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Sample records for improving pneumonia case-management

  1. Challenges to improving case management of childhood pneumonia at health facilities in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Stephen M; English, Mike; Hazir, Tabish; Enarson, Penny; Duke, Trevor

    2008-05-01

    Effective case management is an important strategy to reduce pneumonia-related morbidity and mortality in children. Guidelines based on sound evidence are available but are used variably. This review outlines current guidelines for childhood pneumonia management in the setting where most child pneumonia deaths occur and identifies challenges for improved management in a variety of settings and different "at-risk" groups. These include appropriate choice of antibiotic, clinical overlap with other conditions, prompt and appropriate referral for inpatient care, and management of treatment failure. Management of neonates, and of HIV-infected or severely malnourished children is more complicated. The influence of co-morbidities on pneumonia outcome means that pneumonia case management must be integrated within strategies to improve overall paediatric care. The greatest potential for reducing pneumonia-related deaths in health facilities is wider implementation of the current guidelines built around a few core activities: training, antibiotics and oxygen. This requires investment in human resources and in equipment for the optimal management of hypoxaemia. It is important to provide data from a variety of epidemiological settings for formal cost-effectiveness analyses. Improvements in the quality of case management of pneumonia can be a vehicle for overall improvements in child health-care practices.

  2. Improving pneumonia case-management in Benin: a randomized trial of a multi-faceted intervention to support health worker adherence to Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama Marcel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumonia is a leading cause of death among children under five years of age. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness strategy can improve the quality of care for pneumonia and other common illnesses in developing countries, but adherence to these guidelines could be improved. We evaluated an intervention in Benin to support health worker adherence to the guidelines after training, focusing on pneumonia case management. Methods We conducted a randomized trial. After a health facility survey in 1999 to assess health care quality before Integrated Management of Childhood Illness training, health workers received training plus either study supports (job aids, non-financial incentives and supervision of workers and supervisors or "usual" supports. Follow-up surveys were conducted in 2001, 2002 and 2004. Outcomes were indicators of health care quality for Integrated Management-defined pneumonia. Further analyses included a graphical pathway analysis and multivariable logistic regression modelling to identify factors influencing case-management quality. Results We observed 301 consultations of children with non-severe pneumonia that were performed by 128 health workers in 88 public and private health facilities. Although outcomes improved in both intervention and control groups, we found no statistically significant difference between groups. However, training proceeded slowly, and low-quality care from untrained health workers diluted intervention effects. Per-protocol analyses suggested that health workers with training plus study supports performed better than those with training plus usual supports (20.4 and 19.2 percentage-point improvements for recommended treatment [p = 0.08] and "recommended or adequate" treatment [p = 0.01], respectively. Both groups tended to perform better than untrained health workers. Analyses of treatment errors revealed that incomplete assessment and difficulties processing clinical findings

  3. Strategies to improve clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijvis, S.C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances during the last few decades in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), its incidence remains high. In this thesis, strategies are described for improvement of the quality of clinical management in patients with pneumonia and for the reduction

  4. Improved management of community-acquired pneumonia in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Palomo de los Reyes, María José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Cuena-Boy, Rafael; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín

    2013-06-01

    To determine the impact of implementing clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the emergency department (ED) by analyzing case management decisions (admission or discharge, appropriateness and timeliness of antibiotic therapy, complementary tests) and the consequent results (clinical stabilization time, length of hospital stay, re-admission to ED and mortality). A prospective, observational, descriptive, comparative study carried out from 1st January 2008 to 1st August 2009 in two phases: before and after the implementation of the "Management of CAP in ED" SEMES-SEPAR (Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine - Spanish Society of Pneumology and Thoracic Surgery) clinical practice guidelines from 2008. Two hundred adult patients treated in the ED with a diagnosis of CAP were included in the study, both in the pre-intervention and post-intervention groups. The application of the guidelines increased the administration of early and appropriate antibiotic therapy (Pimplementation of the SEMES-SEPAR 2008 guidelines, along with the use of PSI and biomarkers, significantly improved the entire treatment process of CAP. This benefitted both patients and the system by reducing mortality and improving the results of other patient management factors. Copyright © 2012 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Management of severe childhood pneumonia by day care approach in developing countries

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    Yasmin Jahan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background: Pneumonia is a major cause of child mortality among children under 5 years, worldwide. Pneumonia infection may be caused by bacteria, viruses, or fungi in single or in both lungs. According to recent criteria developed by the World Health Organization(WHO in September (2013, pneumonia can be classified into severe pneumonia, pneumonia and no pneumonia. Most of the deaths occur from severe pneumonia.Methods: Disease management of severe childhood pneumonia requires early identification,prompt referral and the availability of intensive quality care. Under 5 years old children with severe pneumonia should receive day care, with antibiotic treatment, feeding, and supportive care with similar 24-hour hospital treatment.Discussion: Considering that difficulties, International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research,Bangladesh (ICDDR, B initiated Day Care Approach (DCA model, as an innovative, safe,effective and less expensive alternative to hospital management of severe childhood pneumonia.A 24 months old girl came to the health care center with severe breathing difficulty, cough,history of fever and head nodding. The management described below was continued daily until there was clinical improvement; no fever, no fast breathing, no lower chest wall in drawing, no danger signs, no rales on auscultation, and no hypoxemia. Conclusion: Considering the WHO case management protocol for severe pneumonia, DCA recommends that diagnosis of severe pneumonia should be based primarily on visible clinical parameters. On that basis, severe childhood pneumonia can be successfully managed at daycare clinics including for children with hypoxemia who is required prolong (4-6 hours oxygen therapy.

  6. Effect of case management on neonatal mortality due to sepsis and pneumonia

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    Black Robert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each year almost one million newborns die from infections, mostly in low-income countries. Timely case management would save many lives but the relative mortality effect of varying strategies is unknown. We have estimated the effect of providing oral, or injectable antibiotics at home or in first-level facilities, and of in-patient hospital care on neonatal mortality from pneumonia and sepsis for use in the Lives Saved Tool (LiST. Methods We conducted systematic searches of multiple databases to identify relevant studies with mortality data. Standardized abstraction tables were used and study quality assessed by adapted GRADE criteria. Meta-analyses were undertaken where appropriate. For interventions with biological plausibility but low quality evidence, a Delphi process was undertaken to estimate effectiveness. Results Searches of 2876 titles identified 7 studies. Among these, 4 evaluated oral antibiotics for neonatal pneumonia in non-randomised, concurrently controlled designs. Meta-analysis suggested reductions in all-cause neonatal mortality (RR 0.75 95% CI 0.64- 0.89; 4 studies and neonatal pneumonia-specific mortality (RR 0.58 95% CI 0.41- 0.82; 3 studies. Two studies (1 RCT, 1 observational study, evaluated community-based neonatal care packages including injectable antibiotics and reported mortality reductions of 44% (RR= 0.56, 95% CI 0.41-0.77 and 34% (RR =0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.93, but the interpretation of these results is complicated by co-interventions. A third, clinic-based, study reported a case-fatality ratio of 3.3% among neonates treated with injectable antibiotics as outpatients. No studies were identified evaluating injectable antibiotics alone for neonatal pneumonia. Delphi consensus (median from 20 respondents effects on sepsis-specific mortality were 30% reduction for oral antibiotics, 65% for injectable antibiotics and 75% for injectable antibiotics on pneumonia-specific mortality. No trials were

  7. Clinical case review: a method to improve identification of true clinical and radiographic pneumonia in children meeting the World Health Organization definition for pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puumalainen, Taneli; Quiambao, Beatriz; Abucejo-Ladesma, Erma; Lupisan, Socorro; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Ruutu, Petri; Lucero, Marilla G; Nohynek, Hanna; Simoes, Eric A F; Riley, Ian

    2008-07-21

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) case definition for childhood pneumonia, composed of simple clinical signs of cough, difficult breathing and fast breathing, is widely used in resource poor settings to guide management of acute respiratory infections. The definition is also commonly used as an entry criteria or endpoint in different intervention and disease burden studies. A group of paediatricians conducted a retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data including C-reactive protein concentration and chest radiograph findings among Filipino children hospitalised in the Bohol Regional Hospital who were enrolled in a pneumococcal vaccine efficacy study and had an episode of respiratory disease fulfilling the WHO case definition for clinical pneumonia. Our aim was to evaluate which disease entities the WHO definition actually captures and what is the probable aetiology of respiratory infections among these episodes diagnosed in this population. Among the 12,194 children enrolled to the vaccine study we recorded 1,195 disease episodes leading to hospitalisation which fulfilled the WHO criteria for pneumonia. In total, 34% of these episodes showed radiographic evidence of pneumonia and 11% were classified as definitive or probable bacterial pneumonia. Over 95% of episodes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia (with chest indrawing) had an acute lower respiratory infection as final diagnosis whereas 34% of those with non-severe clinical pneumonia had gastroenteritis or other non-respiratory infection as main cause of hospitalisation. The WHO definition for severe pneumonia shows high specificity for acute lower respiratory infection and provides a tool to compare the total burden of lower respiratory infections in different settings. ISRCTN62323832.

  8. Community case management improves use of treatment for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Evaluate the performance of volunteers in providing Community Case Management (CCM) for diarrhea, fever and pneumonia – in a pre-HEW setting in Liben Woreda, Oromiya Regional State. Methods: Save the Children supported Ministry of Health and communities to deliver child survival interventions from ...

  9. Clinical case review: A method to improve identification of true clinical and radiographic pneumonia in children meeting the World Health Organization definition for pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruutu Petri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization's (WHO case definition for childhood pneumonia, composed of simple clinical signs of cough, difficult breathing and fast breathing, is widely used in resource poor settings to guide management of acute respiratory infections. The definition is also commonly used as an entry criteria or endpoint in different intervention and disease burden studies. Methods A group of paediatricians conducted a retrospective review of clinical and laboratory data including C-reactive protein concentration and chest radiograph findings among Filipino children hospitalised in the Bohol Regional Hospital who were enrolled in a pneumococcal vaccine efficacy study and had an episode of respiratory disease fulfilling the WHO case definition for clinical pneumonia. Our aim was to evaluate which disease entities the WHO definition actually captures and what is the probable aetiology of respiratory infections among these episodes diagnosed in this population. Results Among the 12,194 children enrolled to the vaccine study we recorded 1,195 disease episodes leading to hospitalisation which fulfilled the WHO criteria for pneumonia. In total, 34% of these episodes showed radiographic evidence of pneumonia and 11% were classified as definitive or probable bacterial pneumonia. Over 95% of episodes of WHO-defined severe pneumonia (with chest indrawing had an acute lower respiratory infection as final diagnosis whereas 34% of those with non-severe clinical pneumonia had gastroenteritis or other non-respiratory infection as main cause of hospitalisation. Conclusion The WHO definition for severe pneumonia shows high specificity for acute lower respiratory infection and provides a tool to compare the total burden of lower respiratory infections in different settings. Trial registration ISRCTN62323832

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia management and outcomes in the era of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Ian D; Vines, Caroline; Dean, Nathan C

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia continues to be a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality. Implementation of health information technology (HIT) can lead to cost savings and improved care. In this review, we examine the literature on the use of HIT in the management of community-acquired pneumonia. We also discuss barriers to adoption of technology in managing pneumonia, the reliability and quality of electronic health data in pneumonia research, how technology has assisted pneumonia diagnosis and outcomes research. The goal of using HIT is to develop and deploy generalizable, real-time, computerized clinical decision support integrated into usual pneumonia care. A friendly user interface that does not disrupt efficiency and demonstrates improved clinical outcomes should result in widespread adoption. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cilloniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni [Servicio de Neumologia, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Ciber de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), Instituto de Investigacion Biomedica Agusti Pi i Sunyer, Universidad de Barcelona (Spain); Rangel, Ernesto [Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Tepic (Mexico); Barlascini, Cornelius [Servizio di Igiene e Sanita Pubblica, Ospedale Generale di Sestri Levante, Sestri Levante (Italy); Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Nicolini, Antonello, E-mail: antonellonicolini@gmail.com [Servizio di Pneumologia, Ospedale Generale di Sestri Levante, Sestri Levante (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. (author)

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae-associated pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis: case series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cilloniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni; Rangel, Ernesto; Barlascini, Cornelius; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Nicolini, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In the antibiotic era, purulent pericarditis is a rare entity. However, there are still reports of cases of the disease, which is associated with high mortality, and most such cases are attributed to delayed diagnosis. Approximately 40-50% of all cases of purulent pericarditis are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, Streptococcus pneumoniae in particular. Methods: We report four cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, with different clinical features and levels of severity. Results: In three of the four cases, the main complication was cardiac tamponade. Microbiological screening (urinary antigen testing and pleural fluid culture) confirmed the diagnosis of severe pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by purulent pericarditis. Conclusions: In cases of pneumococcal pneumonia complicated by pericarditis, early diagnosis is of paramount importance to avoid severe hemodynamic compromise. The complications of acute pericarditis appear early in the clinical course of the infection. The most serious complications are cardiac tamponade and its consequences. Antibiotic therapy combined with pericardiocentesis drastically reduces the mortality associated with purulent pericarditis. (author)

  13. Pneumonia presenting as acute abdomen in children: a report of three cases.

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    Vendargon, S; Wong, P S; Tan, K K

    2000-12-01

    From 10th September 1998 till 5th June 1999, the Paediatric and Cardiothoracic Surgery Units of Sultanah Aminah Hospital Johor Bahru managed three children with lung collapse secondary to pneumonia. The dominant initial clinical presentation in all three cases was acute abdominal pain. Basal pneumonia was diagnosed in two cases post-operatively after surgical contributory causes were excluded intra-operatively. Thoracotomy, evacuation of infected debris and decortication of the collapsed lung was done in all three cases. In children presenting with acute abdominal pain, basal pneumonia should be considered as a possible contributory cause.

  14. Clinical case review: A method to improve identification of true clinical and radiographic pneumonia in children meeting the World Health Organization definition for pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Puumalainen, Taneli; Quiambao, Beatriz; Abucejo-Ladesma, Erma; Lupisan, Socorro; Heiskanen-Kosma, Tarja; Ruutu, Petri; Lucero, Marilla G; Nohynek, Hanna; Simoes, Eric AF; Riley, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The World Health Organization's (WHO) case definition for childhood pneumonia, composed of simple clinical signs of cough, difficult breathing and fast breathing, is widely used in resource poor settings to guide management of acute respiratory infections. The definition is also commonly used as an entry criteria or endpoint in different intervention and disease burden studies. Methods A group of paediatricians conducted a retrospective review of clinical and laboratory da...

  15. A case of chemical pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Woo; Eun, Choung Ki; Choi, Byung Soo; Park, Soo Sung [Chungang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    A case of chemical pneumonia due to the fumes of nitric acid and chemical compounds was encountered, and it is reported with a review of the literatures. A 19 year old Korean male working in an electric materials manufacturing factory of poor facilities dealing with chemical compounds showed initial symptoms closely similar to those of pulmonary tuberculosis of hematogenous disseminating type, and a roentgenogram was hardly helpful for differentiating chemical pneumonia from pulmonary tuberculous of hematogenous disseminating type. The clinical course in this case was very favourable as compared with those of pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia.

  16. A case of chemical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Woo; Eun, Choung Ki; Choi, Byung Soo; Park, Soo Sung

    1974-01-01

    A case of chemical pneumonia due to the fumes of nitric acid and chemical compounds was encountered, and it is reported with a review of the literatures. A 19 year old Korean male working in an electric materials manufacturing factory of poor facilities dealing with chemical compounds showed initial symptoms closely similar to those of pulmonary tuberculosis of hematogenous disseminating type, and a roentgenogram was hardly helpful for differentiating chemical pneumonia from pulmonary tuberculous of hematogenous disseminating type. The clinical course in this case was very favourable as compared with those of pulmonary tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonia

  17. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

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    Heo, Tae Haeng; Park, Jeong Hee; Lim, Jong Nam; Shin, Hyun Jun; Jeon, Hae Jeong [College of Medicine, Kon-Kuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-15

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare disease characterized by chronic infiltration of the lung with eosinophils, usually associated with peripheral eosinophilia. In 65% of cases, the chest radiograph shows typical nonsegmental air-space consolidation confined to the outer third of the lung, and in 25% of cases, the 'photographic negative of pulmonary edema' Typical lung manifestations with peripheral eosinophilia are characteristic of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. In the remaining cases, radiographic findings are nonspecific and require lung biopsy for confirmation. We report a case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia in which chest radiograph and CT scans revealed bilateral patchy or diffuse opacity with nodules scattered throughout the lungs.

  18. A Case of Macrolide-Refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia in Pregnancy Treated with Garenoxacin

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    Yoko Matsuda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and foetal outcomes, and intensive treatment with appropriate antibiotics is essential. However, cases caused by pathogens that are resistant to antibiotics suitable for the developing foetus are challenging. We herein report a case of macrolide-refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in pregnancy. A 40-year-old multigravida with twin pregnancy complained of cough and fever at 13 weeks of gestation and was diagnosed with pneumonia. Even though empiric treatment with ceftriaxone and oral azithromycin was started, her condition deteriorated rapidly. The findings of chest computed tomography suggested Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. Since azithromycin did not work, this strain was considered to be macrolide-refractory. Garenoxacin, an oral quinolone, was selected and was dramatically effective. The use of quinolone could be justified with the emergence of drug-resistant bacterial/atypical pneumonia and in the maternal life-threatening condition.

  19. A Rare Case of Pneumonia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens

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    Rajshree Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, nonfermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. In some very rare cases Shewanella putrefaciens can be a human pathogen. It can produce a wide variety of clinical syndromes including bacteremia as well as skin and soft tissue infections. However, pneumonia due to S. putrefaciens is rare; there are a total of 4 reported cases in the literature. We present a case of 63-year-old male who was presented to emergency room status after cardiac arrest, fell into sea water face down. On the second day of hospitalization, he was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Empirical antibiotic treatment with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of endotracheal aspirate yielded gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown from endotracheal aspirate culture was identified as S. putrefaciens by Biomerieux API 20 NE technique. On review of the literature and according to culture and sensitivity results, therapy in our patient was changed to cefepime. Patient’s pneumonia improved with treatment with cefepime. We believe that our patient developed pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens, after near drowning in sea water. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  20. Radiologic discussion on Klebsiella pneumonia in 89 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunsheng; Li Xuejun; Tai Hanzhen; Wang Guohua; Qi Shi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of radiology and CT scanning in Klebsiella pneumoniae. Methods: The clinical, radiologic data and CT films of 89 patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Three types of chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT) findings for Klebsiella pneumonia were found. (1)Increased pulmonary markings occured in 31 cases. (2)35 cases with single lesions showed frequently involvement in the upper or lower lobe of right lung. When lesion was involved in the upper lobe, it developed oblique fissure shift down in radiology films and represent stalactitic symptom in CT imagining. (3)In 23 cases with Klebsiella pneumonia showed typical cavitary lung abscesses. Conclusion: The radiologic findings of Klebsiella pneumoniae were complicated and hard to make a good diagnosis. Combined the imaging features with the clinic data, sometimes, we can get the right diagnosis in some cases with typical Klebsiella pneumoniae. (authors)

  1. Pneumonia caused by Pittsburgh pneumonia agent: radiologic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muder, R.R.; Reddy, S.C.; Yu, V.L.; Kroboth, F.J.

    1984-01-01

    Using an objective scoring system, chest radiographs were reviewed in 23 cases of pneumonia due to the Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (PPA, Tatlockia micdadei, Legionella micdadei), including six cases of pneumonia with simultaneous isolation of PPA and L pneumophila (Legionnaires' disease). Infiltrates were typically segmental to lobar; nodular infiltrates were noted in three cases. Spread to additional lobes after presentation occurred in four of 17 PPA infections. Pneumonia caused by both PPA and L pneumophila was unusually severe, with involvement of all lobes occurring in four of six cases, compared with one of 17 cases of PPA infection (p>0.02). Radiographic severity did not correlate with underlying disease, immune status, or outcome. The majority of patients receiving erythromycin demonstrated objective radiologic improvement. In a patients, population that included nonimmunosuppressed patient, nodule formation and rapid radiologic progression were not found to be characteristic of PPA pneumonia

  2. Non-severe pneumonia in childhood: guidelines for management in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Among the under 5-year-olds worldwide there are about 156,000,000 cases of pneumonia each year. This causes about 20% of all deaths in this age group. Effective implementation of the WHO. Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) reduces this morbidity and mortality. The recommendations for treating ...

  3. Aspiration pneumonia. Pathophysiological aspects, prevention and management. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroianni, A; Ceccarelli, D; Conti, V; Terzano, C

    2006-12-01

    Aspiration pneumonias occur more frequently than reported and, in many cases, the disease is not recognised. In hospitalised and institutionalised patients with predisposing diseases prompt diagnosis of this complication and correct preventive measures can drastically reduce the worsening of clinical conditions and the deaths due to aspiration pneumonia. Normal airway structure, effective defence mechanisms, and preventive measures are decisive in reducing aspiration episodes. An increased aspiration risk for food, fluids, medications, or secretions may lead to the development of pneumonia. Pneumonia is the most common respiratory complication in all stroke deaths and in mechanical ventilation patients. In addition, the increased incidence of aspiration pneumonia with aging may be a consequence of impairment of swallowing and the cough reflex. Dysphagia, compromised consciousness, invasive procedures, anaesthesia, insufficient oral care, sleep disorders, and vomiting are all risk factors. Aspiration pneumonia includes different characteristic syndromes based on the amount (massive, acute, chronic) and physical character of the aspirated material (acid, infected, lipoid), needing a different therapeutic approach. Chronic patients education and correct health care practices are the keys for preventing the events of aspiration. In patients at risk a clinical and instrumental assessment of dysphagia should be evaluated. Management includes the removal of etiologic factors (drugs, tubes, mobilisation, oral hygiene), supportive care, and in bacterial pneumonias a specific antibiotic therapy for community-acquired or nosocomial events.

  4. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L.; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3–3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31–0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49–0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92–119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India’s pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  5. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Habib; Jit, Mark; Heymann, David L; Zodpey, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3-3.9 million) episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31-0.40 million) all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths) Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths), and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths). Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49-0.64 million) severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92-119 thousand) pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India's pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our results

  6. Burden of Severe Pneumonia, Pneumococcal Pneumonia and Pneumonia Deaths in Indian States: Modelling Based Estimates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Farooqui

    Full Text Available The burden of severe pneumonia in terms of morbidity and mortality is unknown in India especially at sub-national level. In this context, we aimed to estimate the number of severe pneumonia episodes, pneumococcal pneumonia episodes and pneumonia deaths in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We adapted and parameterized a mathematical model based on the epidemiological concept of potential impact fraction developed CHERG for this analysis. The key parameters that determine the distribution of severe pneumonia episode across Indian states were state-specific under-5 population, state-specific prevalence of selected definite pneumonia risk factors and meta-estimates of relative risks for each of these risk factors. We applied the incidence estimates and attributable fraction of risk factors to population estimates for 2010 of each Indian state. We then estimated the number of pneumococcal pneumonia cases by applying the vaccine probe methodology to an existing trial. We estimated mortality due to severe pneumonia and pneumococcal pneumonia by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from multi-centric hospital-based studies. Our results suggest that in 2010, 3.6 million (3.3-3.9 million episodes of severe pneumonia and 0.35 million (0.31-0.40 million all cause pneumonia deaths occurred in children younger than 5 years in India. The states that merit special mention include Uttar Pradesh where 18.1% children reside but contribute 24% of pneumonia cases and 26% pneumonia deaths, Bihar (11.3% children, 16% cases, 22% deaths Madhya Pradesh (6.6% children, 9% cases, 12% deaths, and Rajasthan (6.6% children, 8% cases, 11% deaths. Further, we estimated that 0.56 million (0.49-0.64 million severe episodes of pneumococcal pneumonia and 105 thousand (92-119 thousand pneumococcal deaths occurred in India. The top contributors to India's pneumococcal pneumonia burden were Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan in that order. Our

  7. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia: A case report

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    Lovrenski Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia is one of the rarest idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and the rarest form of smoking-related interstitial lung diseases. It was first described by Liebow in 1965. Histologically, it is characterized by the presence of eosinophilic macrophages uniformly filling airspaces which often contain a finely granular light-brown pigment that does not stain for hemosiderin. The alveolar walls are usually mildly thickened by fibrous tissue and infiltrated by a moderate number of lymphocytes. Case Outline. Our patient was a 56-year-old male, heavy smoker, with bilateral lung infiltrations of unknown etiology and several months of discomfort in the form of dry cough and shortness of breath. Lung function tests showed a moderate restrictive ventilation disorder and a severe reduction of diffusing capacity. Since bronchoscopic specimens did not reveal lung lesion etiology, an open lung biopsy of the lower left pulmonary lobe was performed, and based on the obtained surgical material the pathohistologically diagnosis of desquamative interstitial pneumonia was established. The patient was started on corticosteroid and immunosuppressive therapy, and he ceased smoking. At the last control examination, two years after the onset of symptoms, the patient was feeling well, and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT scan of the thorax showed regression of pathological changes. Conclusion. Although, as in our case, the majority of DIP patients improve on treatment, some patients still develop progressive irreversible fibrosis despite therapy.

  8. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

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    Jung, Gyoo; Sik; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, Jong Min; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Man Hong [Kosin Medical College, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is one of a recently described idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease, which differs from chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Patients with acute eosinophilic pneumonia develop acute onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion on chest radiograph, and show an increase in number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung biopsy specimen. Prompt and complete response to corticosteroid therapy without any recurrence is characteristically seen in patient with this disease. Although the etiology of acute eosinophilic pneumonia is not known, it has been suggested to be related to a hypersensitivity phenomenon to an unidentified inhaled antigen. We report four cases of acute eosinophilic pneumonia presented with acute onset of dyspnea, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in previously healthy adults.

  9. Acute eosinophilic pneumonia: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Gyoo; Sik; Oh, Kyung Seung; Kim, Jong Min; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Man Hong

    1995-01-01

    Acute eosinophilic pneumonia is one of a recently described idiopathic eosinophilic lung disease, which differs from chronic eosinophilic pneumonia. Patients with acute eosinophilic pneumonia develop acute onset of dyspnea, hypoxemia, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion on chest radiograph, and show an increase in number of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or lung biopsy specimen. Prompt and complete response to corticosteroid therapy without any recurrence is characteristically seen in patient with this disease. Although the etiology of acute eosinophilic pneumonia is not known, it has been suggested to be related to a hypersensitivity phenomenon to an unidentified inhaled antigen. We report four cases of acute eosinophilic pneumonia presented with acute onset of dyspnea, diffuse pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph, and eosinophilia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in previously healthy adults

  10. Optimizing community case management strategies to achieve equitable reduction of childhood pneumonia mortality: An application of Equitable Impact Sensitive Tool (EQUIST) in five low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Donald; Theodoratou, Evropi; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Chopra, Mickey

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to populate the Equitable Impact Sensitive Tool (EQUIST) framework with all necessary data and conduct the first implementation of EQUIST in studying cost-effectiveness of community case management of childhood pneumonia in 5 low- and middle-income countries with relation to equity impact. Wealth quintile-specific data were gathered or modelled for all contributory determinants of the EQUIST framework, namely: under-five mortality rate, cost of intervention, intervention effectiveness, current coverage of intervention and relative disease distribution. These were then combined statistically to calculate the final outcome of the EQUIST model for community case management of childhood pneumonia: US$ per life saved, in several different approaches to scaling-up. The current 'mainstream' approach to scaling-up of interventions is never the most cost-effective. Community-case management appears to strongly support an 'equity-promoting' approach to scaling-up, displaying the highest levels of cost-effectiveness in interventions targeted at the poorest quintile of each study country, although absolute cost differences vary by context. The relationship between cost-effectiveness and equity impact is complex, with many determinants to consider. One important way to increase intervention cost-effectiveness in poorer quintiles is to improve the efficiency and quality of delivery. More data are needed in all areas to increase the accuracy of EQUIST-based estimates.

  11. Pneumonia: challenges in the definition, diagnosis, and management of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottosen, Julie; Evans, Heather

    2014-12-01

    Defining health care-associated pneumonia, which includes both hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), is problematic and controversial. Aspiration pneumonia is often included as a subtype of HAP but may be related to community-acquired aspiration events. Scoring systems exist and new surveillance guidelines have been implemented to make early recognition of pneumonia more precise and objective. Management and prevention should follow recommendations, including early empirical therapy, targeted therapy, and limited duration of treatment. Patients with trauma present a challenge to the diagnosis and management of pneumonia, because of increased risk for aspiration and underlying chest and pulmonary injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Pneumonia cases following an EF-5 tornado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshee-Hakala, Beth A

    2015-07-01

    Infections following a natural disaster such as an EF-5 tornado can be atypical and difficult to treat. Studies have looked at illness following several natural disasters, but few have studied respiratory illness following a tornado. A review of patients with pneumonia admitted during the period from May 22, 2009, through May 21, 2012, was completed. The Tornado Zone Group included adult patients who lived or worked in the tornado zone during the year following the tornado. Data were isolated by number of pneumonia cases within and outside the tornado zone per month per year. An analysis of variance comparing the number of pneumonia cases from the tornado zone per month per year was significant at F2,38 = 12.93 and P Tornado Zone Group (P Tornado Zone patients to be younger than controls (t390 = 5.14; P Tornado Zone Group included uncommon pathogens not isolated during the 2 years prior. The number of pneumonia cases may increase following tornadoes. Although current guidelines recommend narrow-spectrum antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia, results of this study suggest the possible need for broader antimicrobial coverage after tornadoes. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of community mobilization on appropriate care seeking for pneumonia in Haripur, Pakistan

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    Salim Sadruddin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Appropriate and timely care seeking reduces mortality for childhood illnesses including pneumonia. Despite over 90 000 Lady Health Workers (LHWs deployed in Pakistan, whose tasks included management of pneumonia, only 16% of care takers sought care from them for respiratory infections. As part of a community case management trial for childhood pneumonia, community mobilization interventions were implemented to improve care seeking from LHWs in Haripur district, Pakistan. The objective of the study was to increase the number of children receiving treatment for pneumonia and severe pneumonia by Lady Health Workers (LHWs through community mobilization approaches for prompt recognition and care seeking in 2 to 59 month–old children. Methods: To assess pneumonia care seeking practices, pre and post– intervention household surveys were conducted in 28 target Union Councils. Formative research to improve existing LHW training materials, job aids and other materials was carried out. Advocacy events were organized, LHWs and male health promoters were trained in community mobilization, non–functional women and male health committees were revitalized and LHWs and male health promoters conducted community awareness sessions. Results: The community mobilization interventions were implemented from April 2008 – December 2009. Project and LHW program staff organized 113 sensitization meetings for opinion leaders, which were attended by 2262 males and 3288 females. The 511 trained LHWs organized 6132 community awareness sessions attended by 50 056 women and 511 male promoters conducted 523 sessions attended by 7845 males. In one year period, the number of LHWs treating pneumonia increased from 11 in April 2008 to 505 in March 2009. The care seeking from LHWs for suspected pneumonia increased from 0.7% in pre–intervention survey to 49.2% in post–intervention survey. Conclusion: The increase in care seeking from LHWs benefited the community

  14. Quality and safety of integrated community case management of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests and pneumonia by community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Brooks, Erin Twohig; Semrau, Katherine; Pilingana, Portipher; MacLeod, William B; Siazeele, Kazungu; Sabin, Lora L; Thea, Donald M; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo

    2012-03-01

    To assess the quality and safety of having community health workers (CHWs) in rural Zambia use rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and provide integrated management of malaria and pneumonia. In the context of a cluster-randomized controlled trial of two models for community-based management of malaria and/or non-severe pneumonia in children under 5 years old, CHWs in the intervention arm were trained to use RDTs, follow a simple algorithm for classification and treat malaria with artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and pneumonia with amoxicillin. CHW records were reviewed to assess the ability of the CHWs to appropriately classify and treat malaria and pneumonia, and account for supplies. Patients were also followed up to assess treatment safety. During the 12-month study, the CHWs evaluated 1017 children with fever and/or fast/difficult breathing and performed 975 RDTs. Malaria and/or pneumonia were appropriately classified 94-100% of the time. Treatment based on disease classification was correct in 94-100% of episodes. Supply management was excellent with over 98% of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL properly accounted for. The use of RDTs, amoxicillin, and AL was associated with few minor adverse events. Most febrile children (90%) with negative RDT results recovered after being treated with an antipyretic alone. Volunteer CHWs in rural Zambia are capable of providing integrated management of malaria and pneumonia to children safely and at high quality.

  15. Cost-effectiveness analysis of revised WHO guidelines for management of childhood pneumonia in 74 Countdown countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Incardona, Beatrice; Qazi, Shamim A; Stenberg, Karin; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2017-06-01

    expected to result in a 39.5% reduction in treatment costs compared to the 2005 guidelines which could save up to US$ 1.16 (0.68-1.23) billion in the 74 Countdown countries, with potential savings greatest in low HIV burden countries which can implement effective community case management of pneumonia.

  16. Aspiration pneumonia of mineral oil: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malheiros, Noemia Reis; Costa Praxedes, Marcia da; Machado, Dianne Mello; Marchiori, Edson

    1995-01-01

    The authors report a case of 14 month-old boy with clinical features of dyspnea, cough and acrocyanosis following aspiration of mineral oil used in the treatment of partial small bowel obstruction by Ascaris lumbricoides. A chest roentgenogram was reported as extensive bilateral confluent consolidation that showed progressive improvement and the presence of a bilateral infiltration. The diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia of mineral oil was confirmed by lung biopsy. Radiological and anatomo pathological aspects are presented as well as a review of the medical literature about the case. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs

  17. Rainfall is a risk factor for sporadic cases of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Garcia-Vidal

    Full Text Available It is not known whether rainfall increases the risk of sporadic cases of Legionella pneumonia. We sought to test this hypothesis in a prospective observational cohort study of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (1995-2011. Cases with Legionella pneumonia were compared with those with non-Legionella pneumonia. Using daily rainfall data obtained from the regional meteorological service we examined patterns of rainfall over the days prior to admission in each study group. Of 4168 patients, 231 (5.5% had Legionella pneumonia. The diagnosis was based on one or more of the following: sputum (41 cases, antigenuria (206 and serology (98. Daily rainfall average was 0.556 liters/m(2 in the Legionella pneumonia group vs. 0.328 liters/m(2 for non-Legionella pneumonia cases (p = 0.04. A ROC curve was plotted to compare the incidence of Legionella pneumonia and the weighted median rainfall. The cut-off point was 0.42 (AUC 0.54. Patients who were admitted to hospital with a prior weighted median rainfall higher than 0.42 were more likely to have Legionella pneumonia (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1.02-1.78; p = .03. Spearman Rho correlations revealed a relationship between Legionella pneumonia and rainfall average during each two-week reporting period (0.14; p = 0.003. No relationship was found between rainfall average and non-Legionella pneumonia cases (-0.06; p = 0.24. As a conclusion, rainfall is a significant risk factor for sporadic Legionella pneumonia. Physicians should carefully consider Legionella pneumonia when selecting diagnostic tests and antimicrobial therapy for patients presenting with CAP after periods of rainfall.

  18. Building Perinatal Case Manager Capacity Using Quality Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Improving breastfeeding rates among Black women is a potential strategy to address disparities in health outcomes that disproportionately impact Black women and children. This quality improvement (QI) initiative aimed to improve perinatal case manager knowledge and self-efficacy to promote breastfeeding among Black, low-income women who use services through Boston Healthy Start Initiative. QI methodology was used to develop and test a two-part strategy for perinatal case managers to promote a...

  19. Radiographic features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: differential diagnosis and performance timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Sugiu, Tadaaki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Oda, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Tetsuya; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Oka, Mikio

    2009-01-01

    The Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines propose a differential diagnosis for atypical pneumonia and bacterial pneumonia using a scoring system for the selection of appropriate antibiotic. In order to improve this scoring system, the guidelines are seeking new specific parameter. The purpose of this study was to clarify the pattern of abnormalities with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia on chest computed tomography (CT) and whether the radiographic findings could distinguish M. pneumoniae pneumonia from Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. A retrospective review was performed of the CT findings of 64 cases and 68 cases where M. pneumoniae and S. pneumoniae, respectively, were the only pathogen identified by the panel of diagnostic tests used. Of the 64 patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia, bronchial wall thickening was observed most frequently (81%), followed by centrilobular nodules (78%), ground-glass attenuation (78%), and consolidation (61%). Bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules were observed more often in M. pneumoniae patients than in S. pneumoniae patients (p < 0.0001). The presence of bilateral bronchial wall thickening or centrilobular nodules was only seen in patients with M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Using the scoring system of the Japanese Respiratory Society guidelines and chest CT findings, 97% of M. pneumoniae patients were suspected to be M. pneumoniae pneumonia without serology. When comparing the CT findings between early stage and progressed stage in the same patients with severe pneumonia, the radiographic features of early stage M. pneumoniae pneumonia were not observed clearly in the progressed stage. The present results indicate that the diagnosis of M. pneumoniae pneumonia would appear to be reliable when found with a combination of bronchial wall thickening and centrilobular nodules in the CT findings. However, these CT findings are not observed in progressed severe M. pneumoniae pneumonia patients

  20. Pneumonia in the immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, J H; McDonald, G; Alton, H; Gordon, S B

    2010-12-01

    Pneumonia is an acute inflammation of the lower respiratory tract. Lower respiratory tract infection is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Pneumonia is most common at the extremes of life. Predisposing factors in children include an under-developed immune system together with other factors, such as malnutrition and over-crowding. In adults, tobacco smoking is the single most important preventable risk factor. The commonest infecting organisms in children are respiratory viruses and Streptoccocus pneumoniae. In adults, pneumonia can be broadly classified, on the basis of chest radiographic appearance, into lobar pneumonia, bronchopneumonia and pneumonia producing an interstitial pattern. Lobar pneumonia is most commonly associated with community acquired pneumonia, bronchopneumonia with hospital acquired infection and an interstitial pattern with the so called atypical pneumonias, which can be caused by viruses or organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Most cases of pneumonia can be managed with chest radiographs as the only form of imaging, but CT can detect pneumonia not visible on the chest radiograph and may be of value, particularly in the hospital setting. Complications of pneumonia include pleural effusion, empyema and lung abscess. The chest radiograph may initially indicate an effusion but ultrasound is more sensitive, allows characterisation in some cases and can guide catheter placement for drainage. CT can also be used to characterise and estimate the extent of pleural disease. Most lung abscesses respond to medical therapy, with surgery and image guided catheter drainage serving as options for those cases who do not respond.

  1. Cost of management of severe pneumonia in young children: systematic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shanshan; Sammon, Peter M.; King, Isobel; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Toscano, Cristiana M.; Araujo, Sheila N; Sinha, Anushua; Madhi, Shabir A.; Khandaker, Gulam; Yin, Jiehui Kevin; Booy, Robert; Huda, Tanvir M; Rahman, Qazi S; El Arifeen, Shams; Gentile, Angela; Giglio, Norberto; Bhuiyan, Mejbah U.; Sturm–Ramirez, Katharine; Gessner, Bradford D.; Nadjib, Mardiati; Carosone–Link, Phyllis J.; Simões, Eric AF; Child, Jason A; Ahmed, Imran; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Soofi, Sajid B; Khan, Rumana J; Campbell, Harry; Nair, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Background Childhood pneumonia is a major cause of childhood illness and the second leading cause of child death globally. Understanding the costs associated with the management of childhood pneumonia is essential for resource allocation and priority setting for child health. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify studies reporting data on the cost of management of pneumonia in children younger than 5 years old. We collected unpublished cost data on non–severe, severe and very severe pneumonia through collaboration with an international working group. We extracted data on cost per episode, duration of hospital stay and unit cost of interventions for the management of pneumonia. The mean (95% confidence interval, CI) and median (interquartile range, IQR) treatment costs were estimated and reported where appropriate. Results We identified 24 published studies eligible for inclusion and supplemented these with data from 10 unpublished studies. The 34 studies included in the cost analysis contained data on more than 95 000 children with pneumonia from both low– and–middle income countries (LMIC) and high–income countries (HIC) covering all 6 WHO regions. The total cost (per episode) for management of severe pneumonia was US$ 4.3 (95% CI 1.5–8.7), US$ 51.7 (95% CI 17.4–91.0) and US$ 242.7 (95% CI 153.6–341.4)–559.4 (95% CI 268.9–886.3) in community, out–patient facilities and different levels of hospital in–patient settings in LMIC. Direct medical cost for severe pneumonia in hospital inpatient settings was estimated to be 26.6%–115.8% of patients’ monthly household income in LMIC. The mean direct non–medical cost and indirect cost for severe pneumonia management accounted for 0.5–31% of weekly household income. The mean length of stay (LOS) in hospital for children with severe pneumonia was 5.8 (IQR 5.3–6.4) and 7.7 (IQR 5.5–9.9) days in LMIC and HIC respectively for these children. Conclusion This is the most

  2. Chest Radiograph Findings in Childhood Pneumonia Cases From the Multisite PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancourt, Nicholas; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Hammitt, Laura L; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Awori, Juliet O; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; Chipeta, James; DeLuca, Andrea N; Diallo, Mahamadou; Driscoll, Amanda J; Ebruke, Bernard E; Higdon, Melissa M; Jahan, Yasmin; Karron, Ruth A; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P; Nahar, Kamrun; Naorat, Sathapana; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Wa Somwe, Somwe; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Zaman, Syed M A; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are frequently used to assess pneumonia cases. Variations in CXR appearances between epidemiological settings and their correlation with clinical signs are not well documented. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health project enrolled 4232 cases of hospitalized World Health Organization (WHO)-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 9 sites in 7 countries (Bangladesh, the Gambia, Kenya, Mali, South Africa, Thailand, and Zambia). At admission, each case underwent a standardized assessment of clinical signs and pneumonia risk factors by trained health personnel, and a CXR was taken that was interpreted using the standardized WHO methodology. CXRs were categorized as abnormal (consolidation and/or other infiltrate), normal, or uninterpretable. CXRs were interpretable in 3587 (85%) cases, of which 1935 (54%) were abnormal (site range, 35%-64%). Cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely than those with normal CXRs to have hypoxemia (45% vs 26%), crackles (69% vs 62%), tachypnea (85% vs 80%), or fever (20% vs 16%) and less likely to have wheeze (30% vs 38%; all P pneumonia cases with abnormal CXRs were more likely to have signs typically associated with pneumonia. However, CXR-normal cases were common, and clinical signs considered indicative of pneumonia were present in substantial proportions of these cases. CXR-consolidation cases represent a group with an increased likelihood of death at 30 days post-discharge. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Pneumonia's second wind? A case study of the global health network for childhood pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, David

    2016-04-01

    Advocacy, policy, research and intervention efforts against childhood pneumonia have lagged behind other health issues, including malaria, measles and tuberculosis. Accelerating progress on the issue began in 2008, following decades of efforts by individuals and organizations to address the leading cause of childhood mortality and establish a global health network. This article traces the history of this network's formation and evolution to identify lessons for other global health issues. Through document review and interviews with current, former and potential network members, this case study identifies five distinct eras of activity against childhood pneumonia: a period of isolation (post WWII to 1984), the duration of WHO's Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) Programme (1984-1995), Integrated Management of Childhood illness's (IMCI) early years (1995-2003), a brief period of network re-emergence (2003-2008) and recent accelerating progress (2008 on). Analysis of these eras reveals the critical importance of building a shared identity in order to form an effective network and take advantage of emerging opportunities. During the ARI era, an initial network formed around a relatively narrow shared identity focused on community-level care. The shift to IMCI led to the partial dissolution of this network, stalled progress on addressing pneumonia in communities and missed opportunities. Frustrated with lack of progress on the issue, actors began forming a network and shared identity that included a broad spectrum of those whose interests overlap with pneumonia. As the network coalesced and expanded, its members coordinated and collaborated on conducting and sharing research on severity and tractability, crafting comprehensive strategies and conducting advocacy. These network activities exerted indirect influence leading to increased attention, funding, policies and some implementation. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of

  4. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia presenting with ipsilateral pleural effusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriratanaviriyakul, Narin; La, Hanh H; Albertson, Timothy E

    2016-08-12

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia is a rare idiopathic interstitial lung disease. The nearly pathognomonic radiographic finding is the peripheral distribution of alveolar opacities. Pleural effusions are rarely seen. We report a case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with transudative eosinophilic pleural effusion. A 57-year-old Hispanic woman, a nonsmoker with a history of controlled asthma, presented to the hospital with unresolving pneumonia despite three rounds of antibiotics over a 2-month period. She was later diagnosed with chronic eosinophilic pneumonia based on the presence of peripheral blood eosinophilia, the peripheral distribution of alveolar infiltrates on chest radiograph, and a lung parenchymal biopsy with infiltrates of eosinophils. Upon presentation, our patient had a right-sided moderate-sized pleural effusion. The pleural fluid profile was consistent with a transudative effusion with eosinophil predominance. Our patient responded promptly to oral corticosteroid treatment in a few days. The pulmonary infiltrates and pleural effusion subsided on a 1-month follow-up chest radiograph after starting corticosteroid treatment. We report the first case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia presenting with pneumonia with ipsilateral transudative eosinophilic pleural effusion. Like other cases of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia, early recognition and diagnosis is essential and prompt treatment with corticosteroids is the mainstay of therapy. Pleural effusion resolved without the further need for therapeutic thoracentesis.

  5. mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sarah Ginsburg

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing

  6. Cost-effectiveness analysis of the national implementation of integrated community case management and community-based health planning and services in Ghana for the treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribano Ferrer, Blanca; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Gyapong, Margaret; Bruce, Jane; Narh Bana, Solomon A; Narh, Clement T; Allotey, Naa-Korkor; Glover, Roland; Azantilow, Naa-Charity; Bart-Plange, Constance; Sagoe-Moses, Isabella; Webster, Jayne

    2017-07-05

    Ghana has developed two main community-based strategies that aim to increase access to quality treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia: the integrated community case management (iCCM) and the community-based health planning and services (CHPS). The aim of the study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of these strategies under programme conditions. A cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment given was the effectiveness measure used. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment data was obtained from a household survey conducted 2 and 8 years after implementation of iCCM in the Volta and Northern Regions of Ghana, respectively. The study population was carers of children under-5 years who had fever, diarrhoea and/or cough in the last 2 weeks prior to the interview. Costs data was obtained mainly from the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP), the Ministry of Health, CHPS compounds and from a household survey. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia was more cost-effective under the iCCM than under CHPS in the Volta Region, even after adjusting for different discount rates, facility costs and iCCM and CHPS utilization, but not when iCCM appropriate treatment was reduced by 50%. Due to low numbers of carers visiting a CBA in the Northern Region it was not possible to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis in this region. However, the cost analysis showed that iCCM in the Northern Region had higher cost per malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia case diagnosed and treated when compared to the Volta Region and to the CHPS strategy in the Northern Region. Integrated community case management was more cost-effective than CHPS for the treatment of malaria, diarrhoea and suspected pneumonia when utilized by carers of children under-5 years in the Volta Region. A revision of the iCCM strategy in the Northern Region is needed to improve its cost-effectiveness. Long-term financing

  7. Predictors and outcome of hypoxemia in severely malnourished children under five with pneumonia: a case control design.

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    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available There is lack of information in the medical literature on predictors of hypoxemia in severely malnourished children with pneumonia, although hypoxemia is common and is often associated with fatal outcome in this population. We explored the predictors of hypoxemia in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and severe acute malnutrition (SAM.In this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of both sexes, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B with radiological pneumonia and hypoxemia during April 2011 to April 2012 were studied. SAM children with pneumonia and hypoxemia (SpO(2<90% constituted the cases (n = 37, and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia but without hypoxemia constituted controls (n = 111.The case-fatality was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (30% vs. 4%; p<0.001. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as nasal flaring, head nodding, inability to drink, and crackles in lungs, fast breathing (95% CI = 1.09-13.55, lower chest wall in-drawing (95% CI = 2.48-43.41, and convulsion at admission (95% CI = 3.14-234.01 were identified as independent predictors of hypoxemia in this population. The sensitivity of fast breathing, lower chest wall in-drawing and convulsion at admission and their 95% confidence intervals (CI to predict hypoxemia were 84 (67-93%, 89 (74-96%, and 19 (9-36% respectively, and their specificity were 53 (43-63%, 60 (51-69% and 98 (93-100% respectively.Fast breathing and lower chest wall in-drawing were the best predictors of hypoxemia in SAM children with pneumonia. There thus, in resources poor settings where pulse oximetry is not available, identification of these simple clinical predictors of hypoxemia in such children could be reliably used for early O(2 supplementation in addition to other

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Estrada, Sergio; Borgatta, Bárbara; Rello, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. PMID:26855594

  9. Nitrofurantoin-Associated Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia: Report of a Case

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    Mark E Fenton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia due to nitrofurantoin has rarely been reported and is associated with poor outcomes. A case of nitrofurantoin-associated bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia responsive to drug withdrawal and corticosteroids is presented.

  10. [Case managers experience improved trajectories for cancer patients after implementation of the case manager function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Karina Rahbek; Nafei, Hanne; Jakobsen, Stine Finne; Gandrup, Per; Knudsen, Janne Lehmann

    2015-06-08

    Case managers are increasingly used to optimize trajectories for patients. This study is based on a questionnaire among case managers in cancer care, aiming at the clarification of the func­tion and its impact on especially patient safety, when handing over the responsibility. The results show a major variation in how the function is organized, the level of competence and the task to be handled. The responsibility has in general been nar­rowed to department level. Overall, the case managers believe that the function has optimized pathways for cancer patients and improved safety, but barriers persist.

  11. Management of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Giacobbe, D R; Giamarellou, H; Viscoli, C; Daikos, G L; Dimopoulos, G; De Rosa, F G; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, E J; Rossolini, G M; Righi, E; Karaiskos, I; Tumbarello, M; Nicolau, D P; Viale, P L; Poulakou, G

    2018-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) has become one of the most important contemporary pathogens, especially in endemic areas. To provide practical suggestion for physicians dealing with the management of KPC-KP infections in critically ill patients, based on expert opinions. PubMed search for relevant publications related to the management of KPC-KP infections. A panel of experts developed a list of 12 questions to be addressed. In view of the current lack of high-level evidence, they were asked to provide answers on the bases of their knowledge and experience in the field. The panel identified several key aspects to be addressed when dealing with KPC-KP in critically ill patients (preventing colonization in the patient, preventing infection in the colonized patient and colonization of his or her contacts, reducing mortality in the infected patient by rapidly diagnosing the causative agent and promptly adopting the best therapeutic strategy) and provided related suggestions that were based on the available observational literature and the experience of panel members. Diagnostic technologies could speed up the diagnosis of KPC-KP infections. Combination treatment should be preferred to monotherapy in cases of severe infections. For non-critically ill patients without severe infections, results from randomized clinical trials are needed for ultimately weighing benefits and costs of using combinations rather than monotherapy. Multifaceted infection control interventions are needed to decrease the rates of colonization and cross-transmission of KPC-KP. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of treatment failure among Kenyan children hospitalised with severe community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study of the clinical effectiveness of WHO pneumonia case management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agweyu, Ambrose; Kibore, Minnie; Digolo, Lina; Kosgei, Caroline; Maina, Virginia; Mugane, Samson; Muma, Sarah; Wachira, John; Waiyego, Mary; Maleche-Obimbo, Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    To determine the extent and pattern of treatment failure (TF) among children hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia at a large tertiary hospital in Kenya. We followed up children aged 2-59 months with WHO-defined severe pneumonia (SP) and very severe pneumonia (VSP) for up to 5 days for TF using two definitions: (i) documentation of pre-defined clinical signs resulting in change of treatment (ii) primary clinician's decision to change treatment with or without documentation of the same pre-defined clinical signs. We enrolled 385 children. The risk of TF varied between 1.8% (95% CI 0.4-5.1) and 12.4% (95% CI 7.9-18.4) for SP and 21.4% (95% CI 15.9-27) and 39.3% (95% CI 32.5-46.4) for VSP depending on the definition applied. Higher rates were associated with early changes in therapy by clinician in the absence of an obvious clinical rationale. Non-adherence to treatment guidelines was observed for 70/169 (41.4%) and 67/201 (33.3%) of children with SP and VSP, respectively. Among children with SP, adherence to treatment guidelines was associated with the presence of wheeze on initial assessment (P = 0.02), while clinician non-adherence to guideline-recommended treatments for VSP tended to occur in children with altered consciousness (P < 0.001). Using propensity score matching to account for imbalance in the distribution of baseline clinical characteristics among children with VSP revealed no difference in TF between those treated with the guideline-recommended regimen vs. more costly broad-spectrum alternatives [risk difference 0.37 (95% CI -0.84 to 0.51)]. Before revising current pneumonia case management guidelines, standardised definitions of TF and appropriate studies of treatment effectiveness of alternative regimens are required. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and atypical Stevens-Johnson syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Karen A; Rappaport, Lara D; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Wadowsky, Robert M; Wald, Ellen R; Michaels, Marian M

    2007-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired respiratory illness in the adolescent population. Stevens-Johnson syndrome is an extrapulmonary manifestation that has been associated with M. pneumoniae infections. Three adolescent males presented within a 1-month period with M. pneumoniae respiratory illnesses and severe mucositis but without the classic rash typical of Stevens-Johnson. Diagnosis was facilitated by the use of a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. This case series highlights the potential for M. pneumoniae-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome to occur without rash and supports the use of polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis.

  14. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia after ingestion of shark liver oil: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jae Bum; Seong, Hyeon Lim; Park, Chan Sup; Park, Yang Hee; Lee, Sang Sun

    1991-01-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia was first described in 1925 by Laughlen and a sizeable literature developed, reaching a peak in the 1940s. Two cases of exogenous lipoid pneumonia in children were reported domestically. We wish to report a case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia presented with bilateral air-space consolidation in a 53-year-old man who had a long history of ingestion of shark liver oil. This report describes its radiological findings, along with a review of the literature

  15. Disease characteristics and management of hospitalised adolescents and adults with community-acquired pneumonia in China: a retrospective multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiqian; Han, Xiudi; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Chunxiao; Suo, Lijun; Wang, Jingxiang; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Guangqiang; Yao, Xuexin; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chunxue; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yanli; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Xiaojing; Li, Lijuan; Uyeki, Timothy M; Wang, Chen; Cao, Bin

    2018-02-15

    To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in China. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study. 13 teaching hospitals in northern, central and southern China from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 PARTICIPANTS: Information on hospitalised patients aged ≥14 years with radiographically confirmed pneumonia with illness onset in the community was collected using standard case report forms. Resource use for CAP management. Of 14 793 patients screened, 5828 with radiographically confirmed CAP were included in the final analysis. Low mortality risk patients with a CURB-65 score 0-1 and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class I-II accounted for 81.2% (4434/5594) and 56.4% (2034/3609) patients, respectively. 21.7% (1111/5130) patients had already achieved clinical stability on admission. A definite or probable pathogen was identified only in 12.7% (738/5828) patients. 40.9% (1575/3852) patients without pseudomonal infection risk factors received antimicrobial overtreatment regimens. The median duration between clinical stability to discharge was 5.0 days with 30-day mortality of 4.2%. These data demonstrated the overuse of health resources in CAP management, indicating that there is potential for improvement and substantial savings to healthcare systems in China. NCT02489578; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study.

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    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children.In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50 with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354. Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001. In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons.We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case fatality in such children.

  17. [Non allergic simple eosinophilic pneumonia--Löffler syndrome--a case report study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meta-Jevtović, Ivana; Tomović, Miroslav S; Mojsilović, Slavica; Petrović, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Löffler syndrome is an acute, pneumonia of unknown ethiology. This disease is not often associated with bronchial asthma. In its asymptomatic form, this disease is reversible, transient, self-limited with no requests for specific therapy regimen. In the symptomatic form, as well as during its progression, treatment with steroids is very effective. Furthermore, in both acute eosinophilic and idiopathic chronic eosinophilic form, this kind of therapy ensures survival. The case of a 53-year-old Caucasian woman was presented with 2-month history of low grade fever, shortness of breath, cough and reduced exercise tolerance. Although she had an allergic accident on insects in history, non allergy reactions as well as an obstructive disease with that kind of origin were not detected on admission. The diagnosis of simple eosinophilic pneumonia (SEP) (Löffler's syndrome) was confirmed by transbronchial biopsy and by sternal testing. The peripheral blood eosinophilia with pulmonary eosinophilic infiltrates on X ray chest radiography were observed during clinical examination. Biopsy specimen of the lung parenchym showed changes associated with Löffler's syndrome. The diagnosis was, also, confirmed according to the radiographic findings of unilateral migratory infiltrates consistent pneumonia. Churg Strauss syndrome (CSS) has to be considered in this differential diagnosis. Frequently, this disease has extrinsic bronchial asthma with eosinophilic pneumonia in history: asthma is often associated with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. In the reported case, treatment with steroids resulted in a marked clinical improvement compared to nonsteroid therapy.

  18. Determinants of Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) non-severe pneumonia classification and care in Malawi health facilities: Analysis of a national facility census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Emily White; Nsona, Humphreys; Carvajal-Aguirre, Liliana; Amouzou, Agbessi; Hildenwall, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Research shows inadequate Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI)-pneumonia care in various low-income settings but evidence is largely from small-scale studies with limited evidence of patient-, provider- and facility-levels determinants of IMCI non-severe pneumonia classification and its management. The Malawi Service Provision Assessment 2013-2014 included 3149 outpatients aged 2-59 months with completed observations, interviews and re-examinations. Mixed-effects logistic regression models quantified the influence of patient-, provider and facility-level determinants on having IMCI non-severe pneumonia and its management in observed consultations. Among 3149 eligible outpatients, 590 (18.7%) had IMCI non-severe pneumonia classification in re-examination. 228 (38.7%) classified cases received first-line antibiotics and 159 (26.9%) received no antibiotics. 18.6% with cough or difficult breathing had 60-second respiratory rates counted during consultations, and conducting this assessment was significantly associated with IMCI training ever received (odds ratio (OR) = 2.37, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.29-4.31) and negative rapid diagnostic test results (OR = 3.21, 95% CI: 1.45-7.13). Older children had lower odds of assessments than infants (OR = 48-59 months: 0.35, 95% CI: 0.16-0.75). Children presenting with any of the following complaints also had reduced odds of assessment: fever, diarrhea, skin problem or any danger sign. First-line antibiotic treatment for classified cases was significantly associated with high temperatures (OR = 3.26, 95% CI: 1.24-8.55) while older children had reduced odds of first-line treatment compared to infants (OR = 48-59 months: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.10-0.83). RDT-confirmed malaria was a significant predictor of no antibiotic receipt for IMCI non-severe pneumonia (OR = 10.65, 95% CI: 2.39-47.36). IMCI non-severe pneumonia care was sub-optimal in Malawi health facilities in 2013-2014 with inadequate

  19. Ventilator-associated pneumonia management in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertos, Raquel; Caralt, Berta; Rello, Jordi

    2011-03-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a frequent adverse event in the intensive care unit.We review recent publications about the management and prevention of VAP. The latest care bundles introduced standard interventions to facilitate implementation of evidence-based clinical guidelines and to improve the outcome of patients. Recent studies find that prevention management of ventilated patients decreases the risk of VAP. Enteral feeding, considered a risk factor for VAP, currently has been recommended, with appropriate administration, for all critical ill patients if no contraindications exist. In view of the recently available data, it can be concluded that the implementation of care bundles on the general management of ventilated patients in daily practice has reduced the VAP rates. The main pharmacological measures to prevent VAP are proper hands hygiene, high nurse-to-patient ratio, avoid unnecessary transfer of ventilated patients, use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation, shortening weaning period, avoid the use of nasal intubation, prevent bio-film deposition in endotracheal tube, aspiration of subglottic secretions, maintenance of adequate pressure of endotracheal cuffs, avoid manipulation of ventilator circuits, semi-recumbent position and adequate enteral feeding.In addition, updated guidelines incorporate more comprehensive diagnostic protocols to the evidence-based management of VAP.

