersonal relationships and self-image. Impairments in interpersonal functioning have always been a prominent characteristic of BPD, indicating a need for research to identify the specific interpersonal processes that are problematic for diagnosed individuals. Previous research has concentrated on self-report questionnaires, unidirectional tests, and experimental paradigms wherein the exchange of social signals between individuals was not the focus. We propose joint musical improvisation as an alternative method to investigate interpersonal processes. Using a novel, carefully planned, ABA′ accompaniment paradigm, and taking into account the possible influences of mood, psychotropic medication, general attachment, and musical sophistication, we recorded piano improvisations of 16 BPD patients and 12 matched healthy controls. We hypothesized that the insecure attachment system associated with BPD would be activated in the joint improvisation and manifest in measures of timing behavior. Results indicated that a logistic regression model, built on differences in timing deviations, predicted diagnosis with 82% success. More specifically, over the course of the improvisation B section (freer improvisation, controls' timing deviations decreased (temporal synchrony became more precise whereas that of the patients with BPD did not, confirming our hypothesis. These findings are in accordance with previous research, where BPD is characterized by difficulties in attachment relationships such as maintaining strong attachment with others, but it is novel to find empirical evidence of such issues in joint musical improvisation. We suggest further longitudinal research within the field of music therapy, to study how recovery of these timing

  4. Impaired Maintenance of Interpersonal Synchronization in Musical Improvisations of Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foubert, Katrien; Collins, Tom; De Backer, Jos

    2017-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a serious and complex mental disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 5.9%, characterized by pervasive difficulties with emotion regulation, impulse control, and instability in interpersonal relationships and self-image. Impairments in interpersonal functioning have always been a prominent characteristic of BPD, indicating a need for research to identify the specific interpersonal processes that are problematic for diagnosed individuals. Previous research has concentrated on self-report questionnaires, unidirectional tests, and experimental paradigms wherein the exchange of social signals between individuals was not the focus. We propose joint musical improvisation as an alternative method to investigate interpersonal processes. Using a novel, carefully planned, ABA′ accompaniment paradigm, and taking into account the possible influences of mood, psychotropic medication, general attachment, and musical sophistication, we recorded piano improvisations of 16 BPD patients and 12 matched healthy controls. We hypothesized that the insecure attachment system associated with BPD would be activated in the joint improvisation and manifest in measures of timing behavior. Results indicated that a logistic regression model, built on differences in timing deviations, predicted diagnosis with 82% success. More specifically, over the course of the improvisation B section (freer improvisation), controls' timing deviations decreased (temporal synchrony became more precise) whereas that of the patients with BPD did not, confirming our hypothesis. These findings are in accordance with previous research, where BPD is characterized by difficulties in attachment relationships such as maintaining strong attachment with others, but it is novel to find empirical evidence of such issues in joint musical improvisation. We suggest further longitudinal research within the field of music therapy, to study how recovery of these timing habits are related

  5. Musical Improvisation as Action: An Arendtian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    A basic premise of this essay is that music education practice is a form of--a broadly conceived notion of--political practice insofar as it creates situations where specific meanings are produced, attitudes built, identities shaped, and hierarchies of musical and social values constructed. Every music education practice expresses, and at the same…

  6. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is the ...

  7. Neurophysiological correlates of musical creativity: The example of improvisation.

    OpenAIRE

    Skirtach I.A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the turn of this century, a substantial body of research has been published on the neuroscience of creativity. Now, it is necessary to study the neurophysiological correlates in true-to-life, professionally specific situations. The aim of our empirical research was to study the neurophysiological correlates of musical improvisation, a spontaneous creative activity. The participants were 136 right-handed practicing musicians aged 19 to 36 (102 males and 34 females), divided into two grou...

  8. Neurophysiological correlates of musical creativity: the example of improvisation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Since the turn of this century, a substantial body of research has been published on the neuroscience of creativity. Now, it is necessary to study the neurophysiological correlates in true-to-life, professionally specific situations. The aim of our empirical research was to study the neurophysiological correlates of musical improvisation, a spontaneous creative activity. The participants were 136 right-handed practicing musicians aged 19 to 36 (102 males and 34 females), divided into two grou...

  9. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  10. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  11. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  12. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  13. Umbanda, Music and Music Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira de Queiroz, Gregorio José

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the use of music in religious rites of Umbanda and the possible correlations among the role played by music in this rite and its role in music therapy process, especially in some of its approaches...

  14. The effect of improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on reducing pianists' music performance anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngshin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two music therapy approaches, improvisation-assisted desensitization, and music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation and imagery on ameliorating the symptoms of music performance anxiety (MPA) among student pianists. Thirty female college pianists (N = 30) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: (a) improvised music-assisted desensitization group (n = 15), or (b) music-assisted progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and imagery group (n = 15). All participants received 6 weekly music therapy sessions according to their assigned group. Two lab performances were provided; one before and one after the 6 music therapy sessions, as the performance stimuli for MPA. All participants completed pretest and posttest measures that included four types of visual analogue scales (MPA, stress, tension, and comfort), the state portion of Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and the Music Performance Anxiety Questionnaire (MPAQ) developed by Lehrer, Goldman, and Strommen (1990). Participants' finger temperatures were also measured. When results of the music-assisted PMR and imagery condition were compared from pretest to posttest, statistically significant differences occurred in 6 out of the 7 measures-MPA, tension, comfort, STAI, MPAQ, and finger temperature, indicating that the music-assisted PMR and imagery treatment was very successful in reducing MPA. For the improvisation-assisted desensitization condition, the statistically significant decreases in tension and STAI, with increases in finger temperature indicated that this approach was effective in managing MPA to some extent. When the difference scores for the two approaches were compared, there was no statistically significant difference between the two approaches for any of the seven measures. Therefore, no one treatment condition appeared more effective than the other. Although statistically significant differences were not found between

  15. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, ... grateful I chose a career as rewarding as music therapy. I love what I do each day!” Where ...

  16. Cortical regions involved in the generation of musical structures during improvisation in pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Sara L; Csíkszentmihályi, Mihály; Ullén, Fredrik

    2007-05-01

    Studies on simple pseudorandom motor and cognitive tasks have shown that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and rostral premotor areas are involved in free response selection. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether these brain regions are also involved in free generation of responses in a more complex creative behavior: musical improvisation. Eleven professional pianists participated in the study. In one condition, Improvise, the pianist improvised on the basis of a visually displayed melody. In the control condition, Reproduce, the participant reproduced his previous improvisation from memory. Participants were able to reproduce their improvisations with a high level of accuracy, and the contrast Improvise versus Reproduce was thus essentially matched in terms of motor output and sensory feedback. However, the Improvise condition required storage in memory of the improvisation. We therefore also included a condition FreeImp, where the pianist improvised but was instructed not to memorize his performance. To locate brain regions involved in musical creation, we investigated the activations in the Improvise-Reproduce contrast that were also present in FreeImp contrasted with a baseline rest condition. Activated brain regions included the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the presupplementary motor area, the rostral portion of the dorsal premotor cortex, and the left posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus. We suggest that these regions are part of a network involved in musical creation, and discuss their possible functional roles.

  17. Music therapy in palliative care: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian

    2002-03-01

    As the music therapy profession has developed internationally over the last 25 years, so has its role in palliative care. Music is a highly versatile and dynamic therapeutic modality, lending itself to a variety of music therapy techniques used to benefit both those living with life-threatening illnesses and their family members and caregivers. This article will give a broad overview of the historical roots of music therapy and introduce the techniques that are employed in current practice. By combining a review of mainstream music therapy practice involving musical improvisation, song-writing and receptive/recreational techniques with case material from my own experience, this article aims to highlight the potential music therapy holds as an effective holistic practice for palliative care, whatever the care setting.

  18. [Music improvisation with schizophrenic patients--a controlled study in the assessment of therapeutic effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, H; Wunderlich, S; Bender, W; Elz, U; Horn, B

    1987-11-01

    The effects of a course of music therapy with free improvisation, consisting of 27 sessions over a period of 6 months, were examined in a controlled study of matched therapy and waiting group, each comprising 7 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective psychosis. The psychopathologic picture having essentially remained unaltered on the measuring instrument used (Lorr scales), significant positive changes were found in the self-assessment questionnaires completed by the participants. Improvements in recreational and social behaviours could not be shown. The disease and reintegration processes took similarly positive courses in both groups, supported by the extensive range of psychiatric/psychotherapeutic services available in the Munich area. The improvising orientation of the music therapy course had mostly been approved of by the patients, it however also gave rise to a desire for more structuring and a more goal-directed therapeutic approach. A tendency towards the initial values, i.e. a deterioration, was stated in the therapy group at follow-up six months post-therapy.

  19. Making Music, Making Friends: Long-Term Music Therapy with Young Adults with Severe Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicevic, Mercédès; O'Neil, Nicky; Powell, Harriet; Jones, Oonagh; Sampathianaki, Ergina

    2014-01-01

    This collaborative practitioner research study emerged from music therapists' concerns about the value of improvisational, music-centred music therapy for young adults with severe learning disabilities (SLDs), given the long-term nature of such work. Concerns included the relevance, in this context, of formulating, and reporting on, therapeutic…

  20. Making Music, Making Friends: Long-Term Music Therapy with Young Adults with Severe Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlicevic, Mercédès; O'Neil, Nicky; Powell, Harriet; Jones, Oonagh; Sampathianaki, Ergina

    2014-01-01

    This collaborative practitioner research study emerged from music therapists' concerns about the value of improvisational, music-centred music therapy for young adults with severe learning disabilities (SLDs), given the long-term nature of such work. Concerns included the relevance, in this context, of formulating, and reporting on, therapeutic…

  1. Expertise in musical improvisation and creativity: the mediation of idea evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oded M Kleinmintz

    Full Text Available The current study explored the influence of musical expertise, and specifically training in improvisation on creativity, using the framework of the twofold model, according to which creativity involves a process of idea generation and idea evaluation. Based on the hypothesis that a strict evaluation phase may have an inhibiting effect over the generation phase, we predicted that training in improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on the evaluation system, leading to greater creativity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared performance among three groups--musicians trained in improvisation, musicians not trained in improvisation, and non-musicians--on divergent thinking tasks and on their evaluation of creativity. The improvisation group scored higher on fluency and originality compared to the other two groups. Among the musicians, evaluation of creativity mediated how experience in improvisation was related to originality and fluency scores. It is concluded that deliberate practice of improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on creativity.

  2. Expertise in musical improvisation and creativity: the mediation of idea evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinmintz, Oded M; Goldstein, Pavel; Mayseless, Naama; Abecasis, Donna; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored the influence of musical expertise, and specifically training in improvisation on creativity, using the framework of the twofold model, according to which creativity involves a process of idea generation and idea evaluation. Based on the hypothesis that a strict evaluation phase may have an inhibiting effect over the generation phase, we predicted that training in improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on the evaluation system, leading to greater creativity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared performance among three groups--musicians trained in improvisation, musicians not trained in improvisation, and non-musicians--on divergent thinking tasks and on their evaluation of creativity. The improvisation group scored higher on fluency and originality compared to the other two groups. Among the musicians, evaluation of creativity mediated how experience in improvisation was related to originality and fluency scores. It is concluded that deliberate practice of improvisation may have a "releasing effect" on creativity.

  3. Teaching Improvisation through Processes. Applications in Music Education and Implications for General Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasutti, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Improvisation is an articulated multidimensional activity based on an extemporaneous creative performance. Practicing improvisation, participants expand sophisticated skills such as sensory and perceptual encoding, memory storage and recall, motor control, and performance monitoring. Improvisation abilities have been developed following several methodologies mainly with a product-oriented perspective. A model framed under the socio-cultural theory of learning for designing didactic activities on processes instead of outcomes is presented in the current paper. The challenge is to overcome the mere instructional dimension of some practices of teaching improvisation by designing activities that stimulate self-regulated learning strategies in the students. In the article the present thesis is declined in three ways, concerning the following three possible areas of application: (1) high-level musical learning, (2) musical pedagogy with children, (3) general pedagogy. The applications in the music field focusing mainly on an expert's use of improvisation are discussed. The last section considers how these ideas should transcend music studies, presenting the benefits and the implications of improvisation activities for general learning. Moreover, the application of music education to the following cognitive processes are discussed: anticipation, use of repertoire, emotive communication, feedback and flow. These characteristics could be used to outline a pedagogical method for teaching music improvisation based on the development of reflection, reasoning, and meta-cognition.

  4. Teaching Improvisation through Processes. Applications in Music Education and Implications for General Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Biasutti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Improvisation is an articulated multidimensional activity based on an extemporaneous creative performance. Practicing improvisation, participants expand sophisticated skills such as sensory and perceptual encoding, memory storage and recall, motor control, and performance monitoring. Improvisation abilities have been developed following several methodologies mainly with a product-oriented perspective. A model framed under the socio-cultural theory of learning for designing didactic activities on processes instead of outcomes is presented in the current paper. The challenge is to overcome the mere instructional dimension of some practices of teaching improvisation by designing activities that stimulate self-regulated learning strategies in the students. In the article the present thesis is declined in three ways, concerning the following three possible areas of application: (1 high-level musical learning, (2 musical pedagogy with children, (3 general pedagogy. The applications in the music field focusing mainly on an expert's use of improvisation are discussed. The last section considers how these ideas should transcend music studies, presenting the benefits and the implications of improvisation activities for general learning. Moreover, the application of music education to the following cognitive processes are discussed: anticipation, use of repertoire, emotive communication, feedback and flow. These characteristics could be used to outline a pedagogical method for teaching music improvisation based on the development of reflection, reasoning, and meta-cognition.

  5. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  6. A Case Study of Diverse Multimodal Influences on Music Improvisation Using Visual Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    This case study employed multimodal methods and visual analysis to explore how a young multilingual student used music improvisation to form a speech rap. This student, recently arrived in Australia from Ethiopia, created piano music that was central to his music identity and that simultaneously, through dialogue with his mother, enhanced his…

  7. The role of emotion in musical improvisation: an analysis of structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Malinda J; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Rankin, Summer K; Limb, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary functions of music is to convey emotion, yet how music accomplishes this task remains unclear. For example, simple correlations between mode (major vs. minor) and emotion (happy vs. sad) do not adequately explain the enormous range, subtlety or complexity of musically induced emotions. In this study, we examined the structural features of unconstrained musical improvisations generated by jazz pianists in response to emotional cues. We hypothesized that musicians would not utilize any universal rules to convey emotions, but would instead combine heterogeneous musical elements together in order to depict positive and negative emotions. Our findings demonstrate a lack of simple correspondence between emotions and musical features of spontaneous musical improvisation. While improvisations in response to positive emotional cues were more likely to be in major keys, have faster tempos, faster key press velocities and more staccato notes when compared to negative improvisations, there was a wide distribution for each emotion with components that directly violated these primary associations. The finding that musicians often combine disparate features together in order to convey emotion during improvisation suggests that structural diversity may be an essential feature of the ability of music to express a wide range of emotion.

  8. The role of emotion in musical improvisation: an analysis of structural features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinda J McPherson

    Full Text Available One of the primary functions of music is to convey emotion, yet how music accomplishes this task remains unclear. For example, simple correlations between mode (major vs. minor and emotion (happy vs. sad do not adequately explain the enormous range, subtlety or complexity of musically induced emotions. In this study, we examined the structural features of unconstrained musical improvisations generated by jazz pianists in response to emotional cues. We hypothesized that musicians would not utilize any universal rules to convey emotions, but would instead combine heterogeneous musical elements together in order to depict positive and negative emotions. Our findings demonstrate a lack of simple correspondence between emotions and musical features of spontaneous musical improvisation. While improvisations in response to positive emotional cues were more likely to be in major keys, have faster tempos, faster key press velocities and more staccato notes when compared to negative improvisations, there was a wide distribution for each emotion with components that directly violated these primary associations. The finding that musicians often combine disparate features together in order to convey emotion during improvisation suggests that structural diversity may be an essential feature of the ability of music to express a wide range of emotion.

  9. Learning Pre-Played Solos: Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Jazz/Improvised Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Siw G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the self-regulated learning strategies of two advanced students in jazz/improvised music education when learning pre-played solos over well-known jazz tunes. The students were enrolled in a well-established performance degree programme in a music conservatoire, and videotaped their own individual practice sessions. In…

  10. Oratorium - auditorium - laboratorium: early modern improvisations on cabala, music, and alchemy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forshaw, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The article explores the improvisations in the practices of cabala, music and alchemy. It examines the connection between magic, alchemy and cabala and their implications for theosophy according to Paracelsian doctor Heinrich Khunrath. It also analyzes the musical composition and harmony of alchemic

  11. Learning Pre-Played Solos: Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Jazz/Improvised Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Siw G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the self-regulated learning strategies of two advanced students in jazz/improvised music education when learning pre-played solos over well-known jazz tunes. The students were enrolled in a well-established performance degree programme in a music conservatoire, and videotaped their own individual practice sessions. In…

  12. “Immunology of music”? A short introduction to cognitive science of musical improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Wachowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on music in the area of cognitive sciences – quite varied despite their short history – meet with scepticism. The author of this introduction, presenting some spectacular examples of research on musical improvisation, tries to demonstrate that they enrich rather than reduce our understanding of this phenomenon.

  13. Common ground: 1970s improvised music as part of a cross-genre Dutch ensemble culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusch, L.

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the way in which jazz and Western art music in the Netherlands during the 1970s were intertwined, both social and musically, and how alliances between their avant-gardes (Improvising Musicians and Contemporary Musicians) contributed to what came to be known as Dutch ensemble

  14. Music therapy in supportive cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-06-08

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients-interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life.

  15. Perception of ‘Back-Channeling’ Nonverbal Feedback in Musical Duo Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nikki; Hadley, Lauren V.; Bader, Maria; Keller, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In witnessing face-to-face conversation, observers perceive authentic communication according to the social contingency of nonverbal feedback cues (‘back-channeling’) by non-speaking interactors. The current study investigated the generality of this function by focusing on nonverbal communication in musical improvisation. A perceptual experiment was conducted to test whether observers can reliably identify genuine versus fake (mismatched) duos from musicians’ nonverbal cues, and how this judgement is affected by observers’ musical background and rhythm perception skill. Twenty-four musicians were recruited to perform duo improvisations, which included solo episodes, in two styles: standard jazz (where rhythm is based on a regular pulse) or free improvisation (where rhythm is non-pulsed). The improvisations were recorded using a motion capture system to generate 16 ten-second point-light displays (with audio) of the soloist and the silent non-soloing musician (‘back-channeler’). Sixteen further displays were created by splicing soloists with back-channelers from different duos. Participants (N = 60) with various musical backgrounds were asked to rate the point-light displays as either real or fake. Results indicated that participants were sensitive to the real/fake distinction in the free improvisation condition independently of musical experience. Individual differences in rhythm perception skill did not account for performance in the free condition, but were positively correlated with accuracy in the standard jazz condition. These findings suggest that the perception of back-channeling in free improvisation is not dependent on music-specific skills but is a general ability. The findings invite further study of the links between interpersonal dynamics in conversation and musical interaction. PMID:26086593

  16. Perception of 'Back-Channeling' Nonverbal Feedback in Musical Duo Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nikki; Hadley, Lauren V; Bader, Maria; Keller, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    In witnessing face-to-face conversation, observers perceive authentic communication according to the social contingency of nonverbal feedback cues ('back-channeling') by non-speaking interactors. The current study investigated the generality of this function by focusing on nonverbal communication in musical improvisation. A perceptual experiment was conducted to test whether observers can reliably identify genuine versus fake (mismatched) duos from musicians' nonverbal cues, and how this judgement is affected by observers' musical background and rhythm perception skill. Twenty-four musicians were recruited to perform duo improvisations, which included solo episodes, in two styles: standard jazz (where rhythm is based on a regular pulse) or free improvisation (where rhythm is non-pulsed). The improvisations were recorded using a motion capture system to generate 16 ten-second point-light displays (with audio) of the soloist and the silent non-soloing musician ('back-channeler'). Sixteen further displays were created by splicing soloists with back-channelers from different duos. Participants (N = 60) with various musical backgrounds were asked to rate the point-light displays as either real or fake. Results indicated that participants were sensitive to the real/fake distinction in the free improvisation condition independently of musical experience. Individual differences in rhythm perception skill did not account for performance in the free condition, but were positively correlated with accuracy in the standard jazz condition. These findings suggest that the perception of back-channeling in free improvisation is not dependent on music-specific skills but is a general ability. The findings invite further study of the links between interpersonal dynamics in conversation and musical interaction.

  17. Perception of 'Back-Channeling' Nonverbal Feedback in Musical Duo Improvisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki Moran

    Full Text Available In witnessing face-to-face conversation, observers perceive authentic communication according to the social contingency of nonverbal feedback cues ('back-channeling' by non-speaking interactors. The current study investigated the generality of this function by focusing on nonverbal communication in musical improvisation. A perceptual experiment was conducted to test whether observers can reliably identify genuine versus fake (mismatched duos from musicians' nonverbal cues, and how this judgement is affected by observers' musical background and rhythm perception skill. Twenty-four musicians were recruited to perform duo improvisations, which included solo episodes, in two styles: standard jazz (where rhythm is based on a regular pulse or free improvisation (where rhythm is non-pulsed. The improvisations were recorded using a motion capture system to generate 16 ten-second point-light displays (with audio of the soloist and the silent non-soloing musician ('back-channeler'. Sixteen further displays were created by splicing soloists with back-channelers from different duos. Participants (N = 60 with various musical backgrounds were asked to rate the point-light displays as either real or fake. Results indicated that participants were sensitive to the real/fake distinction in the free improvisation condition independently of musical experience. Individual differences in rhythm perception skill did not account for performance in the free condition, but were positively correlated with accuracy in the standard jazz condition. These findings suggest that the perception of back-channeling in free improvisation is not dependent on music-specific skills but is a general ability. The findings invite further study of the links between interpersonal dynamics in conversation and musical interaction.

  18. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications of ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will donate ...

  19. Writing Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Helena Rykov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available

    Communicating about music therapy is problematic because discursive language fails to convey the nonverbal, embodied essence of experience. I explore the emergence of this problem in the music therapy literature. I discuss the scholarship of phenomenological writing. I provide examples of nondiscursive music therapy writing. I introduce the genre of poetic inquiry.

    Poetry is the most musical form of language. Poetry and music, linked throughout history, share many characteristics. It makes sense that we use poetry to write about music therapy.

    Writing is a crucial skill for music therapy professionals who must produce various notes, proposals, and reports. Writing poetically is a diminished stance compared to discursive prose writing. It is understandable that representing music therapy in experimental, tentative, and creative texts is risky. I invite music therapists to aspire towards poetry when writing music therapy to better address nonverbal, embodied, music therapy essence. I address this invitation to all writers of music therapy: undergraduate and graduate students, clinicians, and researchers.

  20. Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Iwan; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Wopereis, I. G. J. H., Van Merriënboer, J. J. G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition. In K. Gomez, L. Lyons, & J. Radinsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Vol. 2 (pp. 419-420). Chic

  1. Neural substrates of spontaneous musical performance: an FMRI study of jazz improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Braun, Allen R

    2008-02-27

    To investigate the neural substrates that underlie spontaneous musical performance, we examined improvisation in professional jazz pianists using functional MRI. By employing two paradigms that differed widely in musical complexity, we found that improvisation (compared to production of over-learned musical sequences) was consistently characterized by a dissociated pattern of activity in the prefrontal cortex: extensive deactivation of dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbital regions with focal activation of the medial prefrontal (frontal polar) cortex. Such a pattern may reflect a combination of psychological processes required for spontaneous improvisation, in which internally motivated, stimulus-independent behaviors unfold in the absence of central processes that typically mediate self-monitoring and conscious volitional control of ongoing performance. Changes in prefrontal activity during improvisation were accompanied by widespread activation of neocortical sensorimotor areas (that mediate the organization and execution of musical performance) as well as deactivation of limbic structures (that regulate motivation and emotional tone). This distributed neural pattern may provide a cognitive context that enables the emergence of spontaneous creative activity.

  2. The Instant Composers Pool: Music Notation and the Mediation of Improvising Agency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, F.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article relates the recent development of a “relational musicology” to debates about participatory art and relational aesthetics. I present results from an ethnographic study of the Dutch improvising music collective the Instant Composers Pool, founded in 1967 and still performing. With a backg

  3. Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wopereis, Iwan; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Wopereis, I. G. J. H., Van Merriënboer, J. J. G., & Kirschner, P. A. (2010). Improvising in music: A learning biography study to reveal skill acquisition. In K. Gomez, L. Lyons, & J. Radinsky (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: Vol. 2 (pp. 419-420). Chic

  4. Improvisation in the English Primary Music Classroom: Teachers' Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions and practices concerning musical improvisation in the English primary classroom. A questionnaire survey was carried out with participants drawn from primary teachers--both generalists and specialists--working in various regions of England. The findings demonstrate a positive view of teachers'…

  5. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  6. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  7. Creativity as a distinct trainable mental state: An EEG study of musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Joel A; Nowicki, Elizabeth A; Joanisse, Marc F

    2017-03-18

    Alpha-band EEG was used to index how creative mental states relate to the creation of artistic works in skilled musicians. We contrasted differences in frontal upper alpha-band activity between tasks with high and low creativity demands by recording EEGs while skilled musicians listened to, played back, and improvised jazz melodies. Neural responses were compared for skilled musicians with training in musical improvisation versus those who had no formal improvisation training. Consistent with our hypotheses, individuals showed increased frontal upper alpha-band activity during more creative tasks (i.e., improvisation) compared to during less creative tasks (i.e., rote playback). Moreover, this effect was greatest for musicians with formal improvisation training. The strength of this effect also appeared to modulate the quality of these improvisations, as evidenced by significant correlations between upper alpha EEG power and objective post-hoc ratings of individuals' performances. These findings support a conceptualization of creativity as a distinct mental state and suggest spontaneous processing capacity is better nurtured through formal institutional training than informal.

  8. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  9. Origins and Expertise in the Musical Improvisations of Adults and Children: A Phenomenological Study of Content and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodero, Lori A.

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the musical content and human processes of improvisations of children and adults using the phenomenological lenses of time, space and responsivity. Paired improvisational performances of two late-career adult composers and two 7-year-old children were analysed considering a lifespan-related perspective involving the origins of…

  10. Differential parietal and temporal contributions to music perception in improvising and score-dependent musicians, an fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2015-01-01

    Using fMRI, cerebral activations were studied in 24 classically-trained keyboard performers and 12 musically unskilled control subjects. Two groups of musicians were recruited: improvising (n=12) and score-dependent (non-improvising) musicians (n=12). While listening to both familiar and unfamiliar

  11. Differential parietal and temporal contributions to music perception in improvising and score-dependent musicians, an fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, Robert; de Jong, Bauke M.

    2015-01-01

    Using fMRI, cerebral activations were studied in 24 classically-trained keyboard performers and 12 musically unskilled control subjects. Two groups of musicians were recruited: improvising (n=12) and score-dependent (non-improvising) musicians (n=12). While listening to both familiar and unfamiliar

  12. Child-Computer Interaction at the Beginner Stage of Music Learning: Effects of Reflexive Interaction on Children's Musical Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Anna Rita; Anelli, Filomena; Benghi, Diber; Friberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    In this article children's musical improvisation is investigated through the "reflexive interaction" paradigm. We used a particular system, the MIROR-Impro, implemented in the framework of the MIROR project (EC-FP7), which is able to reply to the child playing a keyboard by a "reflexive" output, mirroring (with repetitions and variations) her/his inputs. The study was conducted in a public primary school, with 47 children, aged 6-7. The experimental design used the convergence procedure, based on three sample groups allowing us to verify if the reflexive interaction using the MIROR-Impro is necessary and/or sufficient to improve the children's abilities to improvise. The following conditions were used as independent variables: to play only the keyboard, the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro but with not-reflexive reply, the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro with reflexive reply. As dependent variables we estimated the children's ability to improvise in solos, and in duets. Each child carried out a training program consisting of 5 weekly individual 12 min sessions. The control group played the complete package of independent variables; Experimental Group 1 played the keyboard and the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro with not-reflexive reply; Experimental Group 2 played only the keyboard with the reflexive system. One week after, the children were asked to improvise a musical piece on the keyboard alone (Solo task), and in pairs with a friend (Duet task). Three independent judges assessed the Solo and the Duet tasks by means of a grid based on the TAI-Test for Ability to Improvise rating scale. The EG2, which trained only with the reflexive system, reached the highest average results and the difference with EG1, which did not used the reflexive system, is statistically significant when the children improvise in a duet. The results indicate that in the sample of participants the reflexive interaction alone could be sufficient to increase the improvisational skills, and necessary

  13. Music therapy in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avers, Laura; Mathur, Ambika; Kamat, Deepak

    2007-09-01

    The soothing effects of music have been well described over the centuries and across cultures. In more recent times, studies have shown the beneficial effects of music in alleviating symptoms in a wide variety of clinical and psychologic conditions. Music therapy has been primarily used as an intervention to control emotional states, in pain management, cognitive processing, and stress management. Stress is associated with increased production of the stress hormone cortisol, which is known to suppress immune responses. Several studies in the past few decades have demonstrated a positive effect of music therapy on reducing stress or increasing immune responses, or both. Music therapy should therefore be considered as a valuable addition to standard pharmacologic therapeutic modalities in enhancing the immune response and lowering stress levels in such conditions. This article reviews the role of music as a therapeutic modality and the future for music therapy, particularly in pediatrics.

  14. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  15. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  16. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  17. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  18. Expertise-related deactivation of the right temporoparietal junction during musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Ansari, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Musical training has been associated with structural changes in the brain as well as functional differences in brain activity when musicians are compared to nonmusicians on both perceptual and motor tasks. Previous neuroimaging comparisons of musicians and nonmusicians in the motor domain have used tasks involving prelearned motor sequences or synchronization with an auditorily presented sequence during the experiment. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine expertise-related differences in brain activity between musicians and nonmusicians during improvisation--the generation of novel musical-motor sequences--using a paradigm that we previously used in musicians alone. Despite behaviorally matched performance, the two groups showed significant differences in functional brain activity during improvisation. Specifically, musicians deactivated the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) during melodic improvisation, while nonmusicians showed no change in activity in this region. The rTPJ is thought to be part of a ventral attentional network for bottom-up stimulus-driven processing, and it has been postulated that deactivation of this region occurs in order to inhibit attentional shifts toward task-irrelevant stimuli during top-down, goal-driven behavior. We propose that the musicians' deactivation of the rTPJ during melodic improvisation may represent a training-induced shift toward inhibition of stimulus-driven attention, allowing for a more goal-directed performance state that aids in creative thought.

