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Sample records for improved shock normals

  1. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks Four spacecraft determination of shock normals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Mellott, M. M.; Smith, E. J.; King, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 1, 2, 3, IMP 8, and Prognoz 7 observations of interplanetary shocks in 1978 and 1979 provide five instances where a single shock is observed by four spacecraft. These observations are used to determine best-fit normals for these five shocks. In addition to providing well-documented shocks for future investigations these data allow the evaluation of the accuracy of several shock normal determination techniques. When the angle between upstream and downstream magnetic field is greater than 20 deg, magnetic coplanarity can be an accurate single spacecraft method. However, no technique based solely on the magnetic measurements at one or multiple sites was universally accurate. Thus, the use of overdetermined shock normal solutions, utilizing plasma measurements, separation vectors, and time delays together with magnetic constraints, is recommended whenever possible.

  2. On possible structures of normal ionizing shock waves in electromagnetic shock tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, M.A.; Synakh, V.S.; Zakajdakhov, V.V.; Velikovich, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of possible structures of normal ionizing shock waves is studied. On the basis of the general theory of ionizing shock waves in magnetic fields, a similarity solution of the piston problem for an impenetrable piston and a magnetic piston is described and a numerical solution of the non-stationary piston problem is obtained. It is shown that precursor photo-ionization of the neutral gas by the radiation of the shock-heated gas is the dominant factor in shaping normal ionizing shock structures. In particular, it is shown that the strong overheating of atoms and ions in shock fronts is due to the tensor form of Ohm's law in the precursor region. (author)

  3. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: four spacecraft determination of shock normals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.; Mellott, M.M.; Smith, E.J.; King, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    ISEE 1,2,3 IMP8, and Prognoz 7 observations of interplanetary shocks in 1978 and 1979 provide five instances where a single shock is observed by four spacecraft. These observations are used to determine best-fit normals for these five shocks. In addition to providing well-documented shocks for furture techniques. When the angle between upstream and downstream magnetic field is greater than 20, magnetic coplanarity can be an accurate single spacecraft method. However, no technique based solely on the magnetic measurements at one or multiple sites was universally accurate. Thus, we recommend using overdetermined shock normal solutions whenever possible, utilizing plasma measurements, separation vectors, and time delays together with magnetic constraints

  4. The Effect of Shock Stress and Field Strength on Shock-Induced Depoling of Normally Poled PZT 95/5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHHABILDAS, LALIT C.; FURNISH, MICHAEL D.; MONTGOMERY, STEPHEN T.; SETCHELL, ROBERT E.

    1999-01-01

    Shock-induced depoling of the ferroelectric ceramic PZT 95/5 is utilized in a number of pulsed power devices. Several experimental and theoretical efforts are in progress in order to improve numerical simulations of these devices. In this study we have examined the shock response of normally poled PZT 95/5 under uniaxial strain conditions. On each experiment the current produced in an external circuit and the transmitted waveform at a window interface were recorded. The peak electrical field generated within the PZT sample was varied through the choice of external circuit resistance. Shock pressures were varied from 0.6 to 4.6 GPa, and peak electrical fields were varied from 0.2 to 37 kV/cm. For a 2.4 GPa shock and the lowest peak field, a nearly constant current governed simply by the remanent polarization and the shock velocity was recorded. Both decreasing the shock pressure and increasing the electrical field resulted in reduced current generation, indicating a retardation of the depoling kinetics

  5. An improved method to experimentally determine temperature and pressure behind laser-induced shock waves at low Mach numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendijanifard, Mohammad; Willis, David A

    2011-01-01

    Laser-matter interactions are frequently studied by measuring the propagation of shock waves caused by the rapid laser-induced material removal. An improved method for calculating the thermo-fluid parameters behind shock waves is introduced in this work. Shock waves in ambient air, induced by pulsed Nd : YAG laser ablation of aluminium films, are measured using a shadowgraph apparatus. Normal shock solutions are applied to experimental data for shock wave positions and used to calculate pressure, temperature, and velocity behind the shock wave. Non-dimensionalizing the pressure and temperature with respect to the ambient values, the dimensionless pressure and temperature are estimated to be as high as 90 and 16, respectively, at a time of 10 ns after the ablation pulse for a laser fluence of F = 14.5 J cm -2 . The results of the normal shock solution and the Taylor-Sedov similarity solution are compared to show that the Taylor-Sedov solution under-predicts pressure when the Mach number of the shock wave is small. At a fluence of 3.1 J cm -2 , the shock wave Mach number is less than 3, and the Taylor-Sedov solution under-predicts the non-dimensional pressure by as much as 45%.

  6. Variable field-to-normal angles in the shock foreshock boundary observed by ISEE 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstadt, E.W.; Mellot, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Saturated ULF waves in the foreshock, with amplitudes comparable to the magnitude of the average field, are convected by the solar wind to the quasi-parallel shock where the average field-normal angle is less than, or about, 45 0 . Several examples from ISEE 1 and 2 magnetometer data show waves that defined local, instantaneous field-normal angles very different periodically from the average. Local geometric conditions at the nominally quasi-parallel shock varied from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular, at the periods of typical upstream waves. Clear magnetic shock transitions occurred under temporarily quasi-perpendicular geometry

  7. Dynamic analysis to establish normal shock and vibration of radioactive material shipping packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    A computer model, CARDS (Cask-Railcar Dynamic Simulator) was developed to provide input data for a broad range of radioactive material package-tiedown structural assessments. CARDS simulates the dynamic behavior of shipping packages and their transporters during normal transport conditions. The model will be used to identify parameters which significantly affect the normal shock and vibration environments which, in turn, provide the basis for determining the forces transmitted to the packages

  8. On the evolution of normal ionizing shock waves in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synakh, V.S.; Zakajdakov, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    The generation, structure and propagation of one-dimensional ionizing MHD shock waves in helium under a pressure of 100 mTorr are investigated with the help of numerical simulation. The normal magnetic field varies within 3 to 10 kG and the longitudinal magnetic field varies up to 2.5 kG. The model includes the kinetics of ionization and photo-processes. If a solid conducting piston is a source of perturbation, it may give rise to generation and further development of an MHD switch-on wave. Its evolution at an advanced stage depends weakly on the source. The curves for the dependence of the shock speed on time and the driving magnetic field as well as the profiles for the main quantities are presented. A possibility of comparison with real experiments is discussed. Algorithms based on Godunov's sliding meshes and the imbedding methods are used for numerical simulation. (author)

  9. Normal Reflection Characteristics of One-Dimensional Unsteady Flow Shock Waves on Rigid Walls from Pulse Discharge in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Yan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong shock waves can be generated by pulse discharge in water, and the characteristics due to the shock wave normal reflection from rigid walls have important significance to many fields, such as industrial production and defense construction. This paper investigates the effects of hydrostatic pressures and perturbation of wave source (i.e., charging voltage on normal reflection of one-dimensional unsteady flow shock waves. Basic properties of the incidence and reflection waves were analyzed theoretically and experimentally to identify the reflection mechanisms and hence the influencing factors and characteristics. The results indicated that increased perturbation (i.e., charging voltage leads to increased peak pressure and velocity of the reflected shock wave, whereas increased hydrostatic pressure obviously inhibited superposition of the reflection waves close to the rigid wall. The perturbation of wave source influence on the reflected wave was much lower than that on the incident wave, while the hydrostatic pressure obviously affected both incident and reflection waves. The reflection wave from the rigid wall in water exhibited the characteristics of a weak shock wave, and with increased hydrostatic pressure, these weak shock wave characteristics became more obvious.

  10. Maximization of energy recovery inside supersonic separator in the presence of condensation and normal shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shooshtari, S.H. Rajaee; Shahsavand, A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural gases provide around a quarter of energy consumptions around the globe. Supersonic separators (3S) play multifaceted role in natural gas industry processing, especially for water and hydrocarbon dew point corrections. These states of the art devices have minimum energy requirement and favorable process economy compared to conventional facilities. Their relatively large pressure drops may limit their application in some situations. To maximize the energy recovery of the dew point correction facility, the pressure loss across the 3S unit should be minimized. The optimal structure of 3s unit (including shock wave location and diffuser angle) is selected using simultaneous combination of normal shock occurrence and condensation in the presence of nucleation and growth processes. The condense-free gas enters the non-isentropic normal shock wave. The simulation results indicate that the normal shock location, pressure recovery coefficient and onset position strongly vary up to a certain diffuser angle (β = 8°) with the maximum pressure recovery of 0.88 which leads to minimum potential energy loss. Computational fluid dynamic simulations show that separation of boundary layer does not happen for the computed optimal value of β and it is essentially constant when the inlet gas temperatures and pressures vary over a relatively broad range. - Highlights: • Supersonic separators have found numerous applications in oil and gas industries. • Maximum pressure recovery is crucial for such units to maximize energy efficiency. • Simultaneous condensation and shock wave occurrence are studied for the first time. • Diverging nozzle angle of 8° can provide maximum pressure recovery of 0.88. • The optimal diffuser angle remains constant over a broad range of inlet conditions.

  11. Fluid resuscitation does not improve renal oxygenation during hemorrhagic shock in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Legrand, Matthieu; Mik, Egbert; Balestra, Gianmarco; Lutter, Rene; Pirracchio, Romain; Payen, Didier; Ince, Can

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The resuscitation strategy for hemorrhagic shock remains controversial, with the kidney being especially prone to hypoxia. Methods: The authors used a three-phase hemorrhagic shock model to investigate the effects of fluid resuscitation on renal oxygenation. After a 1-h shock phase, rats were randomized into four groups to receive either normal saline or hypertonic saline targeting a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of either 40 or 80 mmHg. After such resuscitation, rats w...

  12. ELABELA Improves Cardio-Renal Outcome in Fatal Experimental Septic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquerel, David; Chagnon, Frédéric; Sainsily, Xavier; Dumont, Lauralyne; Murza, Alexandre; Côté, Jérôme; Dumaine, Robert; Sarret, Philippe; Marsault, Éric; Salvail, Dany; Auger-Messier, Mannix; Lesur, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    Apelin-13 was recently proposed as an alternative to the recommended β-adrenergic drugs for supporting endotoxin-induced myocardial dysfunction. Since Apelin-13 signals through its receptor (Apelin peptide jejunum) to exert singular inotropic/vasotropic actions and to optimize body fluid balance, this candidate pathway might benefit septic shock management. Whether the newly discovered ELABELA (ELA), a second endogenous ligand of the Apelin peptide jejunum receptor highly expressed in the kidney, further improves cardio-renal impairment remains unknown. Interventional study in a rat model of septic shock (128 adult males) to assess the effects of ELA and Apelin-13 on vascular and cardio-renal function. Experiments were performed in a tertiary care University-based research institute. Polymicrobial sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction was produced by cecal ligation puncture to assess hemodynamic efficacy, cardioprotection, and biomechanics under acute or continuous infusions of the apelinergic agonists ELA or Apelin-13 (39 and 15 µg/kg/hr, respectively) versus normal saline. Apelinergic agonists improved 72-hour survival after sepsis induction, with ELA providing the best clinical outcome after 24 hours. Apelinergic agonist infusion counteracted cecal ligation puncture-induced myocardial dysfunction by improving left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. ELA-treated cecal ligation puncture rats were the only group to 1) display a significant improvement in left ventricular filling as shown by increased E-wave velocity and left ventricular end-diastolic volume, 2) exhibit a higher plasma volume, and 3) limit kidney injury and free-water clearance. These beneficial renal effects were superior to Apelin-13, likely because full-length ELA enabled a distinctive regulation of pituitary vasopressin release. Activation of the apelinergic system by exogenous ELA or Apelin-13 infusion improves cardiovascular function and survival after cecal ligation puncture

  13. Shock and vibration environments encountered during normal rail transportation of heavy cargo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, C.F.

    1982-08-01

    This study was conducted to obtain vibration and superimposed shock data during normal rail shipment of heavy cargo. The data were obtained during a regularly scheduled rail shipment of a 45-tonne (50-ton) cargo which consisted of an empty spent-fuel container, its supporting structure, and associated hoisting devices. The shipment was made over rail lines which are operated by the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company between Denver, Colorado and Albuquerque, New Mexico. The instrumented rail car was equipped with 0.38-m (15-in.) hydraulic end-of-car coupling devices. The 99 percentile levels of vibration acceleration amplitudes and single degree-of-freedom superimposed shock response spectra for the longitudinal, transverse, and vertical axes are presented

  14. Thermodynamic bounds for existence of normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIO COLLE

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper is concerned with the thermodynamic theory of the normal shock in compressible fluid flow in pipes, in the lights of the pioneering works of Lord Rayleigh and G. Fanno. The theory of normal shock in pipes is currently presented in terms of the Rayleigh and Fanno curves, which are shown to cross each other in two points, one corresponding to a subsonic flow and the other corresponding to a supersonic flow. It is proposed in this paper a novel differential identity, which relates the energy flux density, the linear momentum flux density, and the entropy, for constant mass flow density. The identity so obtained is used to establish a theorem, which shows that Rayleigh and Fanno curves become tangent to each other at a single sonic point. At the sonic point the entropy reaches a maximum, either as a function of the pressure and the energy density flux or as a function of the pressure and the linear momentum density flux. A Second Law analysis is also presented, which is fully independent of the Second Law analysis based on the Rankine-Hugoniot adiabatic carried out by Landau and Lifshitz (1959.

  15. A shock surface geometry - The February 15-16, 1967, event. [solar flare associated interplanetary shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Chao, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    An estimated shape is presented for the surface of the flare-associated interplanetary shock of February 15-16, 1967, as seen in the ecliptic-plane cross section. The estimate is based on observations by Explorer 33 and Pioneers 6 and 7. The estimated shock normal at the Explorer 33 position is obtained by a least-squares shock parameter-fitting procedure for that satellite's data; the shock normal at the Pioneer 7 position is found by using the magnetic coplanarity theorem and magnetic-field data. The average shock speed from the sun to each spacecraft is determined along with the local speed at Explorer 33 and the relations between these speeds and the position of the initiating solar flare. The Explorer 33 shock normal is found to be severely inclined and not typical of interplanetary shocks. It is shown that the curvature of the shock surface in the ecliptic plane near the earth-Pioneer 7 region is consistent with a radius of not more than 0.4 AU.