  20. Cost of management of severe pneumonia in young children: systematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhang 1,2

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood pneumonia is a major cause of childhood illness and the second leading cause of child death globally. Understanding the costs associated with the management of childhood pneumonia is essential for resource allocation and priority setting for child health.

  1. Zoonotic atypical pneumonia due to Chlamydophila psittaci: First reported psittacosis case in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Cheng

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human psittacosis caused by Chlamydophila psittaci is one of the most common zoonotic atypical pneumonias featuring pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary infections. Most of the cases involve avian contact history especially with psittacine birds. Herein we report a 44-year-old male patient displaying atypical pneumonia symptoms of intermittent fever, dry cough, chest pain, dyspnea, headache, hepatitis, and hyponatremia. He had two sick cockatiels, one of which had died a month previously. A microimmunofluorescence test was performed to check the serum antibody levels against Chlamydophila psittaci. The serum IgM titer showed positive titer of 1:256, 1:256, and 1:128 on Days 11, 23, and 43 after disease onset, respectively. His fever subsided soon and clinical symptoms improved after minocycline was administrated on Day 12. The psittacosis case was confirmed by history of psittacine bird contact, clinical symptoms, treatment response, and positive IgM titer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a psittacosis case in Taiwan.

  2. Hypersensitivity pneumonia-nonspecific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis histopathologic presentation: a study in diagnosis and long-term management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Robert L; Andrews, Charles P

    2003-02-01

    Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis (NSIP) has been classified a form of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia/fibrosis. We have shown that cases of NSIP without demonstrable serum precipitins may be caused by inhalation of high levels of mold and/or bacteria in closed environments. We report a patient with a clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of NSIP without serum precipitins caused by a microbial contamination in her home. Her case was converted from an acute to an insidious clinical presentation by inadequate remediation. A prolonged avoidance-challenge technique demonstrated that this case of NSIP was a form of hypersensitivity pneumonia that was reversible by effective remediation. The patient was identified by compatible signs and symptoms, roentgenographic studies, pulmonary function tests, and a transbronchial lung biopsy. She was further evaluated with a detailed environmental history, serologic tests, and investigation of the home environment. An environmental avoidance and challenge technique was performed to confirm cause and effect and to determine that remediation had been effective. Review of the biopsy showed NSIP and failed to reveal any non-caseating granuloma formation. Investigation of the home revealed a Cladosporium species contamination of the air conditioning system and Penicillium species beneath an entryway carpet. Serum precipitins to commercial antigens of common mold to the south Texas area were negative. Avoidance and challenge techniques confirmed the home as the causative environment in this case of NSIP. The patient has been free of signs and symptoms and has taken no medication for interstitial lung disease over the past 30 months. Some cases of NSIP may be caused by inhalation of microbial antigen(s) in a closed environment. An environmental challenge technique was an effective method to determine the causative environment and confirm that remediation had been effective. Inadequate remediation may lead to symptomatic

  3. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  4. Prolonged delay for controlling KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae outbreak: the role of clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delory, T; Seringe, E; Antoniotti, G; Novakova, I; Goulenok, C; Paysant, I; Boyer, S; Carbonne, A; Naas, T; Astagneau, P

    2015-10-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are becoming of immediate concern for infection control policies. Prompt detection of CPE on health care setting admission is crucial to halt the spread of an outbreak. We report a cluster of 13 Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-2-producing K pneumoniae cases in a tertiary care hospital.The objective of this study was to identify contributing factors originating the outbreak. An outbreak investigation was conducted using descriptive epidemiology, observation of health care practices, and interviews of management staff. A root cause analysis was performed to identify patent and latent failures of infection control measures using the association of litigation and risk management method. The main patent failure was the delay in identifying KPC-2-producing K pneumoniae carriers. Contributing factors were work and environmental factors: understaffing, lack of predefined protocols, staff members' characteristics, and underlying patients' characteristics. Latent failures were as follows: no promotion of the national guidelines for prevention of CPE transmission, no clear procedure for the management of patients hospitalized abroad, no clear initiative for promoting a culture of quality in the hospital, biologic activity recently outsourced to a private laboratory, and poor communication among hospital members. Clinical management should be better promoted to control hospital outbreaks and should include team work and safety culture. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Case Report of Necrotizing Fasciitis Associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae

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    Lei Jiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is an extremely rare and life-threatening bacterial soft tissue infection. We report a case of early necrotizing fasciitis associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in a 26-year-old man who was immunocompromised with mixed connective tissue disease. The patient presented with acute, painful, erythematous, and edematous skin lesions of his right lower back, which rapidly progressed to the right knee. The patient underwent surgical exploration, and a diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis was confirmed by pathological evidence of necrosis of the fascia and neutrophil infiltration in tissue biopsies. Cultures of fascial tissue biopsies and blood samples were positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis resulting from Streptococcus pneumoniae diagnosed at early phase; the patient recovered well without surgical debridement.

  6. Immunomodulators targeting MARCO expression improve resistance to postinfluenza bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Muzo; Gibbons, John G; DeLoid, Glen M; Bedugnis, Alice S; Thimmulappa, Rajesh K; Biswal, Shyam; Kobzik, Lester

    2017-07-01

    Downregulation of the alveolar macrophage (AM) receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) leads to susceptibility to postinfluenza bacterial pneumonia, a major cause of morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine whether immunomodulation of MARCO could improve host defense and resistance to secondary bacterial pneumonia. RNAseq analysis identified a striking increase in MARCO expression between days 9 and 11 after influenza infection and indicated important roles for Akt and Nrf2 in MARCO recovery. In vitro, primary human AM-like monocyte-derived macrophages (AM-MDMs) and THP-1 macrophages were treated with IFNγ to model influenza effects. Activators of Nrf2 (sulforaphane) or Akt (SC79) caused increased MARCO expression and a MARCO-dependent improvement in phagocytosis in IFNγ-treated cells and improved survival in mice with postinfluenza pneumococcal pneumonia. Transcription factor analysis also indicated a role for transcription factor E-box (TFEB) in MARCO recovery. Overexpression of TFEB in THP-1 cells led to marked increases in MARCO. The ability of Akt activation to increase MARCO expression in IFNγ-treated AM-MDMs was abrogated in TFEB-knockdown cells, indicating Akt increases MARCO expression through TFEB. Increasing MARCO expression by targeting Nrf2 signaling or the Akt-TFEB-MARCO pathway are promising strategies to improve bacterial clearance and survival in postinfluenza bacterial pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Massive empyema caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in an adult: A case report

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    Ron Merav

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae is responsible for more than 20% of community acquired pneumonia cases, and capable of causing upper respiratory illness as well. Complications of M.pneumoniae infections include CNS involvement but other as pericarditis were also reported. The lack of feasible culture methods and under appreciation of the pathogens ability to cause invasive disease leads to reduced number of diagnosed M.pneumoniae related complications. In contrast to many other respiratory pathogens causing pneumonia, M. pneumoniae related severe pleural complications were almost never reported. Case presentation We report a previously healthy 57 years old woman presented with indolent massive right pleural effusion, leukocytosis and elevated ESR. Extensive microbiological evaluation didn't reveal any pathogen in the pus even before antibiotic treatment was started. Surprisingly, M.pneumoniae DNA was detected in the pus from the empyema using PCR designed to detect M.pneumoniae. A serological assay (Serodia-Myco II using convalescent serum was indeterminate with a titer of 1:80. The patient responded well to a treatment that included right thoracotomy with pleural decortication and a combination of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory medications. Conclusion M.pneumoniae related empyema was never reported before in adult patients and was reported in only a few pediatric patients. In our patient there was no evidence to any common pathogens even before initiating antibiotic treatment. The only pathogen detected was M.pneumoniae. In this patient, serology was not helpful in establishing the diagnosis of M.pneumoniae related diseases, as was suggested before for older patients. We suggest that M.pneumoniae related empyema is probably under-diagnosed complication due to insensitivity of serology in older patients and under use of other diagnosis methods.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia in children - a changing spectrum of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, David M; Zar, Heather J

    2017-10-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented.

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia in children. A changing spectrum of disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, David M.; Zar, Heather J.

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented. (orig.)

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia in children. A changing spectrum of disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, David M. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); New Somerset Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Cape Town (South Africa); Zar, Heather J. [Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2017-10-15

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in children outside the neonatal period, despite advances in prevention and management. Over the last 20 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the incidence of childhood pneumonia and pneumonia-associated mortality. New conjugate vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae have contributed to decreases in radiologic, clinical and complicated pneumonia cases and have reduced hospitalization and mortality. The importance of co-infections with multiple pathogens and the predominance of viral-associated disease are emerging. Better access to effective preventative and management strategies is needed in low- and middle-income countries, while new strategies are needed to address the residual burden of disease once these have been implemented. (orig.)

  11. Viral pneumonia in adults in sub-Saharan Africa – epidemiology, aetiology, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Ho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia causes substantial morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa with an estimated 131 million new cases each year. Viruses – such as influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus – are now recognised as important causes of respiratory disease in older children and adults in the developed world following the emergence of sensitive molecular diagnostic tests, recent severe viral epidemics, and the discovery of novel viruses. Few studies have comprehensively evaluated the viral aetiology of adult pneumonia in Africa, but it is likely to differ from Western settings due to varying seasonality and the high proportion of patients with immunosuppression and co-morbidities. Emerging data suggest a high prevalence of viral pathogens, as well as multiple viral and viral/bacterial infections in African adults with pneumonia. However, the interpretation of positive results from highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction tests can be challenging. Therapeutic and preventative options against viral respiratory infections are currently limited in the African setting. This review summarises the current state of the epidemiology, aetiology, diagnosis and management of viral pneumonia in sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Influenza A (H1N1) organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrego, Alfons; Pajares, Virginia; Mola, Anna; Lerma, Enrique; Franquet, Tomás

    2010-04-27

    In November 2009, countries around the world reported confirmed cases of pandemic influenza H1N1, including over 6000 deaths. No peak in activity has been seen. The most common causes of death are pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with organising pneumonia associated with influenza A (H1N1) infection confirmed by transbronchial lung biopsy. Organising pneumonia should also be considered as a possible complication of influenza A (H1N1) infection, given that these patients can benefit from early diagnosis and appropriate specific management.

  13. BILATERAL ENDOGENOUS BACTERIAL ENDOPHTHALMITIS SECONDARY TO PNEUMONIA IN AN AIDS PATIENT : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Ku.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTI ON: Endogenous or metastatic endophthalmitis is a very rare sever form of ocular disease which is uncommon now - a - days. Prevalence of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis is 2 - 8% of all cases of endophthalmitis 1 . Mostly it is associated with chronic disease like diabetes mellitus, renal failure, liver abscesses, prolong placement of catheter, IV line or central venous line, drug abusers and immunocompromise d patients. Gram +bacteria are the most common causative organism of the endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis . 1 A few cases of endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis due to klebsiella pneumonias, a gram - ve organism have been documented and majority of them were in Taiwan . 2, 3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia endophthalmitis is associated with diabetes mellitus and hepatic abscesses can be bilateral and resulted into poor visual outcome . 2,3,4,5,6, 7 K. pneumonia pneumonia has been reported most frequently from patients with alcoholic liver diseases and one of the common cause of acute osteomyelitis and septic arthritis . 8,9 In this scenario we report the case of a Malawian in African Continent who developed bilateral endogenous bacterial endophthalmitis after suffering from pneumonia in immunocompromise state. PURPOSE : to report a case bilateral endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to pneumonia in an AIDS patient . DESIGN : Observational case report . METHODS : A patient with bilateral pain full red eye with diminution of vision was seen in c onsultation by ophthalmology. RESULT : with clinical characteristic and laboratory diagnosis of sputum and blood conf i rmed the causative agent for pneumonia and endophthalmitis is K.pneumonia. CONCLUSION : it is unusual disease, required early detection and prompt treatment.

  14. Two unusual cases of successful treatment of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome

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    Hiroki Namikawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few Japanese cases of hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae invasive syndrome have recently been reported. Although extrahepatic complications from bacteremic dissemination have been observed, infected aneurysms are rare. Furthermore, the primary source of infection is generally a liver abscess, and is rarely the prostate. Therefore, we report two atypical cases of hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae invasive syndrome. Case presentation The first case was an 81-year-old Japanese man with no significant medical history, who was referred to our hospital for vision loss in his right eye. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed abscesses in the liver and the prostate, and an infected left internal iliac artery aneurysm. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. Cultures of the liver abscess specimen and aqueous humor revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried the magA gene (mucoviscosity-associated gene A and the rmpA gene (regulator of mucoid phenotype A. We performed enucleation of the right eyeball, percutaneous transhepatic drainage, coil embolization of the aneurysm, and administered a 6-week course of antibiotic treatment. The second case was a 69-year-old Japanese man with diabetes mellitus, who was referred to our hospital with fever, pollakiuria, and pain on urination. Contrast-enhanced whole-body computed tomography revealed lung and prostate abscesses, but no liver abscesses. Contrast-enhanced head magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain abscesses. The sputum, urine, prostate abscess specimen, and aqueous humor cultures revealed K. pneumoniae with the hypermucoviscosity phenotype, which carried magA and rmpA. We performed enucleation of the left eyeball, percutaneous drainage of the prostate abscess, and administered a 5-week course of antibiotic treatment. Conclusions Hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae can cause infected

  15. Principles of Antibiotic Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael T; Niederman, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) encompasses a broad spectrum of disease severity and may require outpatient, inpatient, or intensive care management. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely offending pathogens and the severity of disease. This review summarizes key principles in starting treatment and provides recommended empiric therapy regimens for each site of care. In addition, we discuss the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory role macrolides play in CAP, as well as specific information for managing individual CAP pathogens such as community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae . We also examine several novel antibiotics being developed for CAP and review the evidence guiding duration of therapy and current best practices for the transition of hospitalized patients from intravenous antibiotics to oral therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Climate variability and nonstationary dynamics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozuka, Daisuke; Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    A stationary association between climate factors and epidemics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) pneumonia has been widely assumed. However, it is unclear whether elements of the local climate that are relevant to M. pneumoniae pneumonia transmission have stationary signatures of climate factors on their dynamics over different time scales. We performed a cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the patterns of association between monthly M. pneumoniae cases in Fukuoka, Japan, from 2000 to 2012 and indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Monthly M. pneumoniae cases were strongly associated with the dynamics of both the IOD and ENSO for the 1-2-year periodic mode in 2005-2007 and 2010-2011. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of M. pneumoniae epidemics. Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary, possibly non-linear, patterns of association between M. pneumoniae cases and climatic factors in early warning systems.

  17. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia: a case report and review of the literature.

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    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Oikonomou, Anastasia; Froudarakis, Marios; Zarogoulidis, Pavlos; Steiropoulos, Paschalis; Mikroulis, Dimitrios; Antoniades, Antonis; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2009-10-12

    Organising pneumonia is a distinct histopathological entity characterized by intra-alveolar buds of granulation tissue, called Masson bodies, which mainly comprise of activated fibroblasts and loose connective tissue. This histopathologic pattern has been described in idiopathic cases, characterizing cryptogenic organising pneumonia as well as in the context of pulmonary infection, drug-induced pneumonitis and following lung transplantation. Although distinct as a clinical and pathological entity, community organising pneumonia may present with atypical clinical and pathological features, such as intra-alveolar fillings of fibrin balls and organising tissue that resembles acute respiratory distress syndrome or diffuse alveolar damage. The latter characteristics constitute a recently described anatomoclinical entity called acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia. Here, we describe a rare case of acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia, in an otherwise healthy 65-year-old Greek woman who complained of dry cough, fever, weight loss and progressive dyspnoea. She had never been a smoker. Her clinical symptoms showed a rapid deterioration in the two weeks before admission, despite a course of oral antibiotics. After excluding infection and malignancy with routine laboratory tests and flexible bronchoscopy, high resolution computed tomography and video assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy were performed. Diagnosis was based on radiological features typical of community organising pneumonia coupled with pathologic features characteristic of acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and showed excellent clinical and radiological response three months after treatment initiation. Acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia is an extremely rare pathologic entity, often misdiagnosed as typical community organising pneumonia. To our knowledge, this is the seventh case of acute fibrinous and organising pneumonia in the literature, with no

  18. Radiation-Induced Organizing Pneumonia: A Characteristic Disease that Requires Symptom-Oriented Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Keisuke; Seo, Yuji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-27

    Radiation-induced organizing pneumonia (RIOP) is an inflammatory lung disease that is occasionally observed after irradiation to the breast. It is a type of secondary organizing pneumonia that is characterized by infiltrates outside the irradiated volume that are sometimes migratory. Corticosteroids work acutely, but relapse of pneumonia is often experienced. Management of RIOP should simply be symptom-oriented, and the use of corticosteroids should be limited to severe symptoms from the perspective not only of cost-effectiveness but also of cancer treatment. Once steroid therapy is started, it takes a long time to stop it due to frequent relapses. We review RIOP from the perspective of its diagnosis, epidemiology, molecular pathogenesis, and patient management.

  19. An Unusual Case of Cystic Fibrosis Associated Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia in an Infant

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    Ravinder Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP is one of the major infections in patients with impaired immunity. The entity is common in HIV-seropositive individuals but quite very rare in HIV-seronegative individuals especially children. We report here a case of 16-week-old HIV-seronegative infant with chief complaint of chronic cough of one month of evolution. Sweat chloride test for diagnosis of cystic fibrosis was positive. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was collected and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated on culture. Empirical antibiotic regimen comprising ceftriaxone and azithromycin was initiated that was switched to meropenem as per antimicrobial susceptibility report, but the patient did not improve. Subsequently, an immunofluorescence staining of BAL fluid was performed and P. jiroveci cysts were detected. Following a laboratory confirmation of Pneumocystis pneumonia, cotrimoxazole was added and the clinical condition of the patient significantly improved. This is an unusual case wherein unsuspected PJP occurred and since signs and symptoms of the patient persisted even after the initiation of antimicrobial therapy for Pseudomonas infection and resolved only after treatment for PJP was started, it suggests a causative role of P. jiroveci rather than colonization/contamination.

  20. Clinical evaluation of the need for carbapenems to treat community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Kanemoto, Koji; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Shiotani, Seiji; Hirose, Yumi; Suzuki, Masatsune; Ishikawa, Hiroichi

    2015-08-01

    Carbapenems have an overall broad antibacterial spectrum and should be protected against from the acquisition of drug resistance. The clinical advantages of carbapenem in cases of pneumonia have not been certified and the need for antipseudomonal antimicrobial agents to treat healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) remains controversial. We introduced an antimicrobial stewardship program for carbapenem and tazobactam/piperacillin use and investigated the effects of this program on the clinical outcomes of 591 pneumonia cases that did not require intensive care unit management, mechanical ventilation or treatment with vasopressor agents [221 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and 370 patients with HCAP]. Compared with the pre-intervention period, age, comorbidities and the severity and etiology of pneumonia did not differ during the intervention period. Carbapenems were rarely used during the intervention period in cases of pneumonia (CAP: 12% vs. 1%, HCAP: 13% vs. 1%), while antipseudomonal beta-lactam use was reduced from 33% to 8% among cases with HCAP. This reduction in the rate of carbapenem administration did not have an impact on the prognosis in the cases of CAP, and the in-hospital mortality was lower among the patients with HCAP during the intervention period (15% vs. 5%, p = 0.013). The causes of death in the cases of HCAP were not directly related to pneumonia during the intervention period. The current study shows that carbapenem use can be avoided in cases of CAP or HCAP that are not in a critical condition. The frequent use of antipseudomonal beta-lactams does not improve the clinical outcomes of HCAP. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Two cases of monomicrobial intraabdominal abscesses due to KPC - 3 Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 clone

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    Madonia Simona

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the etiology of pyogenic liver and pancreatic abscesses is an important factor in determining the success of combined surgical and antibiotic treatment. Literature shows geographical variations in the prevalence and distribution of causative organisms, and the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing bacteria is an emerging cause of abdominal infections. Case presentation We herein describe two cases of intra-abdominal abscesses due to monomicrobial infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 258 producing K. pneumoniae carbapenemase 3 (KPC-Kp. In case 1, a 50-year-old HIV-negative Italian woman with chronic pancreatitis showed infection of a pancreatic pseudocystic lesion caused by KPC-Kp. In case 2, a 64-year-old HIV- negative Italian woman with pancreatic neoplasm and liver metastases developed a liver abscess due to KPC after surgery. Both women were admitted to our hospital but to different surgical units. The clonal relationship between the two isolates was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. In case 2, the patient was already colonized at admission and inter-hospital transmission of the pathogen was presumed. A long-term combination regimen of colistin with tigecycline and percutaneous drainage resulted in full recovery and clearance of the multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogen. Conclusions Timely microbiological diagnosis, the combined use of new and old antibiotics and radiological intervention appeared to be valuable in managing these serious conditions. The emergence and dissemination of MDR organisms is posing an increasing challenge for physicians to develop new therapeutic strategies and control and prevention frameworks.

  2. Climate variability and nonstationary dynamics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia in Japan.

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    Daisuke Onozuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A stationary association between climate factors and epidemics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae pneumonia has been widely assumed. However, it is unclear whether elements of the local climate that are relevant to M. pneumoniae pneumonia transmission have stationary signatures of climate factors on their dynamics over different time scales. METHODS: We performed a cross-wavelet coherency analysis to assess the patterns of association between monthly M. pneumoniae cases in Fukuoka, Japan, from 2000 to 2012 and indices for the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD and El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO. RESULTS: Monthly M. pneumoniae cases were strongly associated with the dynamics of both the IOD and ENSO for the 1-2-year periodic mode in 2005-2007 and 2010-2011. This association was non-stationary and appeared to have a major influence on the synchrony of M. pneumoniae epidemics. CONCLUSIONS: Our results call for the consideration of non-stationary, possibly non-linear, patterns of association between M. pneumoniae cases and climatic factors in early warning systems.

  3. Management of Rhodococcus equi pneumonia in foals

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    Johns I

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Imogen Johns Department of Clinical Sciences and Services, Royal Veterinary College, North Mymms, UK Abstract: Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen, is the most important cause of pneumonia in foals aged 3 weeks to 5 months. The disease occurs worldwide, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality on endemically affected farms. Foals appear to become infected early in life, but clinical signs are typically delayed until 1–3 months of age because of the insidious nature of the disease. Although pneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation, up to 74% of foals may concurrently have extrapulmonary disorders, including both extrapulmonary infections (abdominal abscessation, colitis, osteomyelitis and immune-mediated disorders (nonseptic synovitis, uveitis. Diagnosis is based on the combination of clinical signs and abnormalities on hematologic screening and thoracic imaging in an appropriately aged foal and is confirmed by bacteriologic culture of the organism. Management of R. equi infections, in particular on farms with endemic disease, combines appropriate treatment of affected foals with preventative measures targeted at preventing infection and identifying foals before the development of severe disease. The combination of rifampin and a macrolide antimicrobial is recommended for treatment, as the combination is synergistic, reaches high intracellular concentrations, and should minimize the development of antimicrobial resistance. The prognosis for survival for foals with R. equi pneumonia is good, especially in foals mildly or subclinically affected, as is the prognosis for future athletic performance. Screening for early identification before the development of clinical signs has been advocated on endemically affected farms, although the most appropriate method, the timing of screening, and the selection of foals requiring treatment have yet to be determined. Recent evidence suggests that

  4. Recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced giant cell interstitial pneumonia: Case report and literature review

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    Boeun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP is a rare form of chronic interstitial pneumonia typically associated with hard metal exposure. Only two cases of GIP induced by nitrofurantoin have been reported in the medical literature. We are reporting a case of recurrent nitrofurantoin-induced GIP. Although extremely rare, GIP needs to be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with chronic nitrofurantoin use who present with respiratory illness.

  5. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax and the value of procalcitonin: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chong; Vali, Yusuf; Naeem, Muhammad; Reddy, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia (COP) is a relatively rare condition and can be difficult to differentiate from Community acquired pneumonia (CAP). We report two cases which demonstrate the importance of considering this differential diagnosis in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who have raised inflammatory markers or lung infiltrates. Our report highlights the value of serum procalcitonin as a biomarker in differentiating between community acquired pneumonia and cryptogenic organising pneumonia especially in the context of a high serum C-reactive protein. Furthermore, the cases show early diagnosis and prompt treatment with corticosteroids may impact the clinical outcome.

  6. Computed tomographic features of 23 sporadic cases with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hui; Higa, Futoshi; Hibiya, Kenji; Furugen, Makoto; Sato, Yoko; Shinzato, Takashi; Haranaga, Shusaku; Yara, Satomi; Tateyama, Masao; Fujita, Jiro; Li, Huiping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the chest computed tomographic (CT) findings of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. Methods: CT scans obtained from 23 sporadic cases of L. pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed. Chest CT findings were analyzed with regard to the patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the histopathology of lungs from guinea pigs with experimentally induced L. pneumophila pneumonia. Results: Consolidation and ground-glass opacity (GGO) were the main findings of CT scans in L. pneumophila pneumonia. The distribution of opacities was categorized as non-segmental (n = 20) and segmental (n = 4). Non-segmental distribution may follow an onset of segmental distribution. Pleural effusion was observed in 14 (58.3%) patients, of which 13 were accompanied with non-segmental distribution. Abscess formation was observed in only one immunocompromised patient. In the animal pneumonia model, the lesions comprised of terminal bronchioles, alveolar spaces, and interstitia. Small bacilli were observed to be contained by many macrophages within the alveoli. Conclusion: Non-segmental distribution was significantly more frequent than segmental distribution in L. pneumophila pneumonia. It is possible that L. pneumophila infection initially results in segmental pneumonia, which progresses to typical non-segmental distribution.

  7. Computed tomographic features of 23 sporadic cases with Legionella pneumophila pneumonia

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    Yu Hui [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Higa, Futoshi; Hibiya, Kenji; Furugen, Makoto [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Sato, Yoko [Tomishiro Chuo Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Shinzato, Takashi [Nakagami General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Haranaga, Shusaku; Yara, Satomi; Tateyama, Masao [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Fujita, Jiro, E-mail: fujita@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Medicine and Therapeutics, Control and Prevention of Infectious Diseases (First Department of Internal Medicine), Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Li, Huiping [Department of Respiratory Diseases, Shanghai Pneumology Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2010-06-15

    Objective: To describe the chest computed tomographic (CT) findings of Legionella pneumophila pneumonia. Methods: CT scans obtained from 23 sporadic cases of L. pneumophila pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed. Chest CT findings were analyzed with regard to the patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the histopathology of lungs from guinea pigs with experimentally induced L. pneumophila pneumonia. Results: Consolidation and ground-glass opacity (GGO) were the main findings of CT scans in L. pneumophila pneumonia. The distribution of opacities was categorized as non-segmental (n = 20) and segmental (n = 4). Non-segmental distribution may follow an onset of segmental distribution. Pleural effusion was observed in 14 (58.3%) patients, of which 13 were accompanied with non-segmental distribution. Abscess formation was observed in only one immunocompromised patient. In the animal pneumonia model, the lesions comprised of terminal bronchioles, alveolar spaces, and interstitia. Small bacilli were observed to be contained by many macrophages within the alveoli. Conclusion: Non-segmental distribution was significantly more frequent than segmental distribution in L. pneumophila pneumonia. It is possible that L. pneumophila infection initially results in segmental pneumonia, which progresses to typical non-segmental distribution.

  8. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax and the value of procalcitonin: A case report

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    Chong Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia (COP is a relatively rare condition and can be difficult to differentiate from Community acquired pneumonia (CAP. We report two cases which demonstrate the importance of considering this differential diagnosis in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who have raised inflammatory markers or lung infiltrates. Our report highlights the value of serum procalcitonin as a biomarker in differentiating between community acquired pneumonia and cryptogenic organising pneumonia especially in the context of a high serum C-reactive protein. Furthermore, the cases show early diagnosis and prompt treatment with corticosteroids may impact the clinical outcome.

  9. The cryptogenic organizing pneumonia: the analysis of CT features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaohua; Li Tiannv; You Zhengqian; Ma Jun; Jiang Sen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To improve our understanding concerning radiographic manifestations of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP). Methods: The diagnosis of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia was made based on clinical and radiological features, and was verified with lung biopsy and pathological examination in 23 cases. All data were analyzed and relevant literatures were reviewed. Results: CT scans revealed multi- patch shadows, patchy air-space consolidations in 15 cases, often located in predominantly subpleural and(or) both inferior lungs, with or ground-glass opacities, bronchiectasis, and cords. Lesion sites changed over time in some patients. Corticosteroid treatment led to significant improvement in most cases. Conclusions: The diagnosis of cryptogenic organizing pneumonia required the converging evidence from clinical and radiological manifestations as well as pathologies. It is important to appreciate CT manifestations of COP. (authors)

  10. Ventilação mecânica não-invasiva em paciente com provável pneumonia por pneumocystis jirovecii: relato de caso Noninvasive mechanical ventilation in patient with pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia: case report

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    Élida Mara Carneiro

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A pneumonia por Pneumocystis jirovecii tem sido uma das doenças mais comuns e uma complicação infecciosa fatal em pacientes com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida. O objetivo deste estudo foi apresentar uma paciente com provável diagnóstico de pneumonia por Pneumocystis jirovecii que recebeu ventilação não-invasiva com pressão positiva. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo feminino, 25 anos, com diagnóstico provável de pneumonia por Pneumocystis jirovecii grave, recebeu ventilação mecânica não-invasiva com pressão positiva. CONCLUSÕES: Todos os parâmetros melhoraram progressivamente nos primeiros cinco dias. Os resultados sugeriram a eficácia desta medida para otimizar a oxigenação, reverter a hipoxemia e prevenir a intubação traqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia has been one of the most common diseases and life-threatening infectious complications in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. The objective of the case report was to present a patient with probable diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia who received noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. CASE REPORT: A female patient, 25 years old, with probable diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia received noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: All respiratory parameters progressively improved in the first five days. Results suggest the efficacy of this support to improve oxygenation, to revert hypoxemia and to prevent orotracheal intubation.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa ventilator-associated pneumonia management

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    Ramírez-Estrada S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Ramírez-Estrada,1 Bárbara Borgatta,1,2 Jordi Rello3,4 1Critical Care Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, 2CRIPS, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Research (VHIR, 3Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB, Barcelona, 4Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Enfermedad Respiratoria – CIBERES, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is the most common infection in intensive care unit patients associated with high morbidity rates and elevated economic costs; Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most frequent bacteria linked with this entity, with a high attributable mortality despite adequate treatment that is increased in the presence of multiresistant strains, a situation that is becoming more common in intensive care units. In this manuscript, we review the current management of ventilator-associated pneumonia due to P. aeruginosa, the most recent antipseudomonal agents, and new adjunctive therapies that are shifting the way we treat these infections. We support early initiation of broad-spectrum antipseudomonal antibiotics in present, followed by culture-guided monotherapy de-escalation when susceptibilities are available. Future management should be directed at blocking virulence; the role of alternative strategies such as new antibiotics, nebulized treatments, and vaccines is promising. Keywords: multidrug-resistant, ICU, new-antibiotics, adjunctive-therapies, care-bundles

  12. Anticholinergic Exposure and Risk of Pneumonia in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampela, Pasi; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija; Tanskanen, Antti; Tiihonen, Jari; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Taipale, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    Risk of pneumonia is increased in persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In some studies, anticholinergic drugs (AC) have been associated with an increased pneumonia risk. We analyzed the risk of pneumonia associated with ACs in persons with AD. We performed a nested case-control study using register-based data from a Finnish nationwide MEDALZ cohort including all community-dwelling persons diagnosed with AD during 2005-2011. Cases were identified based on pneumonia diagnoses (n = 12,442) from hospital discharge and causes of death registers. Up to two controls without pneumonia were matched based on time since AD diagnoses, age, and gender for each case; AC use was measured using Anticholinergic Drug Scale. Use of AC was associated with an increased risk of pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-1.43). However, there was no increased pneumonia risk in persons using level 3 ACs. Incident use was associated with higher risk of pneumonia (OR 2.68, 95% CI 2.15-3.34) than prevalent use (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.40-1.57). Among persons using cholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs), risk of pneumonia was increased in persons using also ACs (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.41-1.66). ACs were associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in persons with AD, especially at the time of initiation of these drugs. AC use was associated with increased pneumonia risk also in persons using AChEIs. This risk should be carefully considered when treating AD patients.

  13. Hospital management of community-acquired pneumonia in Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Callus, Roberta; Micallef, Josef; Mamo, Jonathan; Montefort, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains a common diagnosis requiring hospital admission and a leading cause of death worldwide. No local guideline is currently available for the management of CAP. Our aim was to evaluate current practices in the management of CAP at Mater Dei Hospital, Malta. In this prospective study we looked at all adult patients admitted with CAP in winter and summer (105 consecutive days for both seasons). Data collected and analysed included: basic patient demographi...

  14. An Update on the Management Of Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia in the Elderly

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    Chao-Hsien Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of infection-related death and represents the fifth cause of mortality in the elderly. There are several reported risk factors for acquiring pneumonia at an older age, such as alcoholism, lung and heart diseases, nursing home residence, and swallowing disorders. Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP is reviewed, with an emphasis on multidrug-resistant (MDR bacterial pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter species, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The clinical characteristics of pneumonia in the elderly differ substantially compared with younger patients, and the severity of the disease is strongly associated with increased age and age-related comorbid disorders. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the pathogen most frequently responsible for pneumonia in the elderly with early HAP without risk factors for MDR; enteric Gram-negative rods should be considered in nursing home-associated pneumonia, as well as anaerobes in patients with aspiration pneumonia. Special attention should be given to preventive measures such as vaccination, oral care, and nutrition. The management of HAP should be instituted early with: appropriate use of antibiotics in adequate doses; avoidance of excessive use of antibiotics by de-escalation of initial antibiotic therapy, based on microbiologic cultures and the clinical response of the patient; and reduction of the duration of treatment to the minimum effective period.

  15. Household air pollution, chronic respiratory disease and pneumonia in Malawian adults: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jary, Hannah R; Aston, Stephen; Ho, Antonia; Giorgi, Emanuele; Kalata, Newton; Nyirenda, Mulinda; Mallewa, Jane; Peterson, Ingrid; Gordon, Stephen B; Mortimer, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Four million people die each year from diseases caused by exposure to household air pollution. There is an association between exposure to household air pollution and pneumonia in children (half a million attributable deaths a year); however, whether this is true in adults is unknown. We conducted a case-control study in urban Malawi to examine the association between exposure to household air pollution and pneumonia in adults. Methods: Hospitalized patients with radiologically confirmed pneumonia (cases) and healthy community controls underwent 48 hours of ambulatory and household particulate matter (µg/m 3 ) and carbon monoxide (ppm) exposure monitoring. Multivariate logistic regression, stratified by HIV status, explored associations between these and other potential risk factors with pneumonia. Results: 145 (117 HIV-positive; 28 HIV-negative) cases and 253 (169 HIV-positive; 84 HIV-negative) controls completed follow up. We found no evidence of association between household air pollution exposure and pneumonia in HIV-positive (e.g. ambulatory particulate matter adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.00 [95% CI 1.00-1.01, p=0.141]) or HIV-negative (e.g. ambulatory particulate matter aOR 1.00 [95% CI 0.99-1.01, p=0.872]) participants. Chronic respiratory disease was associated with pneumonia in both HIV-positive (aOR 28.07 [95% CI 9.29-84.83, ppollution is associated with pneumonia in Malawian adults. In contrast, chronic respiratory disease was strongly associated with pneumonia.

  16. A case of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    豊見山, 寛; 兼島, 洋; 下地, 克佳; 金城, 勇徳; 中富, 昌夫; 小張, 一峰; 松井, 克明; Tomiyama, Hiroshi; Kaneshima, Hiroshi; Shimoji, Katsuyoshi; Kinjo, Yutoku; Nakatomi, Masao; Kobari, Kazumine; Matsui, Katsuaki; 琉球大学医学部第一内科

    1982-01-01

    A case of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia was reported. A 53-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with his complaint of shortness of breath. On physical examination clubbing of the fingers was noticed and velcro rales was heard on the bilateral lower back. On laboratory data no remarkable finding was revealed. Chest roentgenogram showed diffuse reticulonodular shadow and small ring shadow of the bilateral lower lung fields. On pulmonary function test decline of VC and DLco was revealed...

  17. Case Report of Fire Eater’s Pneumonia in Adolescent Female Patient – Evolution of Radiologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olchowy, Cyprian; Łasecki, Mateusz; Inglot, Marcin; Zaleska-Dorobisz, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 16-year-old girl with fire-eater’s pneumonia (hydrocarbon pneumonitis). The goal of this report was to assess evolution of radiological findings. The reported case was unique because that was the first completely described case of fire-eater’s pneumonia reported in an under-aged person. Moreover, this disease is very rare even in adults and only a few scientific reports can be found, mostly because of a small occupational group. The aim of this report was to show that the problem of fire-eater’s pneumonia can occur in under-aged patients and should be taken into consideration in case of severe pneumonia. Another objective was to point out that chest radiograph is not sufficient to depict the evolution of radiological manifestations

  18. Testing Pneumonia Vaccines in the Elderly: Determining a Case Definition for Pneumococcal Pneumonia in the Absence of a Gold Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Jukka; Snellman, Marja; Palmu, Arto A; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Verlant, Vincent; Pascal, Thierry; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Hausdorff, William P; Kilpi, Terhi M

    2017-12-15

    Clinical assessments of vaccines to prevent pneumococcal (Pnc) community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) require sensitive and specific case definitions, but there is no gold standard diagnostic test. To develop a new case definition suitable for vaccine efficacy studies, we applied latent class analysis (LCA) to the results from seven diagnostic tests for Pnc etiology on clinical specimens from 323 elderly radiologically-confirmed pneumonia cases enrolled in The Finnish Community-Acquired Pneumonia Epidemiology study during 2005-2007. Compared to the conventional use of LCA, which is mainly to determine sensitivities and specificities of different tests, we instead used LCA as an appropriate instrument to predict the probability of Pnc etiology for each CAP case based on their test profiles, and utilized the predictions to minimize the sample size that would be needed for a vaccine efficacy trial. When compared to the conventional laboratory criteria of encapsulated Pnc in blood culture or in high-quality sputum culture or urine antigen positivity, our optimized case definition for PncCAP resulted in a trial sample size which was almost 20,000 subjects smaller. We believe that our novel application of LCA detailed here to determine a case definition for PncCAP could also be similarly applied to other diseases without a gold standard. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  19. Chylothorax in dermatomyositis complicated with interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Kentaro; Kiboshi, Takao; Shoda, Takeshi

    2017-04-01

    Chylothorax is a disease in which chyle leaks and accumulates in the thoracic cavity. Interstitial pneumonia and pneumomediastinum are common thoracic manifestations of dermatomyositis, but chylothorax complicated with dermatomyositis is not reported. We report a case of dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia complicated by chylothorax. A 77-year-old woman was diagnosed as dermatomyositis with Gottron's papules, skin ulcers, anti-MDA5 antibody and rapid progressive interstitial pneumonia. Treatment with betamethasone, tacrolimus and intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide was initiated, and her skin symptoms and interstitial pneumonia improved once. However, right-sided chylothorax began to accumulate and gradually increase, and at the same time, her interstitial pneumonia began to exacerbate, and skin ulcers began to reappear on her fingers and auricles. Although her chylothorax improved by fasting and parenteral nutrition, she died due to further exacerbations of dermatomyositis and interstitial pneumonia in spite of steroid pulse therapy, increase in the betamethasone dosage, additional intravenous high-dose cyclophosphamide and plasma pheresis. An autopsy showed no lesions such as malignant tumors in the thoracic cavity. This is the first report of chylothorax complicated by dermatomyositis with interstitial pneumonia.

  20. Cicatricial organising pneumonia mimicking a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churg, Andrew; Wright, Joanne L; Bilawich, AnaMaria

    2018-04-01

    Organising pneumonia (OP) is composed of loose granulation tissue plugs in distal airspaces; these disappear with steroid treatment. Recently a variant labelled 'cicatricial' OP has been described in which the granulation tissue organised to much denser fibrous tissue but still retained the usual pattern of OP. Here we report 10 patients thought to have an interstitial lung disease, and who on biopsy had a variant of cicatricial OP characterised by linear bands or small nodular masses of dense fibrous tissue that does not resemble ordinary OP. The bands/nodules were usually distributed randomly but occasionally resembled fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia in local areas. Small foci of loose granulation tissue at the edge of the fibrotic bands sometimes mimicked fibroblast foci. Recognisable conventional OP was always present, but often in very small amounts. Four cases, including one patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, showed formation of bone in the fibrotic bands and nodules. On computerised tomography (CT) scan of the chest some cases looked like typical OP, but some demonstrated only irregularly distributed linear opacities, sometimes with associated calcification. Follow-up imaging on six cases showed that the process either markedly improved or remained stable over time; no case had progressive disease. Cicatricial OP with this pathological pattern represents an uncommon form of OP that appears to be a generally benign process which may have persisting linear opacities on CT scan but that does not progress; however, it can be confused on biopsy and CT with a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Rational strategy of pharmacotherapy of patients with community-acquired pneumonia at elderly and senil eage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Kuznetsova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nonhospital pneumonia is the most common acute infectious infections disease of the lower respiratory tract. The incidence of the community-acquired pneumonia in Ukraine is 3 - 11 cases per 1,000 in adults per year and is the highest among the elderly and old patients. According to the foreign epidemiological studies, the incidence of nonhospital pneumonia in persons of young and middle-aged adults (> 18 years is 1 - 11,6 %; in the older age groups - 25 - 44 %. Mortality from nonhospital pneumonia without concomitant diseases is also the lowest (1-3 % in those young and middle age. In patients over 60 years of age, if there is a serious comorbidity and in cases of severe nonhospital pneumonia, this figure reaches 15-30 %. To improve treatment outcome in nonhospital pneumonia and cost optimization in recent years a number of international and national recommendations were proposed. This help doctor to choose the most rational strategy for the management of patients in a specific clinical situation. The aim of the study. Retrospective analysis of case histories of patients older than 60 years with nonhospital pneumonia treated in the therapeutic department during the period from September 2010 to May 2013. Assessment of the quality of medical care and the practice of the appointment systemic antibacterial therapy in accordance with modern standards and quality indicators. Material and methods. Were selected 66 case histories of patients with nonhospital pneumonia, men were 41 people (62.1%, and women - 25 (37,9%, the average age was 69,5 ± 8.1 years. Based on the goal of the research objectives were: to assess the quality of medical aid for patients with nonhospital pneumonia and frequency of antibacterial therapy for patients with nonhospital pneumonia in a particular situation.; explore the features of administration of antibiotics at the start of therapy of the community-acquired pneumonia and compliance choice of antibiotic

  2. mPneumonia, an Innovation for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia in Low-Resource Settings: A Feasibility, Usability and Acceptability Study in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Tawiah Agyemang, Charlotte; Ambler, Gwen; Delarosa, Jaclyn; Brunette, Waylon; Levari, Shahar; Larson, Clarice; Sundt, Mitch; Newton, Sam; Borriello, Gaetano; Anderson, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the leading cause of infectious disease mortality in children. Currently, health care providers (HCPs) are trained to use World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and manually assess respiratory rate to diagnose pneumonia in low-resource settings (LRS). However, this approach of relying on clinical signs alone has proven problematic. Hypoxemia, a diagnostic indicator of pneumonia severity associated with an increased risk of death, is not assessed because pulse oximetry is often not available in LRS. To improve HCPs' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, "mPneumonia" was developed. mPneumonia is a mobile health application that integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pulse oximeter. A design-stage qualitative pilot study was conducted to assess feasibility, usability, and acceptability of mPneumonia in six health centers and five community-based health planning and services centers in Ghana. Nine health administrators, 30 HCPs, and 30 caregivers were interviewed. Transcribed interview audio recordings were coded and analyzed for common themes. Health administrators reported mPneumonia would be feasible to implement with approval and buy-in from national and regional decision makers. HCPs felt using the mPneumonia application would be feasible to integrate into their work with the potential to improve accurate patient care. They reported it was "easy to use" and provided confidence in diagnosis and treatment recommendations. HCPs and caregivers viewed the pulse oximeter and breath counter favorably. Challenges included electricity requirements for charging and the time needed to complete the application. Some caregivers saw mPneumonia as a sign of modernity, increasing their trust in the care received. Other caregivers were hesitant or confused about the new technology. Overall, this technology was

  3. Is H3N2 Pneumonia Different from Other Community-Acquired Pneumonia?

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    Coşkun Doğan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical, laboratory, radiological, and demographic data of H3N2 pneumonia cases hospitalized to the Pulmonology Department during H3N2 pandemics and compare them with non-H3N2 community-acquired pneumonia (CAP cases. Methods: The study population consisted of all CAP cases hospitalized to our Pulmonology Department between December 2013 and February 2014 during the influenza outbreak. The patient files were evaluated for physical findings, laboratory data, radiological findings, and treatment and outcome of cases. H3N2 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis of throat swabs. The clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings of H3N2 pneumonia cases were compared with those of non-H3N2 pneumonia cases. Mann–Whitney U test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression analysis by the forward step wise method were used for statistical analyses. P value0.05. The rates of treatment failure and/or transport to the intensive care unit with the need of invasive mechanical ventilation and mortality rates were also similar in both groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: H3N2 pneumonia/viral pneumonia is a member of CAP. Although the number of H3N2 cases are extremely small to draw a conclusion, the results of this study highlight that the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings of H3N2 pneumonia cases are not different from those of non-H3N2 CAP cases.

  4. "Klebsiella Pneumonia" Liver Abscess Syndrome: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Christopher; Spotts, P. Hunter

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess (KPLA) in a student presenting to a university student health center. The authors also provide a review of KPLA and invasive "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess syndrome (IKPLAS), including epidemiology, common clinical manifestations, standard diagnostic…

  5. Análise de 39 casos de pneumonia intersticial crônica idiopática Analysis of 39 cases of idiopathic chronic interstitial pneumonia

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    Rogério Rufino

    2006-12-01

    performed between 1977 and 1999, were reviewed, and 39 cases of idiopathic interstitial lung disease were selected and re-evaluated by two pathologists in accordance with the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification system. RESULTS: Among those 39 cases, the diagnoses were maintained in 28 (71.8%. A new pathologic entity, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, was included in the reclassification, and overlapping patterns were observed in 6 cases. Of the 28 cases in which the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic interstitial pneumonia remained unchanged, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was accompanied by cryptogenic organizing pneumonia in 4, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia was accompanied by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in 1, and desquamative interstitial pneumonia was accompanied by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in 1. All cases of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were confirmed, although 3 of those were found to be accompanied by cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Virtually all prior diagnoses were maintained in the review of the biopsy samples (p > 0,05. CONCLUSION: The American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society system of classifying interstitial lung disease is a useful tool for pathologists who deal with lung biopsies.

  6. Measurement and valuation of health providers' time for the management of childhood pneumonia in rural Malawi: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzani, Fiammetta Maria; Arnold, Matthias; Colbourn, Timothy; Lufesi, Norman; Nambiar, Bejoy; Masache, Gibson; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2016-07-28

    Human resources are a major cost driver in childhood pneumonia case management. Introduction of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) in Malawi can lead to savings on staff time and salaries due to reductions in pneumonia cases requiring admission. Reliable estimates of human resource costs are vital for use in economic evaluations of PCV-13 introduction. Twenty-eight severe and twenty-four very severe pneumonia inpatients under the age of five were tracked from admission to discharge by paediatric ward staff using self-administered timesheets at Mchinji District Hospital between June and August 2012. All activities performed and the time spent on each activity were recorded. A monetary value was assigned to the time by allocating a corresponding percentage of the health workers' salary. All costs are reported in 2012 US$. A total of 1,017 entries, grouped according to 22 different activity labels, were recorded during the observation period. On average, 99 min (standard deviation, SD = 46) were spent on each admission: 93 (SD = 38) for severe and 106 (SD = 55) for very severe cases. Approximately 40 % of activities involved monitoring and stabilization, including administering non-drug therapies such as oxygen. A further 35 % of the time was spent on injecting antibiotics. Nurses provided 60 % of the total time spent on pneumonia admissions, clinicians 25 % and support staff 15 %. Human resource costs were approximately US$ 2 per bed-day and, on average, US$ 29.5 per severe pneumonia admission and US$ 37.7 per very severe admission. Self-reporting was successfully used in this context to generate reliable estimates of human resource time and costs of childhood pneumonia treatment. Assuming vaccine efficacy of 41 % and 90 % coverage, PCV-13 introduction in Malawi can save over US$ 2 million per year in staff costs alone.

  7. Lung abscess due to Streptococcus pneumoniae simulating pulmonary tuberculosis: presentation of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Perazzo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, anaerobes were the most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess; Streptococcus species were the second most common cause. In recent years, this has changed. Klebsiella pneumoniae is now most common cause of community- acquired lung abscess, although Streptococcus species remain pathogen of major importance. We present two cases of pulmonary cavitation due to Streptococcus pneumoniae which resembled pulmonary tuberculosis with regards to their history and radiological findings. These are examples of a common diagnosis presenting in an uncommon way. Our cases had some peculiarities: they had a clinical picture strongly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis or lung cancer rather than necrotizing infectious pneumonia in patients with no comorbidities or underlying diseases (including oral or dental pathologies. Radiological findings did not help the clinicians: pulmonary tuberculosis was the first diagnostic hypothesis in both cases. An underlying lung cancer was excluded in the first case only after invasive pulmonary procedures.

  8. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gasem, M. Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A.; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; van den Broek, Peterhans J.

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR

  9. New trends in the prevention and management of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, D F; van Werkhoven, C H; Huijts, S M; Bolkenbaas, M; Oosterheert, J J; Bonten, M J M

    2012-10-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This review summarises current trends and knowledge gaps in CAP management and prevention. Although Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent cause of CAP, identification of the microbial cause of infection remains unsuccessful in most episodes, and little is known about the aetiology of CAP in immunocompromised patients. Urinary antigen testing has become standard care for diagnosing Legionella infection, and pneumococcal urinary antigen testing is now recommended in the Dutch guidelines to streamline antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalised with CAP. In primary care C-reactive protein determination is recommended to improve antibiotic prescription for lower respiratory tract infections. In patients hospitalised with CAP, three strategies are considered equally effective for choosing empirical antibiotic treatment. Yet, more (and better designed) studies are needed to determine the best strategy, as well as to determine optimal (which usually means the minimum) duration of antibiotic therapy and the role of adjuvant treatment with corticosteroids. The effectiveness of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumococcal CAP remains debated, and whether the newer conjugate vaccines are more effective remains to be determined. Many of these questions are currently being addressed in large-scaled trials in the Netherlands, and their results may allow evidence-based decisions in CAP management and prevention.

  10. [Diagnostic and prognostic power of biomarkers to improve the management of community acquired pneumonia in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Sicilia-Bravo, Isabel; Palomo-de Los Reyes, María José; Cabezas-Martínez, Angeles; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Estebaran-Martín, Josefa; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness and performance of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), procalcitonin (PCT)] and lactate in predicting short- and medium-term mortality compared with the prognostic severity scales (PSS) usually employed for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in assessing the aetiological suspicion of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae and bacteraemia. Observational, prospective and analytical study was conducted on patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our emergency department (ED). The data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, priority level according to the Spanish Triage System (STS), stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and in the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65years), criteria of severe CAP, microbiological studies, and biomarkers determinations. The patients were followed-up for 180days to calculate the prognostic power and the diagnostic performance for bacteraemia and aetiology. A total of 127patients were finally enrolled in the study. The 30-day mortality was 10.3% (13), and 22.6% (28) at 180 days. Blood cultures were positive in 29 patients (23%) and S.pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 28 cases (22.2%). The area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for lactate and MR-proADM to predict 30-day mortality was 0.898 (95%CI: 0.824-0.973; P0.85ng/ml, the NPV and the LR+ were 96.6% and 5.89%, respectively, to predict a S.pneumoniae infection. MR-proADM and lactate showed a similar or even better performance for 30-day intra-hospital mortality than PSI, CURB-65, STS and CAP severity criteria in patients diagnosed with CAP (P>.05). Furthermore, the MR-proADM capacity to predict 180-day mortality was higher than PSS and the rest of biomarkers (P>.05), and its AUC-ROC increased if it was used in combination with PSI, CURB65 and STS. The determination of PCT has a remarkable diagnostic

  11. MR findings of lipoid pneumonia: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jung Wook; Cho, Eun Ok; Kim, Joung Sook; Hur, Gham

    1995-01-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is an unusual disease resulting from aspiration of oil particles. A history of oil ingestion strongly suggests the diagnosis, but the radiological presentation varies from mild perihilar consolidation to diffuse and extensive bilateral involvement, particularly of the posterior basal segment of both lower lung. Since magnetic resonance (MR) provides greater contrast resolution than CT, it offers the potential for tissue characterization. In particular, fatty tissue and lipid containing substances are known to have high signal intensities on T1-and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) images. We report MR findings in two case of exogenous lipoid pneumonia caused by ingestion of shark liver oil (Squalene)

  12. MRI differentiation of pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaeta, Michele, E-mail: gaesam@hotmail.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Ascenti, Giorgio, E-mail: gascenti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Mazziotti, Silvio, E-mail: smazziotti@unime.it [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Contiguglia, Rosario, E-mail: rosariocontiguglia@libero.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Local Health Unit, Messina (Italy); Barone, Mario, E-mail: mario.barone@unime.it [Clinical and Experimental Department of Medicine and Pharmacology, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Messina (Italy); Mileto, Achille, E-mail: achille.mileto@gmail.com [Department of Radiological Sciences, Policlinico ' G. Martino' , Via Consolare Valeria 1, 98100 Messina (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the role of MRI water-sensitive sequences in the differential diagnosis between pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia. Subjects and methods: Twenty-three patients with pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and 30 patients with infectious pneumonia underwent computed tomography (CT) and MRI. Two blinded and independent readers evaluated CT and MR images using a 3-level confidence scale in two separate sessions. Results were tested for statistical significance using the Fisher's exact test and the Cohen's k test. Results: On CT, the two readers respectively made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 17 out of 23 cases (73.9%), and in 15 out of 23 cases (65.2%). A correct diagnosis of infectious pneumonia was made in 22 out of 30 cases (73.3%), and in 24 out of 30 cases (80.0%). On MRI, both readers made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 23 out of 23 (100%) cases, and of infectious pneumonia in 30 out of 30 (100%) cases. Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma between MRI and CT for both readers, P = 0.01 for reader 1 and P = 0.002 for reader 2, respectively. A good agreement (k = 0.73) was found between the two readers on CT evaluation, whereas an almost perfect agreement (k = 1.00) was found for MRI. Conclusions: MRI with 'water-sensitive' sequences should be added in the diagnostic protocol of every patient with pulmonary consolidation suspected to be mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  13. MRI differentiation of pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, Michele; Ascenti, Giorgio; Mazziotti, Silvio; Contiguglia, Rosario; Barone, Mario; Mileto, Achille

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of MRI water-sensitive sequences in the differential diagnosis between pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and infectious pneumonia. Subjects and methods: Twenty-three patients with pneumonia-like mucinous adenocarcinoma and 30 patients with infectious pneumonia underwent computed tomography (CT) and MRI. Two blinded and independent readers evaluated CT and MR images using a 3-level confidence scale in two separate sessions. Results were tested for statistical significance using the Fisher's exact test and the Cohen's k test. Results: On CT, the two readers respectively made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 17 out of 23 cases (73.9%), and in 15 out of 23 cases (65.2%). A correct diagnosis of infectious pneumonia was made in 22 out of 30 cases (73.3%), and in 24 out of 30 cases (80.0%). On MRI, both readers made correct diagnoses of mucinous adenocarcinoma in 23 out of 23 (100%) cases, and of infectious pneumonia in 30 out of 30 (100%) cases. Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in the diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma between MRI and CT for both readers, P = 0.01 for reader 1 and P = 0.002 for reader 2, respectively. A good agreement (k = 0.73) was found between the two readers on CT evaluation, whereas an almost perfect agreement (k = 1.00) was found for MRI. Conclusions: MRI with “water-sensitive” sequences should be added in the diagnostic protocol of every patient with pulmonary consolidation suspected to be mucinous adenocarcinoma.

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae meningoencephalitis: a case report

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    Mehmet Selçuk Bektaş

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nervous system is the most affected area in mycoplasma pneumoniae infections with exception of respiratory system. It is an important agent of childhood acute encephalitis and respiratory system infections in school-age children and young adults. Routine clinical and laboratory findings to identify spesific diagnosis is limited. Twelve-year-old female patient was admitted with fever, fatigue, sore throat, slipping the right eye, withdrawal of the mouth from the right and right hemiclonic seizures. Test of anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae IgM was positive and IgG antibodies were found to be 4-fold increase in the sera of follow-up. This article was presented with the aim of remembering M. pneumoniae to be an differential diagnosis in children with acute encephalitis.

  15. Case report 558: Multicentric Klebsiella pneumoniae (Friedlaenders bacillus) osteomyelitis in sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malpani, A.R.; Sundaram, M.; Ramani, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This patient represents a unique combination of multicentric osteomyelitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae, lesions in the skull, pathological fracture of a long bone and no evidence of pulmonary disease. That Klebsiella pneumoniae osteomyelitis can occur in sickle cell anemia should be considered when such bone changes are seen. The remarkable resolution on conservative management also needs to be noted. (orig./GDG)

  16. Acute Glomerulonephritis in a Child with Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Vitaliti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infectious diseases seem to be an important and independent risk factor for renal failure, but the underlying mechanism of renal involvement during some kinds of infectious diseases is still unclear, even if the literature data report immunomediated and/or autoimmune mechanisms to explain the pathogenic relationship between the two diseases. In paediatric patients, Chlamydia pneumoniae is a rare cause of renal complications and it may manifest in several ways, mainly involving the respiratory system, even if also renal and glomerulalr complications, have been described. Case Diagnosis/Treatment. Herein we report a case of a 3-year-old child who developed an acute glomerulonephritis that was chronologically, clinically, and biologically related to a previous Chlamydia pneumoniae infection. On our knowledge, in the literature it is the youngest patient with renal involvement during course of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection ever reported. Conclusions. The present case supports the hypothesis of a rather close causal relationship between this infective agent and renal and glomerular symptoms occurred in this child, during an acute episode of respiratory disease.