  19. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  20. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  1. Using Jazz to Teach Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Improvising has been around since the dawn of music. Most music in the world is improvised to some extent, and the idea of performing notes on the page "as written" is a fairly young development in music's history. One genre that does heavily stress improvisation from the start is jazz. Since jazz ethic is based on improvised performances,…

  2. Using Jazz to Teach Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Improvising has been around since the dawn of music. Most music in the world is improvised to some extent, and the idea of performing notes on the page "as written" is a fairly young development in music's history. One genre that does heavily stress improvisation from the start is jazz. Since jazz ethic is based on improvised performances,…

  3. Musical friends and foes: The social cognition of affiliation and control in improvised interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucouturier, Jean-Julien; Canonne, Clément

    2017-04-01

    A recently emerging view in music cognition holds that music is not only social and participatory in its production, but also in its perception, i.e. that music is in fact perceived as the sonic trace of social relations between a group of real or virtual agents. While this view appears compatible with a number of intriguing music cognitive phenomena, such as the links between beat entrainment and prosocial behaviour or between strong musical emotions and empathy, direct evidence is lacking that listeners are at all able to use the acoustic features of a musical interaction to infer the affiliatory or controlling nature of an underlying social intention. We created a novel experimental situation in which we asked expert music improvisers to communicate 5 types of non-musical social intentions, such as being domineering, disdainful or conciliatory, to one another solely using musical interaction. Using a combination of decoding studies, computational and psychoacoustical analyses, we show that both musically-trained and non musically-trained listeners can recognize relational intentions encoded in music, and that this social cognitive ability relies, to a sizeable extent, on the information processing of acoustic cues of temporal and harmonic coordination that are not present in any one of the musicians' channels, but emerge from the dynamics of their interaction. By manipulating these cues in two-channel audio recordings and testing their impact on the social judgements of non-musician observers, we finally establish a causal relationship between the affiliation dimension of social behaviour and musical harmonic coordination on the one hand, and between the control dimension and musical temporal coordination on the other hand. These results provide novel mechanistic insights not only into the social cognition of musical interactions, but also into that of non-verbal interactions as a whole. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annerose eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the aesthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%, which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners’ hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners’ judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer’s actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual’s action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  5. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annerose; Keller, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the esthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%), which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners' hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness) in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners' judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer's actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual's action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  6. Reflections on Working with a String Quartet in Aesthetic Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Andrew Lee

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic Music Therapy (AeMT is a music centred approach to clinical practice. This essay describes the beginning experiences of sessions with a professional string quartet. Using clinical improvisation the therapist and quartet explored inter-musical and inter-personal relationships. Questioning the importance of musical quality in clinical improvisation this paper proceeds to examine the parameters of clinical practice with musicians. Through the therapist's reflections on the inspirational aspects of sessions, questions are raised for future work and research.

  7. Perceptions of Jazz Improvisation among Pennsylvania Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Jason Robert

    2010-01-01

    Jazz education has been a part of school music programs in the United States in both extracurricular and curricular settings since the 1920's. An enormous growth in the popularity of stage bands and jazz ensembles was experienced between the 1940's and 1980's resulting in a vibrant, widespread acceptance of jazz in the music curriculum (Luty,…

  8. Perceptions of Jazz Improvisation among Pennsylvania Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Jason Robert

    2010-01-01

    Jazz education has been a part of school music programs in the United States in both extracurricular and curricular settings since the 1920's. An enormous growth in the popularity of stage bands and jazz ensembles was experienced between the 1940's and 1980's resulting in a vibrant, widespread acceptance of jazz in the music curriculum (Luty,…

  9. The Improvised Lives of Women in Music Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Carol P.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses findings of a survey of 18 women music educators. Reports the educators' career paths, reasons for job changes, and professional influences. Reveals their appraisals of the importance of mentoring and goal setting and their definitions of success. Argues that it is up to women music educators to nurture one another. (SG)

  10. An Experimental Study of the Effects of Improvisation on the Development of Children's Creative Thinking in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano; Hargreaves, David J.

    2009-01-01

    This article reports a quasi-experimental study of the effects of improvisation on the development of children's creative thinking in music. The study was conducted in a primary school classroom with two matched groups of 6-year-old children over a period of six months. The music lessons for the experimental group were enriched with a variety of…

  11. Differential parietal and temporal contributions to music perception in improvising and score-dependent musicians, an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert; de Jong, Bauke M

    2015-10-22

    Using fMRI, cerebral activations were studied in 24 classically-trained keyboard performers and 12 musically unskilled control subjects. Two groups of musicians were recruited: improvising (n=12) and score-dependent (non-improvising) musicians (n=12). While listening to both familiar and unfamiliar music, subjects either (covertly) appraised the presented music performance or imagined they were playing the music themselves. We hypothesized that improvising musicians would exhibit enhanced efficiency of audiomotor transformation reflected by stronger ventral premotor activation. Statistical Parametric Mapping revealed that, while virtually 'playing along׳ with the music, improvising musicians exhibited activation of a right-hemisphere distribution of cerebral areas including posterior-superior parietal and dorsal premotor cortex. Involvement of these right-hemisphere dorsal stream areas suggests that improvising musicians recruited an amodal spatial processing system subserving pitch-to-space transformations to facilitate their virtual motor performance. Score-dependent musicians recruited a primarily left-hemisphere pattern of motor areas together with the posterior part of the right superior temporal sulcus, suggesting a relationship between aural discrimination and symbolic representation. Activations in bilateral auditory cortex were significantly larger for improvising musicians than for score-dependent musicians, suggesting enhanced top-down effects on aural perception. Our results suggest that learning to play a music instrument primarily from notation predisposes musicians toward aural identification and discrimination, while learning by improvisation involves audio-spatial-motor transformations, not only during performance, but also perception. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Generation of novel motor sequences: the neural correlates of musical improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aaron L; Ansari, Daniel

    2008-06-01

    While some motor behavior is instinctive and stereotyped or learned and re-executed, much action is a spontaneous response to a novel set of environmental conditions. The neural correlates of both pre-learned and cued motor sequences have been previously studied, but novel motor behavior has thus far not been examined through brain imaging. In this paper, we report a study of musical improvisation in trained pianists with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), using improvisation as a case study of novel action generation. We demonstrate that both rhythmic (temporal) and melodic (ordinal) motor sequence creation modulate activity in a network of brain regions comprised of the dorsal premotor cortex, the rostral cingulate zone of the anterior cingulate cortex, and the inferior frontal gyrus. These findings are consistent with a role for the dorsal premotor cortex in movement coordination, the rostral cingulate zone in voluntary selection, and the inferior frontal gyrus in sequence generation. Thus, the invention of novel motor sequences in musical improvisation recruits a network of brain regions coordinated to generate possible sequences, select among them, and execute the decided-upon sequence.

  13. Interdisciplinary collaboration in music therapy for persons with dementia-in practice and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Coomans, Anke; Stige, Brynjulf

    This contribution aims to give insight in what actually happens in clinical music therapy with people suffering from dementia. Starting from a psychodynamic point of view, the focus is laid on how musical improvisation can contribute to the development of a therapeutic relationship with this spec...

  14. Interdisciplinary collaboration in music therapy for persons with dementia-in practice and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Coomans, Anke; Stige, Brynjulf

    This contribution aims to give insight in what actually happens in clinical music therapy with people suffering from dementia. Starting from a psychodynamic point of view, the focus is laid on how musical improvisation can contribute to the development of a therapeutic relationship...

  15. Theoretical Considerations of Bio-guided Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric B Miller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Music therapists rarely have the opportunity to consider a new model of music therapy and need to review prior models and theoretical approaches to make an informed determination regarding Bio-guided Music Therapy. While initially appearing to fall within the confines of Behavioral Music Therapy, technical advances in sound reproduction, physiological data acquisition methods, as well as innovative application techniques are argued to bring the bio-guided approach into the realm of in-the-moment improvisation. Bio-guided Music Therapy distinguishes itself from other music therapy models by virtue of the client's physiological data being presented in real-time either musically or visually back to the client or the therapist during the therapy session. This real-time data may be presented in key, scale and tempo for flexibility in musical interaction with the music therapist or group. General treatment areas include ADHD, Stress/anxiety, dementia, depression and addictions. The resulting charts and graphs document the impact of the music therapy session in the language of mainstream medicine, readily accessible to other medical professionals.

  16. Vermittlungen - musically speaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weymann, Eckhard; Metzner, Susanne; Fitzthum, Elena

    2001-01-01

    Bilingual publication - mixed content in English and German. Articles were written by participants in the First European Symposium "Improvisation Training in Music Therapy education" which took place in Hamburg, 1998.......Bilingual publication - mixed content in English and German. Articles were written by participants in the First European Symposium "Improvisation Training in Music Therapy education" which took place in Hamburg, 1998....

  17. Music Therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Professional development and recognition is an 'old' issue in music therapy but still a relevant, complex and crucial one. Burning questions regarding professionalisation are at the forefront of most music therapy associations’ agendas across Europe and beyond, and feed back directly to the work...... of the EMTC. Considering the wider political, socio-economic, cultural and disciplinary aspects of professionalisation, different development pathways impact directly on music therapy practice, training, ethics, professional collaboration and employment conditions. Although a number of endeavours have been...... implemented regarding music therapy’s professional development and recognition in different countries, documentation and sharing of such endeavours on international level has been limited and scattered. Drawing from the EMTC’s work since the early ‘90s, as well as from colleagues’ experiences (and struggles...

  18. Neural substrates of interactive musical improvisation: an FMRI study of 'trading fours' in jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, Gabriel F; Rankin, Summer K; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Limb, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication.

  19. Neural substrates of interactive musical improvisation: an FMRI study of 'trading fours' in jazz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel F Donnay

    Full Text Available Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication.

  20. The Marriage of Music and Narrative: Explorations in Art, Therapy, and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Eyre

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Music and narrative share similar goals – the expression of thoughts, feelings, emotions, and meanings. While narrative may be employed as an oral or literary form, as a research tool, or as a therapeutic technique, music, as an art form, is most often perceived as a performance art or compositional act. Elements of both music and narrative have common ontological roots in human communication and expression. Over the past 50 years, both music and narrative have gained stature as therapeutic practices. The first two parts of this paper will focus on how music may be used to narrate events and to express personal meaning in both art and therapy. The third part will reveal the results of a pilot research study that explored the relationship between verbal narrative and music improvisation in the creation of an autobiography. The subjects (4 music therapists narrated their autobiography, then improvised on each period (Narrative Improvisation Method – NIM, or performed the tasks in reverse order (Improvisation Narrative Method – INM. Musical and verbal data were analyzed to compare what was evoked in the music and in the narrative. Subjects were interviewed about their experiences in both methods and the interview data were analyzed to gain a deeper understanding of the process. Implications for the development of clinical and research techniques that integrate both verbal and music narration are discussed.

  1. Music Therapy with Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukko Tervo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic community described in this paper was situated at the University of Oulu Central Hospital Department of Psychiatry, Finland, during the years 1979-1989. The ward consisted of eight beds, four for boys and four for girls. The basic emphasis in the treatment was laid on psychoanalytic psychotherapy and music and art therapies suitable for the stage of adolescent development. Adolescent community therapy (psychoanalytic psychotherapy, music therapy, art therapy, special school etc. creates an environment which supports individual growth of the adolescent and youth culture. This, in turn, simultaneously supports psychotherapy.

  2. Varied Understanding and Application of Counter Transference in Active Music Therapy in Adult Psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2006-01-01

    The article presents varied ways of understanding and applying the clinical concept of counter transference. The sources are drawn from the author's own clinical praxis, from psychoanalytic and music therapy literature and from a qualitative interview examination among experienced music therapist...... applying the concept in music therapy improvisational work in adult psychiatry.......The article presents varied ways of understanding and applying the clinical concept of counter transference. The sources are drawn from the author's own clinical praxis, from psychoanalytic and music therapy literature and from a qualitative interview examination among experienced music therapists...

  3. Music Education and Music Therapy. Introduction to Plenary Session 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2002-01-01

    Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics......Chairman's introduction to plenary session on the relationship between music therapy and music pedagogics...

  4. Music therapy in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, L M; Huston, M J; Nelson, K A; Walsh, D; Steele, A L

    2001-05-01

    A partnership between The Cleveland Clinic Foundation and The Cleveland Music School Settlement has resulted in music therapy becoming a standard part of the care in our palliative medicine inpatient unit. This paper describes a music therapy program and its impact on patients, their families, and staff. A service delivery model is suggested for implementation and integration of music therapy within palliative medicine. Specific music therapy interventions, evaluation and documentation techniques are also mentioned. A description of patient and family responses to music therapy, staff satisfaction, and effectiveness of interventions is presented.

  5. The early beginnings of Nordoff-Robbins music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngshin

    2004-01-01

    Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy is an improvisational and compositional approach to individual and group therapy that resulted from the pioneering teamwork of Paul Nordoff and Clive Robbins over a period of 17 years. Nordoff and Robbins developed this approach for practical clinical purposes while working with the children at Sunfield Children's Home in 1959. This paper explores the critical academic year of 1959-1960 as a watershed in the early development of Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy. By way of context, it also examines (a) how Paul Nordoff, as a distinguished American pianist and composer, became a music therapist; (b) how Nordoff's former musical career as a composer and pianist affected his clinical musicianship as a music therapist; (c) how Clive Robbins, as a British special educator, became a music therapist; (d) how their team work emerged; and (e) how they developed their own approach. In conclusion, the early development of Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy resulted from Nordoff and Robbins' similar philosophical background, the supportive environment of Sunfield Children's Home, the guidance of Herbert Geuter, M.D., and their courage. Since the 1959-1960 academic years, the application and practice of Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy has undergone many changes. However, the pioneering spirit of Nordoff and Robbins manifested in that watershed year remains strong among contemporary Nordoff-Robbins music therapy practitioners.

  6. Connecting to create: expertise in musical improvisation is associated with increased functional connectivity between premotor and prefrontal areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Ana Luísa; de Manzano, Örjan; Fransson, Peter; Eriksson, Helene; Ullén, Fredrik

    2014-04-30

    Musicians have been used extensively to study neural correlates of long-term practice, but no studies have investigated the specific effects of training musical creativity. Here, we used human functional MRI to measure brain activity during improvisation in a sample of 39 professional pianists with varying backgrounds in classical and jazz piano playing. We found total hours of improvisation experience to be negatively associated with activity in frontoparietal executive cortical areas. In contrast, improvisation training was positively associated with functional connectivity of the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, dorsal premotor cortices, and presupplementary areas. The effects were significant when controlling for hours of classical piano practice and age. These results indicate that even neural mechanisms involved in creative behaviors, which require a flexible online generation of novel and meaningful output, can be automated by training. Second, improvisational musical training can influence functional brain properties at a network level. We show that the greater functional connectivity seen in experienced improvisers may reflect a more efficient exchange of information within associative networks of importance for musical creativity.

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... m Having Trouble Logging In/Staying Logged In Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? What do music therapists ...

  8. The Neuroscience of Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Andrew T.; Limb, Charles J.

    2017-01-01

    Current research in the neuroscience of musical creativity reveals promising implications for the value of learning to improvise. This article outlines the neuroscientific literature on musical improvisation and relates these findings to the benefits of musical creativity. We begin by describing the neural substrates of flow with respect to the…

  9. Improvisation skills for clinical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    based on a short theme or ‘leit-motif’ will all be included in the workshop activities, using both piano, and other instruments. While interventions utilising improvisational music therapy should never be driven by clinical procedures, applying therapeutic method, and also recognising method...

  10. Intra- and inter-brain synchronization during musical improvisation on the guitar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Viktor; Sänger, Johanna; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2013-01-01

    Humans interact with the environment through sensory and motor acts. Some of these interactions require synchronization among two or more individuals. Multiple-trial designs, which we have used in past work to study interbrain synchronization in the course of joint action, constrain the range of observable interactions. To overcome the limitations of multiple-trial designs, we conducted single-trial analyses of electroencephalography (EEG) signals recorded from eight pairs of guitarists engaged in musical improvisation. We identified hyper-brain networks based on a complex interplay of different frequencies. The intra-brain connections primarily involved higher frequencies (e.g., beta), whereas inter-brain connections primarily operated at lower frequencies (e.g., delta and theta). The topology of hyper-brain networks was frequency-dependent, with a tendency to become more regular at higher frequencies. We also found hyper-brain modules that included nodes (i.e., EEG electrodes) from both brains. Some of the observed network properties were related to musical roles during improvisation. Our findings replicate and extend earlier work and point to mechanisms that enable individuals to engage in temporally coordinated joint action.

  11. A pilot study into the therapeutic effects of music therapy at a cancer help center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S J; Harbuz, M S; Hucklebridge, F; Bunt, L

    2001-01-01

    Since the mid-1980s, music therapy has been a regular feature of the residential program at the internationally renowned Bristol Cancer Help Centre, United Kingdom. Music therapy complements other therapeutic interventions available to residents at the center. To compare the therapeutic effects of listening to music in a relaxed state with the active involvement of music improvisation (the playing of tuned and untuned percussion instruments) in a music therapy group setting and to investigate the potential influence of music therapy on positive emotions and the immune system of cancer patients. A quantitative pre-posttest, psychological/physiological measures, and qualitative focus group design. A cancer help center that offers a fully integrated range of complementary therapies, psychological support, spiritual healing, and nutritional and self-help techniques addressing the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual needs of cancer patients and their supporters. Twenty-nine cancer patients, aged 21 to 68 years. Group music therapy interventions of listening to recorded/live music in a relaxed state and improvisation. Increased well-being and relaxation and less tension during the listening experience. Increased well-being and energy and less tension during improvisation. Increased levels of salivary immunoglobulin A and decreased levels of cortisol in both experiences. Psychological data showed increased well-being and relaxation as well as altered energy levels in both interventions. Physiological data showed increased salivary immunoglobulin A in the listening experience and a decrease in cortisol levels in both interventions over a 2-day period. Preliminary evidence of a link between positive emotions and the immune system of cancer patients was found. These findings, which link listening to music in a relaxed state and improvisation to alterations in psychological and physiological parameters, may provide a better understanding of the effectiveness of music

  12. Music-centered Music Therapy: Contributions for the Present and Future of Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    André Brandalise

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to make a reflection about the music-centered Music Therapy movement (its origin, thoughts, theories, practice and philosophy) as one of the possibilities for the present and future of Music Therapy in Brazil and in the world. In doing so, music-centered music therapy does not intend to discuss a way of thinking of Music Therapy processes only but a way of better comprehending Mankind, Creativity, Art, and Health.

  13. MUSICAL SCALES, A COMPLETE GUIDE TO INSTRUMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND IMPROVISATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Enrique Ardila

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta la publicación del libro Escalas musicales: guía completa hacia la técnica instrumental y la improvisación. El libro tiene quince capítulos, con la siguiente categorización: “Pentatónicas”, “Hexatónicas”, “Heptatónicas tonales”, “Heptatónicas modales”, “Heptatónicas modales artificiales”, “Heptatónicas diversas”, “Octatónicas”, “Nonatónicas”, “Decatónicas”, “Sistema endecatónico – cromatónico”, “Cromáticas”, “Microtonales” y “Escalas hindúes”. La denominación sistematización y organización del sistema de tetracordios[2] es uno de los alcances fundamentales de la investigación, de la misma forma que el sistema endecatónico cromatónico (escalas de once notas, diseñado por los autores e incluido en la teoría musical. También es importante la relación del libro con las escalas hindúes por medio de la taxonomía, de los tetracordios del relacionamiento con el Melakarta; haciendo de esta obra, un avance importante en la organización y enseñanza de las escalas musicales del mundo, así como las relaciones y trayectos culturales del planeta. La transposición, la memoria y la enarmonía también forman parte del proceso de enseñanza, así como una metodología clara y concisa, que abarca la creatividad y la improvisación. [2] Los tetracordios en esta obra son un aporte importante, siendo esenciales en la identificación de escalas heptatónicas (capítulos 4, 5, 6, 7 y 14, así como de trayectos culturales.

  14. Neo-colonialism In Music Therapy: A Critical Interpretive Synthesis of the Literature Concerning Music Therapy Practice With Refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Comte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings from a critical interpretive synthesis that explored the assumptions influencing music therapists writing about their work with refugees. Music therapy literature suggests that the profession appears to be uniquely suited to address the healthcare needs of the refugee population by transcending cultural and language barriers which often mitigate access to other services. However, when working with individuals characterised by trauma and whose identities have been dictated by political power, it is essential that music therapy practices oppose these forces and provide opportunities for empowerment. Therefore, eleven papers describing music therapy practice with refugees from the international literature were examined and interrogated to determine the assumptions embedded within the language used by music therapists. The synthetic construct of a neo-colonial music therapist emerged from the data and informed subsequent analysis. The concepts of refugees as a homogenous group defined by a dominant narrative of trauma, and musical improvisation as a universal language appeared to be influential in the ways music therapists were reporting on their work. These findings are discussed along with considerations for a music therapy practice that promotes empowerment and advocates for the voices of the refugee population.

  15. On music Therapy : Music and Healing

    OpenAIRE

    栗林, 文雄

    1996-01-01

    The theory of sound as energy is based on the relationship between music and positive humanfeelings. It was discussed the music therapy is effective in the care and cure of elderly with behavioral disorderssuch as senile dementia, and in patients in palliative medicine wards with cancer and in patientswith various kinds of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. alcohol. drug addiction and so on.

  16. On music Therapy : Music and Healing

    OpenAIRE

    栗林, 文雄

    1996-01-01

    The theory of sound as energy is based on the relationship between music and positive humanfeelings. It was discussed the music therapy is effective in the care and cure of elderly with behavioral disorderssuch as senile dementia, and in patients in palliative medicine wards with cancer and in patientswith various kinds of mental disorders such as schizophrenia. alcohol. drug addiction and so on.

  17. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  18. Music Therapy with Premature Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2003-01-01

    Over 20 years of research and clinical practice in music therapy with premature infants has been compiled into this text designed for Board Certified Music Therapists specializing in Neonatal Intensive Care clinical services, for NICU medical staff incorporating research-based music therapy into developmental care plans, and for parents of…

  19. Music therapy career aptitude test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hayoung A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the Music Therapy Career Aptitude Test (MTCAT) was to measure the affective domain of music therapy students including their self-awareness as it relates to the music therapy career, value in human development, interest in general therapy, and aptitude for being a professional music therapist. The MTCAT was administered to 113 music therapy students who are currently freshman or sophomores in an undergraduate music therapy program or in the first year of a music therapy master's equivalency program. The results of analysis indicated that the MTCAT is normally distributed and that all 20 questions are significantly correlated with the total test score of the MTCAT. The reliability of the MTCAT was considerably high (Cronbach's Coefficient Alpha=0.8). The criterion-related validity was examined by comparing the MTCAT scores of music therapy students with the scores of 43 professional music therapists. The correlation between the scores of students and professionals was found to be statistically significant. The results suggests that normal distribution, internal consistency, homogeneity of construct, item discrimination, correlation analysis, content validity, and criterion-related validity in the MTCAT may be helpful in predicting music therapy career aptitude and may aid in the career decision making process of college music therapy students.

  20. Musical and emotional attunement - unique and essential in music therapy with children on the autism spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Geretsegger, Monika

    2016-01-01

    to musical parameters, aspects of timing in the interaction, joint vitality forms and emotional expression. Discussion: Attunement unfolds in different ways, including regulation, selective attunement and gentle redirections of the dynamic in order to regulate the child’s arousal, attention or mood. Both......Background: In improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), facilitating musical and emotional attunement has been found to be one of the unique and essential principles. Methods: Using videotaped sequences of therapy sessions from an international study (TIME......-A), independent raters assessed therapists’ competence in using their behaviour and expression (e.g., through music, voice, arousal level, movement, facial expression) to allow for moments of synchronisation and attunement. Sequences with frequent occurrences of attunement were then examined in relation...

  1. Music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gooding, Lori

    2014-07-01

    This article summarizes the research on music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents with diagnoses commonly treated by psychiatrists. Music therapy and music medicine are defined, effects of music on the brain are described, and music therapy research in psychiatric treatment is discussed. Music therapy research with specific child/adolescent populations is summarized, including disorders usually diagnosed in childhood, substance abuse, mood/anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. Clinical implications are listed, including suggestions for health care professionals seeking to use music medicine techniques. Strengths and weaknesses of music therapy treatment are discussed, as well as areas for future research.

  2. Music Therapy, Song and Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Brandalise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic relationship between therapist, client and music can also be considered as part of a communication system. Illness can seriously affect the functioning of this system in the music therapy process. The musical form song is used very often in therapeutic processes. It can be very efficient in the treatment. This article intends to make a reflection about the links between Music Therapy, Song and Communication.

  3. Audiovisual integration of emotional signals from music improvisation does not depend on temporal correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Karin; McAleer, Phil; Pollick, Frank

    2010-04-06

    In the present study we applied a paradigm often used in face-voice affect perception to solo music improvisation to examine how the emotional valence of sound and gesture are integrated when perceiving an emotion. Three brief excerpts expressing emotion produced by a drummer and three by a saxophonist were selected. From these bimodal congruent displays the audio-only, visual-only, and audiovisually incongruent conditions (obtained by combining the two signals both within and between instruments) were derived. In Experiment 1 twenty musical novices judged the perceived emotion and rated the strength of each emotion. The results indicate that sound dominated the visual signal in the perception of affective expression, though this was more evident for the saxophone. In Experiment 2 a further sixteen musical novices were asked to either pay attention to the musicians' movements or to the sound when judging the perceived emotions. The results showed no effect of visual information when judging the sound. On the contrary, when judging the emotional content of the visual information, a worsening in performance was obtained for the incongruent condition that combined different emotional auditory and visual information for the same instrument. The effect of emotionally discordant information thus became evident only when the auditory and visual signals belonged to the same categorical event despite their temporal mismatch. This suggests that the integration of emotional information may be reinforced by its semantic attributes but might be independent from temporal features.

  4. Music Therapy in Pediatric Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Music therapy is an established health care and human services profession that is dedicated to the implementation of controlled research studies to determine the underlying mechanisms in music that are responsible for therapeutic change, as well as clinical research to direct and guide the work of the music therapist. This growing body of research…

  5. Music Therapy in Pediatric Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    Music therapy is an established health care and human services profession that is dedicated to the implementation of controlled research studies to determine the underlying mechanisms in music that are responsible for therapeutic change, as well as clinical research to direct and guide the work of the music therapist. This growing body of research…

  6. Keyboard Improvisation: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingscott, John; Durrant, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomenon of musical improvisation within two contrasting musical genres--jazz piano and liturgical and concert organ. While improvisation is well documented in both genres, there is little literature relating the two forms and, in particular, the process of improvisation. The aim of this study is to…

  7. Child–Computer Interaction at the Beginner Stage of Music Learning: Effects of Reflexive Interaction on Children’s Musical Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Anna Rita; Anelli, Filomena; Benghi, Diber; Friberg, Anders

    2017-01-01

    In this article children’s musical improvisation is investigated through the “reflexive interaction” paradigm. We used a particular system, the MIROR-Impro, implemented in the framework of the MIROR project (EC-FP7), which is able to reply to the child playing a keyboard by a “reflexive” output, mirroring (with repetitions and variations) her/his inputs. The study was conducted in a public primary school, with 47 children, aged 6–7. The experimental design used the convergence procedure, based on three sample groups allowing us to verify if the reflexive interaction using the MIROR-Impro is necessary and/or sufficient to improve the children’s abilities to improvise. The following conditions were used as independent variables: to play only the keyboard, the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro but with not-reflexive reply, the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro with reflexive reply. As dependent variables we estimated the children’s ability to improvise in solos, and in duets. Each child carried out a training program consisting of 5 weekly individual 12 min sessions. The control group played the complete package of independent variables; Experimental Group 1 played the keyboard and the keyboard with the MIROR-Impro with not-reflexive reply; Experimental Group 2 played only the keyboard with the reflexive system. One week after, the children were asked to improvise a musical piece on the keyboard alone (Solo task), and in pairs with a friend (Duet task). Three independent judges assessed the Solo and the Duet tasks by means of a grid based on the TAI-Test for Ability to Improvise rating scale. The EG2, which trained only with the reflexive system, reached the highest average results and the difference with EG1, which did not used the reflexive system, is statistically significant when the children improvise in a duet. The results indicate that in the sample of participants the reflexive interaction alone could be sufficient to increase the improvisational

  8. [Music therapy and child care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Min; Sung, Huei-Chuan

    2005-12-01

    Music therapy was shown many years ago to have positive effects in various age groups of patients in the Western world. Music can produce physiological and psychological effects, including changes in the vital signs, reductions in anxiety, improvements in the immune system, decreases in cortisol levels, the reduction of stress and the promotion of well-being. Music therapy is an inexpensive and effective intervention for nurses to apply to patients. The application of such therapy to children, however, is different from that to adults due to their limited cognitive and language development. In Taiwan, nurses' knowledge of music therapy is limited, and it is rarely used in child care. This article introduces music therapy and its effects in child care, such as in premature infants, children in emergency care, handicapped children, and children receiving surgery. Music therapy is often used as an assisted intervention for patient care in clinical settings. Health care professionals can perform some of the music therapy activities for patients appropriately even if they have not been trained in music. This article aims to improve nurses' knowledge of music therapy and to provide a useful reference for those involved in child care.

  9. Improvisation and meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Simon

    2013-08-07

    This article presents and discusses a long-term repeated-immersion research process that explores meaning allocated to an episode of 50 seconds of music improvisation in early neurosurgical rehabilitation by a teenage boy with severe traumatic brain injury and his music therapist. The process began with the original therapy session in August 1994 and extends to the current time of writing in 2013. A diverse selection of qualitative research methods were used during a repeated immersion and engagement with the selected episodes. The multiple methods used in this enquiry include therapeutic narrative analysis and musicological and video analysis during my doctoral research between 2002 and 2004, arts-based research in 2008 using expressive writing, and arts-based research in 2012 based on the creation of a body cast of my right hand as I used it to play the first note of my music improvising in the original therapy episode, which is accompanied by reflective journaling. The casting of my hand was done to explore and reconsider the role of my own body as an embodied and integral, but originally hidden, part of the therapy process. Put together, these investigations explore the potential meanings of the episode of music improvisation in therapy in an innovative and imaginative way. However, this article does not aim at this stage to present a model or theory for neurorehabilitation but offers an example of how a combination of diverse qualitative methods over an extended period of time can be instrumental in gaining innovative and rich insights into initially hidden perspectives on health, well-being, and human relating.

  10. Music therapy for dementia symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koger, S M; Brotons, M

    2000-01-01

    While music/music therapy does not represent a treatment of dementia, its use is based on a possible beneficial effect on symptoms including social, emotional and cognitive skills and for decreasing behavioral problems of individuals with dementias. Thus, there are clear implications for patients' and caregivers' quality of life. However, quantification and documentation of the evidence of this effect is necessary. Professional music therapists are accountable for providing efficient, beneficial treatment. Further, music therapists are responsible for assessing, designing and implementing music therapy treatments, monitoring client progress, and reformulating their practice according to data collected and new advancements in the field. If they wait until sufficient valid, empirical data on all aspects of a disability or music response are available before attempting to design a therapy session, they may well reach retirement age before even one client can be served. On the other hand, promulgating the efficacy of music therapy in general, or of specific music therapy techniques, in the absence of any substantiation other than intuition or tradition borders on professional recklessness. To gather and evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia symptoms. All available sources of references were searched for randomised controlled trials of music therapy used as an intervention in dementia. The search terms included 'controlled trial or study, music*, therapy, dement*, Alzheimer*, cognitive impairment.' The reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the studies available for inclusion. The criteria used are presence and adequacy of a control condition, independent assessment of patients' performance (ie standardized ratings carried out by a person other than the music therapist) and the number of participants (no fewer than three). No randomised controlled trials, or trials with quantitative data suitable for analysis were found. The

  11. Music therapy for the Assessment of Parental Competencies for Children in need of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    using the autonomy profile of the Improvisation Assessment Profiles. Results demonstrate the strengths, weaknesses, and potential in the parent, and quantifiable observed musical events in the gradients of autonomy provide evidence of positive and/or negative interactional behaviour. The therapist has......The assessment for parenting competencies for parents of children potentially in need of care involves an evaluation of their relationship with their child, and the interaction that underpins that relationship. The "Assessment of Parenting Competences" (APC) music therapy assessment provides...

  12. Intuitive Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Handbook for people who wish to play or teach freely improvised music and improvisation pieces. With sections on how to start with different types of groups, training of musical awareness, parameters of the musical sound, the history of improvised music and some improvisational pieces....

  13. Intuitive Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    2009-01-01

    Handbook for people who wish to play or teach freely improvised music and improvisation pieces. With sections on how to start with different types of groups, training of musical awareness, parameters of the musical sound, the history of improvised music and some improvisational pieces....

  14. Inclusion, children's groups, music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2016-01-01

    the children! Initially by rocking in time to the rhythm, and then with dance moves or spontaneous singing. In this chapter, we demonstrate how music and music activities can be used as a means of including vulnerable children in school or preschool settings. Based on experiences from music therapy, we have......Music has a rare ability to affect us directly. Pulse and rhythms make us move, and notes and harmonies inspire and express our inner emotions in a direct and immediate way that goes beyond what words or even other art forms can rarely achieve (Panksepp & Trevarthen, 2009). Music creates...... a delightful build-up of tension or soothes us, and its narrative character gives rise to mental imagery or memories. Music brings people together and helps build communities across languages and common divides. And – not least – music captures children’s immediate attention, so when the music starts, so do...