  16. Shock reliability analysis and improvement of MEMS electret-based vibration energy harvesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renaud, M; Goedbloed, M; De Nooijer, C; Van Schaijk, R; Fujita, T

    2015-01-01

    Vibration energy harvesters can serve as a replacement solution to batteries for powering tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS). Autonomous wireless TPMS powered by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electret-based vibration energy harvester have been demonstrated. The mechanical reliability of the MEMS harvester still has to be assessed in order to bring the harvester to the requirements of the consumer market. It should survive the mechanical shocks occurring in the tire environment. A testing procedure to quantify the shock resilience of harvesters is described in this article. Our first generation of harvesters has a shock resilience of 400 g, which is far from being sufficient for the targeted application. In order to improve this aspect, the first important aspect is to understand the failure mechanism. Failure is found to occur in the form of fracture of the device’s springs. It results from impacts between the anchors of the springs when the harvester undergoes a shock. The shock resilience of the harvesters can be improved by redirecting these impacts to nonvital parts of the device. With this philosophy in mind, we design three types of shock absorbing structures and test their effect on the shock resilience of our MEMS harvesters. The solution leading to the best results consists of rigid silicon stoppers covered by a layer of Parylene. The shock resilience of the harvesters is brought above 2500 g. Results in the same range are also obtained with flexible silicon bumpers, which are simpler to manufacture. (paper)

  17. Shock reliability analysis and improvement of MEMS electret-based vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, M.; Fujita, T.; Goedbloed, M.; de Nooijer, C.; van Schaijk, R.

    2015-10-01

    Vibration energy harvesters can serve as a replacement solution to batteries for powering tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS). Autonomous wireless TPMS powered by microelectromechanical system (MEMS) electret-based vibration energy harvester have been demonstrated. The mechanical reliability of the MEMS harvester still has to be assessed in order to bring the harvester to the requirements of the consumer market. It should survive the mechanical shocks occurring in the tire environment. A testing procedure to quantify the shock resilience of harvesters is described in this article. Our first generation of harvesters has a shock resilience of 400 g, which is far from being sufficient for the targeted application. In order to improve this aspect, the first important aspect is to understand the failure mechanism. Failure is found to occur in the form of fracture of the device’s springs. It results from impacts between the anchors of the springs when the harvester undergoes a shock. The shock resilience of the harvesters can be improved by redirecting these impacts to nonvital parts of the device. With this philosophy in mind, we design three types of shock absorbing structures and test their effect on the shock resilience of our MEMS harvesters. The solution leading to the best results consists of rigid silicon stoppers covered by a layer of Parylene. The shock resilience of the harvesters is brought above 2500 g. Results in the same range are also obtained with flexible silicon bumpers, which are simpler to manufacture.

  18. Validation of MCDS by comparison of predicted with experimental velocity distribution functions in rarefied normal shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions in normal shock waves in argon and helium are calculated using Monte Carlo direct simulation. These are compared with experimental results for argon at M = 7.18 and for helium at M = 1.59 and 20. For both argon and helium, the variable-hard-sphere (VHS) model is used for the elastic scattering cross section, with the velocity dependence derived from a viscosity-temperature power-law relationship in the way normally used by Bird (1976).

  19. Feedback to providers improves evidence-based implantable cardioverter-defibrillator programming and reduces shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Marc T; Sterns, Laurence D; Piccini, Jonathan P; Joung, Boyoung; Ching, Chi-Keong; Pickett, Robert A; Rabinovich, Rafael; Liu, Shufeng; Peterson, Brett J; Lexcen, Daniel R

    2015-03-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) shocks are associated with increased anxiety, health care utilization, and potentially mortality. The purpose of the Shock-Less Study was to determine if providing feedback reports to physicians on their adherence to evidence-based shock reduction programming could improve their programming behavior and reduce shocks. Shock-Less enrolled primary prevention (PP) and secondary prevention (SP) ICD patients between 2009 and 2012 at 118 study centers worldwide and followed patients longitudinally after their ICD implant. Center-specific therapy programming reports (TPRs) were delivered to each center 9 to 12 months after their first enrollment. The reports detailed adherence to evidence-based programming targets: number of intervals to detect ventricular fibrillation (VF NID), longest treatment interval (LTI), supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) discriminators (Wavelet, PR Logic), SVT limit, Lead Integrity Alert (LIA), and antitachycardia pacing (ATP). Clinicians programmed ICDs at their discretion. The primary outcome measure was the change in utilization of evidence-based shock reduction programming before (phase I, n = 2694 patients) and after initiation of the TPR (phase II, n = 1438 patients). Patients implanted after feedback reports (phase II) were up to 20% more likely to have their ICDs programmed in line with evidence-based shock reduction programming (eg, VF NID in PP patients 30/40 in 33.5% vs 18.6%, P programming feedback reports improves adherence to evidence-based shock reduction programming and is associated with lower risk of ICD shocks. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Coronal mass ejection shock fronts containing the two types of intermediate shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinolfson, R.S.; Hundhausen, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical solutions of the time-dependent, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations in two dimensions are used to demonstrate the formation of both types of intermediate shocks in a single shock front for physical conditions that are an idealization of those expected to occur in some observed coronal mass ejections. The key to producing such a shock configuration in the simulations is the use of an initial atmosphere containing a magnetic field representative of that in a coronal streamer with open field lines overlying a region of closed field lines. Previous attempts using just open field lines (perpendicular to the surface) produced shock configurations containing just one of the two intermediate shock types. A schematic of such a shock front containing both intermediate shock types has been constructed previously based solely on the known properties of MHD shocks from the Rankine-Hugoniot equations and specific requirements placed on the shock solution at points along the front where the shock normal and upstream magnetic field are aligned. The shock front also contains, at various locations along the front, a hydrodynamic (nonmagnetic) shock, a switch-on shock, and a fast shock in addition to the intermediate shocks. This particular configuration occurs when the shock front speed exceeds the upstream (preshock) intermediate wave speed but is less than a critical speed defined in the paper (equation 1) along at least some portion of the shock front. A distinctive feature of the front is that it is concave upward (away from the surface) near the region where the field in the preshock plasma is normal to the front of near the central portion of the shock front

  1. Heat shock proteins of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, J.L.; Lin, C.Y.; Chen, Y.M.

    1981-01-01

    The pattern of protein synthesis changes rapidly and dramatically when the growth temperture of soybean seedling tissue is increased from 28 0 C (normal) to about 40 0 C (heat shock). The synthesis of normal proteins is greatly decreased and a new set of proteins, heat shock proteins, is induced. The heat shock proteins of soybean consist of 10 new bands on one-dimensional NaDodSO 4 gels; a more complex pattern is observed on two-dimensional gels. when the tissue is returned to 28 0 C after 4 hr at 40 0 C, there is progressive decline in the synthesis of heat shock proteins and reappearance of a normal pattern of synthesis by 3 or 4 hr. In vitro translation of poly(A) + RNAs isolated from tissued grown at 28 and 40 0 C shows that the heat shock proteins are translated from a ndw set of mRNAs induced at 40 0 C; furthermore, the abundant class mRNAs for many of the normal proteins persist even though they are translated weakly (or not at all) in vivo at 40 or 42.5 0 C. The heat shock response in soybean appears similar to the much-studied heat shock phenomenon in Drosophila

  2. Epicardial shock-wave therapy improves ventricular function in a porcine model of ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holfeld, Johannes; Zimpfer, Daniel; Albrecht-Schgoer, Karin; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Paulus, Patrick; Dumfarth, Julia; Thomas, Anita; Lobenwein, Daniela; Tepeköylü, Can; Rosenhek, Raphael; Schaden, Wolfgang; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Grimm, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Previously we have shown that epicardial shock-wave therapy improves left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in a rat model of myocardial infarction. In the present experiments we aimed to address the safety and efficacy of epicardial shock-wave therapy in a preclinical large animal model and to further evaluate mechanisms of action of this novel therapy. Four weeks after left anterior descending (LAD) artery ligation in pigs, the animals underwent re-thoracotomy with (shock-wave group, n = 6) or without (control group, n = 5) epicardial shock waves (300 impulses at 0.38 mJ/mm 2 ) applied to the infarcted anterior wall. Efficacy endpoints were improvement of LVEF and induction of angiogenesis 6 weeks after shock-wave therapy. Safety endpoints were haemodynamic stability during treatment and myocardial damage. Four weeks after LAD ligation, LVEF decreased in both the shock-wave (43 ± 3%, p wave animals 6 weeks after treatment (62 ± 9%, p = 0.006); no improvement was observed in controls (41 ± 4%, p = 0.36), yielding a significant difference. Quantitative histology revealed significant angiogenesis 6 weeks after treatment (controls 2 ± 0.4 arterioles/high-power field vs treatment group 9 ± 3; p = 0.004). No acute or chronic adverse effects were observed. As a potential mechanism of action in vitro experiments showed stimulation of VEGF receptors after shock-wave treatment in human coronary artery endothelial cells. Epicardial shock-wave treatment in a large animal model of ischaemic heart failure exerted a positive effect on LVEF improvement and did not show any adverse effects. Angiogenesis was induced by stimulation of VEGF receptors. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY OF HYPERTONIC SALINE AND NORMAL SALINE SOLUTIONS IN EXPERIMENTALLY INDUCED ENDOTOXIC SHOCK IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. ZAFAR, G. MUHAMMAD, M. H. HUSSAIN, T. AHMAD, A. YOUSAF AND I. SARFARAZ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was contemplated to determine the comparative beneficial effects of hypertonic saline solution and sterile saline solution in induced endotoxic shock in dogs. For this purpose, 12 healthy Mongrel dogs were randomly divided into two equal groups (A and B. All the animals were induced endotoxaemia by slow intravenous administration of Escherichia coli endotoxins 0111:B4. Group A was treated with normal saline solution @ 90 ml/kg BW, while group B was given hypertonic saline solution @ 4 ml/kg BW, followed by normal saline solution @ 10 ml/kg BW. Different parameters were observed for evaluation of these fluids including clinical and haematological parameters, serum electrolytes, mean arterial pressure, and blood gases at different time intervals up to 24 hours post treatments. After infusion of respective fluids, all parameters returned to baseline values in both the groups but group B showed better results than group A except bicarbonates, which better recovered in group A. Thus, it was concluded that a small-volume of hypertonic saline solution could be effectively used in reversing the endotoxaemia. Moreover, it provides a rapid and inexpensive resuscitation from endotoxic shock.

  4. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. II - Wall shear stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M. S.; Adamson, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to calculate the shear stress at the wall for the interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate. A mixing length model is used for the eddy viscosity. The shock wave is taken to be strong enough that the sonic line is deep in the boundary layer and the upstream influence is thus very small. It is shown that unlike the result found for laminar flow an asymptotic criterion for separation is not found; however, conditions for incipient separation are computed numerically using the derived solution for the shear stress at the wall. Results are compared with available experimental measurements.

  5. Relationship of Interplanetary Shock Micro and Macro Characteristics: A Wind Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Adam; Koval, A

    2008-01-01

    The non-linear least squared MHD fitting technique of Szabo 11 9941 has been recently further refined to provide realistic confidence regions for interplanetary shock normal directions and speeds. Analyzing Wind observed interplanetary shocks from 1995 to 200 1, macro characteristics such as shock strength, Theta Bn and Mach numbers can be compared to the details of shock micro or kinetic structures. The now commonly available very high time resolution (1 1 or 22 vectors/sec) Wind magnetic field data allows the precise characterization of shock kinetic structures, such as the size of the foot, ramp, overshoot and the duration of damped oscillations on either side of the shock. Detailed comparison of the shock micro and macro characteristics will be given. This enables the elucidation of shock kinetic features, relevant for particle energization processes, for observations where high time resolution data is not available. Moreover, establishing a quantitative relationship between the shock micro and macro structures will improve the confidence level of shock fitting techniques during disturbed solar wind conditions.

  6. Slow shocks and their transition to fast shocks in the inner solar wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    The jump conditions of MHD shocks may be directly calculated as functions of three upstream conditions: the shock Alfven number based on the normal component of the relative shock speed, the shock angle, and the plasma β value. The shock Alfven number is less than 1 for a slow shock and greater than 1 for a fast shock. A traveling, forward shock can be a slow shock in coronal space, where the Alfven speed is of the order of 1000 km/s. The surface of a forward slow shock has a bow-shaped geometry with its nose facing toward the sun. The decrease in the Alfven speed at increasing heliocentric distance causes the shock Alfven number of a forward slow shock to become greater than 1, and the shock eventually evolves from a slow shock into a fast shock. During the transition the shock system consists of a slow shock, a fast shock, and a rotational discontinuity. They intersect along a closed transition line. As the system moves outward from the sun, the area enclosed by the transition line expands, the fast shock grows stronger, and the slow shock becomes weaker. Eventually, the slow shock diminishes, and the entire shock system evolves into a forward fast shock. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

  7. Improving resident's skills in the management of circulatory shock with a knowledge-based e-learning tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaño, David; Real, Francis; Alonso, Jose Ramon

    2018-05-01

    Correct clinical management of circulatory shock in emergency departments (ER) and intensive care units (ICU) is critical. In this context, the transmission of professional skills by means of the practical supervision of real cases at the point of care entails important issues that can be widely overcome with the use of computer knowledge-based e-learning tools. Shock-Instructor is a web-based e-learning tool implementing the already tested training program model (TPM) that uses a knowledge base about the evidence found in the clinical practice guidelines about seven types of shock. This tool is expected to reduce the learning times and to improve the skills of hospital residents with regard to both the correct application of the guidelines and patient recovery, suppressing the risks of direct interventions. Shock-Instructor has been used to train residents in the Emergency Department of the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona (Spain) in order to reduce the learning cycle without affecting quality. A case-base with the description of 51 cases with shock and a knowledge-base with 137 clinical rules about the treatment of shock were incorporated to the Shock-Instructor system. A group of 33 residents was involved in a randomized controlled trial to check whether the use of Shock-Instructor can significantly improve the skills of clinicians after one week of problem-based training. No significant differences were found in the skill levels of the intervention (IG) and control (CG) groups prior to learning. However, we observed an improvement of the IG clinicians capacity to stabilize patients with shock in better clinical conditions (5% improvement, p = 0.004), and to reduce the risk of death in 19.52% (p = 0.004), after training. First-year residents in IG enhanced 14.3% their sensitivity in the correct application of guidelines (p = 0.01), and 14.9% the mean survival rate of their patients (p = 0.01), after being trained with Shock-Instructor for a week

  8. The aPC treatment improves microcirculation in severe sepsis/septic shock syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donati, Abele; Damiani, Elisa; Botticelli, Laura; Adrario, Erica; Lombrano, Maria Rita; Domizi, Roberta; Marini, Benedetto; van Teeffelen, Jurgen W. G. E.; Carletti, Paola; Girardis, Massimo; Pelaia, Paolo; Ince, Can

    2013-01-01

    The role of recombinant activated protein C (aPC) during sepsis is still controversial. It showed anti-inflammatory effect and improved the microvascular perfusion in experimental models of septic shock. The present study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that recombinant aPC therapy improves the

  9. Unlimited Relativistic Shock Surfing Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucer, D.; Shapiro, V. D.

    2001-01-01

    Nonrelativistic shock surfing acceleration at quasiperpendicular shocks is usually considered to be a preacceleration mechanism for slow pickup ions to initiate diffusive shock acceleration. In shock surfing, the particle accelerates along the shock front under the action of the convective electric field of the plasma flow. However, the particle also gains kinetic energy normal to the shock and eventually escapes downstream. We consider the case when ions are accelerated to relativistic velocities. In this case, the ions are likely to be trapped for infinitely long times, because the energy of bounce oscillations tends to decrease during acceleration. This suggests the possibility of unlimited acceleration by shock surfing

  10. Improved bow shock models for Herbig-Haro objects - application to HH 2A-prime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.C.; Hartmann, L.; Hartigan, P.