  17. Etiology and Factors Associated with Pneumonia in Children under 5 Years of Age in Mali: A Prospective Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Mélina; Sánchez Picot, Valentina; Telles, Jean-Noël; Diakite, Abdoul-Aziz; Komurian-Pradel, Florence; Endtz, Hubert; Diallo, Souleymane; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Background There are very limited data on children with pneumonia in Mali. The objective was to assess the etiology and factors associated with community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children pneumonia; Controls were hospitalized children without respiratory features, matched for age and period. Respiratory specimens, were collected to identify 19 viruses and 5 bacteria. Whole blood was collected from cases only. Factors associated with pneumonia were assessed by multivariate logistic regression. Results Overall, 118 cases and 98 controls were analyzed; 44.1% were female, median age was 11 months. Among pneumonia cases, 30.5% were hypoxemic at admission, mortality was 4.2%. Pneumonia cases differed from the controls regarding clinical signs and symptoms but not in terms of past medical history. Multivariate analysis of nasal swab findings disclosed that S. pneumoniae (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.4, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.6–7.0), human metapneumovirus (aOR = 17.2, 95% CI: 2.0–151.4), respiratory syncytial virus [RSV] (aOR = 7.4, 95% CI: 2.3–23.3), and influenza A virus (aOR = 10.7, 95% CI: 1.0–112.2) were associated with pneumonia, independently of patient age, gender, period, and other pathogens. Distribution of S. pneumoniae and RSV differed by season with higher rates of S. pneumoniae in January-June and of RSV in July-September. Pneumococcal serotypes 1 and 5 were more frequent in pneumonia cases than in the controls (P = 0.009, and P = 0.04, respectively). Conclusions In this non-PCV population from Mali, pneumonia in children was mainly attributed to S. pneumoniae, RSV, human metapneumovirus, and influenza A virus. Increased pneumococcal conjugate vaccine coverage in children could significantly reduce the burden of pneumonia in sub-Saharan African countries. PMID:26696249

  18. Improved detection of focal pneumonia by chest radiography with bone suppression imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Feng; Engelmann, Roger; Pesce, Lorenzo; Armato, Samuel G.; MacMahon, Heber

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate radiologists' ability to detect focal pneumonia by use of standard chest radiographs alone compared with standard plus bone-suppressed chest radiographs. Standard chest radiographs in 36 patients with 46 focal airspace opacities due to pneumonia (10 patients had bilateral opacities) and 20 patients without focal opacities were included in an observer study. A bone suppression image processing system was applied to the 56 radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. In the observer study, eight observers, including six attending radiologists and two radiology residents, indicated their confidence level regarding the presence of a focal opacity compatible with pneumonia for each lung, first by use of standard images, then with the addition of bone suppression images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the observers' performance. The mean value of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for eight observers was significantly improved from 0.844 with use of standard images alone to 0.880 with standard plus bone suppression images (P < 0.001) based on 46 positive lungs and 66 negative lungs. Use of bone suppression images improved radiologists' performance for detection of focal pneumonia on chest radiographs. (orig.)

  19. Improved detection of focal pneumonia by chest radiography with bone suppression imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Feng; Engelmann, Roger; Pesce, Lorenzo; Armato, Samuel G.; MacMahon, Heber [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, MC-2026, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-12-15

    To evaluate radiologists' ability to detect focal pneumonia by use of standard chest radiographs alone compared with standard plus bone-suppressed chest radiographs. Standard chest radiographs in 36 patients with 46 focal airspace opacities due to pneumonia (10 patients had bilateral opacities) and 20 patients without focal opacities were included in an observer study. A bone suppression image processing system was applied to the 56 radiographs to create corresponding bone suppression images. In the observer study, eight observers, including six attending radiologists and two radiology residents, indicated their confidence level regarding the presence of a focal opacity compatible with pneumonia for each lung, first by use of standard images, then with the addition of bone suppression images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the observers' performance. The mean value of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) for eight observers was significantly improved from 0.844 with use of standard images alone to 0.880 with standard plus bone suppression images (P < 0.001) based on 46 positive lungs and 66 negative lungs. Use of bone suppression images improved radiologists' performance for detection of focal pneumonia on chest radiographs. (orig.)

  20. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Fermín; Colón Rivera, Xavier; González Monroig, Hernán A; Garcia Puebla, Juan

    2018-01-30

    BACKGROUND Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. CASE REPORT A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. CONCLUSIONS Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia.

  1. Distribution and determinants of pneumonia diagnosis using Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines: a nationally representative study in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwemedimo, Omolara T; Lewis, Todd P; Essien, Elsie A; Chan, Grace J; Nsona, Humphreys; Kruk, Margaret E; Leslie, Hannah H

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia remains the leading cause of child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy was developed to standardise care in low-income and middle-income countries for major childhood illnesses and can effectively improve healthcare worker performance. Suboptimal clinical evaluation can result in missed diagnoses and excess morbidity and mortality. We estimate the sensitivity of pneumonia diagnosis and investigate its determinants among children in Malawi. Data were obtained from the 2013-2014 Service Provision Assessment survey, a census of health facilities in Malawi that included direct observation of care and re-examination of children by trained observers. We calculated sensitivity of pneumonia diagnosis and used multilevel log-binomial regression to assess factors associated with diagnostic sensitivity. 3136 clinical visits for children 2-59 months old were observed at 742 health facilities. Healthcare workers completed an average of 30% (SD 13%) of IMCI guidelines in each encounter. 573 children met the IMCI criteria for pneumonia; 118 (21%) were correctly diagnosed. Advanced practice clinicians were more likely than other providers to diagnose pneumonia correctly (adjusted relative risk 2.00, 95% CI 1.21 to 3.29). Clinical quality was strongly associated with correct diagnosis: sensitivity was 23% in providers at the 75th percentile for guideline adherence compared with 14% for those at the 25th percentile. Contextual factors, facility structural readiness, and training or supervision were not associated with sensitivity. Care quality for Malawian children is poor, with low guideline adherence and missed diagnosis for four of five children with pneumonia. Better sensitivity is associated with provider type and higher adherence to IMCI. Existing interventions such as training and supportive supervision are associated with higher guideline adherence, but are insufficient to meaningfully improve sensitivity

  2. Improving the Diagnosis of Legionella Pneumonia within a Healthcare System through a Systematic Consultation and Testing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brooke K; Harris, Patricia L; Muder, Robert R; Hong, Jae H; Singh, Nina; Sonel, Ali F; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2016-08-01

    Legionella testing is not recommended for all patients with pneumonia, but rather for particular patient subgroups. As a result, the overall incidence of Legionella pneumonia may be underestimated. To determine the incidence of Legionella pneumonia in a veteran population in an endemic area after introduction of a systematic infectious diseases consultation and testing program. In response to a 2011-2012 outbreak, the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System mandated infectious diseases consultations and testing for Legionella by urine antigen and sputum culture in all patients with pneumonia. Between January 2013 and December 2015, 1,579 cases of pneumonia were identified. The incidence of pneumonia was 788/100,000 veterans per year, including 352/100,000 veterans per year and 436/100,000 veterans per year with community-associated pneumonia (CAP) and health care-associated pneumonia, respectively. Ninety-eight percent of patients with suspected pneumonia were tested for Legionella by at least one method. Legionella accounted for 1% of pneumonia cases (n = 16), including 1.7% (12/706) and 0.6% (4/873) of CAP and health care-associated pneumonia, respectively. The yearly incidences of Legionella pneumonia and Legionella CAP were 7.99 and 5.99/100,000 veterans, respectively. The sensitivities of urine antigen and sputum culture were 81% and 60%, respectively; the specificity of urine antigen was >99.97%. Urine antigen testing and Legionella cultures increased by 65% and 330%, respectively, after introduction of our program. Systematic testing of veterans in an endemic area revealed a higher incidence of Legionella pneumonia and CAP than previously reported. Widespread urine antigen testing was not limited by false positivity.

  3. Klebsiella Pneumoniae Liver Abscess: A Case Series of Six Asian Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, Katerina G; Aye, Myint

    2017-09-26

    BACKGROUND Liver abscesses represent a serious infection of hepatic parenchyma and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The emergence of a new hypervirulent variant of Klebsiella pneumoniae, which can cause serious infections in the Asian population, is under investigation. We report a case series of six Asian patients hospitalized at our institution from January 2013 to November 2015 for liver abscess due to Klebsiella pneumoniae. CASE REPORT Charts of six Asian patients were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients were male and two were female. The mean age was 53 years (range: 35-64 years). All patients had no known past medical history of immunodeficiency. Three patients had multiple liver abscesses at the time of initial presentation. In five patients, the source of entry of the pathogenic microorganism was unknown and in one patient the suspected source of entry was the gastrointestinal tract. In three patients there was also concomitant Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. The mean duration of antibiotic treatment was seven weeks and the mean duration of hospital stay was 13.5 days. CONCLUSIONS Liver abscess should always be included in the differential diagnosis in cases of sepsis without obvious source and/or in the clinical scenarios of fever, abdominal pain, and liver lesions.

  4. Case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Judy; Rice, Eve

    2015-03-01

    Health care in the United States is changing rapidly under pressure from both political and professional stakeholders, and one area on the front line of required change is the discipline of case management. Historically, case management has worked to defragment the health care delivery system for clients and increase access to health care. Case management will have an expanded role resulting from Affordable Care Act initiatives to improve health care. This article includes definitions of case management, current issues related to case management, case management standards of practice, and a case study of the management of pediatric chronic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Calf health from birth to weaning. III. housing and management of calf pneumonia

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    Lorenz Ingrid

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calfhood diseases have a major impact on the economic viability of cattle operations. A three part review series has been developed focusing on calf health from birth to weaning. In this paper, the last of the three part series, we review disease prevention and management with particular reference to pneumonia, focusing primarily on the pre-weaned calf. Pneumonia in recently weaned suckler calves is also considered, where the key risk factors are related to the time of weaning. Weaning of the suckler calf is often combined with additional stressors including a change in nutrition, environmental change, transport and painful husbandry procedures (castration, dehorning. The reduction of the cumulative effects of these multiple stressors around the time of weaning together with vaccination programmes (preconditioning can reduce subsequent morbidity and mortality in the feedlot. In most studies, calves housed individually and calves housed outdoors with shelter, are associated with decreased risk of disease. Even though it poses greater management challenges, successful group housing of calves is possible. Special emphasis should be given to equal age groups and to keeping groups stable once they are formed. The management of pneumonia in calves is reliant on a sound understanding of aetiology, relevant risk factors, and of effective approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Early signs of pneumonia include increased respiratory rate and fever, followed by depression. The single most important factor determining the success of therapy in calves with pneumonia is early onset of treatment, and subsequent adequate duration of treatment. The efficacy and economical viability of vaccination against respiratory disease in calves remains unclear.

  6. Postoperative pneumonia after surgery for lung cancer. Clinical analysis of 23 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Toru; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Funakoshi, Yasunobu; Ohse, Naoko; Kusumoto, Hidenori; Maeda, Hajime

    2010-01-01

    Postoperative pneumonia is sometimes a life-threatening complication of surgery for lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed patients who developed postoperative pneumonia after surgery for lung cancer in order to assess the clinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of this complication. Between 2001 and 2009, 836 patients underwent pulmonary resection for lung cancer in our hospital. Postoperative pneumonia developed in 23 patients (2.8%). Diagnoses of pneumonia were performed on postoperative day 6.8±3.4 (mean± standard deviation (SD)). Plain chest radiography revealed abnormal shadows on the operative side in 20 patients; 2 patients had bilateral pneumonia and 1 underwent pneumonectomy. Computed tomography was performed in 17 patients, and, among them, 13 patients (76.5%) had infiltrative shadows in the caudal or dorsal portion of the operative side of the lung. Nine patients (39.1%) were intubated in order to perform mechanical ventilation, and 4 of them died. Sputum cultures were performed in 12 patients, and pathogenic microorganisms were isolated in 4 (33.3%). The culturing of endotracheal specimens was carried out in 12 patients; among them, normal flora of the oral cavity was isolated in 4 patients (33.3%), no microorganisms were identified in 1 patient (8.3%), and pathogenic microorganisms were isolated in 7 patients (58.3%). The patients whose specimens tested positive for pathogenic microorganisms tended to develop severe pneumonia. We conclude that the insufficient drainage of respiratory tract secretions and silent aspiration after lung surgery are associated with the development of postoperative pneumonia. Further, obtaining and analyzing lower respiratory tract secretions is an important step in the management of postoperative pneumonia. (author)

  7. Systematic literature review of integrated community case management and the private sector in Africa: Relevant experiences and potential next steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awor, Phyllis; Miller, Jane; Peterson, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Despite substantial investments made over the past 40 years in low income countries, governments cannot be viewed as the principal health care provider in many countries. Evidence on the role of the private sector in the delivery of health services is becoming increasingly available. In this study, we set out to determine the extent to which the private sector has been utilized in providing integrated care for sick children under 5 years of age with community-acquired malaria, pneumonia or diarrhoea. We reviewed the published literature for integrated community case management (iCCM) related experiences within both the public and private sector. We searched PubMed and Google/Google Scholar for all relevant literature until July 2014. The search terms used were "malaria", "pneumonia", "diarrhoea", "private sector" and "community case management". A total of 383 articles referred to malaria, pneumonia or diarrhoea in the private sector. The large majority of these studies (290) were only malaria related. Most of the iCCM-related studies evaluated introduction of only malaria drugs and/or diagnostics into the private sector. Only one study evaluated the introduction of drugs and diagnostics for malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea in the private sector. In contrast, most iCCM-related studies in the public sector directly reported on community case management of 2 or more of the illnesses. While the private sector is an important source of care for children in low income countries, little has been done to harness the potential of this sector in improving access to care for non-malaria-associated fever in children within the community. It would be logical for iCCM programs to expand their activities to include the private sector to achieve higher population coverage. An implementation research agenda for private sector integrated care of febrile childhood illness needs to be developed and implemented in conjunction with private sector intervention programs.

  8. Childhood pneumonia and crowding, bed-sharing and nutrition: a case-control study from The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, S R C; Schellenberg, J; Chimah, O; Ideh, R C; Ebruke, B E; Oluwalana, C; Mackenzie, G; Jallow, M; Njie, M; Donkor, S; Dionisio, K L; Goldberg, G; Fornace, K; Bottomley, C; Hill, P C; Grant, C C; Corrah, T; Prentice, A M; Ezzati, M; Greenwood, B M; Smith, P G; Adegbola, R A; Mulholland, K

    2016-10-01

    Greater Banjul and Upper River Regions, The Gambia. To investigate tractable social, environmental and nutritional risk factors for childhood pneumonia. A case-control study examining the association of crowding, household air pollution (HAP) and nutritional factors with pneumonia was undertaken in children aged 2-59 months: 458 children with severe pneumonia, defined according to the modified WHO criteria, were compared with 322 children with non-severe pneumonia, and these groups were compared to 801 neighbourhood controls. Controls were matched by age, sex, area and season. Strong evidence was found of an association between bed-sharing with someone with a cough and severe pneumonia (adjusted OR [aOR] 5.1, 95%CI 3.2-8.2, P Malnutrition and pneumonia had clear evidence of association, which was strongest between severe malnutrition and severe pneumonia (aOR 8.7, 95%CI 4.2-17.8, P malnutrition remains an important tractable determinant.

  9. Quality improvement initiatives in a case management service: case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the importance of quality practices in underpinning the person-centred approach at a Community Options Program (COP) case management service in northern NSW. The NSW community care sector does not have a statutory excellence body to identify, promote and support improved practices and quality and safety across community services, and therefore the COP provider decided to establish a dedicated role to focus on the quality improvement of its service. The subsequent quality improvement initiatives have included mapping the clients' journey through the service, identifying areas to standardise practice, and creating service pathways. The clients' journey was used as the framework to identify where standardised practice was required, and a robust process was implemented to develop over 25 good practice guidelines and tools that addressed the variations in practice and enabled the service pathways to be developed. Prior to trialling the guidelines and tools, staff received education sessions on the anticipated changes to practice, and the practicality and applicability of the guidelines were evaluated at the end of the trials. This information was reviewed and the guidelines were amended accordingly before being rolled out. The guidelines have been in use for over 12 months and have provided the benchmark against which to audit practice, and have resulted in key performance improvements such as an increase in client review rates and a rise in the feedback response rate from clients, with a noticeable shift in the comments about the brokered support worker to acknowledging the role of their case manager. Formalising informal supports for those clients that lived alone also increased, which means these people are less reliant on services and there is a reduced risk of social isolation.

  10. Does marriage protect against hospitalization with pneumonia? A population-based case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mor A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anil Mor, Sinna P Ulrichsen, Elisabeth Svensson, Klara Berencsi, Reimar W Thomsen Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Background: To reduce the increasing burden of pneumonia hospitalizations, we need to understand their determinants. Being married may decrease the risk of severe infections, due to better social support and healthier lifestyle. Patients and methods: In this population-based case-control study, we identified all adult patients with a first-time pneumonia-related hospitalization between 1994 and 2008 in Northern Denmark. For each case, ten sex- and age-matched population controls were selected from Denmark's Civil Registration System. We performed conditional logistic regression analysis to estimate the odds ratios (ORs for pneumonia hospitalization among persons who were divorced, widowed, or never married, as compared with married persons, adjusting for age, sex, 19 different comorbidities, alcoholism-related conditions, immunosuppressant use, urbanization, and living with small children. Results: The study included 67,162 patients with a pneumonia-related hospitalization and 671,620 matched population controls. Compared with controls, the pneumonia patients were more likely to be divorced (10% versus 7% or never married (13% versus 11%. Divorced and never-married patients were much more likely to have previous diagnoses of alcoholism-related conditions (18% and 11%, respectively compared with married (3% and widowed (6% patients. The adjusted OR for pneumonia-related hospitalization was increased, at 1.29 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-1.33 among divorced; 1.15 (95% CI: 1.12-1.17 among widowed; and 1.33 (95% CI: 1.29-1.37 among never-married individuals as compared with those who were married. Conclusion: Married individuals have a decreased risk of being hospitalized with pneumonia compared with never-married, divorced, and widowed patients

  11. Exogenous lipoid pneumonia – a case report of a fire-eater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pielaszkiewicz-Wydra, Magdalena; Homola-Piekarska, Bożena; Szcześniak, Ewa; Ciołek-Zdun, Monika; Fall, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon condition caused by inhalation or aspiration of a fatty substance. It usually presents as chronic respiratory illness mimicking interstitial lung diseases. Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is uncommon and typically is caused by an episode of aspiration of a large quantity of a petroleum-based product. Radiological findings vary and may imitate many other diseases. We present a rare case of acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia in a fire-eater who aspirated liquid paraffin during his flame-blowing show (fire-eater’s lung). He was admitted to the hospital with productive cough, fever, hemoptysis, chest pain and dyspnea. Diagnosis was made on the basis of history of exposure to fatty substance, characteristic findings in CT examination and presence of lipid-laden macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia is a very rare disease that typically occurs in fire-eaters and is called a fire-eater’s lung. The diagnosis is made on the basis of typical history and radiological, as well as histopathological findings

  12. Imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foong, Kap Sum; Lee, Ashley; Pekez, Marijeta; Bin, Wei

    2016-03-04

    Drugs, toxins, and infections are known to cause acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Daptomycin and minocycline are the commonly reported antibiotics associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. In this study, we present a case of imipenem/cilastatin-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia. The patient presented with fever, acute hypoxic respiratory distress, and diffuse ground-glass opacities on the chest CT a day after the initiation of imipenem/cilastatin. Patient also developed peripheral eosinophilia. A reinstitution of imipenem/cilastatin resulted in recurrence of the signs and symptoms. A bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage showed 780 nucleated cells/mm(3) with 15% eosinophil. The patient's clinical condition improved significantly after the discontinuation of imipenem/cilastatin therapy and the treatment with corticosteroid. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.; Tian, L.W.; Zheng, T.Z.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.Z.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q. [NCI, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    2009-02-15

    In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study among all farmers born 1917 through 1951 and living in Xuanwei as of 1 January 1976. The analysis included a total of 42,422 cohort members. Follow-up identified all deaths in the cohort from 1976 through 1996. Ages at entry into and at exit from follow-up ranged from 24 to 59 years and from 25 to 80 years, respectively. The record search detected 225 deaths from pneumonia, and 32,332 (76%) were alive as of 31 December 1996. We constructed multivariable Cox models (time variable = age) to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Use of coal, especially smokeless coal, was positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Annual tonnage and lifetime duration of smoky and smokeless coal use were positively associated with pneumonia mortality. Stove improvement was associated with a 50% reduction in pneumonia deaths (smoky coal users: HR, 0.521; 95% CI, 0.340-0.798; smokeless coal users: HR, 0.449; 95% CI, 0.215-0.937). Our analysis is the first to suggest that indoor air pollution from unvented coal burning is an important risk factor for pneumonia death in adults and that improving ventilation by installing a chimney is an effective measure to decrease it.

  14. Mycoplasma pneumonia-associated Acute Hepatitis in an Adult Patient without Lung Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Wu Lee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is a major cause of respiratory infections in school-aged children. Most M. pneumonia infections in adults involve the respiratory tract. Extrapulmonary manifestations of M. pneumonia infection may be found in the skin, cardiovascular, neurologic and hematologic systems. Concomitant liver disease is rare in adults. Here, we report an unusual case of a patient who presented with fever and abdominal pain, but without pulmonary manifestations. The laboratory work-up demonstrated a hepatocellular pattern of acute hepatitis caused by M. pneumonia infection. Symptoms subsided and laboratory parameters improved with antibiotics treatment. Thus, this case can help raise clinicians' awareness of the possibility of M. pneumonia infection, with or without lung involvement, as a part of the evaluation of undetermined hepatitis.

  15. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  16. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, Jose; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings

  17. Radiology of bacterial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar, Jose E-mail: vilar_jlu@gva.es; Domingo, Maria Luisa; Soto, Cristina; Cogollos, Jonathan

    2004-08-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is commonly encountered in clinical practice. Radiology plays a prominent role in the evaluation of pneumonia. Chest radiography is the most commonly used imaging tool in pneumonias due to its availability and excellent cost benefit ratio. CT should be used in unresolved cases or when complications of pneumonia are suspected. The main applications of radiology in pneumonia are oriented to detection, characterisation and follow-up, especially regarding complications. The classical classification of pneumonias into lobar and bronchial pneumonia has been abandoned for a more clinical classification. Thus, bacterial pneumonias are typified into three main groups: Community acquired pneumonia (CAD), Aspiration pneumonia and Nosocomial pneumonia (NP).The usual pattern of CAD is that of the previously called lobar pneumonia; an air-space consolidation limited to one lobe or segment. Nevertheless, the radiographic patterns of CAD may be variable and are often related to the causative agent. Aspiration pneumonia generally involves the lower lobes with bilateral multicentric opacities. Nosocomial Pneumonia (NP) occurs in hospitalised patients. The importance of NP is related to its high mortality and, thus, the need to obtain a prompt diagnosis. The role of imaging in NP is limited but decisive. The most valuable information is when the chest radiographs are negative and rule out pneumonia. The radiographic patterns of NP are very variable, most commonly showing diffuse multifocal involvement and pleural effusion. Imaging plays also an important role in the detection and evaluation of complications of bacterial pneumonias. In many of these cases, especially in hospitalised patients, chest CT must be obtained in order to better depict these associate findings.

  18. A case of urticarial vasculitis in a female patient with lupus: Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection or lupus reactivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplomatico, Mario; Gicchino, Maria Francesca; Ametrano, Orsola; Marzuillo, Pierluigi; Olivieri, Alma Nunzia

    2017-05-01

    A 17-year-old female patient affected by systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (who had been taking 300 mg/die of hydroxychloroquine for 3 years), Graves' disease (treated with 10 mg/die of tapazole), and celiac disease came to our attention for urticarial vasculitis. She had been taking prednisone (25 mg/die) for 3 days, and her blood tests showed high levels of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The association between urticaria and M. pneumoniae infections can be present in up to 7% of the cases and, to the best of our knowledge, only two reports of urticarial vasculitis and M. pneumoniae in adults are available in the literature. Urticarial vasculitis can also be a rare cutaneous manifestation of SLE (affecting 2% of the patients), and our case is the first in the literature describing the coexistence of M. pneumoniae infection, SLE, and urticarial vasculitis in a pediatric patient, a case that rises an important differential diagnosis issue about the origin of urticarial vasculitis: SLE reactivation or urticarial vasculitis due to M. pneumoniae infection?

  19. Acute Placental Infection Due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: Report of a Unique Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Lage

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old woman, gravida 9, with seven healthy children and a history of one abortion (p 7 + 1 , presented at 18 weeks of gestation with fever and malodorous vaginal discharge. Ultrasound revealed a macerated fetus. The placenta showed acute chorioamnionitis and acute villitis with microabscess formation. Blood and vaginal cultures both grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. This is the first reported case in English literature of Klebsiella pneumoniae causing suppurative placentitis leading to fetal demise.

  20. Advances in the causes and management of community acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Richard G; Waterer, Grant

    2017-07-10

    Community acquired pneumonia remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Usually, the causal organism is not identified and treatment remains empiric. Recent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia, and epidemiologic studies are changing our perspective of what causes community acquired pneumonia, especially the role of viral pathogens and the frequent finding of multiple pathogens. The past decade has seen increasing overuse of empiric coverage of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistant Gram negative pathogens owing to inappropriate application of guidelines for healthcare associated pneumonia. Optimal treatment remains a matter for debate, especially in very sick patients, including the role of combination antibiotic therapy and corticosteroids. Pneumonia care bundles are being defined to improve outcomes. Increased recognition of both acute and long term cardiac complications is shifting our concept of pneumonia from an acute lung disease to a multisystem problem with adverse chronic health consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Structured decision making for managing pneumonia epizootics in bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, Sarah N.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Edwards, Victoria L.; Gude, Justin A.; Anderson, Neil J.

    2016-01-01

    Good decision-making is essential to conserving wildlife populations. Although there may be multiple ways to address a problem, perfect solutions rarely exist. Managers are therefore tasked with identifying decisions that will best achieve desired outcomes. Structured decision making (SDM) is a method of decision analysis used to identify the most effective, efficient, and realistic decisions while accounting for values and priorities of the decision maker. The stepwise process includes identifying the management problem, defining objectives for solving the problem, developing alternative approaches to achieve the objectives, and formally evaluating which alternative is most likely to accomplish the objectives. The SDM process can be more effective than informal decision-making because it provides a transparent way to quantitatively evaluate decisions for addressing multiple management objectives while incorporating science, uncertainty, and risk tolerance. To illustrate the application of this process to a management need, we present an SDM-based decision tool developed to identify optimal decisions for proactively managing risk of pneumonia epizootics in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) in Montana. Pneumonia epizootics are a major challenge for managers due to long-term impacts to herds, epistemic uncertainty in timing and location of future epizootics, and consequent difficulty knowing how or when to manage risk. The decision tool facilitates analysis of alternative decisions for how to manage herds based on predictions from a risk model, herd-specific objectives, and predicted costs and benefits of each alternative. Decision analyses for 2 example herds revealed that meeting management objectives necessitates specific approaches unique to each herd. The analyses showed how and under what circumstances the alternatives are optimal compared to other approaches and current management. Managers can be confident that these decisions are effective, efficient, and

  2. The roentgenological study of measles pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, U.; Song, C. H.; Lee, H. Y.; Chung, H. K.; Joo, K. B.

    1983-01-01

    Measles is important infectious disease of pediatrics and pneumonia is the most commonest complication of measles. We have experienced 20 cases of pneumonia among 31 cases of measles in infant nursing home of Chae Chun during of December. 1981. The results a are as follows; 1. The incidence of measles pneumonia is 64.5%. 2. The patterns of pneumonic infiltration is : The pneumonia may have a bronchopneumonia (60%), Lobar pneumonia (15%), or combined form (35%). 3. Both lungs are involved by measles pneumonia: Right lung only (30%), Left lung only (5%), or Bilateral (65%). 4. Hilar lymphadenopathy (51.6%). Hilar lymphadenopathy with pneumonia (82.2%) and hilar lymphadenopathy without pneumonia (17.8%). 5. There is no pulmonary nodule which is noted frequently in atypical measles pneumonia as a seguale

  3. Improving adolescent pregnancy outcomes and maternal health:a case study of comprehensive case managed services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Elizabeth K; Palley, Howard A

    2003-01-01

    Our findings indicate how health outcomes regarding adolescent pregnancy and maternal and infant health care are intertwined with a case management process that fosters measures that are social in nature-the provision of direct services, as well as the encouragement of informal social supports systems. They also show how case managed services in a small, nongovernmental organization (NGO) with a strong commitment to its clients may provide the spontaneity and caring which results in a "match" between client needs and the delivery of services-and positive outcomes for pregnant women, early maternal health and infant health. The delivery of such case managed services in a manner which is intensive, comprehensive, flexible and integrated contributes significantly to such improved health outcomes.

  4. Epidermal growth factor improves survival and prevents intestinal injury in a murine model of pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jessica A; Vithayathil, Paul J; Khailova, Ludmila; Lawrance, Christopher P; Samocha, Alexandr J; Jung, Enjae; Leathersich, Ann M; Dunne, W Michael; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2011-10-01

    Mortality from pneumonia is mediated, in part, through extrapulmonary causes. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has broad cytoprotective effects, including potent restorative properties in the injured intestine. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of EGF treatment following Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. FVB/N mice underwent intratracheal injection of either P. aeruginosa or saline and were then randomized to receive either systemic EGF or vehicle beginning immediately or 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Systemic EGF decreased 7-day mortality from 65% to 10% when initiated immediately after the onset of pneumonia and to 27% when initiated 24 h after the onset of pneumonia. Even though injury in pneumonia is initiated in the lungs, the survival advantage conferred by EGF was not associated with improvements in pulmonary pathology. In contrast, EGF prevented intestinal injury by reversing pneumonia-induced increases in intestinal epithelial apoptosis and decreases in intestinal proliferation and villus length. Systemic cytokines and kidney and liver function were unaffected by EGF therapy, although EGF decreased pneumonia-induced splenocyte apoptosis. To determine whether the intestine was sufficient to account for extrapulmonary effects induced by EGF, a separate set of experiments was done using transgenic mice with enterocyte-specific overexpression of EGF (IFABP-EGF [intestinal fatty acid-binding protein linked to mouse EGF] mice), which were compared with wild-type mice subjected to pneumonia. IFABP-EGF mice had improved survival compared with wild-type mice following pneumonia (50% vs. 28%, respectively, P < 0.05) and were protected from pneumonia-induced intestinal injury. Thus, EGF may be a potential adjunctive therapy for pneumonia, mediated in part by its effects on the intestine.

  5. Pneumonia por varicela associada com síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda: relato de dois casos Varicella pneumonia complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome: two cases report

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    Marcelo Moreno

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A varicela é uma doença exantemática causada pela infecção primária do vírus varicela zoster (VVZ. A pneumonia pelo VVZ complicada com a síndrome da angústia respiratória aguda (SARA é rara e associa-se a altas taxas de morbimortalidade. O objetivo deste estudo foi apresentar dois casos de pneumonia por varicela que evoluíram com SARA e outras disfunções orgânicas. RELATO DOS CASOS: Paciente de 15 anos, imunocomprometido com a síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (SIDA e uma paciente do sexo feminino imunocompetente, foram admitidos na UTI com quadro clínico de varicela, SARA, trombocitopenia e acidose graves. Além disso, disfunção cardiovascular e falência renal ocorreram no primeiro e segundo casos, respectivamente. Foram tratados com aciclovir além de ventilação mecânica protetora. CONCLUSÕES: Os dois casos de pneumonia por varicela, que apresentaram SARA e disfunções de múltiplos órgãos, obtiveram boa evolução clínica.BACKGROUNG AND OBJECTIVES: Varicella is an exantematic disease caused by varicella-zoster virus. Varicella pneumonia complicated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is very rare in adults and is associated with high morbimortality. We report two cases of ARDS secondary to varicella-zoster virus pneumonia. CASES REPORT: We report two cases of ARDS and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS secondary to varicella-zoster virus pneumonia. A 15-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and a 29-year-old immunocompetent female were admitted in the ICU with primary varicella infection and pneumonia. Both cases progressed towards ARDS, severe thrombocytopenia and acidosis. In addition cardiovascular and renal failure occurred in the first and second patients, respectively. Treatment consisted of immediate administration of intravenous acyclovir and a lung-protective ventilation strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Both cases of varicella

  6. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster Varicella zoster pneumonia

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    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos¹. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto. Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema.Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults. The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review.

  7. [Case Report: Clindamycin with Primaquine Therapy for Severe Pneumocystis Pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Yukihiro; Sakamoto, Youhei; Amano, Yuichiro; Tachikawa, Natsuo

    2015-09-01

    A Japanese female in her 60's on 5 years' treatment with prednisolone 5 mg for ulcetarive colitis developed severe bloody stools and diarrhea and was admitted. A total colectomy was performed because leukocytapheresis with intravenous corticosteroid administration (prednisolone 70 mg/day) relieved her symptoms partially. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis was not introduced then. She developed acute respiratory failure on postoperative day (POD) 8, and was intubated and moved to our intensive care unit. PCP was suspected and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (ST) was started with methylprednisolone 40 mg/day. The pneumonia initially improved but got worse around POD 27 and pulse corticosteroid therapy was administered. Antibiotics were first changed to pentamidine and finally changed to clindamycin/primaquine because of adverse reactions due to both of the medications. She recovered fully and experienced no exacerbation after discontinuation of the secondary prophylaxis. This is the first report of primaquine administration for PCP in Japan. Clindamycin/primaquine are second-line drugs but very important because the first-line medications such as ST and pentamidine cause adverse reactions and frequently result in discontinuation, as was the case in our present patient. Nowadays immunosuppresive therapy for malingnancies and autoimmune diseases has been introduced more frequently than before, PCP has attracted more attention. Therefore primaquine should be approved for appropriate use without delay in Japan.

  8. Initial management of pneumonia and sepsis: factors associated with improved outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, R; Torres, A; Reyes, S; Zalacain, R; Capelastegui, A; Aspa, J; Borderías, L; Martín-Villasclaras, J J; Bello, S; Alfageme, I; de Castro, F R; Rello, J; Molinos, L; Ruiz-Manzano, J

    2012-01-01

    Processes of care and adherence to guidelines have been associated with improved survival in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In sepsis, bundles of processes of care have also increased survival. We aimed to audit compliance with guideline-recommended processes of care and its impact on outcome in hospitalised CAP patients with sepsis. We prospectively studied 4,137 patients hospitalised with CAP in 13 hospitals. The processes of care evaluated were adherence to antibiotic prescription guidelines, first dose within 6 h and oxygen assessment. Outcome measures were mortality and length of stay (LOS). Oxygen assessment was measured in 3,745 (90.5%) patients; 3,024 (73.1%) patients received antibiotics according to guidelines and 3,053 (73.8%) received antibiotics within 6 h. In CAP patients with sepsis, the strongest independent factor for survival was antibiotic adherence (OR 0.4). In severe sepsis, only compliance to antibiotic adherence plus first dose within 6 h was associated with lower mortality (OR 0.60), adjusted for fine prognostic scale and hospital. Antibiotic adherence was related to shorter hospital stay. In sepsis, antibiotic adherence is the strongest protective factor of care associated with survival and LOS. In severe sepsis, combined antibiotic adherence and first dose within 6 h may reduce mortality.

  9. Clinical risk factors of death from pneumonia in children with severe acute malnutrition in an urban critical care ward of Bangladesh.

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    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. METHODS: For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35, and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105. RESULTS: The median (inter-quartile range age (months was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0 vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0; p = 0.210]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38-122.42, had clinical dehydration (some/severe (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42-37.19, abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12-16.52, and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21-24.99 for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and prompt management of these simple clinically

  10. Lung abscess due to Streptococcus pneumoniae: a case series and brief review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cilloniz, Catia; Senarega, Renata; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobes used to be the most common cause of community-acquired lung abscess, and Streptococcus species used to be the second most common cause. In recent years, this has been changing. Klebsiella pneumoniae is now an increasing cause of community- acquired lung abscess, but Streptococcus species continue to be major pathogens. Necrotizing pneumonia has generally been regarded as a rare complication of pneumococcal infection in adults. Type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae was the single most common type implicated in necrosis; however, many other serotypes were implicated. This entity predominately infects children, but is present also in adults. Lung abscess in adults due to Streptococcus pneumoniae is not common. In this regard we present a case series of pulmonary cavitation due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and discuss the possible pathogenic mechanism of the disease.

  11. Clinical Management of Acute Interstitial Pneumonia: A Case Report

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    Yang Xia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 51-year-old woman who was admitted to hospital because of cough and expectoration accompanied with general fatigue and progressive dyspnea. Chest HRCT scan showed areas of ground glass attenuation, consolidation, and traction bronchiectasis in bilateral bases of lungs. BAL fluid test and transbronchial lung biopsy failed to offer insightful evidence for diagnosis. She was clinically diagnosed with acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP. Treatment with mechanical ventilation and intravenous application of methylprednisolone (80 mg/day showed poor clinical response and thus was followed by steroid pulse therapy (500 mg/day, 3 days. However, she died of respiratory dysfunction eventually. Autopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage associated with hyaline membrane formation, pulmonary interstitial, immature collagen edema, and focal type II pneumocyte hyperplasia.

  12. Early detection of interstitial pneumonia by WXGa-citrate scintigraphy. Cases of abnormal pulmonary WXGa uptake with normal chest radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Mikami, Riichiro; Ryujin, Yoshitada

    1985-04-01

    In this paper we report our recent experience indicating usefulness of WXGa-citrate scintigraphy in 4 cases with inflammatory pulmonary diseases. These cases showed abnormal pulmonary WXGa uptake with normal chest radiographs. The first case with malignant lymphoma and the second one with lung cancer suffered from pulmonary infection following secondary immuno-insufficiency due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Pneumocystis carinii was suspected as causative agent in the first case, and gram negative bacilli in the second case. The third case with lung cancer developed radiation pneumonia after radiotherapy. The fourth case with acute bronchitis developed drug induced interstitial pneumonia presumably due to minocycline administration. It is concluded that WXGa-citrate scintigraphy is more sensitive for early detection of interstitial pneumonia than routine chest radiography.

  13. Two Cases of Tsunami Dust Pneumonia: Organizing Pneumonia Caused by the Inhalation of Dried Tsunami Sludge after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanda, Shinsuke; Kobayashi, Seiichi; Hanagama, Masakazu; Sato, Hikari; Suzuki, Satoshi; Ueda, Shinsaku; Takahashi, Toru; Yanai, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of organizing pneumonia (OP) secondary to the inhalation of the dried tsunami sludge which formed during the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and the consequent tsunami. After the disaster, both of these patients had been engaged in the restoration work. About half a month later, they developed shortness of breath and pulmonary infiltrates. These patients were diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia. Their biopsy specimens revealed multifocal peribronchiolitis and OP. An electron probe microanalysis of these specimens demonstrated the presence of elements from the earth's crust in the inflammatory lesions. These two cases indicate that exposure to dried tsunami sludge can cause OP. PMID:27980267

  14. Clinical features of measles pneumonia in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Honma, Shin-ichi; Yamagishi, Masahiko; Honda, Yasuhito; Abe, Shosaku; Igarashi, Tomofumi; Sekine, Kyuichiro.

    1993-01-01

    The clinical features, chest radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) images were evaluated in 11 cases of serologically proved adult measles complicated with pneumonia (10 were previously healthy and one had sarcoidosis). Pneumonia appeared during the rash period in all cases. Respiratory symptoms were cough (9/11), dyspnea (3/11), and hypoxemia (10/11). Pneumonia manifestations were detected in only 4 cases by chest radiograph; on the other hand, they were seen in all cases by CT scan and consisted of ground-glass opacities (73%), nodular opacities (64%) and consolidation (27%). CT seems to be useful method to detect measles pneumonia if it is suspected. Measles pneumonia in previously healthy patients had a good prognosis, as the hypoxemia disappeared within 6 days in all cases. The sarcoidosis patient showed prolonged pneumonic shadows and period of hypoxemia. Measles pneumonia occurring in a host with cellular immunodeficiency may have a severe clinical course. (author)

  15. Identification and selection of cases and controls in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Levine, Orin S.; Black, Robert E.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Campbell, Harry; Cherian, Thomas; Crook, Derrick W.; de Jong, Menno D.; Dowell, Scott F.; Graham, Stephen M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Martin, Paul; Nataro, James P.; Piazza, Franco M.; Qazi, Shamim A.; Zar, Heather J.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Chipeta, James; Ebruke, Bernard; Endtz, Hubert P.; Groome, Michelle; Hammitt, Laura L.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen; Maloney, Susan A.; Moore, David; Otieno, Juliet; Seidenberg, Phil; Tapia, Milagritos; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thea, Donald M.; Zaman, Khaleque

    2012-01-01

    Methods for the identification and selection of patients (cases) with severe or very severe pneumonia and controls for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project were needed. Issues considered include eligibility criteria and sampling strategies, whether to enroll hospital or

  16. A Case Report on Aspergillus lentulus Pneumonia

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    Muharrem Cidem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus lentulus was described as a new species in 2005 but it was isolated from Turkey for the first time. Case report: A. lentulus was isolated as the cause of pneumonia from a patient who had renal transplantation 4 months ago. The patient received immunosuppressive treatment after transplantation. A. lentulus was isolated from his sputum as an agent in pneumonia developed 4 months after the transplantation. Leukocytes, blastospores, and hyphae were seen in both Gram- and Giemsa-stained smears of the sputum. The isolate was identified by using the Maren A. Klich algorithm and molecular methods and confirmed by the reference laboratory of the CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre (The Netherlands. In the susceptibility tests of the isolate, minimal inhibitory concentrations for amphotericin B, voriconazole, posaconazole, and caspofungin were found to be 0.5 µg/mL, 0.25 µg/mL, 0.125 µg/mL, and 0.25 µg/mL, respectively. The patient recovered with voriconazole treatment (2x200 mg/day. Conclusion: The use of the molecular tests is important for identification of A. lentulus strains because they are very easily confused with A.fumigatus strains according to phenotypic characteristics.

  17. [Case of infectious mononucleosis with suspected primary coinfection with Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae and Epstein-Barr virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizuma, Toru

    2008-09-01

    A 26-year-old male was hospitalized with fever and pharyngeal pain. Liver dysfunction and an increase in the percentage of atypical lymphocytes in the peripheral blood were detected. Computed tomography showed pneumonia involving the right lung and synpneumonic pleural effusion. Serum immunological tests showed positive results for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viral capsid antigen (VCA) IgM and IgG antibodies and Chlamydophila (Chlamydia) pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae) IgM and IgA antibodies on admission. The pneumonia and pleural effusion were no longer detectable after a week of treatment with starting azithromycin. At 7 weeks after admission, the liver function test results returned to within normal limits, the serum became negative for EBV VCA IgM antibody, the C. pneumoniae IgM antibody titer decreased, and the C. pneumoniae IgA and IgG antibody titers increased. This case was suspected to have infectious mononucleosis caused by primary coinfection with C. pneumoniae and EBV.

  18. Clinical and radiological aspects of limited forms of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis and slowly resolving pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraiani, Olga; Lesnic, Evelina; Niguleanu, Adriana; Niguleanu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Despite of a clearly defined diagnostic algorithm of pulmonary tuberculosis, low sensibility of contemporary laboratory methods in limited forms of pulmonary tuberculosis contributes to a difficult differential diagnosis with community acquired pneumonia, especially with slowly resolving pneumonia. A case-control, prospective, selective, comparative and descriptive study was performed using a group of 180 patients, divided into two samples: I group - 125 cases with limited form of pulmonary infiltrative tuberculosis; II group - 55 cases with slowly resolving community-acquired pneumonia. The findings identified the prevalence of intoxication syndrome in the slowly resolving pneumonia sample. Lung destructions and bronchogenous dissemination was identified only in the tuberculosis sample. A higher impact of comorbidities and old age was more relevant in slowly resolving pneumonia sample. Clinical and radiological improvement was established in most patients of both groups, but the considerable resorption of lung infiltrates predominated in slowly resolving pneumonia sample. (authors)

  19. Radiologic finding of primary pneumonia in adolescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chi Sung; Kim, Yong Duk

    1989-01-01

    Radiologic findings of 81 cases of acute, primary pneumonia in adolescence (in the twenties) were analyzed retrospectively with regard to their pattern, location, evolution and complication. The results were as follows: 1. The cases of single lesion were 85%, and multiple lesion 15%. 2. Left lower lobe was the most frequent site of involvement (42%), followed by right lower lobe (29%), right middle lobe (13%), left upper lobe (12.5%) and right upper lobe (4%) in the cases of single lesion. In cases of multiple lesions, lower lobe involvement was not so predominant as in cases of single lesion. 3. Most of the lesions were alveolar or bronchopneumonic in radiologic pattern. Interstitial pneumonic pattern was found in only 7 cases (9%). 4. Pleural effusion as associated finding was found in only 2 cases (2%). 5. Rapid radiographic improvement, short clinical course, complete healing, without residue when treated with broad spectrum antibiotics seem to be different findings as compared with secondary or elder group pneumonia

  20. Pneumonia: Features registered in autopsy material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosjerina, Zdravko; Vukoja, Marija; Vuckovic, Dejan; Kosjerina Ostric, Vesna; Jevtic, Marija

    2017-08-01

    Despite improvements in clinical practice, pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Pathologic findings from autopsy reports could provide more precise and valid data on characteristics of pneumonia patients. We retrospectively reviewed autopsy reports of deceased patients admitted to the Institute for Pulmonary Diseases of Vojvodina in Sremska Kamenica, Serbia, between 1994 and 2003. The patients were classified into two groups: group 1 (n = 161) comprised patients in whom pneumonia was the main cause of death, while group 2 (n = 165) consisted of patients in whom pneumonia was confirmed at autopsy but had various different causes of death. From 1776 patients who underwent autopsy 326 (18.3%) were diagnosed with pneumonia. The most common underlying diseases were atherosclerosis (29.4%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (26.7%), and malignancies (20.2%). Pneumonia was the main cause of death in 161 cases (group 1) while in group 2 major causes of death were heart failure (HF) (26.7%), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (16.4%), and pulmonary embolism (PE) (10.9%). Multilobar involvement (91% vs.27%), pulmonary effusion (29% vs.14%), and lung abscess (23.6% vs.8.5%) were more frequently found in group 1, compared to group 2. In patients with pneumonia who underwent autopsy most common underlying diseases were atherosclerosis, COPD, and malignancies, while major causes of death were: progression of pneumonia, HF, AMI, and PE.

  1. A Case of Eosinophilic Pneumonia in a Tobacco Harvester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Yoshioka

    2011-01-01

    Discussion: Green tobacco sickness, a type of nicotine poisoning caused by the dermal absorption of nicotine, is a well known occupational illness of tobacco harvesters. Although it is unclear whether the present case could be identified as a subtype of green tobacco sickness, this is the first report of eosinophilic pneumonia occurred in a tobacco harvester which was possibly induced by tobacco leaf exposure.

  2. Characteristic of inapperceptive pneumonia according to materials of fluorographic examination of population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frejdzon, M.N.; Volynskaya, N.E.

    1984-01-01

    189 (15.5%) cases of pneumonia disclosed during preventive examination of 2202 patients in policlinics for 5 years are analysed. Conclusion is drawn on importance of fluorographic preventive examination of population in pic periods of catarrhal diseases (for diagnosis of not clearly expressed and asymptomatic pneumonia). True number of asymptomatic pneumonia is considerably lower than that registered before X-ray examination. Improvement of diagnostic method is possible with thorough clinical examination of patients

  3. Severe community-acquired Enterobacter pneumonia: a plea for greater awareness of the concept of health-care-associated pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with Enterobacter community-acquired pneumonia (EnCAP) were admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Our primary aim was to describe them as few data are available on EnCAP. A comparison with CAP due to common and typical bacteria was performed. Methods Baseline clinical, biological and radiographic characteristics, criteria for health-care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) were compared between each case of EnCAP and thirty age-matched typical CAP cases. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors independently associated with ENCAP. Their outcome was also compared. Results In comparison with CAP due to common bacteria, a lower leukocytosis and constant HCAP criteria were associated with EnCAP. Empiric antibiotic therapy was less effective in EnCAP (20%) than in typical CAP (97%) (p < 0.01). A delay in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6 days; p < 0.01) and an increase in duration of mechanical ventilation (8.4 ± 5.2 vs. 4.0 ± 4.3 days; p = 0.01) and ICU stay were observed in EnCAP patients. Conclusions EnCAP is a severe infection which is more consistent with HCAP than with typical CAP. This retrospectively suggests that the application of HCAP guidelines should have improved EnCAP management. PMID:21569334

  4. Severe asthma exacerbation: role of acute Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentini, Roberto; Tarsia, Paolo; Canetta, Ciro; Graziadei, Giovanna; Brambilla, Anna Maria; Aliberti, Stefano; Pappalettera, Maria; Tantardini, Francesca; Blasi, Francesco

    2008-05-30

    Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are associated with acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma (AEBA). The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between these acute bacterial infections and the severity of AEBA. We prospectively analysed consecutive patients admitted to the Emergency Department with acute asthma exacerbation. In every patient peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurement was performed on admission, and spirometry during follow-up. Serology for Chlamydophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae was performed on admission and after 4-8 weeks. Fifty-eight patients completed the study. Acute atypical infections (AAI) was observed in 22/58 cases; we found single acute C. pneumoniae in 19 cases, single acute M. pneumoniae in 2 cases, and double acute infection in one case. Functional impairment on admission was greater in patients with AAI than in patients without AAI (PEF 205 +/- 104 L/min vs 276 +/- 117 p = 0.02) and persisted until visit 2 (FEV1% 76.30 +/- 24.54 vs FEV1% 92.91 +/- 13.89, p = 0.002). Moreover, the proportion of patients who presented with severe AEBA was significantly greater in the group with AAI than in the group without AAI (15/22 vs 12/36, p = 0.01; OR 4.29, 95% CI 1.38-13.32). Our data suggest an association between acute atypical infection and a more severe AEBA.

  5. Recurrent Pneumonia due to Double Aortic Arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sedighi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumonia is one of the most common infections during childhood. In children with recurrent bacterial pneumonia complete evaluation for underlying factors is necessary. The most common underlying diseases include: antibody deficiencies , cystic fibrosis , tracheoesophageal fistula and increased pulmonary blood flow. Vascular ring and its pressure effect is a less common cause of stridor and recurrent pneumonia. Congenital abnormalities in aortic arch and main branches which form vascular ring around esophagus and trachea with variable pressure effect cause respiratory symptoms such as stridor , wheezing and recurrent pneumoniaCase Report: A 2 year old boy was admitted in our hospital with respiratory distress and cough . Chest x-Ray demonstrated right lobar pneumonia. He had history of stridor and wheezing from neonatal period and hospitalization due to pneumonia for four times. The patient received appropriate antibiotics. Despite fever and respiratory distress improvement, wheezing continued. Review of his medical documents showed fixed pressure effect on posterior aspect of esophagus in barium swallow. In CT angiography we confirmed double aortic arch.Conclusion: Double aortic arch is one of the causes of persistant respiratory symptom and recurrent pneumonia in children for which fluoroscopic barium swallow is the first non-invasive diagnostic method.(Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2012;19(1:70-74

  6. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia involving with mediastinal lymph nodes: radiologic study of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo Garcia, A.; Gordillo Gutierrez, I.; Guembe Urtiaga, P.

    1994-01-01

    Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) is an uncommon disorder in our setting. Chest x-ray is essential to diagnosis. To date, we have found only three reported cases in which mediastinal lymph nodes were involved. We present three additional cases with standard thoracic study. (Author)

  7. Transient plasma cobalamin elevation in patients with pneumonia - two case reports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, Martin Torp; Scheller, Rudolf; Nybo, Mads

    2018-01-01

    We report two cases of transient significantly elevated plasma cobalamin (B12) in geriatric patients acutely admitted with fever, increased C-reactive protein and X-ray verified pneumonia. Extensive diagnostic workup did not reveal kidney or liver disease, neither any signs of cancer. Furthermore...

  8. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  9. Pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax as presenting signs in severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Jose L.; Vazquez, Ignacio; Garcia-Tejedor, Jose L. [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Radiology, Vigo (Spain); Gonzalez, Maria L.; Reparaz, Alfredo [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Pediatrics, Vigo (Spain)

    2007-12-15

    We present a 3-year-old child with severe extensive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia complicated with pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum have only exceptionally been described in mild cases of the disease. The radiological findings, differential diagnosis and clinical course are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax as presenting signs in severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Jose L.; Vazquez, Ignacio; Garcia-Tejedor, Jose L.; Gonzalez, Maria L.; Reparaz, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-year-old child with severe extensive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia complicated with pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum have only exceptionally been described in mild cases of the disease. The radiological findings, differential diagnosis and clinical course are discussed. (orig.)

  11. A Rare Case of Cavitary Lesion of the Lung Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kashif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an atypical bacterium that most commonly causes upper respiratory tract infections, but it can also cause pneumonia, referred to as “walking pneumonia.” Although cavitary lesions are present in a wide variety of infectious and noninfectious processes, those attributable to M. pneumoniae are extremely uncommon; thus, to date, epidemiological studies are lacking. Here, we present a rare case of a 20-year-old male, referred to us from a psychiatric facility for evaluation of a cough, who was found to have a cavitary lesion in the right upper lobe. An extensive workup for cavitary lesion was negative, but his mycoplasma IgM level was high. A computed tomography (CT of the chest confirmed the presence of a cavitary lesion. After treatment with levofloxacin antibiotics, a follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the lesion. Our case is a rare presentation of mycoplasma pneumonia as a cavitary lesion in a patient without any known risk factors predisposing to mycoplasma infection. Early recognition and treatment with an appropriate antibiotic may lead to complete resolution of the cavitary lesion.

  12. Characteristics and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the Era of Global Aging

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    Catia Cillóniz

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP can occur at any time of life, but its incidence and risk of death are linked to increasing age. CAP in the elderly is a major health problem associated with high rates of readmission, morbidity, and mortality. Since the clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly may be atypical, clinicians should suspect pneumonia in older patients presenting symptoms such as falls and altered mental status, fatigue, lethargy, delirium, anorexia, in order to avoid the complications associated with delayed diagnosis and therapy. Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most frequently reported pathogen in this population. However, particular attention should be paid to patients with risk factors for multidrug resistant pathogens, because a large proportion of elderly persons present multimorbidity. Vaccination is one of the most important preventive approaches for CAP in the elderly. In addition, lifestyle-tailored interventions for different modifiable risk factors will help to reduce the risk of pneumonia in elderly persons. Surveillance of etiological pathogens may improve vaccination policies in this population.

  13. Clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in acute Klebsiella Pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Fumito; Ando, Yumiko; Honda, Koichi; Nakayama, Tomoko; Kiyonaga, Maki; Ono, Asami; Tanoue, Shuichi; Maeda, Toru; Mori, Hiromu

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively evaluated thin-section CT examinations performed between January 1991 and December 2007 from 962 patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. Seven hundred and sixty-four cases with concurrent infectious diseases were excluded. Thus, our study group comprised 198 patients (118 male, 80 female; age range 18-97 years, mean age 61.5). Underlying diseases and clinical findings were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities were evaluated along with the presence of enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion. CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia consisted mainly of ground-glass attenuation (100%), consolidation (91.4%), and intralobular reticular opacity (85.9%), which were found in the periphery (96%) of both sides of the lungs (72.2%) and were often associated with pleural effusion (53%). The underlying conditions in patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia were alcoholism or smoking habit. (orig.)

  14. Clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in acute Klebsiella Pneumoniae pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Fumito [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Oita (Japan); Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Oita (Japan); Ando, Yumiko; Honda, Koichi; Nakayama, Tomoko; Kiyonaga, Maki; Ono, Asami; Tanoue, Shuichi; Maeda, Toru; Mori, Hiromu [Oita University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Oita (Japan)

    2009-04-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and pulmonary thin-section CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively evaluated thin-section CT examinations performed between January 1991 and December 2007 from 962 patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia. Seven hundred and sixty-four cases with concurrent infectious diseases were excluded. Thus, our study group comprised 198 patients (118 male, 80 female; age range 18-97 years, mean age 61.5). Underlying diseases and clinical findings were assessed. Parenchymal abnormalities were evaluated along with the presence of enlarged lymph nodes and pleural effusion. CT findings in patients with acute Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia consisted mainly of ground-glass attenuation (100%), consolidation (91.4%), and intralobular reticular opacity (85.9%), which were found in the periphery (96%) of both sides of the lungs (72.2%) and were often associated with pleural effusion (53%). The underlying conditions in patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia were alcoholism or smoking habit. (orig.)

  15. [Obliterative bronchiolitis with organising pneumonia following FOLFOX 4 chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, C; Fremault, A; Carrasco, J; Colinet, B

    2010-01-01

    FOLFOX 4 chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin) is the standard adjuvant treatment for stage III colon cancer. The principal secondary effects described are haematological, gastro-intestinal or neurological. A single case of obliterative bronchiolitis with organising pneumonia has been described recently. We report the case of a female patient aged 74 years who, after 12 courses of FOLFOX 4 chemotherapy, developed acute onset of severe shortness of breath and a dry cough but remained afebrile. A thoracic CT-scan showed symmetrical bilateral interstitial infiltration that was reticular in appearance, and predominantly basal and peripheral in distribution. Broncho-alveolar lavage revealed an alveolitis with 9% eosinophils and 4% neutrophils. Transbronchial biopsies showed the appearances of obliterative bronchiolitis with organising pneumonia. Systemic corticosteroid treatment led to a remarkable clinical and functional improvement. To our knowledge, this is the second case of obliterative bronchiolitis with organising pneumonia that has been described following adjuvant treatment based on FOLFOX 4.

  16. Clinical Risk Factors of Death From Pneumonia in Children with Severe Acute Malnutrition in an Urban Critical Care Ward of Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Ashraf, Hasan; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Imran, Gazi; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2013-01-01

    Background Risks of death are high when children with pneumonia also have severe acute malnutrition (SAM) as a co-morbidity. However, there is limited published information on risk factors of death from pneumonia in SAM children. We evaluated clinically identifiable factors associated with death in under-five children who were hospitalized for the management of pneumonia and SAM. Methods For this unmatched case-control design, SAM children of either sex, aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during April 2011 to July 2012 with radiological pneumonia were studied. The SAM children with pneumonia who had fatal outcome constituted the cases (n = 35), and randomly selected SAM children with pneumonia who survived constituted controls (n = 105). Results The median (inter-quartile range) age (months) was comparable among the cases and the controls [8.0 (4.9, 11.0) vs. 9.7 (5.0, 18.0); p = 0.210)]. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders, such as vomiting, abnormal mental status, and systolic hypotension (<70 mm of Hg) in absence of dehydration, fatal cases of severely malnourished under-five children with pneumonia were more often hypoxemic (OR = 23.15, 95% CI = 4.38–122.42), had clinical dehydration (some/severe) (OR = 9.48, 95% CI = 2.42–37.19), abdominal distension at admission (OR = 4.41, 95% CI = 1.12–16.52), and received blood transfusion (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.21–24.99) for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension. Conclusion and Significance We identified hypoxemia, clinical dehydration, and abdominal distension as the independent predictors of death in SAM children with pneumonia. SAM children with pneumonia who required blood transfusion for the management of crystalloid resistant systolic hypotension were also at risk for death. Thus, early identification and

  17. Radiologic findings of primary pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chi Sung; Kim, In One; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1991-01-01

    It is not always easy to detect and interpret radiologic findings of pediatric pneumonia. Authors retrospectively analysed radiologic findings of 102 cases of pediatric primary pneumonia treated at Yeong-Deung-Po City Hospital between 1988 and 1990 to understand the past trend of radiologic pattern and to attain helpful information in diagnosing pediatric pneumonia hereafter. Results were as follows. Positive radiologic findings were noted in 85 cases (84%), but 17 cases (16%) showed indefinite lesion. The cases of infantile pneumonia (under 1 year of age) were 44. The most frequent finding was bilateral peribronchial infiltration with overearation (21 cases, 48%), followed by multiple patchy atelectasis associated with the findings of bilateral peribronchial infiltration and overaeration (nine cases, 23%), peribronchial infiltration without definite overaeration (six cases, 14%), alveolar consolidation superimposed on the peribronchial infiltration (three cases, 6%), alveolar consolidation (three cases, 6%) and bronchopneumonic pattern (two cases, 4%). The cases of pre-school age (1-5 years of age) were 34. Bilateral parahilar peribronchial infiltration was the most frequent finding (24 cases, 71%), followed by alveolar consolidation (six cases, 17%) and bronchopneumonic pattern (four cases, 12%). The cases of school age (over 6 years of age) were seven. Six cases (85%) showed alveolar consolidation and one case (15%) showed bronchopneumonic pattern. In short, the younger the patient was, the more frequently the interstitial infiltration occurred. Furthermore, overaeration and patchy atelectasis were unique findings of infantile pneumonia. After the school age, the pattern of pneumonia became similar to that of adults

  18. Lipoid Pneumonia in a Gas Station Attendant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladis Isabel Yampara Guarachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The exogenous lipoid pneumonia, uncommon in adults, is the result of the inhalation and/or aspiration of lipid material into the tracheobronchial tree. This is often confused with bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis due to a nonspecific clinical and radiologic picture. It presents acutely or chronically and may result in pulmonary fibrosis. We describe here a case of lipoid pneumonia in a gas station attendant who siphoned gasoline to fill motorcycles; he was hospitalized due to presenting with a respiratory infection that was hard to resolve. The patient underwent bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, which, on cytochemical (oil red O evaluation, was slightly positive for lipid material in the foamy cytoplasm of alveolar macrophages. Due to his occupational history and radiographic abnormalities suggestive of lipoid pneumonia, a lung biopsy was performed to confirm the diagnosis. The patient was serially treated with segmental lung lavage and showed clinical, functional, and radiological improvement.