  15. Dynamic Interplay in Clinical Improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercédès Pavlicevic

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available I would like to begin by examining the title, since this will clarify the theoretical framework within which this paper will develop. Chambers Dictionary (1988 defines dynamic as relating to force; activity or things in motion; forms or patterns of growth or change; any driving force instrumental in growth or change. The word interplay refers to the reciprocal, mutual musical interaction between therapist and patient. Both players' contributions help to clarify the quality of the emotional interaction in the musical relationship. The concept of clinical improvisation in music therapy is best illustrated by a detour via the literature of mother-infant interaction.

  16. A systematic review on the neural effects of music on emotion regulation: implications for music therapy practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kimberly Sena

    2013-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) is an internal process through which a person maintains a comfortable state of arousal by modulating one or more aspects of emotion. The neural correlates underlying ER suggest an interplay between cognitive control areas and areas involved in emotional reactivity. Although some studies have suggested that music may be a useful tool in ER, few studies have examined the links between music perception/production and the neural mechanisms that underlie ER and resulting implications for clinical music therapy treatment. Objectives of this systematic review were to explore and synthesize what is known about how music and music experiences impact neural structures implicated in ER, and to consider clinical implications of these findings for structuring music stimuli to facilitate ER. A comprehensive electronic database search resulted in 50 studies that met predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Pertinent data related to the objective were extracted and study outcomes were analyzed and compared for trends and common findings. Results indicated there are certain music characteristics and experiences that produce desired and undesired neural activation patterns implicated in ER. Desired activation patterns occurred when listening to preferred and familiar music, when singing, and (in musicians) when improvising; undesired activation patterns arose when introducing complexity, dissonance, and unexpected musical events. Furthermore, the connection between music-influenced changes in attention and its link to ER was explored. Implications for music therapy practice are discussed and preliminary guidelines for how to use music to facilitate ER are shared.

  17. Multicultural Music Therapy: An Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Rose Mahoney

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines multicultural issues that currently exist within the field of music therapy. Music therapists often find themselves working with clients who come from very different cultural backgrounds than themselves. Before music therapists can understand and work with clients from other cultures, they must first have an understanding of their own background and culture, and how their values and beliefs have shaped them as therapists. This paper highlights the value of multicultural awareness, and explores issues of disability, gender/sexuality, feminism, and race, as they relate to music therapy.

  18. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. This presentation describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  19. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. The presented article describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  20. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. The presented article describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  1. Interaction Themes in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2006-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapy interaction called ‘Interaction Themes.’ These are developed from session to session and often appear in music therapy interventions with children with severe functional limitations, especially children with autism. Although...... whose expressions are often difficult to understand. This presentation describes the characteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares the phenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regard to other types of music therapy interaction with this client group....... the Interaction Themes are characterised by a relatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essential function because they contain the child’s and music therapist’s joint interaction history. They make up the context within which it is possible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  2. Vermittlungen - musically speaking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weymann, Eckhard; Metzner, Susanne; Fitzthum, Elena

    2001-01-01

    Bilingual publication - mixed content in English and German. Articles were written by participants in the First European Symposium "Improvisation Training in Music Therapy education" which took place in Hamburg, 1998....

  3. Music Therapy by Proxy: Using Humanised Images in Song

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Chambers

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Developing awareness, exploration and expression of emotionally sensitive issues can be difficult for some clients in music therapy. They may find it hard to express emotion through improvised music and may turn instead to the perceived security of the repetition of known songs.This paper presents the results from a completed research PhD, a qualitative case study based on naturalistic clinical practice, which examined the song choices of one woman in a medium-secure forensic unit over the three-year course of her music therapy. A descriptive narrative account was subjected to analysis according to a modified form of therapeutic narrative analysis (Aldridge and Aldridge 2002, resulting in the abstraction of a series of generative metaphoric images, framed within a chronological series of events. Crucially, these images were found to be humanised figures, yet they were also emotionally decentred or depersonalised. When approached from the philosophical and methodological perspective of behaviourism, which views these as conditioned responses associating music with life experiences as part of a process of developing self-identity, such images can be seen to provide an unspoken voice for the client’s feelings to be expressed in a manner that is personally revealing, socially acceptable, culturally accessible and therapeutically constructive.I assert that using these third-person characters as a form of proxy facilitates mutual reference and experimentation, and places music firmly at the heart of a socially constructed process of music therapy.

  4. [Music therapy and Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy and Alzheimer's dementia. Dementia such as Alzheimer's leads to the deterioration of the patient's global capacities. The cognitive disorders associated with it are disabling and affect every area of the patient's life. Every therapy's session undertaken with and by patients can act as a mirror of the progress of their disease and help to feel better, as described in this article on music therapy.

  5. Music therapy in psychiatry today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    A growing specialization has been developed in psychiatric institutions indicating that staff members specialize in one diagnosis. Music therapists are on the one hand asked to formulate diagnosis specific treatment models; on the other hand music therapy is also recognized to both provide quality...... to be both clinically specialized and both psychodynamic and existentially oriented in our contribution to psychiatric treatment. Cochrane Reviews show that music therapy has a significant impact on reduction of negative symptoms for patients suffering from schizophrenia. The reasons for this positive...... treatment outcome are in the literature related to music therapists´ overall attitudes and relational competencies in their work which also provide quality of life and resources for these patients. This essay, which is based on my Keynote presentation at the 7th Nordic music therapy Congress, Jyväskylä SF...

  6. Music therapy in psychiatry today

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    A growing specialization has been developed in psychiatric institutions indicating that staff members specialize in one diagnosis. Music therapists are on the one hand asked to formulate diagnosis specific treatment models; on the other hand music therapy is also recognized to both provide quality...... to be both clinically specialized and both psychodynamic and existentially oriented in our contribution to psychiatric treatment. Cochrane Reviews show that music therapy has a significant impact on reduction of negative symptoms for patients suffering from schizophrenia. The reasons for this positive...... treatment outcome are in the literature related to music therapists´ overall attitudes and relational competencies in their work which also provide quality of life and resources for these patients. This essay, which is based on my Keynote presentation at the 7th Nordic music therapy Congress, Jyväskylä SF...

  7. Interaction themes in music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    2004-01-01

    Based on a doctoral study, the author presents a type of music therapyinteraction called ?Interaction Themes.? These are developed fromsession to session and often appear in music therapy interventions withchildren with severe functional limitations, especially children withautism. Although...... whoseexpressions are often difficult to understand. The article describes thecharacteristics and functions of Interaction Themes, compares thephenomenon with music therapy case literature and delimits it in regardto other types of music therapy interaction with this client group. Theresults are described through...... the Interaction Themes are characterised by arelatively simple and self-generated content, they have an essentialfunction because they contain the child?s and music therapist?s jointinteraction history. They make up the context within which it ispossible to create meaningful interaction with a client group...

  8. Music Therapy in Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Keßler, Jens; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-11-13

    Music therapy has been used successfully for over 30 years as part of palliative care programs for severely ill patients. There is nonetheless a lack of high-quality studies that would enable an evidence-based evaluation of its psychological and physiological effects. In a randomized controlled trial, 84 hospitalized patients in palliative care were assigned to one of two treatment arms--music therapy and control. The music therapy intervention consisted of two sessions of live music-based relaxation exercises; the patients in the control group listened to a verbal relaxation exercise. The primary endpoints were self-ratings of relaxation, well-being, and acute pain, assessed using visual analog scales. Heart rate variability and health-related quality of life were considered as secondary outcomes. The primary data analysis was performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Analyses of covariance revealed that music therapy was more effective than the control treatment at promoting relaxation (F = 13.7; p Music therapy did not differ from control treatment with respect to pain reduction (F = 0.4; p = 0.53), but it led to a significantly greater reduction in the fatigue score on the quality-of-life scale (F = 4.74; p = 0.03). Music therapy is an effective treatment with a low dropout rate for the promotion of relaxation and well-being in terminally ill persons undergoing palliative care.

  9. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  10. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  11. Exploring improvisation in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Mary Anne; Fenton, Mary V

    2007-06-01

    Improvisation has long been considered a function of music, dance, and the theatre arts. An exploration of the definitions and characteristics of this concept in relation to the art and practice of nursing provide an opportunity to illuminate related qualities within the field of nursing. Nursing has always demonstrated improvisation because it is often required to meet the needs of patients in a rapidly changing environment. However, little has been done to identify improvisation in the practice of nursing or to teach improvisation as a nursing knowledge-based skill. This article strives to explore the concept of improvisation in nursing, to describe the characteristics of improvisation as applied to nursing, and to utilize case studies to illustrate various manifestations of improvisation in nursing practice.

  12. Music therapy in Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Hazard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of music therapy interventions with Parkinson’s patients at the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service of the National Institute of Geriatrics in Santiago of Chile.

  13. Neural Substrates of Interactive Musical Improvisation: An fMRI Study of ‘Trading Fours’ in Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, Gabriel F.; Rankin, Summer K.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Limb, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication. PMID:24586366

  14. Neurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; James, L.; Palaniappan, R.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness (DOC) is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population, where misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects...... with 21 individuals in vegetative or minimally conscious states (VS or MCS). Subjects were presented with live preferred music and improvised music entrained to respiration (i.e., music therapy procedures), recordings of disliked music, white noise and silence. ANOVA tests indicated a range of significant...... patients, significant post hoc EEG amplitude increases for stimuli associated with preferred music were found for frontal midline theta in 6 VS and 4 MCS subjects, and frontal alpha in 3 VS and 4 MCS subjects (p = 0.05 - 0.0001). Furthermore, behavioural data showed a significantly increased blink rate...

  15. Seminar: Music Therapy in Dementia Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2009-01-01

    This seminar presents music therapy in person centered dementia care. In the first part focus is on research and documentation. How can short term music therapy document changes in symptoms of depression? Is Dementia Care Mapping a valid assessment tool for documenting group music therapy......? In the next part focus is on clinical music therapy – in group work as well as in individual work – and how the music therapist works in the interdisciplinary field....

  16. Seminar: Music Therapy in Dementia Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2009-01-01

    This seminar presents music therapy in person centered dementia care. In the first part focus is on research and documentation. How can short term music therapy document changes in symptoms of depression? Is Dementia Care Mapping a valid assessment tool for documenting group music therapy......? In the next part focus is on clinical music therapy – in group work as well as in individual work – and how the music therapist works in the interdisciplinary field....

  17. Musical material as stock of knowledge: Subject, action and interaction within processes of musical improvisation

    OpenAIRE

    Figueroa-Dreher, Silvana K.

    2011-01-01

    Esta contribuição explora a potencialidade da abordagem subjetiva representada na teoria fenomenonológica de Alfred Schutz para explicar processos de improvisação musical a partir de uma perspectiva sociológica. Isto constitui um desafio para a teoria de Schutz, uma vez que sua ideia de projetos de ação tipificados podem explicar ação improvisatória e interação apenas parcialmente. Contudo, esta mesma teoria abre um novo caminho – ainda menos explorado – para explicar fenômenos de improvisaçã...

  18. Music Therapy - History and Cultural Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Even Ruud

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available An essay review 1 of Horden, Peregrine (Ed. (2000. Music as Medicine. The History of Music Therapy since Antiquity. Aldershot: Ashgate. Gouk, Penelope (Ed. (2000. Musical Healing in Cultural Contexts. Aldershot: Ashgate.

  19. Free Improvisation; Life Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Hoon Hong

    2011-01-01

    This autoethnographic study seeks the value, position and possibilities of free improvisation in the musical field. It explores how embodied knowledge, dialectical exchanges, emotional and intellectual stimulation constructs and reconstructs experiences in various contexts for the free improviser, who is both researcher and actual piano performer.…

  20. Music as therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Danhauer, Suzanne C

    2005-03-01

    Music is widely used to enhance well-being, reduce stress, and distract patients from unpleasant symptoms. Although there are wide variations in individual preferences, music appears to exert direct physiologic effects through the autonomic nervous system. It also has indirect effects by modifying caregiver behavior. Music effectively reduces anxiety and improves mood for medical and surgical patients, for patients in intensive care units and patients undergoing procedures, and for children as well as adults. Music is a low-cost intervention that often reduces surgical, procedural, acute, and chronic pain. Music also improves the quality of life for patients receiving palliative care, enhancing a sense of comfort and relaxation. Providing music to caregivers may be a cost-effective and enjoyable strategy to improve empathy, compassion, and relationship-centered care while not increasing errors or interfering with technical aspects of care.

  1. Implicit and explicit mentalisation in music therapy in psychiatric treatment of people with Borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Mentalization is a core concept in the modern treatment model for psychotherapy with personality disorders. The mentalization based treatment model presents a new view on how to understand the process of therapy, and has a view on how the therapist shall act and intervene in order to help...... of the concept of mentalization in music therapy treatment of people with diagnosed personality disorder. It will be based on integrating the theoretical perspective, on the process of therapy with focus on musical improvisation mostly. The clinical material will consist of exemplifying/illustrating vignettes....

  2. Implicit and explicit mentalisation in music therapy in psychiatric treatment of people with Borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Mentalization is a core concept in the modern treatment model for psychotherapy with personality disorders. The mentalization based treatment model presents a new view on how to understand the process of therapy, and has a view on how the therapist shall act and intervene in order to help...... of the concept of mentalization in music therapy treatment of people with diagnosed personality disorder. It will be based on integrating the theoretical perspective, on the process of therapy with focus on musical improvisation mostly. The clinical material will consist of exemplifying/illustrating vignettes....

  3. -Heroines’ Journey- Emerging Story by Refugee Women during Group Analytic Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Ahonen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been some evidence of the benefits of participating in group analytic music therapy with traumatized people. This pilot clinical project investigates the impact of a combination of narrative therapy and group analytic music therapy on refugee/newcomer women in Canada. An ongoing therapy group met for a period of 8 sessions, to share stories and feelings of past experiences and of resettlement. The focus of this group was emotional expression (verbal and musical. Musical listening, improvisation, art, writing, clay-work, and relaxation techniques were used. Several consistent themes re-emerged, including feelings around loneliness, fear guilt, and loss. The analysis of the therapy process showed many commonalities among these women and the process they were going through to deal with their feelings.

  4. The Effects of Group Free Improvisation Instruction on Improvisation Achievement and Improvisation Confidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Maud; Ankney, Kimberly; Healy, Daniel; Gallo, Donna

    2016-01-01

    While improvisation in K-12 schools in the USA has gained some traction since the inception of the US National Standards in 1994, there is still a dearth of improvisation activities in schools because of the lack of music teacher preparation in improvisation. The purpose of this study was to determine if providing group free improvisation…

  5. A livre improvisação musical e a filosofia de Gilles Deleuze The free musical improvisation and the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Luiz Moraes Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nos últimos anos a improvisação passou a figurar como um tema cada vez mais presente nos ambientes acadêmicos e hoje é considerada uma importante linha de pesquisa. A nossa reflexão sobre a livre improvisação, além de se apoiar em nossas experiências práticas, tem como uma das suas principais referências a obra do filósofo francês Gilles Deleuze de quem são emprestados conceitos fundamentais tais como, estratificação, território, plano de consistência, molaridade e molecularidade, corpo sem órgãos, ritmo, meios e ritornelo. Neste artigo, originalmente publicado no número 49, vol. 1 da revista Perspectives of New Music, trataremos de mostrar de que forma estes conceitos nos auxiliam a pensar e fundamentar a livre improvisação musical conforme a concebemos em nossos trabalhos práticos e teóricos.Recently, improvisation has been integrated as a theme increasingly present in scholarly environments and it is now considered as an important line of research. Our thinking about free improvisation, besides relying on our practical experience, has the work of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze as a central reference from which we borrow key concepts such as stratification, territory, plan of consistency, molarity and molecularity, body without organs, rhythm, means and refrain. In this article, originally published in Perspectives of New Music, number 49, v.1, we will try to show how these concepts help us think and support the free musical improvisation as we conceive it in our practical and theoretical work.

  6. Improvisation as Ability, Culture, and Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Lee; Mantie, Roger

    2013-01-01

    We argue in this article for greater role for improvisation in the music classroom. Based on an extensive examination of scholarship about improvisational practices, we propose three conceptualizations--ability, culture, experience--that can serve to guide the teaching of improvisation. When considered as an "ability," improvisation is a…

  7. The Future of Music Therapy for Persons with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    A Biopsychosocial Perspective on Agitation in Dementia Person-Centered Care and Music for Decreasing Agitation Evidence-Based Research on Music and Music Therapy Clinical Music Therapy Practice and Theory Other Current Developments in Music Recommendations...

  8. The Future of Music Therapy for Persons with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    A Biopsychosocial Perspective on Agitation in DementiaPerson-Centered Care and Music for Decreasing AgitationEvidence-Based Research on Music and Music TherapyClinical Music Therapy Practice and TheoryOther Current Developments in MusicRecommendations

  9. The Future of Music Therapy for Persons with Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    A Biopsychosocial Perspective on Agitation in Dementia Person-Centered Care and Music for Decreasing Agitation Evidence-Based Research on Music and Music Therapy Clinical Music Therapy Practice and Theory Other Current Developments in Music Recommendations...

  10. Music therapy with the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2005-01-01

    of the music therapy, instead of trying to prove these effects. This is why I chose to carry out research to see what happens and document the effects of music therapy. In the following pages I want to describe a smaller part of this case study research where I included quantitative measures and looked...... lives. But the problem is how to describe these benefits and positive effects as these participants do communicate, albeit not in a direct way, that they are relating to what is going on in the therapy. The focus of the research therefore was on strategies that made it possible to describe effects...

  11. Music therapy with the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2005-01-01

    of the music therapy, instead of trying to prove these effects. This is why I chose to carry out research to see what happens and document the effects of music therapy. In the following pages I want to describe a smaller part of this case study research where I included quantitative measures and looked...... lives. But the problem is how to describe these benefits and positive effects as these participants do communicate, albeit not in a direct way, that they are relating to what is going on in the therapy. The focus of the research therefore was on strategies that made it possible to describe effects...

  12. Music Therapy with Ethnic Music for Dementia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tanaka

    2012-12-01

    Conclusion: Our results revealed characteristic responses of dementia patients onto the Japanese music, and we expect our result provides an evidence for better music therapy for dementia patients with Japanese culture.

  13. Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160627.html Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive Mom's singing helps ... of over a dozen clinical trials, found that music therapy helped stabilize premature newborns' breathing rate during ...

  14. The Current State of Music Therapy Theory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"......An essay on themes from Ken Aigen (2014): "The Study of Music Therapy. Current Issues and Concepts"...

  15. Historical Research in Music Therapy. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alan L., Ed.; Davis, William B., Ed.; Heller, George N., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This bibliography, produced by the American Music Therapy Association, represents a collection of research articles and publications over the past 50 years of music therapy's history. It is organized by author.

  16. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of psychological problems is high in prisons. Many prisoners have unmet needs for appropriate treatments. Although previous studies have suggested music therapy to be a successful treatment modality for prisoners, more rigorous evidence is needed. This parallel randomised controlled...... study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  17. Evidence of the efficacy of music therapy for adults diagnosed with mental health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis; Odell-Miller, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Music Therapy has been employed as an intervention in psychiatry since the initial development of the profession in the USA and Europe in the late 1940’s. Compared with the fields of special education, adult developmental disability, neurology and paediatrics, significantly less research has been...... undertaken in psychiatry, with a corresponding lack of experimental studies. Ethical issues relating to the collection and analysis of data have restricted more than in other fields, but there is nevertherless a substantial body of knowledge in this area. Evidence of the value of receptive music, active...... improvisational music therapy and Guided Imagery is present in a small number of experimental studies, case studies, case reports, qualitative studies and from the recorded opinion of experts if the field. An overview of studies and clinical reports will be documented, by reviewing principle music therapy...

  18. A music therapy tool for assessing parent-child interaction in cases of emotional neglect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl; H. McKinney, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Using a music therapy approach to assess emotional communication and parent–child interaction is new to the field of child protection. However, musical improvisations in music therapy has long been known as an analogue to affect attunement and early non-verbal communication between parent...... of the APC-R (revised version) in a quantitative study including a small, embedded qualitative component. A total of 52 dyads of children and their parents participated of whom 18 were in residential center to address emotional neglect and 33 functioned as a non-clinical comparison (children aged 5–12). All...... dyads underwent two video recorded music therapy assessment sessions. Video analyses focused on autonomy relationship, turns, and parental response types producing scores on Mutual Attunement, Nonverbal Communication Skills and Emotional Parental Response. Psychometric analyses of the APC-R included...

  19. Promoting social communication through music therapy in children with autism spectrum disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika

    In this book, a PhD study is presented that investigates if and how music therapy may help to promote social communication in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The study examined several dimensions of this complex field, and includes four articles: (i) a systematic review (Cochrane...... review) synthesising research evidence on overall effects of music therapy for individuals with ASD; (ii) a study protocol specifying the design of TIME-A, a randomised controlled trial (RCT) examining effects of improvisational music therapy on social communication skills in children with ASD aged 4...... ways to combine clinical relevance and rigorous research methodology without compromising either, and to integrate scientific findings in the clinical application of a highly individualised approach. Through enhancing communication and knowledge transfer between research and clinical practice in music...

  20. Feminist music therapy pedagogy: a survey of music therapy educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahna, Nicole D; Schwantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between the use of feminist pedagogy and academic rank of the participants. Seventy-two participants responded to this study, with 69 participants included for data analysis. Stake and Hoffman's (2000) feminist pedagogy survey was adapted for this study, examining four subscales of feminist pedagogy: (a) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/ social activism, and (d) critical thinking/open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n=32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n=46) of participants identified as using feminist pedagogy. Results of a mixed analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant difference within the four survey subscales (p<.0001), no significant difference (p=.32) for academic rank, and no significant interaction (p=.08) of academic rank and the four survey subscales. Tukey's post hoc analysis of the data indicated that the survey subscale measuring political activism (p<.0001) was significantly lower than the other three survey subscales. In addition, a qualitative analysis on open-ended responses is also included. Discussion of the results, limitations, and areas for future research are addressed.

  1. Music Therapy and Special Music Education: Interdisciplinary Dialogues

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from Professor Alice-Ann Darrow’s life-long work in the fields of music therapy and special music education, this interview brings to the fore the importance of interdisciplinary dialogue. A range of themes (including the notion of ‘musical rights’ and inclusion) emerge and are discussed in relation to the development of interdisciplinary and collaborative work between different music practices. Darrow shares experiences from her personal and professional life that have shaped her wor...

  2. Music technology in music therapy - A study of the possibilities, potential and problems around the use of music technologies in music therapy with youths and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Misje, René

    2013-01-01

    Music technology in music therapy - A study of the possibilities, potential and problems around the use of music technologies in music therapy with youths and adolescents. This qualitative study explores the usefulness of music technology in music therapeutic practice with youth and adolescents. Four music therapist`s reflections on their use of music technologies and on the possibilities, potential and problems of this use are explored through semi-structured intervi...

  3. Replication of elite music performance enhancement following alpha/theta neurofeedback and application to novice performance and improvisation with SMR benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruzelier, J H; Holmes, P; Hirst, L; Bulpin, K; Rahman, S; van Run, C; Leach, J

    2014-01-01

    Alpha/theta (A/T) and sensory-motor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback were compared in university instrumentalists who were novice singers with regard to prepared and improvised instrumental and vocal performance in three music domains: creativity/musicality, technique and communication/presentation. Only A/T training enhanced advanced playing seen in all three domains by expert assessors and validated by correlations with learning indices, strongest with Creativity/Musicality as shown by Egner and Gruzelier (2003). Here A/T gains extended to novice performance - prepared vocal, improvised vocal and instrumental - and were recognised by a lay audience who judged the prepared folk songs. SMR learning correlated positively with Technical Competence and Communication in novice performance, in keeping with SMR neurofeedback's known impact on lower-order processes such as attention, working memory and psychomotor skills. The importance of validation through learning indices was emphasised in the interpretation of neurofeedback outcome.

  4. Music Therapy System for Patients with Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    大島, 千佳; 中山, 功一; 安田, 清; 伊藤, 直樹; 西本, 一志; 細井, 尚人; 奥村, 浩

    2011-01-01

    We introduced three types of music therapy system. They were made for purpose of helping caregivers and/or patients with dementia enjoying a music performance. We discussed the efficacy of these systems for the caregivers and the patients.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... top How is music therapy utilized in hospitals? Music is used in general hospitals to: alleviate pain in conjunction with anesthesia or pain medication: elevate patients' mood and counteract depression; promote movement for physical rehabilitation; calm or sedate, ...

  6. Music Therapy with Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2002-01-01

    Persons suffering from moderately severe dementia are in a situation where they are in further need of support and empathy and have a special need to express inner feelings and to feel understood. This is exemplified with two case descriptions followed by general views on the use of music based o...... on a literature review, and related to the work with music therapy with the elderly in Denmark.......Persons suffering from moderately severe dementia are in a situation where they are in further need of support and empathy and have a special need to express inner feelings and to feel understood. This is exemplified with two case descriptions followed by general views on the use of music based...

  7. Music Therapy with Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2002-01-01

    Persons suffering from moderately severe dementia are in a situation where they are in further need of support and empathy and have a special need to express inner feelings and to feel understood. This is exemplified with two case descriptions followed by general views on the use of music based o...... on a literature review, and related to the work with music therapy with the elderly in Denmark.......Persons suffering from moderately severe dementia are in a situation where they are in further need of support and empathy and have a special need to express inner feelings and to feel understood. This is exemplified with two case descriptions followed by general views on the use of music based...

  8. Engaging and interacting through improvised music making with girls and wormen with Rett Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Music is a communicative medium that is effective in arousing and sustaining attention and communicative engagement with girsl and women with Rett Syndrome. Timing, expectation, anticipation and musical structure combine to stimuloate turn-taking, intentional communication and pleasure reactions...

  9. [Application of music therapy in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, P; Díaz, V

    2001-02-01

    Music therapy is a science that has been applied since many centuries ago, but it has been organized as a profession during the past century. This science studies the therapeutic effects of music in human beings. Professionals who practice this science are called "music therapists" and they must be trained not only in music theory and performance, but also in psychology, anatomy, research techniques, and other subjects. Today, we can find music therapy research in many areas such as the effects of music in children with autism, adults with psychiatric illnesses, elderly with Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, people with brain injuries, among others. Numerous studies demonstrate the functionality of music therapy in patients with neurological disorders. These studies show that music helps patients to gain control over their walking patterns after a brain injury, stimulates long and short term memory in patients with Alzheimer disease, and increase self esteem and social interaction in elders.

  10. The musical identities of Danish music therapy students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    In the music therapy masters program at Aalborg University (Denmark) Music and Identity is a short, intensive course, based on a musical autobiography written by each participating student. Since 1999 almost 100 students have written a narrative of their musical life story. This article will focu...... Theory (Abrams & Meadows 2005). Patterns of identity construction are presented, and the roles and functions of music in different stages of life discussed, including the self-reported influence of music on the students' health.......In the music therapy masters program at Aalborg University (Denmark) Music and Identity is a short, intensive course, based on a musical autobiography written by each participating student. Since 1999 almost 100 students have written a narrative of their musical life story. This article will focus...... on contributions from students participating from 2010-12 (n=21). Musical autobiographies have been analyzed (a) using the theoretical model of Even Ruud (1997, 1998), (b) as thematic analysis (Braun & Clark 2006), (c) using RepGrid, a qualitative research methodology based on George Kelly’s Personal Construct...

  11. Teaching as Improvisational Experience: Student Music Teachers' Reflections on Learning during an Intercultural Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerlund, Heidi; Partti, Heidi; Karlsen, Sidsel

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative instrumental case study explores Finnish student music teachers' experiences of teaching and learning as participants in an intercultural project in Cambodia. The Multicultural Music University project aimed at increasing master's level music education students' intercultural competencies by providing experiences of teaching and…

  12. [Music therapy and neuropsychology: a proposal to music therapy based on the cognitive processing of music].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masayuki; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2007-11-01

    In the last decade, a considerable number of studies have been made on the cognitive processing of music. A patient with pure amusia due to the infarction of anterior portion of bilateral temporal lobes revealed the disturbance of the discrimination of chords. Using positron emission tomography, these regions were activated when musically naive normal subjects listened to the harmony compared to the rhythm of identical music. So, we concluded that anterior temporal portion might participate in the recognition of chords. Several articles reported that the musician's brain was different from nonmusicians' functionally and anatomically. This difference was considered to be caused by the musical training for a long time. Recent studies clarified that the reorganization might occur by musical training for a few months. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a method aimed to improve speech output of aphasic patients, using short melodic phrase with a word. The literatures of mental processing of music suggested that right hemisphere might participate in the expression of music, namely singing and playing instrumentals. So, it was supposed that MIT utilized the compensational function of right hemisphere for damaged left hemisphere. We also reported that mental singing improved the gait disturbance of patients with Parkinson's disease. Music therapy is changing from a social science model based on the individual experiences to a neuroscience-guided model based on brain function and cognitive processing of the perception and expression of music.

  13. TIME-A - an international RCT on the effectiveness of music therapy in ASD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geretsegger, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Social communication is one of the core challenges of people on the autism spectrum. Previous research has suggested that music therapy may enhance skills of social interaction and communication and is therefore considered as promising early intervention for children diagnosed with autism spectrum...... disorders (ASD). However, generalisability of previous findings has been restricted, as studies were limited in either methodological accuracy or the clinical relevance of their approach. TIME-A is hosted by the Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, Bergen/Norway, and sets out to examine whether...... improvisational music therapy is superior to standard care in improving social communication in children with ASD over a 5-month treatment period. Funded by the Research Council of Norway, and building upon a collaboration of nine countries worldwide, TIME-A aims to include a total of 300 children with ASD aged...

  14. Implicit and explicit mentalisation in music therapy in psychiatric treatment of people with Borderline personality disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels

    2014-01-01

    the patient enhance their capacity to mentalize. This improved ability to mentalize is at the core of the treatment model, and is considered to be essential to recovery. There are no prior writings about mentalization in a music therapeutical context. This chapter investigates and discusses the relevance...... of the concept of mentalization in music therapy treatment of people with diagnosed personality disorder. It will be based on integrating the theoretical perspective, on the process of therapy with focus on musical improvisation mostly. The clinical material will consist of exemplifying/illustrating vignettes.......Mentalization is a core concept in the modern treatment model for psychotherapy with personality disorders. The mentalization based treatment model presents a new view on how to understand the process of therapy, and has a view on how the therapist shall act and intervene in order to help...

  15. Music Therapy for children with special needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    Music therapy can meet the basic needs of children with special needs, such as behavioral problems, attention skills, social skills, emotional needs and intersubjective skills. In addition cognitive skills can be strengthened if the basic needs are fulfilled. The lecture gives an overview...... of the current music therapy research in the field, i.e. the results of effect studies as well as research focusing on how music therapy works or why we can see this effect. The developmental psychology, informed by the infant research and neuro-affective psychology, gives a ground to understand what development...... by issues of more mental character forming the identity. Music can obviously be used in many ways here, but music as such cannot be seen as an isolated phenomenon when working in music therapy with children with special needs. The early infant-parent interplay is marked by musical traits, conceptualized...

  16. Art, dance, and music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Rosalie Rebollo

    2004-11-01

    Art, dance, and music therapy are a significant part of complementary medicine in the twenty-first century. These creative arts therapies contribute to all areas of health care and are present in treatments for most psychologic and physiologic illnesses. Although the current body of solid research is small compared with that of more traditional medical specialties, the arts therapies are now validating their research through more controlled experimental and descriptive studies. The arts therapies also contribute significantly to the humanization and comfort of modern health care institutions by relieving stress, anxiety, and pain of patients and caregivers. Arts therapies will greatly expand their role in the health care practices of this country in the twenty-first century.