    1988-01-01

    An improved version of the bow shock theory previously applied to Herbig-Haro objects is presented. The modifications provide a more accurate calculation of the ionization state of material entering the bow shock. The revised preionization does not drastically affect the emission-line predictions for a 200 km/s bow shock model, though the effects will be more severe for slower shock velocities. The line profiles of the new models resemble the observed profiles somewhat more closely, and the relative emission-line intensities typically differ by 30 percent from those predicted by the older models. The models agree well with new IUE spectra and existing optical data for HH 2A-prime. 32 references

  11. Multiple spacecraft observations of interplanetary shocks: characteristics of the upstream ulf turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.; Smith, E.J.; Tsurutani, B.T.; Gosling, J.T.; Bame, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    All interplanetary shocks observed by ISEE-3 and either ISEE-1 or ISEE-2 or both in 1978 and 1979 are examined for evidence of upstream waves. In order to characterize the properties of these shocks it is necessary to determine accurate shock normals. We invert an overdetermined set of equations to obtain shock normals, velocities and error estimates for all these shocks. Tests of the method indicate it is quite reliable. Using these normals we then calculate the Mach number and angle between the interplanetary magnetic field and the shock normal for each shock. These parameters allow us to separate the upstream waves into two classes: whistler-mode precursors which occur at low Mach numbers and upstream turbulence whose amplitude at Mach numbers greater than 1.5 is controlled by the angle of the field to the shock normal. The former waves are right-hand circularly polarized and quite monochromatic. The latter waves are more linearly polarized and have a broadband featureless spectrum

  12. Supersonic flow. Pt. 5 Shock waves; Fondamenti fisici dei fasci molecolari supersonici. Pt 5 Onde di Shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanna, G.; Tomassetti, G. [L`Aquila Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    1998-02-01

    The discontinuities in the flow fields (both tangential and shocks) are considered and the equations for the quantities conserved across them are written. The post-shock flow variables are expressed by the Mach number of the incident supersonic flow and its deflection angle operated by rigid wall. Normal and oblique shocks are considered and graphs and polar diagrams are introduced. Then the reflections of a shock wave operated by a rigid wall and by the boundary between a jet and a stagnating gas are analyzed. Finally, the interactions between two distinct shock waves are considered. [Italiano] Vengono considerate le discontinuita` (tangenziali e shocks) nei campi di flusso e sono scritte le equazioni per le quantita` che si conservano attraverso di esse. Le variabili del flusso oltre lo shock sono espresse in funzione del numero di Mach del flusso supersonico incidente e dell`angolo di deflessione di questo operato da una parete rigida. I casi di shock normale, obliquo e distaccato sono considerati e sono introdotti grafici vari e rappresentazioni polari. Sono quindi considerate le riflessioni di un fronte di shock da una parete rigida e dalla frontiera tra un gas in moto ed uno stagnante. Sono infine considerate le diverse interazioni tra due shock distinti.

  13. A Lever Coupling Mechanism in Dual-Mass Micro-Gyroscopes for Improving the Shock Resistance along the Driving Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Gao

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and application of a lever coupling mechanism to improve the shock resistance of a dual-mass silicon micro-gyroscope with drive mode coupled along the driving direction without sacrificing the mechanical sensitivity. Firstly, the mechanical sensitivity and the shock response of the micro-gyroscope are theoretically analyzed. In the mechanical design, a novel lever coupling mechanism is proposed to change the modal order and to improve the frequency separation. The micro-gyroscope with the lever coupling mechanism optimizes the drive mode order, increasing the in-phase mode frequency to be much larger than the anti-phase one. Shock analysis results show that the micro-gyroscope structure with the designed lever coupling mechanism can notably reduce the magnitudes of the shock response and cut down the stress produced in the shock process compared with the traditional elastic coupled one. Simulations reveal that the shock resistance along the drive direction is greatly increased. Consequently, the lever coupling mechanism can change the gyroscope’s modal order and improve the frequency separation by structurally offering a higher stiffness difference ratio. The shock resistance along the driving direction is tremendously enhanced without loss of the mechanical sensitivity.

  14. High-energy air shock study in steel and grout pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, H.D.; Kratz, H.R.; Keough, D.D.; Duganne, D.A.; Ruffner, D.J.; Swift, R.P.; Baum, D.

    1979-01-01

    Voitenko compressors are used to generate 43 mm/μs air shocks in both a steel and a grout outlet pipe containing ambient atmospheric air. Fiber-optic ports provide diaphragm burst times, time-of-arrival (TOA) data, and velocities for the shock front along the 20-mm-ID exit pipes. Pressure profiles are obtained at higher enthalpy shock propagation than ever before and at many locations along the exit pipes. Numerous other electronic sensors and postshot observations are described, as well as experimental results. The primary objectives of the experiments are as follows: (1) provide a data base for normalization/improvement of existing finite-difference codes that describe high-energy air shocks and gas propagation; (2) obtain quantitative results on the relative attenuation effects of two very different wall materials for high-energy air shocks and gas flows. The extensive experimental results satisfy both objectives

  15. Adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodrich, C.C.; Scudder, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    In collisionless magnetosonic shock waves, ions are commonly thought to be decelerated by dc electrostatic cross-shock electric field along the shock normal n. In a frame where ions are normally incident to the shock the change in the potential energy [qphi/sup N/] in the quasi-perpendicular geommetry is of the order of the change of the energy of normal ion flow: [qphi/sup N/]roughly-equal[1/2m/sub i/(V/sub i//sup N/xn) 2 ], which is approximately 200-500 eV at the earth's bow shock. We show that the electron energy gain, typically 1/10 this number, is consistent with such a large potential jump in this geometry. Key facts are the different paths taken by electrons an ions through the shock wave and the frame dependence of the potential jump in the geometry. In the normal incidence frame, electrons lose energy by doing work against the solar wind motional electric field E/sub M//sup N/, which partially offsets the energy gain from the cross-shock electrostatic potential energy [ephi/sub asterisk//sup N/]. In the de Hoffman-Teller frame the motional electric field vanishes; the elctrons gain the full electrostatic potential energy jump e[phi/sub asterisk//sup H//sup T/] of that frame, which is not, however, equal to the electrostatic potential energy jump e[phi/sub asterisk//sup N/] of that frame, which is not, however, equal to the electrostatic potential energy jump e[phi/sub asterisk//sup N/] in the normal incidence frame

  16. Shock loading predictions from application of indicial theory to shock-turbulence interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Laurence R.; Nixon, David

    1991-01-01

    A sequence of steps that permits prediction of some of the characteristics of the pressure field beneath a fluctuating shock wave from knowledge of the oncoming turbulent boundary layer is presented. The theory first predicts the power spectrum and pdf of the position and velocity of the shock wave, which are then used to obtain the shock frequency distribution, and the pdf of the pressure field, as a function of position within the interaction region. To test the validity of the crucial assumption of linearity, the indicial response of a normal shock is calculated from numerical simulation. This indicial response, after being fit by a simple relaxation model, is used to predict the shock position and velocity spectra, along with the shock passage frequency distribution. The low frequency portion of the shock spectra, where most of the energy is concentrated, is satisfactorily predicted by this method.

  17. Inferring Pre-shock Acoustic Field From Post-shock Pitot Pressure Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Xiao, Heng; Virginia Tech Team; Missouri Univ of Sci; Tech Team

    2017-11-01

    Linear interaction analysis (LIA) and iterative ensemble Kalman method are used to convert post-shock Pitot pressure fluctuations to static pressure fluctuations in front of the shock. The LIA is used as the forward model for the transfer function associated with a homogeneous field of acoustic waves passing through a nominally normal shock wave. The iterative ensemble Kalman method is then employed to infer the spectrum of upstream acoustic waves based on the post-shock Pitot pressure measured at a single point. Several test cases with synthetic and real measurement data are used to demonstrate the merits of the proposed inference scheme. The study provides the basis for measuring tunnel freestream noise with intrusive probes in noisy supersonic wind tunnels.

  18. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  19. A shock surface geometry: The February 15--16, 1967, event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepping, R.P.; Chao, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    The flare-associated interplanetary (IP) shock of February 15--16, 1967, observed by Explorer 33 and Pioneer 7 is analyzed to yield an estimation of the ecliptic plane geometry of the shock surface near 1 AU. These spacecraft were separated by 23degree in heliocentric longitude, and Pioneer 7 was at a distance of 1.12 AU from the sun. There was an 18.9-hour delay between the two observations. The estimated shock normal, obtained by using a least squares shock parameter fitting procedure for the Explorer 33 data, is found to be theta/subS//subE/=-53degree and phi/subS//subE/=198degree. The error cone angle for the shock normal of the Explorer 33 observation was approximately 7degree. This severely inclined shock normal is not typical of IP shocks. The shock normal at the Pioneer 7 position is found to be theta/subn/=-14degree and phi/subn/=161degree. However, the uncertainty is large (approx. =25degree for a 1sigma cone angle). Although a data gap occurred at the apparent time of passage of the disturbance at Pioneer 6,the recovered data did not suggest such a passage. A consistent picture of the shock propagation is given. The average shock speed from the sun to each spacecraft and the local speed at Explorer 33 and their relations to the position of the initiating solar flare are obtained and discussed. In the region of space between the earth and Pioneer 7 the shock surface radius of curvature in the ecliptic plane appears to have been 0.4 AU or less

  20. Deinococcus gobiensis cold shock protein improves salt stress tolerance of escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shijie; Wang Jin; Yang Mingkun; Chen Ming; Zhang Wei; Luo Xuegang

    2013-01-01

    The Deinococcus gobiensis I-0, an extremely radiation-resistant bacterium, isolated from the Gobi, has superior resistance to abiotic stress (e.g radiation, oxidation, dehydration and so on). The two cold-shock proteins encoded by csp1 (Dgo_CA1136) and csp2 (Dgo_PA0041) were identified in the complete genome sequence of D. gobiensis. In this study, we showed that D. gobiensis Csp1 protected Escherichia coli cells against cold shock and other abiotic stresses such as salt and osmotic shocks. The quantitative real-time PCR assay shows that the expression of trehalose synthase (otsA, otsB) was up-regulated remarkably under salt stress in the csp1-expressing strain, while no difference in the expression of the genes involved in trehalose degradation (treB and treC). The results suggested that Csp1 caused the accumulation of the trehalose was a major feature for improving tolerance to salt stress in E. coli. (authors)

  1. Clonidine reduces norepinephrine and improves bone marrow function in a rodent model of lung contusion, hemorrhagic shock, and chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamo, Ines G; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Ramos, Harry; Loftus, Tyler J; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M

    2017-03-01

    Propranolol has been shown previously to restore bone marrow function and improve anemia after lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that daily clonidine administration would inhibit central sympathetic outflow and restore bone marrow function in our rodent model of lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic stress. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 6 days of restraint stress after lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock during which the animals received clonidine (75 μg/kg) after the restraint stress. On postinjury day 7, we assessed urine norepinephrine, blood hemoglobin, plasma granulocyte colony stimulating factor, and peripheral blood mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells, as well as bone marrow cellularity and erythroid progenitor cell growth. The addition of clonidine to lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress significantly decreased urine norepinephrine levels, improved bone marrow cellularity, restored erythroid progenitor colony growth, and improved hemoglobin (14.1 ± 0.6 vs 10.8 ± 0.6 g/dL). The addition of clonidine to lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress significantly decreased hematopoietic progenitor cells mobilization and restored granulocyte colony stimulating factor levels. After lung contusion/hemorrhagic shock with chronic restraint stress, daily administration of clonidine restored bone marrow function and improved anemia. Alleviating chronic stress and decreasing norepinephrine is a key therapeutic target to improve bone marrow function after severe injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interaction between a normal shock wave and a turbulent boundary layer at high transonic speeds. I - Pressure distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiter, A. F.

    1980-01-01

    Asymptotic solutions are derived for the pressure distribution in the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The undisturbed boundary layer is characterized by the law of the wall and the law of the wake for compressible flow. In the limiting case considered, for 'high' transonic speeds, the sonic line is very close to the wall. Comparisons with experiment are shown, with corrections included for the effect of longitudinal wall curvature and for the boundary-layer displacement effect in a circular pipe.