  19. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan; Mohammed Abukhattab; Mohammed AbuKamar; Deshmukh Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical presentation, underlying diseases, antimicrobial susceptibility, treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients. Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admitted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2012. Results: A total of ten cases were identified (nine males and one female). Their mean age was (43.3±12.8) years. Eight patients (80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition. Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom. Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels. Gram stain showed Gram-negative rods in 50%of cases, while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients. Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases, and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments. The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was (19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device, while in-hospital mortality was 50%. Conclusions: The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions. Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  20. Adult Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in Qatar:clinical pattern of ten cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahmi; Yousef; Khan; Mohammed; Abukhattab; Mohanuned; Abukamar; Deshmukh; Anand

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To describe the clinical presentation,underlying diseases,antimicrobial susceptibility,treatment and outcome of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis patients.Methods:This retrospective study involved all patients with 15 years of age or older who admit ted to Hamad General Hospital with culture proven Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis from January 1,2007 to December 31,2012.Results:A total of ten cases were identified mine males and one female).Their mean age was i43.3±12.8) years.Eight patients(80%) had nosocomial meningitis with neurosurgery being the most frequent associated condition.Fever and altered consciousness were the most frequent symptom.Cerebrospinal fluid showed elevated protein and glucose levels.Oram slain showed Gram—negative rods in 50%of cases,while positive cerebrospinal fluid culture results were found in all patients.Multidrug resistance was observed in two cases,and all patients had received appropriate empirical and definitive antibiotic treatments.The mean duration of intravenous antimicrobial treatment was(19.3±7.0) d and all patients with external ventricular drains underwent removal of the device,while in—hospital mortality was 50%.Conclusions:The number of cases was too small to come up with therapeutic and prognostic conclusions.Further large-scale prospective study is needed.

  1. Severe asthma exacerbation: role of acute Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappalettera Maria

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae are associated with acute exacerbation of bronchial asthma (AEBA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between these acute bacterial infections and the severity of AEBA. Methods We prospectively analysed consecutive patients admitted to the Emergency Department with acute asthma exacerbation. In every patient peak expiratory flow (PEF measurement was performed on admission, and spirometry during follow-up. Serology for Chlamydophila and Mycoplasma pneumoniae was performed on admission and after 4–8 weeks. Results Fifty-eight patients completed the study. Acute atypical infections (AAI was observed in 22/58 cases; we found single acute C. pneumoniae in 19 cases, single acute M. pneumoniae in 2 cases, and double acute infection in one case. Functional impairment on admission was greater in patients with AAI than in patients without AAI (PEF 205 ± 104 L/min vs 276 ± 117 p = 0.02 and persisted until visit 2 (FEV1% 76.30 ± 24.54 vs FEV1% 92.91 ± 13.89, p = 0.002. Moreover, the proportion of patients who presented with severe AEBA was significantly greater in the group with AAI than in the group without AAI (15/22 vs 12/36, p = 0.01; OR 4.29, 95% CI 1.38–13.32. Conclusion Our data suggest an association between acute atypical infection and a more severe AEBA.

  2. Should Controls With Respiratory Symptoms Be Excluded From Case-Control Studies of Pneumonia Etiology? Reflections From the PERCH Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higdon, Melissa M; Hammitt, Laura L; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Howie, Stephen R C; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; Murdoch, David R; Scott, J Anthony G; Thea, Donald M; Driscoll, Amanda J; Karron, Ruth A; Park, Daniel E; Prosperi, Christine; Zeger, Scott L; O'Brien, Katherine L; Feikin, Daniel R

    2017-06-15

    Many pneumonia etiology case-control studies exclude controls with respiratory illness from enrollment or analyses. Herein we argue that selecting controls regardless of respiratory symptoms provides the least biased estimates of pneumonia etiology. We review 3 reasons investigators may choose to exclude controls with respiratory symptoms in light of epidemiologic principles of control selection and present data from the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study where relevant to assess their validity. We conclude that exclusion of controls with respiratory symptoms will result in biased estimates of etiology. Randomly selected community controls, with or without respiratory symptoms, as long as they do not meet the criteria for case-defining pneumonia, are most representative of the general population from which cases arose and the least subject to selection bias. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Pneumonia’s second wind? A case study of the global health network for childhood pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlan, David

    2016-01-01

    Advocacy, policy, research and intervention efforts against childhood pneumonia have lagged behind other health issues, including malaria, measles and tuberculosis. Accelerating progress on the issue began in 2008, following decades of efforts by individuals and organizations to address the leading cause of childhood mortality and establish a global health network. This article traces the history of this network’s formation and evolution to identify lessons for other global health issues. Through document review and interviews with current, former and potential network members, this case study identifies five distinct eras of activity against childhood pneumonia: a period of isolation (post WWII to 1984), the duration of WHO’s Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) Programme (1984–1995), Integrated Management of Childhood illness’s (IMCI) early years (1995–2003), a brief period of network re-emergence (2003–2008) and recent accelerating progress (2008 on). Analysis of these eras reveals the critical importance of building a shared identity in order to form an effective network and take advantage of emerging opportunities. During the ARI era, an initial network formed around a relatively narrow shared identity focused on community-level care. The shift to IMCI led to the partial dissolution of this network, stalled progress on addressing pneumonia in communities and missed opportunities. Frustrated with lack of progress on the issue, actors began forming a network and shared identity that included a broad spectrum of those whose interests overlap with pneumonia. As the network coalesced and expanded, its members coordinated and collaborated on conducting and sharing research on severity and tractability, crafting comprehensive strategies and conducting advocacy. These network activities exerted indirect influence leading to increased attention, funding, policies and some implementation. PMID:26438780

  4. Can We Predict Oral Antibiotic Treatment Failure in Children with Fast-Breathing Pneumonia Managed at the Community Level? A Prospective Cohort Study in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina King

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of infectious death amongst children globally, with the highest burden in Africa. Early identification of children at risk of treatment failure in the community and prompt referral could lower mortality. A number of clinical markers have been independently associated with oral antibiotic failure in childhood pneumonia. This study aimed to develop a prognostic model for fast-breathing pneumonia treatment failure in sub-Saharan Africa.We prospectively followed a cohort of children (2-59 months, diagnosed by community health workers with fast-breathing pneumonia using World Health Organisation (WHO integrated community case management guidelines. Cases were followed at days 5 and 14 by study data collectors, who assessed a range of pre-determined clinical features for treatment outcome. We built the prognostic model using eight pre-defined parameters, using multivariable logistic regression, validated through bootstrapping.We assessed 1,542 cases of which 769 were included (32% ineligible; 19% defaulted. The treatment failure rate was 15% at day 5 and relapse was 4% at day 14. Concurrent malaria diagnosis (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.47 and moderate malnutrition (OR: 1.88; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.26 were associated with treatment failure. The model demonstrated poor calibration and discrimination (c-statistic: 0.56.This study suggests that it may be difficult to create a pragmatic community-level prognostic child pneumonia tool based solely on clinical markers and pulse oximetry in an HIV and malaria endemic setting. Further work is needed to identify more accurate and reliable referral algorithms that remain feasible for use by community health workers.

  5. Emergency department case management: the dyad team of nurse case manager and social worker improve discharge planning and patient and staff satisfaction while decreasing inappropriate admissions and costs: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Darlene P; Herrick, Charlotte A

    2002-01-01

    A model of emergency department (ED) case management consisting of a social worker and a nurse case manager can prevent inappropriate admissions, improve discharge planning, decrease cost, and enhance patient satisfaction. The individual and combined roles of the dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager are discussed. A literature review includes how a case management dyad team of social worker and nurse case manager in the ED can decrease utilization of the ED for nonemergent visits, promote the use of community resources, and improve discharge planning to avoid excessive costs. The importance of the dyad team working with the interdisciplinary team in the ED, the primary care physician (PCP), and other community health care providers in order to provide a holistic approach to care is addressed. A discussion about the improvement of both patient and staff satisfaction demonstrates the results of case management strategies that support and advocate for patients to receive quality, cost-effective care across the health care continuum, while decreasing the use of the ED for nonemergent care.

  6. [Lung abscess and necrotizing pneumonia: chest tube insertion or surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, P-B; Bernard, A

    2012-04-01

    Lung abscesses and necrotizing pneumonia are rare complications of community-acquired pneumonia since the advent of antibiotics. Their management leans first of all on the antibiotic treatment adapted on the informed germs. However, in 11 to 20% of the cases of lung abscesses, this treatment is insufficient, and drainage, either endoscopic or percutaneous, must be envisaged. In first intention, we shall go to less invasive techniques: endoscopic or percutaneous radio-controlled. In case of failure of these techniques, a percutaneous surgical drainage by minithoracotomy will be performed. In the necrotizing pneumonia, because of the joint obstruction of the bronchus and blood vessels corresponding to a lung segment, the systemic antibiotic treatment will be poor effective. In case of failure of this one we shall propose, a percutaneous surgical drainage, especially if the necrosis limits itself to a single lobe. The surgical treatment will be reserved: in the failures of the strategy of surgical drainage, in the necroses extending in several lobes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Detection of Pneumocystis DNA in samples from patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia--a case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Dohn, Birthe

    2002-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly known as P. carinii f.sp. hominis) is an opportunistic fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised individuals. Pneumocystis jiroveci can be detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). To investigate the clinical importance of a positive P...... Pneumocystis-PCR among HIV-uninfected patients suspected of bacterial pneumonia, a retrospective matched case-control study was conducted....

  8. Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome and Cytomegalovirus Pneumonia Case Report: Highlights and Missing Links in Classification Criteria and Standardized Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Petarra-Del Río

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cytomegalovirus (CMV pulmonary involvement is rarely associated with IRIS; therefore, limited information is available. Case Presentation. Here, we describe the case of a 43-year-old HIV-infected male who developed an unusual case of IRIS after cytomegalovirus (CMV pneumonia. Clinically there was a progressive and paradoxical worsening of respiratory distress, despite being treated for CMV after initiation with antiretroviral therapy. Chest X-ray revealed disseminated infiltrates in both lungs; chest CT-scan showed generalized lung involvement and mediastinal adenopathy. Pulmonary biopsy confirmed CMV pneumonia with the observation of typical viral inclusions on pneumocytes. Conclusions. CMV pneumonia can be associated with the development of IRIS requiring treatment with immunosuppressant’s and immunomodulatory drugs.

  9. Improving Parolees' Participation in Drug Treatment and Other Services through Strengths Case Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Michael; Cartier, Jerome J

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to increase participation in community aftercare treatment for substance-abusing parolees, an intervention based on a transitional case management (TCM) model that focuses mainly on offenders' strengths has been developed and is under testing. This model consists of completion, by the inmate, of a self-assessment of strengths that informs the development of the continuing care plan, a case conference call shortly before release, and strengths case management for three months post-release to promote retention in substance abuse treatment and support the participant's access to designated services in the community. The post-release component consists of a minimum of one weekly client/case manager meeting (in person or by telephone) for 12 weeks. The intervention is intended to improve the transition process from prison to community at both the individual and systems level. Specifically, the intervention is designed to improve outcomes in parolee admission to, and retention in, community-based substance-abuse treatment, parolee access to other needed services, and recidivism rates during the first year of parole. On the systems level, the intervention is intended to improve the communication and collaboration between criminal justice agencies, community-based treatment organizations, and other social and governmental service providers. The TCM model is being tested in a multisite study through the Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) research cooperative funded by the National Institute of Drug Abuse.

  10. Limited Utility of Polymerase Chain Reaction in Induced Sputum Specimens for Determining the Causes of Childhood Pneumonia in Resource-Poor Settings: Findings From the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thea, Donald M; Seidenberg, Phil; Park, Daniel E; Mwananyanda, Lawrence; Fu, Wei; Shi, Qiyuan; Baggett, Henry C; Brooks, W Abdullah; Feikin, Daniel R; Howie, Stephen R C; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Kotloff, Karen L; Levine, Orin S; Madhi, Shabir A; O'Brien, Katherine L; Scott, J Anthony G; Antonio, Martin; Awori, Juliet O; Baillie, Vicky L; DeLuca, Andrea N; Driscoll, Amanda J; Higdon, Melissa M; Hossain, Lokman; Jahan, Yasmin; Karron, Ruth A; Kazungu, Sidi; Li, Mengying; Moore, David P; Morpeth, Susan C; Ofordile, Ogochukwu; Prosperi, Christine; Sangwichian, Ornuma; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Sylla, Mamadou; Tapia, Milagritos D; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R; Hammitt, Laura L

    2017-06-15

    Sputum examination can be useful in diagnosing the cause of pneumonia in adults but is less well established in children. We sought to assess the diagnostic utility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of respiratory viruses and bacteria in induced sputum (IS) specimens from children hospitalized with severe or very severe pneumonia. Among children aged 1-59 months, we compared organism detection by multiplex PCR in IS and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) specimens. To assess whether organism presence or density in IS specimens was associated with chest radiographic evidence of pneumonia (radiographic pneumonia), we compared prevalence and density in IS specimens from children with radiographic pneumonia and children with suspected pneumonia but without chest radiographic changes or clinical or laboratory findings suggestive of pneumonia (nonpneumonia group). Among 4232 cases with World Health Organization-defined severe or very severe pneumonia, we identified 1935 (45.7%) with radiographic pneumonia and 573 (13.5%) with nonpneumonia. The organism detection yield was marginally improved with IS specimens (96.2% vs 92.4% for NP/OP specimens for all viruses combined [P = .41]; 96.9% vs 93.3% for all bacteria combined [P = .01]). After accounting for presence in NP/OP specimens, no organism was detected more frequently in the IS specimens from the radiographic pneumonia compared with the nonpneumonia cases. Among high-quality IS specimens, there were no statistically significant differences in organism density, except with cytomegalovirus, for which there was a higher quantity in the IS specimens from cases with radiographic pneumonia compared with the nonpneumonia cases (median cycle threshold value, 27.9 vs 28.5, respectively; P = .01). Using advanced molecular methods with IS specimens provided little additional diagnostic information beyond that obtained with NP/OP swab specimens. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the

  11. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Daenas, Christos; Preau, Sebastien; Zygoulis, Paris; Triantaris, Apostolos; Kerenidi, Theodora; Makris, Demosthenes; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Daniil, Zoe

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI) obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF) of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration) and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases). Inter-rater median (IQR) agreement was 91% (82-96). The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC) obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases). Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia

  12. Vibration Response Imaging: evaluation of rater agreement in healthy subjects and subjects with pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makris Demosthenes

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We evaluated pulmonologists variability in the interpretation of Vibration response imaging (VRI obtained from healthy subjects and patients hospitalized for community acquired pneumonia. Methods The present is a prospective study conducted in a tertiary university hospital. Twenty healthy subjects and twenty three pneumonia cases were included in this study. Six pulmonologists blindly analyzed images of normal subjects and pneumonia cases and evaluated different aspects of VRI images related to the quality of data aquisition, synchronization of the progression of breath sound distribution and agreement between the maximal energy frame (MEF of VRI (which is the maximal geographical area of lung vibrations produced at maximal inspiration and chest radiography. For qualitative assessment of VRI images, the raters' evaluations were analyzed by degree of consistency and agreement. Results The average value for overall identical evaluations of twelve features of the VRI image evaluation, ranged from 87% to 95% per rater (94% to 97% in control cases and from 79% to 93% per rater in pneumonia cases. Inter-rater median (IQR agreement was 91% (82-96. The level of agreement according to VRI feature evaluated was in most cases over 80%; intra-class correlation (ICC obtained by using a model of subject/rater for the averaged features was overall 0.86 (0.92 in normal and 0.73 in pneumonia cases. Conclusions Our findings suggest good agreement in the interpretation of VRI data between different raters. In this respect, VRI might be helpful as a radiation free diagnostic tool for the management of pneumonia.

  13. Long-term dynamics of death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and improving air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Abernethy, Amy P; Holman, Sheila; Ross, William G; Lyerly, H Kim

    2014-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a major target of exposure to air pollutants, and respiratory diseases are associated with both short- and long-term exposures. We hypothesized that improved air quality in North Carolina was associated with reduced rates of death from respiratory diseases in local populations. We analyzed the trends of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia mortality and changes of the levels of ozone, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) using monthly data measurements from air-monitoring stations in North Carolina in 1993-2010. The log-linear model was used to evaluate associations between air-pollutant levels and age-adjusted death rates (per 100,000 of population) calculated for 5-year age-groups and for standard 2000 North Carolina population. The studied associations were adjusted by age group-specific smoking prevalence and seasonal fluctuations of disease-specific respiratory deaths. Decline in emphysema deaths was associated with decreasing levels of SO2 and CO in the air, decline in asthma deaths-with lower SO2, CO, and PM10 levels, and decline in pneumonia deaths-with lower levels of SO2. Sensitivity analyses were performed to study potential effects of the change from International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 to ICD-10 codes, the effects of air pollutants on mortality during summer and winter, the impact of approach when only the underlying causes of deaths were used, and when mortality and air-quality data were analyzed on the county level. In each case, the results of sensitivity analyses demonstrated stability. The importance of analysis of pneumonia as an underlying cause of death was also highlighted. Significant associations were observed between decreasing death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and decreases in levels of ambient air pollutants in North Carolina.

  14. Long-term dynamics of death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and improving air quality

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    Kravchenko, Julia; Akushevich, Igor; Abernethy, Amy P; Holman, Sheila; Ross, William G; Lyerly, H Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background The respiratory tract is a major target of exposure to air pollutants, and respiratory diseases are associated with both short- and long-term exposures. We hypothesized that improved air quality in North Carolina was associated with reduced rates of death from respiratory diseases in local populations. Materials and methods We analyzed the trends of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia mortality and changes of the levels of ozone, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10) using monthly data measurements from air-monitoring stations in North Carolina in 1993–2010. The log-linear model was used to evaluate associations between air-pollutant levels and age-adjusted death rates (per 100,000 of population) calculated for 5-year age-groups and for standard 2000 North Carolina population. The studied associations were adjusted by age group-specific smoking prevalence and seasonal fluctuations of disease-specific respiratory deaths. Results Decline in emphysema deaths was associated with decreasing levels of SO2 and CO in the air, decline in asthma deaths–with lower SO2, CO, and PM10 levels, and decline in pneumonia deaths–with lower levels of SO2. Sensitivity analyses were performed to study potential effects of the change from International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9 to ICD-10 codes, the effects of air pollutants on mortality during summer and winter, the impact of approach when only the underlying causes of deaths were used, and when mortality and air-quality data were analyzed on the county level. In each case, the results of sensitivity analyses demonstrated stability. The importance of analysis of pneumonia as an underlying cause of death was also highlighted. Conclusion Significant associations were observed between decreasing death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and decreases in levels of ambient air pollutants in North Carolina. PMID:25018627

  15. Permanent Central Diabetes Insipidus as a Complication of S. pneumoniae Meningitis in the Pediatric Population.

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    Statz, Hannah; Hsu, Benson S

    2016-05-01

    Diabetes insipidus is a rare but recognized complication of meningitis. The occurrence of diabetes insidipus has been previously attributed to Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) in a handful of patients and only once within the pediatric subpopulation. We present the clinical course of a previously healthy 2-year, 8-month-old male child ultimately diagnosed with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) secondary to S. pneumoniae meningitis. Permanent CDI following S. pneumoniae meningitis is unique to our case and has not been previously described. Following the case presentation, we describe the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of CDI. The mechanism proposed for this clinical outcome is cerebral herniation for a sufficient duration and subsequent ischemia leading to the development of permanent CDI. Providers should be aware of CDI resulting from S. pneumoniae meningitis as prompt diagnosis and management may decrease the risk of permanent hypothalamo-pituitary axis damage. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  16. Case Report: Human Bocavirus Associated Pneumonia as Cause of Acute Injury, Cologne, Germany.

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    Krakau, Michael; Gerbershagen, Kathrin; Frost, Ulrich; Hinzke, Markus; Brockmann, Michael; Schildgen, Verena; Gomann, Axel; Limmroth, Volker; Dormann, Arno; Schildgen, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Although the human bocavirus (HBoV) is known since a decade, limited information about its pathogenesis is available due to the lack of an animal model. Thus, clinical cases and studies are the major source of novel information about the course of infection and the related pathophysiology.In this context, a clinical case of an adult patient suffering from severe HBoV-pneumonia is described that was associated with loss of consciousness followed by acute rib fracture and subsequent neurological disorder.Following initial global respiratory dysfunction the clinical respiratory symptoms recovered but the neurological symptoms maintained after weaning and intensive care in the stroke unit. During the initial phase, an acute active HBoV infection was confirmed by positive polymerase chain reactions from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum.The case further demonstrates that HBoV can cause severe pneumonia, induce secondary disease also in adults, and may be associated with neurological symptoms as previously assumed.

  17. A case of nosocomial Legionella pneumonia associated with a contaminated hospital cooling tower.

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    Osawa, Kayo; Shigemura, Katsumi; Abe, Yasuhisa; Jikimoto, Takumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    We report the epidemiological investigation of a nosocomial pneumonia case due to Legionella pneumophila linked to a contaminated hospital cooling tower in an immune-compromised patient. A 73-year-old female patient was diagnosed with nosocomial Legionella pneumonia proven by a culture of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Two strains isolated from the patient and two strains isolated from two cooling towers were found to be identical using repetitive-sequence-based-PCR with a 95% probability. This Legionella pneumonia case might be caused by aerosol from cooling towers on the roof of the hospital building which was contaminated by L. pneumophila. We increased up the temperature of hot water supply appropriately for prevention of Legionella breeding in an environment of patients' living. On the other hand, as the maintenance of cooling tower, we increased the frequency of Legionella culture tests from twice a year to three times a year. In addition, we introduced an automated disinfectants insertion machine and added one antiseptic reagent (BALSTER ST-40 N, Tohzai Chemical Industry Co., Ltd., Kawasaki, Japan) after this Legionella disease, and thereafter, we have no additional cases of Legionella disease or detection of Legionella spp. from the cooling tower or hot water supply. This case demonstrates the importance of detecting the infection source and carrying out environmental maintenance in cooperation with the infection control team. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and the Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Mycoplasma pneumoniae meningoencephalitis].

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    Cambonie, G; Sarran, N; Leboucq, N; Luc, F; Bongrand, A F; Slim, G; Lassus, P; Fournier-Favre, S; Montoya, F; Astruc, J; Rieu, D

    1999-03-01

    Severe central nervous system diseases, such as encephalitis, have been reported in association with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections. After an ENT infection, a 9-year-old boy with Down's syndrome developed encephalitis revealed by an acute alteration in consciousness. Head computed tomography showed, after 2 weeks, an infiltration in the basal ganglia region. The diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae encephalitis was made; recovery was complete in a few weeks. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection should be considered in all cases of acute encephalopathy; yet the pathogenesis of the disorder is unknown and the treatment uncertain.

  19. Pneumonia a Varicella zoster

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    Carla Ferreira Santos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A varicela é uma doença infecto contagiosa comum na infância, ocorrendo pouco mais de 2% dos casos em adultos. Desde a década de 80 que a sua incidência nos adultos tem vindo a aumentar, dos quais apenas 7% são seronegativos1. A pneumonia a Varicella zoster, se bem que rara, constitui a complicação mais grave e mais frequente no adulto.Os autores apresentam um caso clínico ilustrativo de pneumonia a Varicella zoster num adulto fumador e imunocompetente e fazem uma breve revisão teórica sobre o tema. Abstract: Varicella (chickenpox is a common contagious infection of childhood, with fewer than 2% of the cases occurring in adults. Since the early 1980s the incidence of chickenpox in adults has been increasing and only 7% of them are seronegative for Varicella zoster antibodies. Pneumonia, although rare, is the most common and serious complication of chickenpox infection in adults.The authors present an illustrative case of varicella pneumonia in an immunocompetent adult with smoking habits and make a brief thematic review. Palavras-chave: Varicela, pneumonia, ARDS, Key-words: Chickenpox, pneumonia, ARDS

  20. [Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia].

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    Pineda Solas, V; Pérez Benito, A; Domingo Puiggros, M; Larramona Carrera, H; Segura Porta, F; Fontanals Aymerich, D

    2002-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common bacterial cause of community-acquired pneumonia in children. The reference standard for etiological diagnosis is isolation of S. pneumoniae from blood Since the advent of conjugate vaccines, disease caused by this organism can now be prevented. Many studies have been performed of the global incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections and of pneumococcal meningitis but few studies investigated bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia and its complications in children. To determine the incidence, patient characteristics, clinical signs, laboratory data, percentage and days of hospitalization, response to antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance, complications and causal serogroups of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in our environment in order to estimate requirements for systematic vaccination programs. From January 1990 to May 2001, data on all pediatric cases of invasive pneumococcal infections diagnosed in our hospital were collected. Several characteristics of patients with bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were analyzed. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia was diagnosed in patients with positive blood or pleural fluid cultures for S. pneumoniae and radiographically evident pulmonary infiltrate. The incidence of both types of pneumonia were determined according to population census data. All S. pneumonia strains were sent to the Pneumococci Reference Laboratory of the Instituto Carlos III in Madrid for serotyping. We estimated the serotype coverage of the pneumococcal 7-valent conjugate vaccine according to the serotypes included in this vaccine and their distribution. Forty cases of bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia were diagnosed, yielding an incidence of 17,10 and 5 cases per 10(5) children aged less than 2, 4 and 15 years old respectively. The mean age was 50 months and 43% were aged less than 4 years. Peaks occurred in January, March, April and May. A total of 77.5% of the patients were admitted to hospital and the

  1. Metabolomic analysis in severe childhood pneumonia in the Gambia, West Africa: findings from a pilot study.

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    Evagelia C Laiakis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pneumonia remains the leading cause of death in young children globally and improved diagnostics are needed to better identify cases and reduce case fatality. Metabolomics, a rapidly evolving field aimed at characterizing metabolites in biofluids, has the potential to improve diagnostics in a range of diseases. The objective of this pilot study is to apply metabolomic analysis to childhood pneumonia to explore its potential to improve pneumonia diagnosis in a high-burden setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Eleven children with World Health Organization (WHO-defined severe pneumonia of non-homogeneous aetiology were selected in The Gambia, West Africa, along with community controls. Metabolomic analysis of matched plasma and urine samples was undertaken using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC coupled to Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS. Biomarker extraction was done using SIMCA-P+ and Random Forests (RF. 'Unsupervised' (blinded data were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA, while 'supervised' (unblinded analysis was by Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA and Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures (OPLS. Potential markers were extracted from S-plots constructed following analysis with OPLS, and markers were chosen based on their contribution to the variation and correlation within the data set. The dataset was additionally analyzed with the machine-learning algorithm RF in order to address issues of model overfitting and markers were selected based on their variable importance ranking. Unsupervised PCA analysis revealed good separation of pneumonia and control groups, with even clearer separation of the groups with PLS-DA and OPLS analysis. Statistically significant differences (p<0.05 between groups were seen with the following metabolites: uric acid, hypoxanthine and glutamic acid were higher in plasma from cases, while L-tryptophan and adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP were lower

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Falguera, M; Ramírez, M F

    2015-11-01

    This article not only reviews the essential aspects of community-acquired pneumonia for daily clinical practice, but also highlights the controversial issues and provides the newest available information. Community-acquired pneumonia is considered in a broad sense, without excluding certain variants that, in recent years, a number of authors have managed to delineate, such as healthcare-associated pneumonia. The latter form is nothing more than the same disease that affects more frail patients, with a greater number of risk factors, both sharing an overall common approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. A 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea: cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengxi; Zhang, Nuofu; Zhou, Ying; Li, Jinhui; Gu, Yingying; Wang, Jian; Liu, Chunli

    2017-03-01

    Lipoid pneumonia is an uncommon disease caused by the presence of lipid in the alveoli. Here we described a case of a 50-year-old woman with haemoptysis, cough and tachypnea, who was diagnosed with cholesterol pneumonia accompanying with pulmonary artery hypertension. The extremely high pulmonary artery pressure achieved, in this case, is alarming and should alert the physicians that the cholesterol pneumonia may be one of the underlying causes of pulmonary artery hypertension. After a treatment of methylprednisolone, her clinical symptoms were significantly improved, which suggested that steroid might be a promising therapeutic for patients with cholesterol pneumonia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges in monitoring the proportion of young children with pneumonia who receive antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Harry; El Arifeen, Shams; Hazir, Tabish; O'Kelly, James; Bryce, Jennifer; Rudan, Igor; Qazi, Shamim Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains a major cause of child death globally, and improving antibiotic treatment rates is a key control strategy. Progress in improving the global coverage of antibiotic treatment is monitored through large household surveys such as the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS), which estimate antibiotic treatment rates of pneumonia based on two-week recall of pneumonia by caregivers. However, these survey tools identify children with reported symptoms of pneumonia, and because the prevalence of pneumonia over a two-week period in community settings is low, the majority of these children do not have true pneumonia and so do not provide an accurate denominator of pneumonia cases for monitoring antibiotic treatment rates. In this review, we show that the performance of survey tools could be improved by increasing the survey recall period or by improving either overall discriminative power or specificity. However, even at a test specificity of 95% (and a test sensitivity of 80%), the proportion of children with reported symptoms of pneumonia who truly have pneumonia is only 22% (the positive predictive value of the survey tool). Thus, although DHS and MICS survey data on rates of care seeking for children with reported symptoms of pneumonia and other childhood illnesses remain valid and important, DHS and MICS data are not able to give valid estimates of antibiotic treatment rates in children with pneumonia.

  5. Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia: radiograph and CT features of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Hua; Duan Xiaomin; Peng Yun; Zeng Jinjin; Sun Guoqiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the imaging features on chest radiograph and CT in children with Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia. Methods: The imaging data of chest radiograph and CT in six children with Influenza A H1N1 pneumonia confirmed by real-time RT-PCR assay was retrospectively analysis. All patients had chest radiograph at first examination and 4 of them re-examed. One children took CT. Results: All cases showed thick lung markings with varied degrees of pulmonary infiltration and interstitial changes on chest radiograph. Among them, 3 cases showed bilateral pulmonary infiltration and 3 cases showed infiltration in left lung; enlarged hilar was observed in 3 cases. The imaging findings of the pneumonia changed quickly during the follow-up accompanied with the improvement of clinical symptoms. The only one chest CT examination showed bilateral infiltration, multiple ground-glass opacities, small subpleural nodulars, right pleural effusion and lymphadenopathy of lung hila and mediastinum. Conclusions: Chest radiograph and CT revealed certain typical imaging features in the children with influenza A H1N1 pneumonia. However, the final diagnosis of influenza A H1N1 pneumonia still should be made based on epidemiology and laboratory examination. (authors)

  6. Eosinophilic pneumonia associated with daptomycin: a case report and a review of the literature

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    Fanourgiakis Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although several studies did not demonstrate that daptomycin may cause significantly higher rates of pulmonary adverse effects when compared with vancomycin or penicillinase-resistant penicillins, there have been a few case reports of severe pulmonary complications associated with daptomycin administration. Case presentation A rare case of eosinophilic pneumonia occurring 10 days after daptomycin administration in a 78-year-old Caucasian man with possible infectious endocarditis is described. He developed new onset fever, up to 38.5°C, with bilateral pulmonary crackles on physical examination and with no signs of severe respiratory failure. A chest computed tomography-scan showed bilateral nodular consolidations with air bronchograms and pleural effusions. Immediate discontinuation of daptomycin was followed by vigorous improvement of clinical signs and symptoms with progressive resolution of pulmonary consolidations a month later. Conclusion Physicians should be aware of this rare but serious complication during daptomycin treatment, and prompt discontinuation of the offending agent, with or without additional supportive treatment, must occur immediately.

  7. 020. Coexistence of lung adenocarcinoma and usual interstitial pneumonia: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliaka, Aggeliki; Papaemmanouil, Styliani; Spyratos, Dionysis; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Sakkas, Leonidas

    2015-01-01

    Background Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP)/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic fibrosing interstitial pneumonia of unknown cause. The most common symptoms are progressively increased shortness of breath and dry cough. Some studies suggest an association between usual interstitial pneumonia and lung cancer through different pathogenetic mechanisms. Objective The case presentation of a patient with lung adenocarcinoma and UIP. Methods A 66-year-old male presented with persistent dry cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea. The chest radiographs revealed a mass in the lower lobe of the left lung, measuring 3 cm, as well as diffuse interstitial changes in the same lobe. Two partial lobectomies were performed. Results Histological examination of the mass showed moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma, focally with bronchoalveolar pattern (Immunohistochemical detection of EGFR: positive). The rest lung parenchyma presented histological appearance of UIP. Conclusions According to clinicopathological studies, the prevalence of lung cancer among patients with UIP/IPF varies between 4% and 9%. The overall median survival of IPF-Ca patients is seven months in comparison with IPF only patients (14 months).

  8. Surgical Management of Complicated Necrotizing Pneumonia in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jin-Yao; Yang, Wendy; Ming, Yung-Ching

    2017-08-01

    There are no well-established indications for the surgical management of acute necrotizing pneumonitis in children. This study presents our experience regarding this challenging topic. Between 2002 and 2009, 56 necrotizing pneumonitis patients with empyema were treated surgically. The outcomes were analyzed retrospectively. Computed tomography findings of massive lung necrosis or large cavities involving more than 50% of the involved lobe were deemed to be complicated necrotizing pneumonitis. Patients without the above indications were considered uncomplicated. Thirty-one cases were uncomplicated and 25 were complicated. Operative procedures included 38 decortications (31 uncomplicated and seven complicated), 14 wedge resections, and four lobectomies (complicated only). Preoperatively, patients with complicated necrotizing pneumonia had a higher incidence of pneumothorax (32% vs. 14.3%; p = 0.001), endotracheal intubation (44% vs. 9.7%; p = 0.008), and hemolytic uremic syndrome (20% vs. 3.2%; p = 0.01). These patients also had higher incidences of intraoperative transfusion (68% vs. 9.7%; p = 0.03), major postoperative complications (16% vs. 0%; p = 0.02), reoperations (16% vs. 0%; p = 0.02), and longer postoperative stay (19.8 ± 24.2 days vs. 11.2 ± 5.8 days; p = 0.03). Four complicated patients, who initially had decortications and limited resections, underwent reoperations. Compared with uncomplicated patients, those who underwent decortications and wedge resection required longer postoperative stays (23.6 ± 9.9 days, p < 0.01 and 21.1 ± 30.7 days, p = 0.04, respectively), whereas patients who had lobectomy had a similar duration of recovery (9.0 ± 2.1 days, p = 0.23). All patients improved significantly at follow-up. Children with complicated necrotizing pneumonitis have more preoperative morbidities, more major postoperative complications, and require longer postoperative stays. Aggressive surgical treatment results in

  9. A combined disease management and process modeling approach for assessing and improving care processes: a fall management case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askari, Marjan; Westerhof, Richard; Eslami, Saied; Medlock, Stephanie; de Rooij, Sophia E; Abu-Hanna, Ameen

    2013-10-01

    To propose a combined disease management and process modeling approach for evaluating and improving care processes, and demonstrate its usability and usefulness in a real-world fall management case study. We identified essential disease management related concepts and mapped them into explicit questions meant to expose areas for improvement in the respective care processes. We applied the disease management oriented questions to a process model of a comprehensive real world fall prevention and treatment program covering primary and secondary care. We relied on interviews and observations to complete the process models, which were captured in UML activity diagrams. A preliminary evaluation of the usability of our approach by gauging the experience of the modeler and an external validator was conducted, and the usefulness of the method was evaluated by gathering feedback from stakeholders at an invitational conference of 75 attendees. The process model of the fall management program was organized around the clinical tasks of case finding, risk profiling, decision making, coordination and interventions. Applying the disease management questions to the process models exposed weaknesses in the process including: absence of program ownership, under-detection of falls in primary care, and lack of efficient communication among stakeholders due to missing awareness about other stakeholders' workflow. The modelers experienced the approach as usable and the attendees of the invitational conference found the analysis results to be valid. The proposed disease management view of process modeling was usable and useful for systematically identifying areas of improvement in a fall management program. Although specifically applied to fall management, we believe our case study is characteristic of various disease management settings, suggesting the wider applicability of the approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral scrotal abscesses caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Dacia; Pappalepore, Nicola; Colangelo, Maurizia; Chiesa, Pierluigi Lelli

    2010-03-01

    The management of acute scrotal swelling can be challenging in neonatal age, with scrotal infections being great mimickers of testicular torsion. Only a few unilateral cases of scrotal abscess have been previously reported, mostly caused by Staphylococcus and Salmonella. We describe the case of a newborn who developed bilateral scrotal abscesses caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and discuss the rarity of the case, regarding both the bilaterality and the pathogen, never reported before.

  11. Exogenous lipid pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, A.; Gavelli, G.; Zompatori, M.; Galleri, C.; Zanasi, A.; Fabbri, M.; Bazzocchi, F.

    1988-01-01

    Exogenous lipid pneumonia (ELP) is caused by the aspiration of animal, vegetal or, more often, mineral oils. Even though it may also be acute, ELP is most frequently a chronic disease, affecting people with predisposing factors, such as neuromuscular disorders, structural abnormalities and so on; very often exogenous lipid pneumonia is found in tracheotomized patients. The pathology of lipid pneumonia is a chronic inflammatory process evolving in foreign-body-like reaction, and eventually in ''end-stage lung'' condition. Clinically, most patients are asymptomatic; few cases only present with cough, dyspnea and chest pain. Eight cases of ELP, studied over the past 3 years, are described in this paper. All the patients were examined by chest radiographs and standard tomograms; 3 patients underwent CT. X-ray features were mono/bilateral consolidation of the lower zones, with air bronchogram and variable reduction in volume. CT density was not specific for fat tissue. In all cases the diagnosis was confirmed at biopsy. In 5 patients, followed for at least one year, clinical-radiological features showed no change. Thus, complications of ELP (especially malignant evolution) could be excluded. The authors conclude that lipid pneumonia must be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with history of usage of oils and compatible X-ray findings. The usefulness of an accurate follow-up is stressed

  12. CT features of legionella pneumonia, compared with streptococcal pneumonia. A collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Hitoshi; Sakai, Fumikazu; Goto, Hajime

    2007-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila pneumonia (LPP) is of serious concern for chest physicians for its potential lethality and difficulty of diagnosis. In spite of widespread use of urine antigen detection method, it remains one of the most difficult-to-treat disease among community acquired pneumonia. We investigated CT images of 38 cases of LPP, comparing them with wide spread Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia (SPP). We find that sharply demarcated consolidation scattered in ground-glass opacity is the most striking and pathognomonic feature of LPP, which is rarely found in SPP. Bronchiolitis was not found in LPP, while it is a relatively common finding in SPP, which could be the second clue of differentiation of these two diseases. (author)

  13. Diffuse micronodular pattern of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia: a case report

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    Lee, In Jae; Jang, Seung Hun; Min, Kwang Seon; Whang, Im Kyung; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    The typical radiographic findings of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) are known to be patchy air-space consolidation that is often subpleural, and with or without ground-glass opacities. However, there are scant radiologic reports about the micronodular pattern of BOOP. We report here on a case of BOOP that manifested as diffusely scattered ill-defined centrilobular micronodules on HRCT.

  14. Overview of antimicrobial options for Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: focus on macrolide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Qu, Jiu-Xin; Yin, Yu-Dong; Eldere, Johan Van

    2017-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease affecting children and adults of any age. Mycoplasma pneumoniae has emerged as leading causative agent of CAP in some region, and the abrupt increasing resistance to macrolide that widely used for management of M. pneumoniae has reached to the level that it often leads to treatment failures. We aim to discuss the drivers for development of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae, antimicrobial stewardship and also the potential treatment options for patients infected with macrolide-resistant M. pneumonia. The articles in English and Chinese published in Pubmed and in Asian medical journals were selected for the review. M. pneumoniae can develop macrolide resistance by point mutations in the 23S rRNA gene. Inappropriate and overuse of macrolides for respiratory tract infections may induce the resistance rapidly. A number of countries have introduced the stewardship program for restricting the use of macrolide. Tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones are highly effective for macrolide-resistant strains, which may be the substitute in the region of high prevalence of macrolide-resistant M. pneumoniae. The problem of macrolide resistant M. pneumonia is emerging. Antibiotic stewardship is needed to inhibit the inappropriate use of macrolide and new antibiotics with a more acceptable safety profile for all ages need to be explored. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of a Hospital-Based Pneumonia Nurse Navigator Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, Lisa E; McDonough, Kelly; Turner, Barbara; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a hospital-based pneumonia nurse navigator program. This study used a retrospective, formative evaluation. Data of patients admitted from January 2012 through December 2014 to a large community hospital with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pneumonia, excluding aspiration pneumonia, were used. Data included patient demographics, diagnoses, insurance coverage, core measures, average length of stay (ALOS), disposition, readmission rate, financial outcomes, and patient barriers to care were collected. Descriptive statistics and parametric testing were used to analyze data. Core measure performance was sustained at the 90th percentile 2 years after the implementation of the navigator program. The ALOS did not decrease to established benchmarks; however, the SD for ALOS decreased by nearly half after implementation of the navigator program, suggesting the program decreased the number and length of extended stays. Charges per case decreased by 21% from 2012 to 2014. Variable costs decreased by 4% over a 2-year period, which increased net profit per case by 5%. Average readmission payments increased by 8% from 2012 to 2014, and the net revenue per case increased by 8.3%. The pneumonia nurse navigator program may improve core measures, reduce ALOS, and increase net revenue. Future evaluations are necessary to substantiate these findings and optimize the cost and quality performance of navigator programs.

  16. Analysis of invasive pneumonia-causing strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae: serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Cristina R M; Martinez, Marina B; Brandileone, Maria C C; Ragazzi, Selma B; Guerra, Maria L L S; Santos, Silvia R; Shieh, Huei H; Gilio, Alfredo E

    2011-01-01

    To identify the most common pneumococcal serotypes in children hospitalized with invasive pneumonia, correlate isolated serotypes with those included in conjugate vaccines, and ascertain the sensitivity of the isolated pneumococcal strains to penicillin and other antibiotics. From January 2003 to October 2008, a retrospective study of hospitalized children with a diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia was conducted at the university hospital of Universidade de São Paulo. Criteria for inclusion were: age greater than 29 days and less than 15 years, radiological and clinical diagnosis of pneumonia, and isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae in blood cultures and/or pleural effusion. The study included 107 children. The most common serotypes were 14 (36.5%), 1 (16%), 5 (14.6%), 6B (6.3%) and 3 (4.2%). The proportion of identified serotypes contained in the heptavalent, 10-valent and 13-valent conjugate vaccines was 53.1, 86.5, and 96.9%, respectively. Pneumococcal strains were sensitive to penicillin (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC ≤ 2 µg/mL) in 100 cases (93.5%) and displayed intermediate resistance (MIC = 4 µg/mL) in 7 cases (6.5%). No strains were penicillin-resistant (MIC ≥ 8 µg/mL) according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute 2008 standards. Tested isolates were highly sensitive to vancomycin, rifampicin, ceftriaxone, clindamycin, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol. Our results confirm a significant potential impact of conjugate vaccines, mainly 10-valent and 13-valent, on invasive pneumonia. Furthermore, susceptibility testing results show that penicillin is still the treatment of choice for invasive pneumonia in our setting.

  17. Clinical behavior of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis Comportamiento clinico y terapéutico de la meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raisa Bu-Coifiu Fanego

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: There was an increased number of cases of meningoencephalitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, after the successful vaccination campaigns against Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae. This paper aims at describing the clinical characteristics, the laboratory findings, the complications, and the therapeutic management of these patients, who have been suffering from this disease since 1993 to 2006. METHOD: Twelve children with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis admitted to the pediatric hospital of San Miguel del Padron, City of Havana in this period were assessed. RESULTS: Children under one year are the most frequently affected. Septic shock and brain edema were the most severe complications. Three patients died, implying that this disease has a serious course. Early treatment of brain edema is very important to reduce mortality. The elective drugs for treatment of these cases of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis were vancomycin combined with cephalosporin, cefotaxime or ceftriaxone type. CONCLUSION: Patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis show clinical characteristics, complications, and sequels that are different to other bacterial meningoencephalitis, meaning that they could be helpful for physicians considering the differential diagnosis of meningoencephalitis.OBJETIVO: Existe un incremento de la meningoencefalitis producida por Streptococcus pneumoniae, después de las campañas exitosas de vacunación contra Neisseria meningitidis y Haemophilus influenzae. El objetivo de este trabajo es describir las caracteristicas clinicas, los hallazgos de laboratorio, las complicaciones y el manejo terapéutico de los pacientes que sufrieron esta enfermedad desde 1993 a 2006. MÉTODO: Se estudiaron doce niños con meningoencefalitis por Streptococcus pneumoniae ingresados en el Hospital Pediátrico de San Miguel del Padrón, Ciudad de La Habana en este periodo. RESULTADOS: Los ni

  18. [Community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Study of 97 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, José Ramón; Montejo, José Miguel; Cancelo, Laura; Zalacaín, Rafael; López, Leyre; Fernández Gil de Pareja, Joaquín; Alonso, Eva; Oñate, Javier

    2003-10-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the causal agent of 5% to 12% of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia cases, though rates are changing with the use of new diagnostic methods. This is a retrospective study of all patients admitted to our hospital with community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila between 1997 and 2001. Diagnostic criteria included either a positive Legionella serogroup 1 urinary antigen test or seroconversion and a chest radiograph consistent with pneumonia. A total of 97 patients were studied. Ninety cases (92.8%) were community-acquired and 7 (7.2%) were associated with travelling. In 82 cases (84.5%) the presentation was sporadic. Seventy-five patients were smokers (77.3%). The most common symptoms were fever in 91 patients (93.8%) and cough in 67 (68.1%). In five patients (5.2%) creatine phosphokinase concentrations were over 5 times their baseline values (in two over 100 times); four of these patients presented acute renal failure. Seroconversion was observed in 23/42 patients (54.8%). There were no statistically significant differences between the administration of erythromycin or clarithromycin in monotherapy, or in combination with rifampin. Nineteen patients (19.6%) presented acute renal failure and mechanical ventilation was necessary in 22 (22.7%). Twelve patients died (12.5%). Independent prognostic factors associated with death included respiratory rate > 30 breaths/min, urea > 60 mg/dL and PaO2 scale scores and the presence of complications or mortality. The Legionella urinary antigen test permits early diagnosis and treatment of this disease. The severity scale is an indicator of complications or death.

  19. Septic arthritis of shoeulder caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 23F in a female infant. Report of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Nava Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a female infant previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae who developed a septic arthritis in the right shoulder. An artrothomy was performed. The culture of the sy- novial fluid was positive for serotype 23F Streptococcus pneumonia.

  20. Measuring coverage in MNCH: challenges in monitoring the proportion of young children with pneumonia who receive antibiotic treatment.

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    Harry Campbell

    Full Text Available Pneumonia remains a major cause of child death globally, and improving antibiotic treatment rates is a key control strategy. Progress in improving the global coverage of antibiotic treatment is monitored through large household surveys such as the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS and the Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS, which estimate antibiotic treatment rates of pneumonia based on two-week recall of pneumonia by caregivers. However, these survey tools identify children with reported symptoms of pneumonia, and because the prevalence of pneumonia over a two-week period in community settings is low, the majority of these children do not have true pneumonia and so do not provide an accurate denominator of pneumonia cases for monitoring antibiotic treatment rates. In this review, we show that the performance of survey tools could be improved by increasing the survey recall period or by improving either overall discriminative power or specificity. However, even at a test specificity of 95% (and a test sensitivity of 80%, the proportion of children with reported symptoms of pneumonia who truly have pneumonia is only 22% (the positive predictive value of the survey tool. Thus, although DHS and MICS survey data on rates of care seeking for children with reported symptoms of pneumonia and other childhood illnesses remain valid and important, DHS and MICS data are not able to give valid estimates of antibiotic treatment rates in children with pneumonia.

  1. Severe pneumonia associated with ibrutinib monotherapy for CLL and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiniz, Natalia; Bejar, Jacob; Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) particularly since the development of novel therapeutic agents, mostly "biological drugs." One of the obvious advantages of these agents is the decreased rate of infectious complications occurring during the course of therapy, compared to the use of standard immuno-chemotherapy regimens. Here, we describe 3 patients with CLL and 1 with mantle cell lymphoma who developed severe life-threatening pneumonias, during monotherapy with ibrutinib. The first case was a 70-year-old woman with relapsed CLL who developed bilateral pneumonia with hypoxia 1 week after starting ibrutinib. She did not respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics and was treated empirically with trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and improved. In the second case, we describe a 76-year-old woman with relapsed CLL who developed recurrent pneumonia after 3 years of treatment with ibrutinib. Presuming that ibrutinib was the cause of pneumonitis with secondary infection, it was stopped with subsequent improvement. The third patient a 67 year-old man died because of severe bilateral necrotizing pneumonia due to invasive aspergillosis and mucormycosis with pulmonary hemorrhage. The fourth patient with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma died because of severe bilateral pneumonia, caused by pseudomonas and candida, despite receiving appropriate antibiotics. From this experience, we hypothesize that the etiology of severe pneumonia associated with ibrutinib treatment is probably multifactorial, involving factors like preexisting immune-suppression, drug induced pneumonitis and infections. We suggest that patients with CLL or other lymphoproliferative disorders with suspected pneumonia during monotherapy with ibrutinib should be very carefully evaluated and need to undergo complete diagnostic workup to establish an exact diagnosis. Understanding which patients with CLL or lymphoma treated with kinase inhibitors are at a

  2. Spiral CT manifestations of spherical pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaohong; Yang Hongwei; Xu Chunmin; Qin Xiu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the Spiral CT manifestations and differential diagnosis of spherical pneumonia. Methods: 18 cases of spherical pneumonia and 20 cases of peripheral pulmonary carcinoma were selected, both of them were confirmed by clinic and/or pathology. The SCT findings of both groups were compared retrospectively. Results: Main spiral CT findings of spherical pneumonia were showed as followings: square or triangular lesions adjacent to pleura; with irregular shape, blurry, slightly lobulated margin, sometimes with halo sign. Small inflammatory patches and intensified vascular markings around the lesions were seen. Lesions became smaller or vanished after short-term anti-inflammatory treatment. Conclusion: Spherical pneumonia showed some characteristics on Spiral CT scan, which are helpful in diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this disease. (authors)

  3. Legionella pneumonia associated with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage - A rare association

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    Muhammad Kashif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common, usually underreported and undiagnosed cause of community acquired pneumonia which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage rarely have been associated with legionella infection. We present a 61-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity admitted with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. He was found to have Legionella pneumonia with associated diffuse alveolar hemorrhage diagnosed with bronchoscopic sequential bronchoalveolar lavage. He was successfully managed with antibiotics, lung protective strategies and intravenous pulse dose steroids. This patient highlights the unusual association of Legionella infection and diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Additionally, the case re-enforces the need for early and aggressive evaluation and management of patients presenting with pneumonia and progressive hypoxia despite adequate treatment.

  4. Modeling risk of pneumonia epizootics in bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sells, Sarah N.; Mitchell, Michael S.; Nowak, J. Joshua; Lukacs, Paul M.; Anderson, Neil J.; Ramsey, Jennifer M.; Gude, Justin A.; Krausman, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia epizootics are a major challenge for management of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) affecting persistence of herds, satisfaction of stakeholders, and allocations of resources by management agencies. Risk factors associated with the disease are poorly understood, making pneumonia epizootics hard to predict; such epizootics are thus managed reactively rather than proactively. We developed a model for herds in Montana that identifies risk factors and addresses biological questions about risk. Using Bayesian logistic regression with repeated measures, we found that private land, weed control using domestic sheep or goats, pneumonia history, and herd density were positively associated with risk of pneumonia epizootics in 43 herds that experienced 22 epizootics out of 637 herd-years from 1979–2013. We defined an area of high risk for pathogen exposure as the area of each herd distribution plus a 14.5-km buffer from that boundary. Within this area, the odds of a pneumonia epizootic increased by >1.5 times per additional unit of private land (unit is the standardized % of private land where global  = 25.58% and SD = 14.53%). Odds were >3.3 times greater if domestic sheep or goats were used for weed control in a herd's area of high risk. If a herd or its neighbors within the area of high risk had a history of a pneumonia epizootic, odds of a subsequent pneumonia epizootic were >10 times greater. Risk greatly increased when herds were at high density, with nearly 15 times greater odds of a pneumonia epizootic compared to when herds were at low density. Odds of a pneumonia epizootic also appeared to decrease following increased spring precipitation (odds = 0.41 per unit increase, global  = 100.18% and SD = 26.97%). Risk was not associated with number of federal sheep and goat allotments, proximity to nearest herds of bighorn sheep, ratio of rams to ewes, percentage of average winter precipitation, or whether herds were of native versus mixed

  5. Radiographic and HRCT findings of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heo, Jin Sam; Kim, Kun Il; Kim, Chang Won; Park, Soon Kew; Cho, Goon Jae

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the radiographic and HRCT findings of Pneumocystic carinii pneumonia. We reviewed the medical records and retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=31) and HRCT scans(n=17) of 31 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia who had been followed up at our institute between, 1993 and March 1998. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was confirmed by cytologic evaluation of sputum stained with methenamine silver(n=25) or on the basis of clinical history(n=6). The study group included 17 men and 14 women aged 28-78(average, 53.6) years. Twenty-eight patients had underlying conditions such as hematologic diseases(n=13), AIDS(n=8), malignancy(n=2), DM(n=2) and malnutrition(n=1), and three were free from underlying diseases. Twenty patients had pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and 11 had combined lung diseases, namely pulmonary tuberculosis(n=4), pulmonary metastasis(n=2), bacterial pneumonia(n=2), atypical mycobacterial infection(n=1), pulmonary edema(n=1), and Kaposi' s sarcoma(n=1). Chest radiographic findings of 20 cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included consolidation(n=12), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), ill defined haziness(n=7), and nodules(n=6), with bilaterality in is cases and zonal predominance in ten [central(n=5), lower(n=5)]. Ancillary findings included pleural effusion(n=10), cysts(n=5), lymphadenopathy(n=4) and pneumothorax(n=1). In two patients, findings were entirely normal. HRCT findings in ten cases of pure Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included ground-glass opacity(n=6), consolidation(n=6), linear-reticular opacity(n=8), and nodules(n=5), with bilaterallity in seven cases and zonal predominance in five [central(n=5), lower(n=2)]. Ancillary findings among these cases included pleural effusion(n=4), lymphadenopathy(n=2), cysts(n=1), and pneumothorax(n=1). HRCT findings in seven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia combined with other lung diseases included nodules(n=6), ground-glass opacity(n=5), linear-reticular opacity

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  7. Post-infective transverse myelitis following Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis with radiological features of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: a case report

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    Williams Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Post-infectious autoimmune demyelination of the central nervous system is a rare neurological disorder typically associated with exanthematous viral infections. We report an unusual presentation of the condition and a previously undocumented association with Streptococcus pneumonia meningitis. Case presentation A 50-year-old Caucasian woman presented to our facility with an acute myelopathy three days after discharge following acute Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis. Imaging studies of the spine ruled out an infective focus and no other lesions were seen within the cord. Diffuse, bilateral white matter lesions were seen within the cerebral hemispheres, and our patient was diagnosed as having a post-infective demyelination syndrome that met the diagnostic criteria for an acute transverse myelitis. Our patient clinically and radiologically improved following treatment with steroids. Conclusions The novel association of a Streptococcus pneumoniae infection with post-infectious autoimmune central nervous system demyelination should alert the reader to the potentially causative role of this common organism, and gives insights into the pathogenesis. The unusual dissociation between the clinical presentation and the location of the radiological lesions should also highlight the potential for the condition to mimic the presentation of others, and stimulates debate on the definitions of acute transverse myelitis and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and their potential overlap.

  8. Purulent pericarditis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Nigerian Child

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    Igoche David Peter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Western world, cases of purulent pericarditis have become almost nonexistent with progress and advent of new immunizations against many causative organisms. We report Klebsiella pneumoniae pericarditis, a rare cause of this uncommon disease, hitherto unreported in Nigeria. K. pneumoniae, which is a rod-shaped, Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, produces extended-spectrum beta-lactamases; hence, it is usually resistant to a lot of antibiotics and is associated with a significant case fatality rate. Our 13-year-old male patient had septic arthritis of the right hip joint came with a 3 weeks complaint of difficulty with breathing. He had respiratory distress, tachypnea, and tachycardia. Although blood pressure was normal, he had pulsus paradoxus, elevated jugular venous pressure, diffuse apex beat, and heart sounds were distant. Chest radiograph revealed an increased cardiothoracic ratio (0.86 with “water bottle” appearance. Transthoracic echocardiography confirmed pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade. Echo-guided pericardiocentesis was done, and 340 ml of foul-smelling and creamy pus with greenish tinge was aspirated and this grew K. pneumoniae sensitive to ciprofloxacin and gentamycin but resistant to other conventional antibiotics. Recovery was complete after a week of pericardial tube drainage and 3 weeks of treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of Klebsiella - induced pyopericardium and with successful management in a Nigerian child. Pyopericardium may follow rare causes such as K. pneumoniae infection with its unique antibiogram.