  17. The musical identities of Danish music therapy students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    In the music therapy masters program at Aalborg University (Denmark) Music and Identity is a short, intensive course, based on a musical autobiography written by each participating student. Since 1999 almost 100 students have written a narrative of their musical life story. This article will focus...... on contributions from students participating from 2010-12 (n=21). Musical autobiographies have been analyzed (a) using the theoretical model of Even Ruud (1997, 1998), (b) as thematic analysis (Braun & Clark 2006), (c) using RepGrid, a qualitative research methodology based on George Kelly’s Personal Construct...... Theory (Abrams & Meadows 2005). Patterns of identity construction are presented, and the roles and functions of music in different stages of life discussed, including the self-reported influence of music on the students' health....

  18. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Galińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance. It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music.

  19. Music therapy in neurological rehabilitation settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galińska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The neurologic music therapy is a new scope of music therapy. Its techniques deal with dysfunctions resulting from diseases of the human nervous system. Music can be used as an alternative modality to access functions unavailable through non-musical stimulus. Processes in the brain activated by the influence of music can be generalized and transferred to non-musical functions. Therefore, in clinical practice, the translation of non-musical therapeutic exercises into analogous, isomorphic musical exercises is performed. They make use of the executive peculiarity of musical instruments and musical structures to prime, cue and coordinate movements. Among musical components, a repetitive rhythm plays a significant role. It regulates physiologic and behavioural functions through the mechanism of entrainment (synchronization of biological rhythms with musical rhythm based on acoustic resonance). It is especially relevant for patients with a deficient internal timing system in the brain. Additionally, regular rhythmic patterns facilitate memory encoding and decoding of non-musical information hence music is an efficient mnemonic tool. The music as a hierarchical, compound language of time, with its unique ability to access affective/motivational systems in the brain, provides time structures enhancing perception processes, mainly in the range of cognition, language and motor learning. It allows for emotional expression and improvement of the motivation for rehabilitation activities. The new technologies of rhythmic sensory stimulation (i.e. Binaural Beat Stimulation) or rhythmic music in combination with rhythmic light therapy appear. This multimodal forms of stimulation are used in the treatment of stroke, brain injury, dementia and other cognitive deficits. Clinical outcome studies provide evidence of the significant superiority of rehabilitation with music over the one without music.

  20. Music Therapy and Special Music Education: Interdisciplinary Dialogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice-Ann Darrow

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from Professor Alice-Ann Darrow’s life-long work in the fields of music therapy and special music education, this interview brings to the fore the importance of interdisciplinary dialogue. A range of themes (including the notion of ‘musical rights’ and inclusion emerge and are discussed in relation to the development of interdisciplinary and collaborative work between different music practices. Darrow shares experiences from her personal and professional life that have shaped her work and way of thinking over the years. This interview can provide a framework within which readers can situate and further understand Darrow’s rich contribution within the fields of music therapy and special music education both nationally and internationally.

  1. Voices: World Forum for Music Therapy - A new avenue for communication among music therapy communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Kenny

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Welcome to the inaugural issue of a new international music therapy journal, electronically published and with free access. We're sure you have noticed the growing interest in the field of music therapy. The number of music therapists around the world is increasing every year. Diverse contexts for music therapy work grow too. Though music has been practiced as a healing art in Indigenous societies for hundreds of years, contemporary professional music therapy has grown from a Western enterprise to one with a very broad foundation of approaches internationally.

  2. Conversations from the Classroom: Reflections on Feminist Music Therapy Pedagogy in Teaching Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahna, Nicole D.

    2011-01-01

    Four music therapy educators participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews as part of a qualitative study. The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomena of feminist pedagogy as experienced by music therapy educators using phenomenological inquiry. The study examined the following research questions: (a) do music therapy educators…

  3. Conversations from the Classroom: Reflections on Feminist Music Therapy Pedagogy in Teaching Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahna, Nicole D.

    2011-01-01

    Four music therapy educators participated in semi-structured, in-depth interviews as part of a qualitative study. The purpose of this study was to explore the phenomena of feminist pedagogy as experienced by music therapy educators using phenomenological inquiry. The study examined the following research questions: (a) do music therapy educators…

  4. Exploring a neuroplasticity model of music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemöller, Elizabeth L

    2014-01-01

    Given that music therapists work across a wide range of disabilities, it is important that therapists have at least a fundamental understanding of the neurophysiology associated with the client/patient populations that they serve. Yet, there is a large gap of evidence regarding the neurophysiological changes associated with applying music as therapy. The purpose of this article is to provide music therapists with a general background in neuroplasticity principles that can be applied to the use of music therapy with multiple populations. This article will review literature on neuroplasticity and literature supporting the specific attributes of music therapy that apply to neuroplasticity. Finally, examples of how to use neuroplasticity principles to explain and support clinical music therapy will be provided. Using the material presented in this review, music therapists will be equipped with information to effectively communicate why music therapy works using three neuroplasticity principles; increase in dopamine, neural synchrony, and a clear signal. Music therapy is a powerful tool to enhance neuroplasticity in the brain. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. 10th World Congress of Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Hartley

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxford is the place where I live, and also the place where I have worked for a number of years. My music therapy practise takes place in the local Hospice - part of an Oxford National Health Service Trust, with patients facing the end of life in one way or another. As the current Chairperson of the British Society for Music Therapy, it seemed fitting, therefore, to suggest Oxford as the venue for the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy - 'Dialogue and Debate' - Music Therapy in the 21st Century. A Contemporary Force for Change.

  6. Concepts of context in music therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolvsjord, Randi; Stige, Brynjulf

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary music therapy as well as in related interdisciplinary fields, the importance of context in relation to theory, research, and practice has been emphasized. However, the word context seems to be used in several different ways and conceptualizations of contextual approaches vary too. The objective of this theoretical article is to clarify traditions of language use in relation to context in music therapy. In reviewing and discussing the literature, we focus on the field of mental health care. When discussing issues related to context, this literature partly focuses on the surroundings of music therapy practice, partly on the ecology of reciprocal influences within and between situations or systems. On this basis, three types of context awareness in music therapy are identified: music therapy in context; music therapy as context; and music therapy as interacting contexts. The identified types of context awareness are exemplified through references to music therapy literature and then discussed in relation to two very different metaphors, namely context as frame and context as link. Implications for practice, research, and theory development in music therapy are suggested. PMID:26157199

  7. Music therapy to promote psychological and physiological relaxation in palliative care patients: protocol of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Koenig, Julian; Wormit, Alexander F; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is one of the most frequently used complementary therapies in different palliative care settings. Despite its long tradition and high acceptance by other health-care professionals, evidence on the effectiveness of music therapy interventions for terminally ill patients is rare. Recent reviews and health-care reports consistently point out the need of music therapists to provide an evidence-based rationale for their clinical treatments in this field. Therefore, the present study evaluates the psychological and physiological response of palliative care patients to a standardized music therapy relaxation intervention in a randomized controlled trial. A sample of 84 participants from a palliative care unit in Heidelberg is randomized to either two sessions of music therapy or two sessions of a verbal relaxation exercise, each lasting 30 minutes. The music therapy sessions consist of live played monochord music and a vocal improvisation, the control group uses a prerecorded excerpt from the mindfulness-based stress reduction program containing no musical elements. Outcome measures include self-report data on subjective relaxation, well-being, pain intensity, and quality of life, as well as continuous recording of heart rate variability and blood volume pulse as indicators of autonomous nervous system functioning. To our knowledge, this study is the first clinical trial in Europe and one of very few randomized controlled trials worldwide to systematically examine the effects of music therapy in palliative care. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137.

  8. Music as therapy in early history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The notion of music as therapy is based on ancient cross-cultural beliefs that music can have a "healing" effect on mind and body. Explanations for the therapeutic mechanisms in music have almost always included cultural and social science-based causalities about the uses and functions of music in society. However, it is also important to note that the view of music as "therapy" was also always strongly influenced by the view and understanding of the concepts and causes of disease. Magical/mystical concepts of illness and "rational" medicine probably lived side by side for thousands of years. Not until the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries were the scientific foundations of medicine established, which allowed the foundations of music in therapy to progress from no science to soft science and most recently to actual brain science. Evidence for "early music therapy" will be discussed in four broad historical-cultural divisions: preliterate cultures; early civilizations in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel; Greek Antiquity; Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Baroque. In reviewing "early music therapy" practice, from mostly unknown periods of early history (using preliterate cultures as a window) to increasingly better documented times, including preserved notation samples of actual "healing" music, five theories and applications of early music therapy can be differentiated. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Music Therapy Increases Comfort and Reduces Pain in Patients Recovering From Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanaro, John F; Homel, Peter; Lonner, Baron; Shepp, Jennifer; Lichtensztein, Marcela; Loewy, Joanne V

    The treatment of pain continues to gain in saliency as a component of defining best practice in medical care. Music therapy is an integrative treatment modality that impacts patient outcomes in the treatment of spinal pain. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel, we conducted a mixed-methods study addressing the effects of music therapy interventions on the recovery of patients after spine surgery. The study combined standard medical approaches and integrative music therapy. Sixty patients (35 female, 25 male) ranging in age from 40 to 55 years underwent anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior spinal fusion and were randomly assigned to either music therapy plus standard care (medical and nursing care with scheduled pharmacologic pain intervention) or standard care only. Measurements for both groups were completed before and after the intervention. Music therapy involved the use of patient-preferred live music that supported tension release/relaxation through incentive-based clinical improvisation, singing, and/or rhythmic drumming or through active visualization supported by live music that encompasses tension resolution. The control and music groups showed significant differences in degree and direction of change in the visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings from before to after intervention (P = .01). VAS pain levels increased slightly in the control group (to 5.87 from 5.20) but decreased by more than 1 point in the music group (to 5.09 from 6.20). The control and music therapy groups did not differ in the rate of change in scores on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) Anxiety (P = .62), HADS Depression (P = .85), or Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (P = .93). Both groups had slight increases in HADS Anxiety, comparable decreases in HADS Depression, and minimal changes in fear-related movement (Tampa scale).

  10. [Impact of a music therapy program on the stress level of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taets, Gunnar Glauco de Cunto; Borba-Pinheiro, Claudio Joaquim; de Figueiredo, Nébia Maria Almeida; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of a music therapy program on the level of stress for female professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil. Thirty four female volunteers with 33.3 ± 8.5 years of age from different levels of professional participated in the study. We used the Lipp's inventory of symptoms of stress for adults (ISSL) to evaluate the level of stress of participants before and after music therapy. The program consisted of twelve sessions using the techniques of music therapy Improvisation and Musical Re-creation held once a week with 50 minutes / session in a period of three months. The Wilcoxon test for repeated measures was used for statistical analysis. The study showed a statistically significant decrease (Δ = - 60%, p music therapy program. In conclusion, the present study that the music therapy program was effective in decrease the level of stress of women health professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.

  11. Instruments for documentation of music therapy sessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    It is an important part of the clinical music therapy work to document the daily sessions. For the clinician it is necessary to have a brief overview of each session in order to assess the methods and the process, and not least to be able to give clear reports of these issues to other health care...... professionals at staff meetings, conferences, etc. For music therapists with many clients there is not time enough during a working day to provide comprehensive process descriptions in the music therapy log. Therefore instruments that help the clinician in reducing and structuring this information are needed....... Danish and Norwegian music therapist have collaborated on developing a one page sheet with a structured form where they after each music therapy session document their use of methods and techniques in individual music therapy with persons with dementia. With this instrument therapists have easy access...

  12. Music therapy in psychiatry/mental health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    This special feature is a series of papers from a symposium held on 15th April 2016 at Aalborg University, Denmark on the topic: ‘Music therapy: A profession for the future’. The two core questions listed in the title: ‘Why music? Why and when is a music therapist needed?’ were the vehicle...... wondered if common answers to the two core questions in the profession of music therapy would emerge at an international base during the day, or if multiple ideas and subjective answers to the questions would come up. As the contributions show, it is mostly multiple ideas; yet with regard to case material......, the way of carrying out music therapy in a relationship with the users of music therapy is very similar. The theoretical understanding and ideological positions are different. There still seems to be, however, a growing integration of theories and ideas by many presenters and discussion partners...

  13. Instruments for documentation of music therapy sessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    It is an important part of the clinical music therapy work to document the daily sessions. For the clinician it is necessary to have a brief overview of each session in order to assess the methods and the process, and not least to be able to give clear reports of these issues to other health care...... professionals at staff meetings, conferences, etc. For music therapists with many clients there is not time enough during a working day to provide comprehensive process descriptions in the music therapy log. Therefore instruments that help the clinician in reducing and structuring this information are needed....... Danish and Norwegian music therapist have collaborated on developing a one page sheet with a structured form where they after each music therapy session document their use of methods and techniques in individual music therapy with persons with dementia. With this instrument therapists have easy access...

  14. Music behind Scores: Case Study of Learning Improvisation with "Playback Orchestra" Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, P.; Ruokonen, I.; Ruismäki, H.

    2015-01-01

    For music students in the early stages of learning, the music may seem to be hidden behind the scores. To support home practising, Juntunen has created the "Playback Orchestra" method with which the students can practise with the support of the notation program playback of the full orchestra. The results of testing the method with…

  15. Envisioning Autonomy through Improvising and Composing: Castoriadis Visiting Creative Music Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2012-01-01

    Do psychological perspectives constitute the only way through which the role of musical creativity in education can be addressed, researched and theorised? This essay attempts to offer an alternative view of musical creativity as a deeply social and political form of human praxis, by proposing a perspective rooted in the thought of the political…

  16. The use of extemporizing in music therapy to facilitate communication in a person with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Gummesen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    A person who has dementia may also have aphasia and severe communicative disabilities with the risk of leading to social isolation. This study explored the music therapeutic process with a person with dementia and aphasia in order to understand how music therapy may facilitate communication...... and dialogue. In an explorative hermeneutic case study, new understandings to the music therapy process were added and led to the identification of the improvisation method known as extemporizing described by Tony Wigram. In a subsequent literature review extemporization was explored and is suggested...... as a valuable method for providing a safe ground for the person with dementia and hereby facilitating engagement in communicative dialogues and in this way meeting psychosocial needs....

  17. Emotional responses to music: towards scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Miyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Obata, Akiko; Koizumi, Hideaki; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-01-08

    Neurocognitive research has the potential to identify the relevant effects of music therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of music mode (major vs. minor) on stress reduction using optical topography and an endocrinological stress marker. In salivary cortisol levels, we observed that stressful conditions such as mental fatigue (thinking and creating a response) was reduced more by major mode music than by minor mode music. We suggest that music specifically induces an emotional response similar to a pleasant experience or happiness. Moreover, we demonstrated the typical asymmetrical pattern of stress responses in upper temporal cortex areas, and suggested that happiness/sadness emotional processing might be related to stress reduction by music.

  18. Improvisation, change, works and ragas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.

    2008-01-01

    Studying change in music poses considerable challenges. Especially with respect to music that is not, or only partly, written, and improvised music in which the line between ‘fixed’ and ‘free’ is extremely fine. Where does internal variability turn into a breach with the established tradition? This

  19. Improvisation, change, works, and ragas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, W.

    2008-01-01

    Studying change in music poses considerable challenges. Especially with respect to music that is not, or only partly, written, and improvised music in which the line between 'fixed' and 'free' is extremely fine. Where does internal variability turn into a breach with the established tradition? This

  20. effectiveness of music therapy in the psycho- social management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mugumbate

    the Spinal Cord Injury Association of Nigeria Rehabilitation Center located in .... therapy, transpersonal therapy, occupational therapy, recreational therapy and music ... music therapy to be beneficial to patients with brain injury, stroke, spinal.

  1. Vocal Improvisation for Elementary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Keith P.

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the three-phase process of musical creativity (exploratory, invention, organizational), identifying activities in each of the creative phases. Included are vocal impression, picture sounds, chord tones, and name improvisation. Selected readings and recordings are included. (KC)

  2. Improvisation skills for clinical work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    Creativity and flexibility are the hallmarks of effective improvisational technique. It is also becoming increasingly apparent that providing musical structure can be significant in enabling clients with poor communication, reciprocity and resistance to engagement. This workshop will offer some...

  3. Improvisation: Performer as Co-composer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Schick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Elements of musical improvisation have been present throughout the medieval, renaissance, and baroque eras, however, improvisation had the most profound recorded presence in the baroque era. Improvisation is inherently a living practice and leaves little documentation behind for historians to study, but however elusive, it is still important to trace where instances of this improvised art appear throughout the eras listed above. It is also interesting to trace what role improvisation would later have in realizing the Baroque ideals of emotional expression, virtuosity, and individuality. This paper seeks to focus on a few of the best documented mediums of improvisation within each era. During the medieval period, improvisation took on the form of improvised counterpoint against a plainsong. In the renaissance, improvised harmony of faburden and the contenance angloise is this paper’s selected example. In the Baroque, this study seeks to describe several areas where improvisation appears such as the art of improvised accompaniment from figured bass symbols, the practice of expressive ornamentation on a written melody, and improvised vocal embellishments and cadenzas of the da capo aria. A final aim of this research is to provide examples to clarify the definition of improvisation as the degree to which the composer of a musical work has given control of its realization to the performer. Treatises and ear witness accounts of improvised musical forms provided primary sources. Other sources used in this research included writings on performance practices of different historical eras and writings on the changing relationship between the composer and the performer. This paper also consults writings on how improvised music was perceived historically as opposed to composed music.

  4. Working memory benefits creative insight, musical improvisation, and original ideation through maintained task-focused attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreu, Carsten K W; Nijstad, Bernard A; Baas, Matthijs; Wolsink, Inge; Roskes, Marieke

    2012-05-01

    Anecdotes from creative eminences suggest that executive control plays an important role in creativity, but scientific evidence is sparse. Invoking the Dual Pathway to Creativity Model, the authors hypothesize that working memory capacity (WMC) relates to creative performance because it enables persistent, focused, and systematic combining of elements and possibilities (persistence). Study 1 indeed showed that under cognitive load, participants performed worse on a creative insight task. Study 2 revealed positive associations between time-on-task and creativity among individuals high but not low in WMC, even after controlling for general intelligence. Study 3 revealed that across trials, semiprofessional cellists performed increasingly more creative improvisations when they had high rather than low WMC. Study 4 showed that WMC predicts original ideation because it allows persistent (rather than flexible) processing. The authors conclude that WMC benefits creativity because it enables the individual to maintain attention focused on the task and prevents undesirable mind wandering.

  5. Music therapy in the age of enlightenment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorke, M A

    2001-01-01

    As music therapists continue to discover more about the therapeutic powers of music, it is interesting now and then to look to the past in order to seek the roots of our contemporary practices. In this regard, the writings of eighteenth-century physicians are pivotal in the development of music therapy, for it was these individuals who first began to depend greatly upon scientific experimentation and observation to formulate their procedures. Representative of this stage in the history of music therapy are the findings of the renowned London physician Richard Brocklesby, the only doctor to write a treatise on music therapy in eighteenth-century England. The subjects treated by Brocklesby in his Reflections on the Power of Music (1749) include his musical remedies for the excesses of various emotions-particularly fear, excessive joy, and excessive sadness. He also discusses his musical remedies for diseases of the mind recognized in the eighteenth century-delirium, frenzy, melancholia, and maniacal cases. He considers music as well an aid to the elderly and to pregnant women. In short, Brocklesby provides a lively account of the curative powers of music as viewed in the mid-eighteenth century by an excellent medical mind.

  6. Music therapy and chiropractic: an integrative model of tonal and rhythmic spinal adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E B; Redmond, P

    1999-03-01

    There is a philosophical basis for the integration of treatment using music therapy and chiropractic. Perception is intimately linked to the nervous system. A relationship between spinal integrity and consciousness does exist. We can see that as spinal distortions diminish and awareness increases, there is a natural attraction toward the higher or more loving state of consciousness. Rhythms of healing and suffering are a key concept in combining music therapy with chiropractic manipulation. Donald Epstein's conceptualization of the rhythmic stages of consciousness corresponding to prescribed physiological patterns serves as a starting point for the use of rhythm in the healing process. Using interactive music, the music therapist can help facilitate a change in the patient's physical or emotional state. This occurs when the practitioner establishes an initial connection or musical validation of the patient's emotional state and assists the healing process by improvising supportive music while suggesting possibilities for resolution. We believe that the power of music can be used as a significant tool in chiropractic work to aid individuals in their healing process.

  7. Locating the Autonomous Voice: Self-Expression in Music-Centered Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erinn Epp

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available It is a common, perhaps self-evident notion that people express themselves when they are engaged in musical activity. However, there seems to be little music therapy literature that deals explicitly with theories of musical expression. This paper examines some of the existing notions of self-expression in the music therapy literature, focusing on three models: Analytic Music Therapy, Guided Imagery and Music, and Nordoff-Robbins Music Therapy. Implicit assumptions about the self and musical expression are explored, the latter in light of well-known musicological theories. The paper then looks at music-centered music therapy and the role of self-expression in it. In particular, the role of musical structure in self-expression is considered. It is suggested that a theory of self-expression for a music-centered practice cannot detach expressive content from the lived performance of music.

  8. Music therapy modulates fronto-temporal activity in rest-EEG in depressed clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachner, Jörg; Gold, Christian; Erkkilä, Jaakko

    2013-04-01

    Fronto-temporal areas process shared elements of speech and music. Improvisational psychodynamic music therapy (MT) utilizes verbal and musical reflection on emotions and images arising from clinical improvisation. Music listening is shifting frontal alpha asymmetries (FAA) in depression, and increases frontal midline theta (FMT). In a two-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 79 depressed clients (with comorbid anxiety), we compared standard care (SC) versus MT added to SC at intake and after 3 months. We found that MT significantly reduced depression and anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this study is to test whether or not MT has an impact on anterior fronto-temporal resting state alpha and theta oscillations. Correlations between anterior EEG, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), power spectral analysis (topography, means, asymmetry) and normative EEG database comparisons were explored. After 3 month of MT, lasting changes in resting EEG were observed, i.e., significant absolute power increases at left fronto-temporal alpha, but most distinct for theta (also at left fronto-central and right temporoparietal leads). MT differed to SC at F7-F8 (z scored FAA, p effects on cortical activity in depression, suggesting an impact of MT on anxiety reduction.

  9. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magee, Wendy L.; O'Kelly, Julian

    Music therapy is a clinical healthcare discipline that draws its evidence base from a number of theoretical frameworks, including psychology and music neuroscience to improve the health and well-being in individuals from varied clinical populations. Working with individuals across the lifespan...... is to present the latest developments in music therapy intervention and measurement with people with disorders of consciousness stemming from acquired profound brain injury. We will share a standardized clinical protocol and examine recent research findings that illustrate the benefits of music-based methods......, evidence-based therapeutic methods are developed from an understanding of music perception and cognition. However, there are several key challenges. First, developing a theory-based clinical and research approach is necessary to deepen understandings of the complex interactions between music stimulus...

  10. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magee, Wendy L.; O'Kelly, Julian

    Music therapy is a clinical healthcare discipline that draws its evidence base from a number of theoretical frameworks, including psychology and music neuroscience to improve the health and well-being in individuals from varied clinical populations. Working with individuals across the lifespan...... is to present the latest developments in music therapy intervention and measurement with people with disorders of consciousness stemming from acquired profound brain injury. We will share a standardized clinical protocol and examine recent research findings that illustrate the benefits of music-based methods......, evidence-based therapeutic methods are developed from an understanding of music perception and cognition. However, there are several key challenges. First, developing a theory-based clinical and research approach is necessary to deepen understandings of the complex interactions between music stimulus...

  11. Dalcroze-Based Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Robert M.

    1980-01-01

    Described is the Emile Jaques-Dalcroze method of improvisation, which he believed was the study of the direct relations between cerebral commands and muscular interpretations in order to express one's own musical feelings. Performance is propelled by developing the students' powers of sensation, imagination, and memory. (Author/KC)

  12. A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Bonde, Lars Ole

    A detailed guide to music therapy from an international perspective, covering theory, practice, assessment, research and training. 2nd Edition of the first Danish Handbook in music theory, clinical practice, research and training. The Danish version "Musikterapi: Når ord ikke slår til......" was published in 2001 by KLIM, Aarhus DK. The English Edition has a more international orientation and a broader view on research and extended bibliography. The book includes a music CD and a CD rom....

  13. A Comprehensive Guide to Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Bonde, Lars Ole

    A detailed guide to music therapy from an international perspective, covering theory, practice, assessment, research and training. 2nd Edition of the first Danish Handbook in music theory, clinical practice, research and training. The Danish version "Musikterapi: Når ord ikke slår til......" was published in 2001 by KLIM, Aarhus DK. The English Edition has a more international orientation and a broader view on research and extended bibliography. The book includes a music CD and a CD rom....

  14. Analysing change in music therapy interactions of children with communication difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiro, Neta; Himberg, Tommi

    2016-05-05

    Music therapy has been found to improve communicative behaviours and joint attention in children with autism, but it is unclear what in the music therapy sessions drives those changes. We developed an annotation protocol and tools to accumulate large datasets of music therapy, for analysis of interaction dynamics. Analysis of video recordings of improvisational music therapy sessions focused on simple, unambiguous individual and shared behaviours: movement and facing behaviours, rhythmic activity and musical structures and the relationships between them. To test the feasibility of the protocol, early and late sessions of five client-therapist pairs were annotated and analysed to track changes in behaviours. To assess the reliability and validity of the protocol, inter-rater reliability of the annotation tiers was calculated, and the therapists provided feedback about the relevance of the analyses and results. This small-scale study suggests that there are both similarities and differences in the profiles of client-therapist sessions. For example, all therapists faced the clients most of the time, while the clients did not face back so often. Conversely, only two pairs had an increase in regular pulse from early to late sessions. More broadly, similarity across pairs at a general level is complemented by variation in the details. This perhaps goes some way to reconciling client- and context-specificity on one hand and generalizability on the other. Behavioural characteristics seem to influence each other. For instance, shared rhythmic pulse alternated with mutual facing and the occurrence of shared pulse was found to relate to the musical structure. These observations point towards a framework for looking at change in music therapy that focuses on networks of variables or broader categories. The results suggest that even when starting with simple behaviours, we can trace aspects of interaction and change in music therapy, which are seen as relevant by therapists.

  15. Video micro analysis in music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Oldfield, Amelia; Plahl, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Three music therapy researchers from three different countries who have recently completed their PhD theses will each briefly discuss the role of video analysis in their investigations. All three of these research projects have involved music therapy work with children, some of whom were...... and qualitative approaches to data collection. In addition, participants will be encouraged to reflect on what types of knowledge can be gained from video analyses and to explore the general relevance of video analysis in music therapy research....

  16. Teaching Korean Rhythms in Music Class through Improvisation, Composition, and Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyesoo; Kang, Sangmi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the characteristics of Korean rhythmic patterns and provide effective ways to teach Korean rhythms based on the theoretical and pedagogical approaches derived from 5,000 years of Korean musical tradition. First, we have provided the fundamental principles of Korean rhythms that represent the culture from…

  17. Teaching Korean Rhythms in Music Class through Improvisation, Composition, and Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyesoo; Kang, Sangmi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the characteristics of Korean rhythmic patterns and provide effective ways to teach Korean rhythms based on the theoretical and pedagogical approaches derived from 5,000 years of Korean musical tradition. First, we have provided the fundamental principles of Korean rhythms that represent the culture from…

  18. Music as a therapy: role in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, Madhusudan Singh; Zafar, Mehnaz; Rastogi, Rajesh

    2013-06-01

    Music is popularly believed to usher in bliss and serenity, and healing is considered its natural quality. It has an emotionally charging charisma of its own, that we all as listeners might have experienced at times. Music has been there with mankind since the beginning of history, but where does it stand as a therapy? Is there any evidence base? How this therapy came into being and how it has evolved, and what the old and current research says about its role in psychiatric disorders. This review tries to explore these questions and arrives at a conclusion that music certainly promises more than just entertainment, and evidence so far suggests music therapy can be beneficial in the treatment of psychiatric disorders, as a cost effective noninvasive adjunct to standard therapy in a variety of settings and patient groups, yet more validated scientific research is still required to establish it as a sole quantified therapy.

  19. Music Therapy for the Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Anita Louise; Crawford, Celeste

    1982-01-01

    The development and implementation of a music therapy program to achieve behavioral change in visually impaired children and adolescents are described. Goals targeted by the music therapist at the Cleveland Society for the Blind include altering unusual body movements, poor posture, and other mannerisms often associated with blindness. (SEW)

  20. Freedom and Responsibility: The Aesthetics of Free Musical Improvisation and Its Educational Implications--A View from Bakhtin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine how specific aspects of Bakhtin's theoretical perspective might inform our understanding of improvisation. Moreover, it outlines the possible educational implications of such a perspective. Specifically, a sketch of a Bakhtinian conception of improvisation is proposed, a sketch which emphasizes the cultivation of an…

  1. Freedom and Responsibility: The Aesthetics of Free Musical Improvisation and Its Educational Implications--A View from Bakhtin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Panagiotis A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to examine how specific aspects of Bakhtin's theoretical perspective might inform our understanding of improvisation. Moreover, it outlines the possible educational implications of such a perspective. Specifically, a sketch of a Bakhtinian conception of improvisation is proposed, a sketch which emphasizes the cultivation of an…

  2. Situation Songs - Therapeutic Intentions and Use in Music Therapy with Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Kolar-Borsky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to survey the various therapeutic intentions behind the use of one particular improvisation method applied in pediatric music therapy, called the situation song (from the German term “Situationslied”- Plahl & Koch-Temming, 2008, p. 180. According to Plahl & Koch-Temming the term situation song describes an improvised song, which is sung by the therapist or/and the child and which relates to the actual occurrence and the therapeutic relationship. The presented study focuses on the therapist’s singing only. The study was conducted in stages: An elaboration of the first author’s clinical experience with situation songs (preunderstandings, a systematic analysis of relevant literature, followed by semi-structured interviews with three music therapists from Denmark, Austria and Germany. A flexible investigation approach was used, following hermeneutic principles. The findings of the study show that situation songs are regularly used by pediatric music therapists, especially during the work with children at an early developmental age. The various intentions behind the use of situation songs can be summarized as such: to create a therapeutic space; to support the therapeutic relationship; to enhance experience and development in the fields of emotion, behavior, expression and social skills; to express messages in language and to give structure to the child. The overall aim behind the use of situation songs is to offer essential experiences to the child in order to support his or her development. This study attempts to give an impulse to more international exchange of clinical terms applied in music therapy. The study was submitted as the first author’s master thesis in Music Therapy at the Aalborg University in Denmark. The second author supervised the process of the master thesis.

  3. Music Therapy: A Therapeutic Intervention for Girls with Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Kathleen A.

    The paper reviews music therapy, the educational background of music therapists, music therapy's various settings, and its use as an intervention with girls with Rett Syndrome. Sample music therapy programs for three girls (aged 5, 14, and 20 years) with Rett Syndrome are presented. The sample programs provide: student descriptions; the girls'…

  4. Individual Music Therapy for Agitation in Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been...... methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants...... with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6...

  5. Individual Music Therapy for Agitation in Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf; Qvale, Liv Gunnhild

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Agitation in nursing home residents with dementia leads to increase in psychotropic medication, decrease in quality of life, and to patient distress and caregiver burden. Music therapy has previously been found effective in treatment of agitation in dementia care but studies have been...... methodologically insufficient. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of individual music therapy on agitation in persons with moderate/severe dementia living in nursing homes, and to explore its effect on psychotropic medication and quality of life. Method: In a crossover trial, 42 participants...... with dementia were randomized to a sequence of six weeks of individual music therapy and six weeks of standard care. Outcome measures included agitation, quality of life and medication. Results: Agitation disruptiveness increased during standard care and decreased during music therapy. The difference at −6...

  6. Music Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Hazard

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of music therapy interventions with Parkinson’s patients at the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Service of the National Institute of Geriatrics in Santiago of Chile.