  3. Shock analysis: Three useful new relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.J.; Burton, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years a variety of methods for analyzing hydromagnetic shocks have been developed. The Rankine-Hugoniot relations on which the analyses are based are sufficiently complex and involve sufficiently large numbers of variables that in specific instances a decision must be made on how to proceed. The authors analyses have tended to emphasize the magnetic field (B) and velocity (V) as the starting point since they are typically the most accurately determined measurables. They authors have also tended to carry out the analysis in a reference frame aligned, and moving, with the shock. Three new relations have been derived which are generally useful. (1) The shock speed can be calculated from the upstream and downstream values of B and V independent of the shock normal or its direction relative to the upstream field. (2) An explicit relation is derived relating the angles between the jump in velocity, the shock normal, and the upstream field. (3) From the magnetic field and two-dimensional velocity measurements, which are frequently all that are available, it is possible to infer the third component of the upstream-downstream velocity jump

  4. Multi-shock Shield Performance at 16.5 MJ for Catalogued Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Davis, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    While orbital debris of ten centimeters or more are tracked and catalogued, the difficulty of finding and accurately accounting for forces acting on the objects near the ten centimeter threshold results in both uncertainty of their presence and location. These challenges result in difficult decisions for operators balancing potential costly operational approaches with system loss risk. In this paper, numerical simulations and an experiment using the multi-shock shield system is described for a cylindrical projectile composed of Nylon, aluminum and void that is approximately 8 cm in diameter and 10 cm in length weighing 670 g impacting the multi-shock shield normal to the surface with approximately 16.5 MJ of kinetic energy. The multi-shock shield system has been optimized to facilitate the fragmentation, spread and deceleration of the projectile remnants using hydrodynamic simulations of the impact event. The characteristics and function of each of the layers of the multi-shock system will be discussed along with considerations for deployment and improvement.

  5. Analysis of the interaction of a weak normal shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, R. E.; Grossman, B.

    1974-01-01

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to analyze the interaction of a normal shock wave with an unseparated turbulent boundary layer on a flat surface at transonic speeds. The theory leads to a three-layer description of the interaction in the double limit of Reynolds number approaching infinity and Mach number approaching unity. The interaction involves an outer, inviscid rotational layer, a constant shear-stress wall layer, and a blending region between them. The pressure distribution is obtained from a numerical solution of the outer-layer equations by a mixed-flow relaxation procedure. An analytic solution for the skin friction is determined from the inner-layer equations. The significance of the mathematical model is discussed with reference to existing experimental data.

  6. Underwater hydraulic shock shovel control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He-Ping; Luo, A.-Ni; Xiao, Hai-Yan

    2008-06-01

    The control system determines the effectiveness of an underwater hydraulic shock shovel. This paper begins by analyzing the working principles of these shovels and explains the importance of their control systems. A new type of control system’s mathematical model was built and analyzed according to those principles. Since the initial control system’s response time could not fulfill the design requirements, a PID controller was added to the control system. System response time was still slower than required, so a neural network was added to nonlinearly regulate the proportional element, integral element and derivative element coefficients of the PID controller. After these improvements to the control system, system parameters fulfilled the design requirements. The working performance of electrically-controlled parts such as the rapidly moving high speed switch valve is largely determined by the control system. Normal control methods generally can’t satisfy a shovel’s requirements, so advanced and normal control methods were combined to improve the control system, bringing good results.

  7. Detección Simultánea de diferentes tipos de Shocks en Modelos Lineales Dinámicos Normales Matriciales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Figueras, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se plantea el proceso de detección de diversos tipos de shocks en un Modelo Lineal Dinámico Normal Matricial (MLDNM como un problema de comparación bayesiana de modelos. Dicho planteamiento permite analizar, de forma simultánea y secuencial, la existencia de una gran cantidad de comportamientos atípicos en la evolución de series de tiempo multivariantes (outliers aislados, cambios de nivel, cambios en pendiente, cambios en el patrón estacional, etc. e intervenir de acuerdo con el tipo de shock detectado. El esquema planteado extiende el algoritmo de monitorización e intervención automáticas propuesto por Gargallo y Salvador (2002c para el análisis de series univariantes. Finalmente, el procedimiento se ilustra con el análisis de la evolución de las hipotecas y de los depósitos del sistema bancario en Aragón

  8. Design and Implementation of a Dual-Mass MEMS Gyroscope with High Shock Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Huang, Libin; Ding, Xukai; Li, Hongsheng

    2018-03-30

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a dual-mass MEMS gyroscope with high shock resistance by improving the in-phase frequency of the gyroscope and by using a two-stage elastic stopper mechanism and proposes a Simulink shock model of the gyroscope equipped with the two-stage stopper mechanism, which is a very efficient method to evaluate the shock resistance of the gyroscope. The structural design takes into account both the mechanical sensitivity and the shock resistance. The design of the primary structure and the analysis of the stopper mechanism are first introduced. Based on the expression of the restoring force of the stopper beam, the analytical shock response model of the gyroscope is obtained. By this model, the shock response of the gyroscope is theoretically analyzed, and the appropriate structural parameters are obtained. Then, the correctness of the model is verified by finite element (FE) analysis, where the contact collision analysis is introduced in detail. The simulation results show that the application of the two-stage elastic stopper mechanism can effectively improve the shock resistance by more than 1900 g and 1500 g in the x - and y -directions, respectively. Finally, experimental verifications are carried out by using a machete hammer on the micro-gyroscope prototype fabricated by the deep dry silicon on glass (DDSOG) technology. The results show that the shock resistance of the prototype along the x -, y - and z -axes all exceed 10,000 g. Moreover, the output of the gyroscope can return to normal in about 2 s.

  9. An Introduction to the Physics of Collisionless Shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    Collisionless shocks are important in astrophysical, heliospheric and magnetospheric settings. They deflect flows around obstacles; they heat the plasma, and they alter the properties of the flow as it intersects those obstacles. The physical processes occurring at collisionless shocks depend on the Mach number (strength) and beta (magnetic to thermal pressure) of the shocks and the direction of the magnetic field relative to the shock normal. Herein we review how the shock has been modeled in numerical simulations, the basic physical processes at work, including dissipation and thermalization, the electric potential drop at the shock, and the formation of the electron and ion foreshocks

  10. Low Intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Improves Erectile Function in a Model of Type II Diabetes Independently of NO/cGMP Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaly-Kaddoum, Rana; Giuliano, François; Laurin, Miguel; Gorny, Diane; Kergoat, Micheline; Bernabé, Jacques; Vardi, Yoram; Alexandre, Laurent; Behr-Roussel, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    Erectile dysfunction is highly prevalent in type II diabetes mellitus. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy improves erectile function in patients with erectile dysfunction of vasculogenic origin, including diabetes. However, its mode of action remains unknown. We investigated the effects of low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy compared to or combined with sildenafil on erectile dysfunction in a type II diabetes mellitus model. Our purpose was to test our hypothesis of a mode of action targeting the cavernous nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. GK rats, a validated model of type II diabetes mellitus, and age matched Wistar rats were treated with low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy twice weekly for 3 weeks. Treatment was repeated after a 3-week no-treatment interval. The penis was stretched and dipped in a specifically designed water-filled cage. Shock waves were delivered by a calibrated probe yielding a controlled energy flux density (0.09 mJ/mm(2)). The probe was attached to an electrohydraulic unit with a focused shock wave source, allowing for accurate extrapolation to humans. Following a 4-week washout period erectile function was assessed as well as endothelium dependent and independent, and nitrergic relaxations of the corpus cavernosum of GK rats. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy significantly improved erectile function in GK rats to the same extent as sildenafil. Treatment effects were potentiated when combined with sildenafil. Shock wave effects were not associated with improved cavernous endothelium dependent or independent, or nitrergic reactivity. Low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy improved erectile function in GK rats. Unexpectedly, this was not mediated by a nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate dependent mechanism. Sildenafil increased shock wave efficacy. This preclinical paradigm to deliver low intensity extracorporeal shock wave therapy to the rat penis should

  11. Improvement of an installation to generate shock waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-04-29

    An installation to generate a shock wave in a fluid layer is described. A water projectile is moved at a high velocity. It leaves behind an underpressure in which the adjacent water implodes, therby generating the desired shock wave. The installation is characterized by a tube-shaped hull in which a piston can move freely. One side of the hull is connected to the pressure-generator chamber of the piston. (6 claims)

  12. Effects of Shock and Turbulence Properties on Electron Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G.; Kong, F.-J.; Zhang, L.-H.

    2018-06-01

    Using test particle simulations, we study electron acceleration at collisionless shocks with a two-component model turbulent magnetic field with slab component including dissipation range. We investigate the importance of the shock-normal angle θ Bn, magnetic turbulence level {(b/{B}0)}2, and shock thickness on the acceleration efficiency of electrons. It is shown that at perpendicular shocks the electron acceleration efficiency is enhanced with the decrease of {(b/{B}0)}2, and at {(b/{B}0)}2=0.01 the acceleration becomes significant due to a strong drift electric field with long time particles staying near the shock front for shock drift acceleration (SDA). In addition, at parallel shocks the electron acceleration efficiency is increasing with the increase of {(b/{B}0)}2, and at {(b/{B}0)}2=10.0 the acceleration is very strong due to sufficient pitch-angle scattering for first-order Fermi acceleration, as well as due to the large local component of the magnetic field perpendicular to the shock-normal angle for SDA. On the other hand, the high perpendicular shock acceleration with {(b/{B}0)}2=0.01 is stronger than the high parallel shock acceleration with {(b/{B}0)}2=10.0, the reason might be the assumption that SDA is more efficient than first-order Fermi acceleration. Furthermore, for oblique shocks, the acceleration efficiency is small no matter whether the turbulence level is low or high. Moreover, for the effect of shock thickness on electron acceleration at perpendicular shocks, we show that there exists the bendover thickness, L diff,b. The acceleration efficiency does not noticeably change if the shock thickness is much smaller than L diff,b. However, if the shock thickness is much larger than L diff,b, the acceleration efficiency starts to drop abruptly.

  13. Improved Reactive Flow Modeling of the LX-17 Double Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehagen, Thomas J.; Vitello, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Over driven double shock experiments provide a measurement of the properties of the reaction product states of the insensitive high explosive LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight). These experiments used two flyer materials mounted on the end of a projectile to send an initial shock through the LX-17, followed by a second shock of a higher magnitude into the detonation products. In the experiments, the explosive was initially driven by the flyer plate to pressures above the Chapman-Jouguet state. The particle velocity history was recorded by Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes pointing at an aluminum foil coated LiF window. The PDV data shows a sharp initial shock and decay, followed by a rounded second shock. Here, the experimental results are compared to 2D and 3D Cheetah reactive flow modeling. Our default Cheetah reactive flow model fails to accurately reproduce the decay of the first shock or the curvature or strength of the second shock. A new model is proposed in which the carbon condensate produced in the reaction zone is controlled by a kinetic rate. This allows the carbon condensate to be initially out of chemical equilibrium with the product gas. This new model reproduces the initial detonation peak and decay, and matches the curvature of the second shock, however, it still over-predicts the strength of the second shock. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Is shock index associated with outcome in children with sepsis/septic shock?*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Yuki; Khemani, Robinder G; Markovitz, Barry P

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the association between PICU shock index (the ratio of heart rate to systolic blood pressure) and PICU mortality in children with sepsis/septic shock. To explore cutoff values for shock index for ICU mortality, how change in shock index over the first 6 hours of ICU admission is associated with outcome, and how the use of vasoactive therapy may affect shock index and its association with outcome. Retrospective cohort. Single-center tertiary PICU. Five hundred forty-four children with the diagnosis of sepsis/septic shock. None. From January 2003 to December 2009, 544 children met International Pediatric Sepsis Consensus Conference of 2005 criteria for sepsis/septic shock. Overall mortality was 23.7%. Among all patients, hourly shock index was associated with mortality: odds ratio of ICU mortality at 0 hour, 1.08, 95% CI (1.04-1.12); odds ratio at 1 hour, 1.09 (1.04-1.13); odds ratio at 2 hours, 1.09 (1.05-1.13); and odds ratio at 6 hours, 1.11 (1.06-1.15). When stratified by age, early shock index was associated with mortality only in children 1-3 and more than or equal to 12 years old. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve in age 1-3 and more than or equal to 12 years old for shock index at admission was 0.69 (95% CI, 0.58-0.80) and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.52-0.72) respectively, indicating a fair predictive marker. Although higher shock index was associated with increased risk of mortality, there was no particular cutoff value with adequate positive or negative likelihood ratios to identify mortality in any age group of children. The improvement of shock index in the first 6 hours of ICU admission was not associated with outcome when analyzed in all patients. However, among patients whose shock index were above the 50th percentile at ICU admission for each age group, improvement of shock index was associated with lower ICU mortality in children between 1-3 and more than or equal to 12 years old (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). When

  15. Autodigestion: Proteolytic Degradation and Multiple Organ Failure in Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Angelina E.; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for multiorgan failure following shock other than alleviation supportive care. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of these sequelae to shock is required. The intestine plays a central role in multiorgan failure. It was previously suggested that bacteria and their toxins are responsible for the organ failure seen in circulatory shock, but clinical trials in septic patients have not confirmed this hypothesis. Instead, we review here evidence that the digestive enzymes, synthesized in the pancreas and discharged into the small intestine as requirement for normal digestion, may play a role in multi-organ failure. These powerful enzymes are non-specific, highly concentrated and fully activated in the lumen of the intestine. During normal digestion they are compartmentalized in the lumen of the intestine by the mucosal epithelial barrier. However, if this barrier becomes permeable, e.g. in an ischemic state, the digestive enzymes escape into the wall of the intestine. They digest tissues in the mucosa and generate small molecular weight cytotoxic fragments such as unbound free fatty acids. Digestive enzymes may also escape into the systemic circulation and activate other degrading proteases. These proteases have the ability to clip the ectodomain of surface receptors and compromise their function; for example cleaving the insulin receptor causing insulin resistance. The combination of digestive enzymes and cytotoxic fragments leaking into the central circulation causes cell and organ dysfunction, and ultimately may lead to complete organ failure and death. We summarize current evidence suggesting that enteral blockade of digestive enzymes inside the lumen of the intestine may serve to reduce acute cell and organ damage and improve survival in experimental shock. PMID:26717111

  16. Impact of Shock Front Rippling and Self-reformation on the Electron Dynamics at Low-Mach-number Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhongwei; Lu, Quanming; Liu, Ying D.; Wang, Rui

    2018-04-01

    Electron dynamics at low-Mach-number collisionless shocks are investigated by using two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations with various shock normal angles. We found: (1) The reflected ions and incident electrons at the shock front provide an effective mechanism for the quasi-electrostatic wave generation due to the charge-separation. A fraction of incident electrons can be effectively trapped and accelerated at the leading edge of the shock foot. (2) At quasi-perpendicular shocks, the electron trapping and reflection is nonuniform due to the shock rippling along the shock surface and is more likely to take place at some locations accompanied by intense reflected ion-beams. The electron trapping process has a periodical evolution over time due to the shock front self-reformation, which is controlled by ion dynamics. Thus, this is a cross-scale coupling phenomenon. (3) At quasi-parallel shocks, reflected ions can travel far back upstream. Consequently, quasi-electrostatic waves can be excited in the shock transition and the foreshock region. The electron trajectory analysis shows these waves can trap electrons at the foot region and reflect a fraction of them far back upstream. Simulation runs in this paper indicate that the micro-turbulence at the shock foot can provide a possible scenario for producing the reflected electron beam, which is a basic condition for the type II radio burst emission at low-Mach-number interplanetary shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs).