  9. Case of Meningitis in a Neonate Caused by an Extended-Spectrum-Beta-Lactamase-Producing Strain of Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae

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    Khalit S. Khaertynov

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most important infectious agents among neonates. This pathogen has a potential to develop an increased antimicrobial resistance and virulence. The classic non-virulent strain of K. pneumoniae, producing an extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL, is associated with nosocomial infection mainly in preterm neonates. Hypervirulent K. pneumoniae strains are associated with invasive infection among previously healthy ambulatory patients, and most of them exhibit antimicrobial susceptibility. During the last few years, several cases of diseases caused by hypervirulent K. pneumoniae producing ESBL have been registered in different geographical regions of the world. However, reports of such cases in neonates are rare. Here, we reported that this pathogen can cause pyogenic meningitis in full-term neonate with poor prognosis. A previously healthy, full-term, 12-day-old neonate was admitted to the infectious diseases hospital with suspected meningitis. The clinical symptoms included loss of appetite, irritability, fever, seizures, and a bulging anterior fontanelle. The analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid confirmed the diagnosis of meningitis. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for K. pneumoniae, producing ESBL. K. pneumoniae isolates were resistant to aminopenicillins, 3rd generation cephalosporins but were sensitive to imipenem and meropenem. The “string test” was positive. The study of the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae by PCR revealed the presence of the rmpA gene. A combination of K. pneumoniae virulence and drug resistance complicated by cerebral oedema led to the death of the neonate. We concluded that both the risk of developing severe forms of infection and the outcome of the disease due to K. pneumonia are associated with the phenotypic features of the pathogen such as its antibiotic susceptibility and virulence factors. Emergence of the ESBL-producing strain of hypervirulent K

  10. Klebsiella pneumoniae Invasive Syndrome

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    Vasco Evangelista

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive syndrome (KPIS is a rare clinical condition characterized by primary liver abscess associated with metastatic infection. Most case reports are from Southeast Asia, with only one case described in Portugal. The Authors present the case of a 44-year-old man with a history of fever, dry cough and cervicalgia. A thoracic computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple pulmonary and hepatic nodules, suggestive of metastatic malignancy. Both blood cultures and bronchoalveolar lavage were positive for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Imaging studies were repeated during his hospital stay, showing a reduction in both number and volume of identified lesions, thus revealing their infectious nature. This case illustrates how much this entity can mimic other illnesses.

  11. Minocycline-induced acute eosinophilic pneumonia: A case report and review of the literature

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    Sharon W. Hung

    2015-01-01

    Minocycline is commonly used for pneumonia, acute bronchitis, urinary tract infections, and acne and is likely the cause of AEP in our patient. There are 26 case reports of minocycline-induced AEP. In most cases, outcomes were favorable and symptoms rapidly resolved upon discontinuation of minocycline, with 11 cases employing steroids, one case twelve hours of CPAP and another 5 days of intubation. None resulted in mortality. Although it is difficult to evaluate without further studies, steroids should be recommended for minocycline-induced AEP, especially for those with severe or persistent symptoms.

  12. Bacterial Pneumonia in Elderly Japanese Populations

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    Naoya Miyashita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial pneumonia is one of the most important infectious diseases in terms of incidence, effect on quality of life, mortality, and impact on society. Pneumonia was the third leading cause of death in Japan in 2011. In 2016, 119 650 Japanese people died of pneumonia, 96% of whom were aged 65 years and above. The symptoms of pneumonia in elderly people are often atypical. Aspiration pneumonia is seen more frequently than in young people because of swallowing dysfunction in the elderly. The mortality rate is also higher in the elderly than in young people. In Japan, the population is aging at an unprecedented rate, and pneumonia in the elderly will be increasingly important in medicine and medical economics in the future. To manage pneumonia in the elderly, it is important to accurately evaluate its severity, administer appropriate antibiotic treatment, and implement effective preventive measures.

  13. Importance of Q Fever in Community Acquired Pneumonia

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    Monique Goyette

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii appears to be endemic in animals in the Mauricie region of Quebec, and causes some human cases of Q fever annually. Unlike in other rural areas, patients in this study experienced few respiratory symptoms. To determine whether C burnetii pneumonia is underdiagnosed, adults admitted to hospital for community acquired pneumonia were included in a one-year serological study. Significant immunofluorescent antibody (IFA titres in four of 118 patients with pneumonia (fewer than 4% were studied. Clinical presentation, standard laboratory tests and epidemiological data did not allow identification of these cases; however, Q fever increased during the warm months. There were no detectable complement fixing (CF antibodies in these four cases. C burnetii causes few cases of pneumonia in Mauricie. IFA seems to be a more sensitive test than CF.

  14. Cytomegalovirus pneumonitis complicated by a central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Maria M; Ahmed, Asia; Carpenter, Ben; Brown, Jeremy S

    2017-01-01

    We present five cases of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonitis occurring in patients after recent T cell deplete allogeneic stem cell transplantation (AlloHSCT). These cases were complicated by an organising pneumonia (during the recovery period) with a predominantly central peribronchial pattern. All patients presented with evidence of active CMV pneumonitis which was treated successfully with anti-viral therapy but was followed by persistent severe dyspnoea, cough and hypoxia. High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging showed widespread central peribronchial consolidation with traction bronchiectasis. There was a marked clinical and physiological improvement after treatment with systemic corticosteroids. However, in all patients the lung function remained abnormal and in some cases imaging revealed a fibrosing lung disease. These cases represent a previously undescribed central peribronchial pattern of organising pneumonia complicating CMV pneumonitis that can result in chronic lung damage.

  15. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess: A population-based, nested, case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Han-Wei; Huang, Jing-Yang; Teng, Ying-Hock

    2017-01-01

    Bacteremic pneumonia is considered a potential cause of distal organ abscess formation. Therefore, we hypothesize that pneumonia is a risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess (PLA).The aim of this study is to explore the association between pneumonia and PLA. A nationwide, population-based, nested, case-control study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In total, 494 patients with PLA and 1,976 propensity score matched controls were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) in patients with exposure to pneumonia before PLA. After matched and adjusted for confounding factors including age, sex, urbanization, income, chronic liver disease, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, and cancer, hospitalization for pneumonia remained an independent risk factor for PLA with an aORs of 2.104 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.309-3.379, p = 0.0021]. Moreover, the aORs were significantly higher among patients hospitalized for pneumonia within 30 days (aORs = 10.73, 95% CI = 3.381-34.054), 30-90 days (aORs = 4.698, 95% CI = 1.541-14.327) and 90-180 (aORs = 4.000, 95% CI = 1.158-13.817) days before PLA diagnosis. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for subsequent PLA. Moreover, hospitalization for pneumonia within 180 days before PLA diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of PLA.

  16. Computed tomographic study on Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Koba, Hiroyuki; Mori, Takuji; Mori, Masaki; Tsunematsu, Kazunori; Natori, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Akira; Doi, Mikio.

    1985-01-01

    Serologically proven 21 patients with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia that showed infiltrative shadows on chest radiograms were studied by computed tomography (CT). Localization of the lesion and the fashion of its progression through the lung were analyzed. Following 3 loci were defined on the basis of the investigations of critical analysis of the chest radiograms, and of radiopathological analysis of the experimental animal model of mycoplasmal pneumonia with soft X-ray image. I: Peribronchial and periarterial interstitium. II: Bronchiole and its surroundings. III: Lung parenchyma, on hilar area as IIIh, on marginal area as IIIm. Even in the early phase of this disease, radiopathological findings on CT have been distributed in all loci mentioned above. The Shadow disappeared from locus III approximately 14th day from the onset. The shadow have remained, however, loci I, II for a long period. Those findings suggest that locus I and II are one of the major focus of Mycoplasma neumoniae pneumonia. Volume loss in the locus III was observed 78 % of the cases at 28th day from the onset. The shadow on locus IIIh was more prominent than locus IIIm. Reported analytical method with CT could be widely applied to disclose a radiopathological details in other infectious diseases of the lung. (author)

  17. Risk Factors for Aspiration Pneumonia in Older Adults.

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    Toshie Manabe

    Full Text Available Aspiration pneumonia is a dominant form of community-acquired and healthcare-associated pneumonia, and a leading cause of death among ageing populations. However, the risk factors for developing aspiration pneumonia in older adults have not been fully evaluated. The purpose of the present study was to determine the risk factors for aspiration pneumonia among the elderly.We conducted an observational study using data from a nationwide survey of geriatric medical and nursing center in Japan. The study subjects included 9930 patients (median age: 86 years, women: 76% who were divided into two groups: those who had experienced an episode of aspiration pneumonia in the previous 3 months and those who had not. Data on demographics, clinical status, activities of daily living (ADL, and major illnesses were compared between subjects with and without aspiration pneumonia. Two hundred and fifty-nine subjects (2.6% of the total sample were in the aspiration pneumonia group. In the univariate analysis, older age was not found to be a risk factor for aspiration pneumonia, but the following were: sputum suctioning (odds ratio [OR] = 17.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.16-22.62, p < 0.001, daily oxygen therapy (OR = 8.29, 95% CI: 4.39-15.65, feeding support dependency (OR = 8.10, 95% CI: 6.27-10.48, p < 0.001, and urinary catheterization (OR = 4.08, 95% CI: 2.81-5.91, p < 0.001. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, the risk factors associated with aspiration pneumonia after propensity-adjustment (258 subjects each were sputum suctioning (OR = 3.276, 95% CI: 1.910-5.619, deterioration of swallowing function in the past 3 months (OR = 3.584, 95% CI: 1.948-6.952, dehydration (OR = 8.019, 95% CI: 2.720-23.643, and dementia (OR = 1.618, 95% CI: 1.031-2.539.The risk factors for aspiration pneumonia were sputum suctioning, deterioration of swallowing function, dehydration, and dementia. These results could help improve clinical management for preventing

  18. [Examination about utility of a Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular antigen swiftness search kit urine in a pneumonia patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashikita, Giichi; Yamaguti, Toshiyuki; Tachi, Yoshimi; Kishi, Etsuko; Kawamura, Toru; Takahashi, Shun; Arai, Yukie; Koyama, Sachie; Huruhata, Toshihumi; Itabashi, Akira; Oka, Yoko; Yamazaki, Tsutomu; Maesaki, Sigefumi

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the usefullness of Binax NOW urine antigen test, an immunochromatographic assay that binds any soluble Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen (C polysaccharide) for the diagnosis of penumoniae form September 2003 to March 2005. We used 372 samples form the patinets with pneumoniae diagnosed for blood or sputum cultuter or gram-stained sputum smear. Out of 24 culture positive specimens, Binax NOW urine antigen test, showed positive in 18 (75%) specimens. The sensitivity of sputum and blood culture was 71.7% and 83.3%, respectively. Binax NOW urine antigen test was seemed false positives in 55 samples, false negatives in 6 samples. The specificity of Binax NOW urine antigen test was evaluated 84.1%. Overall agreement among tests was 83.6%. When compared to culture, false negative urine antigen may be the result of colonizing S. pneumoniae in sputum or pneumonia caused by an agent other than S. pneumoniae. CRP values for cases were both urine antigen and culture were positive ranged from 40 mg/dl to 10 mg/dl while urine antigen and culture negative cases were predominantly less than 10 mg/dl. Positive blood and pleural fluid culture cases were consistently associated with strongly positive urine antigen tests. Non-agreement between urine antigen, culture, and microscopy may be the result of specimen quality, labile nature of S. pneumoniae and antimicrobial therapy.

  19. Comparison between pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza pneumonia and seasonal influenza pneumonia in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Takayanagi, Noboru; Yoneda, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We compared 126 cases of seasonal influenza pneumonia (seasonal flu) reported between January, 1996 and March, 2009, with 10 cases of laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus pneumonia (novel flu), based on clinical condition, computed tomography (CT) findings, severity, treatment, and prognosis, to clarify the characteristics of this novel flu. The mean age of subjects was 52.4 years in the novel flu group and 64 years in the seasonal flu group, and novel flu patients were younger than seasonal flu patients. Seasonal flu patients had more underlying diseases than did novel flu patients. The median duration from illness onset to hospitalization was 4 days in both groups. Primary viral pneumonia was present in 70% of novel flu cases and 31% of seasonal flu cases. The proportion of primary virus pneumonia was higher in novel flu patients, and the disease severity of the seasonal flu group was more severe than that of the novel flu group. White blood cell and lymphocyte counts were lower in novel flu patients, and chest CT images showed bilateral shadows and pure ground-glass opacities more frequently in the novel flu cases. There were no differences in treatment, number of days required for the fever to subside, or mortality between the groups. (author)

  20. Clinicoroentgenological control in chronic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamilyaev, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive clinicoroentgenological study was used to examine 494 patients with chronic pneumonia. Morphological and functional changes observed in the pulmonary pare and functional changes observed in the pulmonary parenchyma and bronchial tree were studied. Types of pneumosclerosis, tigns of exacerbation of chronic pneumonia and abscess formation, morphological and functional disorders of bronchial penetrability in the pneumonic zone were described. Three forms of chronic pneumonia: bronchial, bronchiectatic and abscessing are signled out. The bronchial form is subdivided into chronic pneumonia with chronic bronchitis without deformity and wi.th deforming chronic bronchitis. In the bronchiectatic form pneumonia can be with cylindrical, saccular and cyst-like bronchiectasia. The general diagnosis of chronic pneumonia is established clinically depending on type and variants in 89-94% of cases, by X-ray and sonographic findings in all patients; types and variants of disease are most frequently defined after bronchography

  1. Analysis of clinical value of CT in the diagnosis of pediatric pneumonia and mycoplasma pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    GONG, LIANG; ZHANG, CHONG-LIN; ZHEN, QING

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease of the lung causing mortality. Mycoplasma pneumonia (MP) is an atypical bacterial pneumonia that damages several organs. Lung computed tomography (CT) has been utilized in its identification. The aim of the present study was to examine the value of computed tomography diagnosis for pediatric MP. The present study prospectively analyzed the clinical and imaging data of 1,280 cases of pediatric MP in the out- and inpatient departments from March, 2010 to March...

  2. The definition of pneumonia, the assessment of severity, and clinical standardization in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scott, J. Anthony G.; Wonodi, Chizoba; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Karron, Ruth A.; Bhat, Niranjan; Murdoch, David R.; Crawley, Jane; Levine, Orin S.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Black, Robert E.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Campbell, Harry; Cherian, Thomas; Crook, Derrick W.; de Jong, Menno D.; Dowell, Scott F.; Graham, Stephen M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Martin, Paul; Nataro, James P.; Piazza, Franco M.; Qazi, Shamim A.; Zar, Heather J.

    2012-01-01

    To develop a case definition for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project, we sought a widely acceptable classification that was linked to existing pneumonia research and focused on very severe cases. We began with the World Health Organization's classification of severe/very

  3. Atypical pathogens and challenges in community-acquired pneumonia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atypical organisms such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila are implicated in up to 40 percent of cases of community-acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic treatment is empiric and includes coverage for both typical and atypical organisms. Doxycycline, a fluoroquinolone with ...

  4. The Definition of Pneumonia, the Assessment of Severity, and Clinical Standardization in the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonodi, Chizoba; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Karron, Ruth A.; Bhat, Niranjan; Murdoch, David R.; Crawley, Jane; Levine, Orin S.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Feikin, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    To develop a case definition for the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project, we sought a widely acceptable classification that was linked to existing pneumonia research and focused on very severe cases. We began with the World Health Organization’s classification of severe/very severe pneumonia and refined it through literature reviews and a 2-stage process of expert consultation. PERCH will study hospitalized children, aged 1–59 months, with pneumonia who present with cough or difficulty breathing and have either severe pneumonia (lower chest wall indrawing) or very severe pneumonia (central cyanosis, difficulty breastfeeding/drinking, vomiting everything, convulsions, lethargy, unconsciousness, or head nodding). It will exclude patients with recent hospitalization and children with wheeze whose indrawing resolves after bronchodilator therapy. The PERCH investigators agreed upon standard interpretations of the symptoms and signs. These will be maintained by a clinical standardization monitor who conducts repeated instruction at each site and by recurrent local training and testing. PMID:22403224

  5. Drug-resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among Spanish middle aged and older adults with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raga-Luria Xavier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pneumococcal diseases remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Updated data on drug-resistance from different populations may be important to recognize changes in disease patterns. This study assessed current levels of penicilin resistance among Streptococcus Pneumoniae causing pneumonia in Spanish middle age and older adults. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested for 104 consecutive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients 50 years or older with radiographically confirmed pneumonia in the region of Tarragona (Spain between 2002 and 2007. According to the minimum inhibitory concentration of tested antimicrobials (penicillin, erythromycin, cefotaxime and levofloxacin strains were classified as susceptible or resistant. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for early cases (2002–2004 and contemporary cases (2005–2007. Results Twenty-seven (25.9% were penicillin-resistant strains (19 strains with intermediate resistance and 8 strains with high resistance. Penicillin-resistance was higher in 2002–2004 than in 2005–2007 (39.5% vs 18.2%, p = 0.017. Of 27 penicillin-resistant strains, 10 (37% were resistant to erythromycin, 8 (29.6% to cefotaxime, 2 (7.4% to levofloxacin, and 4 (14.8% were identified as multidrug resistant. Case-fatality rate was higher among those patients who had an infection caused by any penicillin susceptible strain (16.9% than in those with infections due to penicillin-resistant strains. Conclusion Resistance to penicillin among Streptococcus pneumoniae remains high, but such resistance does not result in increased mortality in patients with pneumococcal pneumonia.

  6. Benzodiazepine and Z-drug use and risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic kidney disease: A population-based nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng-Ting; Wang, Yun-Han; Chang, Hsin-An; Tsai, Chen-Liang; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lin, Chen Wei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2017-01-01

    Concerns were raised about pneumonia development from benzodiazepines (BZDs) and Z-drugs, but direct evidence is limited, conflicting and without examining the highly susceptible patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) nor specifying the risk for different drug utilizations. This study aimed to investigate whether use of BZDs and Z-drugs was each associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in a CKD population. We performed a nested case-control study of 36,880 CKD patients analyzing the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database between 01/1/2000 and 12/31/2011. Among the study cohort, we identified 4,533 cases of pneumonia based on validated disease codes, chest x-ray examination, and prescriptions of respiratory antibiotics, and randomly selected 16,388 controls from risk sets, matched by sex, age, and number of CKD-related hospitalizations. All prescription filling records of BZDs and Z-drugs in the year before the event/index date were analyzed for cases and controls. Conditional logistic regressions were performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs). Current use of BZDs was associated with a 1.31-fold (95% CI, 1.18-1.26) increased risk of pneumonia compared to nonuse, but not for recent and past use. The risk from current BZD use was confined to new initiation (adjusted OR, 2.47; 95% CI, 2.02-3.03) or use for ≤ 30 days, and elevated to 2.88-fold (95% CI, 1.87-4.42) with parenteral administration. New initiation and current short-term use of Z-drugs was associated with a 2.94-fold (95% CI, 1.65-5.26) and 1.75-fold (95% CI, 1.13-2.72) increased risk of pneumonia, respectively. The findings were robust to adoption of a case-crossover study that analyzed cases only. Use of BZRAs is associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in CKD patients, especially for patients newly initiating BZDs or Z-drugs or those injected with BZDs. Physicians should exercise cautions for signs of pneumonia when prescribing BZDs or Z-drugs to CKD patients.

  7. Antibiotic Usage Prior and During Hospitalization for Clinical Severe Pneumonia in Children under Five Years of Age in Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Ruiz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Scarce and limited epidemiological, clinical and microbiological data are available regarding pediatric respiratory tract infections in the Kingdom of Morocco, a middle-income country in Northwestern Africa. Data on antibiotic usage for such infections are also scarce. A good understanding of pre-admission and intra-hospital usage of antibiotics in children with respiratory infections linked with an adequate surveillance of the antibiotic susceptibility from circulating pathogens could help policy makers improve their recommendations on management of respiratory infections. We hereby present data on antibiotic usage prior and during admission and antibiotic susceptibility of major circulating respiratory pathogens in children under five years of age admitted to the Hôpital d’Enfants de Rabat, Morocco, with a diagnosis of clinical severe pneumonia (using World Health Organization (WHO standardized case definitions during a period of 14 months (November 2010–December 2011, as part of a larger hospital-based surveillance study designed to understand the etiology and epidemiology of severe pneumonia cases among children.

  8. A case of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia associated with SAPHO (synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Fawad; Steer, Henry

    2017-08-01

    A 57-year-old woman with SAPHO (synovitis-acne-pustulosis-hyperostosis-osteitis) syndrome presented with recurrent episodes of pneumonia. She was treated with multiple courses of antibiotics with no success. The transbronchial biopsy undertaken via bronchoscopy revealed organising pneumonia (OP). She was treated with steroids and responded well with full clinical recovery and normalisation of her chest X-ray.To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of OP in association with SAPHO syndrome. This case report highlights the importance of considering OP in patients with SAPHO syndrome who present with chest infection. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol

    2013-01-01

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  10. Enterobacter Asburiae Pneumonia with Cavitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seung Woo; Heo, Jeong Nam; Park, Choong Ki [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri Hospital, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Enterobacter species have increasingly been identified as pathogens over the past several decades. These bacterial species have become more important because most are resistant to cephalothin and cefoxitin, and can produce extended-spectrum {beta}-lactamase. Enterobacter asburiae (E. asburiae) is a gram-negative rod of the family Enterobacteriaceae, named in 1986. Since then, there has been only one clinical report of E. asburiae pneumonia. We report a case of E. asburiae pneumonia with cavitation and compare it with the previous case.

  11. ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY OF COMMUNITY-ACKUIRED PNEUMONIA: NECESSITY AND SUFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Savchenkova

    2016-01-01

      failures  at both the outpatient  and  inpatient, which  significantly increases the cost of treatment. From the standpoint of evidence-based medicine is justified by the  inclusion in the  treatment of communityacquired pneumonia, only a mucolytic drugs and indications NSAIDs as an antipyretic and analgesic short course. The use of most drugs of pathogenic therapy do not have the evidence base  and  the  efficiency of their  purpose can not  be considered reasonable. In this case, the analysis can serve as a basis for planning a set of measures for improvement of pharmacotherapy community-acquired pneumonia based on the principle of minimal sufficiency. 

  12. Factors Associated with Pneumonia-caused Death in Older Adults with Autopsy-confirmed Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Toshie; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Hashizume, Yoshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Kudo, Koichiro; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Objective A better understanding of risk factors for pneumonia-caused death may help to improve the clinical management of dementia. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted by reviewing the medical charts and autopsy reports of 204 patients who were admitted to hospital, underwent a post-mortem examination, and who were neuropathologically diagnosed with dementia. The risk factors for pneumonia-caused death were examined both as underlying and immediate causes of death using logistic regression models. Results A high frequency of pneumonia-caused death was observed both in underlying- (37.3%) and immediate- (44.1%) cause of death, but varied according to the subtypes of dementia. The factors related to pneumonia-caused death (underlying) were subtypes of dementia; Alzheimer's disease (odds ratio [OR], 2.891; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.459-5.730); argyrophilic grain disease (OR, 3.148; 95% CI, 0.937-10.577); and progressive supranuclear palsy (OR, 34.921; 95% CI, 3.826-318.775), dysphagia (OR, 2.045; 95% CI, 1.047-3.994), diabetes mellitus (OR, 3.084; 95% CI, 1.180-8.061) and conversely related with heart failure (OR, 0.149; 95% CI, 0.026-0.861). Factors relating to pneumonia-caused death (immediate) were incidence of pneumonia during hospitalizations (OR, 32.579; 95%CI, 4.308-246.370), gender-male (OR, 2.060; 95% CI, 1.098-3.864), and conversely related with malignant neoplasm (OR, 0.220; 95% CI, 0.058-0.840). Conclusion The different factors relating to the pneumonia-caused death were evaluated depending on whether pneumonia was the underlying- or immediate-cause of death. Strengthening clinical management on dysphagia and diabetes mellitus, and preventing incidence of pneumonia during hospitalization appear to be the important for the terminal stage of hospitalized patients with dementia.

  13. The clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fuzheng; Wang Mingzhi; Chen Jianjiang; Wang Zhongxiang; Mao Yongjie

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the clinical characteristics of the radiation pneumonia, sum the experience and the basis of the radiation pneumonia for its prevention and treatment. Method: Twenty three cases with radiation pneumonia from 1991 to 1998 were retrospectively analysed. Its clinical manifestation, chest X-ray, thoracic CT and blood routine were evaluated. Result: The acute manifestation was fever, cough, dyspnea, and the chronic manifestation was cough and insufficiency of pulmonary function. Conclusion: The prevention of radiation pneumonia is more important, high dose cortical steroids and antibiotics were prescribed during the acute stage and the chronic radiation pneumonia is irreversible

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion: report of two pediatric cases and a comprehensive literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norishi Ueda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No literature review exists on Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated mild encephalitis/encepharopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS. Methods M.pneumoniae-associated MERS cases were searched till August 2016 using PubMed/Google for English/other-language publications and Ichushi ( http://www.jamas.or.jp/ for Japanese-language publications. Inclusion criteria were children fulfilling definition for encephalitis, M.pneumoniae infection, and neuroimaging showing hyperintensity in the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC alone (type I or SCC/other brain areas (type II. Results We described two children with type I and II M.pneumoniae-associated MERS. Thirteen cases found by the search and our 2 cases were reviewed. Mean age, male/female ratio, duration of prodromal illness was 8.3 years, 1.5 and 3.5 days. The most common neurological symptom was drowsiness, followed by abnormal speech/behavior, ataxia, seizure, delirium, confusion, tremor, hallucination, irritability, muscle weakness, and facial nerve paralysis. Fever was the most common non-neurological symptom, followed by cough, headache, gastrointestinal symptoms, headache, lethargy and dizziness. Seizure and respiratory symptoms were less common. All were diagnosed for M.pneumoniae by serology. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF M.pneumoniae was undetectable by PCR in the 3 patients. Three patients were clarithromycin-resistant. Leukocytosis, positive C-reactive protein, hyponatremia, CSF pleocytosis and slow wave on electroencephalography frequently occurred. All except 2 were type I MERS. Neuroimaging abnormalities disappeared within 18 days in the majority of patients. All type I patients completely recovered within 19 days. Two type II patients developed neurological sequelae, which recovered 2 and 6 months after onset. Conclusions Prognosis of M.pneumoniae-associated MERS is excellent. Type II MERS may increase a risk of neurological sequelae.

  15. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassirer, E. Frances; Plowright, Raina K.; Manlove, Kezia R.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Potter, Kathleen A.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Bighorn sheep mortality related to pneumonia is a primary factor limiting population recovery across western North America, but management has been constrained by an incomplete understanding of the disease. We analysed patterns of pneumonia-caused mortality over 14 years in 16 interconnected bighorn sheep populations to gain insights into underlying disease processes. 2. We observed four age-structured classes of annual pneumonia mortality patterns: all-age, lamb-only, secondary all-age and adult-only. Although there was considerable variability within classes, overall they differed in persistence within and impact on populations. Years with pneumonia-induced mortality occurring simultaneously across age classes (i.e. all-age) appeared to be a consequence of pathogen invasion into a naïve population and resulted in immediate population declines. Subsequently, low recruitment due to frequent high mortality outbreaks in lambs, probably due to association with chronically infected ewes, posed a significant obstacle to population recovery. Secondary all-age events occurred in previously exposed populations when outbreaks in lambs were followed by lower rates of pneumonia-induced mortality in adults. Infrequent pneumonia events restricted to adults were usually of short duration with low mortality. 3. Acute pneumonia-induced mortality in adults was concentrated in fall and early winter around the breeding season when rams are more mobile and the sexes commingle. In contrast, mortality restricted to lambs peaked in summer when ewes and lambs were concentrated in nursery groups. 4. We detected weak synchrony in adult pneumonia between adjacent populations, but found no evidence for landscape-scale extrinsic variables as drivers of disease. 5. We demonstrate that there was a >60% probability of a disease event each year following pneumonia invasion into bighorn sheep populations. Healthy years also occurred periodically, and understanding the factors driving these

  16. A Case of Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Caused by Ewingella americana : First Report from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenan Ecemiş

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Ewingella americana is a very rare cause of serious infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP in an intensive care unit patient, who was treated successfully with ceftriaxone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of VAP due to Ewingella americana in the English literature.J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(3: 118-120

  17. First case of pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus in an infant in the Gulf Cooperation Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Raghda; Alyousef, Wafaa; Omara, Abdelwahab; Alamoudi, Suha; Alshami, Alanoud; Abdalhamid, Baha

    2017-02-28

    Cupriavidus pauculus is an emerging organism causing infections in immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. We report a C.pauculus pneumonia case susceptible to cefepime in an infant with end-stage renal failure. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of C. pauculus causing respiratory infections in the Gulf Cooperation Council.

  18. Pulmonary Embolism in Pneumonia: Still a Diagnostic Challenge? Results of a Case-Control Study in 100 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Paparoupa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the diagnostic value of D-dimer, CRP, and leucocytes count to detect an underlying pulmonary embolism (PE in patients with pneumonia. A predictive model of an underlying PE, based on laboratory markers and clinical symptoms, was our ultimate objective. Overall 100 patients underwent a computed tomography angiography (CTA of the lung: 54 with coexistence of PE and pneumonia (cases and 46 with pneumonia without PE (controls. Cases and controls were matched 1 : 1. Symptoms and paraclinical findings were registered on admission. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves, search for an optimal threshold, and conditional logistic regression analysis were conducted. D-dimer has a moderate ability to detect PE in pneumonia. Sensitivity of D-dimer was estimated at 97.78% and specificity at 11.11%. No optimal cut-point has acceptable diagnostic ability. After excluding patients with sepsis, sensitivity was reduced to 96.97%, whereas specificity increased to 16.13%. Consolidation in chest X-ray and positive D-dimer predict better an underlying PE as D-dimer itself. Thus, discriminatory power of the prediction model (AUC of 0.740 is not much greater than D-dimer (AUC of 0.703. No threshold that could increase the diagnostic value of D-dimer or a prediction model which is significantly better than D-dimer itself was identified.

  19. The need to improve the diagnosis, clinical care and outcomes of children with pneumonia: where are the gaps?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne B Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the greatest contributor to childhood mortality and morbidity in resource-poor regions, while in high-income countries it is one of the most common reasons for clinic attendance and hospitalization in this age group. Furthermore, pneumonia in children increases the risk of developing chronic pulmonary disorders in later adult life. While substantial advances in managing childhood pneumonia have been made, many issues remain, some of which are highlighted in this perspective. Multiple studies are required as many factors that influence outcomes, such as etiology, patient characteristics and prevention strategies can vary between and within countries and regions. Also, outside of vaccine studies, most randomized controlled trials (RCTs on pneumonia have been based in resource-poor countries where the primary aim is usually prevention of mortality. Few RCTs have focused on medium to long-term outcomes or prevention. We propose different tiers of primary outcomes, where in resource-rich countries medium to long-term sequelae should also be included and not just the length of hospitalization and readmission rates.

  20. A managed multidisciplinary programme on multi-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Danish university hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteria-producing extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes are resistant to commonly used antimicrobials. In 2008, routine monitoring revealed a clonal hospital outbreak of ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-KP). METHODS: At a 510-bed Danish university hospital...... the application of a managed, multi-faceted intervention that does not require ongoing antibiotic stewardship....

  1. Evaluation of risk factors for severe pneumonia in children: the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonodi, Chizoba B.; Deloria-Knoll, Maria; Feikin, Daniel R.; DeLuca, Andrea N.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Moïsi, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Hope L.; Murdoch, David R.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Levine, Orin S.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Black, Robert E.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Campbell, Harry; Cherian, Thomas; Crook, Derrick W.; de Jong, Menno D.; Dowell, Scott F.; Graham, Stephen M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Martin, Paul; Nataro, James P.; Piazza, Franco M.; Qazi, Shamim A.; Zar, Heather J.; Baggett, Henry C.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Chipeta, James; Ebruke, Bernard; Endtz, Hubert P.; Groome, Michelle; Hammitt, Laura L.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Kotloff, Karen; Maloney, Susan A.; Moore, David; Otieno, Juliet; Seidenberg, Phil; Tapia, Milagritos; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Thea, Donald M.; Zaman, Khaleque

    2012-01-01

    As a case-control study of etiology, the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) project also provides an opportunity to assess the risk factors for severe pneumonia in hospitalized children at 7 sites. We identified relevant risk factors by literature review and iterative expert

  2. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and seasonal influenza vaccine for pneumonia among the elderly - Selection of controls in a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kanzo; Washio, Masakazu; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Maeda, Akiko; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-08-24

    We conducted a case-control study to elucidate associations between pneumonia in elderly individuals and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) and seasonal influenza vaccine (influenza vaccine). Here, we examined selection of controls in our study using an analytic epidemiology approach. The study period was from October 1, 2009 through September 30, 2014. Cases comprised ≥65-year-old patients newly diagnosed with pneumonia. For every case with pneumonia, two patients with other diseases (one respiratory medicine, one non-respiratory medicine) who were sex-, age-, visit date- and visit hospital-matched were selected as controls. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of vaccination for pneumonia were calculated using conditional logistic regression model. Similar analyses were also conducted based on the clinical department of controls. Analysis was conducted in 234 cases and 438 controls. Effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination or influenza vaccination against pneumonia was not detected. Proportions of either vaccination in controls were greater among respiratory medicine (pneumococcal vaccine, 38%; influenza vaccine, 55%) than among non-respiratory medicine (23%; 48%). Analysis using controls restricted to respiratory medicine showed marginally significant effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination (OR, 0.59; 95%CI, 0.34-1.03; P=0.064) and influenza vaccination (0.64; 0.40-1.04; 0.072). However, this effectiveness might have been overestimated by selection bias of controls, as pneumonia cases are not necessarily respiratory medicine patients. In the analysis using controls restricted to non-respiratory medicine, OR of pneumococcal vaccination for pneumonia was close to 1, presumably because the proportion of pneumococcal vaccination was higher in cases than in controls. Because pneumococcal vaccine was not routinely administered during the study period, differences in recommendations of vaccination by physician in different

  3. Pediatric Round Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yen-Lin; Wu, Ping-Sheng; Tsai, Li-Ping; Tsai, Wen-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    “Round pneumonia” or “spherical pneumonia” is a well-characterized clinical entity that seems to be less addressed by pediatricians in Taiwan. We herein report the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with prolonged fever, cough, and chest X-rays showing a well-demarcated round mass measuring 5.9 × 5.6 × 4.3 cm in the left lower lung field, findings which were typical for round pneumonia. The urinary pneumococcal antigen test was positive, and serum anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibody titer...

  4. Central bronchial carcinoid: Management of a case and anesthetic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Goswami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructing lesions of the central airways present with a variety of symptoms and are often associated with pneumonia or asthma-like states. Anesthesia to these patients often presents challenges right from the preoperative stabilization of underlying lung condition, mask ventilation in the supine position to maintaining oxygenation and ventilation in the intraoperative and postoperative period. We present here a case of a young woman with a central bronchial tumor with significant airway obstruction with potential for major bleeding and subsequent anesthetic management without lung sacrificing measures and cardiopulmonary bypass assistance.

  5. Isolation of Chlamydia abortus from a laboratory worker diagnosed with atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Nieves; Caro, M Rosa; Gallego, M Carmen; Murcia-Belmonte, Antonio; Álvarez, Daniel; Del Río, Laura; Cuello, Francisco; Buendía, Antonio J; Salinas, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the aetiological agent of atypical pneumonia in human can sometimes be a tedious process, especially in cases where Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species and Chlamydia pneumoniae are ruled out. In such cases, a correct anamnesis of the patient is basic to clarify which pathogens might have produced the infection. For this reason, health professionals including veterinarians and laboratory personnel working with zoonotic pathogens should keep their doctors informed. A human case of atypical pneumonia linked to Chlamydia abortus is reported. A 47-year-old male, a veterinarian researcher into chlamydiae, developed respiratory symptoms, breathing problems and high fever. Serological analyses ruled out the involvement of several respiratory pathogens, such as M. pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Rickettsia conorii and C. pneumoniae, and Chlamydia abortus was identified as the possible aetiological agent of the infection. The isolation of C. abortus from the patient's sputum and subsequent molecular analysis confirmed the presence of this microorganism. As far as we know, although C. abortus has not been previously described as capable of causing pneumonia in humans, this is the first reported case of atypical pneumonia in which C. abortus is thought to have played an aetiological role.

  6. Pneumonia Atipikal

    OpenAIRE

    Budastra I Nyoman; Siadi Purniti Putu; Subanada Ida Bagus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia atipikal adalah pneumonia yang disebabkan oleh mikroorganisme yang tidak dapat diidentifikasi dengan teknik diagnostik standar pneumonia pada umumnya dan tidak menunjukkan respon terhadap antibiotik b-laktam. Mikroorganisme patogen penyebab pneumonia atipikal pada umumnya adalah Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, dan Legionella pneumophila. Manifestasi klinik, pemeriksaan laboratorium dan radiologis pneumonia atipikal menunjukkan gambaran tidak spesifik. Man...

  7. Aspiration pneumonia and bronchopneumonia in progressive supranuclear palsy treated with qing fei tang: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Ichiro; Kato-Motozaki, Yuko; Ikeda, Tokuhei; Takahashi, Kazuya; Tagami, Atsuro; Ishida, Chiho; Komai, Kiyonobu

    2015-03-26

    Qing fei tang, which is used for various respiratory diseases, is useful for reducing relapse of aspiration pneumonia and bronchopneumonia in stroke, but the effect remains unknown in Parkinson's syndrome. We report two cases of Japanese patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and relapsing aspiration pneumonia and bronchopneumonia, which was successfully prevented by qing fei tang. Two Japanese men with progressive supranuclear palsy and receiving total enteral feeding (patient one (66-years-old) and patient two (76-years-old)) had experienced recurrent aspiration pneumonia and bronchopneumonia, which was unresponsive to conventional therapy. The respiratory infection developed twice at intervals of two months in patient one, and nine times at almost monthly intervals in patient two. Thereafter, they were given qing fei tang. After administration of qing fei tang, the respiratory infection reoccurred only once; after 5.5 months for patient one, and six months for patient two. Both of our patients clearly showed a reduced incidence of respiratory infection. Both of our patients clearly showed a reduced incidence of respiratory infection after the administration of qing fei tang. Qing fei tang could be useful for the prevention of recurrent aspiration pneumonia and bronchopneumonia in progressive supranuclear palsy.

  8. Mycoplasma Pneumoniae among Children Hospitalized with Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutty, Preeta K; Jain, Seema; Taylor, Thomas H; Bramley, Anna M; Diaz, Maureen H; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Edwards, Kathryn M; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Winchell, Jonas M; Schrag, Stephanie J; Hicks, Lauri A

    2018-05-17

    The burden and epidemiology of Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) among U.S. children (<18 years) hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are poorly understood. In the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, we prospectively enrolled 2254 children hospitalized with radiographically-confirmed pneumonia from January 2010-June 2012 and tested nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs for Mp using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical and epidemiological features of Mp-PCR-positive and -negative children were compared using logistic regression. Macrolide susceptibility was assessed by genotyping isolates. In the EPIC study, 182(8%) children were Mp-PCR-positive (median age: 7 years); 12% required intensive care and 26% had pleural effusion. No in-hospital deaths occurred. Macrolide resistance was found in 6/169(4%) isolates. Of 178(98%) Mp-PCR-positive children tested for co-pathogens, 50(28%) had ≥1 co-pathogen detected. Variables significantly associated with higher odds of Mp detection included age {10-17 years [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 7.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-13.6)] and 5-9 years [aOR: 4.8 (CI: 2.9-7.8)] vs. 2-4 years}, outpatient antibiotics ≤5 days pre-admission [aOR: 2.3 (CI: 1.5-3.4)], and co-pathogen detection [aOR: 2.1 (CI: 1.3-3.1)]. Clinical characteristics often seen included hilar lymphadenopathy, rales, headache, sore throat, and decreased breath sounds. Usually considered as a mild respiratory infection, M. pneumoniae was the most commonly detected bacteria among children ≥5 years hospitalized with CAP; one-quarter of whom had co-detections. Although associated with clinically non-specific symptoms, there was a need for intensive care support in some cases. M. pneumoniae should be included in the differential diagnosis for school-aged children hospitalized with CAP.

  9. A Culture-Proven Case of Community-Acquired Legionella Pneumonia Apparently Classified as Nosocomial: Diagnostic and Public Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Bargellini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Legionella pneumonia in a 78-year-old patient affected by cerebellar haemangioblastoma continuously hospitalised for 24 days prior to the onset of overt symptoms. According to the established case definition, this woman should have been definitely classified as a nosocomial case (patient spending all of the ten days in hospital before onset of symptoms. Water samples from the oncology ward were negative, notably the patient’s room and the oxygen bubbler, and the revision of the case history induced us to verify possible contamination in water samples collected at home. We found that the clinical strain had identical rep-PCR fingerprint of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 isolated at home. The description of this culture-proven case of Legionnaires’ disease has major clinical, legal, and public health consequences as the complexity of hospitalised patients poses limitations to the rule-of-thumb surveillance definition of nosocomial pneumonia based on 2–10-day incubation period.

  10. Exame do escarro no manejo clínico dos pacientes com pneumonia adquirida na comunidade Sputum examination in the clinical management of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gilberto Haas Signori

    2008-03-01

    reviewed regarding the following aspects: age; gender; severity of pneumonia (Fine score; presence of sputum; sputum bacteriology; treatment history; change in treatment; and mortality. RESULTS: A total of 274 CAP patients (134 males and 140 females were evaluated. Using the Fine score to quantify severity, we classified 79 (28.8% of those 274 patients as class II, 45 (16.4% as class III, 97 (35.4% as class IV, and 53 (19.3% as class V. Sputum examination was carried out in 92 patients (33.6%. A valid sample was obtained in 37 cases (13.5%, and an etiological diagnosis was obtained in 26 (9.5%, resulting in a change of treatment in only 9 cases (3.3%. Overall mortality was 18.6%. Advanced age (above 65, CAP severity, and dry cough were associated with an increase in the mortality rate. Sputum examination did not alter any clinical outcome or have any influence on mortality. CONCLUSION: Sputum examination was used in a minority of patients and was not associated with any noticeable benefit in the clinical management of patients with CAP treated in a hospital setting.

  11. Spatio-temporal dynamics of pneumonia in bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassirer, E Frances; Plowright, Raina K; Manlove, Kezia R; Cross, Paul C; Dobson, Andrew P; Potter, Kathleen A; Hudson, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    1. Bighorn sheep mortality related to pneumonia is a primary factor limiting population recovery across western North America, but management has been constrained by an incomplete understanding of the disease. We analysed patterns of pneumonia-caused mortality over 14 years in 16 interconnected bighorn sheep populations to gain insights into underlying disease processes. 2. We observed four age-structured classes of annual pneumonia mortality patterns: all-age, lamb-only, secondary all-age and adult-only. Although there was considerable variability within classes, overall they differed in persistence within and impact on populations. Years with pneumonia-induced mortality occurring simultaneously across age classes (i.e. all-age) appeared to be a consequence of pathogen invasion into a naïve population and resulted in immediate population declines. Subsequently, low recruitment due to frequent high mortality outbreaks in lambs, probably due to association with chronically infected ewes, posed a significant obstacle to population recovery. Secondary all-age events occurred in previously exposed populations when outbreaks in lambs were followed by lower rates of pneumonia-induced mortality in adults. Infrequent pneumonia events restricted to adults were usually of short duration with low mortality. 3. Acute pneumonia-induced mortality in adults was concentrated in fall and early winter around the breeding season when rams are more mobile and the sexes commingle. In contrast, mortality restricted to lambs peaked in summer when ewes and lambs were concentrated in nursery groups. 4. We detected weak synchrony in adult pneumonia between adjacent populations, but found no evidence for landscape-scale extrinsic variables as drivers of disease. 5. We demonstrate that there was a >60% probability of a disease event each year following pneumonia invasion into bighorn sheep populations. Healthy years also occurred periodically, and understanding the factors driving these

  12. A pediatric case of Fascioliasis with eosinophilic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayhan, Gülsüm İclal; Batur, Abdulsamet; Taylan-Özkan, Ayşegül; Demirören, Kaan; Beyhan, Yunus Emre

    2016-01-01

    Fasciolia spp. are common trematode infestations worldwide. Fasciolia spp. may lead to hepatic diseases in the acute phase and may cause biliary diseases in the chronic phase. In addition, Fasciolia spp. may rarely cause extrahepatic signs and symptoms. The clinical manifestations of fascioliasis are divided into three groups: typical, atypical, and ectopic. Eosinophilic pneumonia is an atypical presentation of acute fascioliasis and it has been reported very rarely. Herein, we report a boy with marked blood eosinophilia and eosinophilic pneumonia who was diagnosed with fascioliasis by serologic tests and abdominal USG. The patient recovered completely following triclabendazole treatment.

  13. Pneumonia After Cardiac Surgery: Experience of the NIH/CIHR Cardiothoracic Surgical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailawadi, Gorav; Chang, Helena L.; O’Gara, Patrick T.; O'sullivan, Karen; Woo, Y. Joseph; DeRose, Joseph J.; Parides, Michael K.; Thourani, Vinod H.; Robichaud, Sophie; Gillinov, A. Marc; Taddei-Peters, Wendy C.; Miller, Marissa A.; Perrault, Louis P.; Smith, Robert L.; Goldsmith, Lyn; Horvath, Keith A.; Doud, Kristen; Baio, Kim; Gelijns, Annetine C.; Moskowitz, Alan J.; Bagiella, Emilia; Alexander, John H.; Iribarne, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Rationale Pneumonia remains the most common major infection after cardiac surgery despite numerous preventive measures. Objectives To prospectively examine the timing, pathogens, and risk factors, including modifiable management practices, for post-operative pneumonia and estimate its impact on clinical outcomes. Methods 5,158 adult cardiac surgery patients were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study across 10 centers. All infections were adjudicated by an independent committee. Competing risk models were used to assess the association of patient characteristics and management practices with pneumonia within 65 days of surgery. Mortality was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model, and length of stay using a multi-state model. Measurements and Main Results The cumulative incidence of p neumonia was 2.4% ,33% of which occurred after discharge. Older age, lower hemoglobin level, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, steroid use, operative time and left ventricular assist device/heart transplant were risk factors. Ventilation time (24–48 vs ≤24 hours;HR,2·83; 95% CI,1·72–4·66; >48 hours HR,4·67; 95% CI,2·70–8·08), nasogastric tubes (HR,1·80; 95% CI,1·10–2·94), and each unit of blood cells transfused (HR,1·16; 95% CI,1·08–1·26) increased pneumonia risk. Prophylactic use of second-generation cephalosporins (HR,0·66; 95% CI, 0·45–0·97) and platelet transfusions (HR, 0·49, 95% CI, 0·30–0·79) were protective. Pneumonia was associated with a marked increase in mortality (HR,8·89; 95% CI,5·02–15·75), and longer LOS of 13·55 ± 1·95 days (bootstrap 95% CI,10·31–16·58). Conclusions Pneumonia continues to impose a major impact on the health of patients after cardiac surgery. Adjusting for baseline risk, several specific management practices were associated with pneumonia, which offer targets for quality improvement and further research. PMID:28341473

  14. Coal use, stove improvement, and adult pneumonia mortality in Xuanwei, China: a retrospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, M.; Chapman, R.S.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Tian, L.; Zheng, T.; Chen, B.E.; Engels, E.A.; He, X.; Blair, A.; Lan, Q.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Xuanwei County, China, unvented indoor coal burning is strongly associated with increased risk of lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the impact of coal burning and stove improvement on risk of pneumonia is not clear. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective

  15. Correlation of gastroesophageal reflex with aspiration pneumonia after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Tokuji; Hashimoto, Hajime; Noro, Toshio; Takahashi, Tadao; Hino, Yasunori; Kuroiwa, Kouzirou

    1996-01-01

    In order to elucidate the correlation of gastroesophageal reflex (GER) with aspiration pneumonia after surgery, 48 patients (mean, 75.6 years) with gastric cancer treated at the hospital from March, 1994 to December, 1994 were subjected to this prospective study. The pharyngeal stimulation test, nutritional assessment, radionuclide esophageal scintigraphy (34 cases) were performed before surgery and relationship between those results and aspiration pneumonia were studied. Aspiration pneumonia occurred in 3 cases, and all of them were in, significantly, poor nutritional status, compared with other. A significant increase in the frequency of GER was observed when a naso-gastric tube (NGT) was placed, but surprisingly, all the patients with aspiration pneumonia were 3 out of 4 patients who had continuous GER without NGT. It is noteworthy, continuous GER without NGT was significantly (p<0.001) affected postoperative aspiration pneumonia and impaired phalyngeal reflex was frequently correlated with development of aspiration pneumonia, when malnutritional status existed. (author)

  16. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Santos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O padrão histológico de Pneumonia Aguda Fibrinosa e Organizante (AFOP – Acute Fibrinous And Organizing Pneumonia, descrito por Beasley em 2002, caracteriza-se pela existência de fibrina intra-alveolar sob a forma de bolas de fibrina e pneumonia organizativa difusa. A apresentação clínica desta doença intersticial pulmonar pode ser aguda ou subaguda, diferindo no entanto dos outros padrões histológicos habitualmente associados a lesão pulmonar aguda – Lesão Alveolar Difusa (DAD, Pneumonia Organizativa (OP e Pneumonia Eosinofílica (EP.A propósito deste tema, os autores fazem uma revisão da literatura e descrevem o caso clínico de um doente de 44 anos, com aspectos imagiológicos e evolução pouco habituais. Abstract: The histologic pattern of Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP, described by Beasley in 2002, is characterized by the existence of intra alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin “balls” and diffuse organizing pneumonia. Presenting symptoms of this interstitial pulmonary disease can be acute or subacute. However, it differs from the well-recognized histologic patterns of acute pulmonary lesion – Diffuse Alveolar Damage (DAD, Organizing Pneumonia (OP and Eosinophilic Pneumonia (EP.The authors carry out a review of the literature concerning this topic and describe the clinical case of a 44-year-old patient with unusual imaging features and outcome. Palavras-chave: AFOP, bolas de fibrina, pneumonia organizativa, Key-word: AFOP, fibrin balls, organizing pneumonia

  17. Percutaneous CT-Guided Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosing Pneumonia and Mimics of Pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanos, Loukas; Galani, Panagiota; Mylona, Sophia; Pomoni, Maria; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of percutaneous core needle biopsy (CNB) relative to fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. In this prospective study we present our experience with 48 thoracic FNAs and CNBs carried out on 48 patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. Samples were obtained from all patients using both CNB (with an automated 18-G core biopsy needle and a gun) and FNA (with a 22-G needle). A specific diagnosis was made in 10/48 cases (20.83%) by FNA and in 42/48 (87.5%) by CNB. The main complications encountered were pneumothorax (n = 4) and hemoptysis (n = 2), yielding a total complication rate of 12.5%. We concluded that CNB using an automated biopsy gun results in a higher diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia and pneumonia mimic biopsies than FNA. Complications should be considered and proper patient observation should follow the procedure

  18. Disk Battery Ingestion A Malpractice Case that Results in Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Şarkış

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkaline batteries have become the second most swallowed foreign bodies following coins. Most cases have an uncomplicated course, but some may lead to serious complications and even death. Here we report a 28 months old boy who had experienced discomfort, eating refusal, vomiting and slightly wheezing after falling from a sofa bed. He has been in three different county hospitals and two private hospitals due to complaints, has been examined by two pediatricians and a cranial surgeon. A cranial CT imaging, a cranial X-ray radiograph and a chest X-ray radiograph was obtained. Firstly, diagnosed as head and neck trauma, then diagnosed as acute bronchiolitis, and finally pneumonia. Hospitalized twice. Finally, a chest radiograph revealed a button battery in the esophagus. The foreign body was endoscopic removed. The child had a quick clinical impairment after removal of the battery. As a result, alkaline batteries with their increasing risk of engulfment poses very serious problems. The parents and physicians should be informed against increasing frequency of ingestion of alkaline batteries by infants and children. Also, clinicians should be careful about the risk of these batteries that they can cause pneumonia and infiltration which may make it difficult to detect the foreign body.

  19. Risk factors for pneumonia in infants and young children and the role of solid fuel for cooking: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalanabis, D.; Gupta, S.; Paul, D.; Gupta, A.; Lahiri, M.; Khaled, M.A. [Society of Applied Studies, Calcutta (India)

    2002-08-01

    The paper evaluates the risk factors for childhood pneumonia with particular reference to indoor air-pollution associated with solid fuel use for cooking (e.g. coal, wood, dung), using a case-control study in a children's hospital in Calcutta. Cases were 127 children aged 2-35 months of either sex admitted with pneumonia and controls were 135 children attending their immunization clinic. Solid fuel use (odds ratio = 3.97, CI = 2.00-7.88), history of asthma in the child (OR = 5.49, CI = 2.37-12.74), poor economic status indicator (OR = 4.95, CI = 2.38 to 10.28), keeping large animals (OR = 6.03, CI = 1.13-32.27) were associated with high risk of pneumonia after adjusting for confounding (logistic regression analysis). Nearly 80% of people in India use such smoke producing fuel and the population attributable risk would be very high. This finding has important health policy implications. Furthermore, history of asthma is a useful prognostic indicator for early action for prevention of severe pneumonia.

  20. Improving the effectiveness of sickness benefit case management through a public-private partnership?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malene Rode; Aust, Birgit; Høgelund, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether a multidimensional public-private partnership intervention, focussing on improving the quality and efficiency of sickness benefit case management, reduced the sickness benefit duration and the duration until self-support. Methods We used...... a difference-in-difference (DID) design with six intervention municipalities and 12 matched control municipalities in Denmark. The study sample comprised 282,103 sickness benefit spells exceeding four weeks. The intervention group with 110,291 spells received the intervention, and the control group with 171......,812 spells received ordinary sickness benefit case management. Using register data, we fitted Cox proportional hazard ratio models, estimating hazard ratios (HR) and confidence intervals (CI). Results We found no joint effect of the intervention on the sickness benefit duration (HR 1.02, CI 0...

  1. Costing commodity and human resource needs for integrated community case management in thie differing community health strategies of Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefdt, Rory; Ribaira, Eric; Diallo, Khassoum

    2014-10-01

    To ensure correct and appropriate funding is available, there is a need to estimate resource needs for improved planning and implementation of integrated Community Case Management (iCCM). To compare and estimate costs for commodity and human resource needs for iCCM, based on treatment coverage rates, bottlenecks and national targets in Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia from 2014 to 2016. Resource needs were estimated using Ministry of Health (MoH) targets fronm 2014 to 2016 for implementation of case management of pneumonia, diarrhea and malaria through iCCM based on epidemiological, demographic, economic, intervention coverage and other health system parameters. Bottleneck analysis adjusted cost estimates against system barriers. Ethiopia, Kenya and Zambia were chosen to compare differences in iCCM costs in different programmatic implementation landscapes. Coverage treatment rates through iCCM are lowest in Ethiopia, followed by Kenya and Zambia, but Ethiopia had the greatest increases between 2009 and 2012. Deployment of health extension workers (HEWs) in Ethiopia is more advanced compared to Kenya and Zambia, which have fewer equivalent cadres (called commu- nity health workers (CHWs)) covering a smaller proportion of the population. Between 2014 and 2016, the propor- tion of treatments through iCCM compared to health centres are set to increase from 30% to 81% in Ethiopia, 1% to 18% in Kenya and 3% to 22% in Zambia. The total estimated cost of iCCM for these three years are USD 75,531,376 for Ethiopia, USD 19,839,780 for Kenya and USD 33,667,742 for Zambia. Projected per capita expen- diture for 2016 is USD 0.28 for Ethiopia, USD 0.20 in Kenya and USD 0.98 in Zambia. Commodity costs for pneumonia and diarrhea were a small fraction of the total iCCM budget for all three countries (less than 3%), while around 80% of the costs related to human resources. Analysis of coverage, demography and epidemiology data improves estimates of fimding requirements for iCCM. Bottleneck

  2. Candida krusei pneumonia as a complication of a tuboovarian abscess treatment – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Uranjek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequency of infections, caused by Candida glabrata and Candida krusei, which are more resistant to fluconazole, is increasing among hospitalised patients, especially among patients in intensive care units (ICU. Systemic Candida infections are particularly dangerous. Pneumonia, caused by Candida species, most commonly albicans, rarely others, is a serious infection especially for immunocompromised patients. It’s often fatal. We present a case report of a serious lung infection with fluconazole resistant Candida krusei in a 42-year-old previously healthy patient with perforated tuboovarian abscess (TOA, consecutive severe sepsis and septic shock. Patient used intrauterine device (IUD for 17 years without any gynaecological controls. Ascending genital infection with E.colli and Staph. chromogenes led to TOA. In spite of empirical antibiotic treatment, surgical and intensive care supportive therapy of affected organs, patient’s condition critically deteriorated until exact fungus specification was made and specific antifungal therapy for Candida krusei with voriconazol was started. After that patient’s condition improved.Conclusions: Connection between patient’s age, IUD use duration and severity of the pelvic inflammatory disease (PID was seen as multiorgan septic dysfunction with dominant lung failure. Candida pneumonia is rare with non-neutropenic patients. Especially with »non albicans« species. We believe Candida krusei infection in our patient is related to general weakness and immunocompromised condition because of prolonged and severe PID. Candida krusei infection needs immediate specific antifungal treatment. It was the first Candida krusei infection in our ICU.

  3. HRCT of diffuse interstitial pneumonia during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masashi; Sano, Akira; Imanaka, Kazufumi

    1989-01-01

    HRCT was carried out in twenty patients with diffuse interstitial pneumonia: 13 cases of IIP, 3 of BOOP, 2 of drug-induced pneumonia, 1 of rheumatoid lung and acute interstitial pneumonia of unknown origin. With special attention to inflammatory activity, the patients underwent HRCT periodically during the treatment. Correlative investigation between HRCT image and grade of accumulation in 67 Ga scintigraphy was also performed. Response to steroid therapy was clearly reflected on HRCT image, that was shown as decreasing pulmonary density or thinning of honeycomb wall. HRCT is considered to be useful in assessing the activity of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. (author)

  4. Understanding Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > Pneumonia Learn About Pneumonia Pneumonia is a common lung infection caused by ... vaccinated and practicing good health habits What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection in one or both ...

  5. Pneumonia caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica in two HIV-positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Filipini Rampelotto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Bordetella bronchiseptica (BB is a Gram-negative coccobacillus responsible for respiratory diseases in dogs, cats and rabbits. Reports on its development in humans are rare. However, in immunosuppressed patients, especially in those with the immunodeficiency virus (HIV, BB can cause severe pulmonary infections. We report on two cases of pneumonia caused by BB in HIV-positive male patients in a university hospital. CASE REPORT: The first case comprised a 43-year-old patient who was admitted presenting chronic leg pain and coughing, with suspected pneumonia. BB was isolated from sputum culture and was successfully treated with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in association with levofloxacin. The second case comprised a 49-year-old patient who was admitted presenting fever, nausea, sweating and a dry cough, also with suspected pneumonia. BB was isolated from sputum culture, tracheal secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage. The disease was treated with ciprofloxacin but the patient died. CONCLUSION: BB should be included in the etiology of pneumonia in immunodeficient HIV patients. As far as we know, these two were the first cases of pneumonia due to BB to occur in this university hospital.

  6. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vani; Mangaiyarkarasi, T; Gopal, R

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes different types of health care-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and meningitis. We report here a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease. A middle-aged man with a known case of diabetes mellitus and Hansen's disease presented with the complaints of blurred vision in the left eye and the patient was found to have cataract. Patient was operated for cataract and Intraocular lens implanted. Patient developed headache and vomiting on the 4th post-operative day. Lumbar puncture was carried out and gram stain of cerebrospinal fluid showed Gram-negative bacilli in the direct smear and culture yielded a heavy growth of K. pneumoniae. The patient was treated with antimicrobials according to the susceptibility pattern. He initially showed improvement but later on developed altered sensorium and hypotension. Patient succumbed to infection in spite of all medical attention.