  7. Music Therapy for Post Operative Cardiac Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Karin

    Background This study is the first controlled research study undertaken in the early phase of rehabilitation after cardiac surgery investigating the effect of a receptive music therapy method. Various forms of music therapy interventions including both active and receptive methods were reported...... and a music medicine intervention. Guided Relaxation with Music was considered potentially helpful for post operative cardiac patients in order to induce relaxation and facilitate recovery involving listening to relaxing music as a background while systematically guiding patients through a process of bodily...... relaxation. Method Participants were 68 patients (following randomization the operation was cancelled for five of these participants), age range from 40 to 80 years, who had a heart valve operation as a single procedure, or as part of a double procedure including a concurrent coronary artery bypass surgery...

  8. Concepts of context in music therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rolvsjord, Randi; Stige, Brynjulf

    2013-01-01

    In contemporary music therapy as well as in related interdisciplinary fields, the importance of context in relation to theory, research, and practice has been emphasized. However, the word context seems to be used in several different ways and conceptualizations of contextual approaches vary too. The objective of this theoretical article is to clarify traditions of language use in relation to context in music therapy. In reviewing and discussing the literature, we focus on the field of mental...

  9. Interpretation in Music Therapy: Music and the Movement of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Migner-Laurin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical article explores philosophical roots of the interpretive task in music therapy. Drawing from creativity practices and interpretation traditions such as philosophical hermeneutics, the author focuses on Gadamer’s concept of dialogue in the understanding of art. Distancing itself from the objective-subjective dichotomy of the scientific model, the truth of the artwork is viewed as participative, as it always requires an encounter, a form of presence. As clinicians, it encourages us to recognize and make the most of our own sensible response to music. Art therapist Shaun McNiff advocates for a temporary suspension of clinical meaning in order to expand the interpretive possibilities in creative art therapies. The patient’s creation is viewed as an Other, complex and mysterious, which whom we are invited to relate. Through a clinical example, this paper examines how we understand and respond to our client’s music. The notions of “intuition in the act” (Kimura and “being played” (Gadamer show that conscious decisions and interventions, we also follow the movement of music itself. Therefore, its meaning tends to transcend the materiality and the personality and connects us to our human condition. It is an invitation to open our hearts, listen deeply and respond creatively to the music played in therapy.

  10. [Music therapy in different dental specialties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Katarzyna; Wyganowska-Swiatkowska, Marzena; Kowalkowska, Iwona; Kurhańska-Flisykowska, Anna; Piotrowski, Paweł

    2012-01-01

    Music is generally recognized as the best and, in parallel, the simplest medium of communication. The music therapy, applied in various spheres linked to a therapeutic process, is particularly valued in rehabilitation, medicine, humanities and social sciences. Present study aimed at determination of usefulness of selected techniques of music therapy in different dental specialties. The studies were conducted on 81 generally healthy patients aging 18 to 62 years. Various planned dental procedures were performed first time or were appraised by the patients as unpleasant ones. On the basis of pilot studies, a stable scheme of the visits was established. At the beginning of the studies, music therapy according to Kierył was conducted. Subsequently, basing on description of Schwabe, a form of regulatory individual music therapy was conducted. Depending on psychoemotional condition of the patient, music programming was based on ISO and LEVEL principles, taking into account musical preferences of the patient and his/her age. After every visit the patients filled questionnaires and appropriate results, together with results of studies performed by the dentist, were subjected to statistical analysis. 1. Results of the studies encourage application of musicotherapeutic techniques in different dental specialties. 2. Dental visit can be made attractive and patient's visits in dental office can be facilitated with no significant financial input or organizational.

  11. Music Therapy with Young People in Schools: After the Black Saturday Fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina McFerran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Black Saturday bushfires of 2009 resulted in the largest loss of life as the consequence of a natural disaster recorded in Australian history. The community music therapy project described in this paper took place in a secondary school affected by the fires six months later. Three groups of young men and women participated in ten weeks of music therapy groups where they were empowered to choose the content and focus of sessions. Each young person had been impacted in some way by the fires and this was expressed either through improvisations, song writing or song sharing, resulting in a sense of relief. Although it was important that other group members understood the impact of the bushfires, the young people were more inclined to focus on positive opportunities for growth within the groups and appreciated the fun and freedom of sessions. They described how "musicing" opened a door for new experiences, both musically and personally, where they were able to more confidently express themselves once group cohesion had been established. The relevance of community music therapy theory is considered in light of the emphasis on coping by the young people and compared to the implications of adopting a trauma orientation in the context of a natural disaster.

  12. Developing clinical piano improvisation skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Teaching piano improvisation skills for use in clinical work relies on the development of a range of musical techniques and therapeutic methods that are combined and integrated. Simple musical styles of playing such as melody dialogues, two chord accompaniments, walking basses (tonal and atonal), 6...

  13. Can Improvisation Be "Taught"?: A Call for Free Improvisation in Our Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Maud

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the idea that the music education profession's current drive to include improvisation in school music is limited in its approach, and that "teaching" improvisation, in the traditional sense, is not possible. These beliefs are based on an examination of current methodologies and texts in light of the…

  14. Suggested Guidelines for Conducting Music Therapy Literature Reviews & an Introduction to Systematic Reviews in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Bonde, Lars Ole; Rickson, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the kinds of literature reviews found in music therapy writings and offers ideas for authors preparing literature reviews related to their clinical practice and research. It includes a description of systematic review and lists samples of literature reviews and systematic...... reviews conducted in music therapy....

  15. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Yee Cheong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods: Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4 were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music and days 2 and 3 (with CMT. Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS. Results: Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01 in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01 in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014. Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01 and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045 were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion: These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation.

  16. Creative Music Therapy in an Acute Care Setting for Older Patients with Delirium and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Chin Yee; Tan, Jane An Qi; Foong, Yi-Lin; Koh, Hui Mien; Chen, Denise Zhen Yue; Tan, Jessie Joon Chen; Ng, Chong Jin; Yap, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The acute hospital ward can be unfamiliar and stressful for older patients with impaired cognition, rendering them prone to agitation and resistive to care. Extant literature shows that music therapy can enhance engagement and mood, thereby ameliorating agitated behaviours. This pilot study evaluates the impact of a creative music therapy (CMT) programme on mood and engagement in older patients with delirium and/or dementia (PtDD) in an acute care setting. We hypothesize that CMT improves engagement and pleasure in these patients. Methods Twenty-five PtDD (age 86.5 ± 5.7 years, MMSE 6/30 ± 5.4) were observed for 90 min (30 min before, 30 min during, and 30 min after music therapy) on 3 consecutive days: day 1 (control condition without music) and days 2 and 3 (with CMT). Music interventions included music improvisation such as spontaneous music making and playing familiar songs of patient's choice. The main outcome measures were mood and engagement assessed with the Menorah Park Engagement Scale (MPES) and Observed Emotion Rating Scale (OERS). Results Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed a statistically significant positive change in constructive and passive engagement (Z = 3.383, p = 0.01) in MPES and pleasure and general alertness (Z = 3.188,p = 0.01) in OERS during CMT. The average pleasure ratings of days 2 and 3 were higher than those of day 1 (Z = 2.466, p = 0.014). Negative engagement (Z = 2.582, p = 0.01) and affect (Z = 2.004, p = 0.045) were both lower during CMT compared to no music. Conclusion These results suggest that CMT holds much promise to improve mood and engagement of PtDD in an acute hospital setting. CMT can also be scheduled into the patients' daily routines or incorporated into other areas of care to increase patient compliance and cooperation. PMID:27489560

  17. Health music(k)ing - Music therapy or Music and health?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2011-01-01

    The field of music therapy is expanding rapidly into new areas, practices and interdisciplinary fields, as well as redefining its goals and values. Increasingly "music and health" is used to describe the field when it comes to naming new training programs, new interdisciplinary fields of theory...

  18. Singing in Individual Music Therapy with Persons suffering from Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2002-01-01

    Persons in middle or last stages of dementia seem to respond less and less to music. Experiences from clinical music therapy practise with a structured and safe setting shows that this population responds to music therapy and communicates musically. The presentation consists of a short descriptio...

  19. Music Techniques in Therapy, Counseling, and Special Education, Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne M.; Jones, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    "Music Techniques in Therapy, Counseling, and Special Education" is the culmination of the first author's research in the skill development of prospective music therapists and music educators during graduate and undergraduate preparation. Standley studied the abilities and progress of students across multiple clinical music therapy and music…

  20. Mixed methods research in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Burns, Debra S; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Music therapists have an ethical and professional responsibility to provide the highest quality care possible to their patients. Much of the time, high quality care is guided by evidence-based practice standards that integrate the most current, available research in making decisions. Accordingly, music therapists need research that integrates multiple ways of knowing and forms of evidence. Mixed methods research holds great promise for facilitating such integration. At this time, there have not been any methodological articles published on mixed methods research in music therapy. The purpose of this article is to introduce mixed methods research as an approach to address research questions relevant to music therapy practice. This article describes the core characteristics of mixed methods research, considers paradigmatic issues related to this research approach, articulates major challenges in conducting mixed methods research, illustrates four basic designs, and provides criteria for evaluating the quality of mixed methods articles using examples of mixed methods research from the music therapy literature. Mixed methods research offers unique opportunities for strengthening the evidence base in music therapy. Recommendations are provided to ensure rigorous implementation of this research approach.

  1. Music in the family: music making and music therapy with young children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetherick, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Songs and singing games are a healthy part of young children's social, emotional and cognitive development. Such shared music making can facilitate and strengthen relationships between parents and children. Family health workers can encourage carers' informal uses of music with their children. In cases of developmental delay, disability, severe illness or family stress, music can continue to have a significant role in supporting children and parents. In some cases referral to specialist music therapy services may be appropriate for assessment and/or treatment.

  2. Use Jazz to Teach Your String Students Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Standards 3 and 9 of the National Standards for Music Education charge teachers to teach improvisation as well as music of diverse cultures. Jazz is a musical style that is perfect to cover both content areas. Until now, however, jazz repertoire and improvisation have not played a major role in the education of string students. One reason is that…

  3. Use Jazz to Teach Your String Students Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Standards 3 and 9 of the National Standards for Music Education charge teachers to teach improvisation as well as music of diverse cultures. Jazz is a musical style that is perfect to cover both content areas. Until now, however, jazz repertoire and improvisation have not played a major role in the education of string students. One reason is that…

  4. Pedagogical Techniques of Improvisation Instructors without Academic Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Richard Wayne

    2010-01-01

    The importance of music improvisation can be seen in its inclusion in the National Standards for Music Education and the accreditation standards for the National Association of Schools of Music. The purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogical techniques and materials of improvisation instructors who do not hold academic credentials. The…

  5. Interaction with Machine Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assayag, Gerard; Bloch, George; Cont, Arshia; Dubnov, Shlomo

    We describe two multi-agent architectures for an improvisation oriented musician-machine interaction systems that learn in real time from human performers. The improvisation kernel is based on sequence modeling and statistical learning. We present two frameworks of interaction with this kernel. In the first, the stylistic interaction is guided by a human operator in front of an interactive computer environment. In the second framework, the stylistic interaction is delegated to machine intelligence and therefore, knowledge propagation and decision are taken care of by the computer alone. The first framework involves a hybrid architecture using two popular composition/performance environments, Max and OpenMusic, that are put to work and communicate together, each one handling the process at a different time/memory scale. The second framework shares the same representational schemes with the first but uses an Active Learning architecture based on collaborative, competitive and memory-based learning to handle stylistic interactions. Both systems are capable of processing real-time audio/video as well as MIDI. After discussing the general cognitive background of improvisation practices, the statistical modelling tools and the concurrent agent architecture are presented. Then, an Active Learning scheme is described and considered in terms of using different improvisation regimes for improvisation planning. Finally, we provide more details about the different system implementations and describe several performances with the system.

  6. Music and Health Promotion - In the Life of Music Therapy and Music Psychology Researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2014-01-01

    In August 2013 Center for Music and Health published its first anthology in English on ‘Musical Life Stories’. 17 authors from 6 countries present their research on the influence of music in a lifelong health perspective. A unique feature in the book is a collection of “personal narratives......” by the authors. In a free form each author wrote a short narrative of music’s influence on their identity and health in a life span perspective. The present article is a thematic analysis of these 13 narratives. The themes identified are briefly related more generally to the international research literature...... on music and identity and more specifically to the author’s study of health themes in the musical autobiographies of music therapy students at Aalborg University (DK). The analysis shows that there are some specific themes in the professional’s narratives, however, the researchers are very much in line...

  7. Singing in Individual Music Therapy with Persons suffering from Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2002-01-01

    Persons in middle or last stages of dementia seem to respond less and less to music. Experiences from clinical music therapy practise with a structured and safe setting shows that this population responds to music therapy and communicates musically. The presentation consists of a short description...... of the 6 participants, a view of the clinical music therapy setting, video examples exemplifying different response categories, graphically correlation tendencied between musical and physiological responses, and finally a short case example of the way a person with dementia emotionally profits from...... the structured musical form....

  8. Music Therapy Interventions for Deaf Clients with Dual Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Johnson Ward

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The current music therapy literature addresses the use of music with the Deaf population, particularly those with cochlear implants. However, few studies or descriptions of music therapy with Deaf individuals who are dually diagnosed with an emotional or behavioral disorder and an intellectual disability have been conducted. Given that music therapy has been found to be an effective intervention for both Deaf individuals and individuals with emotional or behavioral needs, ideas and resources for music therapists working with this population are needed. These case examples provide a description of music therapy for individuals who were dually diagnosed in a residential mental health facility. Music therapy experiences and their effectiveness for Deaf patients with dual diagnoses are presented as well as cultural aspects of music within the Deaf community and their implications for creating music therapy interventions.

  9. A Role for Music Therapy in Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveson, Barbara; Edwards, Jane

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the role and application of music therapy in special education in an Australian context. Notes that music therapy in Australia is practiced in medical contexts, education contexts, and in private practice and community programs. (DB)

  10. EinScream!: Possibilities of New Musical Ideas to Form a Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rii Numata

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrates a place where plural individual participants with different cultural resources meet and communicate with each other to create improvisational music. The philosophy and methodology of improvisation in Music Therapy have already been discussed by M. Pavlicevic (1997, T. Wigram (2004, and others, but mainly from the framework of "how the music therapist can match to the music of the client." I would like to discuss the possibilities of coexistence of different values of music by introducing the notions implied in new music forms, such as Cobra, Shogi Composition, or D. Bailey's free improvisation, with video excerpts of my own clinical work. This paper is based on the idea that I presented at the 11th World Congress of Music Therapy 2005 held in Brisbane, Australia.

  11. A Survey Study of Pre-Professionals' Understanding of the Canadian Music Therapy Internship Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements-Cortes, Amy

    2015-01-01

    There is limited research to date on the clinical music therapy internship experience from the perspective of the pre-professional. Further study is required to advance this significant stage in clinician development, as it is an intense period when pre-professionals apply and integrate theoretical knowledge about music therapy into their clinical practice. This study aimed to: (1) assess the skills, competence, comfort, concerns, issues, challenges, and anxieties of Canadian undergraduate students at two stages in the internship process (pre- and post-internship); and (2) examine whether these perceptions are consistent with published research on internship. Thirty-five pre-professionals, from a pool of 50 eligible respondents (70% response rate), completed a 57-question survey using a five-point Likert scale ranking pre- and post-internship experience and participated in an interview post-study. Survey results indicate a statistically significant increase in pre-professionals' perceived clinical, music, and personal skill development from pre- to post-internship. Areas of desired skill development included counseling, functional guitar, and clinical improvisation. Recommendations for educators and supervisors are provided with respect to areas of focus in undergraduate education and during clinical internship. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Orff Music Therapy: History, Principles and Further Development

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Voigt

    2013-01-01

    Orff Music Therapy, a developmental approach to music therapy, was developed by Gertrud Orff within the framework of social paediatrics in Munich, Germany. A short historical background of Orff Music Therapy is discussed. The history of the clinical setting in which it was developed is described as is Gertrud Orff’s professional background. The role of Orff-Schulwerk in Orff Music Therapy and the development of theoretical foundations are discussed. Current principles and practice of Orff Mus...

  13. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients.

  14. Reporting on Music Therapy in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Otieno Akombo

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available here are approximately 500,000 refugees living in Kenya today, with approximately 20,000 children attending formal education in about twenty refugee schools. These children often show severe emotional distress that is observable through consistent evaluation. The children's hopes need to be restored and their mental health rejuvenated. Several Kenyan music teachers and paramedics including myself came together in August 1998, and thought about new ways and means of helping these children. One way we thought was worth trying was music therapy. This we thought could be achieved by incorporating a music therapy component into their co-curricular (after school activities. We thought singing and dancing after school could be a good stepping stone for the provision of therapy to the kids in the refugee camps.

  15. Ukrainian Music Therapy - Does It Have a Chance to Exist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Ivannikova

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents some personal experiences that helped the author to find her way to music therapy. Particularities of using music therapy with a group of depressed patients in a clinic in Zaporizhzhia are then outlined. The article also gives some information about educational programs in music therapy in Ukraine.

  16. Tactile Paths : on and through Notation for Improvisers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tactile Paths: on and through Notation for Improvisers is an artistic research project that articulates and expands the nexus of notation and improvisation in contemporary and experimental music. The project interweaves direct artistic experience with insights from improvisation studies, the social

  17. Tactile paths : on and through notation for improvisers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Tactile Paths: on and through Notation for Improvisers is an artistic research project that articulates and expands the nexus of notation and improvisation in contemporary and experimental music. The project interweaves direct artistic experience with insights from improvisation studies, the social

  18. Using Baroque Techniques to Teach Improvisation in Your Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyesoo

    2015-01-01

    Before our current notation system was widely adopted by musicians, improvisation was a key component of music throughout the Western world. One of the fundamental elements of the baroque style, namely, using improvised embellishment, offered musicians great artist liberty. During the baroque period, improvisation spread across Europe and beyond.…

  19. Improvisation: Another Way to Move and Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Using improvisation in movement and dance classes is an ideal way to help students relate to how their bodies move. Students can learn confidence from the way they move by experimenting with unconventional and different methods. Improvisation, as such, is responding spontaneously to stimuli (music) in order to create a composition that allows for…

  20. Music therapy: a valuable adjunct in the oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Emily M; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2011-08-01

    Music therapy is the supervised and therapeutic use of music by a credentialed therapist to promote positive clinical outcomes. It can be a valuable form of complementary medicine in the oncology setting to decrease patient stress and anxiety, relieve pain and nausea, provide distraction, alleviate depression, and promote the expression of feelings. The music therapist assesses the patient and consults other members of the multidisciplinary team to create a therapeutic treatment plan. Music therapists design music sessions based on patients' needs and their intended therapeutic goals. Patients can participate actively or passively in individual or group sessions. Only a credentialed music therapist can provide safe and beneficial music therapy interventions.

  1. Four Decades of Music Therapy Behavioral Research Designs : A Content Analysis of Journal of Music Therapy Articles

    OpenAIRE

    ,; 藤原, 志帆; 高田, 艶子; 曹, 念慈; 吉富, 功修

    2004-01-01

    本訳稿は、Dianne Gregory著 "Four Decades of Music Therapy Behavioral Research Designs : A Content Analysis of Journal of Music Therapy Articles", Journal of Music Therapy, 2002, 41(1), pp.56-71を全訳したものである。

  2. Why Does Music Therapy Help in Autism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Khetrapal

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy is shown to be an effective intervention for emotional recognition deficits in autism. However, researchers to date have yet to propose a model that accounts for the neurobiological and cognitive components that are responsible for such improvements. The current paper outlines a model whereby the encoding of tonal pitch is proposed as the underlying mechanism. Accurate tonal pitch perception is important for recognizing emotions like happiness and sadness in the auditory domain. Once acquired, the ability to perceive tonal pitch functions as a domain-specific module that proves beneficial for music cognition. There is biological preparedness for the development of such a module and it is hypothesized to be preserved in autism. The current paper reinforces the need to build intervention programs based on this preserved module in autism, and proposes that this module may form the basis for a range of benefits related to music therapy. Possible brain areas associated with this module are suggested.

  3. Therapeutic Songwriting in Music Therapy Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Songwriting as therapeutic intervention has received increasing attention in the field of music therapy over the past decade however much of the publications focus on clinical outcomes rather than methods of practice. This paper, part of a two-part research report into trends in the clinical...... of songwriting clinical practice and the frequency with which songwriting is employed in practice. The data highlights that songwriting is frequently employed in developmental disability and ASD practice, with reports on songwriting with these diagnostic groups being underrepresented in the music therapy...... practice of songwriting, aims to describe the most frequently employed goal areas across a range of clinical populations and compare these findings with the published literature. Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 477 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which...

  4. Therapeutic Songwriting in Music Therapy Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2008-01-01

    Songwriting as therapeutic intervention has received increasing attention in the field of music therapy over the past decade however much of the publications focus on clinical outcomes rather than methods of practice. This paper, part of a two-part research report into trends in the clinical...... of songwriting clinical practice and the frequency with which songwriting is employed in practice. The data highlights that songwriting is frequently employed in developmental disability and ASD practice, with reports on songwriting with these diagnostic groups being underrepresented in the music therapy...... practice of songwriting, aims to describe the most frequently employed goal areas across a range of clinical populations and compare these findings with the published literature. Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 477 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which...

  5. Music Therapy Interventions for Deaf Clients with Dual Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Johnson Ward

    2016-01-01

    The current music therapy literature addresses the use of music with the Deaf population, particularly those with cochlear implants. However, few studies or descriptions of music therapy with Deaf individuals who are dually diagnosed with an emotional or behavioral disorder and an intellectual disability have been conducted. Given that music therapy has been found to be an effective intervention for both Deaf individuals and individuals with emotional or behavioral needs, ideas and resources ...

  6. Theoretical Considerations of Bio-guided Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Eric B.

    2011-01-01

    Music therapists rarely have the opportunity to consider a new model of music therapy and need to review prior models and theoretical approaches to make an informed determination regarding Bio-guided Music Therapy. While initially appearing to fall within the confines of Behavioral Music Therapy, technical advances in sound reproduction, physiological data acquisition methods, as well as innovative application techniques are argued to bring the bio-guided approach into the realm of in-the-mom...

  7. The music therapy assessment tool in Alzheimer's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, N J

    1992-01-01

    1. Empirical research is needed to evaluate immediate and sustained physiological, psychological, and psychosocial therapeutic effects, if any, of music therapy on behavioral patterns of elderly institutionalized Alzheimer's patients. 2. The Music Therapy Assessment Tool (MTAT) was specifically designed and developed to assess the effects of music therapy on behavioral patterns of Alzheimer's disease patients. 3. Preliminary testing of the MTAT suggests that it has fairly high internal consistency and inter-rater reliability and warrants consideration as a research tool. 4. Musical intervention included familiar music to facilitate communication and socialization, ethnic and nostalgic music to stimulate reminiscence, and melodies with distinctive rhythmic patterns to enhance movement and behavioral repatterning.

  8. Music as a complementary therapy in medical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Halim

    2002-01-01

    Music can act not only as a source of enjoyable sound that gives pleasant feeling, but also a source of healing. Music as a therapy has developed, supported by many researches conducted by experts in music, education and medicine. The impact of music therapy can be observed in many case studies, showing the positive effects of music to the betterment of human’s neuro-behavior, emotional and physical states. Some reasons to use music as a therapy are: toget audioanalgesic response, to focus at...

  9. The Importance of Research in Educating About Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L. Wheeler

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this "Essay" article, the author explores some ways in which music therapy research is important in educating people—music therapists and those outside of music therapy—about music therapy. There are different levels and types of research, and different levels are appropriate at different points in the development of music therapy in a country. However, some type of music therapy research is important for the development of music therapy in all cases and in all situations and all countries. The author suggests that music therapy research may be used to: (a describe a situation, (b identify and examine processes and causal factors, (c provide evidence about outcomes, or (d change a situation. Information on music therapy research for each purpose is provide. The article examines how all of these may be used to educate people about music therapy. It is suggested that music therapists in different countries have different needs for research and that one thing that leads to these variations is how highly developed music therapy is in the country.

  10. Vocal Improvisation and Creative Thinking by Australian and American University Jazz Singers: A Factor Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Steinman, Patrice Madura

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the author investigated factors underlying vocal improvisation achievement and relationships with the singers' musical background. Participants were 102 college students in Australia and the United States who performed 3 jazz improvisations and 1 free improvisation. Jazz improvisations were rated on rhythmic, tonal, and creative…

  11. Vocal Improvisation and Creative Thinking by Australian and American University Jazz Singers: A Factor Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Steinman, Patrice Madura

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the author investigated factors underlying vocal improvisation achievement and relationships with the singers' musical background. Participants were 102 college students in Australia and the United States who performed 3 jazz improvisations and 1 free improvisation. Jazz improvisations were rated on rhythmic, tonal, and creative…

  12. Music therapy in the psychosocial rehabilitation of people with epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramaviciute Z.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a pilot study analysing the application of music therapy in the today’s psychosocial rehabilitation of people with epilepsy. The study is based on the analysis of the up-to-date application of music therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation, outcomes of epilepsy and special needs of people with this disorder. The analysis serves as a basis for making the assumption that music therapy is an effective measure addressing psychosocial issues of patients suffering from epilepsy. To achieve the objective set, an on-line survey method was used. A questionnaire was sent to the European Confederation of Music Therapy, the International Fellowship in Music Therapy for Neuro-disability, and several members of the World Federation of Music Therapy. It is difficult to formulate final conclusions about the today’s role of music therapy in the psychosocial rehabilitation of people suffering from epilepsy on the basis of this study as the sample is not representative. The analysis of literature and the results of the survey prove the issue of the role of music therapy in the psychosocial rehabilitation of epileptic people to be complex. The service of music therapy should be integrated into health promotion programmes focused on meeting special needs of people with epilepsy and implemented by an interdisciplinary team. Music therapy is applied specifically and diversely subject to symptoms of the disorder and the therapeutic objectives set. Crystallising the specificity of the application of music therapy in this context requires further research.

  13. Music Therapy and Culture: An Essential Relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Morris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst being interviewed by Brynjulf Stige for the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy (volume 10, issue 1, Kenneth Aigen said “I do not think it is reasonable to think that we could automatically work with someone from a very different culture” (Aigen 2001: 90. Standing alone, this passage spoken by Aigen may give a negative impression. This paper will aim to put the above statement in context and think carefully about what Aigen might be suggesting. Through an honest and open exploration of the questions the statement raises, a realistic and more optimistic dialogue which was hidden beneath the words is unearthed. Through the deconstruction of Aigen’s statement this paper investigates our attitudes as music therapists towards culture and music and the preconceptions and assumptions which may arise. This paper will stress how a willingness to explore and broaden not only our attitudes towards culture, but also the confines of our musical ability, can result in an expansion of our knowledge, awareness and receptiveness. This, in turn, could lead to a practice of music therapy which is more fruitful and successful, one in which we are clinically open and prepared for whatever our clients might bring to or need from their sessions.

  14. Orff Music Therapy: History, Principles and Further Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Voigt

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orff Music Therapy, a developmental approach to music therapy, was developed by Gertrud Orff within the framework of social paediatrics in Munich, Germany. A short historical background of Orff Music Therapy is discussed. The history of the clinical setting in which it was developed is described as is Gertrud Orff’s professional background. The role of Orff-Schulwerk in Orff Music Therapy and the development of theoretical foundations are discussed. Current principles and practice of Orff Music Therapy, illustrated by a case example show how the profile of Orff Music Therapy has developed. On the basis of the case example, theory is related to practice. Finally, changes influencing Orff Music Therapy today, training and research are considered.

  15. Searching for Music's Potential: A Critical Examination of Research on Music Therapy with Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert; Comer, Ronald; Heller, Wendy B.

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted a literature review on music therapy for individuals with autism because of the frequent use of music therapy for those with autism and recent research on the musical abilities of this population. To accomplish this narrative review, articles were searched from relevant databases, reference lists from articles, and book…

  16. Music therapy for depression: it seems to work, but how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike J; Procter, Simon

    2011-08-01

    Evidence is beginning to emerge that music therapy can improve the mental health of people with depression. We examine possible mechanisms of action of this complex intervention and suggest that music therapy partly is effective because active music-making within the therapeutic frame offers the patient opportunities for new aesthetic, physical and relational experiences.

  17. Psycho-social Aims of Music Therapy for Elderly Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fukumi Kitamoto

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In Japan, the population is rapidly aging. Given this situation, music therapy has proven to be a valuable new psycho-social approach. I have been introducing music therapy into my clinical work as a psychological treatment mediated by music. Here I will examine its meaning, sharing my communication experiences with various clients

  18. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  19. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  20. Building the first music therapy programme… - a reflection on new music therapy in new place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwika Konieczna

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This story presents the reflections on building a music therapy programme in a new place. The description of the experiences of a young clinician who started music therapy programme in a facility for abused and neglected children in Poland is given. Both professional and personal challenges that were faced by the music therapist are discussed. The story of the author might not be different from those that happen to music therapists in similar situations all over the world. Therefore, the author discusses the advantages and disadvantages of being the one who builds a music therapy program as the first practitioner, and builds awareness of Music Therapy as a profession in a new place. The more general reflections on being in this situation follow. Dangers and benefits resulting from freedom as well as the importance of responsibility are also presented. The conclusion is that establishing social trust for MT as a profession and promoting this kind of therapy with success from the very beginning is an extremely rewarding work.

  1. Music therapy in an integrated pediatric palliative care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Wang, Hua; Curtis, Charlotte; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    National experts have recommended that children with life-limiting illnesses receive integrated palliative and medical care. These programs offer a variety of services, including music therapy. Using survey data from parents whose were enrolled in Florida's Partners in Care: Together for Kids (PIC:TFK) program, this study investigates parents' experiences with music therapy. About 44% of children with life-limiting illnesses and 17% of their siblings used music therapy. For children who used music therapy, multivariate results suggest that their parents were 23 times as likely to report satisfaction with the overall PIC:TFK program (P music therapy. Pediatric palliative care programs should include music therapy, although recruiting licensed music therapists may be challenging.

  2. History of music therapy treatment interventions for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke-Hernández, Alaine E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a systematic review of the history of music therapy research and treatment of children with autism. Understanding such history is important in order to improve clinical efficacy and inform future research. This paper includes a history of autism diagnosis, reviews strengths and limitations of music therapy practice with children with autism from 1940-2009, and suggests direction for future music therapy research and clinical practice with this population. Literature was limited to the English language and obtained with the following search terms: autism, autistic, (early) infantile autism, child, therapeutic music, musical therapy, and music therapy. Table of contents from music therapy journals were searched, and reference lists from obtained articles were perused for additional articles. This historical review focused primarily on journal articles, however, books and book chapters that appeared to hold particular historical significance were also included.

  3. Cancer patients' interest and preferences for music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Debra S; Sledge, Renata B; Fuller, Leigh Ann; Daggy, Joanne K; Monahan, Patrick O

    2005-01-01

    The reason for lack of routine integration of music therapy into healthcare may be that patients are not comfortable being involved in a music therapy intervention. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine cancer patients' interest in and preferences for using 2 types of music therapy interventions, music-making and music listening. Sixty-five patients completed the Music Interest Survey in addition to standardized measures of coping, affect, anxiety, and fatigue. Results suggest adult cancer patients are interested in music therapy, especially music listening. Patient interest and preference were associated with negative affect, anxiety, age, perceived intervention-specific benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy. Findings highlight the need for a comprehensive assessment of patient needs and preferences prior to intervention.

  4. Dementia and the Power of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Dementia is now a leading cause of both mortality and morbidity, particularly in western nations, and current projections for rates of dementia suggest this will worsen. More than ever, cost effective and creative non-pharmacological therapies are needed to ensure we have an adequate system of care and supervision. Music therapy is one such measure, yet to date statements of what music therapy is supposed to bring about in ethical terms have been limited to fairly vague and under-developed claims about an improvement in well-being. This article identifies the relevant sense of wellbeing at stake in the question of dementia therapies of this type. In broad terms the idea is that this kind of therapy has a restorative effect on social agency. To the extent that music arouses a person through its rhythms and memory-inducing effects, particularly in communal settings, it may give rise to the recovery of one's narrative agency, and in turn allow for both carer and patient to participate in a more meaningful and mutually engaging social connection.