  17. 14 CFR 27.475 - Tires and shock absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tires and shock absorbers. 27.475 Section 27.475 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Strength Requirements Ground Loads § 27.475 Tires and shock absorbers. Unless otherwise prescribed...

  18. Shock drift acceleration in the presence of waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the initial results of a model designed to study the modification of the scatter-free, shock drift acceleration of energetic test particles by wave activity in the vicinity of a quasi-perpendicular, fast-mode MHD shock. It is emphasized that the concept of magnetic moment conservation is a valid approximation only in the perpendicular and nearly perpendicular regimes, when the angle theta-Bn between the shock normal and the upstream magnetic field vector is in the range from 70 deg to 90 deg. The present investigation is concerned with one step in a program which is being developed to combine the shock drift and diffusive processes at a shock of arbitrary theta-Bn.

  19. Role of drifts in diffusive shock acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    The role played by shock-associated drifts during the diffusive acceleration of charged particles at collisionless MHD shocks is evaluated. In the rest frame of the shock, the total energy gained by a particle is shown to result from two coupled acceleration mechanisms, the usual first-order Fermi mechanism and the drift mechanism. When averaged over a distribution of particles, the ratio of the drift-associated energy gain to the total energy is found to be independent of the total energy at a given theta1 (the angle between the shock normal and the unperturbed upstream magnetic field) in agreement with theoretical predictions. No evidence is found for drift-associated deceleration, suggesting that drifts always augment acceleration. 35 references

  20. Kinematical Compatibility Conditions for Vorticity Across Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy

    2015-11-01

    This work develops the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity across arbitrary shock waves in compressible, inviscid fluids. The vorticity compatibility conditions are derived from the curl of the momentum equation using singular distributions defined on two-dimensional shock wave surfaces embedded in three-dimensional flow fields. The singular distributions are represented as generalized differential operators concentrated on moving shock wave surfaces. The derivation of the compatibility conditions for vorticity requires the application of second-order generalized derivatives and elementary tensor algebra. The well-known vorticity jump conditions across a shock wave are then shown to follow from the general kinematical compatibility conditions for vorticity by expressing the flow field velocity in vectorial components normal and tangential to a shock surface.

  1. Grain destruction in interstellar shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seab, C.G.; Shull, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    One of the principal methods for removing grains from the Interstellar Medium is to destroy them in shock waves. Previous theoretical studies of shock destruction have generally assumed only a single size and type of grain; most do not account for the effect of the grain destruction on the structure of the shock. Earlier calculations have been improved in three ways: first, by using a ''complete'' grain model including a distribution of sizes and types of grains; second, by using a self-consistent shock structure that incorporates the changing elemental depletions as the grains are destroyed; and third, by calculating the shock-processed ultraviolet extinction curves for comparison with observations. (author)

  2. Normal saline influences coagulation and endothelial function after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekker, Simone E; Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted

    2014-01-01

    ), colloids (Hextend [HEX]), and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation are associated with differential effects on coagulation and endothelial systems. METHODS: We subjected 15 Yorkshire swine to TBI and HS (40% blood volume), and kept in HS for 2 hours before resuscitation with NS, HEX, or FFP. Markers......BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and hemorrhagic shock (HS) are the leading causes of trauma-related deaths. These insults disrupt coagulation and endothelial systems. This study investigated whether previously reported differences in lesion size and brain swelling during normal saline (NS...... of endothelial activation (E-selectin, Intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1), coagulation activation (prothrombin fragment 1 + 2), and natural anticoagulation (activated protein C [aPC]) were determined in serum and brain whole cell lysates. RESULTS: Serum levels of aPC were greater in the NS group (203 ± 30...

  3. Resonant ion acceleration by collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohsawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant ion acceleration ( the ν/sub rho/xΒ acceleration ) in laminar magnetosonic shock waves is studied by theory and simulation. Theoretical analysis based on a two-fluid model shows that, in laminar shocks, the electric field strength in the direction of the wave normal is about (m/sub i/m/sub e/) 1 2 times large for quasi-perpendicular shocks than that for the quasi-parallel shocks, which is a reflection of the fact that the width of quasi-perpendicular shocks is much smaller than that of the quasi-parallel shocks. Trapped ions can be accelerated up to the speed about ν/sub A/(m/sub i/m/sub e/) 1 2(M/sub A/-1) 3 2 in quasi-perpendicular shocks. Time evolution of self-consistent magnetosonic shock waves is studied by using a 2-12 dimensional fully relativistic, fully electromagnetic particle simulation with full ion and electron dynamics. Even a low-Mach-number shock wave can significantly accelerate trapped ions by the ν/sub rho/xΒ acceleration. The resonant ion acceleration occurs more strongly in quasi-perpendicular shocks, because the magnitude of this acceleration is proportional to the electric field strength

  4. On the high-temperature combustion of n-butanol: Shock tube data and an improved kinetic model

    KAUST Repository

    Vasu, Subith S.

    2013-11-21

    The combustion of n-butanol has received significant interest in recent years, because of its potential use in transportation applications. Researchers have extensively studied its combustion chemistry, using both experimental and theoretical methods; however, additional work is needed under specific conditions to improve our understanding of n-butanol combustion. In this study, we report new OH time-history data during the high-temperature oxidation of n-butanol behind reflected shock waves over the temperature range of 1300-1550 K and at pressures near 2 atm. These data were obtained at Stanford University, using narrow-line-width ring dye laser absorption of the R1(5) line of OH near 306.7 nm. Measured OH time histories were modeled using comprehensive n-butanol literature mechanisms. It was found that n-butanol unimolecular decomposition rate constants commonly used in chemical kinetic models, as well as those determined from theoretical studies, are unable to predict the data presented herein. Therefore, an improved high-temperature mechanism is presented here, which incorporates recently reported rate constants measured in a single pulse shock tube [C. M. Rosado-Reyes and W. Tsang, J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 9825-9831]. Discussions are presented on the validity of the proposed mechanism against other literature shock tube experiments. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  5. Improving the lens design and performance of a contemporary electromagnetic shock wave lithotripter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neisius, Andreas; Smith, Nathan B.; Sankin, Georgy; Kuntz, Nicholas John; Madden, John Francis; Fovargue, Daniel E.; Mitran, Sorin; Lipkin, Michael Eric; Simmons, Walter Neal; Preminger, Glenn M.; Zhong, Pei

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), a noninvasive first-line therapy for millions of nephrolithiasis patients, has not improved substantially in the past two decades, especially in regard to stone clearance. Here, we report a new acoustic lens design for a contemporary electromagnetic (EM) shock wave lithotripter, based on recently acquired knowledge of the key lithotripter field characteristics that correlate with efficient and safe SWL. The new lens design addresses concomitantly three fundamental drawbacks in EM lithotripters, namely, narrow focal width, nonidealized pulse profile, and significant misalignment in acoustic focus and cavitation activities with the target stone at high output settings. Key design features and performance of the new lens were evaluated using model calculations and experimental measurements against the original lens under comparable acoustic pulse energy (E+) of 40 mJ. The −6-dB focal width of the new lens was enhanced from 7.4 to 11 mm at this energy level, and peak pressure (41 MPa) and maximum cavitation activity were both realigned to be within 5 mm of the lithotripter focus. Stone comminution produced by the new lens was either statistically improved or similar to that of the original lens under various in vitro test conditions and was significantly improved in vivo in a swine model (89% vs. 54%, P = 0.01), and tissue injury was minimal using a clinical treatment protocol. The general principle and associated techniques described in this work can be applied to design improvement of all EM lithotripters. PMID:24639497

  6. Comparison of three methods for the estimation of cross-shock electric potential using Cluster data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Dimmock

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cluster four point measurements provide a comprehensive dataset for the separation of temporal and spatial variations, which is crucial for the calculation of the cross shock electrostatic potential using electric field measurements. While Cluster is probably the most suited among present and past spacecraft missions to provide such a separation at the terrestrial bow shock, it is far from ideal for a study of the cross shock potential, since only 2 components of the electric field are measured in the spacecraft spin plane. The present paper is devoted to the comparison of 3 different techniques that can be used to estimate the potential with this limitation. The first technique is the estimate taking only into account the projection of the measured components onto the shock normal. The second uses the ideal MHD condition E·B = 0 to estimate the third electric field component. The last method is based on the structure of the electric field in the Normal Incidence Frame (NIF for which only the potential component along the shock normal and the motional electric field exist. All 3 approaches are used to estimate the potential for a single crossing of the terrestrial bow shock that took place on the 31 March 2001. Surprisingly all three methods lead to the same order of magnitude for the cross shock potential. It is argued that the third method must lead to more reliable results. The effect of the shock normal inaccuracy is investigated for this particular shock crossing. The resulting electrostatic potential appears too high in comparison with the theoretical results for low Mach number shocks. This shows the variability of the potential, interpreted in the frame of the non-stationary shock model.

  7. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by ti-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lindig, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon fiber reinforced carbon (CFC) is the present candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its ability to withstand excessive heat loads during ELMs and plasma disruptions. However, chemical erosion of carbon under hydrogen bombardment from the plasma involves serious disadvantages for this application (replacement and safety problems due to tritium co-deposition). In addition, the manufacturing process of present CFC candidate materials is long and complex resulting in high costs, and CFC materials are inherently anisotropic. Doping of carbon with small amounts (several at. %) of titanium has proved to be effective in reducing chemical erosion while maintaining or even improving the mechanical properties. furthermore, TiC as dopant contributes to increase significantly the thermal conductivity and consequently the thermal shock resistance, due to the catalytic effect of this carbide on the graphitization. The aim of this work is to improve substantially the thermal shock resistance of fine-grained isotropic graphite by doping it with small amounts of TiC, reducing at the same time the chemical erosion. By this way Ti-doped graphites could be competitive with present CFC candidate materials for next step fusion devices. To achieve this, a synthetic naphthalene-derived mesophase pitch named AR is used as carbon precursor; this raw material exhibits excellent graphitizability, high chemical purity and consistent quality. Due to the low viscosity at the softening point of AR, resulting in swelling during the carbonization treatment, it is necessary to modify the initial viscosity of AR by an adequate oxidative stabilization treatment. As dopant, TiC powder with 130 nm average particle size is added. The influence of several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in

  8. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by ti-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C. [Navarrra Univ., CEPT, San Sebastian (Spain); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Garching (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon fiber reinforced carbon (CFC) is the present candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its ability to withstand excessive heat loads during ELMs and plasma disruptions. However, chemical erosion of carbon under hydrogen bombardment from the plasma involves serious disadvantages for this application (replacement and safety problems due to tritium co-deposition). In addition, the manufacturing process of present CFC candidate materials is long and complex resulting in high costs, and CFC materials are inherently anisotropic. Doping of carbon with small amounts (several at. %) of titanium has proved to be effective in reducing chemical erosion while maintaining or even improving the mechanical properties. furthermore, TiC as dopant contributes to increase significantly the thermal conductivity and consequently the thermal shock resistance, due to the catalytic effect of this carbide on the graphitization. The aim of this work is to improve substantially the thermal shock resistance of fine-grained isotropic graphite by doping it with small amounts of TiC, reducing at the same time the chemical erosion. By this way Ti-doped graphites could be competitive with present CFC candidate materials for next step fusion devices. To achieve this, a synthetic naphthalene-derived mesophase pitch named AR is used as carbon precursor; this raw material exhibits excellent graphitizability, high chemical purity and consistent quality. Due to the low viscosity at the softening point of AR, resulting in swelling during the carbonization treatment, it is necessary to modify the initial viscosity of AR by an adequate oxidative stabilization treatment. As dopant, TiC powder with 130 nm average particle size is added. The influence of several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in

  9. Pioneer Venus and near-earth observations of interplanetary shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalov, J.D.; Russell, C.T.; Knudsen, W.C.; Scarf, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-three transient interplanetary shocks observed near earth during 1978-1982, and mostly reported in the literature, have also been identified at the Pioneer Venus Orbiter spacecraft. There seems to be a fairly consistent trend for lower shock speeds, farther from the sun. Shock normals obtained using the Pioneer Venus data correspond well with published values from near earth. By referring to the portion of the Pioneer Venus plasma data used here from locations at longitudes within 37 degree of earth, it is found that shocks are weaker at earth, compared with closer to the sun

  10. Shock waves in helium at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepmann, H.W.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from studies of the properties of low temperature He-4 using shock waves as a probe. Ideal shock tube theory is used to show that sonic speeds of Mach 40 are attainable in He at 300 K. Viscosity reductions at lower temperatures minimize boundary layer effects at the side walls. A two-fluid model is described to account for the phase transition which He undergoes at temperatures below 2.2 K, after which the quantum fluid (He II) and the normal compressed superfluid (He I) coexist. Analytic models are provided for pressure-induced shocks in He I and temperature-induced shock waves (called second sound) which appear in He II. The vapor-fluid interface of He I is capable of reflecting second and gasdynamic sound shocks, which can therefore be used as probes for studying phase transitions between He I and He II. 17 references

  11. [Management of severe sepsis and septic shock in a tertiary care urban hospital emergency department: opportunities for improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monclús Cols, Ester; Capdevila Reniu, Aina; Roedberg Ramos, Desirée; Pujol Fontrodona, Gabriel; Ortega Romero, Mar

    2016-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of early management of severe sepsis and septic shock in a hospital emergency department that does not have a specific triage category to identify patients in these states. To determine opportunities for improvement. Prospective cohort study from March 2014 to March 2015. On each day during the study period, we included the first patient with signs compatible with septic shock. We recorded the severity level assigned according to the Andorran Triage Model and the main clinical and epidemiological variables. Patients were followed until hospital discharge. Fifty patients (35 men) with septic shock (mean age 65 years) were included. Thirty-five were at triage level 1 or 2 and 15 were at level 3. Patients initially classified as level 1-2 had significantly higher heart rates than level 3 patients (mean 110 vs 90 bpm, respectively; P=.003) and respiratory rates (mean 27 vs 18 breaths per minute; P=.001). Patients classified as level 1-2 also had significantly shorter care times than level 3 patients: time from arrival to examination room entry, 18 vs 117 minutes, respectively (P=.002); time from arrival to the first antibiotic dose (85 vs 231 minutes (P=.001). Medical care for patients with septic shock in this emergency department needs to improve in terms of earlier diagnosis and better compliance with guidelines for initial therapeutic management.