  7. Factors Associated With Pneumonia Among Overweight and Obese Under-Five Children in an Urban Hospital of a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Shahunja MBBS

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, there are no data on the role of overweight and obesity in childhood pneumonia. We sought to determine that impact of overweight and obesity in such children. In this retrospective chart analysis, we enrolled hospitalized children aged 6 to 59 months in the Dhaka Hospital of the icddr,b, Bangladesh (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, from January 2010 to June 2014. Children with pneumonia having overweight and obesity (body mass index Z score [BMIZ] >2.00 constituted cases (n = 25, and those who had pneumonia without overweight and obesity (BMIZ −2.00 to 2.00 constituted controls (n = 75. Controls were 3-fold of the cases and were randomly selected. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the cases and the controls were compared. The cases more often had diarrhea and dehydration (36% vs 12%, P = .013, hypoxemia (SpO2 < 90% in room air; 28% vs 7%, P = .009 on admission, and required to change antibiotics (32% vs 11%, P = .023 during hospitalization compared to the controls. However, in logistic regression analysis the cases were independently associated with diarrhea (P < .001 and hypoxemia (P = .024 on admission. Our data suggest that overweight and obesity in children with pneumonia is prone to be associated with hypoxemia on admission, which may guide clinicians in promptly managing pneumonia in order to evade its ramification in such children. However, future research with larger samples is imperative to consolidate or refute our observation.

  8. Lipoid pneumonia: computed tomography findings - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Janos; Martins, Erick Malheiro Leoncio; Pozes, Aline Serfaty; Marchiori, Edson

    2004-01-01

    The authors report a case of lipoid pneumonia in an 80 year old man with chronic constipation in regular use of mineral oil as a laxative. According to his family, he experienced coughing episodes when he took his medication. He also presented dyspnoea at rest and diminished consciousness levels. Chest radiographs showed a consolidation area in the posterior segment of right upper lobe, which did not change on successive exams. High resolution computed tomography demonstrated low-density consolidation with negative Hounsfield units (-29 to -83 UH) and ground-glass opacities in the right upper lobe and inferior lobes. These opacities predominated in the posterior regions of the lungs. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of oil material on bronchoalveolar washing. The patient was advised to discontinue the ingestion of mineral oil and did not return for follow-up. (author)

  9. Pneumonia caused by Neisseria meningitidis: report of a case and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta M, Rafael E; Rada E, Robin A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcus affecting only humans, is a rare disease that was first recognized more than 60 years ago. The infection is usually manifested as meningitis and septicemia with cutaneous manifestations. Involvement of the lower respiratory tract is much less frequently diagnosed, partly because this microorganism can be present in the oropharyngeal flora of up to 10% of asymptomatic people. The serotypes most frequently involved in lung infections are: B, Y, and W-135. Serotype Y has been held to be most important. In cases of pneumonia, diagnosis has to be reached by isolation of the microorganism in blood and/or pleural fluid. Mortality is low, and person-to-person transmission, although documented, is rare. Complications such as pulmonary abscess, pleural effusion, and pericarditis are infrequent.

  10. Detection and quantification of Streptococcus pneumoniae from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to develop a real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for quantitative detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae from clinical respiratory specimens. Initially, 184 respiratory specimens from patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) (n = 129) and 55 cases with hospital associated ...

  11. Four cases of radiation pneumonia after breast conservative therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horii, Rie; Fukuuchi, Atushi; Nishi, Tsunehiro

    1997-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1996, a series of 240 patients with early stage breast cancer were treated with breast conservative treatment, and 201 patients of them all received irradiation at a dose of 46-60 Gy to the affected breast. Among the 201 patients who received breast irradiation, four (2.0%) patients experienced radiation pneumonia. These four patients with radiation pneumonia presented with coughing from 7 to 20 weeks after irradiation. Chest X-ray film revealed interstitial pneumonia in a lung field where coincided with the irradiated field in them. Three out of four patients demanded steroids, but all patients got well within 4 months. Radiation pneumonia following conservative surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer is an infrequent complication, but attention should be paid to radiation pneumonia if the patient suffers from persistent coughing after radiotherapy. (author)

  12. Prophylactic antibiotics are associated with a lower incidence of pneumonia in cardiac arrest survivors treated with targeted temperature management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, David J; Nielsen, Niklas; Fraser, Gilles L

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Prophylactic antibiotics (PRO) reduce the incidence of early-onset pneumonia in comatose patients with structural brain injury, but have not been examined in cardiac arrest survivors undergoing targeted temperature management (TTM). We investigated the effect of PRO on the development...... of pneumonia in that population. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing patients treated with PRO to those not receiving PRO (no-PRO) using Northern Hypothermia Network registry data. Cardiac arrest survivors ≥ 18 years of age with a GCS...-34 °C were enrolled in the registry. Differences were analyzed in univariate analyses and with logistic regression models to evaluate independent associations of clinical factors with incidence of pneumonia and good functional outcome. RESULTS: 416 of 1240 patients (33.5%) received PRO. Groups were...

  13. [A retrospective clinicopathological study of aspiration pneumonia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Chun; Zhong, Xuefeng; Fang, Fang; Yang, Yimeng; Xu, Xiaomao; Sun, Tieying

    2014-08-01

    To explore the clinicopathological characteristics of aspiration pneumonia in the elderly. The clinical data of 30 cases of autopsy-proven aspiration pneumonia in Beijing Hospital from 1973 to 2002 were reviewed. The patients consisted of 28 males and 2 females, aged from 63 to 103 [mean (83 ± 9)] years. Only 15 cases were clinically diagnosed as aspiration pneumonia before death. Concomitant diseases were severe and complex, mostly coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, hypertension, COPD, and diabetes mellitus. All the patients suffered from at least 3 concomitant diseases. Long-term bedridden and nasogastric feeding was seen in 11 and 17 patients respectively. The clinical presentation and chest X-ray of aspiration pneumonia in the elderly were nonspecific and variable. Mixed infections were common . The main bacteria isolated were Gram-negative bacilli, in particular Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. By pathology, macrophages with foreign bodies were found in all the 30 cases and multiple small abscesses were found in 14 cases. The lesions were adjacent to the bronchioles and in the lung tissue around the bronchioles, mostly multi-lobar and bilateral. Unilateral or bilateral pleural effusion developed in 20 patients. The accordance between radiological and pathological diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia was very poor. The foci of infection detected by X-ray were proven by autopsy in 13 patients, while pleural effusions in X-ray were proven by autopsy in 15 patients. Multi-concomitant diseases, mixed infection and extra-pulmonary presentations were common in elderly patients with aspiration pneumonia. Multiple small abscesses were the pathological characteristics of aspiration pneumonia in the aged. A definite clinical diagnosis of aspiration pneumonia was difficult. Recurrent silent microaspiration was a feature of aspiration in the elderly. The assessment of risk factor of aspiration played an

  14. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia: a consequence of breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Ahmed; Campbell, Anne P; Hart, Simon Paul

    2012-01-18

    The authors describe a case of 51-year-old woman who presented with breathlessness following radiotherapy for breast carcinoma. A chest radiograph and thoracic CT scan revealed extensive airspace consolidation affecting right upper and lower lobes. A trans-bronchial biopsy revealed evidence of foamy macrophages and fibroblastic plugs within alveoli, consistent with organising pneumonia. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed evidence of antiepithelial antibodies. Gradual but complete resolution occurred without any specific treatment. This case highlights the importance of considering radiation induced bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in the context of parenchymal shadowing following radiotherapy. Although corticosteroids are widely recommended for treatment, this case illustrates that organising pneumonia may resolve spontaneously.

  15. Pneumonia nosocomial: Actualização terapêutica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Falcão Baptista

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A pneumonia nosocomial é uma doença frequente, potencialmente fatal, e que apresenta elevada mortalidade. Neste artigo, após revisão crítica dos consensos e protocolos actuais para o tratamento da pneumonia nosocomial, são actualizadas as bases racionais da antibioterapia, revendo os aspectos epidemiológicos, microbiológicos e farmacológicos. No final faz-se referência ao posicionamento dos mais recentes antibióticos disponíveis para o seu tratamento. Abstract: Nosocomial pneumonia is a common disease with high mortality rate. In this article we review the antibiotic therapy fundamentals highlighting epidemiological, microbiological and pharmacological aspects, based on the actual consensus and protocols for the management of nosocomial pneumonia. In the end we make a short review of the current antibiotherapy practiced in this clinical situation. Palavras-chave: Pneumonia nosocomial, pneumonia associada ao ventilador, tratamento empírico, descalonamento terapêutico, antibioterapia, farmacodinâmica, farmacocinética, Key words: Nosocomial pneumonia, ventilator associated pneumonia, empirical therapy, de-escalation, antibiotherapy, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics

  16. Lung abscess caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Lung abscess has been considered to be a rare complication of pneumococcal infection, and most cases are reported to be Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. A 67-year-old man presented with fever and was diagnosed to have lung abscess caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 6B. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of penicillin for the isolate was 1 μg/mL. He was treated with high-dose intravenous sulbactam/ampicillin as definitive therapy based on susceptibility testing for S. pneumoniae and recovered successfully without surgical intervention. S. pneumoniae serotype 6B can cause lung abscess. Keywords: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lung abscess, Serotype 6B, Penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae

  17. Long-term dynamics of death rates of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia and improving air quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Julia Kravchenko,1 Igor Akushevich,2 Amy P Abernethy,3 Sheila Holman,4 William G Ross Jr,5 H Kim Lyerly1,6 1Department of Surgery, 2Center for Population Health and Aging, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, 4Division of Air Quality, North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Raleigh, 5Nicholas School of the Environment, 6Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Background: The respiratory tract is a major target of exposure to air pollutants, and respiratory diseases are associated with both short- and long-term exposures. We hypothesized that improved air quality in North Carolina was associated with reduced rates of death from respiratory diseases in local populations. Materials and methods: We analyzed the trends of emphysema, asthma, and pneumonia mortality and changes of the levels of ozone, sulfur dioxide (SO2, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, carbon monoxide (CO, and particulate matters (PM2.5 and PM10 using monthly data measurements from air-monitoring stations in North Carolina in 1993–2010. The log-linear model was used to evaluate associations between air-pollutant levels and age-adjusted death rates (per 100,000 of population calculated for 5-year age-groups and for standard 2000 North Carolina population. The studied associations were adjusted by age group-specific smoking prevalence and seasonal fluctuations of disease-specific respiratory deaths. Results: Decline in emphysema deaths was associated with decreasing levels of SO2 and CO in the air, decline in asthma deaths–with lower SO2, CO, and PM10 levels, and decline in pneumonia deaths–with lower levels of SO2. Sensitivity analyses were performed to study potential effects of the change from International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes, the effects of air pollutants on mortality during summer and winter, the impact of approach when only

  18. Growth in serum-free medium improves isolation of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Maass, M; Essig, A; Marre, R; Henkel, W

    1993-01-01

    Infectivity titers were determined for eight Chlamydia pneumoniae strains simultaneously grown in serum-free and serum-supplemented cell culture media. Use of serum-free medium resulted in a 10- to 50-fold increase in the susceptibility of HL cells to chlamydial infection. Comparative primary isolation of a wild-type strain also produced higher inclusion counts in a serum-free environment. Serum-free cultivation is recommended to increase the efficiency of C. pneumoniae isolation from clinica...

  19. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia with cardiac complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eman Shebl

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac complications are common in the admitted patients with pneumonia and they are associated with increased pneumonia severity and increased cardiovascular risk, these complications adds to the risk of mortality, so optimal management of these events may reduce the burden of death associated with this infection.

  20. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopstaken, R.M. E-mail: rogier.hopstaken@hag.unimaas.nl; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present ({kappa}=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae ({kappa}=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement.

  1. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopstaken, R.M.; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present (κ=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (κ=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement

  2. EXPERIMENTAL PNEUMONIA (FRIEDLANDER TYPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W R; Walker, I C

    1915-12-01

    The foregoing experiments show that in cats a definite lobar pneumonia may be caused by Bacillus mucosus capsulatus. Judging both from the clinical course and from the pathological findings, this form of pulmonary infection differs from the usual pneumococcus types of pneumonia and closely resembles the so called Friedländer's bacillus or Bacillus pneumonioe in man. In all instances in which a lobar pneumonia was found after the injection of the bacillus, a similar organism was recovered from the lung, and in no case was this associated with other organisms. The course of the disease in cats is very short, the animals developing early symptoms of profound toxemia. In 87 per cent of the animals showing a lobar pneumonia positive blood cultures were obtained. The pathological findings, judging from the early stages of the disease, are subject to considerable variation. In some instances the process may suggest a pseudolobar or confluent lobular distribution. In these cases the lung has a mottled, marble-like appearance. In the majority of cases, however, the process gave a more homogeneous appearance, suggesting a diffuse and uniform distribution. Foci of hemorrhage were not uncommon in both. Such areas cause the mottled appearance sometimes found. In all instances the consolidated lung presents a greater infiltration of tissue than is usually seen in other types of experimental pneumonia. Although the exudate as seen on the cut surface may be abundant and especially viscid in character, this is not present in most cases. The cut surface of the consolidated lung does not present a granular appearance. The histological findings are also subject to considerable variation. In most instances the infundibular and alveolar spaces are completely filled with an exudate made up chiefly of polymorphonuclear cells. Associated with these are the capsulated bacilli, large vacuolated mononuclear phagocytic cells, and red blood cells, and occasionally small amounts of fibrin. The

  3. Early detection of interstitial pneumonia by 67Ga-citrate scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shinsaku; Mikami, Riichiro; Ryujin, Yoshitada

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we report our recent experience indicating usefulness of 67 Ga-citrate scintigraphy in 4 cases with inflammatory pulmonary diseases. These cases showed abnormal pulmonary 67 Ga uptake with normal chest radiographs. The first case with malignant lymphoma and the second one with lung cancer suffered from pulmonary infection following secondary immuno-insufficiency due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Pneumocystis carinii was suspected as causative agent in the first case, and gram negative bacilli in the second case. The third case with lung cancer developed radiation pneumonia after radiotherapy. The fourth case with acute bronchitis developed drug induced interstitial pneumonia presumably due to minocycline administration. It is concluded that 67 Ga-citrate scintigraphy is more sensitive for early detection of interstitial pneumonia than routine chest radiography. (author)

  4. Childhood Pneumonia Screener: a concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jukka Räsänen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Childhood pneumonia continues to be the number one cause of death in children under five years of age in developing countries. In addition to mortality, pneumonia constitutes an enormous economic and social burden because late diagnosis is associated with high cost of treatment and often leads to chronic health problems. There are several bottlenecks in developing countries in the case flow of a child with lung infection: 1 recognising the symptoms as a reason to seek care, 2 getting the patient to a first-tier health facility, 3 scarcity of trained healthcare personnel who can diagnose the condition and its severity, 4 access to a second-tier facility in severe cases. These factors are commonly present in rural areas but even in more urban settings, access to a physician is often delayed. The Childhood Pneumonia Screener project aims at bridging the diagnostic gap using emerging technology. Mobile “smart” phone communication with several inexpensive dedicated sensors is proposed as a rapid data-collection and transmission unit that is connected to a central location where trained personnel assisted by sophisticated signal processing algorithms, evaluate the data and determine if the child is likely to have pneumonia and what the level and urgency of care should be.

  5. Pneumonia Caused by Moraxella Catarrhalis in Haematopoietic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two patients with haematopoietic stem cell transplant who developed pneumonia caused by M. catarrhalis at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh are reported and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, these are the first case reports of M. catarrhalis pneumonia in haematopoietic stem cell ...

  6. Susceptibility to Childhood Pneumonia: A Genome-Wide Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Lystra P; Cho, Michael H; McDonald, Merry-Lynn N; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that in adult smokers, a history of childhood pneumonia is associated with reduced lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There have been few previous investigations using genome-wide association studies to investigate genetic predisposition to pneumonia. This study aims to identify the genetic variants associated with the development of pneumonia during childhood and over the course of the lifetime. Study subjects included current and former smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease participating in the COPDGene Study. Pneumonia was defined by subject self-report, with childhood pneumonia categorized as having the first episode at pneumonia (843 cases, 9,091 control subjects) and lifetime pneumonia (3,766 cases, 5,659 control subjects) were performed separately in non-Hispanic whites and African Americans. Non-Hispanic white and African American populations were combined in the meta-analysis. Top genetic variants from childhood pneumonia were assessed in network analysis. No single-nucleotide polymorphisms reached genome-wide significance, although we identified potential regions of interest. In the childhood pneumonia analysis, this included variants in NGR1 (P = 6.3 × 10 -8 ), PAK6 (P = 3.3 × 10 -7 ), and near MATN1 (P = 2.8 × 10 -7 ). In the lifetime pneumonia analysis, this included variants in LOC339862 (P = 8.7 × 10 -7 ), RAPGEF2 (P = 8.4 × 10 -7 ), PHACTR1 (P = 6.1 × 10 -7 ), near PRR27 (P = 4.3 × 10 -7 ), and near MCPH1 (P = 2.7 × 10 -7 ). Network analysis of the genes associated with childhood pneumonia included top networks related to development, blood vessel morphogenesis, muscle contraction, WNT signaling, DNA damage, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune response (P ≤ 0.05). We have identified genes potentially associated with the risk of pneumonia. Further research will be required to confirm these

  7. Pneumonia Nosokomial

    OpenAIRE

    Keliat, E.N; Abidin, Alwinsyah; Lubis, Nursyamsiah

    2017-01-01

    Pada masa yang lalu pneumonia diklasifikasikan sebagai pneumonia tipikal yang disebabkan oleh Str. Pneumonia daan atipikal yang disebabkan kuman atipik seperti halnya M. pneumonia. Kemudian ternyata manifestasi dari patogen lain seperti H. influenza, S. aureus dan bakteri Gram negatif memberikan sindrom klinik yang identik dengan pneumonia oleh Str E.N Keliat

  8. [Clinical effect of Saccharomyces boulardii powder combined with azithromycin sequential therapy in treatment of children with diarrhea secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi-Fen; Zhang, Yi-Wei

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of Saccharomyces boulardii powder combined with azithromycin sequential therapy in the treatment of children with diarrhea secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. A total of 88 children with diarrhea secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia between June 2015 and March 2017 were divided into control group and study group using a random number table, with 44 children in each group. The children in the control group were given routine treatment combined with azithromycin sequential therapy, and those in the study group were given oral Saccharomyces boulardii powder in addition to the treatment in the control group until the end of azithromycin sequential therapy. After the treatment ended, the two groups were compared in terms of time to improvement of clinical symptoms, length of hospital stay, clinical outcome, defecation frequency before and after treatment, condition of intestinal dysbacteriosis, and incidence of adverse events. Compared with the control group, the study group had significantly shorter time to improvement of clinical symptoms and length of hospital stay (P0.05). In the treatment of children with diarrhea secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia, Saccharomyces boulardii powder combined with azithromycin sequential therapy can improve clinical symptoms, shorten the length of hospital stay, reduce defecation frequency and the incidence of intestinal dysbacteriosis, and improve clinical outcomes, and does not increase the risk of adverse events.

  9. Bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia in patients taking acebutolol or amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, P; Lombard, J N; Perrichon, M; Piard, F; Guérin, J C; Thivolet, F B; Jeannin, L

    1989-01-01

    Two patients, treated with acebutolol and amiodarone respectively, developed a disease clinically, radiologically, and pathologically indistinguishable from bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia. In one case recovery followed discontinuation of acebutolol; in the other case cessation of amiodarone had no effect, and corticosteroids were required. In addition to these patients, several cases of bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia have been reported during treatment with gold salts, amiodarone, and miscellaneous other drugs. Taken together, this information supports the view that bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia may be a form of response by the lungs to insult by drugs. Images PMID:2588206

  10. Platypnea and orthodeoxia associated with Pneumocystis jiroveci and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikas Christoforos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Platypnea-orthodeoxia is an uncommon syndrome characterized by dyspnea and deoxygenation accompanying a change to a sitting or standing posture from a recumbent position. It is usually related to interatrial communications, although several other disorders associated with platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome have been reported. However, the precise mechanisms are unknown. Case presentation We present the case of a 75-year-old Caucasian woman with chronic renal failure due to vasculitis who was admitted with fever and respiratory failure. She was found to have both Pneumocystis jiroveci and Cytomegalovirus pneumonia. She was HIV negative. Severe platypnea and orthodeoxia were major features of her illness with no history of respiratory, liver or cardiac disease. Further investigation with contrast echocardiography revealed no intracardiac or intrapulmonary shunts. Although one case involving Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and platypnea has been previously reported, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that two opportunistic pathogens have been accompanied by platypnea and orthodeoxia. As both lung bases were predominantly affected and no obvious explanation was found, platypnea and orthodeoxia were attributed to significant areas of low or zero ventilation/perfusion (V/Q ratio. Conclusion Platypnea-orthodeoxia is a rare and usually underestimated syndrome. Intracardiac shunts and anatomic pulmonary vascular shunts are the most common etiologic associations. However, if a detailed examination reveals no obvious intracardiac or intrapulmonary shunting combined with extensive pulmonary lesions, then severe V/Q mismatching should be considered as the probable explanation.

  11. Streptococcus pneumoniae Coinfection Is Correlated with the Severity of H1N1 Pandemic Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisterna, Daniel; Savji, Nazir; Bussetti, Ana Valeria; Kapoor, Vishal; Hui, Jeffrey; Tokarz, Rafal; Briese, Thomas; Baumeister, Elsa; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial reports in May 2009 of the novel influenza strain H1N1pdm estimated a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.6%, similar to that of seasonal influenza. In July 2009, however, Argentina reported 3056 cases with 137 deaths, representing a CFR of 4.5%. Potential explanations for increased CFR included virus reassortment or genetic drift, or infection of a more vulnerable population. Virus genomic sequencing of 26 Argentinian samples representing both severe and mild disease indicated no evidence of reassortment, mutations associated with resistance to antiviral drugs, or genetic drift that might contribute to virulence. Furthermore, no evidence was found for increased frequency of risk factors for H1N1pdm disease. Methods/Principal Findings We examined nasopharyngeal swab samples (NPS) from 199 cases of H1N1pdm infection from Argentina with MassTag PCR, testing for 33 additional microbial agents. The study population consisted of 199 H1N1pdm-infected subjects sampled between 23 June and 4 July 2009. Thirty-nine had severe disease defined as death (n = 20) or hospitalization (n = 19); 160 had mild disease. At least one additional agent of potential pathogenic importance was identified in 152 samples (76%), including Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 62); Haemophilus influenzae (n = 104); human respiratory syncytial virus A (n = 11) and B (n = 1); human rhinovirus A (n = 1) and B (n = 4); human coronaviruses 229E (n = 1) and OC43 (n = 2); Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2); Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 2); Serratia marcescens (n = 1); and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 35) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA, n = 6). The presence of S. pneumoniae was strongly correlated with severe disease. S. pneumoniae was present in 56.4% of severe cases versus 25% of mild cases; more than one-third of H1N1pdm NPS with S. pneumoniae were from subjects with severe disease (22 of 62 S. pneumoniae-positive NPS, p = 0

  12. Outpatient Management of Children With World Health Organization Chest Indrawing Pneumonia: Implementation Risks and Proposed Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Eric D; Ginsburg, Amy Sarah

    2017-10-16

    This Viewpoints article details our recommendation for the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines to consider additional referral or daily monitoring criteria for children with chest indrawing pneumonia in low-resource settings. We review chest indrawing physiology in children and relate this to the risk of adverse pneumonia outcomes. We believe there is sufficient evidence to support referring or daily monitoring of children with chest indrawing pneumonia and signs of severe respiratory distress, oxygen saturation <93% (when not at high altitude), moderate malnutrition, or an unknown human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status in an HIV-endemic setting. Pulse oximetry screening should be routine and performed at the earliest point in the patient care pathway as possible. If outpatient clinics lack capacity to conduct pulse oximetry, nutritional assessment, or HIV testing, then we recommend considering referral to complete the evaluation. When referral is not possible, careful daily monitoring should be performed. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  13. Imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Yanwei; Zhang Jingwen; Wu Jianlin; Zhou Yong; Li Mingwu; Lei Zhen; Shi Lifu

    2006-01-01

    Objection: To analyze the imaging appearances of cholesterol pneumonia. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the X-ray and CT findings of 3 patients with cholesterol pneumonia confirmed pathologically and reviewed correlative literature. Results: Lesions similar to mass were found in X-ray and CT imaging of three cases. Two of them appeared cavity with fluid-level and one showed multiple ring enhancement after CT contrast. The course of disease was very. long and it had no respond to antibiotic therapy. Amounts of foam cells rich in cholesterol crystal were detected in pathological examination. Conclusions: Cholesterol pneumonia is a rare chronic pulmonary idiopathic disease, and the radiological findings can do some help to its diagnosis. (authors)

  14. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: CT features in 16 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Inho; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hye-Kyung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea)

    2006-03-15

    The objective of this study was to assess the computed tomography (CT) features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings of 16 patients (M:F=9:7, age range 1-74 years, median 9 years) with serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and with chest CT scan available. Two distinctive patterns of CT features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia were noted between the paediatric (age <18 years) and the adult (age {>=}18 years) groups. The pediatric group (n=11) showed lobar or segmental consolidation (100%) with frequent pleural effusion (82%) and regional lymphadenopathy (82%) and mild volume decrease of the involved lobe (73%), while four of the five adult patients showed diffuse and/or multifocal, centrilobular or peribronchovascular areas of ground-glass attenuation (80%) with a lobular distribution, and frequent thickening of interlobular septa (60%) and the bronchial walls (40%) were also detected at high-resolution CT. The CT finding of a lobar or segmental consolidation with a parapneumonic effusion seen in our children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia was similar to that of bacterial lobar pneumonia. In contrast, the CT findings noted in our adult patients consisted of a mixture of a bacterial bronchopneumonia pattern and a viral interstitial pneumonia pattern. (orig.)

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia: CT features in 16 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Inho; Kim, Tae Sung; Yoon, Hye-Kyung

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the computed tomography (CT) features of Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed CT findings of 16 patients (M:F=9:7, age range 1-74 years, median 9 years) with serologically proven Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia and with chest CT scan available. Two distinctive patterns of CT features of M. pneumoniae pneumonia were noted between the paediatric (age <18 years) and the adult (age ≥18 years) groups. The pediatric group (n=11) showed lobar or segmental consolidation (100%) with frequent pleural effusion (82%) and regional lymphadenopathy (82%) and mild volume decrease of the involved lobe (73%), while four of the five adult patients showed diffuse and/or multifocal, centrilobular or peribronchovascular areas of ground-glass attenuation (80%) with a lobular distribution, and frequent thickening of interlobular septa (60%) and the bronchial walls (40%) were also detected at high-resolution CT. The CT finding of a lobar or segmental consolidation with a parapneumonic effusion seen in our children with M. pneumoniae pneumonia was similar to that of bacterial lobar pneumonia. In contrast, the CT findings noted in our adult patients consisted of a mixture of a bacterial bronchopneumonia pattern and a viral interstitial pneumonia pattern. (orig.)

  16. Organising pneumonia associated with fumaric acid ester treatment for psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deegan, Alexander Paul

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: We present the case of a 49-year old male who presented with dyspnoea, cough, weight loss, night sweats and general malaise. He had been on treatment with oral fumaric acid esters (FAE, Fumaderm(R); Biogen Idec GmbH, Ismaning, Germany) for 6 months. METHODS: Report of a case. RESULTS: His chest X-ray showed patchy infiltrates in the left upper lobe which failed to resolve under empiric antibiotic therapy. A computed tomography of thorax revealed bilateral, mostly peripheral foci of consolidation with air bronchograms. Transbronchial biopsies showed a pattern of organising pneumonia (OP). CONCLUSIONS: Therapy with oral prednisolone (40 mg\\/day) resulted in a rapid clinical and radiological improvement. An association of FAE and OP has not previously been reported. Please cite this paper as: Deegan AP, Kirby B, Rogers S, Crotty TB and McDonnell TJ. Organising pneumonia associated with fumaric acid ester treatment for psoriasis.

  17. A case of BOOP-like pneumonia induced by radiotherapy after surgical resection of breast cancer which healed spontaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Masahiro; Sawada, Satoshi; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Harima, Yoko; Kariya, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Kazuyuki

    2004-01-01

    The patient was a 67-year-old woman. After mastectomy, she received 50 Gy radiation to her chest wall using a tangential beam. About 3 months later, she developed dry cough, and an infiltrated shadow was noted in the irradiated lung. The shadow later moved to the opposite lung. The pneumonia healed spontaneously thereafter. This case is noteworthy since it endorses the previously reported clinical feature of broncholitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), i.e., a high likelihood of spontaneous healing even when it is induced by radiotherapy. (author)

  18. Computerized tomography in radiodiagnosis of pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyareva, I.A.; Mamaev, V.V.; Savchenko, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    Experience in the use of computerized tomography (CT) in combined radiodiagnosis of pneumonia was analysed. It has been concluded that CT objectively reflects morphological inflammatory changes and permits their all-round assessment over time. The diagnosis of pneumonia in CT is based on classical x-ray symptoms. As compared to survery radiography CT reveals symptoms of pneumonia to the full at earlier stages. CT is an important additional method of investigation of inflammatory pulmonary diseases but it should not be used separately without survey radiography. In a majority of cases when CT is performed there is no need in x-ray tomography

  19. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful. (orig.) [de

  20. iTRAQ-based Quantitative Proteomics Study in Patients with Refractory Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia-Lu; Song, Qi-Fang; Xie, Zhi-Wei; Jiang, Wen-Hui; Chen, Jia-Hui; Fan, Hui-Feng; Xie, Ya-Ping; Lu, Gen

    2017-09-25

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) is a leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia in children and young adults. Although MP pneumonia is usually benign and self-limited, in some cases it can develop into life-threating refractory MP pneumonia (RMPP). However, the pathogenesis of RMPP is poorly understood. The identification and characterization of proteins related to RMPP could provide a proof of principle to facilitate appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for treating paients with MP. In this study, we used a quantitative proteomic technique (iTRAQ) to analyze MP-related proteins in serum samples from 5 patients with RMPP, 5 patients with non-refractory MP pneumonia (NRMPP), and 5 healthy children. Functional classification, sub-cellular localization, and protein interaction network analysis were carried out based on protein annotation through evolutionary relationship (PANTHER) and Cytoscape analysis. A total of 260 differentially expressed proteins were identified in the RMPP and NRMPP groups. Compared to the control group, the NRMPP and RMPP groups showed 134 (70 up-regulated and 64 down-regulated) and 126 (63 up-regulated and 63 down-regulated) differentially expressed proteins, respectively. The complex functional classification and protein interaction network of the identified proteins reflected the complex pathogenesis of RMPP. Our study provides the first comprehensive proteome map of RMPP-related proteins from MP pneumonia. These profiles may be useful as part of a diagnostic panel, and the identified proteins provide new insights into the pathological mechanisms underlying RMPP.

  1. Deployment of lean six sigma in care coordination: an improved discharge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Susan Ellen; Hamilton, Karen Marie; Paynter, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a quality improvement project to reduce readmissions in the Medicare population related to heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. The article describes a systematic approach to the discharge process aimed at improving transitions of care from hospital to post-acute care, utilizing Lean Six Sigma methodology. Inpatient acute care hospital. A coordinated discharge process, which includes postdischarge follow-up, can reduce avoidable readmissions. Implications for The quality improvement project demonstrated the significant role case management plays in preventing costly readmissions and improving outcomes for patients through better transitions of care from the hospital to the community. By utilizing Lean Six Sigma methodology, hospitals can focus on eliminating waste in their current processes and build more sustainable improvements to deliver a safe, quality, discharge process for their patients. Case managers are leading this effort to improve care transitions and assure a smoother transition into the community postdischarge..

  2. Fatal Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes different types of health care-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and meningitis. We report here a case of Klebsiella pneumoniae meningitis in a patient with diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease. A middle-aged man with a known case of diabetes mellitus and Hansen′s disease presented with the complaints of blurred vision in the left eye and the patient was found to have cataract. Patient was operated for cataract and Intraocular lens implanted. Patient developed headache and vomiting on the 4 th post-operative day. Lumbar puncture was carried out and gram stain of cerebrospinal fluid showed Gram-negative bacilli in the direct smear and culture yielded a heavy growth of K. pneumoniae. The patient was treated with antimicrobials according to the susceptibility pattern. He initially showed improvement but later on developed altered sensorium and hypotension. Patient succumbed to infection in spite of all medical attention.

  3. Use of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy in a Pregnant Woman with Dermatomyositis-Related Interstitial Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Shoji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old pregnant woman was referred to our hospital with respiratory distress at 30 weeks of gestation. Chest computed tomography (CT scans revealed pulmonary infiltrates along the bronchovascular bundles and ground-glass opacities in both lungs. Despite immediate treatment with steroid pulse therapy for suspected interstitial pneumonia, the patient’s condition worsened. Respiratory distress was slightly alleviated after the initiation of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC oxygen therapy (40 L/min, FiO2 40%. We suspected clinically amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM complicating rapidly progressive refractory interstitial pneumonia. In order to save the life of the patient, the use of combination therapy with immunosuppressants was necessary. The patient underwent emergency cesarean section and was immediately treated with immunosuppressants while continuing HFNC oxygen therapy. The neonate was treated in the neonatal intensive care unit. The patient’s condition improved after 7 days of hospitalization; by this time, she was positive for myositis-specific autoantibodies and was diagnosed with interstitial pneumonia preceding dermatomyositis. This condition can be potentially fatal within a few months of onset and therefore requires early combination immunosuppressive therapy. This case demonstrates the usefulness of HFNC oxygen therapy for respiratory management as it negates the need for intubation and allows for various treatments to be quickly performed.

  4. A case of newborn with community acquired pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Ozkan, Sengül; Tanır, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming, non-fermentative motile bacillus. The bacillus can be isolated from water, bottled mineral water, and water from ultrafiltration systems in hospital setting. C. pauculus rarely causes human infections, however it may be an infectious agent especially in immunocompromised individuals. In this report, we present the first case of community acquired pneumonia caused by C. pauculus in a previously healthy newborn who was hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit on postnatal day 16 because of respiratory distress.

  5. Immune Thrombocytopenia Associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Gouveia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP related to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection is a rare condition and usually associated with a severe clinical course. We here report a case of a young man with a clinical diagnosis of severe ITP secondary to M. pneumoniae infection. The clinical features, therapy and outcome are presented.

  6. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG treatment improves intestinal permeability and modulates inflammatory response and homeostasis of spleen and colon in experimental model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khailova, Ludmila; Baird, Christine H; Rush, Aubri A; Barnes, Christopher; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2017-12-01

    Recent clinical trials and in vivo models demonstrate probiotic administration can reduce occurrence and improve outcome of pneumonia and sepsis, both major clinical challenges worldwide. Potential probiotic benefits include maintenance of gut epithelial barrier homeostasis and prevention of downstream organ dysfunction due to systemic inflammation. However, mechanism(s) of probiotic-mediated protection against pneumonia remain poorly understood. This study evaluated potential mechanistic targets in the maintenance of gut barrier homeostasis following Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) treatment in a mouse model of pneumonia. Studies were performed in 6-8 week old FVB/N mice treated (o.g.) with or without LGG (10 9  CFU/ml) and intratracheally injected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or saline. At 4, 12, and 24 h post-bacterial treatment spleen and colonic tissue were collected for analysis. Pneumonia significantly increased intestinal permeability and gut claudin-2. LGG significantly attenuated increased gut permeability and claudin-2 following pneumonia back to sham control levels. As mucin expression is key to gut barrier homeostasis we demonstrate that LGG can enhance goblet cell expression and mucin barrier formation versus control pneumonia animals. Further as Muc2 is a key gut mucin, we show LGG corrected deficient Muc2 expression post-pneumonia. Apoptosis increased in both colon and spleen post-pneumonia, and this increase was significantly attenuated by LGG. Concomitantly, LGG corrected pneumonia-mediated loss of cell proliferation in colon and significantly enhanced cell proliferation in spleen. Finally, LGG significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in colon and spleen post-pneumonia. These data demonstrate LGG can maintain intestinal barrier homeostasis by enhancing gut mucin expression/barrier formation, reducing apoptosis, and improving cell proliferation. This was accompanied by reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the

  7. The Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol Reduces Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Dysphagia Following Acute Stroke: a Clinical Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah E; Miles, Anna; Fink, John N; Huckabee, Maggie-Lee

    2018-03-30

    Cough reflex testing has been evaluated as a component of the clinical swallowing assessment as a means of identifying patients at risk of aspiration during swallowing. A previous study by our research group found good sensitivity and specificity of the cough reflex test for identifying patients at risk of aspiration post-stroke, yet its use did not decrease pneumonia rates, contrary to previous reports. The aim of this study was to expand on our earlier work by implementing a clinical management protocol incorporating cough reflex testing within the same healthcare setting and compare patient outcomes to those from the original study and to evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with acute stroke who were managed using the Dysphagia in Stroke Protocol (DiSP). Secondarily, to compare those outcomes to historical data prior to implementation of the DiSP. This clinical audit measured outcomes from 284 patients with acute stroke managed per the DiSP, which guides use of videofluoroscopic swallowing study and patient management based on clinical exam with cough reflex testing. Data from our previous trial were included for comparison of pre- and post-DiSP patient outcomes. Data collection took place between November 2012 and April 2016 at four urban hospitals within New Zealand. Following implementation of the DiSP, the rate of aspiration pneumonia (10%) was substantially lower than the pre-DiSP rate (28%), with no pneumonia readmissions within 3 months. Pneumonia-related mortality was unchanged. By 3 months, 81% of the patients were on a normal diet and 67% had returned home, compared to pre-DiSP outcomes of 55% and 55% respectively. Previous work has suggested that simply implementing cough reflex testing in dysphagia management may not be sufficient to improve patient outcomes. The present study adds to this picture by suggesting that the true variable of influence may be the way in which the results of the test are applied to patient care. There is a strong case

  8. Meningitis and pneumonia in Guatemalan children: the importance of Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis y neumonía en niños guatemaltecos: importancia de Haemophilus influenzae tipo b y de Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin J. Asturias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib and Streptococcus pneumoniae invasive infections in hospitalized Guatemalan children. This is an important issue since Hib vaccine has not been incorporated into the routine immunization program in Guatemala and information from hospital records in 1995 indicated a low incidence of Hib and S. pneumoniae as causes of meningitis and invasive infections. METHODS: Children who were hospitalized in Guatemala City with clinical signs compatible with bacterial infections were evaluated for evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae infection. Normally sterile body fluids were cultured, and antigen detection was performed on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and pleural fluid. RESULTS: Of 1 203 children 1-59 months of age hospitalized over a 28-month period, 725 of them (60.3% had a primary diagnosis of pneumonia, 357 (29.7% of meningitis, 60 (5.0% of cellulitis, and 61 (5.1% of sepsis and other conditions. Hib was identified in 20.0% of children with meningitis and S. pneumoniae in 12.9%. The average annual incidence of Hib meningitis was 13.8 cases per 100 000 children under 5 years of age, and 32.4% of meningitides caused by Hib and 58.7% of S. pneumoniae meningitides occurred prior to 6 months of age. Case fatality rates were 14.1%, 37.0%, and 18.0%, respectively, for children with Hib, S. pneumoniae, and culture-negative and antigen-negative meningitis. Prior antibiotic therapy was common and was associated with significant reductions in CSF-culture-positive results for children with other evidence of Hib or S. pneumoniae meningitis. CONCLUSIONS: Improvements in case detection, culture methods, and latex agglutination for antigen detection in CSF resulted in identification of Hib and S. pneumoniae as important causes of severe disease in Guatemalan children. Using a cutoff of > 10 white blood cells per cubic millimeter in CSF would improve the sensitivity for detection of bacterial

  9. Organising pneumonia presenting as acute life threatening pulmonary haemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhaiah, Damodhara Honnavally; Chakravorty, Indranil; Swamy, Rajiv; Prakash, Doraiswamy

    2011-11-08

    Organising pneumonia, previously called bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia is a clinicopathological entity of unknown aetiology, which has been reported with increasing frequency. Various modes of presentation have been described such as cough, fever, weight loss and alveolar opacities on chest radiograph. Haemoptysis as primary presenting symptom has only rarely been reported. The authors report a case in which massive life-threatening haemoptysis was the major presenting symptom. No aetiology was identified for the haemoptysis and the diagnosis was confirmed on postmortem histology. This case highlights the importance of considering organising pneumonia in the differential diagnosis of acute severe haemoptysis.

  10. Lung Infarction due to Pulmonary Vein Stenosis after Ablation Therapy for Atrial Fibrillation Misdiagnosed as Organizing Pneumonia: Sequential Changes on CT in Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Mi Ri; Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Jong Ho; Um, Sang Won [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary vein (PV) stenosis is a complication of ablation therapy for arrhythmias. We report two cases with chronic lung parenchymal abnormalities showing no improvement and waxing and waning features, which were initially diagnosed as nonspecific pneumonias, and finally confirmed as PV stenosis. When a patient presents for nonspecific respiratory symptoms without evidence of infection after ablation therapy and image findings show chronic and repetitive parenchymal abnormalities confined in localized portion, the possibility of PV stenosis should be considered.

  11. Round pneumonia: imaging findings in a large series of children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Donnelly, Lane F. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Although round pneumonia is a well-known clinical entity, there have been no large case reviews, with most knowledge based on case reports and small series from the 1960s and 1970s. To review the imaging findings of a large series of children with round pneumonia. A retrospective review of radiographic and CT findings in all children reported to have round pneumonia at a large children's hospital from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Children with underlying medical conditions were excluded. Epidemiologic characteristics, radiographic and CT findings, and follow-up imaging were reviewed. The review identified 109 children (mean age 5 years, range 4 months to 19 years). Round pneumonias tended to be solitary 98% (107/109), have well-defined borders 70% (77/109), and be posteriorly located 83% (91/109), with the following lobar distribution: left lower lobe (36), right lower lobe (33), right upper lobe (28), left upper lobe (7), right middle lobe (4), and lingula (2). Round pneumonia tended to resolve on follow-up imaging (95%, 41/43) as compared to progression to lobar pneumonia (4.6%, 2/43). Three patients (2.6%, 3/112) originally suspected to have round pneumonia were later shown to have other diagnoses: cavitary necrosis in pneumonia (two) or pleural pseudocyst (one). Round pneumonia occurs in young children (mean age 5 years), tends to be a solitary lesion, and is most commonly posteriorly located. Misdiagnosis of other pathology as round pneumonia is uncommon. (orig.)

  12. Round pneumonia: imaging findings in a large series of children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Donnelly, Lane F.

    2007-01-01

    Although round pneumonia is a well-known clinical entity, there have been no large case reviews, with most knowledge based on case reports and small series from the 1960s and 1970s. To review the imaging findings of a large series of children with round pneumonia. A retrospective review of radiographic and CT findings in all children reported to have round pneumonia at a large children's hospital from 2000 to 2006 was performed. Children with underlying medical conditions were excluded. Epidemiologic characteristics, radiographic and CT findings, and follow-up imaging were reviewed. The review identified 109 children (mean age 5 years, range 4 months to 19 years). Round pneumonias tended to be solitary 98% (107/109), have well-defined borders 70% (77/109), and be posteriorly located 83% (91/109), with the following lobar distribution: left lower lobe (36), right lower lobe (33), right upper lobe (28), left upper lobe (7), right middle lobe (4), and lingula (2). Round pneumonia tended to resolve on follow-up imaging (95%, 41/43) as compared to progression to lobar pneumonia (4.6%, 2/43). Three patients (2.6%, 3/112) originally suspected to have round pneumonia were later shown to have other diagnoses: cavitary necrosis in pneumonia (two) or pleural pseudocyst (one). Round pneumonia occurs in young children (mean age 5 years), tends to be a solitary lesion, and is most commonly posteriorly located. Misdiagnosis of other pathology as round pneumonia is uncommon. (orig.)

  13. A necrotic lung ball caused by co-infection with Candida and Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Toshinobu Yokoyama, Jun Sasaki, Keita Matsumoto, Chie Koga, Yusuke Ito, Yoichiro Kaku, Morihiro Tajiri, Hiroki Natori, Masashi HirokawaDivision of Respirology, Neurology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, JapanIntroduction: A necrotic lung ball is a rare radiological feature that is sometimes seen in cases of pulmonary aspergillosis. This paper reports a rare occurrence of a necrotic lung ball in a young male caused by Candida and Streptococcus pneumoniae.Case report: A 28-year-old male with pulmonary candidiasis was found to have a lung ball on computed tomography (CT of the chest. The patient was treated with ß-lactams and itraconazole and then fluconazole, which improved his condition (as found on a following chest CT scan and serum ß-D-glucan level. The necrotic lung ball was suspected to have been caused by co-infection with Candida and S. pneumoniae.Conclusion: A necrotic lung ball can result from infection by Candida and/or S. pneumoniae, indicating that physicians should be aware that patients may still have a fungal infection of the lungs that could result in a lung ball, even when they do not have either Aspergillus antibodies or antigens.Keywords: lung ball, necrotic lung ball, Candida, Streptococcus pneumoniae

  14. Quinine-induced bronchiolitis obliterans and organizing pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoodur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quinine is a vital anti-malarial drug used in the management of resistant Falciparum malaria. There are previous reports of quinine-induced pulmonary edema and infiltrates. We report the first case of biopsy-proven bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP, confirmed by the Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale (NADRS of 5 and a severity scale of 5, secondary to intravenous quinine, in a 15-year-old girl with Plasmodium falciparum infection after a visit to Kenya. Clinical course of the patient followed by review of the literature and appropriate medical interventions for quinine-induced BOOP are suggested.

  15. Detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae in pediatric community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae is an emerging infectious agent with a spectrum of clinical manifestations including lower and upper respiratory tract infections. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children using serological tests. Settings and Design: Two hundred children, age 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 200 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The demographic, clinical and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (6% patients; specific IgM antibodies were detected in 11 (91.67%; specific IgG antibodies in 1 (8.33% patients, while 4-fold rise in C. pneumoniae IgG antibody titers were noted in none of the patients. Conclusions: C. pneumoniae has a role in community-acquired LRTIs, even in children aged < 5 years. Serological detection using ELISA would enable pediatricians in better management of C. pneumoniae infections.

  16. “Watch Out! Pneumonia Secondary to Achromobacter Denitrificans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pneumonia is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. The frequency and importance of emerging new pathogens have significant implications for therapy. We report a case of pneumonia caused by a very rare organism, Achromobacter denitrificans which was treated successfully ...

  17. Acute exogenous lipoid pneumonia, on a fire eating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintanilla-Gallo, Juvel; Jimenez-Navarrete, Manuel Fco.; Gourzong-Taylor, Charles

    2006-01-01

    A case of an adult 19 years of age, fire juggler and manipulator is presented. The young came in to the medical emergency service of the Hospital Dr. Rafael A. Calderon Guardia, because of a sudden episode of right thoracic pain and dyspnea. A right pleural effusion was documented and a round mass at the base of the left lung. A suggestive clinic of bronchopneumonia started after hours, it was localized first as community acquired pneumonia. Considering his work history and clinical characteristics, the case was reoriented and concluded that this is what the medical literature in English is called f ire-eater pneumonia , uncommon aspiration pneumonia which was a literature review. (author) [es

  18. Pneumocystis Pneumonia Presenting as an Enlarging Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunal Bharat Patel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia is a life threatening infection that usually presents with diffuse bilateral ground-glass infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a single nodular granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia in a male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after R-CHOP therapy. He presented with symptoms of productive cough, dyspnea, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain that failed to resolve despite treatment with multiple antibiotics. Chest X-ray revealed right lower lobe atelectasis and CT of chest showed development of 2 cm nodular opacity with ground-glass opacities. Patient underwent bronchoscopy and biopsy that revealed granulomatous inflammation in a background of organizing pneumonia pattern with negative cultures. Respiratory symptoms resolved but the solitary nodular opacity increased in size prompting a surgical wedge resection which revealed granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia infection. This case is the third documented report of Pneumocystis pneumonia infection within a solitary pulmonary nodule in an individual with hematologic neoplasm. Although Pneumocystis pneumonia most commonly occurs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with diffuse infiltrates, the diagnosis should not be overlooked when only a solitary nodule is present.

  19. Acute solitary localized pneumonia: CT diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tieyi

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT in the differential diagnosis of solitary localized pneumonia. Method: Only plain CT without contrast study was done because of different types of CT scanners weed. There were 25 cases with localized pneumonia with initial diagnosis as suspected peripheral bronchogenic carcinoma. All patients were over forty years of age, 84% 50-80 years, 13(52%) patients were asymptomatic, 5(20%) patients had bloody sputum. Results: The CT features were divided into three patterns: (1) irregular nodule with relatively well-defined margin, ground-glass opacity and a few punctuate high densities. (2) irregular nodule with sharply circumscribed, spiculate border and homogeneous density. (3) regular nodule with relatively well-defined margin, and homogeneous density. The third type was most frequent (60%) with predilection for the dorsal segments of the lower lobes, or the posterior basal segments. Of the 25 patients 3 had operation, the remaining cases were treated as pneumonia, the lesions were resolved in 18(82%) patients in 2-3 weeks. Conclusions: Sometimes it is very difficult to differentiate localized pneumonia from peripheral lung cancer on the basis of clinical presentation and imaging. The spiculate margins of irregular nodule shown on CT could be indeterminate on chest radiography, and as a result chest radiograph is helpful in differential diagnosis of localized pneumonia. Change in size of the lesion as observed at the same cross-section scan, smaller at mediastinal window than at lung window is in favor of localized pneumonia, however, with the exception of alveolar carcinoma, treatment with antibiotic therapy for a period of 2-3 weeks, helps differentiate these diseases

  20. High seroprevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsu Lai

    Full Text Available Q fever is serologically cross-reactive with other intracellular microorganisms. However, studies of the serological status of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydophila pneumoniae during Q fever are rare. We conducted a retrospective serological study of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, a method widely used in clinical practice, in 102 cases of acute Q fever, 39 cases of scrub typhus, and 14 cases of murine typhus. The seropositive (57.8%, 7.7%, and 0%, p<0.001 and seroconversion rates (50.6%, 8.8%, and 0%, p<0.001 of M. pneumoniae IgM, but not M. pneumoniae IgG and C. pneumoniae IgG/IgM, in acute Q fever were significantly higher than in scrub typhus and murine typhus. Another ELISA kit also revealed a high seropositivity (49.5% and seroconversion rate (33.3% of M. pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever. The temporal and age distributions of patients with positive M. pneumoniae IgM were not typical of M. pneumoniae pneumonia. Comparing acute Q fever patients who were positive for M. pneumoniae IgM (59 cases with those who were negative (43 cases, the demographic characteristics and underlying diseases were not different. In addition, the clinical manifestations associated with atypical pneumonia, including headache (71.2% vs. 81.4%, p=0.255, sore throat (8.5% vs. 16.3%, p=0.351, cough (35.6% vs. 23.3%, p=0.199, and chest x-ray suggesting pneumonia (19.3% vs. 9.5%, p=0.258, were unchanged between the two groups. Clinicians should be aware of the high seroprevalence of M. pneumoniae IgM in acute Q fever, particularly with ELISA kits, which can lead to misdiagnosis, overestimations of the prevalence of M. pneumoniae pneumonia, and underestimations of the true prevalence of Q fever pneumonia.

  1. Improving paediatric and neonatal care in rural district hospitals in the highlands of Papua New Guinea: a quality improvement approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa'avu, Martin; Duke, Trevor; Matai, Sens

    2014-05-01

    In developing countries such as Papua New Guinea (PNG), district hospitals play a vital role in clinical care, training health-care workers, implementing immunization and other public health programmes and providing necessary data on disease burdens and outcomes. Pneumonia and neonatal conditions are a major cause of child admission and death in hospitals throughout PNG. Oxygen therapy is an essential component of the management of pneumonia and neonatal conditions, but facilities for oxygen and care of the sick newborn are often inadequate, especially in district hospitals. Improving this area may be a vehicle for improving overall quality of care. A qualitative study of five rural district hospitals in the highlands provinces of Papua New Guinea was undertaken. A structured survey instrument was used by a paediatrician and a biomedical technician to assess the quality of paediatric care, the case-mix and outcomes, resources for delivery of good-quality care for children with pneumonia and neonatal illnesses, existing oxygen systems and equipment, drugs and consumables, infection-control facilities and the reliability of the electricity supply to each hospital. A floor plan was drawn up for the installation of the oxygen concentrators and a plan for improving care of sick neonates, and a process of addressing other priorities was begun. In remote parts of PNG, many district hospitals are run by under-resourced non-government organizations. Most hospitals had general wards in which both adults and children were managed together. Paediatric case-loads ranged between 232 and 840 patients per year with overall case-fatality rates (CFR) of 3-6% and up to 15% among sick neonates. Pneumonia accounts for 28-37% of admissions with a CFR of up to 8%. There were no supervisory visits by paediatricians, and little or no continuing professional development of staff. Essential drugs were mostly available, but basic equipment for the care of sick neonates was often absent or

  2. CT characteristics of peripheral organizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seong Oh; Choi, Chul Soon; Kim, Myung Joon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Hyung Sik; Jun, Young Hwan; Park, Yong Koo

    1988-01-01

    Diagnostic dilemma of persistent mass-forming parenchymal opacity in the lung periphery occurs occasionally in the realm of diagnostic radiology. Until recently, literature on the role of computed tomography in peripheral organizing pneumonia, which is difficult to differentiate from malignancy, has little been published. We experienced one case of pathologically proven organizing pneumonia diagnosed preoperatively by chest CT. When it comes to solitary peripheral mass density in the lung, we think that CT can be proved useful in the diagnosis of benign organizing pneumonia by showing regular and smoothly corrugate margin, peripheral contrast enhancement with inner low density, and air-trapping by intervening normal lung parenchyma.

  3. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup [College of Medicine, Chungang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan.

  4. CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia: correlation with pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yang Soo; Kim, Young Goo; Park, Un Sup

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the CT findings of focal organizing pneumonia and to correlate them with pathologic findings to help differentiating from lung cancer. We evaluated radiologic and pathologic findings of five patients with solitary pulmonary nodule which were confirmed as focal organizing pneumonia pathologically. On CT scan, focal organizing pneumonia had irregular margin contacting the pleura in all five cases. The shape of the nodules were spherical to wedge or elliptical and the size from 3.5cm to 5.5cm(average 4.2 cm) in largest diameter. On postcontrast CT scan, all nodules showed enhancement and four cases showed central low density components. Two nodules contained air within the nodule. In four cases, pleural changes such as effusion and/or focal thickening were noted. No lymphadenopathy was found in all cases. Pathologically, the enhancing portion on CT showed findings of organizing pneumonia such as granulation tissue with fibroblast proliferation in alveolar space and interstitial thickening. The central low density areas on CT were due to ischemic necrosis, abscess and exudate, transudate and infiltration of foamy histiocyte. The possibility of focal organizing pneumonia should be considered when peripherally located solitary pulmonary nodule had enhancing component with no combined lymphadenopathy on CT scan

  5. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP

    2009-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). In this paper will be presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  6. Prevalence of Acquired Carbapenemase Genes in Klebsiella Pneumoniae by Multiplex PCR in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin Khorvash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae has been considered as a serious global threat. This study was done to investigate carbapenemase producing genomes among K. pneumoniae isolates in Isfahan, Central Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study from 2011 to 2012, 29 carbapenem resistant (according to disc diffusion method carbapenemase producing (according to modified Hodge test K. pneumoniae strains were collected from Intensive Care Unit (ICUs of Al-Zahra referral Hospital. In the strains with the lack of sensitivity to one or several carbapenems, beta-lactams, or beta-lactamases, there has been performed modified Hodge test to investigate carbapenmase and then only strains producing carbapenmases were selected for molecular methods. Results: In this study, there have been 29 cases of K. pneumoniae isolated from hospitalized patients in the (ICU. Three cases (10.3% contained blaVIM, 1 case (3.4% contained blaIMP, and 1 case (3.4% contained blaOXA. The genes blaNDM and blaKPC were not detected. Then, 16 cases (55.2% from positive cases of K. pneumoniae were related to the chip, 4 cases (13.8% to catheter, 6 cases (20.7% to urine, and 3 cases (10.3% to wound. Conclusion: It is necessary to monitor the epidemiologic changes of these carbapenemase genes in K. pneumoniae in our Hospital. More attention should be paid to nosocomial infection control measures. Other carbapenemase producing genes should be investigated.

  7. Organising pneumonia associated with fumaric acid ester treatment for psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Alexander Paul; Kirby, Brian; Rogers, Sarah; Crotty, Tom Bernard; McDonnell, Timonthy John

    2010-10-01

      We present the case of a 49-year old male who presented with dyspnoea, cough, weight loss, night sweats and general malaise. He had been on treatment with oral fumaric acid esters (FAE, Fumaderm®; Biogen Idec GmbH, Ismaning, Germany) for 6 months.   Report of a case.   His chest X-ray showed patchy infiltrates in the left upper lobe which failed to resolve under empiric antibiotic therapy. A computed tomography of thorax revealed bilateral, mostly peripheral foci of consolidation with air bronchograms. Transbronchial biopsies showed a pattern of organising pneumonia (OP).   Therapy with oral prednisolone (40 mg/day) resulted in a rapid clinical and radiological improvement. An association of FAE and OP has not previously been reported. Please cite this paper as: Deegan AP, Kirby B, Rogers S, Crotty TB and McDonnell TJ. Organising pneumonia associated with fumaric acid ester treatment for psoriasis. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Liana Sousa [UNESP; Do Vale, Simone Alves [UNESP; Godoy, Irma de [UNESP; Tanni, Suzana Erico [UNESP

    2012-01-01

    Pneumonia is an infectious disease with great morbidity and mortality worldwide. According to the current guidelines recommendations the authors reviewed the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and health care-associated pneumonia (HCAP). In this paper will be also presented data about etiology, clinics and diagnostic tools. © Copyright Moreira Jr. Editora.

  9. Case manager satisfaction in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Russell K; Fawcett, Jacqueline; Gall, Gail B; Harrow, Brooke; Woodford, Mary Lou

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine correlates of case managers' satisfaction with their work, services, and service network and to identify connections to service performance and service costs. A decentralized public health program that exemplifies the trend toward more diverse clients and networked services. A mixed method design with 34 case managers. As hypothesized, the case managers' experiences with clients and the service network, and their service effectiveness, were associated with their satisfaction with their jobs and the services they provide. Satisfaction was also positively associated with more timely service delivery. These associations were explained in part by case managers' education and training. Case managers can achieve high levels of job and service satisfaction in outreach programs serving a diverse client population in a decentralized service network. Case managers' job and service satisfaction improves with reduced service problems and service delays and when case managers can devise work-arounds for persistent service problems. Using advanced practice nurses (APN) and providing more on-the-job training may increase case manager satisfaction with their jobs and the services they provide. Special efforts may be needed to prevent a decline in job satisfaction with years of experience.