  5. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tracey; Porter, Sam

    2017-08-01

    Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therapy for palliative care. In keeping with the realist approach, we examined all relevant literature to develop theories that could explain how music therapy works. A total of 51 articles were included in the review. Music therapy was found to have a therapeutic effect on the physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual suffering of palliative care patients. We also identified program mechanisms that help explain music therapy's therapeutic effects, along with facilitating contexts for implementation. Music therapy may be an effective nonpharmacological approach to managing distressing symptoms in palliative care patients. The findings also suggest that group music therapy may be a cost-efficient and effective way to support staff caring for palliative care patients. We encourage others to continue developing the evidence base in order to expand our understanding of how music therapy works, with the aim of informing and improving the provision of music therapy for palliative care patients.

  6. Relationships among Selected Practice Behaviours and Achievement in Jazz Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the practice strategies that collegiate music majors chose to employ in preparing for a jazz improvisation performance, and the relationships among selected practice behaviours and achievement in instrumental jazz improvisation. Participants for the study (N = 62) were enrolled as music majors…

  7. Relationships among Selected Practice Behaviours and Achievement in Jazz Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the practice strategies that collegiate music majors chose to employ in preparing for a jazz improvisation performance, and the relationships among selected practice behaviours and achievement in instrumental jazz improvisation. Participants for the study (N = 62) were enrolled as music majors…

  8. [Music therapy for dementia and higher cognitive dysfunction: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    Music is known to affect the human mind and body. Music therapy utilizes the effects of music for medical purposes. The history of music therapy is quite long, but only limited evidence supports its usefulness in the treatment of higher cognitive dysfunction. As for dementia, some studies conclude that music therapy is effective for preventing cognitive deterioration and the occurrence of behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). In patients receiving music therapy for the treatment of higher cognitive dysfunction, aphasia was reported as the most common symptom. Many studies have been conducted to determine whether singing can improve aphasic symptoms: singing familiar and/or unfamiliar songs did not show any positive effect on aphasia. Melodic intonation therapy (MIT) is a method that utilizes melody and rhythm to improve speech output. MIT is a method that is known to have positive effects on aphasic patients. Some studies of music therapy for patients with unilateral spatial neglect; apraxia; hemiparesis; and walking disturbances, including parkinsonian gait, are available in the literature. Studies showed that the symptoms of unilateral spatial neglect and hemiparesis significantly improved when musical instruments were played for several months as a part of the music therapy. Here, I describe my study in which mental singing showed a positive effect on parkinsonian gait. Music is interesting, and every patient can go through training without any pain. Future studies need to be conducted to establish evidence of the positive effects of music therapy on neurological and neuropsychological symptoms.

  9. Multidisciplinary perspectives of music therapy in adult palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Koffman, Jonathan

    2007-04-01

    Music therapy aims to provide holistic support to individuals through the sensitive use of music by trained clinicians. A recent growth in music therapy posts in UK palliative care units has occurred despite a paucity of rigorous research. To explore the role of music therapy within multidisciplinary palliative care teams, and guide the future development of the discipline. In-depth qualitative interviews with 20 multidisciplinary colleagues of music therapists, based in five UK hospices. Analysis of interview material revealed a number of themes relevant to the study aims. Music therapy was valued by most interviewees; however there exists some lack of understanding of the role of the music therapist, particularly amongst nurses. Emotional, physical, social, environmental, creative and spiritual benefits of music therapy were described, with some benefits perceived as synergistic, arising from collaborations with other disciplines. Interviewees found experiencing or witnessing music therapy is effective in developing an understanding of the discipline. Music therapy is an appropriate therapeutic intervention for meeting the holistic needs of palliative care service users. More understanding and integration of music therapy could be encouraged with collaborative work, educational workshops, and the utilization of environmentally focused techniques. The study merits further research to explore and develop these findings.

  10. A Classroom-Based Study of Small-Group Planned Improvisation with Fifth-Grade Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and describe children's music improvisations and the interactions that transpired within their four-person groups during regular weekly music classes as they planned and performed music improvisations in response to three different prompts: a poem, a painting, and a musical composition. Participants were…

  11. Music therapy and the resettlement of women prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leith, Helen

    2014-01-01

    an increasing number of UK music therapists work in forensic psychiatry providing treatment for mentally disordered offenders, there is a dearth of music therapists working in UK prisons. There is correspondingly little research into music therapy and women prisoners. This embedded QUAL(quan) mixed methods...... study investigates whether there is a change in the self-perception of women prisoners attending music therapy, and whether, if this is the case, they show an improved ability to engage with prison resettlement interventions. It also examines the impact of different treatment lengths on outcomes. 10...... that women prisoners attending music therapy experienced a change in self-perception. Engagement in music therapy translated into behavioural change outside the music therapy room. Participants showed an increase in self-confidence, self-esteem, self-efficacy, achievement motivation and a number of other...

  12. Music Therapy Through Irish Eyes: A Student Therapist’s Experience of Irish Traditional Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Armstrong

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines my personal experience of Irish traditional music and considers how it can inform music therapy practice. The use of Irish music may be particularly meaningful for some clients and help them connect with their culture and identity. Music therapy can also draw on specific features; including the melodic, rhythmic and social aspects of the music. The melody is prominent in Irish traditional music, and its expression is very important. The word draíoght (meaning "spell" or "enchantment" is used to describe this expressivity. Music therapists can aspire to capture this quality in the music they create with their clients. Often the rhythm of dance tunes elicits a physical response, so these tunes could be used in movement activities. The relaxed and informal style of playing in sessions provides an atmosphere where the music can grow out of the interactions between players. An attempt to create a similar atmosphere may facilitate creativity and spontaneity in group work. While this article only presents a few ways in which Irish traditional music can influence music therapy practice, it is hoped that readers will be inspired to seek their own ways of relating Irish music to music therapy.

  13. Biography, Identity, Improvisation, Sound: Intersections of Personal and Social Identity through Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilde, Rineke

    2016-01-01

    This essay addresses the relationship of improvisation and identity. Biographical research that was conducted by the author into professional musicians' lifelong learning showed the huge importance of improvisation for personal expression. Musically, the concept of "sound" appeared to serve as a strong metaphor for identity. In addition,…

  14. The Future of Music Therapy with Persons Suffering from Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents important research concerning music therapy with persons suffering from schizophrenia. It further presents the most Applied theories and models concerning clinical practice individual and in Groups with this population. It offers ideas as to why music therapy Works...... with persons suffering from schizophrenia. These ideas are divided into 1) possible positions of the music therapist, 2) the function of the music. Finally a discussion on the questions:´ Should music therapy focus on symptoms, resources - or both?´, is unfodled....

  15. The Future of Music Therapy with Persons Suffering from Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents important research concerning music therapy with persons suffering from schizophrenia. It further presents the most Applied theories and models concerning clinical practice individual and in Groups with this population. It offers ideas as to why music therapy Works...... with persons suffering from schizophrenia. These ideas are divided into 1) possible positions of the music therapist, 2) the function of the music. Finally a discussion on the questions:´ Should music therapy focus on symptoms, resources - or both?´, is unfodled....

  16. Active Music Therapy and Physical Improvements From Rehabilitation for Neurological Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogutek, Demian Leandro; Holmes, Jeffrey David; Grahn, Jessica Adrienne; Lutz, Sara G; Ready, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Context • A variety of rehabilitation-based interventions are currently available for individuals with physical impairments resulting from neurological conditions, including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech language pathology. Many individuals find participation in those therapies to be challenging. Alternative therapies have emerged as beneficial adjunctive treatments for individuals undergoing neurological rehabilitation, including music therapy (MT). Objective • The study intended to identify and collate systematically the evidence on MT interventions that address physical improvements in a rehabilitative setting. Design • The research team performed a literature review, searching electronic databases from their inception to April 2014, including Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, and ProQuest. The review included original studies that examined the use of active MT as an intervention that promotes physical improvements for adults >18 y of age. Articles were excluded if the studies focused primarily on psychosocial, emotional, or spiritual therapeutic goals. The review identified the studies' outcome measures for different populations and the MT approaches and interventions and obtained a general description of the clinical sessions, such as the frequency and duration of the therapy, interventions performed, sessions designs, populations, equipment used, and credentials of the therapists. Results • Eleven studies identified 2 major categories for the delivery of MT sessions: individual and group. One study included group sessions, and 10 studies included individual sessions. The studies included a total of 290 participants, 32 in the group MT, and 258 in the individual MT. The one study that used group therapy was based on active MT improvisation. For the individual therapy, 2 studies had investigated therapeutic instrument music performance and 8 used music-supported therapy. Conclusions • The findings of the review suggested that active MT

  17. Music Therapy and Eating Disorders- A Single Case Study about the Sound of Human Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Bauer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I reflect on a music therapy intervention realized many years ago, with a young woman who had the diagnosis of Bulimia Nervosa. The concepts to which I will refer are the concept of resource orientated psychotherapy and the Bernese concept of need adapted -and motivational attunement (Grawe, 1998; Grawe and Grawe-Gerber, 1999; Stucki and Grawe, 2007. I re-viewed one of my cases, Ms. H., following some of the ideas developed by the authors.  I discovered various moments of interest, which made me think in terms of a Need Adapted Music Therapy process. Therefore, in the presentation of the case, besides talking about the patient’s eating disorder I want to point out her basic needs and how she demanded for them to be met symbolically during shared improvisational moments with the music therapist. And even if the therapist did not have the mentioned concepts in her mind at the time, it seems as if patient and therapist met quite often in this kind of “silent space of needs”.

  18. Music-therapy analyzed through conceptual mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Rodolfo; de la Fuente, Rebeca

    2002-11-01

    Conceptual maps have been employed lately as a learning tool, as a modern study technique, and as a new way to understand intelligence, which allows for the development of a strong theoretical reference, in order to prove the research hypothesis. This paper presents a music-therapy analysis based on this tool to produce a conceptual mapping network, which ranges from magic through the rigor of the hard sciences.

  19. A Decade of Music Therapy in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Young Hwang

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the trends of research in music therapy through the analysis of studies from 1997 to 2005, and to make some directions for the future development of music therapy research in Korea. In this study, a total of 488 theses including master's and doctoral degrees, were analyzed by researchers' degree, publication resources, client population, research methods, and research objectives. The results of this study were listed as follows. First, the target theses were categorized as follows; 5 doctoral and 483 master's theses. In other respect, 276 were theses from music therapy programs and 212 were those from other programs. Second, regarding client population, 228 theses were about client with disabilities, 190 with non-disabilities, 29 with medical patients, and 41 others. Third, research methods of each thesis were categorized as 411 quantitative studies, 64 literature studies, 2 qualitative studies, and 11 quantitative-qualitative mixed studies. Fourth, in the target number of research, the field of emotion was the highest with 35%.

  20. Music Therapy and Medical Ethnomusicology: Distinctive and Connected

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Edwards

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A music therapist and an ethnomusicologist who is also qualified as a music therapist explore some of the ways in which music therapy and medical ethnomusicology might engage a dialogue that is helpful to expanding thinking and practice in both fields. We begin by describing music therapy and outlining some core concepts of therapeutic work. We then discuss ethnomusicology and reflect on the ways in which music therapy and ethnomusicology may complement one another in the field of medical ethnomusicology. We consider how an exploration of concepts informing cultural safety might be enacted in healthcare through the use of music and whether this might serve as a useful joint future enterprise between music therapists and medical ethnomusicologists. Finally we explain why we encourage medical ethnomusicologists to cease attempts to become applied therapeutic practitioners without further therapy skills training.

  1. "Music Therapy is Changing" and So Am I: Reconstructing the Identity of A Music Therapist

    OpenAIRE

    Yuji Igari

    2004-01-01

    Identity is an important aspect for music therapists, both professionally and personally. This is a story of how one music therapist reconstructed his professional and personal identity, as a social creature and a musician, through the encounter with new theories in music therapy.

  2. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, T; Porter, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. METHOD: We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therap...

  3. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, T.; Porter, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. METHOD: We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therap...

  4. Music Therapy and Autism: A View from Disability Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Straus

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy has positioned itself squarely within the medical model of disability, arguing that many sorts of human variability should be understood as illnesses, diseases, or other sorts of pathological medical conditions, and offering music as a source of normalization, remediation, and therapy toward a possible cure. But for many human conditions, including autism, cure is neither possible nor desirable. Instead of seeking to normalize autistic people, music therapy might instead ackno...

  5. The Bucket System – A computer mediated signaling system for group improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; Nilsson, Per Anders; Robair, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The Bucket System is a new system for computer-mediated ensemble improvisation, designed by improvisers for improvisers. Coming from a tradition of structured free ensemble improvisation practices (comprovisation), influenced by post-WW2 experimental music practices, it is a signaling system...... implemented with a set of McMillen QuNeo controllers as input and output interfaces, powered by custom software. It allows for a new kind of on-stage compositional/improvisation interaction....

  6. The Bucket System – A computer mediated signaling system for group improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; Nilsson, Per Anders; Robair, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The Bucket System is a new system for computer-mediated ensemble improvisation, designed by improvisers for improvisers. Coming from a tradition of structured free ensemble improvisation practices (comprovisation), influenced by post-WW2 experimental music practices, it is a signaling system...... implemented with a set of McMillen QuNeo controllers as input and output interfaces, powered by custom software. It allows for a new kind of on-stage compositional/improvisation interaction....

  7. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    practitioners in all three areas (and beyond) can demonstrate, through previous and current research, that the music therapy service and interventions they provide are relevant and effective (Ansdell, Pavicevic & Proctor, 2004; Gold, Voracek and Wigram, 2004; Vink, 2003; Wigram 2002). Documentation of research...... in lengthy and complex theses is seldom accessible to the practitioner working ‘at the coal-face’; and sometimes lacks clear direction on how the results are applicable in everyday therapy. For results to be implemented in clinical practice and disseminated to colleagues in related fields as well as senior...

  8. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    practitioners in all three areas (and beyond) can demonstrate, through previous and current research, that the music therapy service and interventions they provide are relevant and effective (Ansdell, Pavicevic & Proctor, 2004; Gold, Voracek and Wigram, 2004; Vink, 2003; Wigram 2002). Documentation of research...... in lengthy and complex theses is seldom accessible to the practitioner working ‘at the coal-face’; and sometimes lacks clear direction on how the results are applicable in everyday therapy. For results to be implemented in clinical practice and disseminated to colleagues in related fields as well as senior...

  9. Music Therapy and the Education of Students with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Music therapists regard music therapy as a valuable intervention for students with moderate to severe intellectual disability or multiple disabilities, but many special educators would regard it as a controversial practice, unsupported by empirical research. This paper reviews the goals and strategies used by music therapists working with students…

  10. Music Therapy and the Education of Students with Severe Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Music therapists regard music therapy as a valuable intervention for students with moderate to severe intellectual disability or multiple disabilities, but many special educators would regard it as a controversial practice, unsupported by empirical research. This paper reviews the goals and strategies used by music therapists working with students…

  11. Music therapy with children and adolescents in mainstream schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carr, Catherine; Wigram, Tony

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies existing research and clinical activity utilising music therapy with mainstream children, and a potential need for music therapy with this client group.  A systematic review was undertaken of music therapy literature relating to work with children in mainstream schools.  S...... intervention. The review demonstrates that further research is required if music therapy is to be considered an effective intervention to address the needs of mainstream schoolchildren.......This article identifies existing research and clinical activity utilising music therapy with mainstream children, and a potential need for music therapy with this client group.  A systematic review was undertaken of music therapy literature relating to work with children in mainstream schools...... to be addressed by the UK government. However further research, service-planning and reorganisation is required.  There is evidence that music therapy is being used with children in mainstream schools both at home and abroad, and both research and clinical reports suggest that music therapy is an effective...

  12. Music Therapy with Children: A Review of Clinical Utility and Application to Special Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaw, John David Andrew

    This paper reviews the effectiveness of music therapy in treating children with psychiatric and developmental problems. The clinical utility of music therapy is first evaluated by examining the foundational effects of music on affect and behavior. Next, the two broad approaches to music therapy, active and passive music therapy, are discussed.…

  13. Music as a complementary therapy in medical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Halim

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Music can act not only as a source of enjoyable sound that gives pleasant feeling, but also a source of healing. Music as a therapy has developed, supported by many researches conducted by experts in music, education and medicine. The impact of music therapy can be observed in many case studies, showing the positive effects of music to the betterment of human’s neuro-behavior, emotional and physical states. Some reasons to use music as a therapy are: toget audioanalgesic response, to focus attention, to reinforce learning, to enhance interpersonal relationships, and to promote mind-body health in the medical staff. The use of music to help patients with non-infectious diseases such as Alzheimer disease, autism, cancer, headache, heart disease and stroke are described along with experiments and case studies on these diseases. However controversies around music therapy occurred. Therefore, more experiments need to be taken in order to clear the controversies and to use music as a therapy in the present and future medical treatment. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 250-7.Keywords: therapeutic effect, music therapy, Alzheimer, autism, cancer, stroke

  14. Music and Health Promotion - In the Life of Music Therapy and Music Psychology Researchers: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Ole Bonde

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In August 2013, the Centre for Music and Health published its first anthology in English - ‘Musical Life Stories’. In the Anthology, 17 authors from 6 countries present their research on the influence of music in a lifelong health perspective. A unique feature of the book is a collection of “personal narratives” by the authors. 13 of the authors wrote a short, free-form narrative about the influence of music on their own identity and health from a life span perspective. This article describes a thematic analysis of the 13 narratives. I investigated the question “Do these music therapy/music psychology researchers use music for their own health in different ways than lay people?” The themes identified are related to the international research literature on music and identity, as well as being considered in relation to the author’s study of health themes in the musical autobiographies of music therapy students at Aalborg University (DK. The analysis reveals that the researchers’ appreciation and appropriation of music’s affordances are basically the same as those reported by music therapy students and lay people.

  15. Me Making Music, Music Making Me: Unexpected Travels in Music and Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer James Nicol

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Personal stories illuminate the particular while also hinting at the universal in its many variations. I offer my story because of its very ordinary and everyday nature. The particulars of this version evolved through reflection and conceptualization, that is, recalling personal anecdotes of lived experience and lived meaning as well as situating them in theory. This paper is organized developmentally and parallels three musically distinct phases in my life - from 8 until 18 years, 18 to 28 years, and 28 to 38 years. Each phase is characterized by personal and professional factors that, together, offer variations on the common theme of music as a lifelong endeavor. They also illustrate the two phrases, "me-making-music" and "music-making-me," which were coined in thinking about my experience with music as a lifelong endeavor.

  16. Developing clinical piano improvisation skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Teaching piano improvisation skills for use in clinical work relies on the development of a range of musical techniques and therapeutic methods that are combined and integrated. Simple musical styles of playing such as melody dialogues, two chord accompaniments, walking basses (tonal and atonal), 6...... in a new direction. Structure and lack of structure play a balanced role in the clinical process, and reflects the skills of the therapist to musically meet the needs of the client. This workshop will provide teaching and practice tools for the participants that are intended to sustain the creativity...

  17. Novice Collaboration in Solo and Accompaniment Improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how non-musicians engaged in a solo-accompaniment music improvisation relationship. Seven user teams interacted with two electronic music instruments integrated in two pen tablets. One instrument was a melody instrument and the other a chord instru-ment. The study was done...

  18. Music therapy for patients receiving spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pi-Chu; Lin, Man-Ling; Huang, Li-Ching; Hsu, Hsiu-Chu; Lin, Chiong-Chu

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of music therapy on anxiety, postoperative pain and physiological reactions to emotional and physical distress in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Surgery-related anxiety and pain are the greatest concern of surgical patients, especially for those undergoing major procedures. A quasi-experimental study design was conducted in a medical centre in Taiwan from April-July 2006. Sixty patients were recruited. The study group listened to selected music from the evening before surgery to the second day after surgery. The control group did not listen to music. Patients' levels of anxiety and pain were measured with visual analogue scales (VAS). Physiological measures, including heart rate, blood pressure and 24-hour urinalysis, were performed. The average age of the 60 patients was 62·18 (SD 18·76) years. The mean VAS score for degree of anxiety in the study group was 0·8-2·0, compared with 2·1-5·1 in the control group. The mean VAS score for degree of pain in the study group was 1·7-3·0, compared with 4·4-6·0 in the control group. The differences between the two groups in VAS scores for both anxiety (p = 0·018-0·001) and pain (p = 0·001) were statistically significant. One hour after surgery, the mean blood pressure was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (p = 0·014), but no significant differences were found between the two groups in urine cortisol (p = 0·145-0·495), norepinephrine (p = 0·228-0·626) or epinephrine values (p = 0·074-0·619). Music therapy has some positive effects on levels of anxiety and pain in patients undergoing spinal surgery. Complementary music therapy can alleviate pain and anxiety in patients before and after spinal surgery. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Rethinking Music Therapy From the Perspective of Bio-politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Miyake

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available

    In this article, I intend to reconsider music therapy process from the perspectives of bio-power and bio-politics by Foucault (1977, 1990, Agamben (1998, 1999 and Hardt & Negri (2000, 2004.

    My interest is in the political implications of music therapy. I examine discussions of music therapists on the first session of Edward that appeared in the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy (2003. In this article, a predilection to culturally acceptable musical expression is suggested. This musical integration might increase "possibilities of action" or might be a process of civilization (social conformity. When I position these arguments beside bio-politics, the discourses are exclusively discussed from the side of bios, or civilization. Little concern seems to be rendered from the perspective of zoe.

    Can the cultural inclusion through music therapy really help clients construct identities? To go beyond this, I introduce Hardt and Negris' concept of multitude. This concept seems to resonate with many recent music therapists' intentions. The new ways of music making and therapy that can respect the singularity of musical expressions. I suggest that common ideas might be more acceptable within this conceptual framework.

  20. Effects of Music Therapy on Mood in Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong Soo; Park, Yoon Ghil; Choi, Jung Hwa; Im, Sang-Hee; Jung, Kang Jae; Cha, Young A; Jung, Chul Oh; Yoon, Yeo Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of music therapy on depressive mood and anxiety in post-stroke patients and evaluate satisfaction levels of patients and caregivers. Materials and Methods Eighteen post-stroke patients, within six months of onset and mini mental status examination score of over 20, participated in this study. Patients were divided into music and control groups. The experimental group participated in the music therapy program for four weeks. Psychological status was evaluated...

  1. Caring for the Caregiver: The Use of Music and Music Therapy in Grief and Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewy, Joanne V., Ed.; Hara, Andrea Frisch, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    A collection of reflections on music therapy interventions provided as a part of the New York City Music Therapy Relief Project, sponsored by AMTA and the Recording Academy after September 11th, 2001. Edited by Joanne V. Loewy and Andrea Frisch Hara. Each chapter is written by a different therapist involved in the project.

  2. Five Improvisations: aspetti nonlineari di un’improvvisazione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirio Cosottini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to show how it is possible to enrich our knowledge of music through a linear and nonlinear analysis of sound. For this purpose, 1. I conduct a nonlinear analysis of a specific improvised music for winds and percussion, 2. I describe the sound characteristics of the invariants present in the improvisation, and 3. I finally show the relationship between linear and nonlinear properties of music.

  3. One Size Fits All, or What is Music Therapy Theory For?

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Rykov

    2005-01-01

    In this writing I explore theory in music therapy opinion, discourse, research and practice. To this end, I define theory and examine factors impinging on music therapy theory and the exchange of information within and beyond music therapy. I contend that we all have theories and that these ideologies-including beliefs, goals and ways of knowing music, music therapy and ourselves-must be shared. I question whether a grand, general theory for music therapy is possible. And I conclude that rath...

  4. Intersections between Music Education and Music Therapy: Education Reform, Arts Education, Exceptionality, and Policy at the Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Karen; Pasiali, Varvara

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a music teacher educator and a music therapy clinician and educator discuss special education policy and arts instruction at the district level. To illustrate the gulf between federal and local policies with regard to exceptional learners and arts instruction, we examine the intersections of music therapy and music education with…

  5. Music therapy in dementia care and neuro-rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2017-01-01

    medication. Music therapists,who play a role in staff training and supervision, and not only in direct music therapy practice, bring new important dimensions to how music therapy discipline is understood and how it is integrated in interdisciplinary work........ Then she turns her head away and wipes away a tear, clearly moved by his singing. In line with the increasing interest in applying music in medical care, the healing power of music has been recently highlighted in journals such as the Scientific American (Thompson & Schlaug 2015) and Musicae Scientiae...... (Croom 2015). In an article published in the journal Nature, the “surprising preservation of musical memory” in persons with Alzheimer’s Disease is explained (Jacobsen et al. 2015: 2439). The common goal for the dementia field is to advance and develop the culture of care. The music therapist may engage...

  6. Entries for "International Dictionary of Music Therapy"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    Lars Ole Bondehar skrevet eller bidraget til følgende opslag: analogy, graphic notation, health musicking, intensity profile, metaphor, musical pragmatics, musical semantics, musical syntax, narrative, Even Ruud, self-inquiry, vitality affects (dynamics), Tony Wigram...

  7. Parents' Voices Supporting Music Therapy within Pediatric Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Lindenfelser

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been my experience that parents are willing and open to express their voices to promote and advocate for music therapy services for their terminally ill children. By listening to parents' voices when providing care for terminally ill children, much can be done to ease the suffering of children and families at the end of life (Widger & Wilkins, 2004. My music therapy masters research at the University of Melbourne with Dr. Katrina McFerran will investigate bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child. This inquiry unfolded through my music therapy work with several children and families within hospice and palliative care. Parents have reflected that music therapy was a vital component in their child's care at the end of life. As one mom commented, "I don't care what anyone says, it has made a world of a difference." In order to further explore parents' experiences of music therapy, in-depth interviews will be conducted and transcripts will be analyzed using phenomenological strategies. It has been reported that parents find the interview process helpful in working through grief. They have also reported feeling an overall eagerness to share their child's story in order to provide input that might assist other families in the future (Widger & Wilkins, 2004. This article will describe pediatric palliative and hospice care, discuss parents as advocates for their terminally ill children, portray the use of music therapy within pediatrics, and share an example of music therapy with Jack.

  8. Action / Relationship / Communication: A Music Therapy Method for Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Negreiros-Vianna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The author states that music therapy has an important role in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia. The article describes the method Action/Relationship/ Communication (ARC, its theoretical basis, and the procedures in Music Therapy sessions. Examples of the clinical practice are provided.

  9. The clinical effects of music therapy in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Legrand, Susan B

    2006-08-01

    This study was to objectively assess the effect of music therapy on patients with advanced disease. Two hundred patients with chronic and/or advanced illnesses were prospectively evaluated. The effects of music therapy on these patients are reported. Visual analog scales, the Happy/Sad Faces Assessment Tool, and a behavior scale recorded pre- and post-music therapy scores on standardized data collection forms. A computerized database was used to collect and analyze the data. Utilizing the Wilcoxon signed rank test and a paired t test, music therapy improved anxiety, body movement, facial expression, mood, pain, shortness of breath, and verbalizations. Sessions with family members were also evaluated, and music therapy improved families' facial expressions, mood, and verbalizations. All improvements were statistically significant (Presponse to music therapy. Objective data were obtained for a large number of patients with advanced disease. This is a significant addition to the quantitative literature on music therapy in this unique patient population. Our results suggest that music therapy is invaluable in palliative medicine.

  10. An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William B.; Gfeller, Kate E.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    "An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice, Third Edition," provides a comprehensive overview of the practice of music therapy for the 21st century. It looks at where we have been, where we are today, and where we might be in the future. Combining sound pedagogy with recent research findings, this new edition has been updated and…

  11. Using Music Therapy Techniques To Treat Teacher Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, James R.; Bradley, Loretta J.; Parr, Gerald; Lan, William

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of music therapy techniques as an intervention for teacher burnout. Results of the study indicated that teachers who participated in school-based counseling groups, using music therapy techniques in conjunction with cognitive behavioral interventions, reported lower levels of burnout symptoms…

  12. Using Music Therapy Techniques To Treat Teacher Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheek, James R.; Bradley, Loretta J.; Parr, Gerald; Lan, William

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of music therapy techniques as an intervention for teacher burnout. Results of the study indicated that teachers who participated in school-based counseling groups, using music therapy techniques in conjunction with cognitive behavioral interventions, reported lower levels of burnout symptoms…

  13. An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, William B.; Gfeller, Kate E.; Thaut, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    "An Introduction to Music Therapy: Theory and Practice, Third Edition," provides a comprehensive overview of the practice of music therapy for the 21st century. It looks at where we have been, where we are today, and where we might be in the future. Combining sound pedagogy with recent research findings, this new edition has been updated and…

  14. Models of Music Therapy Intervention in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian L., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This completely revised 2nd edition edited by Brian L. Wilson, addresses both theoretical issues and practical applications of music therapy in educational settings. 17 chapters written by a variety of authors, each dealing with a different setting or issue. A valuable resource for demonstrating the efficacy of music therapy to school…

  15. Descriptive analysis of YouTube music therapy videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Lori F; Gregory, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a descriptive analysis of music therapy-related videos on YouTube. Preliminary searches using the keywords music therapy, music therapy session, and "music therapy session" resulted in listings of 5000, 767, and 59 videos respectively. The narrowed down listing of 59 videos was divided between two investigators and reviewed in order to determine their relationship to actual music therapy practice. A total of 32 videos were determined to be depictions of music therapy sessions. These videos were analyzed using a 16-item investigator-created rubric that examined both video specific information and therapy specific information. Results of the analysis indicated that audio and visual quality was adequate, while narrative descriptions and identification information were ineffective in the majority of the videos. The top 5 videos (based on the highest number of viewings in the sample) were selected for further analysis in order to investigate demonstration of the Professional Level of Practice Competencies set forth in the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) Professional Competencies (AMTA, 2008). Four of the five videos met basic competency criteria, with the quality of the fifth video precluding evaluation of content. Of particular interest is the fact that none of the videos included credentialing information. Results of this study suggest the need to consider ways to ensure accurate dissemination of music therapy-related information in the YouTube environment, ethical standards when posting music therapy session videos, and the possibility of creating AMTA standards for posting music therapy related video.

  16. Music and Dance Therapy in Nigeria: The Task before the Potential Nigerian Music Therapists in the Twenty First Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor M. A. Iyeh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of music and dance as a palliative measure, diversionary means, audio-analgesic and to control pain, is found in the musical practices of Nigerians. These different categories of the use of music can be put into two classifications: the use of music as medicine and the use of music as accompaniment to other healing rites. This paper examines: definitions of music therapy, the concept of illness in the contemporary Nigerian society, and music therapy and its social relevance. While highlighting the emerging issues before the Nigerian music/dance therapists, this paper ends by making some suggestions aimed at enhancing the present level of practice in Nigeria.

  17. Music Therapy and Autism: A View from Disability Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Straus

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy has positioned itself squarely within the medical model of disability, arguing that many sorts of human variability should be understood as illnesses, diseases, or other sorts of pathological medical conditions, and offering music as a source of normalization, remediation, and therapy toward a possible cure. But for many human conditions, including autism, cure is neither possible nor desirable. Instead of seeking to normalize autistic people, music therapy might instead acknowledge their distinctive sorts of musical interests and attitudes and offer to enhance their indigenous culture in an atmosphere of mutual respect. Instead of normalization and cure, music therapists might seek enhanced self-expression, knowledge, and pleasure through mutual music-making.