  12. Immediate effects of chest physiotherapy on hemodynamic, metabolic, and oxidative stress parameters in subjects with septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rafael S; Donadio, Márcio V F; da Silva, Gabriela V; Blattner, Clarissa N; Melo, Denizar A S; Nunes, Fernanda B; Dias, Fernando S; Squizani, Eamim D; Pedrazza, Leonardo; Gadegast, Isabella; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2014-09-01

    Septic shock presents as a continuum of infectious events, generating tissue hypoxia and hypovolemia, and increased oxidative stress. Chest physiotherapy helps reduce secretion, improving dynamic and static compliance, as well as improving secretion clearance and preventing pulmonary complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the immediate effect of chest physiotherapy on hemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and oxidative stress parameters in subjects in septic shock. We conducted a quasi-experimental study in 30 subjects in septic shock, who underwent chest physiotherapy, without associated heart diseases and with vasopressors stress were evaluated before and 15 min after physiotherapy. Thirty subjects with a mean age of 61.8 ± 15.9 y and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment of 8 (range 6-10) were included. Chest physiotherapy caused a normalization of pH (P = .046) and P(aCO2) (P = .008); reduction of lactate (P = .001); and an increase in P(aO2) (P = .03), arterial oxygen saturation (P = .02), and P(aO2)/F(IO2) (P = .034), 15 min after it was applied. The results indicate that chest physiotherapy has immediate effects, improving oxygenation and reducing lactate and oxidative damage in subjects in septic shock. However, it does not cause alterations in the inflammatory and hemodynamic parameters. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Subcritical-to-supercritical transition in quasi-perpendicular fast shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    The magnetic structure of collisionless quasi-perpendicular bow shock waves was observed and studied using fluxgate magnetometer data from the ISEE-1 and 2 spacecraft. The angle theta/sub Bn/ between upstream magnetic field and the shock normal was determined for each case. The fast Mach number M, β/sub i/, and β/sub e/ of the shock waves were estimated using solar wind plasma parameters. The critical fast Mach number M/sub c/, the Mach number for which the downstream flow speed just equals the downstream sound speed, was calculated for each shock using the Rankine-Hugoniot shock jump conditions. A survey of the dependence of various magnetic substructures upon these parameters was performed. A precursor foot to the shock was noted for shock waves characterized by M/M/sub c/ > 1. The thickness of this foot region was in good quantitative agreement with predicted trajectories of solar wind ions undergoing specular reflection from the shock ramp

  14. Analytical solutions of hypersonic type IV shock - shock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, Michael John

    An analytical model has been developed to predict the effects of a type IV shock interaction at high Mach numbers. This interaction occurs when an impinging oblique shock wave intersects the most normal portion of a detached bow shock. The flowfield which develops is complicated and contains an embedded jet of supersonic flow, which may be unsteady. The jet impinges on the blunt body surface causing very high pressure and heating loads. Understanding this type of interaction is vital to the designers of cowl lips and leading edges on air- breathing hypersonic vehicles. This analytical model represents the first known attempt at predicting the geometry of the interaction explicitly, without knowing beforehand the jet dimensions, including the length of the transmitted shock where the jet originates. The model uses a hyperbolic equation for the bow shock and by matching mass continuity, flow directions and pressure throughout the flowfield, a prediction of the interaction geometry can be derived. The model has been shown to agree well with the flowfield patterns and properties of experiments and CFD, but the prediction for where the peak pressure is located, and its value, can be significantly in error due to a lack of sophistication in the model of the jet fluid stagnation region. Therefore it is recommended that this region of the flowfield be modeled in more detail and more accurate experimental and CFD measurements be used for validation. However, the analytical model has been shown to be a fast and economic prediction tool, suitable for preliminary design, or for understanding the interactions effects, including the basic physics of the interaction, such as the jet unsteadiness. The model has been used to examine a wide parametric space of possible interactions, including different Mach number, impinging shock strength and location, and cylinder radius. It has also been used to examine the interaction on power-law shaped blunt bodies, a possible candidate for

  15. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  16. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ 0 /p 0 ) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ 0 is the permeability, and p 0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  17. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullin, D. I. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Samtaney, R. [Mechanical Engineering, Physical Sciences and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  18. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R = √μ0/p0 I/(2π) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field then

  19. Experimental Investigation on Airfoil Shock Control by Plasma Aerodynamic Actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Quan; Cheng Bangqin; Li Yinghong; Cui Wei; Jin Di; Li Jun

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation on airfoil (NACA64—215) shock control is performed by plasma aerodynamic actuation in a supersonic tunnel (Ma = 2). The results of schlieren and pressure measurement show that when plasma aerodynamic actuation is applied, the position moves forward and the intensity of shock at the head of the airfoil weakens. With the increase in actuating voltage, the total pressure measured at the head of the airfoil increases, which means that the shock intensity decreases and the control effect increases. The best actuation effect is caused by upwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, and then downwind-direction actuation with a magnetic field, while the control effect of aerodynamic actuation without a magnetic field is the most inconspicuous. The mean intensity of the normal shock at the head of the airfoil is relatively decreased by 16.33%, and the normal shock intensity is relatively reduced by 27.5% when 1000 V actuating voltage and upwind-direction actuation are applied with a magnetic field. This paper theoretically analyzes the Joule heating effect generated by DC discharge and the Lorentz force effect caused by the magnetic field. The discharge characteristics are compared for all kinds of actuation conditions to reveal the mechanism of shock control by plasma aerodynamic actuation

  20. High temperature mechanical properties and surface fatigue behavior improving of steel alloy via laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, N.F.; Yang, H.M.; Yuan, S.Q.; Wang, Y.; Tang, S.X.; Zheng, L.M.; Ren, X.D.; Dai, F.Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The properties of 00C r 12 were improved by laser shock processing. • A deep layer of residual compressive stresses was introduced. • Fatigue life was enhanced about 58% at elevated temperature up to 600 °C. • The pinning effect is the reason of prolonging fatigue life at high temperature. - Abstract: Laser shock peening was carried out to reveal the effects on ASTM: 410L 00C r 12 microstructures and fatigue resistance in the temperature range 25–600 °C. The new conception of pinning effect was proposed to explain the improvements at the high temperature. Residual stress was measured by X-ray diffraction with sin 2 ψ method, a high temperature extensometer was utilized to measure the strain and control the strain signal. The grain and precipitated phase evolutionary process were observed by scanning electron microscopy. These results show that a deep layer of compressive residual stress is developed by laser shock peening, and ultimately the isothermal stress-controlled fatigue behavior is enhanced significantly. The formation of high density dislocation structure and the pinning effect at the high temperature, which induces a stronger surface, lower residual stress relaxation and more stable dislocation arrangement. The results have profound guiding significance for fatigue strengthening mechanism of components at the elevated temperature

  1. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi [Division of Mechanical and Space Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Kodama, Tetsuya [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Takahira, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kobakazu@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance.

  2. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance.

  3. Shock wave-bubble interaction near soft and rigid boundaries during lithotripsy: numerical analysis by the improved ghost fluid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazumichi; Kodama, Tetsuya; Takahira, Hiroyuki

    2011-10-01

    In the case of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), a shock wave-bubble interaction inevitably occurs near the focusing point of stones, resulting in stone fragmentation and subsequent tissue damage. Because shock wave-bubble interactions are high-speed phenomena occurring in tissue consisting of various media with different acoustic impedance values, numerical analysis is an effective method for elucidating the mechanism of these interactions. However, the mechanism has not been examined in detail because, at present, numerical simulations capable of incorporating the acoustic impedance of various tissues do not exist. Here, we show that the improved ghost fluid method (IGFM) can treat shock wave-bubble interactions in various media. Nonspherical bubble collapse near a rigid or soft tissue boundary (stone, liver, gelatin and fat) was analyzed. The reflection wave of an incident shock wave at a tissue boundary was the primary cause for the acceleration or deceleration of bubble collapse. The impulse that was obtained from the temporal evolution of pressure created by the bubble collapse increased the downward velocity of the boundary and caused subsequent boundary deformation. Results of this study showed that the IGFM is a useful method for analyzing the shock wave-bubble interaction near various tissues with different acoustic impedance.

  4. Hydrogen gas inhalation inhibits progression to the "irreversible" stage of shock after severe hemorrhage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaru; Sano, Motoaki; Hayashida, Kei; Tamura, Tomoyoshi; Homma, Koichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Junichi

    2017-09-01

    Mortality of hemorrhagic shock primarily depends on whether or not the patients can endure the loss of circulating volume until radical treatment is applied. We investigated whether hydrogen (H2) gas inhalation would influence the tolerance to hemorrhagic shock and improve survival. Hemorrhagic shock was achieved by withdrawing blood until the mean arterial blood pressure reached 30-35 mm Hg. After 60 minutes of shock, the rats were resuscitated with a volume of normal saline equal to four times the volume of shed blood. The rats were assigned to either the H2 gas (1.3% H2, 26% O2, 72.7% N2)-treated group or the control gas (26% O2, 74% N2)-treated group. Inhalation of the specified gas mixture began at the initiation of blood withdrawal and continued for 2 hours after fluid resuscitation. The survival rate at 6 hours after fluid resuscitation was 80% in H2 gas-treated rats and 30% in control gas-treated rats (p gas-treated rats than in the control rats. Despite losing more blood, the increase in serum potassium levels was suppressed in the H2 gas-treated rats after 60 minutes of shock. Fluid resuscitation completely restored blood pressure in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas it failed to fully restore the blood pressure in the control gas-treated rats. At 2 hours after fluid resuscitation, blood pressure remained in the normal range and metabolic acidosis was well compensated in the H2 gas-treated rats, whereas we observed decreased blood pressure and uncompensated metabolic acidosis and hyperkalemia in the surviving control gas-treated rats. H2 gas inhalation delays the progression to irreversible shock. Clinically, H2 gas inhalation is expected to stabilize the subject until curative treatment can be performed, thereby increasing the probability of survival after hemorrhagic shock.

  5. Laser shock peening of titanium 6-4 alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brar, N.S.; Hopkins, A.; Laber, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    Laser shock peening of titanium 6-4 has been shown to improve its high cycle fatigue life. Residual compressive stresses generated on the surface of titanium 6-4, as a result of laser shocking, have shown dramatic improvement in the performance of aircraft turbine blades. Laser shocking of titanium was carried out with a 20 ns pulse width, 50 joule pulsed laser, operated by LSP Technologies, Columbus, OH. Titanium disks, 20-mm in diameter, and ranging in thicknesses from zero (bare LiF) to 3-mm were subjected to laser shock to monitor amplitude and temporal stress profiles of the pulsed laser. Laser shock stress amplitudes on the back of titanium disks were monitored with VISAR using LiF as the window material. The peak shock stress produced in LiF (titanium thickness zero) was measured to be 16±1 GPa. The laser shock amplitude decays to about 2.7 GPa while propagating through 3-mm thick disk of titanium 6-4

  6. Shock therapy: Gris Gun's shock absorber can take the punch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-04-01

    A newly developed shock impedance tool that isolates downhole tools that measure the effects of well stimulation techniques from being damaged by the violent shaking caused by various well stimulation techniques which combine perforating and propellant technology in a single tool, is discussed. The shock exerted by a perforating gun can exceed 25,000 G forces within 100 to 300 milliseconds, may damage or even destroy the sensitive electronics housed in the various recorders that record data about fracture gradients, permeability and temperature. The shock absorber developed by Tesco Gris Gun and Computalog, incorporates the mechanics of a piston style shock absorber in combination with a progressive spring stack and energy-dampening silicone oil chambers. The end results is an EUE 'slim line' assembly that is adaptable between the gun perforating string and the electronic equipment. It is typically attached below, reducing the shock load by as much as 90 per cent. The shock absorber is now available commercially through Gris Gun's exclusive distributorship. An improved version, currently under development, will be used for wireline perforating and tubing-conveyed perforating applications. 2 figs.