  10. "Since I have my case manager, I am back to life" case management in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Ema N; Ivezić-Strkalj, Sladana; Agius, Mark; Martić-Biocina, Sanja

    2008-03-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient who was treated by a case manager, a member of a Croatian Community Mental Health (CMH) Team, following the recommendations of WHO 2004 as well as the IRIS guidelines and the Basic Standards for Management of Patients with Serious Mental Illness in the Community (Agius 2005) and using the elements of Clinical case management (Muser 1998), Assertive community treatment model (Burns 1995, Scott 1995, Wolfsan 1990), the personal strength model (Rapp 1988) and Rehabilitation model (Anthony 1993). In order to emphasize the importance of the therapist-patient relationship in the treatment of chronic schizophrenic patients (Ivezic 2001) and creating the group atmosphere a Croatian model of case management is created where the patient's needs and risks are assessed by a multidisciplinary team which also conducts the recommended psychosocial interventions plan. The majority of interventions are conducted in groups. The case manager develops a confident relationship with a patient, nourishes the positive transference and aids the delivery of the treatment. The main goals of the interventions are empowerment of the patient, improvement of his abilities and decreasing of disabilities. The case manager also carries out a full assessment of the needs of the patient's family so that the family or carers are also included in the treatment or support if necessary (Gruber 2006). A case report of a patient and the work of her case manager as well as the case manager's diary (Gruber 2007) and the Croatian model of case management is presented in this article.

  11. Isolation of Chlamydia abortus from a laboratory worker diagnosed with atypical pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Nieves; Caro, M. Rosa; Gallego, M. Carmen; Murcia-Belmonte, Antonio; ?lvarez, Daniel; del R?o, Laura; Cuello, Francisco; Buend?a, Antonio J.; Salinas, Jes?s

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying the aetiological agent of atypical pneumonia in human can sometimes be a tedious process, especially in cases where Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species and Chlamydia pneumoniae are ruled out. In such cases, a correct anamnesis of the patient is basic to clarify which pathogens might have produced the infection. For this reason, health professionals including veterinarians and laboratory personnel working with zoonotic pathogens should keep their doctors informed. ...

  12. Nurse case-manager vs multifaceted intervention to improve quality of osteoporosis care after wrist fracture: randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, S R; Johnson, J A; Bellerose, D; McAlister, F A; Russell, A S; Hanley, D A; Garg, S; Lier, D A; Maksymowych, W P; Morrish, D W; Rowe, B H

    2011-01-01

    Few outpatients with fractures are treated for osteoporosis in the years following fracture. In a randomized pilot study, we found a nurse case-manager could double rates of osteoporosis testing and treatment compared with a proven efficacious quality improvement strategy directed at patients and physicians (57% vs 28% rates of appropriate care). Few patients with fractures are treated for osteoporosis. An intervention directed at wrist fracture patients (education) and physicians (guidelines, reminders) tripled osteoporosis treatment rates compared to controls (22% vs 7% within 6 months of fracture). More effective strategies are needed. We undertook a pilot study that compared a nurse case-manager to the multifaceted intervention using a randomized trial design. The case-manager counseled patients, arranged bone mineral density (BMD) tests, and prescribed treatments. We included controls from our first trial who remained untreated for osteoporosis 1-year post-fracture. Primary outcome was bisphosphonate treatment and secondary outcomes were BMD testing, appropriate care (BMD test-treatment if bone mass low), and costs. Forty six patients untreated 1-year after wrist fracture were randomized to case-manager (n = 21) or multifaceted intervention (n = 25). Median age was 60 years and 68% were female. Six months post-randomization, 9 (43%) case-managed patients were treated with bisphosphonates compared with 3 (12%) multifaceted intervention patients (relative risk [RR] 3.6, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.1-11.5, p = 0.019). Case-managed patients were more likely than multifaceted intervention patients to undergo BMD tests (81% vs 52%, RR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1-2.4, p = 0.042) and receive appropriate care (57% vs 28%, RR 2.0, 95%CI 1.0-4.2, p = 0.048). Case-management cost was $44 (CDN) per patient vs $12 for the multifaceted intervention. A nurse case-manager substantially increased rates of appropriate testing and treatment for osteoporosis in

  13. Construction of improved tools for protein localization studies in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda X Henriques

    Full Text Available We have constructed a set of plasmids that allow efficient expression of both N- and C-terminal fusions of proteins of interest to fluorescent proteins mCherry, Citrine, CFP and GFP in the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to improve expression of the fluorescent fusions to levels that allow their detection by fluorescence microscopy, we have introduced a 10 amino acid tag, named i-tag, at the N-terminal end of the fluorescent proteins. This caused increased expression due to improved translation efficiency and did not interfere with the protein localization in pneumococcal bacteria. Localizing fluorescent derivatives of FtsZ, Wzd and Wze in dividing bacteria validated the developed tools. The availability of the new plasmids described in this work should greatly facilitate studies of protein localization in an important clinical pathogen.

  14. Bortezomib-Induced Bronchiolitis Obliterans Organizing Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vandeix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor indicated for the treatment of multiple myeloma patients. The most frequent side effects are gastrointestinal and neurological. Serious pulmonary complications have been described rarely. Observation. This case involves a 74-year-old man suffering from IgG Kappa myeloma treated with bortezomib, melphalan, and dexamethasone. After administering chemotherapy, the patient developed an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. A surgical pulmonary biopsy proved the existence of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP lesions. Systemic corticotherapy led to a rapid improvement in the patient’s condition. Conclusion. This is the first reported histologically confirmed case of bortezomid-induced BOOP. Faced with severe respiratory symptoms in the absence of other etiologies, complications due to bortezomid treatment should be evoked and corticotherapy considered.

  15. Case management redesign in an urban facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaden, Stefany; Freshman, Brenda; Quaye, Beverly

    2011-01-01

    To explore strategies for improving patient throughput and to redesign case management processes to facilitate level of care transitions and safe discharges. Large Urban Medical Center in South Los Angeles County, with 384 licensed beds that services poor, underserved communities. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were applied. Combined theoretical frameworks were used for needs assessment, intervention strategies, and change management. Observations, interviews, surveys, and database extraction methods were used. The sample consisted of case management staff members and several other staff from nursing, social work, and emergency department staff. Postintervention measures indicated improvement in reimbursements for services, reduction in length of stay, increased productivity, improved patients' access to care, and avoiding unnecessary readmission or emergency department visits. Effective change management strategies must consider multiple factors that influence daily operations and service delivery. Creating accountability by using performance measures associated with patient transitions is highlighted by the case study results. The authors developed a process model to assist in identifying and tracking outcome measures related to patient throughput, front-end assessments, and effective patient care transitions. This model can be used in future research to further investigate best case management practices.

  16. Pneumonia aspirativa associada a alterações da deglutição: relato de caso Aspirative pneumonia associated to swallowing dysfunction: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Toufen Junior

    2007-03-01

    ventilation, and comorbities as stroke, correlate with this increased threat in intensive care unit (ICU patients. Recognition of deglutition dysfunction may identify patients at high risk of aspiration, and thereby help to avoid pulmonary complications such as recurrent pneumonia. The goal of our report is show a severe case of recurrent aspirative pneumonia after acute stroke and intubation, alerting to appropriate diagnosis and treatment of this condition. CASE REPORT: A male patient, 57 year old, was admitted to the hospital because of acute stroke. Ten days later, the patient began to have fever and severe shortness of breath. He was admitted to the ICU necessitating of intratracheal intubation. Four days after intubation he was extubated, however, he had a new aspirative pneumonia in ICU, newly treated. An evaluation of swallowing demonstrated a severe deglutition dysfunction with a high risk of aspiration. The patient was transferred, but aspirative pneumonia was diagnosed eight days after his ICU discharge and he was readmitted, stayed for a long time in ICU and presenting severe morbidity. CONCLUSIONS: ICU patients who are at risk for swallowing dysfunction and aspiration should be identified to prevent their associated morbidity and mortality.

  17. A diagnostic dilemma of cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, K

    2012-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia is a rare lung condition, which has incidence of 6-9 cases per 1,000,000 people with onset at age group between 50-60. The pathogenesis of this condition remains unknown. It mimics like pneumonia but has a good outcome with steroid treatment. Early recognition is very important and treatment with steroid therapy can save lives. This case highlights the unusual cause of shortness of breath due to COP and co existing incidental severe AS where we faced a diagnostic dilemma till lung biopsy was performed.

  18. Diagnostic approach to localised organising pneumonia--A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurić, Mirna; Považan, Djordje; Djurić, Dejan; Eri, Živka; Trudić, Anika

    2015-08-01

    Localised organising pneumonia, radiologically presented with oval or round shadows mimicing lung cancer or metastases, is a major issue in differential diagnosis. A female patient was hospitalized to clarified the etiology of multiple nodular lung lesions. The chest X-ray and the chest computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral patchy and nodular shadows, and round lung lesions, respectively. Neither sputum analyses, nor histology of bronchoscopy samples clarified the etiology of these lung lesions. As secondary deposits in the lungs were suspected, video-assisted thoracoscopy and anterolateral right minithoracotomy with atypical upper and lower lobe resection were performed. The frozen-section analysis suggested the benign nature of the lesion, and the definite histopathological finding of localised organising pneumonia was established. Due to bilateral lung lesions, corticosteroids were applied. Seven weeks later, the chest CT finding revealed a total regression of the lesions. A surgical resection was necessary to diagnose the localised organising pneumonia which mimiced secondary malignant lesions, thus establishing the definite etiology of lung lesions. Bronchoscopic cryobiopsy, recently introduced in order to obtain peripheral lung biopsy samples, has provided new possibilities in the diagnosis and treatment of neoplastic and non-neoplastic lung diseases.

  19. Laboratory methods for determining pneumonia etiology in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murdoch, David R.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Driscoll, Amanda J.; Karron, Ruth A.; Bhat, Niranjan; Black, Robert E.; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Campbell, Harry; Cherian, Thomas; Crook, Derrick W.; de Jong, Menno D.; Dowell, Scott F.; Graham, Stephen M.; Klugman, Keith P.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Martin, Paul; Nataro, James P.; Piazza, Franco M.; Qazi, Shamim A.; Zar, Heather J.; Levine, Orin S.; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Feikin, Daniel R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.; Driscoll, Amanda; DeLuca, Andrea; Crawley, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory diagnostics are a core component of any pneumonia etiology study. Recent advances in diagnostic technology have introduced newer methods that have greatly improved the ability to identify respiratory pathogens. However, determining the microbial etiology of pneumonia remains a challenge,

  20. Occupational therapy consultation for case managers in community mental health: exploring strategies to improve job satisfaction and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapleau, Ann; Seroczynski, A D; Meyers, Susan; Lamb, Kristen; Haynes, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was 2-fold: (1) to examine to what extent case managers' job satisfaction and self-efficacy were impacted by the addition of an occupational therapy consultation model and (2) to identify factors that both positively and negatively impacted the occupational therapy consultation services. The study was conducted at a mental health community support program in a local homeless center. In a 2-year study, a mixed-methods design was used to study changes over time in job satisfaction and perceived self-efficacy among 14 case managers who received ongoing occupational therapy consultation. Job satisfaction and self-efficacy data were obtained using standardized questionnaires. Qualitative data related to factors impacting the consultation program were obtained using open-ended written questions, focus groups, and individual interviews. Statistically significant differences in job satisfaction and perceptions of self-efficacy were found 18 months into the study, when case managers were more actively seeking occupational therapy consultation services and were reporting improved client outcomes from occupational therapy intervention. In addition, themes related to both positive and negative factors impacting the occupational therapy consultation program were identified and provided useful data for development of future consultation services. IMPLICATION FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: Results suggest that ongoing training and professional support for case managers who are paraprofessionals and/or new to mental health practice may improve job satisfaction and efficacy. Occupational therapy consultation may be helpful in developing services for health promotion, including self-care management, cognitive assessments, activity-based programming, and home safety evaluation and modification. In addition, new graduates and paraprofessional case managers working with clients who are high utilizers of services may benefit from smaller caseloads and support

  1. Addressing the Analytic Challenges of Cross-Sectional Pediatric Pneumonia Etiology Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammitt, Laura L; Feikin, Daniel R; Scott, J Anthony G; Zeger, Scott L; Murdoch, David R; O'Brien, Katherine L; Deloria Knoll, Maria

    2017-06-15

    Despite tremendous advances in diagnostic laboratory technology, identifying the pathogen(s) causing pneumonia remains challenging because the infected lung tissue cannot usually be sampled for testing. Consequently, to obtain information about pneumonia etiology, clinicians and researchers test specimens distant to the site of infection. These tests may lack sensitivity (eg, blood culture, which is only positive in a small proportion of children with pneumonia) and/or specificity (eg, detection of pathogens in upper respiratory tract specimens, which may indicate asymptomatic carriage or a less severe syndrome, such as upper respiratory infection). While highly sensitive nucleic acid detection methods and testing of multiple specimens improve sensitivity, multiple pathogens are often detected and this adds complexity to the interpretation as the etiologic significance of results may be unclear (ie, the pneumonia may be caused by none, one, some, or all of the pathogens detected). Some of these challenges can be addressed by adjusting positivity rates to account for poor sensitivity or incorporating test results from controls without pneumonia to account for poor specificity. However, no classical analytic methods can account for measurement error (ie, sensitivity and specificity) for multiple specimen types and integrate the results of measurements for multiple pathogens to produce an accurate understanding of etiology. We describe the major analytic challenges in determining pneumonia etiology and review how the common analytical approaches (eg, descriptive, case-control, attributable fraction, latent class analysis) address some but not all challenges. We demonstrate how these limitations necessitate a new, integrated analytical approach to pneumonia etiology data. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hasan; Tokur, Mahmut; Sayar, Hamide; Inci, Mehmet Fatih

    2013-06-10

    Cryptogenic organising pneumonia is not considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. We submitted a patient presenting with bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. We suspected diagnosis of sarcoidosis, but the patient was diagnosed as cryptogenic organising pneumonia with the histological result. This is the second case report of cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with bilateral hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

  3. Pneumonia aguda fibrinosa e organizante

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Damas

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A designação acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP foi proposta por Beasley et al para os casos em que as características histopatológicas das lesões não se enquadravam em outras situações clínicas (agu-das ou subagudas conhecidas. A presença de fibrina intra alveolar e de pneumonia organizativa, com distribuição difusa, é a principal alteração histológica associada a esta entidade.Os autores descrevem o caso de um doente do sexo masculino, com o diagnóstico de AFOP, por bióp-sia pulmonar cirúrgica. O doente teve uma apresentação subaguda, apresentando por queixas principais tosse, dor torácica e febre. TAC torácica mostrou infiltrados bilaterais, difusos. Após início de corticoterapia sistémica e ciclofosfamida, o doente apresentou melhoria clínica significativa. Ao elaborar este caso, os autores esperam acrescentar mais alguns dados sobre esta nova entidade.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Abstract: The term Acute Fibrinous and Organizing Pneumonia (AFOP has been proposed by Beasley et al for cases that not fit into the histopathologic criteria of the recognized entities described as acute or subacute clinical presentations. The presence of intra-alveolar fibrin in the form of fibrin ‘balls’ and organizing pneumonia with patchy distribution are the main histological features of this entity. We describe the case of a male patient with the diagnostic of AFOP made by surgical lung biopsy. He had a subacute presentation of symptoms consisting of productive cough, chest pain and fever. Bilateral infiltrates with patchy and diffuse distribution were the predominant features in his chest HRCT scan. The patient had a good clinical course after a treatment with prednisone and cyclophosphamide. Our hope in reporting this case study is to add some more data to the discussion of this new entity.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (5: 615-620 Palavras

  4. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Young Cheol; Suh, Gee Young; Han, Joung Ho; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2002-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are at present classified as one of four types: usual, nonspecific, acute, or desquamative. The acute form has the worst prognosis, followed by the usual and the nonspecific form; it is in desquamative cases that prognosis is best. At high-resolution CT, usual interstitial pneumonia, the most frequent type, manifests as patchy subpleural areas of ground-glass attenuation, irregular linear opacity, and honeycombing, which the nonspecific type, the second most frequent, appears as subpleural patchy areas of ground-glass attenuation with associated areas of irregular linear opacity. Acute interstitial pneumonia demonstrates extensive bilateral airspace consolidation and patchy or diffuse bilateral areas of ground-glass attenuation in middle and lower lung zones

  5. The Incidence of Postoperative Pneumonia in Various Surgical Subspecialties: A Dual Database Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chughtai, Morad; Gwam, Chukwuweike U; Khlopas, Anton; Newman, Jared M; Curtis, Gannon L; Torres, Pedro A; Khan, Rafay; Mont, Michael A

    2017-07-25

    Pneumonia is the third most common postoperative complication. However, its epidemiology varies widely and is often difficult to assess. For a better understanding, we utilized two national databases to determine the incidence of postoperative pneumonia after various surgical procedures. Specifically, we used the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) to determine the incidence and yearly trends of postoperative pneumonia following orthopaedic, urologic, otorhinolaryngologic, cardiothoracic, neurosurgery, and general surgeries. The NIS and NSQIP databases from 2009-2013 were utilized. The Clinical Classification Software (CCS) for International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition (ICD-9) codes provided by the NIS database was used to identify all surgical subspecialty procedures. The incidence of postoperative pneumonia was identified as the total number of cases under each identifying CCS code that also had ICD-9 codes for postoperative pneumonia. In the NSQIP database, the surgical subspecialties were selected using the following identifying string variables provided by NSQIP: 1) "Orthopedics", 2) "Otolaryngology (ENT)", 3) "Urology", 4) "Neurosurgery", 5) "General Surgery", and 6) "Cardiac Surgery" and "Thoracic Surgery". Cardiac and thoracic surgery was merged to create the variable "Cardiothoracic Surgery". Postoperative pneumonia cases were extracted utilizing the available NSQIP nominal variables. All variables were used to isolate the incidences of postoperative pneumonia stratified by surgical specialty. A subsequent trend analysis was conducted to assess the associations between operative year and incidence of postoperative pneumonia. For all NIS surgeries, the incidence of postoperative pneumonia was 0.97% between 2009 and 2013. The incidence was highest among patients who underwent cardiothoracic surgery (3.3%) and urologic surgery (1.73%). Patients who

  6. A case of laryngeal palsy and persistent aspiration pneumonia following radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Kazunari; Tayama, Niro; Mizuno, Masahiro; Niimi, Seiji.

    1997-01-01

    A 80-year-old man developed impairment in his laryngeal movement, vocal fold fixation and severe misdeglutition after radiotherapy for laryngeal carcinoma. Despite of several surgical treatments for aspiration pneumonia, the misdeglutition did not cease because of the stiffness in his larynx until a laryngectomy was finally performed. The resected larynx showed marked fibrosis, and it was considered as a late complication of radiotherapy. The treatment course in this difficult case is discussed. (author)

  7. Update on the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Eva M; Limper, Andrew H

    2011-02-01

    Pneumocystis is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes an often-lethal pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Although the organism was discovered in the early 1900s, the first cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans were initially recognized in Central Europe after the Second World War in premature and malnourished infants. This unusual lung infection was known as plasma cellular interstitial pneumonitis of the newborn, and was characterized by severe respiratory distress and cyanosis with little or no fever and no pathognomic physical signs. At that time, only anecdotal cases were reported in adults and usually these patients had a baseline malignancy that led to a malnourished state. In the 1960-1970s additional cases were described in adults and children with hematological malignancies, but Pneumocystis pneumonia was still considered a rare disease. However, in the 1980s, with the onset of the HIV epidemic, Pneumocystis prevalence increased dramatically and became widely recognized as an opportunistic infection that caused potentially life-treating pneumonia in patients with impaired immunity. During this time period, prophylaxis against this organism was more generally instituted in high-risk patients. In the 1990s, with widespread use of prophylaxis and the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the treatment of HIV-infected patients, the number of cases in this specific population decreased. However, Pneumocystis pneumonia still remains an important cause of severe pneumonia in patients with HIV infection and is still considered a principal AIDS-defining illness. Despite the decreased number of cases among HIV-infected patients over the past decade, Pneumocystis pneumonia continues to be a serious problem in immunodeficient patients with other immunosuppressive conditions. This is mostly due to increased use of immunosuppressive medications to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, following bone marrow and solid organ

  8. Lung abscess caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yuhei; Toyoshima, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Takehiro; Iwamoto, Keisuke; Sasano, Hajime; Itani, Hidetoshi; Kondo, Shigeto; Tanigawa, Motoaki

    2018-01-01

    Lung abscess has been considered to be a rare complication of pneumococcal infection, and most cases are reported to be Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3. A 67-year-old man presented with fever and was diagnosed to have lung abscess caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 6B. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin for the isolate was 1 μg/mL. He was treated with high-dose intravenous sulbactam/ampicillin as definitive therapy based on susceptibility testing for S. pneumoniae and recovered successfully without surgical intervention. S. pneumoniae serotype 6B can cause lung abscess.

  9. Severe respiratory failure secondary to Varicella zoster pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfiye Mülazımoğlu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Varicella is one of the most contagious diseases of childhood. Whenever varicella is seen in adults, it can cause serious complications. Pneumonia is one of the most serious complications of varicella during adulthood and it has a high mortality rate. Cases of varicella pneumonia which need mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit, have %50 of mortality rate.This report presents a patient who was diagnosed as varicella pneumonia in our intensive care unit. Our treatment and diagnostic approach is presented together with actual literature.

  10. Improving Chronic Disease Self-Management by Older Home Health Patients through Community Health Coaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Dye

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to pilot test a model to reduce hospital readmissions and emergency department use of rural, older adults with chronic diseases discharged from home health services (HHS through the use of volunteers. The study’s priority population consistently experiences poorer health outcomes than their urban counterparts due in part to lower socioeconomic status, reduced access to health services, and incidence of chronic diseases. When they are hospitalized for complications due to poorly managed chronic diseases, they are frequently readmitted for the same conditions. This pilot study examines the use of volunteer community members who were trained as Health Coaches to mentor discharged HHS patients in following the self-care plan developed by their HHS RN; improving chronic disease self-management behaviors; reducing risk of falls, pneumonia, and flu; and accessing community resources. Program participants increased their ability to monitor and track their chronic health conditions, make positive lifestyle changes, and reduce incidents of falls, pneumonia and flu. Although differences in the ED and hospital admission rates after discharge from HHS between the treatment and comparison group (matched for gender, age, and chronic condition were not statistically significant, the treatment group’s rate was less than the comparison group thus suggesting a promising impact of the HC program (90 day: 263 comparison vs. 129 treatment; p = 0.65; 180 day 666.67 vs. 290.32; p = 0.19. The community health coach model offers a potential approach for improving the ability of discharged older home health patients to manage chronic conditions and ultimately reduce emergent care.

  11. Lipoid pneumonia: computed tomography findings - a case report; Pneumonia lipidica: aspectos na tomografia computadorizada - relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Janos; Martins, Erick Malheiro Leoncio; Pozes, Aline Serfaty; Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Fialho, Suzane Mansur [Clinica Radiologica Emilio Amorim, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-02-01

    The authors report a case of lipoid pneumonia in an 80 year old man with chronic constipation in regular use of mineral oil as a laxative. According to his family, he experienced coughing episodes when he took his medication. He also presented dyspnoea at rest and diminished consciousness levels. Chest radiographs showed a consolidation area in the posterior segment of right upper lobe, which did not change on successive exams. High resolution computed tomography demonstrated low-density consolidation with negative Hounsfield units (-29 to -83 UH) and ground-glass opacities in the right upper lobe and inferior lobes. These opacities predominated in the posterior regions of the lungs. The diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of oil material on bronchoalveolar washing. The patient was advised to discontinue the ingestion of mineral oil and did not return for follow-up. (author)

  12. Coronavirus 229E-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pene, Frédéric; Merlat, Annabelle; Vabret, Astrid; Rozenberg, Flore; Buzyn, Agnès; Dreyfus, François; Cariou, Alain; Freymuth, François; Lebon, Pierre

    2003-10-01

    Coronaviruses strains 229E and OC43 have been associated with various respiratory illnesses ranging from the self-resolving common cold to severe pneumonia. Although chronic underlying conditions are major determinants of severe respiratory virus infections, few data about coronavirus-related pneumonia in immunocompromised patients are available. Here we report 2 well-documented cases of pneumonia related to coronavirus 229E, each with a different clinical presentation. Diagnosis was made on the basis of viral culture and electron microscopy findings that exhibited typical crown-like particles and through amplification of the viral genome by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. On the basis of this report, coronaviruses should be considered as potential causative microorganisms of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients.

  13. [The case manager--from words to deeds?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegaard, Birthe Rosenkrantz; Qvist, Peter

    2010-04-19

    Allocation of a case manager is now mandatory for both in- and outpatients in Denmark. Case manager allocation is reported quarterly to the regions and results are generally satisfying. Knowledge about fulfillment of the case manager role is, however, sparse. This study aims to examine the degree of fulfillment of the case manager role for a sample of inpatients. Two medical and two surgical wards participated. Patients were interviewed in relation to discharge while staff assigned as case managers completed a survey. Both patients and case managers answered questions regarding the defined roles as case managers: Planning/coordination, continuous information and discharge planning. 107 of 125 eligible patients were interviewed. Only 25 declared themselves informed about the allocation of a case manager. The patients' assessment of the service provided by the staff in relation to case manager tasks was generally good, but the services were seldom provided by the named case manager. 22% of patients did not experience continuous information, while only 13% did not experience a generally coherent stay in hospital. 110 case managers completed the survey. Less than half felt themselves well informed about the case manager role. Only a few case managers feel that they succeed in fulfilling the role, particularly regarding the participation in discharge planning. There seems to be a need for a targeted effort to improve the conditions for case managers in Danish hospitals in order to meet the intentions of this initiative.

  14. Increased Nasopharyngeal Density and Concurrent Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis Are Associated with Pneumonia in Febrile Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chochua, Sopio; D'Acremont, Valérie; Hanke, Christiane; Alfa, David; Shak, Joshua; Kilowoko, Mary; Kyungu, Esther; Kaiser, Laurent; Genton, Blaise; Klugman, Keith P; Vidal, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    We assessed nasopharyngeal (NP) carriage of five pathogens in febrile children with and without acute respiratory infection (ARI) of the upper (URTI) or lower tract, attending health facilities in Tanzania. NP swabs collected from children (N = 960) aged 2 months to 10 years, and with a temperature ≥38°C, were utilized to quantify bacterial density of S. pneumoniae (Sp), H. influenzae (Hi), M. catarrhalis (Mc), S. aureus (Sa), and N. meningitidis (Nm). We determined associations between presence of individual species, densities, or concurrent carriage of all species combination with respiratory diseases including clinical pneumonia, pneumonia with normal chest radiography (CXR) and endpoint pneumonia. Individual carriage, and NP density, of Sp, Hi, or Mc, but not Sa, or Nm, was significantly associated with febrile ARI and clinical pneumonia when compared to febrile non-ARI episodes. Density was also significantly increased in severe pneumonia when compared to mild URTI (Sp, p<0.002; Hi p<0.001; Mc, p = 0.014). Accordingly, concurrent carriage of Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+, in the absence of Sa- and Nm-, was significantly more prevalent in children with ARI (p = 0.03), or clinical pneumonia (p<0.001) than non-ARI, and in children with clinical pneumonia (p = 0.0007) than URTI. Furthermore, Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+ differentiated children with pneumonia with normal CXR, or endpoint pneumonia, from those with URTI, and non-ARI cases. Concurrent NP carriage of Sp, Hi, and Mc was a predictor of clinical pneumonia and identified children with pneumonia with normal CXR and endpoint pneumonia from those with febrile URTI, or non-ARI episodes.

  15. Increased Nasopharyngeal Density and Concurrent Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis Are Associated with Pneumonia in Febrile Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopio Chochua

    Full Text Available We assessed nasopharyngeal (NP carriage of five pathogens in febrile children with and without acute respiratory infection (ARI of the upper (URTI or lower tract, attending health facilities in Tanzania.NP swabs collected from children (N = 960 aged 2 months to 10 years, and with a temperature ≥38°C, were utilized to quantify bacterial density of S. pneumoniae (Sp, H. influenzae (Hi, M. catarrhalis (Mc, S. aureus (Sa, and N. meningitidis (Nm. We determined associations between presence of individual species, densities, or concurrent carriage of all species combination with respiratory diseases including clinical pneumonia, pneumonia with normal chest radiography (CXR and endpoint pneumonia.Individual carriage, and NP density, of Sp, Hi, or Mc, but not Sa, or Nm, was significantly associated with febrile ARI and clinical pneumonia when compared to febrile non-ARI episodes. Density was also significantly increased in severe pneumonia when compared to mild URTI (Sp, p<0.002; Hi p<0.001; Mc, p = 0.014. Accordingly, concurrent carriage of Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+, in the absence of Sa- and Nm-, was significantly more prevalent in children with ARI (p = 0.03, or clinical pneumonia (p<0.001 than non-ARI, and in children with clinical pneumonia (p = 0.0007 than URTI. Furthermore, Sp+, Hi+, and Mc+ differentiated children with pneumonia with normal CXR, or endpoint pneumonia, from those with URTI, and non-ARI cases.Concurrent NP carriage of Sp, Hi, and Mc was a predictor of clinical pneumonia and identified children with pneumonia with normal CXR and endpoint pneumonia from those with febrile URTI, or non-ARI episodes.

  16. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection-associated erythema multiforme

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    Shinsaku Imashuku

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a well-known correlation between Herpes simplex (HSV infection and erythema multiforme (EM. More recently, in Japan, it was found that Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cp may promote the development of EM. All cases of Cp infection-associated EM that had been diagnosed in our clinic over the past two years (from 2011 to 2012 were analyzed. Cp infection was diagnosed on the basis of a significant increase (>2.00 in anti-Cp IgM titers, as measured by the HITAZYME-ELISA test. There were 7 cases of Cp-EM, one male and 6 females. Median age was 13 years (range 3-29 years. It is recommended that the possible involvement of Cp infection, besides HSV or Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections, should be considered in all cases of EM.

  17. Cavitary Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia and abnormalities of the Basal Ganglia Case presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieto, Enrique; Mora, Alfonso Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia (COP) is a pulmonary disorder with a wide spectrum of radiological features. A case of a young patient of 16 years old is shown with CAT appearance of multiple cavitary nodules in both lungs that responded with a complete resolution after corticosteroid therapy. This patient also reveals abnormalities of the basal ganglia as the result of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy associated with the acute presentation of this disorder. We justify the inclusion of COP in the differential diagnosis of multiple cavitary nodules, and it is discussed the differential diagnosis of her abnormalities of the basal ganglia

  18. Quality of care for elderly patients hospitalized for pneumonia in the United States, 2006 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan S; Nsa, Wato; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Trivedi, Amal N; Bratzler, Dale W; Auden, Dana; Mor, Maria K; Baus, Kristie; Larbi, Fiona M; Fine, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    Nearly every US acute care hospital reports publicly on adherence to recommended processes of care for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. However, it remains uncertain how much performance of these process measures has improved over time or whether performance is associated with superior patient outcomes. To describe trends in processes of care, mortality, and readmission for elderly patients hospitalized for pneumonia and to assess the independent associations between processes and outcomes of care. Retrospective cohort study conducted from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2010, at 4740 US acute care hospitals. The cohort included 1 818 979 cases of pneumonia in elderly (≥65 years), Medicare fee-for-service patients who were eligible for at least 1 of 7 pneumonia inpatient processes of care tracked by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Annual performance rates for 7 pneumonia processes of care and an all-or-none composite of these measures; and 30-day, all-cause mortality and hospital readmission, adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics. Adjusted annual performance rates for all 7 CMS processes of care (expressed in percentage points per year) increased significantly from 2006 to 2010, ranging from 1.02 for antibiotic initiation within 6 hours to 5.30 for influenza vaccination (P < .001). All 7 measures were performed in more than 92% of eligible cases in 2010. The all-or-none composite demonstrated the largest adjusted relative increase over time (6.87 percentage points per year; P < .001) and was achieved in 87.4% of cases in 2010. Adjusted annual mortality decreased by 0.09 percentage points per year (P < .001), driven primarily by decreasing mortality in the subgroup not treated in the intensive care unit (ICU) (-0.18 percentage points per year; P < .001). Adjusted annual readmission rates decreased significantly by 0.25 percentage points per year (P < .001). All 7 processes of care were independently

  19. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Ideguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

  20. Nationwide implementation of integrated community case management of childhood illness in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugeni, Catherine; Levine, Adam C; Munyaneza, Richard M; Mulindahabi, Epiphanie; Cockrell, Hannah C; Glavis-Bloom, Justin; Nutt, Cameron T; Wagner, Claire M; Gaju, Erick; Rukundo, Alphonse; Habimana, Jean Pierre; Karema, Corine; Ngabo, Fidele; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Between 2008 and 2011, Rwanda introduced integrated community case management (iCCM) of childhood illness nationwide. Community health workers in each of Rwanda's nearly 15,000 villages were trained in iCCM and equipped for empirical diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia, diarrhea, and malaria; for malnutrition surveillance; and for comprehensive reporting and referral services. Methods: We used data from the Rwanda health management information system (HMIS) to calculate monthly all-cause under-5 mortality rates, health facility use rates, and community-based treatment rates for childhood illness in each district. We then compared a 3-month baseline period prior to iCCM implementation with a seasonally matched comparison period 1 year after iCCM implementation. Finally, we compared the actual changes in all-cause child mortality and health facility use over this time period with the changes that would have been expected based on baseline trends in Rwanda. Results: The number of children receiving community-based treatment for diarrhea and pneumonia increased significantly in the 1-year period after iCCM implementation, from 0.83 cases/1,000 child-months to 3.80 cases/1,000 child-months (P = .01) and 0.25 cases/1,000 child-months to 5.28 cases/1,000 child-months (P<.001), respectively. On average, total under-5 mortality rates declined significantly by 38% (P<.001), and health facility use declined significantly by 15% (P = .006). These decreases were significantly greater than would have been expected based on baseline trends. Conclusions: This is the first study to demonstrate decreases in both child mortality and health facility use after implementing iCCM of childhood illness at a national level. While our study design does not allow for direct attribution of these changes to implementation of iCCM, these results are in line with those of prior studies conducted at the sub-national level in other low-income countries. PMID:25276592

  1. Detection of pneumonia associated pathogens using a prototype multiplexed pneumonia test in hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia.

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    Berit Schulte

    Full Text Available Severe pneumonia remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR has been shown to be more sensitive than current standard microbiological methods--particularly in patients with prior antibiotic treatment--and therefore, may improve the accuracy of microbiological diagnosis for hospitalized patients with pneumonia. Conventional detection techniques and multiplex PCR for 14 typical bacterial pneumonia-associated pathogens were performed on respiratory samples collected from adult hospitalized patients enrolled in a prospective multi-center study. Patients were enrolled from March until September 2012. A total of 739 fresh, native samples were eligible for analysis, of which 75 were sputa, 421 aspirates, and 234 bronchial lavages. 276 pathogens were detected by microbiology for which a valid PCR result was generated (positive or negative detection result by Curetis prototype system. Among these, 120 were identified by the prototype assay, 50 pathogens were not detected. Overall performance of the prototype for pathogen identification was 70.6% sensitivity (95% confidence interval (CI lower bound: 63.3%, upper bound: 76.9% and 95.2% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 94.6%, upper bound: 95.7%. Based on the study results, device cut-off settings were adjusted for future series production. The overall performance with the settings of the CE series production devices was 78.7% sensitivity (95% CI lower bound: 72.1% and 96.6% specificity (95% CI lower bound: 96.1%. Time to result was 5.2 hours (median for the prototype test and 43.5 h for standard-of-care. The Pneumonia Application provides a rapid and moderately sensitive assay for the detection of pneumonia-causing pathogens with minimal hands-on time.Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS DRKS00005684.

  2. Etiology and anti-microbial sensitivity of organisms causing community acquired pneumonia: A single hospital study

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    Resmi U Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the common etiological pathogens causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP in our hospital and sensitivity patterns to the common antibiotics used. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in a 750 bedded multi-specialty referral hospital in Kerala catering to both urban and semi-urban populations. It is a prospective study of patients who attended the medical out-patient department and those admitted with a clinical diagnosis of CAP, during the year 2009. Data were collected based on detailed patient interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The latter included sputum culture and sensitivity pattern. These were tabulated and percentage incidence of etiological pathogens calculated. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was also classified by percentage and expressed as bar diagram. Results: The study showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be the most common etiological agent for CAP, in our hospital setting. The other organisms isolated in order of frequency were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alpha hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli, Beta hemolytic streptococci and atypical coli. S. pneumoniae was most sensitive to linezolid, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, cloxacillin and ceftriaxone. Overall, the common pathogens causing CAP showed highest sensitivity to amikacin, followed by ofloxacin, gentamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, ceftriaxone and linezolid. The least sensitivity rates were shown to amoxicillin and cefoperazone. Conclusion: In a hospital setting, empirical management for cases of CAP is not advisable. The present study has shown S. pneumoniae as the most likely pathogen and either linezolid or amikacin as the most likely effective antimicrobial in cases of CAP, in our setting.

  3. Biomarkers improve mortality prediction by prognostic scales in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, R; Martínez, R; Reyes, S; Mensa, J; Filella, X; Marcos, M A; Martínez, A; Esquinas, C; Ramirez, P; Torres, A

    2009-07-01

    Prognostic scales provide a useful tool to predict mortality in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the inflammatory response of the host, crucial in resolution and outcome, is not included in the prognostic scales. The aim of this study was to investigate whether information about the initial inflammatory cytokine profile and markers increases the accuracy of prognostic scales to predict 30-day mortality. To this aim, a prospective cohort study in two tertiary care hospitals was designed. Procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP) and the systemic cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukins IL6, IL8 and IL10 were measured at admission. Initial severity was assessed by PSI (Pneumonia Severity Index), CURB65 (Confusion, Urea nitrogen, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, > or = 65 years of age) and CRB65 (Confusion, Respiratory rate, Blood pressure, > or = 65 years of age) scales. A total of 453 hospitalised CAP patients were included. The 36 patients who died (7.8%) had significantly increased levels of IL6, IL8, PCT and CRP. In regression logistic analyses, high levels of CRP and IL6 showed an independent predictive value for predicting 30-day mortality, after adjustment for prognostic scales. Adding CRP to PSI significantly increased the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) from 0.80 to 0.85, that of CURB65 from 0.82 to 0.85 and that of CRB65 from 0.79 to 0.85. Adding IL6 or PCT values to CRP did not significantly increase the AUC of any scale. When using two scales (PSI and CURB65/CRB65) and CRP simultaneously the AUC was 0.88. Adding CRP levels to PSI, CURB65 and CRB65 scales improves the 30-day mortality prediction. The highest predictive value is reached with a combination of two scales and CRP. Further validation of that improvement is needed.

  4. Disease mapping for informing targeted health interventions: childhood pneumonia in Bohol, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Deborah S K; Anthamatten, Peter; Root, Elisabeth Dowling; Lucero, Marilla; Nohynek, Hanna; Tallo, Veronica; Williams, Gail M; Simões, Eric A F

    2015-11-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) are the leading cause of childhood mortality worldwide. Currently, most developing countries assign resources at a district level, and yet District Medical Officers have few tools for directing targeted interventions to high mortality or morbidity areas. Mapping of ALRI at the local level can guide more efficient allocation of resources, coordination of efforts and targeted interventions, which are particularly relevant for health management in resource-scarce settings. An efficacy study of 11-valent pneumococcal vaccine was conducted in six municipalities in the Bohol Province of central Philippines from July 2000 to December 2004. Geocoded under-five pneumonia cases (using WHO classifications) were mapped to create spatial patterns of pneumonia at the local health unit (barangay) level. There were 2951 children with WHO-defined clinical pneumonia, of whom 1074 were severe or very severely ill, 278 were radiographic, and 219 were hypoxaemic. While most children with pneumonia were from urban barangays, there was a disproportionately higher distribution of severe/very severe pneumonia in rural barangays and the most severe hypoxaemic children were concentrated in the northern barangays most distant from the regional hospital. Mapping of ALRI at the local administrative health level can be performed relatively simply. If these principles are applied to routinely collected IMCI classification of disease at the district level in developing countries, such efforts can form the basis for directing public health and healthcare delivery efforts in a targeted manner. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Organising pneumonia due to dronedarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D; Avery, S; Edey, A J; Medford, A R L

    2015-01-01

    Organising pneumonia is one of the responses of the lung to injury and can mimic bacterial pneumonia but importantly it does not respond to antibiotic therapy. We present the case of a 67-year-old male who was diagnosed with organising pneumonia secondary to dronedarone. Drug reactions are a common cause and early identification of the culprit is mandatory to prevent further morbidity and ensure a favourable outcome. On chest radiography there may be fleeting peripheral consolidation, while computed tomography can show a range of stereotyped patterns including perilobular consolidation. Bronchoscopic biopsy may not always be possible but response to steroids is often rapid following removal of the culprit drug. Dronedarone should be included in the list of possible drugs and the Pneumotox database remains a useful resource for the clinician when acute drug-related pneumotoxicity is suspected.

  6. CNS Complications of Mycoplasma Pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of acute central nervous system disease occurring subsequent to infection with M pneumoniae are reported from University College, Institute of Child Health, and Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK.

  7. Salmonella Typhimurium pneumonia in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sadia; Kumar, V Anil; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Mehta, Asmita; Backer, Binita; Dinesh, Kavitha R

    2015-04-01

    Pneumonia due to non-typhoidal Salmonella is a rarely reported entity. A fatal case of Salmonella pneumonia is reported here where Salmonella Typhimurium was isolated from the endotracheal aspirate and blood culture. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Lipid aspiration pneumonia due to gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfson, B.J.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Allen, J.L.; Panitch, H.B.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA; Karmazin, N.; Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA

    1989-01-01

    The development of lipid aspiration pneumonia after chronic nasopharyngeal installation of mineral oil was first described in 1925 by Laughlin. Since that time this entity has been well recognized and numerous substances have been identified or implicated as the aspirated material. The classic radiographic appearance of severe chronic lipid aspiration pneumonia has been described as consisting of intense perihilar infiltrates. However, the radiographic findings are more often non-specific and usually consist of varying degrees of diffuse interstitial infiltrates that tend to be more prominent in the perihilar regions and the right lung. We are reporting a case of biopsy-proven lipid aspiration pneumonia in an infant with known gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) who had medium-chain triglyceride oil administered via nasogastric tube. Serial roentgenograms demonstrated a changing pulmonary pattern from diffuse bilateral interstitial infiltrates initially to a diffuse alveolar pattern at the time of the lung biopsy. Modern medicine has developed new methods for providing nourishment to sick newborns and infants to improve their nutritional status and help them to grow. One such method involves the administration of medium-chain triglycerides (MCT oil) into the GI tract via a nasogastric or nasoenteral tube. The purpose of this report is to describe a significant complication of this method of providing nutrition to an infant with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the diagnostic dilemma it presented. (orig.)

  9. Risk for Death among Children with Pneumonia, Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihullah, Rahmani; Dhoubhadel, Bhim G; Rauf, Ferogh A; Shafiq, Sahab A; Suzuki, Motoi; Watanabe, Kiwao; Yoshida, Lay M; Yasunami, Michio; Zabihullah, Salihi; Parry, Christopher M; Mirwais, Rabi; Ariyoshi, Koya

    2017-08-01

    In Afghanistan, childhood deaths from pneumonia are high. Among 639 children at 1 hospital, the case-fatality rate was 12.1%, and 46.8% of pneumococcal serotypes detected were covered by the 13-valent vaccine. Most deaths occurred within 2 days of hospitalization; newborns and malnourished children were at risk. Vaccination could reduce pneumonia and deaths.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J.

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [de

  11. Radiological alterations in tularemic pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simay, A.; Muennich, D.

    1980-01-01

    Pneumonia of tularemic origin exhibited the following radiological symptoms: confluent oval shaped infiltrations in the lungs, enlarged lymph nodes in the hilus, and in 50-70% of the cases accumulation of intrapleural fluid. (L.E.)

  12. How Visual Management for Continuous Improvement Might Guide and Affect Hospital Staff: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhassan, Waqar; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Westerlund, Hugo; Sandahl, Christer; Thor, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Visual management (VM) tools such as whiteboards, often employed in Lean thinking applications, are intended to be helpful in improving work processes in different industries including health care. It remains unclear, however, how VM is actually applied in health care Lean interventions and how it might influence the clinical staff. We therefore examined how Lean-inspired VM using whiteboards for continuous improvement efforts related to the hospital staff's work and collaboration. Within a case study design, we combined semistructured interviews, nonparticipant observations, and photography on 2 cardiology wards. The fate of VM differed between the 2 wards; in one, it was well received by the staff and enhanced continuous improvement efforts, whereas in the other ward, it was not perceived to fit in the work flow or to make enough sense in order to be sustained. Visual management may enable the staff and managers to allow communication across time and facilitate teamwork by enabling the inclusion of team members who are not present simultaneously; however, its adoption and value seem contingent on finding a good fit with the local context. A combination of continuous improvement and VM may be helpful in keeping the staff engaged in the change process in the long run.

  13. Economic Burden of Community-Acquired Pneumonia among Adults in the Philippines: Its Equity and Policy Implications in the Case Rate Payments of the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumanan-Mendoza, Bernadette A; Mendoza, Victor L; Punzalan, Felix Eduardo R; Reganit, Paul Ferdinand M; Bacolcol, Silverose Ann A

    2015-05-01

    To determine 1) the cost of hospitalization, the 1-week postdischarge cost, the total cost, and the economic burden of community-acquired pneumonia among patients aged 19 years or older in the Philippines and 2) the difference between the estimated costs and the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth) pneumonia case rate payments. The study involved two tertiary private hospitals in the Philippines. Using the societal perspective, both health care and non-health care costs were determined. A base-case analysis and sensitivity analyses were performed, and the economic burden of pneumonia was determined using PhilHealth claims. The estimated cost of hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia-moderate risk (CAP-MR) ranged from Philippine peso (PHP) 36,153 to 113,633 (US $852-2678) and its 1-week postdischarge cost ranged from PHP1450 to 8800 (US $34-207). The cost of hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia-high risk (CAP-HR) ranged from PHP104,544 to 249,695 (US $2464-5885) and PHP101,248 to 243, 495 (US $2386-5739) using invasive and noninvasive ventilation, respectively. The postdischarge cost for CAP-HR ranged from PHP1716 to 10,529 (US $40-248). If only health care cost was considered, the cost ranged from PHP24,403 to 89,433 for CAP-MR and PHP92,848 to 213,395 for CAP-HR. The present PhilHealth case rate payments are PHP15,000 (US $354) and PHP32,000 (US $754) for CAP-MR and CAP-HR, respectively. Based on the number of PhilHealth claims for 2012 and the estimated health care cost, the economic burden of pneumonia in 2012 was PHP8.48 billion for CAP-MR and PHP643.76 million for CAP-HR. The estimated health care cost of hospitalization is markedly higher than the PhilHealth case rate payments. As per the study results, the economic burden of pneumonia is, thus, significantly higher than PhilHealth estimates. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  14. Experiences of case management with chronic illnesses: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, J Y; Liu, M F

    2018-03-01

    This qualitative systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize recent qualitative studies to improve understanding of the experiences and perceptions of case management interventions that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have. Case management has been shown to be effective at improving quality of care and lowering costs for individuals with chronic illnesses. However, no qualitative review has been synthesized with recent qualitative studies about case management experiences by individual with chronic illnesses. This qualitative systematic review uses a thematic synthesis method to review 10 qualitative studies published within the last 10 years, from 2007 to 2016, thereby identifying and discussing the understandings that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have about case management. From this synthesis, three themes were identified as facilitators of case management (access to healthcare resources, health status supports and emotional aid) and two themes were identified as barriers to it (low information about case management and time constraints). This is the first qualitative systematic review of the perceptions and experiences that individuals with chronic illnesses and their caregivers have about case management. The facilitators of case management can be employed to inform patients about the benefits of case management and to improve population health. The findings about barriers to case management can be used to reform case management for populations with chronic illnesses. These factors should be considered by nursing researchers and healthcare policymakers when implementing case management. © 2018 International Council of Nurses.

  15. Legionnaire's pneumonia: Is there really an interstitial disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, C.; Frat, J.P.; Le Moal, G.; Roblot, F.; Michalakis, G.; Cabon, E.; Tasu, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Legionella pneumonia is usually classified as 'atypical pneumonia', which suggests a predominance of interstitial patterns in chest X-rays. Based on a selection of recent clinical cases and a brief review of the literature, the aim of the study is to clarify, how far the actual radiological findings would be consistent with these expectations. Patients and methods: A retrospective analysis of 18 epidemic personal cases and a review of the literature data were performed to describe the chest X-ray findings of Legionella pneumophila (LP) community acquired pneumonia. X-ray review was performed simultaneously and in consensus by two radiologists (J.P.T., E.C.) and a physician (C.G.). Results: From our series, 17 patients had an abnormal chest X-ray on admission. Among these pathological X-ray cases, infiltrates were more often confluent (n = 16), or patchy (n = 7), rather than interstitial (n = 1). Fifteen patients had infiltrates involving the lower lung fields. Bilateral distribution of abnormalities and pleural effusion were each observed in three cases. Radiological findings deteriorated between the second and seventh days following admission, particularly in the form of patchy infiltrates with pleural effusion. The review of the literature is consistent with these findings, by reporting prevalent confluent or patchy infiltrates. Conclusions: These findings are consistent with the physiopathological particularity of this affection and incite us to avoid the classification 'atypical pneumonia' in radiologic terminology. This term is more appropriate for clinical and microbiological use

  16. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  17. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  18. Case of severe Friedlander′s pneumonia with review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna K Satpathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedlander′s bacillus (Klebsiella pneumoniae is among the most common Gram-negative bacteria encountered by physicians world-wide. Here, we report 31 years immunocompetent male who presented with fever, productive cough, hemoptysis, breathlessness and multi-organ failure with radiological evidence of total right upper lobe consolidation. Sputum microscopy, culture and blood culture - all confirmed Friedlander′s bacillus as the etiology of this severe community acquired pneumonia with fatal outcome.

  19. A ten-step process to develop case management plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahan, Hussein A

    2002-01-01

    The use of case management plans has contained cost and improved quality of care successfully. However, the process of developing these plans remains a great challenge for healthcare executives, in this article, the author presents the answer to this challenge by discussing a 10-step formal process that administrators of patient care services and case managers can adapt to their institutions. It also can be used by interdisciplinary team members as a practical guide to develop a specific case management plan. This process is applicable to any care setting (acute, ambulatory, long term, and home care), diagnosis, or procedure. It is particularly important for those organizations that currently do not have a deliberate and systematic process to develop case management plans and are struggling with how to improve the efficiency and productivity of interdisciplinary teams charged with developing case management plans.

  20. Examining End-of-Life Case Management: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger E. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Case management was initiated in the 1970s to reduce care discontinuity. A literature review focused on end-of-life (EOL case management identified 17 research articles, with content analysis revealing two themes: (a seeking to determine or establish the value of EOL case management and (b identifying ways to improve EOL case management. The evidence, although limited, suggests that EOL case management is helpful to dying individuals and their families. Research is needed to more clearly illustrate its usefulness or outcomes and the extent of need for it and actual availability. Among other benefits, EOL case management may help reduce hospital utilization, a major concern with the high cost of hospital-based care and the increased desire for home-based EOL care.

  1. Pneumonia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Pneumonia KidsHealth / For Parents / Pneumonia What's in this article? ... the Doctor? Print en español Neumonía What Is Pneumonia? Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs . The ...

  2. Rocking pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Rijkers, Ger T.; Rodriguez Gomez, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ever since Chuck Berry coined the term “rocking pneumonia” in his 1956 song “Roll over Beethoven”, pneumonia has been mentioned frequently in modern blues and rock songs. We analyzed the lyrics of these songs to examine how various elements of pneumonia have been represented in popular music, specifically the cause of pneumonia, the risk groups, comorbidity (such as the boogie woogie flu), the clinical symptoms, and treatment and outcome. Up to this day, songwriters suggest that pneumonia is ...

  3. CT findings of necrotizing pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyae Young; Im, Jung Gi; Whang, Sung Il; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, Jae Kyo; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    Necrotizing pneumonia causes necrosis of pulmonary parenchyma and may lead to pulmonary gangrene. Prior to the antibiotic era, extensive pulmonary involvement was potentially fatal, but the incidence of necrotizing pneumoniais now less common. On contrast-enhanced CT scans, consolidation with contrast enhancement containing necrotic foci with low attenuation and cavities is characteristic. Radiologic findings do not differ according to the causative organism and in most of cases, specific diagnosis may be impossible. Clinical findings and certain characteristic radiologic findings may be helpful for narrowing the differential diagnosis. We illustrate the clinical and radiologic characteristics of necrotizing pneumonia according to causative bacterial organisms

  4. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  5. Radiologic Findings of Influenza A (H1N1) Pneumonia: Report of Two Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jin Kyoung; Ahn, Myeong Im; Jung, Jung Im; Han, Dae Hee; Park, Seog Hee; Park, Chan Kwon; Kim, Young Kyoon [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Novel influenza A (H1N1) infection is a highly infectious disease, which has been rapidly spreading worldwide since it was first documented in March of 2009 in Mexico. We experienced and report two cases of Influenza A (H1N1) pneumonia, accompanied by chest radiographic and CT findings. The chest radiographs revealed diffuse haziness and extensive airspace consolidation, whereas the CT scans demonstrated multifocal areas of ground glass opacity and airspace consolidation with a CT halo sign.

  6. [The clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luxi; Chen, Yu; Xia, Shuyue; Ma, Jiangwei; Zhao, Hongwen; Lu, Ye; Tao, Sixu; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the clinical value of urinary antigen detection of Legionella, and to describe the clinical characteristics of Legionella pneumonia. Patients with suspected Legionella pneumonia were enrolled from the Respiratory departments of 3 tertiary hospitals in Shenyang during May 2011 to November 2013. Urinary Legionella antigen was detected for all the enrolled patients. Bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Legionella, and double Legionella antibody detection in sera were performed for each patient whose urinary antigen was positive. Patients confirmed to have Legionella pneumonia were pooled and analyzed. Totally 13 cases presenting with pneumonia were positive for Legionella by the urinary antigen method, and in one of them Legionella strain was isolated from the secretion of lower respiratory tract. PCR detection was performed in 8 patients, and 4 of them were positive. Legionella antibody detection was performed in 12 patients, and 7 of them were positive. Nine patients had a history of exposure to Legionella high-risk environments. The characteristics of the cases with Legionella pneumonia were as follows: characteristic orange sputum in 4 patients, digestive symptoms in 6, neurologic disorders in 8, hyponatremia in 10, hypoxia with oxygenation index 130) in 8 patients . Chest CT scan showed bilateral involvement in 6, ground-glass opacity combined with consolidation in 11, and moderate pleural effusion in 11 patients. Cavity and reversed halo sign were found in one case, respectively. All of the patients received fluoroquinolone treatment, and 11 patients recovered completely while 2 died of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, one of them was complicated with secondary infection. Detection of urinary antigen of Legionella is very useful in the diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia. Attention should be paid to exposure history to the high-risk environments and multiple organ impairment when Legionella infection is suspected. Orange sputum

  7. Recurrent Pneumonia in Children: A Reasoned Diagnostic Approach and a Single Centre Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Silvia; Corcione, Adele; Santamaria, Francesca

    2017-01-29

    Recurrent pneumonia (RP), i.e., at least two episodes of pneumonia in one year or three episodes ever with intercritical radiographic clearing of densities, occurs in 7.7%-9% of children with community-acquired pneumonia. In RP, the challenge is to discriminate between children with self-limiting or minor problems, that do not require a diagnostic work-up, and those with an underlying disease. The aim of the current review is to discuss a reasoned diagnostic approach to RP in childhood. Particular emphasis has been placed on which children should undergo a diagnostic work-up and which tests should be performed. A pediatric case series is also presented, in order to document a single centre experience of RP. A management algorithm for the approach to children with RP, based on the evidence from a literature review, is proposed. Like all algorithms, it is not meant to replace clinical judgment, but it should drive physicians to adopt a systematic approach to pediatric RP and provide a useful guide to the clinician.

  8. Monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis in a white male caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Brandt, Pernille B; Gad, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous Klebsiella pneumoniae in an immunocompromised white male after travel to China. The K. pneumoniae isolate belonged to the K2 serotype, and carried the virulence factors RmpA and aerobactin. To the best of our...... knowledge this is the first report of necrotizing fasciitis caused by hypermucoviscous K. pneumoniae resembling the highly virulent K. pneumoniae isolates associated with liver abscess syndrome in Asia....

  9. Hospital Outcomes of Adult Respiratory Tract Infections with Extended-Spectrum B-Lactamase (ESBL) Producing Klebsiella Pneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Li-Cher; Nor Izran Hanim bt Abdul Samad,; Rosdara Masayuni bt Mohd Sani,; Raman, Sree; Thayaparan, Tarmizi; Kumar, Shalini

    2007-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae ranks high as a cause of adult pneumonia requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. To study whether extended-spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL) producing K. pneumoniae was linked to hospital outcomes, we retrospectively studied 441 cases of adult respiratory tract infections with microbial proven K. pneumoniae from an urban-based university teaching hospital between 2003 and 2004. 47 (10.6%) cases had ESBL. Requirement for ventilation and median length of hospital stay, were great...

  10. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of communityacquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. Conclusion The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions. PMID:25909312

  11. Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Pernille; Worm, Signe Westring; Lundgren, Bettina

    2004-01-01

    Serotype-specific mortality from invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae disease revisited.Martens P, Worm SW, Lundgren B, Konradsen HB, Benfield T. Department of Infectious Diseases 144, Hvidovre University Hospital, DK-2650 Hvidovre, Denmark. pernillemartens@yahoo.com BACKGROUND: Invasive infection...... with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Case series and experimental data have shown that the capsular serotype is involved in the pathogenesis and a determinant of disease outcome. METHODS: Retrospective review of 464 cases of invasive disease among adults diagnosed...

  12. Prolonged after-effects of pneumonia in children | Wesley | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-two black children were prospectively followed up for 1 - 7 years after pneumonia contracted at a median age of 17 months. In 55% of cases the pneumonia was measles-associated and 27% had serological evidence of Infection with other respiratory viruses. Recurrence of cough or wheeze for more than 6 months ...

  13. [Community-acquired Acinetobacter pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, E; Wüst, J; Speich, R; Flury, G; Krause, M

    1993-08-21

    We report the history of a 38-year-old male native of Sri Lanka admitted to the emergency ward because of chest pain and shortness of breath. On physical and radiographic examination a bilateral predominantly right-sided pneumonia was found. The patient was admitted to the medical ICU and an antibiotic regimen with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and erythromycin was initiated. Shortly afterwards septic shock developed. The patient was intubated and received high doses of catecholamines. He died 30 hours after admission to the hospital. Cultures from sputum, tracheal aspirate and blood grew Acinetobacter baumanni. Acinetobacter is an ubiquitous gram-negative rod with coccobacillary appearance in clinical specimens, that may appear gram-positive due to poor discoloration on Gram-stain. It is a well known causative agent of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units. Community-acquired pneumonias, however, are quite rare. Sporadic cases have been reported from the US, Papua-New Guinea and Australia. Interestingly, these pneumonias are fulminant and have a high mortality. Chronic obstructive lung disease, diabetes, and tobacco and alcohol consumption appear to be predisposing factors. Due to the rapid course and poor prognosis, prompt diagnosis and adequate antibiotic treatment are indicated. Antibiotics use for community-acquired pneumonias, such as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid or macrolides, are not sufficient. Appropriate antibiotics for the initial treatment of suspected Acinetobacter infections include imipenem and carboxy- and ureidopenicillins combined with an aminoglycoside.