  18. Improvisation and Meditation in the Academy: Parallel Ordeals, Insights, and Openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article examines parallel challenges and avenues for progress I have observed in my efforts to introduce improvisation in classical music studies, and meditation in music and overall academic settings. Though both processes were once central in their respective knowledge traditions--improvisation in earlier eras of European classical music,…

  19. Improvisation and Meditation in the Academy: Parallel Ordeals, Insights, and Openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath, Edward

    2015-01-01

    This article examines parallel challenges and avenues for progress I have observed in my efforts to introduce improvisation in classical music studies, and meditation in music and overall academic settings. Though both processes were once central in their respective knowledge traditions--improvisation in earlier eras of European classical music,…

  20. Aesthetic Experience and Transformation in Music Therapy: A Critical Essay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgos Tsiris

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a critical essay which is based on Aigen’s (2007, p. 127 premise that "aesthetic experience involves and models processes of transformation that are necessary parts of successful music therapy." From his premise, three basic points emerge: aesthetic experience, transformation and successful music therapy. Based on these points I structure my essay in four parts. In the first part I do a brief retrospective review of the philosophical discourse of aesthetics, as this emerged in ancient Greece and later on in the eighteenth and nineteenth century in Western Europe. The second part concerns the nature of aesthetic experience and its relevance to music therapy where my focus is mainly concentrated on Aigen’s concept of music as a medium and its fundamental relation to Dewey’s ideas. The third part of the essay concerns transformation, its meaning and its role in therapy. I explore the concept of transformation as an intermediate stage between "death" and "rebirth" by drawing mainly from humanistic approaches and Rogers’ notion of "becoming a person." The connection of aesthetic experience with processes of transformation is revealed through their common inherent characteristics of change, growth, and tension. In the last part, I define what "successful" music therapy means by identifying its clinical aims. I also develop the importance of aesthetic experience and transformation in the framework of music-centered music therapy, while I conclude by suggesting its significance to the broader field of music therapy.

  1. The taste of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesz, Bruno; Trevisan, Marcos A; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Zarlino, one of the most important music theorists of the XVI century, described the minor consonances as 'sweet' (dolci) and 'soft' (soavi) (Zarlino 1558/1983, in On the Modes New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1983). Hector Berlioz, in his Treatise on Modern Instrumentation and Orchestration (London: Novello, 1855), speaks about the 'small acid-sweet voice' of the oboe. In line with this tradition of describing musical concepts in terms of taste words, recent empirical studies have found reliable associations between taste perception and low-level sound and musical parameters, like pitch and phonetic features. Here we investigated whether taste words elicited consistent musical representations by asking trained musicians to improvise on the basis of the four canonical taste words: sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. Our results showed that, even in free improvisation, taste words elicited very reliable and consistent musical patterns:'bitter' improvisations are low-pitched and legato (without interruption between notes), 'salty' improvisations are staccato (notes sharply detached from each other), 'sour' improvisations are high-pitched and dissonant, and 'sweet' improvisations are consonant, slow, and soft. Interestingly, projections of the improvisations of taste words to musical space (a vector space defined by relevant musical parameters) revealed that, in musical space, improvisations based on different taste words were nearly orthogonal or opposite. Decoding methods could classify binary choices of improvisations (i.e., identify the improvisation word from the melody) at performance of around 80%--well above chance. In a second experiment we investigated the mapping from perception of music to taste words. Fifty-seven non-musical experts listened to a fraction of the improvisations. We found that listeners classified with high performance the taste word which had elicited the improvisation. Our results, furthermore, show that associations of taste and music

  2. Apollo's gift: new aspects of neurologic music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Music listening and music making activities are powerful tools to engage multisensory and motor networks, induce changes within these networks, and foster links between distant, but functionally related brain regions with continued and life-long musical practice. These multimodal effects of music together with music's ability to tap into the emotion and reward system in the brain can be used to facilitate and enhance therapeutic approaches geared toward rehabilitating and restoring neurological dysfunctions and impairments of an acquired or congenital brain disorder. In this article, we review plastic changes in functional networks and structural components of the brain in response to short- and long-term music listening and music making activities. The specific influence of music on the developing brain is emphasized and possible transfer effects on emotional and cognitive processes are discussed. Furthermore, we present data on the potential of using musical tools and activities to support and facilitate neurorehabilitation. We will focus on interventions such as melodic intonation therapy and music-supported motor rehabilitation to showcase the effects of neurologic music therapies and discuss their underlying neural mechanisms.

  3. Music Therapy, Acquired Brain Injury and Interpersonal Communication Competencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) often affects physical, cognitive and psychological aspects of a person's functioning (Bateman, et al., 2010). Psychosocial problems associated with ABI may be the major challenge facing the rehabilitation process (Morton & Wehman, 1995) Consequently, interventions...... that music is a useful tool to stimulate interaction since musical interaction can be engaged at almost any cognitive and physical level and still be meaningful (Baker & Tamplin, 2006; Gilbertson, 2005; Hald, 2011). In addition, music therapy researchers specialising in ABI have found that: - Music therapy...

  4. Music as Therapy for the Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Fred

    1981-01-01

    The author cites these benefits of music to the visually handicapped student: physiological music activities enhance psychomotor coordination and promote relaxation and the ability to cope with frustration; participation in music events encourages interaction with sighted peers. Organizations providing music instructional materials for the…

  5. Microanalysis in Music Therapy: Introduction and Theoretical basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    video and audio materials, interviewing, and monitoring the client's heart rate, and also give examples of the practical application of microanalysis from their clinical experience, including work with clients who have psychiatric illness, autism and other conditions. Microanalyses in Music Therapy......In the context of music therapy, microanalysis is the detailed analysis of that short period of time during a music therapy session during which some kind of significant change takes place. These moments are crucial to the therapeutic process, and there is increasing interest amongst music...... therapists in understanding how they come about and whether there are ways of initiating them. The contributors to this groundbreaking book look at methods of micro process analyses used in a variety of music therapy contexts, both clinical and research-based. They outline their methods, which include using...

  6. Music therapy and Alzheimer's disease: Cognitive, psychological, and behavioural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Gallego, M; Gómez García, J

    2017-06-01

    Music therapy is one of the types of active ageing programmes which are offered to elderly people. The usefulness of this programme in the field of dementia is beginning to be recognised by the scientific community, since studies have reported physical, cognitive, and psychological benefits. Further studies detailing the changes resulting from the use of music therapy with Alzheimer patients are needed. Determine the clinical improvement profile of Alzheimer patients who have undergone music therapy. Forty-two patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease underwent music therapy for 6 weeks. The changes in results on the Mini-mental State Examination, Neuropsychiatric Inventory, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Barthel Index scores were studied. We also analysed whether or not these changes were influenced by the degree of dementia severity. Significant improvement was observed in memory, orientation, depression and anxiety (HAD scale) in both mild and moderate cases; in anxiety (NPI scale) in mild cases; and in delirium, hallucinations, agitation, irritability, and language disorders in the group with moderate Alzheimer disease. The effect on cognitive measures was appreciable after only 4 music therapy sessions. In the sample studied, music therapy improved some cognitive, psychological, and behavioural alterations in patients with Alzheimer disease. Combining music therapy with dance therapy to improve motor and functional impairment would be an interesting line of research. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of vibroacoustic stimulation in music therapy for palliative care patients: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Kotz, Svenja; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-12-15

    The present study aimed at examining whether methodological strategies from a previously implemented study design could be transferred to the evaluation of the psychological and physiological effects of a music therapy intervention working with vibroacoustic stimulation in palliative care. Nine participants suffering from advanced cancer took part in single-sessions of music therapy, lasting for 30 min. The live music therapy intervention utilized singing chair sounds and vocal improvisation. Visual analogue scales (VAS) were used to assess self-ratings of pain, relaxation, and well-being before and after each session. During the intervention, we continuously recorded heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of autonomic functioning. Data collection was complemented by a semi-structured interview to explore subjective experiences in more detail. Feasibility was defined as the ability to complete 80 % of the sessions in accordance with the study protocol. In 5 out of 9 sessions (55 %) it was possible to deliver the intervention and obtain all data as intended. VAS assessment was feasible, although graphical and statistical examination revealed only marginal mean changes between pre and post. HRV recordings were subject to artifacts. While HRV parameters differed between individuals, mean changes over time remained relatively constant. Interview data confirmed that the individual perception was very heterogeneous, ranging from "calming" to "overwhelming". The criterion of feasibility was not met in this study. Physiological data showed high attrition rates, most likely due to movement artifacts and reduced peripheral blood flow in some participants' extremities. Examination of individual-level trajectories revealed that vibroacoustic stimulation may have an impact on the autonomic response. However, the direction and mechanisms of effects needs to be further explored in future studies. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137 (July 4(th), 2014).

  8. Music Belongs to Everyone: Moments of Progress in Community Music Therapy with Musicians with Severe Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Tiszai

    2016-01-01

    The article describes novel and successful projects involving musicians with severe disabilities and adolescent music students. The Nádizumzuzum Orchestra consists of adult members of a nursing home. They are able to play music with a newly developed method called Consonate. The young musicians are students of the Zoltán Kodály Hungarian Choir School. This article presents the historical and socio-political background of the project to illustrate how music therapy grows from particular cultur...

  9. The influence of music and music therapy on pain-induced neuronal oscillations measured by magnetencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Metzner, Susanne; Rohlffs, Fiona; Lorenz, Jürgen; Engel, Andreas K

    2013-04-01

    Modern forms of music therapy are clinically established for various therapeutic or rehabilitative goals, especially in the treatment of chronic pain. However, little is known about the neuronal mechanisms that underlie pain modulation by music. Therefore, we attempted to characterize the effects of music therapy on pain perception by comparing the effects of 2 different therapeutic concepts, referred to as receptive and entrainment methods, on cortical activity recorded by magnetencephalography in combination with laser heat pain. Listening to preferred music within the receptive method yielded a significant reduction of pain ratings associated with a significant power reduction of delta-band activity in the cingulate gyrus, which suggests that participants displaced their focus of attention away from the pain stimulus. On the other hand, listening to self-composed "pain music" and "healing music" within the entrainment method exerted major effects on gamma-band activity in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices. Pain music, in contrast to healing music, increased pain ratings in parallel with an increase in gamma-band activity in somatosensory brain structures. In conclusion, our data suggest that the 2 music therapy approaches operationalized in this study seem to modulate pain perception through at least 2 different mechanisms, involving changes of activity in the delta and gamma bands at different stages of the pain processing system.

  10. Creative Pansori: A New Korean Approach in Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hyunju Kim; Wolfgang Mastnak

    2016-01-01

    Creative Pansori is a music therapeutic method especially designed for people receiving treatment for depression. Developed by the Korean music therapist Hyunju Kim, Creative Pansori was internationally presented at the World Congress for Music Therapy 2014 in Krems / Austria. Based on elements of the Korean UNESCO cultural heritage “Pansori”, Hyunju Kim created a clinical method integrating the patient’s self-expressive narration, the therapist’s drumming, and specific verbal and non-verbal ...

  11. Apollo’s gift: new aspects of neurologic music therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2015-01-01

    Music listening and music making activities are powerful tools to engage multisensory and motor networks, induce changes within these networks, and foster links between distant, but functionally related brain regions with continued and life-long musical practice. These multimodal effects of music together with music’s ability to tap into the emotion and reward system in the brain can be used to facilitate and enhance therapeutic approaches geared toward rehabilitating and restoring neurological dysfunctions and impairments of an acquired or congenital brain disorder. In this article, we review plastic changes in functional networks and structural components of the brain in response to short- and long-term music listening and music making activities. The specific influence of music on the developing brain is emphasized and possible transfer effects on emotional and cognitive processes are discussed. Furthermore, we present data on the potential of using musical tools and activities to support and facilitate neurorehabilitation. We will focus on interventions such as melodic intonation therapy and music-supported motor rehabilitation to showcase the effects of neurologic music therapies and discuss their underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25725918

  12. Body Movement Music Score – Introduction of a newly developed model for the analysis and description of body qualities, movement and music in music therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Agnieszka Skrzypek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background In music therapy, there is a range of music therapy concepts that, in addition to music, describe and analyse the body and movement. A model that equally examines the body, movement and music has not been developed. The Body Movement Music Score (BMMS is a newly developed and evaluated music therapy model for analysing body qualities, movement, playing style of musical instruments and music and to describe body behaviour and body expression, movement behaviour and movement expression, playing behaviour and musical expression in music therapy treatment. The basis for the development of the Body Movement Music Score was the evaluation of the analytical movement model Emotorics-Emotive Body Movement Mind Paradigm (Emotorics-EBMMP by Yona Shahar Levy for the analysis and description of the emotive-motor behaviour and movement expression of schizophrenic patients in music therapy treatment. Participants and procedure The application of the Body Movement Music Score is presented in a videotaped example from the music therapy treatment of one schizophrenic patient. Results The results of applying the Body Movement Music Score are presented in the form of Body Qualities I Analysis, Body Qualities II Analysis, Movement Analysis, Playing Style Analysis and Music Analysis Profiles. Conclusions The Body Movement Music Score has been developed and evaluated for the music therapy treatment of schizophrenic patients. For the development of the model, a proof of reliability is necessary to verify the reliability and limitations of the model in practice and show that the Body Movement Music Score could be used for both practical and clinical work, for documentation purposes and to impact research in music therapy.

  13. Gaku, Jutsu and Gei in Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuji Murai

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Needless to say, every therapist is trying hard to create his/her own professional personality in order to become a good therapist as a life long task. And the only premise for this task is to be a specialist of music therapy. However, aiming to be a good therapist varies depending on where each person puts his/her basis. For example, since my major work has been around schizophrenia, I have been trying to watch schizophrenic people closely and constantly. It might seem to be a natural task for a music therapist who deals with schizophrenia. But every time I have tried to summarize this disease, I have felt keenly how challenging this task is, even after a 30- year career. What on the earth is the cause of schizophrenia? It is said that the person's own make-up or hereditary predisposition might come into control, or the environmental factors might operate. But how do these things build up an individual to schizophrenia? How and when are the so-called "pre-personality tendencies" made, such as withdrawing or lack of self-confidence? This pattern of thoughts/behaviors that entice the person to the world of morbid experiences, has a close connection with the build-up of the disease. I personally believe that in this secret connection, there are some clues to the treatment. The work of discovering these clues is achieved by reviewing my own past clinical cases and other researchers' papers.

  14. Playing Together: Analyzing Jazz Improvisation to Improve the Multiframe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Powers

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Musical terminology is often used when discussing narrative forms of art. However, this is seldom accompanied by a systematic application of musical concepts for use by artists in these other mediums. Comics, in particular, parallel music in terms of the multiframe, where various individual elements are perceived at once. Therefore, a useful analogy can be made between the multiframe and thematic and vertical musical construction. The interactivity among jazz musicians during a collective improvisation exemplifies this musical simultaneity, and this article creates an analogy between improvisation and narrative comics, deriving several analytical tools that can be used to inform the creation of more meaningful multiframes.

  15. Using mixed methods in music therapy health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    »Mixed methods« (or »multiple methods») is a fairly new concept in music therapy research. It is inspired by recent methodological developments in social science, covering the interaction of quantitative and qualitative methods in one and the same research study. Mixed methods are not the same...... as the diversity or pluralism of methods advocated by many scholars who are critical towards the principles of evidence-based medicine. This article presents a concrete example of mixed methods in music therapy research: a psycho-social study of music therapy with female cancer survivors. Problems related...

  16. Music therapy as a non-pharmacological treatment for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Huan; Jiang, Guohui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. Currently, the primary methods of treatment include pharmacological and surgical treatment. However, approximately one-third of patients exhibit refractory epilepsy. Therefore, a novel approach to epilepsy treatment is necessary. Several studies have confirmed that music therapy can be effective at reducing seizures and epileptiform discharges, thus providing a new option for clinicians in the treatment of epilepsy. Although the underlying mechanism of music therapy is unknown, it may be related to resonance, mirror neurons, dopamine pathways and parasympathetic activation. Large sample, multicenter, randomized double-blind and more effectively designed studies are needed for future music therapy studies.

  17. The role of music therapy in palliative medicine and supportive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M

    2011-06-01

    This paper is designed to provide an introduction to music therapy in the continuum of cancer care. The value and use of music therapy during diagnosis and treatment, palliation, hospice, actively dying, and bereavement have been well documented. The music therapy process will be identified, research will be shared, and the importance and role of music therapy in palliative medicine and supportive cancer care discussed. Music therapy is invaluable throughout the entire cancer treatment process. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of group music therapy on quality of life for participants living with a severe and enduring mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grocke, Denise; Bloch, Sidney; Castle, David

    2009-01-01

    A 10-week group music therapy project was designed to determine whether music therapy influenced quality of life and social anxiety for people with a severe and enduring mental illness living in the community. Ten one-hour weekly sessions including song singing, song writing and improvisation, culminated in each group recording original song/s in a professional studio. The principal outcome measure was the WHOQOLBREF Quality of Life (QoL) Scale; other instruments used were the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Qualitative data were gathered through focus group interviews and an analysis of lyric themes. Statistically significant improvement was found on five items of the QoL Scale. There were no changes on the BSI indicating that QoL improvement was not mediated by symptomatic change. Themes from the focus groups were: music therapy gave joy and pleasure, working as a team was beneficial, participants were pleasantly surprised at their creativity, and they took pride in their song. An analysis of song lyrics resulted in 6 themes: a concern for the world, peace and the environment; living with mental illness is difficult; coping with mental illness requires strength; religion and spirituality are sources of support; living in the present is healing; and working as a team is enjoyable.

  19. Effects of active music therapy on the normal brain: fMRI based evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, Alfredo; Galandra, Caterina; Sibilla, Luisella; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gaeta, Francesca; Di Salle, Francesco; Moro, Luca; Carne, Irene; Bastianello, Stefano; Baldi, Maurizia; Imbriani, Marcello

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neurophysiological bases of Active Music Therapy (AMT) and its effects on the normal brain. Twelve right-handed, healthy, non-musician volunteers were recruited. The subjects underwent 2 AMT sessions based on the free sonorous-music improvisation using rhythmic and melodic instruments. After these sessions, each subject underwent 2 fMRI scan acquisitions while listening to a Syntonic (SP) and an A-Syntonic (AP) Production from the AMT sessions. A 3 T Discovery MR750 scanner with a 16-channel phased array head coil was used, and the image analysis was performed with Brain Voyager QX 2.8. The listening to SP vs AP excerpts mainly activated: (1) the right middle temporal gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus, (2) the right middle frontal gyrus and in particular the right precentral gyrus, (3) the bilateral precuneus, (4) the left superior temporal sulcus and (5) the left middle temporal gyrus. These results are consistent with the psychological bases of the AMT approach and with the activation of brain areas involved in memory and autobiographical processes, and also in personal or interpersonal significant experiences. Further studies are required to confirm these findings and to explain possible effects of AMT in clinical settings.

  20. Single case design studies in music therapy: resurrecting experimental evidence in small group and individual music therapy clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Hitchcock, John H

    2014-01-01

    The profession would benefit from greater and routine generation of causal evidence pertaining to the impact of music therapy interventions on client outcomes. One way to meet this goal is to revisit the use of Single Case Designs (SCDs) in clinical practice and research endeavors in music therapy. Given the appropriate setting and goals, this design can be accomplished with small sample sizes and it is often appropriate for studying music therapy interventions. In this article, we promote and discuss implementation of SCD studies in music therapy settings, review the meaning of internal study validity and by extension the notion of causality, and describe two of the most commonly used SCDs to demonstrate how they can help generate causal evidence to inform the field. In closing, we describe the need for replication and future meta-analysis of SCD studies completed in music therapy settings. SCD studies are both feasible and appropriate for use in music therapy clinical practice settings, particularly for testing effectiveness of interventions for individuals or small groups. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Singing in Individual Music Therapy with Persons suffering from Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2001-01-01

    Persons suffering from dementia progressively loose language skills, cognitive skills, memory function, perception, etc. Still they seem to respond to music and to interact in the music therapy setting. As part of a Ph.D.-research I have worked with 6 persons suffering from middle to last stages ...

  2. A joint research protocol for music therapy in dementia care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf

    2011-01-01

    Agitation is a major challenge within institutions of care for the elderly. The effect of music therapy on agitation and quality of live is investigated in a practice-relevant research combined with a Randomized Controlled Trial and multicentre research. The research protocol is developed...... in dialogue with practicing music therapists....

  3. Music therapy: proposed physiological mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, G R

    1997-03-01

    ALTHOUGH STILL CONTROVERSIAL, studies suggest that music therapy can be an effective nursing intervention in stressful situations for decreasing anxiety, blood pressure, and heart rate. This article (1) reviews research related to the effect of music on anxiety, blood pressure, and heart rate; (2) proposes a potential physiological framework for the effects of music; and (3) suggests clinical implications for the use of music therapy in acute- and chronic-care settings by clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). Findings from clinical research suggesting that music may facilitate a reduction in the stress response include decreased anxiety levels, decreased blood pressure and heart rate, and changes in plasma stress hormone levels. Findings from laboratory research using animal models, provide beginning, although speculative, support for a physiological framework of music's influence on the stress response. Music therapy may be useful in a wide range of clinical settings with patients experiencing health problems as diverse as hypertension/cardiovascular disease, migraine headaches, and gastrointestinal ulcers. Suggestions for development of a music therapy procedure and for areas in need of additional research are offered.

  4. Music Therapy with Bereaved Teenagers: A Mixed Methods Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina; Roberts, Melina; O'Grady, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative investigations have indicated that music therapy groups may be beneficial for bereaved teenagers. The existing relationship between young people and music serves as a platform for connectedness and emotional expression that is utilised within a therapeutic, support group format. This investigation confirms this suggestion through…

  5. Music Therapy in Special Education: Where Are We Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickson, Daphne J.; McFerran, Katrina

    2007-01-01

    Research is an essential aspect of the music therapy profession. Practice is grounded in theoretical frameworks based on research studies and the evaluation of clinical interventions. Early research drew heavily on behavioural principles, observing measurable change in response to musical interventions. As the profession gained stature, music…

  6. Clinical Guide to Music Therapy in Physical Rehabilitation Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Wong, MT-BC presents tools and information designed to arm the entry-level music therapist (or an experienced MT-BC new to rehabilitation settings) with basic knowledge and materials to develop or work in a music therapy program treating people with stroke, brain injury, and those who are ventilator dependent. Ms. Wong offers goals and…

  7. Music Therapy with Bereaved Teenagers: A Mixed Methods Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina; Roberts, Melina; O'Grady, Lucy

    2010-01-01

    Qualitative investigations have indicated that music therapy groups may be beneficial for bereaved teenagers. The existing relationship between young people and music serves as a platform for connectedness and emotional expression that is utilised within a therapeutic, support group format. This investigation confirms this suggestion through…

  8. Measuring Supportive Music and Imagery Interventions: The Development of the Music Therapy Self-Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anthony; Burns, Debra S; Perkins, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated modest benefits from music-based interventions, specifically music and imagery interventions, during cancer care. However, little attention has been paid to measuring the benefits of music-based interventions using measurement instruments specifically designed to account for the multidimensional nature of music-imagery experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the development of, and psychometrically evaluate, the Music Therapy Self-Rating Scale (MTSRS) as a measure for cancer patients engaged in supportive music and imagery interventions. An exploratory factor analysis using baseline data from 76 patients who consented to participate in a music-based intervention study during chemotherapy. Factor analysis of 14 items revealed four domains: Awareness of Body, Emotionally Focused, Personal Resources, and Treatment Specific. Internal reliability was excellent (Cronbach alphas ranging from 0.75 to 0.88) and construct and divergent-discriminant validity supported. The MTSRS is a psychometrically sound, brief instrument that captures essential elements of patient experience during music and imagery interventions. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A joint behavioral and emotive analysis of synchrony in music therapy of children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Venuti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Synchrony is an essential component of interactive exchanges. In mother-infant interaction, synchrony underlies reciprocity and emotive regulation. A severe lack of synchrony is indeed a core issue within the communication and interaction deficit that characterizes autism spectrum disorders (ASD in accordance with the DSM-5 classification. Based on emerging evidence that music therapy can improve the communication and regulation ability in children with ASD, we aim to verify quantitatively whether: 1 children with ASD improve synchrony with their therapist during music therapy sessions, and 2 this ability persists in different structured contexts. Participants and procedure Twenty-five children, aged from 4 to 6 years (M = 57.80, SD = 16.70, with an autistic disorder diagnosis based on DSM IV-TR and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS, participated in the study. An observational tool for coding behaviors and emotive states of synchrony (Child Behavioral and Emotional status Code [CBEC] and Adult Behavioral and Emotional status Code [ABEC] was applied in video recorded sessions of improvisational music therapy (IMT for the subject-therapist pair. For each subject, we considered the 20 central minutes of the first, tenth and twentieth session of IMT. To verify the persistence of effect in a different context with a different adult, we administered and coded the interactive ADOS section (anticipation of a routine with objects applied after session 20 of therapy. Results During the IMT cycle, the amount of synchronic activity increases, with a significant difference from Session 1 to Session 20 in behavioral synchrony and emotional attunement. Also, the increase of synchrony is confirmed at the end of the therapy cycle as measured by an interactive ADOS section. Conclusions Synchrony is an effective indicator of efficacy for music therapy in children with ASD, in particular to evaluate the expansion of positive emotive

  10. L’appréciation esthétique de l’improvisation

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    Clément Canonne

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I defend the idea that the way we listen to improvisation depends on the very ontological nature of improvisation. More specifically, I argue that improvisation calls for an intentionalist listening, by which the listener follows the improvisation as the creative process that it is. This listening attitude is made possible by the heightening of musical experience inherent to the improvisational situation and by the empathy linking the audience to the improvisers – both the consequences of improvisation’s ontological and temporal structure.

  11. Music therapy in rehabilitation: a narrative review (2004-2014

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    María del Carmen Gómez Álvaro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available During this decade, there has been an increased on research about music therapy interventions as a therapeutic tool.  Narrative reviews that have been published till nowadays show the implications and effectiveness of interventions based on music therapy as a rehabilitative intervention strategy. However, due to their narrowness they lack of a general perspective of the construct. Moreover, these reviews do not include in their criteria the search term “music therapy”, thereby excluding studies that support the effectiveness of music therapy in rehabilitation. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to solve this issue including and reviewing findings of published research that have been excluded from previous reviews over the last ten years. There were two research questions: For which disorders is music therapy more effective? What are the benefits of music therapy in rehabilitation? In order to answer these questions, we conducted a literature review in academic databases, such as Academic Search Complete, Medline, and Science Direct, including the search term "music therapy".   Furthermore, papers fulfilling inclusion criteria, such as empirical studies, written in English, which used music as therapeutic stimulation were reviewed. We found twenty-four studies in which we analyzed the participants (experimental vs. control, the results, and limitations. We conclude, cautiously, that music therapy may help in the rehabilitation of cognitive, motor, and sensory functions of brain damage, the rehabilitation of schizophrenia and primary depression; and amelioration of neurodegenerative disorders, autism spectrum disorders, substance abuse and other pathologies. We recommend overcoming the methodological limitations of these studies and the suitability of cross-cultural studies.

  12. Music therapy CD creation for initial pediatric radiation therapy: a mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Philippa; O'Callaghan, Clare; Wheeler, Greg; Grocke, Denise

    2010-01-01

    A mixed methods research design was used to investigate the effects of a music therapy CD (MTCD) creation intervention on pediatric oncology patients' distress and coping during their first radiation therapy treatment. The music therapy method involved children creating a music CD using interactive computer-based music software, which was "remixed" by the music therapist-researcher to extend the musical material. Eleven pediatric radiation therapy outpatients aged 6 to 13 years were randomly assigned to either an experimental group, in which they could create a music CD prior to their initial treatment to listen to during radiation therapy, or to a standard care group. Quantitative and qualitative analyses generated multiple perceptions from the pediatric patients, parents, radiation therapy staff, and music therapist-researcher. Ratings of distress during initial radiation therapy treatment were low for all children. The comparison between the two groups found that 67% of the children in the standard care group used social withdrawal as a coping strategy, compared to 0% of the children in the music therapy group; this trend approached significance (p = 0.076). MTCD creation was a fun, engaging, and developmentally appropriate intervention for pediatric patients, which offered a positive experience and aided their use of effective coping strategies to meet the demands of their initial radiation therapy treatment.

  13. Nonverbal Communication, Music Therapy, and Autism: A Review of Literature and Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a review of nonverbal literature relating to therapy, music, autism, and music therapy. Included is a case study of a woman with autism who was nonverbal. The case highlights and analyzes behaviors contextually. Interpretations of communication through the music therapy, musical interactions, and the rapport that developed…

  14. Nonverbal Communication, Music Therapy, and Autism: A Review of Literature and Case Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a review of nonverbal literature relating to therapy, music, autism, and music therapy. Included is a case study of a woman with autism who was nonverbal. The case highlights and analyzes behaviors contextually. Interpretations of communication through the music therapy, musical interactions, and the rapport that developed…

  15. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PLAY THERAPY AND MUSICAL THERAPY IN REDUCING THE HOSPITALIZATION STRESS

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    Yuni Sufyanti Arief

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospitalization in pediatric patients may caused an anxiety and stress in all age levels. Several techniques can be applied to reduced hospitalization stress in children, such as playing therapy and music therapy. The objective of this study was to analyze the difference of effectiveness between both therapies in reducing the hospitalization stress in 4-6 years old children. Method: A quasy-experimental pre-posttest design was used in this study. There were 18 respondents, divided into three groups, i.e. group one receiving playing therapy, group two receiving music therapy and the last group as control group. Data were collected by using observation sheet before and after intervention to recognize the hospitalization stress. Data were analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level of α<0.05. Result: Result showed that playing therapy and music therapy had significant effect to reduce the hospitalization stress with p=0.027 for play therapy, p=0.024 for musical therapy, and p=0.068 for control. Mann Whitney U Test revealed that there were no difference in the effectiveness of play therapy and musical therapy in reducing the hospitalization stress with p=0.009 for play therapy and control group, p=0.012 for music therapy and control group, and p=0.684 for playing therapy and musical therapy. Discussion: It can be concluded that play therapy and musical therapy are equally effective to reduce the hospitalization stress in children. It’s recommended for nurses in pediatric ward to do  playg therapy and musical therapy periodically.

  16. Music therapy in the context of palliative care in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Rebecca

    2010-10-01

    There has been much written to support music therapy as an adjunct in managing pain and anxiety in palliative care patients in Western societies, but little written on its use in developing countries. In light of increasing numbers of terminally ill patients in Tanzania owing to HIV/AIDS and cancer, limited access to opioids, and a growing interest in palliative care support, this study looks at the application of music in this context. The study reviews the history and principles of therapeutic music and outlines its role in palliative care. A qualitative study was conducted by questionnaire of 17 professionals involved in home-based palliative care in Tanzania. Findings include beliefs about the power of music, how music is being used to bring comfort to the dying patient, and the most important aspects of helpful music to many Tanzanian palliative care patients. Music can powerfully affect body, mind and spirit. It is vocal music, which is an accepted therapeutic music tool used to bring comfort to the palliative care patient and their family members. Finally, music is an active and participatory activity in Tanzanian culture, even for the dying.

  17. In Visible Hands: The Matter and Making of Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the topics of matter and making in music therapy through embodied reflexive retrospection with six music therapists. The participants were asked to re-enact a hand position from their memory of a significant moment in therapy. In individual research meetings, they shared their thoughts about this moment while the researcher made a body cast of their chosen hand pose. A thematic analysis of the participant narratives, the hand casts, and existing literature was used to generate the following themes: The biographic hand, The body, space, place, and time, The plural hand, Matter of the hand, and The method in hand. The research procedure facilitated an exploration of epistemological, ontological, and phenomenological perspectives in understanding music therapy practitioner experiences. The study highlights the inseparability and multiplicity of matter, making, and narrating music therapy that transcends context or therapeutic approach.