  7. In-tube shock wave driven by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhisa; Kajiwara, Ken; Takahashi, Koji; Kasugai, Atsushi; Sakamoto, Keishi; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2009-01-01

    A shock wave in a tube supported by atmospheric millimeter-wave plasma is discussed. After atmospheric breakdown, the shock wave supported by the millimeter wave propagates at a constant velocity in the tube. In this study, a driving model of the millimeter-wave shock wave is proposed. The model consists of a normal shock wave supported by a propagating heat-supply area in which an ionization front is located. The flow properties predicted by the model show good agreement with the measured properties of the shock wave generated in the tube using a 170 GHz millimeter wave beam. The shock propagation velocity U shock is identical to the propagation velocity of the ionization front U ioniz when U ioniz is supersonic. Then the pressure increment at the tube end is independent of the power density. (author)

  8. Transonic shock wave. Boundary layer interaction at a convex wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koren, B.; Bannink, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    A standard finite element procedure has been applied to the problem of transonic shock wave – boundary layer interaction at a convex wall. The method is based on the analytical Bohning-Zierep model, where the boundary layer is perturbed by a weak normal shock wave which shows a singular pressure

  9. Comment on Risk Shocks by Christiano, Motto, and Rostagno (2014)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Gabriel; Salyer, Kevin; Strobel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper, Christiano, Motto and Rostagno (2014, henceforth CMR) report that risk shocks are the most important source of business cycle fluctuations. This result is in contrast to much of the existing literature; e.g. Bachmann and Bayer (2013) report that risk shocks account for 4% of the volatility in GDP. We resolve this apparent contradiction by first highlighting that CMR depart from the normal definition of a risk shock by including an additional \

  10. Electric field measurements at subcritical, oblique bow shock crossings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wygant, J.R.; Bensadoun, M.; Mozer, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Electric field measurements at oblique, subcritical bow shock crossings are presented from the ISEE 1 University of California, Berkeley, double-probe electric field experiment. The measurements averaged over the 3-s spin period of the spacecraft provide the first observations of the large-scale (100 km) laminar oscillations in the longitudinal component of the electric field associated with the whistler precursor which is characteristic of these dispersive shocks. The amplitude of the oscillations increases from ∼0.5 mV/m to a maximum of 6 mV/m across the magnetic ramp of the shock (directed along the shock normal). The calculated electric potential drops across the shocks varied from 340 to 550 volts, which is 40-60% of the observed loss of kinetic energy associated with the bulk flow of the ions. These measurements suggest that at these shocks the additional deceleration of incident ions is due to the Lorentz force. The contributions to the normal component of the large-scale electric field at the shock due to the parallel and perpendicular components (relative to the magnetic field) of the electric field are evaluated. It is shown that the perpendicular component of the electric field dominates, accounting for most of the cross-shock potential, but that there is a nonnegligible parallel component. This large-scale parallel component has a magnitude of 1-2 mV/m which sometimes results in a potential well for electrons with a depth of ∼150 eV. It is experimentally demonstrated that the dominance of the perpendicular over the parallel component of the electric field resulted in a correlation between the longitudinal component of the large-scale electric field and the fluctuations in the magnetic field component perpendicular to the coplanarity plane

  11. Cures for the shock instability: Development of a shock-stable Roe scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, S S; Rho, O H; Kyu-Hong, S

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the development of an improved Roe scheme that is free from the shock instability and still preserves the accuracy and efficiency of the original Roe's Flux Difference Splitting (FDS). Roe's FDS is known to possess good accuracy but to suffer from the shock instability, such as the carbuncle phenomenon. As the first step towards a shock-stable scheme, Roe's FDS is compared with the HLLE scheme to identify the source of the shock instability. Through a linear perturbation analysis on the odd-even decoupling problem, damping characteristic is examined and Mach number-based functions f and g are introduced to balance damping and feeding rates, which leads to a shock-stable Roe scheme. In order to satisfy the conservation of total enthalpy, which is crucial in predicting surface heat transfer rate in high-speed steady flows, an analysis of dissipation mechanism in the energy equation is carried out to find out the error source and to make the proposed scheme preserve total enthalpy. By modif...

  12. Shock Tube Measurements for Liquid Fuels Combustion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Ronald K

    2006-01-01

    ...) fundamental studies of fuel spray evaporation rates and ignition times of low-vapor pressure fuels such as JP-8, diesel fuel and normal alkane surrogates in a new aerosol shock tube using state...

  13. Radiative shocks with electron thermal conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, Kazimierz.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studies the influence of electron thermal conduction on radiative shock structure for both one- and two-temperature plasmas. The dimensionless ratio of the conductive length to the cooling length determines whether or not conduction is important, and shock jump conditions with conduction are established for a collisionless shock front. He obtains approximate solutions with the assumptions that the ionization state of the gas is constant and the cooling rate is a function of temperature alone. In the absence of magnetic fields, these solutions indicate that conduction noticeably influences normal-abundance interstellar shocks with velocities 50-100 km s -1 and dramatically affects metal-dominated shocks over a wide range of shock velocities. Magnetic fields inhibit conduction, but the conductive energy flux and the corresponding decrease in the post-shock electron temperature may still be appreciable. He calculates detailed steady-state radiative shock models in gas composed entirely of oxygen, with the purpose of explaining observations of fast-moving knots in Cas A and other oxygen-rich supernova remnants (SNRs). The O III ion, whose forbidden emission usually dominates the observed spectra, is present over a wide range of shock velocities, from 100 to 170 kms -1 . All models with conduction have extensive warm photoionization zones, which provides better agreement with observed optical (O I) line strengths. However, the temperatures in these zones could be lowered by (Si II) 34.8 μm and (Ne II) 12.8 μm cooling if Si and Ne are present in appreciable abundance relative to O. Such low temperatures would be inconsistent with the observed (O I) emission in oxygen-rich SNRs

  14. Shock wave treatment in medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    to open surgery, the cost of the ESWT is very reasonable. But nevertheless it is necessary to improve the basic un ... In second group, shock waves are used to measure distances because of the low energy loss over large distances ... pared to a piezoelectric hydrophone. The rise time of an electrohydraulic generated shock ...

  15. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  16. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Chang [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States); Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A. [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Cheng, Gary J., E-mail: gjcheng@purdue.edu [School of Industrial Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  17. Fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by dynamic strain aging and dynamic precipitation during warm laser shock peening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Chang; Suslov, Sergey; Kim, Bong Joong; Stach, Eric A.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a thermomechanical treatment technique combining the advantages of laser shock peening and dynamic strain aging (DSA). Through DSA, WLSP of steel increases the dislocation density and stabilizes the dislocation structure by pinning of mobile dislocations by carbon atoms. In addition, WLSP generates nanoscale carbide precipitates through strain-induced precipitation. The carbide precipitates stabilize the microstructure by dislocation pinning. This results in higher stability of the dislocation structure and thus improves the stability of the compressive residual stress. In this study the mechanism of fatigue performance improvement in AISI 4140 steel by WLSP is investigated. It is found that microstructures formed after WLSP lead to a higher stability of dislocation structures and residual stress, which are beneficial for fatigue performance.

  18. Shock-jump conditions in a general medium: weak-solution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, L. K.; Krzysik, O. A.

    2017-05-01

    General conservation laws are considered, and the concept of a weak solution is extended to the case of an equation involving three space variables and time. Four-dimensional vector calculus is used to develop general jump conditions at a shock wave in the material. To illustrate the use of this result, jump conditions at a shock in unsteady three-dimensional compressible gas flow are presented. It is then proved rigorously that these reduce to the commonly assumed conditions in coordinates normal and tangential to the shock face. A similar calculation is also outlined for an unsteady three-dimensional shock in magnetohydrodynamics, and in a chemically reactive fluid. The technique is available for determining shock-jump conditions in quite general continuous media.

  19. Thermal shock cracking of GSO single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Kazunari; Tamura, Takaharu; Kurashige, Kazuhisa; Ishibashi, Hiroyuki; Susa, Kenzo

    1998-01-01

    The quantitative estimation of the failure stress of a gadolinium orthosilicate (Gd 2 SiO 5 , hereafter abbreviated as GSO) single crystal due to thermal shock was investigated. A cylindrical test specimen was heated in a silicone oil bath, then subjected to thermal shock by pouring room temperature silicone oil. Cracking occurred during cooling. The heat conduction analysis was performed to obtain temperature distribution in a GSO single crystal at cracking, using the surface temperatures measured in the thermal shock cracking test. Then the thermal stress was calculated using temperature profile of the test specimen obtained from the heat conduction analysis. It is found from the results of the thermal stress analysis and the observation of the cracking in test specimens that the thermal shock cracking occurs in a cleavage plane due to the stress normal to the plane. Three-point bending tests were also performed to examine the relationship between the critical stress for thermal shock cracking and the three-point bending strength obtained from small-sized test specimens. (author)

  20. PIV tracer behavior on propagating shock fronts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazyrin, Fyodor N; Mursenkova, Irina V; Znamenskaya, Irina A

    2016-01-01

    The present work was aimed at the quantitative particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of a velocity field near the front of a propagating shock wave and the study of the dynamics of liquid tracers crossing the shock front. For this goal, a shock tube with a rectangular cross-section (48  ×  24 mm) was used. The flat shock wave with Mach numbers M  =  1.4–2.0 propagating inside the tube channel was studied as well as an expanding shock wave propagating outside the channel with M  =  1.2–1.8 at its main axis. The PIV imaging of the shock fronts was carried out with an aerosol of dioctyl sebacate (DEHS) as tracer particles. The pressures of the gas in front of the shock waves studied ranged from 0.013 Mpa to 0.1 MPa in the series of experiments. The processed PIV data, compared to the 1D normal shock theory, yielded consistent values of wake velocity immediately behind the plain shock wave. Special attention was paid to the blurring of the velocity jump on the shock front due to the inertial particle lag and peculiarities of the PIV technique. A numerical algorithm was developed for analysis and correction of the PIV data on the shock fronts, based on equations of particle-flow interaction. By application of this algorithm, the effective particle diameter of the DEHS aerosol tracers was estimated as 1.03  ±  0.12 μm. A number of different formulations for particle drag were tested with this algorithm, with varying success. The results show consistency with previously reported experimental data obtained for cases of stationary shock waves. (paper)

  1. Feedforward somatosensory inhibition is normal in cervical dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa R; Ganos, Christos; Bhatia, Kailash P; Haggard, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Insufficient cortical inhibition is a key pathophysiological finding in dystonia. Subliminal sensory stimuli were reported to transiently inhibit somatosensory processing. Here we investigated whether such subliminal feedforward inhibition is reduced in patients with cervical dystonia. Sixteen cervical dystonia patients and 16 matched healthy controls performed a somatosensory detection task. We measured the drop in sensitivity to detect a threshold-level digital nerve shock when it was preceded by a subliminal conditioning shock, compared to when it was not. Subliminal conditioning shocks reduced sensitivity to threshold stimuli to a similar extent in both patients and controls, suggesting that somatosensory subliminal feedforward inhibition is normal in cervical dystonia. Somatosensory feedforward inhibition was normal in this group of cervical dystonia patients. Our results qualify previous concepts of a general dystonic deficit in sensorimotor inhibitory processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid Atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    ANSI Std. Z39.18 j CONVERSION TABLE Conversion Factors for U.S. Customary to metric (SI) units of measurement. MULTIPLY BY TO...Gray (Gy) coulomb /kilogram (C/kg) second (s) kilogram (kg) kilo pascal (kPa) 1 Improved Root Normal Size Distributions for Liquid

  3. Remote sensing of local structure of the quasi-perpendicular Earth's bow shock by using field-aligned beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Miao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned ion beams (FABs originate at the quasi-perpendicular Earth's bow shock and constitute an important ion population in the foreshock region. The bulk velocity of these FABs depends significantly on the shock normal angle, which is the angle between shock normal and upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. This dependency may therefore be taken as an indicator of the local structure of the shock. Applying the direct reflection model to Cluster measurements, we have developed a method that uses proton FABs in the foreshock region for remote sensing of the local shock structure. The comparison of the model results with the multi-spacecraft observations of FAB events shows very good agreement in terms of wave amplitude and frequency of surface waves at the shock front.

  4. Modeling of ion acceleration through drift and diffusion at interplanetary shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1986-01-01

    A test particle simulation designed to model ion acceleration through drift and diffusion at interplanetary shocks is described. The technique consists of integrating along exact particle orbits in a system where the angle between the shock normal and mean upstream magnetic field, the level of magnetic fluctuations, and the energy of injected particles can assume a range of values. The technique makes it possible to study time-dependent shock acceleration under conditions not amenable to analytical techniques. To illustrate the capability of the numerical model, proton acceleration was considered under conditions appropriate for interplanetary shocks at 1 AU, including large-amplitude transverse magnetic fluctuations derived from power spectra of both ambient and shock-associated MHD waves.

  5. A Prognostic Model for Development of Profound Shock among Children Presenting with Dengue Shock Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phung Khanh Lam

    Full Text Available To identify risk factors and develop a prediction model for the development of profound and recurrent shock amongst children presenting with dengue shock syndrome (DSS.We analyzed data from a prospective cohort of children with DSS recruited at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital for Tropical Disease in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The primary endpoint was "profound DSS", defined as ≥2 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting in compensated shock, or ≥1 recurrent shock episodes (for subjects presenting initially with decompensated/hypotensive shock, and/or requirement for inotropic support. Recurrent shock was evaluated as a secondary endpoint. Risk factors were pre-defined clinical and laboratory variables collected at the time of presentation with shock. Prognostic model development was based on logistic regression and compared to several alternative approaches.The analysis population included 1207 children of whom 222 (18% progressed to "profound DSS" and 433 (36% had recurrent shock. Independent risk factors for both endpoints included younger age, earlier presentation, higher pulse rate, higher temperature, higher haematocrit and, for females, worse hemodynamic status at presentation. The final prognostic model for "profound DSS" showed acceptable discrimination (AUC=0.69 for internal validation and calibration and is presented as a simple score-chart.Several risk factors for development of profound or recurrent shock among children presenting with DSS were identified. The score-chart derived from the prognostic models should improve triage and management of children presenting with DSS in dengue-endemic areas.