  14. "It is good to take her early to the doctor" - mothers' understanding of childhood pneumonia symptoms and health care seeking in Kilimanjaro region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muro, Florida; Meta, Judith; Renju, Jenny; Mushi, Adiel; Mbakilwa, Hilda; Olomi, Raimos; Reyburn, Hugh; Hildenwall, Helena

    2017-09-22

    Pneumonia is among the leading causes of avoidable deaths for young children globally. The main burden of mortality falls on children from poor and rural families who are less likely to obtain the treatment they need, highlighting inequities in access to effective care and treatment. Caretakers' illness perceptions and care-seeking practices are of major importance for children with pneumonia to receive adequate care. This study qualitatively explores the caretaker concepts of childhood pneumonia in relation to treatment seeking behaviour and health worker management in Moshi urban district, Tanzania. In May - July 2013 data was gathered through different qualitative data collection techniques including five focus group discussions (FGDs) with mothers of children under-five years of age. The FGDs involved free listing of pneumonia symptoms and video presentations of children with respiratory symptoms done, these were triangulated with ten case narratives with mothers of children admitted with pneumonia and eleven in-depth interviews with hospital health workers. Transcripts were coded and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Mothers demonstrated good awareness of common childhood illnesses including pneumonia, which was often associated with symptoms such as cough, flu, chest tightness, fever, and difficulty in breathing. Mothers had mixed views on causative factors and treatments options but generally preferred modern medicine for persisting and severe symptoms. However, all respondent reported access to health facilities as a barrier to care, associated with transport, personal safety and economic constraints. Local illness concepts and traditional treatment options did not constitute barriers to care for pneumonia symptoms. Poor access to health facilities was the main barrier. Decentralisation of care through community health workers may improve access to care but needs to be combined with strengthened referral systems and accessible hospital care for

  15. Comparative analysis of cervical spine management in a subset of severe traumatic brain injury cases using computer simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimbroe J Carter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No randomized control trial to date has studied the use of cervical spine management strategies in cases of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI at risk for cervical spine instability solely due to damaged ligaments. A computer algorithm is used to decide between four cervical spine management strategies. A model assumption is that the emergency room evaluation shows no spinal deficit and a computerized tomogram of the cervical spine excludes the possibility of fracture of cervical vertebrae. The study's goal is to determine cervical spine management strategies that maximize brain injury functional survival while minimizing quadriplegia. METHODS/FINDINGS: The severity of TBI is categorized as unstable, high risk and stable based on intracranial hypertension, hypoxemia, hypotension, early ventilator associated pneumonia, admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and age. Complications resulting from cervical spine management are simulated using three decision trees. Each case starts with an amount of primary and secondary brain injury and ends as a functional survivor, severely brain injured, quadriplegic or dead. Cervical spine instability is studied with one-way and two-way sensitivity analyses providing rankings of cervical spine management strategies for probabilities of management complications based on QALYs. Early collar removal received more QALYs than the alternative strategies in most arrangements of these comparisons. A limitation of the model is the absence of testing against an independent data set. CONCLUSIONS: When clinical logic and components of cervical spine management are systematically altered, changes that improve health outcomes are identified. In the absence of controlled clinical studies, the results of this comparative computer assessment show that early collar removal is preferred over a wide range of realistic inputs for this subset of traumatic brain injury. Future research is needed on identifying factors in

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis with airspace consolidation vs mycoplasma pneumonia in adults: high-resolution CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Chull Hee; Choi, Gyo Chang; Park, Jai Soung; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Kyung Rak; Im, Han Haek; Kim, Dae Ho; Choi, Deuk Lin [Soonchunghyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To analyse and compare high-resolution CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis with consolidation and mycoplasma pneumonia. Twenty patients with pulmonary tuberculosis [confirmed by sputum culture (n=9) and bronchoscopic biopsy (n=11)] and airspace consolidation on high-resolution CT and 17 patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, confirmed by serologic test, were included in this study. High-resolution CT findings were analyzed in terms of ground-glass opacities, distribution of consolidation, type of nodules, cavities, interlobular septal thickening, bronchial dilatations, bronchial wall thickening and pleural effusion. In patients with tuberculosis, average age was 33.5 years (range, 20-67); in those with mycoplasma pneumonia it was 32.5 years (range, 17-74). Segmental and subsegmental distributions were most common in both diseases; the preferred site of consolidation was different, however; for tuberculosis it was the upper lobes (13 cases, 65%; bilateral involvement, 7 cases); for mycoplasma pneumonia it was the lower lobes (11 cases, 64.7%). Non-segmental (diffuse and random) distribution of ground-glass opacities were seen in two patients(11.8%) with mycoplasma pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, branching linear opacities and alveolar nodules were not different in both diseases, but there were nodules above 10mm in 14 cases of tuberculosis and in only one case of mycoplasma pneumonia. Tree-in-bud appearances were seen in five cases of tuberculosis. Cavities without air-fluid level were noted in ten cases of tuberculosis. Other interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation and pleural effusion were not different in both diseases. There was considerable overlap between high resolution CT findings of tuberculosis with airspace consolidation and those of mycoplasma pneumonia. The location of consolidation, type of nodules, and the presence of tree-in-bud appearance and cavities help in the differentiation of the two diseases, however.

  17. Pulmonary tuberculosis with airspace consolidation vs mycoplasma pneumonia in adults: high-resolution CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Chull Hee; Choi, Gyo Chang; Park, Jai Soung; Hwang, Jung Hwa; Kim, Kyung Rak; Im, Han Haek; Kim, Dae Ho; Choi, Deuk Lin

    1997-01-01

    To analyse and compare high-resolution CT findings of pulmonary tuberculosis with consolidation and mycoplasma pneumonia. Twenty patients with pulmonary tuberculosis [confirmed by sputum culture (n=9) and bronchoscopic biopsy (n=11)] and airspace consolidation on high-resolution CT and 17 patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, confirmed by serologic test, were included in this study. High-resolution CT findings were analyzed in terms of ground-glass opacities, distribution of consolidation, type of nodules, cavities, interlobular septal thickening, bronchial dilatations, bronchial wall thickening and pleural effusion. In patients with tuberculosis, average age was 33.5 years (range, 20-67); in those with mycoplasma pneumonia it was 32.5 years (range, 17-74). Segmental and subsegmental distributions were most common in both diseases; the preferred site of consolidation was different, however; for tuberculosis it was the upper lobes (13 cases, 65%; bilateral involvement, 7 cases); for mycoplasma pneumonia it was the lower lobes (11 cases, 64.7%). Non-segmental (diffuse and random) distribution of ground-glass opacities were seen in two patients(11.8%) with mycoplasma pneumonia. Centrilobular nodules, branching linear opacities and alveolar nodules were not different in both diseases, but there were nodules above 10mm in 14 cases of tuberculosis and in only one case of mycoplasma pneumonia. Tree-in-bud appearances were seen in five cases of tuberculosis. Cavities without air-fluid level were noted in ten cases of tuberculosis. Other interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening, bronchial dilatation and pleural effusion were not different in both diseases. There was considerable overlap between high resolution CT findings of tuberculosis with airspace consolidation and those of mycoplasma pneumonia. The location of consolidation, type of nodules, and the presence of tree-in-bud appearance and cavities help in the differentiation of the two diseases, however

  18. National scale-up of integrated community case management in rural Ethiopia: implementation and early lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Although under-five mortality in Ethiopia has decreased 67% in the past two decades, many, children still die from preventable or treatable conditions, mainly pneumonia, newborn problems, diarrhea, malaria and malnutrition. Most of these deaths can be avoided with timely and appropriate care, but access to and use of treatment remains inadequate. Community health workers, appropriately trained, supervised, and supplied with essen- tial equipment and medicines, can deliver case management or referral to most sick children. In 2010, Ethiopia added pneumonia to diarrhea, malaria and severe acute malnutrition, targeted for treatment in the integrated community case management (iCCM) strategy. This article describes the national scale-up of iCCM implementation and early lessons learned. We reviewed data related to iCCM program inputs and processes from reports, minutes, and related documents from January 2010 through July 2013. We describe introduction and scale-up through eight health system components. The government and partners trained and supplied 27,116 of the total 32,000 Health Extension Workers and mentored 80% of them to deliver iCCM services to over one million children. The government led a strong-iCCM partnership that attracted development partners in implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and research. Service utilization and weak supply chain remain-major challenges. Strong MOH leadership, policy support, and national partnerships helped successful national iCCM scale-up and should help settle remaining challenges.

  19. Successful Immunoglobulin Treatment in Severe Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia Caused by Dermatomyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In connective tissue diseases, autoantibodies cause pulmonary interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and patients require treatment with an immunosuppressive agent such as a steroid. Dermatomyositis is an incurable, uncommon form of connective tissue disease that occasionally causes diffuse pulmonary inflammation leading to acute severe respiratory failure. In such cases, the prognosis is very poor despite treatment with high-dose steroid. In the present case, a 46-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea. He was diagnosed with dermatomyositis combined with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP with respiratory failure and underwent treatment with steroid and an immunosuppressive agent, but the COP was not improved. However, the respiratory failure did improve after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin, which therefore can be considered a treatment option in cases where steroids and immunosuppressive agents are ineffective.

  20. The Association Between Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection and Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Chlamydia pneumoniae has been linked with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases; however, data on stroke and cerebrovascular accidents are sparse. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the association between C. pneumoniae infection and ischemic stroke. Patients and Methods In a case-control study, 141 patients, admitted with ischemic stroke, were compared with gender and age-matched control subjects (n = 141. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, the presence of C. pneumoniae IgG and IgA in the patients’ sera was determined. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 15 and were compared between the two groups using T-test and chi square test. Results The mean ages of the case and control groups were 68.97 ± 12.29 and 66.95 ± 6.68 years old, respectively. The difference between these two groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.102. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgG were 78.7% in the patients with stroke and 52.5% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. The seroprevalence of C. pneumoniae-specific IgA were 41.1% in the stroke and 15.6% in the control group. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001. Conclusions The results supported the hypothesis that serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection may be associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular accident.

  1. Using structured decision making to manage disease risk for Montana wildlife

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael S.; Gude, Justin A.; Anderson, Neil J.; Ramsey, Jennifer M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Sullivan, Mark G.; Edwards, Victoria L.; Gower, Claire N.; Cochrane, Jean Fitts; Irwin, Elise R.; Walshe, Terry

    2013-01-01

    We used structured decision-making to develop a 2-part framework to assist managers in the proactive management of disease outbreaks in Montana, USA. The first part of the framework is a model to estimate the probability of disease outbreak given field observations available to managers. The second part of the framework is decision analysis that evaluates likely outcomes of management alternatives based on the estimated probability of disease outbreak, and applies managers' values for different objectives to indicate a preferred management strategy. We used pneumonia in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) as a case study for our approach, applying it to 2 populations in Montana that differed in their likelihood of a pneumonia outbreak. The framework provided credible predictions of both probability of disease outbreaks, as well as biological and monetary consequences of management actions. The structured decision-making approach to this problem was valuable for defining the challenges of disease management in a decentralized agency where decisions are generally made at the local level in cooperation with stakeholders. Our approach provides local managers with the ability to tailor management planning for disease outbreaks to local conditions. Further work is needed to refine our disease risk models and decision analysis, including robust prediction of disease outbreaks and improved assessment of management alternatives.

  2. Unexplained Dyspnea in a Young Adult with Epstein–Barr Virus Infectious Mononucleosis: Pulmonary Involvement or Co-Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A.; Herrarte Fornos, Scarlet

    2017-01-01

    Clinically, in young immunocompetent adults, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually manifests as infectious mononucleosis (IM). Typical clinical findings of EBV IM include fever, profound fatigue, pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly. Respiratory involvement with EBV IM may occur, but is distinctly rare. We present a case of a 20 year old female who with classic EBV IM, but was inexplicably dyspneic and hypoxemic. Further diagnostic testing confirmed co-infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae. As a non-zoonotic atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), M. pneumoniae may rarely be accompanied by severe hypoxemia and even acute respiratory distress syndrome. She represented a diagnostic dilemma regarding the cause of her hypoxemia, i.e., due to EBV IM with pulmonary involvement or severe M. pneumoniae CAP. The patient slowly recovered with respiratory quinolone therapy. PMID:28869530

  3. Unexplained Dyspnea in a Young Adult with Epstein-Barr Virus Infectious Mononucleosis: Pulmonary Involvement or Co-Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A; Herrarte Fornos, Scarlet

    2017-09-04

    Clinically, in young immunocompetent adults, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) usually manifests as infectious mononucleosis (IM). Typical clinical findings of EBV IM include fever, profound fatigue, pharyngitis, bilateral posterior cervical adenopathy, and splenomegaly. Respiratory involvement with EBV IM may occur, but is distinctly rare. We present a case of a 20 year old female who with classic EBV IM, but was inexplicably dyspneic and hypoxemic. Further diagnostic testing confirmed co-infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae . As a non-zoonotic atypical community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), M. pneumoniae may rarely be accompanied by severe hypoxemia and even acute respiratory distress syndrome. She represented a diagnostic dilemma regarding the cause of her hypoxemia, i.e., due to EBV IM with pulmonary involvement or severe M. pneumoniae CAP. The patient slowly recovered with respiratory quinolone therapy.

  4. Necrotizing pneumonia after pharyngitis due to fusobacterium necrophorum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, P K; Flowers, R A

    1984-01-01

    A case of necrotizing pneumonia secordary to Fusobacterium necrophorum is reported. This anaerobic infection commonly originates in the upper respiratory tract and is often accompanied by multiple system disease due to hematogeneous seeding. When the lungs are involved, diffuse necrotizing pneumonia with pleural effusions and cavitation result. The course is prolonged, and the diagnosis is frequently delayed. With appropriate antibiotics, the prognosis is good.

  5. Detection of plant DNA in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Bousbia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospital-acquired infections such as nosocomial pneumonia are a serious cause of mortality for hospitalized patients, especially for those admitted to intensive care units (ICUs. Despite the number of the studies reported to date, the causative agents of pneumonia are not completely known. Herein, we found by molecular technique that vegetable and tobacco DNA may be detected in the bronchoalveolar lavage from patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we studied bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL from patients admitted to ICUs with ventilator-associated pneumonia. BAL fluids were assessed with molecular tests, culture and blood culture. We successfully identified plant DNA in six patients out of 106 (6% with ventilator-associated pneumonia. Inhalation was confirmed in four cases and suspected in the other two cases. Inhalation was significantly frequent in patients with plant DNA (four out of six patients than those without plant DNA (three out of 100 patients (P<0.001. Nicotiana tabacum chloroplast DNA was identified in three patients who were smokers (cases 2, 3 and 6. Cucurbita pepo, Morus bombycis and Triticum aestivum DNA were identified in cases 1, 4 and 5 respectively. Twenty-three different bacterial species, two viruses and five fungal species were identified from among these six patients by using molecular and culture techniques. Several of the pathogenic microorganisms identified are reported to be food-borne or tobacco plant-associated pathogens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study shows that plants DNA may be identified in the BAL fluid of pneumonia patients, especially when exploring aspiration pneumonia, but the significance of the presence of plant DNA and its role in the pathogenesis of pneumonia is unknown and remains to be investigated. However, the identification of these plants may be a potential marker of aspiration in patients with pneumonia.

  6. Invasive liver abscess syndrome caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae with definite K2 serotyping in Japan: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ryota; Kudo, Daisuke; Gu, Yoshiaki; Yano, Hisakazu; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Omura, Taku; Irino, Shigemi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kushimoto, Shigeki

    2016-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia is a well-known human pathogen, and recently, a distinct invasive syndrome caused by K. pneumoniae serotypes K1 and K2 has been recognized in Southeast Asia. This syndrome is characterized by primary liver abscess and extrahepatic complications resulting from bacteremic dissemination. We report the first adult case of primary liver abscess caused by the definite K2 serotyped pathogen, with endogenous endophthalmitis in Japan. A 64-year-old woman was admitted to a nearby hospital for a high fever and diarrhea. She had visual loss of her right eye, renal dysfunction, and thrombocytopenia within 24 h from admission. She was transferred to our institution. On admission, she had no alteration of mental status and normal vital signs; however, she had almost complete ablepsia of the right eye. Laboratory data showed severe inflammation, liver dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, an increased serum creatinine level, and coagulopathy. Computed tomography showed a low density area in the right lobe of the liver. Invasive liver abscess syndrome probably caused by K. pneumonia was highly suspected and immediately administered broad-spectrum antibiotics for severe sepsis. Concurrently, endogenous endophthalmitis was diagnosed, and we performed vitrectomy on the day of admission. The blood culture showed K. pneumoniae infection. Percutaneous drainage of the liver abscess was also performed. Although she was discharged in a good general condition on day 22, she had complete ablepsia of the right eye. The K2A gene was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is consistent with the K2 serotype. PCR was also positive for the virulence-associated gene rmpA. Final diagnosis was invasive liver abscess syndrome caused by K2 serotype K. pneumonia. Although the primary liver abscess caused by K. pneumoniae with a hypermucoviscous phenotype is infrequently reported outside Southeast Asia, physicians should recognize this syndrome, and appropriate diagnosis and

  7. Organizing pneumonia and occupational and environmental risk factors: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobard, Stéphanie; Chaigne, Benjamin; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Lasfargues, Gérard; Diot, Elisabeth

    2017-11-01

    A single-center case-control study was carried out to investigate the relationship between occupational and environmental exposure and organizing pneumonia (OP). Thirty-seven cases of OP, including 25 cases of cryptogenic OP, and 111 controls were included. Occupational exposure was assessed retrospectively by an industrial hygienist and an occupational physician, through semi-quantitative estimates of exposure. An exposure score was calculated for each subject, based on probability, intensity, daily frequency, and duration of exposure for each period of employment. The final cumulative exposure score was obtained by summing exposure scores for all periods of employment. Significant associations with all-cause OP were observed for exposure to tetrachloroethylene (OR 13.33, CI 95% 1.44-123.5) and silica (OR 6.61, CI 95% 1.16-37.71). A significant association with cryptogenic OP was observed only for tetrachloroethylene (OR 31.6, CI 95% 1.64-610.8). No associations were found for environmental exposure. Despite its low statistical power, this work suggests that occupational risk factors could be involved in OP.

  8. Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood--nervous system disorder during or after a respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Sauteur, P M; Streuli, J C; Iff, T; Goetschel, P

    2011-07-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is an important aetiological agent of encephalitis in children, with encephalitis being the most frequent paediatric extrapulmonary manifestation of M. pneumoniae infections. Evidence of M. pneumoniae involvement in childhood encephalitis is difficult to obtain, because M. pneumoniae is seldom detected in the cerebrospinal fluid and the clinical picture shows gradual onset. Therefore, we present a small case-study as a paradigm of M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood and illustrate the importance of this entity based on a review of previously published cases. We describe neurological signs and symptoms of 2 patients with M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis in childhood. Respiratory symptoms with fever occurred in both children. They were seropositive for M. pneumoniae, but did not have the organism detected by PCR from cerebrospinal fluid. No long-term neurologic sequelae occurred. M. pneumoniae has to be considered as a responsible pathogen of encephalitis in children, even if respiratory symptoms do not occur. Due to the seldom detection of M. pneumoniae in cerebrospinal fluid, evidence of m. pneumoniae involvement in childhood encephalitis is difficult to obtain.Faced with a neurological disease with no organism detected in CNS in the majority of cases assumes that M. pneumoniae-associated encephalitis is most likely a paradigm for an autoimmune disease with uniform pathogenesis mediated by an immunologic response to an antecedent antigenic stimulus from M. pneumoniae. It is important to relate this organism to this relatively common and potentially devastating clinical syndrome. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Incidence and Consequences of Near-Drowning-Related Pneumonia-A Descriptive Series from Martinique, French West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerland, Laura; Mégarbane, Bruno; Kallel, Hatem; Brouste, Yanick; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Resiere, Dabor

    2017-11-17

    Drowning represents one major cause of accidental death. Near-drowning patients are exposed to aspiration that may result in pneumonia with life-threatening consequences. We designed this descriptive study to investigate the frequency, nature, and consequences of post-drowning pneumonia. One hundred and forty-four near-drowning patients (33 children and 111 adults) admitted during four years to the University Hospital of Martinique, French Indies, were included. Patients presented pre-hospital cardiac arrest (41%) and exhibited acute respiratory failure (54%), cardiovascular failure (27%), and lactic acidosis (75%) on admission. Empirical antibiotics, as decided by the physicians in charge, were administered in 85 patients (59%). Post-drowning early onset bacterial pneumonia was diagnosed as "possible" in 13 patients (9%) and "confirmed" in 22 patients (15%). Tracheal aspiration revealed the presence of polymorphous pharyngeal flora (59%) or one predominant bacteria species (41%) including Enterobacter aerogenes , Enterobacter cloacae , Staphylococcus aureus , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Aeromonas hydrophilia , and Morganella morgani . Despite adequate supportive care, drowning resulted in 45 fatalities (31%). Early onset bacterial aspiration pneumonia (either possible or confirmed) did not significantly influence the risk of death. In conclusion, near-drowning-related bacterial aspiration pneumonia seems rare and does not influence the mortality rate. There is still a need for practice standardization to improve diagnosis of post-drowning pneumonia and near-drowning patient management.

  10. Subgroup analysis of large trials can guide further research: a case study of vitamin E and pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Hemilä

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Harri Hemilä, Jaakko KaprioDepartment of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FinlandBackground: Biology is complex and the effects of many interventions may vary between population groups. Subgroup analysis can give estimates for specific populations, but trials are usually too small for such analyses.Purpose: To test whether the effect of vitamin E on pneumonia risk is uniform over subgroups defined by smoking and exercise.Methods: The Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study examined the effects of vitamin E (50 mg per day and β-carotene (20 mg per day on lung cancer in 29,133 male smokers aged 50–69 years using a 2 × 2 factorial design. The trial was conducted among the general community in Finland during 1985–1993; the intervention lasted for 6.0 years (median. In the present study, we tested the uniformity of vitamin E effect on the risk of hospital-treated pneumonia (898 cases by adding a dummy variable to allow each subgroup its own vitamin E effect in a Cox model covering all participants.Results: Vitamin E effect was not uniform over eight subgroups defined by baseline smoking (5–19 vs ≥20 cigarettes per day, age of smoking initiation (≤20 vs ≥21 years, and exercise during leisure time (yes vs no. Vitamin E decreased pneumonia risk by 69% (95% CI: 43% to 83% among participants who had the least exposure to smoking and exercised during leisure time. Vitamin E increased pneumonia risk by 79% (95% CI: 27% to 150% among those who had the highest exposure to smoking and did not exercise.Limitations: Although the evidence of heterogeneity is strong, it is not evident to what extent the estimates of effect or the limits between the subgroups can be extrapolated to other populations.Conclusion: Subgroup analysis of large trials should be encouraged, though caution is needed in the interpretation of findings. The role of vitamin E in susceptibility to pneumonia in physically active nonsmokers warrants

  11. Health care and social care costs of pneumonia in Denmark: a register-based study of all citizens and patients with COPD in three municipalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brogaard SL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Susanne Lausten Brogaard,1 Maj Britt Dahl Nielsen,1 Lars Ulrik Nielsen,2 Trine Mosegaard Albretsen,3 Morten Bundgaard,4 Niels Anker,1 Maja Appel,1 Kim Gustavsen,1 Rose-Marie Lindkvist,5 Anne Skjoldan,2 Grete Breinhild,3 Peter Bo Poulsen5 1COWI AS, Management - Health, Kongens Lyngby, 2Seniors and Health Department, Gladsaxe Municipality, Welfare Technology, Søborg, 3Elderly and Health Care Department, Lolland Municipality, Maribo, 4Department of Public Health, Holbaek Municipality, Holbaek, 5Pfizer Denmark ApS, Health & Value, Ballerup, Denmark Background: Pneumonia is a frequent lung infection and a serious illness, which is often diagnosed among patients hospitalized with acute exacerbations of COPD. The aim of this study was to estimate the attributable costs due to pneumonia among patients hospitalized with pneumonia compared to a matched general population control group without pneumonia hospitalization.Methods: This study includes citizens older than 18 years from three municipalities (n=142,344. Based on national registers and municipal data, the health and social care costs of pneumonia in the second half of 2013 are estimated and compared with propensity score-matched population controls.Results: The average health care costs of 383 patients hospitalized with pneumonia in the second half of 2013 were US$34,561 per patient. Among pneumonia patients with COPD, the costs were US$35,022. The attributable costs of patients with pneumonia compared to the population control group for the 6-month period were US$24,155 per case. Overall, the attributable costs for the 383 pneumonia cases amounted to US$9.25 million. Subgroup analyses showed that costs increased with age. The attributable costs due to pneumonia were highest among the 18–59-year-old and the 70–79-year-old patients. This difference is likely to reflect an increased risk of mortality among the pneumonia patients. Men have higher costs than women in the pneumonia group

  12. Impacto de Streptococcus pneumoniae en las neumonías del niño latinoamericano Impact of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumonias of Latin American children

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    María Hortal

    2000-09-01

    xico (47,0% y los menores a Colombia (12,1%. La resistencia a la penicilina se asoció con un reducido número de serotipos capsulares, fundamentalmente el 14 y el 23F, el primero resistente a la penicilina y a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol, y el segundo multirresistente. La frecuencia de la resistencia a la trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol fue elevada en todos los países y el valor máximo correspondió a Argentina (58,0%. La disminución de la susceptibilidad al cloranfenicol tuvo baja frecuencia, salvo en Colombia (23,4%. La resistencia a la eritromicina fue baja en todos los países y todos los aislados fueron sensibles a la vancomicina.Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the leading causes of infant morbidity and mortality. Studies conducted in developing countries indicate that the most serious symptoms of pneumonia are associated with bacterial causes, mainly Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by Haemophilus influenzae type b. Managing those infections in children under two years of age is hindered by the lack of appropriate vaccines and by the decreased susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and other antibiotics. In 1993, at the initiative of the Regional System for Vaccines of the Pan American Health Organization, and with funding from the Canadian International Development Agency, a study was designed to identify the S. pneumoniae capsular types that cause invasive disease in Latin American children under 5 years of age. The objective of the study was to determine the ideal composition of a conjugate vaccine that could be used in Latin America, and the penicillin susceptibility of the S. pneumoniae isolates. The initiative was undertaken in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Uruguay. This report analyzes the information that the participating countries generated on pneumococcal pneumonia. A total of 3 393 children were found with systemic S. pneumoniae infections, of which 1 578 corresponded to pneumonias. The analysis focused on 1 409 cases

  13. Bayesian Estimation of Pneumonia Etiology: Epidemiologic Considerations and Applications to the Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloria Knoll, Maria; Fu, Wei; Shi, Qiyuan; Prosperi, Christine; Wu, Zhenke; Hammitt, Laura L; Feikin, Daniel R; Baggett, Henry C; Howie, Stephen R C; Scott, J Anthony G; Murdoch, David R; Madhi, Shabir A; Thea, Donald M; Brooks, W Abdullah; Kotloff, Karen L; Li, Mengying; Park, Daniel E; Lin, Wenyi; Levine, Orin S; O'Brien, Katherine L; Zeger, Scott L

    2017-06-15

    In pneumonia, specimens are rarely obtained directly from the infection site, the lung, so the pathogen causing infection is determined indirectly from multiple tests on peripheral clinical specimens, which may have imperfect and uncertain sensitivity and specificity, so inference about the cause is complex. Analytic approaches have included expert review of case-only results, case-control logistic regression, latent class analysis, and attributable fraction, but each has serious limitations and none naturally integrate multiple test results. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study required an analytic solution appropriate for a case-control design that could incorporate evidence from multiple specimens from cases and controls and that accounted for measurement error. We describe a Bayesian integrated approach we developed that combined and extended elements of attributable fraction and latent class analyses to meet some of these challenges and illustrate the advantage it confers regarding the challenges identified for other methods. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  14. Risk factors associated with development of ventilator associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed; Hussain, Syed Fayyaz

    2005-02-01

    To assess the risk factors associated with development of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). A case control study. Intensive Care Unit (ICU) at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, between January 1999 and June 2000. All patients with assisted mechanical ventilation were assessed for the development of VAP. Risk factors associated with development of VAP were determined. Adult patients who developed pneumonia, 48 hours after ventilation, were called cases while those who did not develop pneumonia were called controls. Seventy (28%) out of 250 mechanically ventilated patients developed VAP (rate of VAP was 26 cases per 1000 ventilator days). Shock during first 48 hours of ventilation (odds ratio (OR), 5.95; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.83-12.52), transport out of ICU during mechanical ventilation (OR, 6.0; 95% CI, 2.92-12.37), re-intubation (OR, 4.23; 95% CI, 2.53-9.85), prior episode of aspiration of gastric content (OR, 3.07; 95% CI, 1.35-7.01), and use of antibiotics prior to intubation (OR,2.55; 95% CI, 1.20-5.41) were found to be independently associated with a higher risk of developing VAP. Gram negative organisms and Staphylococcus aureus were responsible for over 90% of cases. Patients with VAP had higher crude mortality rate (57.1%) compared with controls (32.2%). Ventilator associated pneumonia is associated with a high mortality. This study has identified risk factors associated with VAP.

  15. Lung abscess in a child secondary to Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Candelotti, P; Tulli, M; Sabatini, M R; Luciani, L; Carlucci, A

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of a lung abscess in a child 6-year-old admitted with a history of right hemithorax pain lasting for 15 days and the onset of mild fever in the last two days. Etiological research showed positivity of IgM antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae after seven days of admission. The child has been successfully treated with antibiotic therapy, without the use of macrolides, for a duration of 4 weeks. Our study suggests that the Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection may predispose to severe infections, such as lung abscess, caused by typical respiratory pathogens. The reported case of lung abscess is one of the few reported in the literature in the modern antibiotic era and is the first preceded by Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection.

  16. The impact of airborne particulate matter on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia among children in Jinan, China: A case-crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chenguang; Wang, Xianfeng; Pang, Na; Wang, Lanzhong; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Tengfei; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tianran; Li, Wei

    2017-06-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of short-term changes in the concentration of particulate matter of diameter ≤2.5 µm (PM 2.5 ) and ≤10 µm (PM 10 ) on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. It explores confoundings factors of weather, season, and chemical pollutants. Information on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in 2014 was extracted from the database of Jinan Qilu Hospital. The relative risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was assessed using a case-crossover approach, controlling weather variables, day of the week, and seasonality. The single-pollutant model demonstrated that increased risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was significantly associated with elevated PM 2.5 concentrations the day before hospital admission and elevated PM 10 concentrations 2 days before hospital admission. An increment of 10 μg/m 3 in PM 2.5 and PM 10 was correlated with a 6% (95% CI 1.02--1.10) and 4% (95% CI 1.00-1.08) rise in number of admissions for pneumonia, respectively. In two pollutant models, PM 2.5 and PM 10 remained significant after inclusion of sulfur dioxide or nitrogen dioxide but not carbon monoxide. This study demonstrated that short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM 2.5 /PM 10 ) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. This study demonstrated that short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM 2.5 /PM 10 ) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China, and suggested the relevance of pollutant exposure levels and their effects. As a specific group, children are sensitive to airborne particulate matter. This study estimated the short-term effects attribute to other air pollutants to provide references for relevant studies.

  17. ASUPAN SENG YANG RENDAH SEBAGAI FAKTOR RISIKO KEPARAHAN PNEUMONIA PADA ANAK USIA 12-59 BULAN

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    Meiry Nasution

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Period prevalence of infant pneumonia in Indonesia is 18.5 per mile. The high mortality rate due to pneumonia of 62 percent was found in 10 countries and 5 countries was located in Asia. Zinc is one of micronutrients which is reported to prevent pneumonia as   an acute phase response to infection and help to boost the body immune response. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of zinc intake as risk factor of severe pneumonia in children. A case control study was conducted among children aged 12–59  months in 2 hospitals and 6 health centres, Yogyakarta city. Thirty four children were categorized as having severe pneumonia (cases and 102 children were categorized as having pneumonia (control.  All sample’s mothers completed a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire during March-April 2014. Data analysis was performed  using Mantel-Haenszel test and conditional logistic regression, α = 0,05. Results of the study showed that there were 41.2 percent cases and 56.9 percent control were exclusively breast-fed. The  proportion of cases who had inadequate zink intake was higher than control group. There was no difference between inadequate zinc intake and the severe pneumonia (OR 1,08 and  95% CI 0,5-2,3. There was a statistically significant correlation between low-zinc intake and severe pneumonia if second  disease exist (OR 3,8  and 95% CI 1,4 -10,8. As an conclusion, Inadequate zinc intake affected severe pneumonia when the secondary diseases exist in children with pneumonia.   ABSTRAK   Period prevalence pneumonia balita di Indonesia adalah 18,5 per mil. Angka kematian yang tinggi akibat pneumonia sebesar 62 persen terdapat di 10 negara dan 5 negara di antaranya merupakan negara di Asia. Defisiensi seng menyebabkan penurunan kekebalan sel sehingga meningkatkan kerentanan terhadap penyakit pneumonia. Tujuan penelitian ini menganalisis asupan seng yang kurang sebagai faktor risiko keparahan pneumonia pada anak

  18. The impact of community-acquired pneumonia on the health-related quality-of-life in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2017-03-14

    The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life of community-dwelling elderly with and without community-acquired pneumonia during a 12-month follow-up period. In a matched cohort study design, nested in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on the efficacy of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine in community-dwelling persons of ≥65 years, health-related quality-of-life was assessed in 562 subjects hospitalized with suspected community-acquired pneumonia (i.e. diseased cohort) and 1145 unaffected persons (i.e. non-diseased cohort) matched to pneumonia cases on age, sex, and health status (EQ-5D-3L-index). Health-related quality-of-life was determined 1-2 weeks after hospital discharge/inclusion and 1, 6 and 12 months thereafter, using Euroqol EQ-5D-3L and Short Form-36 Health survey questionnaires. One-year quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were estimated for both diseased and non-diseased cohorts. Separate analyses were performed for pneumonia cases with and without radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia. The one-year excess QALY loss attributed to community-acquired pneumonia was 0.13. Mortality in the post-discharge follow-up year was 8.4% in community-acquired pneumonia patients and 1.2% in non-diseased persons (p pneumonia patients, compared to non-diseased persons, but differences in health-related quality-of-life between radiologically confirmed and non-confirmed community-acquired pneumonia cases were not statistically significant. Community-acquired pneumonia was associated with a six-fold increased mortality and 16% lower quality-of-life in the post-discharge year among patients surviving hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia, compared to non-diseased persons. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00812084 .

  19. Combined pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Legionella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup; Jønsson, V; Niebuhr, U

    1987-01-01

    During a one year period acute pericarditis was diagnosed in 16 consecutive patients without acute infarction or malignancy. In two of these patients with both pericarditis and pneumonia Legionella infection was present. One case was caused by Legionella longbeachae and the other by both Legionella...... longbeachae and Legionella jordanis. When pericarditis is associated with pneumonia Legionella infection should be sought so that effective treatment with erythromycin may be started early....

  20. Chest X-ray quality in the diagnosis of pneumonia in children: from prescription to optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estevan, M.; Cotelo, E.; Hortal, M.; Iraola, I.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRI), primarily pneumonia, is the leading cause of childhood death in developing countries. The increasing incidence of antimicrobial resistance and the high cost of vaccines lead to considering the first strategy to reduce pneumonia deaths the early detection of the disease. Case management begins with the clinical examination and may continue with the prescription of a chest x-ray. Consequently, the radiograph should meet quality standards, and radiologists and paediatricians must know how to interpret the images. Special attention should be paid on patient dose due to children radiosensitivity, high frequency and chest x rays rejection rate. This paper is a retrospective study of chest radiographs performed in 5731 children with clinical diagnosis of ALRI assisted in three Uruguayan hospitals during the three year investigation supported by the Division of Vaccines and Immunization of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) that had the aim of estimating the burden of pneumonia (from 2001 to 2004). It is analyzed the prescription of radiographs during the diagnosis and in later controls (2220 children assisted in two of the three hospitals). Patient doses are estimated from technical parameters and equipment specifications. The investigation also analyzes patient doses that could have been avoided if paediatricians had managed the disease according to the established protocols. Results show that 82.4 % of chest X-rays diagnosed pneumonia and that some children underwent up to ten radiographs. Significant differences were found in patient dose in the three hospitals, concluding that education on image quality on chest radiographs of radiologists, paediatricians and radiological technologists is the first and best tool for the earlier diagnosis of pneumonia in children and for the application of Radiation Protection (RP) principles in medical exposures. (author)

  1. Should Aerosolized Antibiotics Be Used to Treat Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Berra, Lorenzo; Klompas, Michael

    2016-06-01

    In patients with ventilator-associated pneumonia, systemic use of antibiotics is the cornerstone of medical management. Supplemental use of aerosolized antibiotics with intravenous antibiotics in both experimental and clinical studies has been shown to have the following pharmacologic benefits: (1) aerosolized antibiotics reach the infected lung parenchyma without crossing the pulmonary alveolar capillary barrier; (2) aerosolized antibiotics increase anti-bacterial efficacy through increased local antibiotic concentration; and (3) aerosolized antibiotics decrease systemic toxicity. These benefits may be particularly beneficial to treat pneumonia caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Clinical data on the benefits of aerosolized antibiotics are more limited. Studies to date have not clearly shown improvements in time to extubation, mortality, or other patient-centered outcomes. At present, amikacin, colistin, and ceftazidime are the most frequently used and studied aerosolized antibiotics. This review summarizes the characteristics of aerosolized antibiotics, reviews the advantages and disadvantages of using aerosolized antibiotics, and calls for future investigations based on animal study data. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Managing Returnable Containers Logistics - A Case Study Part II - Improving Visibility through Using Automatic Identification Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Meiser

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This case study is the result of a project conducted on behalf of a company that uses its own returnable containers to transport purchased parts from suppliers. The objective of this project was to develop a proposal to enable the company to more effectively track and manage its returnable containers. The research activities in support of this project included (1 the analysis and documentation of the physical flow and the information flow associated with the containers and (2 the investigation of new technologies to improve the automatic identification and tracking of containers. This paper explains the automatic identification technologies and important criteria for selection. A companion paper details the flow of information and containers within the logistics chain, and it identifies areas for improving the management of the containers.

  3. Predicting 30-Day Pneumonia Readmissions Using Electronic Health Record Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makam, Anil N; Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Clark, Christopher; Zhang, Song; Xie, Bin; Weinreich, Mark; Mortensen, Eric M; Halm, Ethan A

    2017-04-01

    Readmissions after hospitalization for pneumonia are common, but the few risk-prediction models have poor to modest predictive ability. Data routinely collected in the electronic health record (EHR) may improve prediction. To develop pneumonia-specific readmission risk-prediction models using EHR data from the first day and from the entire hospital stay ("full stay"). Observational cohort study using stepwise-backward selection and cross-validation. Consecutive pneumonia hospitalizations from 6 diverse hospitals in north Texas from 2009-2010. All-cause nonelective 30-day readmissions, ascertained from 75 regional hospitals. Of 1463 patients, 13.6% were readmitted. The first-day pneumonia-specific model included sociodemographic factors, prior hospitalizations, thrombocytosis, and a modified pneumonia severity index; the full-stay model included disposition status, vital sign instabilities on discharge, and an updated pneumonia severity index calculated using values from the day of discharge as additional predictors. The full-stay pneumonia-specific model outperformed the first-day model (C statistic 0.731 vs 0.695; P = 0.02; net reclassification index = 0.08). Compared to a validated multi-condition readmission model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores, the full-stay pneumonia-specific model had better discrimination (C statistic range 0.604-0.681; P pneumonia. This approach outperforms a first-day pneumonia-specific model, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services pneumonia model, and 2 commonly used pneumonia severity of illness scores. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:209-216. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  4. Correlations between computed tomography findings and clinical manifestations of Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagihashi, Kunihiro; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Fujikawa, Atsuko; Matsuoka, Shin; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the imaging features and compare computed tomography (CT) findings with clinical features of patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia. We retrospectively reviewed 75 patients (44 men, 31 women; mean age 67 years) diagnosed with S. pneumoniae pneumonia who underwent chest CT scanning at our institution between January 2007 and August 2008. Diagnoses were based on detection of the S. pneumoniae antigen in urine. Chest CT scans revealed abnormalities in all patients. The predominant opacity patterns were an airspace pneumonia pattern (48%) and a bronchopneumonia pattern (48%), followed by an interstitial pneumonia pattern (4%). Consolidation was observed most frequently (84%) followed by ground glass opacity (82.7%), bronchial wall thickening (61.3%), and centrilobular nodules (49.3%). Airway dilatation (21.6%), pleural effusion (33.3%), lymphadenopathy (34.8%), and pulmonary emphysema (21.3%) were also observed. Pulmonary emphysema was significantly less frequent in patients with the bronchopneumonia pattern than in those without (p=0.007). The clinical features and CT findings did not differ significantly. CT image analysis showed that patients with S. pneumoniae pneumonia exhibited the bronchopneumonia and airspace pneumonia patterns with equal frequency. Bronchopneumonia pattern was less common in patients with preexisting emphysema. (author)

  5. Validity of bacterial pneumonia score for predicting bacteremia in children with pneumonia

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    Rosalia Theodosia Daten Beyeng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacteremia in children with pneumonia reflects a severe condition, with longer duration of hospital care and potentially lethal complications. Early detection of bacteremia in patients with pneumonia may reduce serious complications. Few bacteremia screening tools have been widely used in chidren with pneumonia. One of those tools is the bacterial pneumonia score (BPS. Objective To assess the validity of the bacterial pneumonia score for predicting bacteremia in pediatric patients with pneumonia. Methods A diagnostic test was conducted on children aged 1 to 60 months hospitalized with pneumonia from December 2009 to August 2010. Subjects were collected consecutively. Pneumonia was diagnosed using the World Healt Organization (WHO criteria. Subjects underwent complete blood counts and blood culture examinations at admission. Statistical analyses included sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV/NPV, positive and negative likelihood ratio (PLR/NLR, and post-test probability. Results Our study included 229 children. Based on BPS with a cut-off score of ≥ 4, the sensitivity was 83.3%, specificity 49.7%, PPV 8.4%, NPV 98.2%, PLR 1.66, NLR 0.31, and post-test probability 8.4% for detecting bacteremia in pediatric pneumonia patients. Conclusion BPS can not be used for predicting bacteremia in pediatric patients with pneumonia.

  6. Daptomycin-Induced Acute Eosinophilic Pneumonia: Late Onset and Quick Recovery

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    Mohamad Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide antibiotic that provides great coverage for gram positive cocci. From the early years of daptomycin use, concerns were raised regarding the pulmonary side effects of daptomycin and potential development of acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP secondary to daptomycin therapy. Discussion. AEP could be idiopathic or induced by drugs or toxins. It is a distinct entity from atopic diseases and autoimmune, parasitic, or fungal infections that can also cause pulmonary eosinophilia. Multiple medications are associated with acute eosinophilic pneumonia. Multiple cases of daptomycin-induced AEP have been reported in the literature. Diagnosis of AEP is based on clinical history, laboratory tests, and radiographic studies. Obtaining bronchoalveolar lavage or lung biopsy is needed to confirm the diagnosis. Timing of the drug use and clinical presentation is crucial in the diagnosis of drug-induced AEP. Discontinuation of the offending drug and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay treatment with great outcomes and recovery. Conclusion. We present a case of AEP caused by daptomycin, with complete recovery after discontinuation of daptomycin and administration of steroids. The patient had AEP after almost 6 weeks of daptomycin therapy which has never been reported in literature and our patient achieved complete recovery with appropriate management.

  7. Pneumonia in the tropics.

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    Lim, Tow Keang; Siow, Wen Ting

    2018-01-01

    Pneumonia in the tropics poses a heavy disease burden. The complex interplay of climate change, human migration influences and socio-economic factors lead to changing patterns of respiratory infections in tropical climate but also increasingly in temperate countries. Tropical and poorer countries, especially South East Asia, also bear the brunt of the global tuberculosis (TB) pandemic, accounting for almost one-third of the burden. But, as human migration patterns evolve, we expect to see more TB cases in higher income as well as temperate countries, and rise in infections like scrub typhus from ecotourism activities. Fuelled by the ease of air travel, novel zoonotic infections originating from the tropics have led to global respiratory pandemics. As such, clinicians worldwide should be aware of these new conditions as well as classical tropical bacterial pneumonias such as melioidosis. Rarer entities such as co-infections of leptospirosis and chikungunya or dengue will need careful consideration as well. In this review, we highlight aetiologies of pneumonia seen more commonly in the tropics compared with temperate regions, their disease burden, variable clinical presentations as well as impact on healthcare delivery. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  8. Standardized Interpretation of Chest Radiographs in Cases of Pediatric Pneumonia From the PERCH Study.

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    Fancourt, Nicholas; Deloria Knoll, Maria; Barger-Kamate, Breanna; de Campo, John; de Campo, Margaret; Diallo, Mahamadou; Ebruke, Bernard E; Feikin, Daniel R; Gleeson, Fergus; Gong, Wenfeng; Hammitt, Laura L; Izadnegahdar, Rasa; Kruatrachue, Anchalee; Madhi, Shabir A; Manduku, Veronica; Matin, Fariha Bushra; Mahomed, Nasreen; Moore, David P; Mwenechanya, Musaku; Nahar, Kamrun; Oluwalana, Claire; Ominde, Micah Silaba; Prosperi, Christine; Sande, Joyce; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2017-06-15

    Chest radiographs (CXRs) are a valuable diagnostic tool in epidemiologic studies of pneumonia. The World Health Organization (WHO) methodology for the interpretation of pediatric CXRs has not been evaluated beyond its intended application as an endpoint measure for bacterial vaccine trials. The Pneumonia Etiology Research for Child Health (PERCH) study enrolled children aged 1-59 months hospitalized with WHO-defined severe and very severe pneumonia from 7 low- and middle-income countries. An interpretation process categorized each CXR into 1 of 5 conclusions: consolidation, other infiltrate, both consolidation and other infiltrate, normal, or uninterpretable. Two members of a 14-person reading panel, who had undertaken training and standardization in CXR interpretation, interpreted each CXR. Two members of an arbitration panel provided additional independent reviews of CXRs with discordant interpretations at the primary reading, blinded to previous reports. Further discordance was resolved with consensus discussion. A total of 4172 CXRs were obtained from 4232 cases. Observed agreement for detecting consolidation (with or without other infiltrate) between primary readers was 78% (κ = 0.50) and between arbitrators was 84% (κ = 0.61); agreement for primary readers and arbitrators across 5 conclusion categories was 43.5% (κ = 0.25) and 48.5% (κ = 0.32), respectively. Disagreement was most frequent between conclusions of other infiltrate and normal for both the reading panel and the arbitration panel (32% and 30% of discordant CXRs, respectively). Agreement was similar to that of previous evaluations using the WHO methodology for detecting consolidation, but poor for other infiltrates despite attempts at a rigorous standardization process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  9. Project management in practice : Evaluating a case project through project management theories

    OpenAIRE

    Uusitalo, Jenni

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to evaluate a case project and to study whether it was carried out in a correct manner; meaning that did the case project follow the project management models. In addition, part of the study was to determine what could have been improved in the management of the case project. The case project was about creating and launching a communication channel based on a social media service, on a blog platform called Tumblr, for Team Finland in Spain network. The network p...

  10. Improving the management of post-operative acute pain: Priorities for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meissner, W. (Winfried); F. Coluzzi (Flaminia); Fletcher, D. (Dominique); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); B. Morlion (Bart); Neugebauer, E. (Edmund); Pérez, A.M. (Antonio Montes); J. Pergolizzi (Joseph)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPoor management of post-operative acute pain can contribute to medical complications including pneumonia, deep vein thrombosis, infection and delayed healing, as well as the development of chronic pain. It is therefore important that all patients undergoing surgery should receive

  11. Pathology and polymerase chain reaction detection of ovine progressive pneumonia (maedi) cases in slaughtered sheep in India.

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    Singh, Rahul; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Rajendra; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumari, Swati; Yadav, Jay Prakash; Kashyap, Gayatri; Singh, Karam Pal; Singh, Vidya; Sahoo, Monalisa

    2017-11-01

    The small ruminant lentiviruses are known to cause maedi-visna (MV) and caprine arthritis - encephalitis in sheep and goats, typically affecting joints, udder, lungs, and the central nervous system. The diagnosis usually involves serology, clinical signs, immunohistochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the present study, the histopathologically positive pneumonia cases of MV were confirmed by PCR in lung tissue probably for the first time in India. A total of 888 lungs of adult sheep, aged between 2 and 5 years, were screened during slaughter, of which 121 were found to have pneumonic lesions. The tissues from each pneumonic lung including associated lymph nodes were collected in 10% neutral buffered formalin for histopathology. The frozen tissues of the same were also collected and stored at -20°C for PCR confirmation. Three of 121 cases of pneumonic lungs of sheep revealed gross and histopathological lesions suggestive of maedi or ovine progressive pneumonia infection. These 3 cases were further confirmed by PCR technique that amplified 291-base pair DNA in the long terminal repeat sequence of MV provirus. This study suggests the low occurrence of MV virus (MVV) infection in India in naturally affected sheep based on pathomorphological lesions and using the molecular tool of PCR detection of the virus in tissues. Further, a combination of pathomorphology or/and PCR testing might be optimal for detecting the animals infected with MVV.

  12. Quality of care in integrated community case management services in Bugoye, Uganda: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James S; English, Lacey; Matte, Michael; Mbusa, Rapheal; Ntaro, Moses; Bwambale, Shem; Kenney, Jessica; Siedner, Mark J; Reyes, Raquel; Lee, Patrick T; Mulogo, Edgar; Stone, Geren S

    2018-02-27

    Village health workers (VHWs) in five villages in Bugoye subcounty (Kasese District, Uganda) provide integrated community case management (iCCM) services, in which VHWs evaluate and treat malaria, pneumonia, and diarrhoea in children under 5 years of age. VHWs use a "Sick Child Job Aid" that guides them through the evaluation and treatment of these illnesses. A retrospective observational study was conducted to measure the quality of iCCM care provided by 23 VHWs in 5 villages in Bugoye subcounty over a 2-year period. Patient characteristics and clinical services were summarized using existing aggregate programme data. Lot quality assurance sampling of individual patient records was used to estimate adherence to the iCCM algorithm, VHW-level quality (based on adherence to the iCCM protocol), and change over time in quality of care (using generalized estimating equations regression modelling). For each of 23 VHWs, 25 patient visits were randomly selected from a 2-year period after iCCM care initiation. In these visits, 97% (150) of patients with diarrhoea were treated with oral rehydration and zinc, 95% (216) of patients with pneumonia were treated with amoxicillin, and 94% (240) of patients with malaria were treated with artemisinin-based combination therapy or rectal artesunate. However, only 44% (44) of patients with a negative rapid test for malaria were appropriately referred to a health facility. Overall, 75% (434) of patients received all the correct evaluation and management steps. Only 9 (39%) of the 23 VHWs met the pre-determined LQAS threshold for high-quality care over the 2-year observation period. Quality of care increased significantly in the first 6 months after initiation of iCCM services (p = 0.003), and then plateaued during months 7-24. Quality of care was high for uncomplicated malaria, pneumonia and diarrhoea. Overall quality of care was lower, in part because VHWs often did not follow the guidelines to refer patients with fever who tested

  13. Coping strategies for financial burdens in families with childhood pneumonia in Bangladesh.

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    Alamgir, Nadia I; Naheed, Aliya; Luby, Stephen P

    2010-10-19

    This study aimed to determine the out-of pocket expenditure and coping strategies adopted by families of children admitted in a hospital in Bangladesh with pneumonia. Trained interviewers surveyed parents of 90 children and conducted in-depth interviews with six families below the age of 5 years who were admitted to the largest pediatric hospital in Bangladesh with a diagnosis of pneumonia. We estimated the total cost of illness associated with hospitalization and explored the coping strategies of the families. The mean expenditure of the families for the illness episode was US$ 94 (±SD 52.5) with 75% having spent more than half of their total monthly expenditure on this hospitalization. Three fourths (68/90, 76%) of the families managed the expenditure by borrowing, mortgaging or selling assets; 64% had to borrow the full cost of hospitalization and 10% borrowed from the formal sector with a monthly interest rate of 5 to 30%. The burden was highest for the people from poor income strata. Families earning ≤US$ 59 per month were 10 times more likely than families earning ≥US$ 59 per month to borrow money (OR = 10.0, 95% CI: 2.8-38.8). To repay their debts, 22% of families reported that they would work extra hours and 50% planned to reduce spending on food and education for their children. Coping strategies adopted by the families to manage the out-of-pocket expenditure for children requiring hospitalization were catastrophic for the majority of the families. Efforts to prevent childhood pneumonia for example, by vaccination against the most common pathogens, by improving air quality and by improving childhood nutrition can provide a double advantage. They can prevent both disease and poverty.

  14. Coping strategies for financial burdens in families with childhood pneumonia in Bangladesh

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    Luby Stephen P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study aimed to determine the out-of pocket expenditure and coping strategies adopted by families of children admitted in a hospital in Bangladesh with pneumonia. Methods Trained interviewers surveyed parents of 90 children and conducted in-depth interviews with six families below the age of 5 years who were admitted to the largest pediatric hospital in Bangladesh with a diagnosis of pneumonia. We estimated the total cost of illness associated with hospitalization and explored the coping strategies of the families. Results The mean expenditure of the families for the illness episode was US$ 94 (±SD 52.5 with 75% having spent more than half of their total monthly expenditure on this hospitalization. Three fourths (68/90, 76% of the families managed the expenditure by borrowing, mortgaging or selling assets; 64% had to borrow the full cost of hospitalization and 10% borrowed from the formal sector with a monthly interest rate of 5 to 30%. The burden was highest for the people from poor income strata. Families earning ≤US$ 59 per month were 10 times more likely than families earning ≥US$ 59 per month to borrow money (OR = 10.0, 95% CI: 2.8-38.8. To repay their debts, 22% of families reported that they would work extra hours and 50% planned to reduce spending on food and education for their children. Conclusions Coping strategies adopted by the families to manage the out-of-pocket expenditure for children requiring hospitalization were catastrophic for the majority of the families. Efforts to prevent childhood pneumonia for example, by vaccination against the most common pathogens, by improving air quality and by improving childhood nutrition can provide a double advantage. They can prevent both disease and poverty.

  15. Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis in systemic lupus erythematosus.

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    Sánchez, A; Robaina, R; Pérez, G; Cairoli, E

    2016-04-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rapidly progressive destructive soft tissue infection with high mortality. Streptococcus pneumoniae as etiologic agent of necrotizing fasciitis is extremely unusual. The increased susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus is probably a multifactorial phenomenon. We report a case of a patient, a 36-year-old Caucasian female with 8-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus who presented a fatal Streptococcus pneumoniae necrotizing fasciitis. The role of computed tomography and the high performance of blood cultures for isolation of the causative microorganism are emphasized. Once diagnosis is suspected, empiric antibiotic treatment must be prescribed and prompt surgical exploration is mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. A prospective study of the prevalence of tuberculosis and bacteraemia in Bangladeshi children with severe malnutrition and pneumonia including an evaluation of Xpert MTB/RIF assay.

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    Mohammod Jobayer Chisti

    Full Text Available Severe malnutrition is a risk factor for pneumonia due to a wide range of pathogens but aetiological data are limited and the role of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncertain.We prospectively investigated severely malnourished young children (<5 years with radiological pneumonia admitted over a 15-month period. Investigations included blood culture, sputa for microscopy and mycobacterial culture. Xpert MTB/RIF assay was introduced during the study. Study children were followed for 12 weeks following their discharge from the hospital.405 eligible children were enrolled, with a median age of 10 months. Bacterial pathogens were isolated from blood culture in 18 (4.4% children, of which 72% were Gram negatives. Tuberculosis was confirmed microbiologically in 7% (27/396 of children that provided sputum - 10 by culture, 21 by Xpert MTB/RIF assay, and 4 by both tests. The diagnostic yield from induced sputum was 6% compared to 3.5% from gastric aspirate. Sixty (16% additional children had tuberculosis diagnosed clinically that was not microbiologically confirmed. Most confirmed tuberculosis cases did not have a positive contact history or positive tuberculin test. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay compared to culture was 67% (95% CI: 24-94 and 92% (95% CI: 87-95 respectively. Overall case-fatality rate was 17% and half of the deaths occurred in home following discharge from the hospital.TB was common in severely malnourished Bangladeshi children with pneumonia. X-pert MTB/RIF assay provided higher case detection rate compared to sputum microscopy and culture. The high mortality among the study children underscores the need for further research aimed at improved case detection and management for better outcomes.

  17. Improved malaria case management in formal private sector through public private partnership in Ethiopia: retrospective descriptive study.

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    Argaw, Mesele D; Woldegiorgis, Asfawesen Gy; Abate, Derebe T; Abebe, Mesfin E

    2016-07-11

    Malaria is a major public health problem and still reported among the 10 top causes of morbidity and mortality in Ethiopia. More than one-third of the people sought treatment from the private health sector. Evaluating adherences of health care providers to standards are paramount importance to determine the quality and the effectiveness of service delivery. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of public private mix (PPM) approach in improving quality of malaria case management among formal private providers. A retrospective data analysis was conducted using 2959 facility-months data collected from 110 PPM for malaria care facilities located in Amhara, Dire Dawa, Hareri, Oromia, Southern Nation Nationalities and Peoples and Tigray regions. Data abstraction formats were used to collect and collate the data on quarterly bases. The data were manually cleaned and analysed using Microsoft Office Excel 2010. To claim statistical significance non-parametric McNemar test was done and decision accepted at P < 0.05. From April 2012-September 2015, a total of 873,707 malaria suspected patients were identified, of which one-fourth (25.6 %) were treated as malaria cases. Among malaria suspected cases the proportion of malaria investigation improved from recorded in first quarter 87.7-100.0 % in last quarter (X(2) = 66.84, P < 0.001). The majority (96.0 %) were parasitologically-confirmed cases either by using microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests. The overall slid positivity rate was 25.1 % of which half (50.7 %) were positive for Plasmodium falciparum and slightly lower than half (45.2 %) for Plasmodium vivax; the remaining 8790 (4.1 %) showed mixed infections of P. falciparum and P. vivax. Adherence to appropriate treatment using artemether-lumefantrine (AL) was improved from 47.8 % in the first quarter to 95.7 % in the last quarter (X(2) = 12.89, P < 0.001). Similarly, proper patient management using chloroquine (CQ) was improved

  18. Acute suppurative parotitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in an HIV-infected man.

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    Guzman Vinasco, Luis; Bares, Sara; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2015-03-02

    We report a case of a 32-year-old man who presented with progressive unilateral parotid gland enlargement and subsequently tested positive for HIV. A CT scan of the neck performed with contrast showed a phlegmon in the region of the right parotid tail measuring approximately 2.5×2.4 cm. Cultures of the aspirated fluid grew Streptococcus pneumoniae and the S. pneumoniae urinary antigen test was also positive. The patient underwent surgical debridement and received antimicrobial therapy with complete resolution of the parotitis. Parotitis caused by S. pneumoniae is rare, and HIV infection should be suspected in any case of invasive pneumococcal disease. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. A Community-acquired Lung Abscess Attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae which Extended Directly into the Chest Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yuki; Tobino, Kazunori; Yasuda, Yuichiro; Sueyasu, Takuto; Nishizawa, Saori; Yoshimine, Kouhei; Munechika, Miyuki; Asaji, Mina; Yamaji, Yoshikazu; Tsuruno, Kosuke; Miyajima, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Yosuke; Ebi, Noriyuki

    We herein report the case of 75-year-old Japanese female with a community-acquired lung abscess attrib