  18. Development and efficacy of music therapy techniques within palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements-Cortés, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Music therapy is increasingly becoming an intervention used in palliative care settings around the globe. While the specialty of palliative care music therapy is relatively young having emerged in the late 1980s, there is a strong and growing body of evidence demonstrating its efficacy in assisting a variety of issues common at end-of-life. There are multiple music therapy techniques that are implemented with clients in palliative care and they can be categorized in four broad areas: receptive, creative, recreative and combined. These techniques will be presented with respect to their development by clinicians as supported by the descriptive and research literature. Information is also provided on the use of music therapy in facilitating the grieving and bereavement process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Music therapy as psychospiritual process in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, D

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for understanding how music therapy elicits and supports depth experiences in palliative care. The author explores music therapy as a containing or sacred space in which ventures into the realm of psychospiritual awareness may safely occur. The ultimate goal is to facilitate the process of connecting to that which is psychologically and spiritually significant for the patient, thereby transforming experiences of suffering into those of meaning.

  20. Parents' Voices Supporting Music Therapy within Pediatric Palliative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kathryn Lindenfelser

    2005-01-01

    It has been my experience that parents are willing and open to express their voices to promote and advocate for music therapy services for their terminally ill children. By listening to parents' voices when providing care for terminally ill children, much can be done to ease the suffering of children and families at the end of life (Widger & Wilkins, 2004). My music therapy masters research at the University of Melbourne with Dr. Katrina McFerran will investigate bereaved parents' experie...

  1. Aesthetic Experience and Transformation in Music Therapy: A Critical Essay

    OpenAIRE

    Giorgos Tsiris

    2008-01-01

    The present paper is a critical essay which is based on Aigen’s (2007, p. 127) premise that "aesthetic experience involves and models processes of transformation that are necessary parts of successful music therapy." From his premise, three basic points emerge: aesthetic experience, transformation and successful music therapy. Based on these points I structure my essay in four parts. In the first part I do a brief retrospective review of the philosophical discourse of aesthetics, as this emer...

  2. Directive and Non-Directive Movement in Child Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krason, Katarzyna; Szafraniec, Grazyna

    1999-01-01

    Presents a new authorship method of child therapy based on visualization through motion. Maintains that this method stimulates motor development and musical receptiveness, and promotes personality development. Suggests that improvised movement to music facilitates the projection mechanism and that directed movement starts the channeling phase.…

  3. Does Music Therapy Improve Anxiety and Depression in Alzheimer's Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rubia Ortí, José Enrique; García-Pardo, María Pilar; Cabañés Iranzo, Carmen; Cerón Madrigal, José Joaquin; Castillo, Sandra Sancho; Julián Rochina, Mariano; Prado Gascó, Vicente Javier

    2017-07-17

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the implementation of a short protocol of music therapy as a tool to reduce stress and improve the emotional state in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. A sample of 25 patients with mild Alzheimer's received therapy based on the application of a music therapy session lasting 60 min. Before and after the therapy, patient saliva was collected to quantify the level of salivary cortisol using the Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) immunoassay technique and a questionnaire was completed to measure anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). The results show that the application of this therapy lowers the level of stress and decreases significantly depression and anxiety, establishing a linear correlation between the variation of these variables and the variation of cortisol. A short protocol of music therapy can be an alternative medicine to improve emotional variables in Alzheimer patients.

  4. The Grieg Effect – On the Contextualized Effects of Music in Music Therapy

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    Brynjulf Stige

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I examine the group Upbeat's encounter with Grieg and his music and this story is used as an exemplar to illuminate themes of broader relevance concerning the role of music in music therapy. The contextual perspective taken is situated in relation to Wittgenstein's (1953/1967 discussion of meaning as use, De Nora's (2000 discussion of how various music(s may afford certain things through appropriation, and Stige's (2002 discussion of health musicing. After a critical excursion to the discourse on the Mozart Effect and a brief discussion of various assumptions on the role of music in music therapy, the centrepiece of the essay is developed as the story of Upbeat's encounter with Grieg. This story is interpreted in relation to the involved interplay of human protomusicality, personal and cultural history, and in the concluding section of the essay the contextual perspective taken is substantiated through a summarized description of the proposed Grieg Effect as well as through a clarification of the concept of context itself.

  5. Effectiveness of Music Therapy in Alzheimer Patients: Systematic Review

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    Neslihan Lok

    Full Text Available The incidence of Alzheimers disease increases with advancing age. This increase cause significant economic and emotional burden on family and national health care system which makes Alzheimers disease a national issue to be considered. Music therapy could be an alternative treatment approach in Alzheimer's disease. Especially in the second stage of Alzheimers disease, growth and expansion of amyloid plaques results in anger and aggression among patients. Calming effects of music might be beneficial in management of patients during this period. This study is a systematic review of researches conducted to determine the effects of music therapy in Alzheimer's diseases. In sum results have supported possible positive effects of music therapy on Alzheimer patients. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(3.000: 266-274

  6. The Field of Play in music therapy education

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    Debbie Carroll

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I illustrate how the Field of Play model, developed by Carolyn Kenny (1989 as a guide for the theory and practice of music therapy, can also serve as a model for educational practice. Descriptions of each of the fields that comprise this model - aesthetic, musical space, field of play, ritual, a particular state of consciousness, power and creative process - provide a springboard for reflecting on my role as a music therapy educator in sowing a Field of Play with my students. I also discuss some of the theoretical and philosophical ideas that inform my work. I conclude with some ‘food’ for thought, including a list of questions for reflection aimed at inspiring you, the reader, to begin, or continue, reflecting on the assumptions, theories and values that inform your work as music therapy clinician, educator and/or researcher.

  7. Music therapy as part of the alternative-complementary therapy in cancer patients in hospital

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    Efstratios Athanassakis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the modern health problems of people living in developed countries. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches to cancer patients is constantly updated with new data. Aim: The aim of the present study was to review the international literature referred to the application of music therapy in the treatment for pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Method and materials: The method of this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature on MEDLINE (2000-2010 database and using as key words music, music therapy, alternative-complementary therapy, cancer, children. Results: Music therapy, the last few years, seems to be one of the forms of alternative-complementary therapy for patients treated for cancer. Music therapy is applied as part of complementary therapy in pediatric and adult patients with cancer. Complementary-alternative methods are non-invasive, non-toxic, cheap, safe and can be easily used by the patients themselves. Primarily, the music therapy aimed to the reduction of the emotional trauma and the feeling of the pain during the process of the treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, other painful procedures but also in the whole patients life. Conclusions: Scientific bibliographic databases research concerning the music therapy in patients with cancer seem encouraging, especially in children. Nevertheless, the further study of the role of the music during hospitalization in the outcome of the treatment is essential

  8. Foreword by the president of the European Music Therapy Confederation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2016-01-01

    On behalf of the European Music Therapy Confederation, I want to address my sincere appreciation to the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy (NJMT) and to the Viennese EMTC2016 Organising Committee for this printed collection of scientific conference abstracts that you have in your hands (or the elect......On behalf of the European Music Therapy Confederation, I want to address my sincere appreciation to the Nordic Journal of Music Therapy (NJMT) and to the Viennese EMTC2016 Organising Committee for this printed collection of scientific conference abstracts that you have in your hands (or...... the electronic version on your device). Thanks to the collaboration between the NJMT and the EMTC2016 Local Organising Committee it has been possible – for the first time in the history of European Music Therapy Congresses – to present refereed conference proceedings in affiliation with a well-established, high...... and scientific work in progress as well as final results and theoretical ideas. This is how we develop a rich field embracing a variety of perspectives in the understanding of the use of music in human life. In addition, this is how we open up to other fields and encourage interdisciplinarity. I am impressed...

  9. Identity and self-esteem in the context of music and music therapy: a review

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    Rafał Lawendowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in music therapy offers opportunities for the participants to engage in identity work – to define, develop, or reflect on their understanding of themselves, and to cultivate new expressions of self-identity. The music therapy involves breaking away from the reality and engaging in intense interactions, which in turn facilitate relationships between participants. Patients tend to be more open to new kinds of experiences and explore new ways of perceiving themselves and others. Their self-understanding develops and leads to self-acceptance and personal growth. Although questions concerning the relationship between music therapy and human identity have been asked since antiquity, many issues have still not been resolved. As of today, there are no publications that systematically review the current state of knowledge. This article aims to review the available empirical evidence in order to identify the relationship between music therapy processes, identity, and specific individual identity variables, such as self-esteem. Also, it attempts to discover how self-regulatory behavior relates to both general music instruction and interventions designed to enhance self-esteem and identity. We searched PubMed and PsycInfo up to 13.09.2016. Screening, eligibility, and data extraction were done by one reviewer. Out of 31 relevant records, 20 were assessed for eligibility, and 14 were included. There was marked variation across included studies regarding type of MT approach used, type of participants, settings, outcomes and measurement tools. A qualitative analysis showed that expression of emotion and a sense of agency (which is considered valuable for both the client and those around them is a way to provide one’s damaged Self with healthful aspects of personality, thus improving one’s self-esteem. This review provides insight into the effects of music therapy processes, specifically self-knowledge (music identity and self

  10. Say Who You Are, Play Who You Are: Improvisation, Pedagogy, and Youth on the Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willox, Ashlee Cunsolo; Heble, Ajay; Jackson, Rob; Walker, Melissa; Waterman, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a research that emerges from a set of community-based outreach activities associated with a large-scale, interdisciplinary project, Improvisation, Community, and Social Practice (ICASP), which focuses on the social and pedagogical implications of improvised musical practices. Working from the premise that musical improvisation…

  11. The Role of the EMTC for development and recognition of the music therapy profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Lerner, Adrienne; Suvini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of music therapy in Europe is reflected in the increasing number of trained professionals, music therapy positions and research publications. A development of the discipline implies increased requirements regarding the skills and competences of music therapy clinicians...... in relation to the music therapy profession throughout the European countries. With this as a starting point, as well as our own engagement in the European Music Therapy Confederation (EMTC) for more than a decade, we will explore the innate complexity of the profession and formulate our views for the future...... directions of the music therapy profession in Europe and the potential role of the EMTC in this development....

  12. Music Therapy, Social Policy and Ecological Models: A Located Example of Music in Australian Schools

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    Alexander Hew Dale Crooke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While music therapy courses rarely cover the finer points of social policy, a basic knowledge of how this system of governance works can be highly beneficial for those wanting to maximise their presence and impact in a given field. Taking an ecological approach, this article presents how music therapy as a discipline and practise can be seen as located within a structure of policy. Further, it illustrates how understanding this structure can help practitioners and researchers capitalise on the opportunities they provide, and work around the barriers they impose. It does this by providing a background of the ecological model approach, and discussing how this approach can be useful for thinking about the relationship between music therapy and social policy. It then uses the policy situation surrounding music in Australian schools to give a grounded example of how understanding this situation can help position music therapy to meet key policy goals at national and localised levels. It is hoped that increased awareness, and an example of how it can be applied, will empower music therapists to learn about policies in their specific areas, and capitalise on the opportunities they provide.

  13. Effects of music therapy on drug therapy of adult psychiatric outpatients: A pilot randomised controlled study

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    Mario Degli Stefani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27 with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia, F25 (schizoaffective disorders, F31 (bipolar affective disorder, F32 (depressive episode and F60 (specific personality disorders were randomised to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of two hours or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilisers and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage relative to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilisers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusions: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care is effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discuss the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centred perspective were also discussed.

  14. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients' engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed.

  15. Effects of Music Therapy on Drug Therapy of Adult Psychiatric Outpatients: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Stefani, Mario; Biasutti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Framed in the patients’ engagement perspective, the current study aims to determine the effects of group music therapy in addition to drug care in comparison with drug care in addition to other non-expressive group activities in the treatment of psychiatric outpatients. Method: Participants (n = 27) with ICD-10 diagnoses of F20 (schizophrenia), F25 (schizoaffective disorders), F31 (bipolar affective disorder), F32 (depressive episode), and F60 (specific personality disorders) were randomized to receive group music therapy plus standard care (48 weekly sessions of 2 h) or standard care only. The clinical measures included dosages of neuroleptics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Results: The participants who received group music therapy demonstrated greater improvement in drug dosage with respect to neuroleptics than those who did not receive group music therapy. Antidepressants had an increment for both groups that was significant only for the control group. Benzodiazepines and mood stabilizers did not show any significant change in either group. Conclusion: Group music therapy combined with standard drug care was effective for controlling neuroleptic drug dosages in adult psychiatric outpatients who received group music therapy. We discussed the likely applications of group music therapy in psychiatry and the possible contribution of music therapy in improving the psychopathological condition of adult outpatients. In addition, the implications for the patient-centered perspective were also discussed. PMID:27774073

  16. Music therapy for end-of-life care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Dileo, Cheryl

    2010-01-20

    Music therapy in end-of-life care aims to improve a person's quality of life by helping relieve symptoms, addressing psychological needs, offering support, facilitating communication, and meeting spiritual needs. In addition, music therapists assist family and caregivers with coping, communication, and grief/bereavement. To examine effects of music therapy with standard care versus standard care alone or standard care combined with other therapies on psychological, physiological, and social responses in end-of-life care. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PSYCINFO, LILACS, CancerLit, Science Citation Index, www.musictherapyworld.de, CAIRSS for Music, Proquest Digital Dissertations, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials, and the National Research Register to September 2009. We handsearched music therapy journals and reference lists, and contacted experts to identify unpublished manuscripts. There was no language restriction. We included all randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that compared music interventions and standard care with standard care alone or combined with other therapies in any care setting with a diagnosis of advanced life-limiting illness being treated with palliative intent and with a life expectancy of less than two years. Data were extracted, and methodological quality was assessed, independently by review authors. Additional information was sought from study authors when necessary. Results are presented using weighted mean differences for outcomes measured by the same scale and standardized mean differences for outcomes measured by different scales. Posttest scores were used. In cases of statistically significant baseline difference, we used change scores. Five studies (175 participants) were included. There is insufficient evidence of high quality to support the effect of music therapy on quality of life of people in end-of-life care. Given the limited number of studies and small sample sizes, more research is

  17. Experiences in the Five Dimensions of Performance in Music Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Jampel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Constructing a procedure to assess, evaluate and treat psychopathology as it relates to the process of performing music addresses a link that is missing in contemporary music therapy practice and research. Conversely, no current explanation exists on how performing music can consistently promote health and human wellbeing. This article attempts to do both. It will apply the research findings of a study conducted with ten adult mental health consumers in 2004 and examine how the procedures developed in that study were then employed in a music psychotherapy group conducted over the course of a two and a half year period. That group process yielded a textured description of the meaning that performing held for the participants and how their relationship to performing music changed their lives. The data will then be interpreted through a system of analysis that examines the performance process through a five dimensional system. A case study will be presented to illustrate this process.

  18. Application of receptive music therapy in internal medicine and cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Marconato

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of receptive music therapy in clinical practice. METHODS: Receptive music therapy was individually applied via musical auditions, including five stages: musical stimulation, sensation, situation, reflection, and behavioral alteration. Following anamnesis and obtainment of consent, patients answered a first questionnaire on health risk evaluation (Q1, and after participating in 16 weekly music therapy sessions, answered a second one (Q2. RESULTS: Two men and 8 women, aged above 18 years, referred to us due to symptoms of stress, emotional suffering, and the need to change lifestyles (health risk behavior were studied between August 1998 and December 1999. Comparison between answers to Q1 and Q2, showed a trend (P=0.059 for reduction of ingestion of cholesterol-rich foods and for increased prospects in life with a tendency towards improvement, and also of increased intake of fiber-rich food (55.6%, increased levels of personal satisfaction (44.5%, and decreased levels of stress (66.7%. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated decreased stress levels and increased personal satisfaction, higher consumption of fiber-rich food, lower cholesterol intake, and a better perspective on life, suggesting that receptive music therapy may be applied in clinical practice as an auxiliary therapeutic intervention for the treatment of behavioral health risks.

  19. Exploring the benefits of music therapy on patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in a Turkish university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Salur, Musa Özgür

    2016-01-01

    Although music therapy is an evidence-based and effective therapy method in clinical psychiatric settings all around the world, the literature on music therapy use in Turkish clinical settings is extremely limited. This study aims to show the clinical benefits of music therapy in a Turkish university hospital, to enable further research and promote the recognition of music therapy as a valid clinical method in this country. A study was conducted within a clinical setting with 6...

  20. WORLD-WIDE PERSPECTIVES ON IMPROVISATIONAL MUSIC THERAPY FROM THE TIME-A PROJECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottfried, Tali; Thompson, Grace; Geretsegger, Monika

    is useful with children with ASD (Oldfield, 2006). The clinical examples also examined the range of characteristics of the children in the study, including those who are: high functioning and verbal; low functioning and non-verbal; younger (4 years old); older (7 years old); and receiving IMT in natural...

  1. Music Therapy with Traumatized Refugees in a Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap Orth

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available As music therapists now deal more often with traumatized refugees, and the demand for documentation, research, and a methodical description has grown, in this article I would like to make a contribution to the development of a methodology in music therapy with traumatized refugees. Various methods used by music therapists in trauma treatment will be described. An overview of the development of a set of methods at Phoenix, a highly specialized inpatient treatment facility for refugees and asylum seekers, will be presented and I will focus on four approaches I developed in my work with traumatized refugees.

  2. [Music therapy in adults with cochlear implants : Effects on music perception and subjective sound quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, E; Grapp, M; Argstatter, H

    2016-12-01

    People with severe hearing impairments and deafness can achieve good speech comprehension using a cochlear implant (CI), although music perception often remains impaired. A novel concept of music therapy for adults with CI was developed and evaluated in this study. This study included 30 adults with a unilateral CI following postlingual deafness. The subjective sound quality of the CI was rated using the hearing implant sound quality index (HISQUI) and musical tests for pitch discrimination, melody recognition and timbre identification were applied. As a control 55 normally hearing persons also completed the musical tests. In comparison to normally hearing subjects CI users showed deficits in the perception of pitch, melody and timbre. Specific effects of therapy were observed in the subjective sound quality of the CI, in pitch discrimination into a high and low pitch range and in timbre identification, while general learning effects were found in melody recognition. Music perception shows deficits in CI users compared to normally hearing persons. After individual music therapy in the rehabilitation process, improvements in this delicate area could be achieved.

  3. Therapeutic songwriting in music therapy, Part II: Comparing the literature with practice across diverse clinical populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Felicity; Wigram, Tony; Stott, Dave

    2009-01-01

    . Responses to a 21-question on-line survey were obtained from 419 professional music therapists practicing in 29 countries which focused on approaches to songwriting within their practice with a single clinical population. Results suggest that in general, the literature provides good representation for what...... is occurring in clinical practice. Generally, songs were composed with individual clients in single sessions, with lyrics created prior to the music. Clinicians had a significant role in creating the music with improvised and pre-determined musical structures being equally employed.  Chi-square or comparable......  Exact tests (Fisher-Freeman-Halton) were applied to the data and significant associations were found according to clinical populations particularly with respect the number of sessions required to complete a song, approaches to composing lyrics and music, the context with which songwriting was employed...

  4. Music Therapy in Canada: An Interview with Marianne Bargiel

    OpenAIRE

    Guylaine Vaillancourt

    2010-01-01

    Marianne Bargiel is practicing music therapy since 1991 with children and adults in school, community, and psychiatric facilities. She has taken on Josée Préfontaine’s work at directing the Institut québécois de musicothérapie. She is a candidate for a psychology Ph. D. (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières) where her main research interest is musically evoked emotional processes in psychopathology.

  5. Music Therapy for Symptom Management After Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation: Results From a Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Debbie; Bolwell, Brian; Majhail, Navneet S; Rybicki, Lisa; Yurch, Melissa; Abounader, Donna; Kohuth, Joseph; Jarancik, Shannon; Koniarczyk, Heather; McLellan, Linda; Dabney, Jane; Lawrence, Christine; Gallagher, Lisa; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Dean, Robert; Hill, Brian; Pohlman, Brad; Hamilton, Betty K; Gerds, Aaron T; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Liu, Hien D

    2017-09-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is frequently performed in patients with hematologic malignancies. ASCT can result in significant nausea, pain, and discomfort. Supportive care has improved, and pharmacologic therapies are frequently used, but with limitations. Music has been demonstrated to improve nausea and pain in patients undergoing chemotherapy, but little data are available regarding the effects of music therapy in the transplantation setting. In a prospective study, patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma undergoing ASCT were randomized to receive either interactive music therapy with a board-certified music therapist or no music therapy. The music therapy arm received 2 music therapy sessions on days +1 and +5. Primary outcomes were perception of pain and nausea measured on a visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes were narcotic pain medication use from day -1 to day +5 and impact of ASCT on patient mood as assessed by Profile of Mood States (POMS) on day +5. Eighty-two patients were enrolled, with 37 in the music therapy arm and 45 in the no music therapy arm. Patients who received MT had slightly increased nausea by day +7 compared with the no music therapy patients. The music therapy and no music therapy patients had similar pain scores; however, the patients who received music therapy used significantly less narcotic pain medication (median, 24 mg versus 73 mg; P = .038). Music therapy may be a viable nonpharmacologic method of pain management for patients undergoing ASCT; the music therapy patients required significantly fewer morphine equivalent doses compared with the no music therapy patients. Additional research is needed to better understand the effects of music therapy on patient-perceived symptoms, such as pain and nausea. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sound Continuing Bonds with the Deceased: The Relevance of Music, Including Preloss Music Therapy, for Eight Bereaved Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C.; McDermott, Fiona; Hudson, Peter; Zalcberg, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines music's relevance, including preloss music therapy, for 8 informal caregivers of people who died from cancer. The design was informed by constructivist grounded theory and included semistructured interviews. Bereaved caregivers were supported or occasionally challenged as their musical lives enabled a connection with the…

  7. Sound Continuing Bonds with the Deceased: The Relevance of Music, Including Preloss Music Therapy, for Eight Bereaved Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C.; McDermott, Fiona; Hudson, Peter; Zalcberg, John R.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines music's relevance, including preloss music therapy, for 8 informal caregivers of people who died from cancer. The design was informed by constructivist grounded theory and included semistructured interviews. Bereaved caregivers were supported or occasionally challenged as their musical lives enabled a connection with the…

  8. Music therapy for individuals with dementia: areas of interventions and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raglio, A; Gianelli, M V

    2009-06-01

    This contribution focuses on the definition of music therapy as a specific applicative context to be seen as distinct from the generic use of music in a variety of pathologies. Music therapy is presented as a discipline grounded both upon relationship and upon the theoretical-methodological principles peculiar to each applicative model. The therapeutic nature proper to music therapy is highlighted with specific reference to the domain of the dementias. Music therapy facilitates expression, communication and relationship in the non-verbal context. Such an opportunity allows persons with dementia to establish contact, to express, and even contrive an organisation/regulation of their emotions, through the sonorous-musical relationship with the music therapist. On the basis of a brief analysis of the relevant literature, attention is drawn to the importance of both evidence-based clinical practice and music therapy evaluations, aimed at proving the effectiveness of music therapy, while promoting its correct application.

  9. Bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Grocke, Denise; McFerran, Katrina

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate bereaved parents' experiences of music therapy with their terminally ill child. In-depth interviews were conducted with 7 bereaved parents who were recruited through a community-based palliative care program. The parent participants' experiences varied as their children who received music therapy ranged in ages from 5 months to 12 years old. The interview transcripts were analyzed using phenomenological strategies. Five global themes emerged from the analysis. These included (a) music therapy was valued as a means of altering the child's and family's perception of their situation in the midst of adversity, (b) music therapy was a significant component of remembrance, (c) music therapy was a multifaceted experience for the child and family, (d) music therapy enhanced communication and expression, and (e) parents shared perceptions of and recommendations for improving music therapy services. These emergent themes yield knowledge into the relevance of music therapy within pediatric palliative care.

  10. Effects of vibroacoustic stimulation in music therapy for palliative care patients: a feasibility study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Kotz, Svenja; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-01-01

    ... of a music therapy intervention working with vibroacoustic stimulation in palliative care. Nine participants suffering from advanced cancer took part in single-sessions of music therapy, lasting for 30 min...

  11. [Music therapy induced alternations in natural killer cell count and function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Y; Kubota, N; Inagaki, T; Shinagawa, N

    2001-03-01

    The effects of music therapy on natural killer (NK) cell count and activity (NKCA) were studied in 19 persons. Alzheimer's disease, cerebrovessel disease and Parkinson's disease subjects were assigned to a music therapy. Blood samples were drawn at rest and after completion of music therapy. Music therapy did not change the number of circulating lymphocytes. The percentage of NK cells increased during music therapy, along with an increase in the NK cell activity. The proportion of T cells, CD4 and CD8 did not change significantly during music therapy. One hour after the music therapy session, plasma adrenaline increased but cortisol and noradrenalin did not change. The results indicate that music therapy can significantly increase NK cell count and activity. The change in NK cell and function were independent of neuro-degenerative diseases.

  12. Percussion use and training: a survey of music therapy clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffel, Stephanie; Matney, Bill

    2014-01-01

    Percussion instruments are commonly used in music therapy practice; however, the body of published literature regarding music therapy-related percussion training and practice is limited. The purpose of our survey study was to describe: (a) clinician perspectives of their academic percussion training; (b) use of percussion testing during academic training; (c) clinician perspectives on relevance, adequacy, and importance of academic percussion training; (d) clinician perspectives of their nonacademic percussion training; and (e) current use of percussion in clinical practice. Through comparisons of these parameters, we sought to provide information that may inform future percussion use and training. Participants were selected using an email list from the Certification Board for Music Therapists. Board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) were provided with a researcher-created survey about academic percussion training, nonacademic percussion training, and use of percussion in clinical practice. Survey response rate was 14.4% (611/4234). We used demographic data to address potential nonresponse error and ensure population representation for region of residence and region of academic training. Results revealed concerns about perceived adequacy of percussion training received during music therapy education (14.6% reported receiving no academic percussion training; 40.6% reported training was not adequate), and absence of percussion-specific proficiency exams. Of the training received, 62.8% indicated that training was relevant; however, a majority (76.5%) recommended current music therapy students receive more percussion training on instruments and skills most relevant to clinical practice. Comparisons between academic training, perceived needs in academic training, and clinical usage may inform future training and clinical competency. We provide suggestions for developing future training, as well as for furthering clinical implementation and research. © the American

  13. Personal therapy for undergraduate music therapy students: a survey of AMTA program coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardstrom, Susan C; Jackson, Nancy A

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to gather information in order to understand if and how various modalities of personal therapy are employed with undergraduate music therapy students in the United States. AMTA degree program coordinators were asked about 3 therapy modalities, in particular: verbal therapy, music therapy, and expressive arts therapy (excluding music therapy). It was predicted that less than a quarter of the respondents would indicate that personal therapy of any modality was required in their undergraduate curricula, but that a larger percentage would indicate that it was encouraged. Both hypotheses were supported, with just over 14% of the respondents indicating that they require some form of personal therapy and 32% indicating that they encourage it, with 73% of this latter subgroup encouraging verbal therapy and 46% encouraging music therapy. It was further predicted that, when therapy was required or encouraged, it was most often provided by an individual who was associated with the college/university and that therapy was usually provided in a group format. Respondent comments related to these 2 questions revealed considerable confusion between experiential exercises and personal therapy, leading to dubious validity of some of the numerical data. Qualitative treatment of narrative responses illuminated 4 salient issues regarding personal therapy for undergraduate music therapy students, as follows: (a) the legal and ethical feasibility of making personal therapy a requirement; (b) the cost and availability of qualified professionals; (c) the benefits of personal therapy as an integral facet of undergraduate music therapy training and education; and (d) the appropriateness of personal therapy at the undergraduate level of training.

  14. Intuitive Music and Graphic Notation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstrøm-Nielsen, Carl

    Describes subjects existing at Aalborg University since the middle eighties. "Intuitive Music" trains free improvisation through exercises including group-dynamic exercises, awareness exercises and parameter exercises. Students also create open compositions. "Graphic notation"concerns aural scores....... Students' works are quoted. The writer discusses the theoretical context and advocates for giving more attention to music as the medium in which music therapy takes place, referring to language theory and Jakobson. NB: the description of the two subjects are, at the present moment (2011) no longer up...... to date. Intuitive music stresses less making compositions and more using the main instrument intuitively. Graphic notation has been integrated into a larger subject (also taught by the present author) which also comprises other methods of description and interpretation of music....

  15. Music Therapy for children with special needs - clinical practice and assessment in the light of developmental psychology and communicative musicality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla

    for patterns in clinical work, e.g. analyzing the way members act in the group or towards the therapist. The practices will continuously be connected with a focus on how the music therapy research as well as developmental psychology can inform the assessment. Literature for further reading: Holck, U. (2007......Assessment or evaluation is a continuing part of clinical music therapy, both in the beginning, in the continuous process, and in the evaluation of the music therapy – and sometimes even for a diagnostic assessment (Wigram, Pedersen and Bonde, 2002). After an overall introduction to music therapy...... assessment, the focus is on clinical use of an assessment approach in everyday work, followed by ways of using video recordings in assessing music therapy processes. The way you ask musically, the way the child can answer you! Therefore, it is the therapist’s responsibility to ask in many ways...

  16. Why Provide Music Therapy in the Community for Adults With Mental Health Problems?

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Odell-Miller

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes music therapy within a community mental health setting for adults using a care programme approach in England. It describes the setting, and emphasises the importance of multidisciplinary teamwork in order to enable music therapy to be effective. It provides some statistics and descriptive clinical information which demonstrate the efficacy of music therapy for adults with long-term mental health problems, and argues that music therapy should be a priority for this client ...

  17. The Music Therapy assessment tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, R.

    2013-01-01

    in respiration rate with decreases in respiration variability. Similar findings within EEG data for controls and both VS and MCS cohorts, combined with significant findings for behavioral measures across the VS cohort, indicate music therapy is able to increase arousal levels for DOC patients, optimising...... is limited, is a challenging process. With awareness often masked by perceptual or motor impairments, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy assessment holds the potential to elicit responses despite damage to verbal or visual processing faculties, although robust empirical studies are lacking...... the conditions for accurate assessment. Research is indicated to explore both the use of bio-markers of awareness and longer term effects upon neuroplasticity in response to music therapy within this population....

  18. Schizophrenia and personality disorder patients' adherence to music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Niels Jørgensen; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard; Hestbæk, Trine Lundsfryd

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a random sample of patients receiving music therapy for variables predicting drop out from music therapy treatment. Method: All 27 pt with the diagnosis F 20 and F 60 were included. As explanatory variables were used 3 groups: Sociodemographic variables, psychiatric...... variables such as diagnoses, medication etc., and therapeutic variables. As outcome variable was drop out of treatment. Results: No variables were found to be statistically significant. 11 % dropped out and were identical: No prior music therapy experience, not familiar with the method, all found only maybe...... suitable for treatment, no specific referral criteria, all dropped out before the 20’ session, were women and had no occupation. Conclusion: This study found no statistical connection between drop out from treatment and specific variables. The drop out rate was relatively low. The findings indicate...

  19. A pilot usability study of MINWii, a music therapy game for demented patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulay, Mélodie; Benveniste, Samuel; Boespflug, Sandra; Jouvelot, Pierre; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2011-01-01

    MINWii is a music therapy game for the renarcissization of demented patients. It lets players improvise or play songs of their choice by pointing at a virtual keyboard with a Wiimote Pistol. We present the results of a three-month usability study we conducted with 7 institutionalized patients suffering from mild to moderately severe Alzheimer's disease at the LUSAGE Living Lab in Paris. We demonstrate that MINWii is indeed usable by AD patients despite their motor and cognitive impairments: our results, which were largely computed automatically thanks to MINWii's extensive logging capabilities, show either an instant mastery or a clear learning effect depending on patients' cognitive abilities. Moreover, patients were overall very satisfied with the game and expressed a desire to repeat the experience: MINWii fosters positive interaction with the caregivers and elicits powerful reminiscence with even the most severely impaired patients. This study justifies future research to assess the lasting effects of playing MINWii on both quality of life and cognitive impairment in demented patients.

  20. The Role of the EMTC for development and recognition of the music therapy profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Lerner, Adrienne; Suvini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of music therapy in Europe is reflected in the increasing number of trained professionals, music therapy positions and research publications. A development of the discipline implies increased requirements regarding the skills and competences of music therapy clinicians, and ...