  6. Evaluation of XHVRB for Capturing Explosive Shock Desensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Leah; Schmitt, Robert; Kittell, Dave; Harstad, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Explosive shock desensitization phenomena have been recognized for some time. It has been demonstrated that pressure-based reactive flow models do not adequately capture the basic nature of the explosive behavior. Historically, replacing the local pressure with a shock captured pressure has dramatically improved the numerical modeling approaches. Models based upon shock pressure or functions of entropy have recently been developed. A pseudo-entropy based formulation using the History Variable Reactive Burn model, as proposed by Starkenberg, was implemented into the Eulerian shock physics code CTH. Improvements in the shock capturing algorithm were made. The model is demonstrated to reproduce single shock behavior consistent with published pop plot data. It is also demonstrated to capture a desensitization effect based on available literature data, and to qualitatively capture dead zones from desensitization in 2D corner turning experiments. This models shows promise for use in modeling and simulation problems that are relevant to the desensitization phenomena. Issues are identified with the current implementation and future work is proposed for improving and expanding model capabilities. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Hydrogen-Helium shock Radiation tests for Saturn Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of shock layer radiation in Hydrogen/Helium mixtures representative of that encountered by probes entering the Saturn atmosphere. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen-Helium mixtures (89:11% by volume) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 km/s. Radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared. An induction time of several centimeters is observed where electron density and radiance remain well below equilibrium. Radiance is observed in front of the shock layer, the characteristics of which match the expected diffusion length of Hydrogen.

  8. Back-pressure Effect on Shock-Train Location in a Scramjet Engine Isolator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    breathing single-stage-to-orbit ( SSTO ) reusable spacecraft, X-30. It made a great contribution towards developing a rectangular, airframe-integrated...scramjet. This program was cancelled without conducting a flight test. The goal of this program was to build a full scale operational SSTO vehicle...bomber, SSTO , or hypersonic transportation. Shock system A shock-train is a system of series of oblique or normal shocks, which is a very complex flow

  9. Thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuates hemorrhagic-induced splanchnic hypo-perfusion in post-resuscitation experimental hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir S Madjid

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of present study was to assess the effects of thoracic epidural anesthesia on splanchnic perfusion, bacterial translocation and histopathologic changes in experimental hemorrhagic shock in short-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina. Sixteen Macaca nemestrinas were randomly assigned to one of two groups i.e. the lidocaine group (n = 8, receiving general anesthesia plus lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia; and the saline group (n = 8, receiving general anesthesia alone as control. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by withdrawing blood gradually to a mean arterial pressure (MAP of 40 mm Hg, and maintained for 60 minutes. Animals were then resuscitated with their own blood and ringer lactate solution (RL. After resuscitation, epidural lidocaine 2% was given in the lidocaine group and saline in the control group. Resuscitation that was performed after one hour hemorrhagic shock, with hemodynamic variables and urine output returned to normal, revealed there was no improvement of splanchnic perfusion. PgCO2, P(g-aCO2, and pHi remained in critical value and tended to deteriorate in the saline group. Contrast to saline group, splanchnic perfusion in lidocaine group tended to improve. This condition was supported by the finding of less bacterial translocation and better histopathologic changes in lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia group than in saline group. This study concludes that lidocaine thoracic epidural anesthesia attenuates splachnic hypoperfusion in post-resuscitation hemorrhagic shock in Macaca nemestrina. (Med J Indones 2008; 17: 73-81Keywords: thoracic epidural anesthesia, lidocaine, hemorrhagic shock, splanchnic hypoperfusion, bacterial translocation

  10. Noncoplanar magnetic fields at collisionless shocks: A test of a new approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosling, J.T.; Winske, D.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Within the foot and ramp of a fast mode collisionless shock the magnetic field rotates out of the plane of coplanarity defined by the upstream magnetic field and the shock normal. As previously noted (Goodrich and Scudder, 1984), the sense of this rotation is such as to reduce the cross-shock potential drop when measured in the deHoffman-Teller frame relative to that measured in the normal incidence frame. From a consideration of the requirement that there be zero current in the coplanarity plane downstream of the shock, Jones and Ellison (1987) have argued that the field rotation and potential drop difference are a consequence of unequal ion and electron masses, and have derived an expression for the spatial integral of the noncoplanar field component in terms of the electron current within the shock layer. Moreover, by assuming that the ion current within the shock layer is negligible compared to the electron current, they derive equations which predict the magnitude of both the field rotation and the potential drop difference in terms of upstream quantities and the field jump at the shock. We have tested their equations with ISEE 1 and 2 plasma and field measurements at the Earth's bow shock and by means of numerical simulations. We find substantial support for their suggestion that the field rotation and thus also the frame dependence of the potential drop are fundamentally a consequence of unequal ion and electron masses. Further, for subcritical shocks (low Mach number) one can neglect the ion current to predict both the sign and the magnitude of the field rotation and potential drop difference. However, at supercritical shocks (high Mach numbers) the ion current associated with reflected, gyrating ions cannot be neglected, and the final equations of Jones and Ellison seriously underestimate the magnitude of the field rotation and the potential drop difference at these shocks

  11. Current Opinions in Pediatric Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Irazuzta

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Our aim is to describe the current clinical practice related to the management of septic shock (SS. Methods: Review of medical literature using the MEDLINE database. Articles were selected according to their relevancy to the objective and according to the author’s opinion. Summary of the findings: The outcome from SS is dependent on an early recognition and a sequential implementation of time-sensitive goal-directed therapies. The goals of the resuscitation are rapid restoration of micro circulation and improved organ tissue perfusion. Clinical and laboratory markers are needed to assess the adequacy of the treatments. Initial resuscitation involves the use of isotonic solutions (>60ml/kg either crystalloid (normal saline or colloid infusion often followed by vasoactive medications. Altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics responses dictate that vasoactive agents should be adjusted to achieve predetermined goals. An assessment of central venous pressure complements clinical and serological findings to tailor therapies. Elective airway instrumentation and mechanical ventilation as well as adjunctive therapy with stress dose of corticosteroid are indicated in selected populations. In neonates, a special attention to the presence of electrolyte imbalance and increase pulmonary vascular resistance needs to be considered early. Conclusions: Septic shock hemodynamic is a changing process that requires frequent assessment and therapeutic adjustments.

  12. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10{sup {minus}7} cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results.

  13. Hydride transport vessel vibration and shock test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipton, D.G.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed vibration and shock testing on a Savannah River Hydride Transport Vessel (HTV) which is used for bulk shipments of tritium. This testing is required to qualify the HTV for transport in the H1616 shipping container. The main requirement for shipment in the H1616 is that the contents (in this case the HTV) have a tritium leak rate of less than 1x10 -7 cc/sec after being subjected to shock and vibration normally incident to transport. Helium leak tests performed before and after the vibration and shock testing showed that the HTV remained leaktight under the specified conditions. This report documents the tests performed and the test results

  14. Some new results on shock chemistry in IC 443

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNoyer, L.K.; Frerking, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    We have made new observations of CO, 13 CO, SiO, SO, H 2 CO, HCO + , N 2 H + , CS, OCS, HCN, and OH in the shocked clouds of IC 443. At position IC 443 B, we find (a) the shocked CO is optically thin, (b) the HCO + /CO abundance ratio is 4--9 x 10 -4 , a tenfold enhancement over normal interstellar clouds, (c) HCN/CO = 1--3 x 10 -4 and CS/CO = 2--3 x 10 -4 , consistent with abundances found in ordinary clouds, (d) no enhancements of SO or SiO as occur in Orion KL, (e) optically thin preshock OH, confirming a hundredfold enhancement of OH/CO in the shock, and (f) an OH main line anomaly, with T/sub ex/(1667)>T/sub ex/(1665) in the shocked region

  15. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Caroline; Mahta, Ali; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Tsiouris, A John; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-02-01

    Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  16. Extended charge banking model of dual path shocks for implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosdall, Derek J; Sweeney, James D

    2008-08-01

    Single path defibrillation shock methods have been improved through the use of the Charge Banking Model of defibrillation, which predicts the response of the heart to shocks as a simple resistor-capacitor (RC) circuit. While dual path defibrillation configurations have significantly reduced defibrillation thresholds, improvements to dual path defibrillation techniques have been limited to experimental observations without a practical model to aid in improving dual path defibrillation techniques. The Charge Banking Model has been extended into a new Extended Charge Banking Model of defibrillation that represents small sections of the heart as separate RC circuits, uses a weighting factor based on published defibrillation shock field gradient measures, and implements a critical mass criteria to predict the relative efficacy of single and dual path defibrillation shocks. The new model reproduced the results from several published experimental protocols that demonstrated the relative efficacy of dual path defibrillation shocks. The model predicts that time between phases or pulses of dual path defibrillation shock configurations should be minimized to maximize shock efficacy. Through this approach the Extended Charge Banking Model predictions may be used to improve dual path and multi-pulse defibrillation techniques, which have been shown experimentally to lower defibrillation thresholds substantially. The new model may be a useful tool to help in further improving dual path and multiple pulse defibrillation techniques by predicting optimal pulse durations and shock timing parameters.

  17. Response of Seven Crystallographic Orientations of Sapphire Crystals to Shock Stresses of 16 to 86 GPa

    OpenAIRE

    Kanel, G. I.; Nellis, W. J.; Savinykh, A. S.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rajendran, A. M.

    2009-01-01

    Shock-wave profiles of sapphire (single-crystal Al2O3) with seven crystallographic orientations were measured with time-resolved VISAR interferometry at shock stresses in the range 16 to 86 GPa. Shock propagation was normal to the surface of each cut. The angle between the c-axis of the hexagonal crystal structure and the direction of shock propagation varied from 0 for c-cut up to 90 degrees for m-cut in the basal plane. Based on published shock-induced transparencies, shock-induced optical ...

  18. Numerical Simulation Of Shock Response To Wall Changes In High Speed Intakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincham, J.; Taylor, N. V.

    2011-05-01

    Hypersonic flight presents a number of challenges to the designer, one of which is the intake behaviour. Minimising drag requires careful positioning of the intake shock structure, while accurate understanding of the dynamic behaviour is required to allow minimisation of margins. In this paper, a two shock external compression intake derived from the Reaction Engines Limited SABRE engine is examined using inviscid axisymmetric CFD analysis to determine the response of the normal shockwave to axial motion of the intake centrebody. An approximately linear relationship between centrebody position and both the normal shock position and additive drag in steady flow is demonstrated. Initial results from an unsteady analysis are also given, which show complex behaviours may be triggered by rapid motion of the centrebody in response to control input.

  19. Effect of continuous hemofiltration on internal environment and survival rate of severe heatstroke dogs with shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-ming CHEN

    2011-08-01

    groups.In CHF group the electrolyte disturbance recovered gradually and reached normal level at 180min after shock,while it did not recover in HS group.The levels of serum sodium,chlorine and potassium in HS group were significantly higher than those in CHF group at each time point after shock(P < 0.05,P < 0.01.The median survival time of CHF group(180 minutes was significantly longer than that of HS group(75 minutes,χ2=6.929,P=0.008.Conclusion CHF could improve the prognosis of severe heatstroke dogs with shock,prolong the survival time and reduce the fatality rate.The mechanism may be associated with fast cooling at early stage,maintenance of hemodynamic stability,and correction the acid-base imbalance and electrolyte disturbance.

  20. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.; Pullin, D. I.; Samtaney, Ravi; Wheatley, V.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  1. Geometrical shock dynamics for magnetohydrodynamic fast shocks

    KAUST Repository

    Mostert, W.

    2016-12-12

    We describe a formulation of two-dimensional geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) suitable for ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fast shocks under magnetic fields of general strength and orientation. The resulting area–Mach-number–shock-angle relation is then incorporated into a numerical method using pseudospectral differentiation. The MHD-GSD model is verified by comparison with results from nonlinear finite-volume solution of the complete ideal MHD equations applied to a shock implosion flow in the presence of an oblique and spatially varying magnetic field ahead of the shock. Results from application of the MHD-GSD equations to the stability of fast MHD shocks in two dimensions are presented. It is shown that the time to formation of triple points for both perturbed MHD and gas-dynamic shocks increases as (Formula presented.), where (Formula presented.) is a measure of the initial Mach-number perturbation. Symmetry breaking in the MHD case is demonstrated. In cylindrical converging geometry, in the presence of an azimuthal field produced by a line current, the MHD shock behaves in the mean as in Pullin et al. (Phys. Fluids, vol. 26, 2014, 097103), but suffers a greater relative pressure fluctuation along the shock than the gas-dynamic shock. © 2016 Cambridge University Press

  2. Remote sensing of local structure of the quasi-perpendicular Earth's bow shock by using field-aligned beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Miao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Field-aligned ion beams (FABs originate at the quasi-perpendicular Earth's bow shock and constitute an important ion population in the foreshock region. The bulk velocity of these FABs depends significantly on the shock normal angle, which is the angle between shock normal and upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. This dependency may therefore be taken as an indicator of the local structure of the shock. Applying the direct reflection model to Cluster measurements, we have developed a method that uses proton FABs in the foreshock region for remote sensing of the local shock structure. The comparison of the model results with the multi-spacecraft observations of FAB events shows very good agreement in terms of wave amplitude and frequency of surface waves at the shock front.

  3. Oxygen radicals in experimental shock: effects of spin-trapping nitrones in ameliorating shock pathophysiology (see comments)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.P. (Institute of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Florence, Careggi Hospital, (Italy))

    1992-04-01

    Circulatory shock is accepted as a consequence of an acute oxygen radical overgeneration. Spin-trapping nitrones inactivate free radicals by forming relatively stable adducts. Three spin-trapping nitrones (N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone; alpha-4-pyridyl-oxide-N-tert-butyl-nitrone; 5-5,dimethyl,1,pyrroline-N-oxide) were tested regarding their role in the pathophysiology and evolution of circulatory shock in rats. A prospective, randomized, controlled trial of spin-trapping nitrones in rats experiencing three different models of circulatory shock was designed. In the first group, endotoxic, traumatic, and mesenteric artery occlusion shock (all 100% lethal in control experiments) was prevented by the ip administration of N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone (150 mg/kg); alpha-4-pyridyl-oxide-N-tert-butyl-nitrone (100 mg/kg); or 5-5,dimethyl,1,pyrroline-N-oxide (100 mg/kg). However, the evolution of shock was unaffected by the same compounds when all three nitrones had been previously inactivated by exposure to light and air. In the second group, microcirculatory derangements that were provoked by endotoxin and were observed in the mesocecum of rats were completely prevented by pretreatment with either peritoneal administration of each of the three nitrones or by their topical application to the microscopic field. While the rats survived after systemic treatment, those rats receiving topical nitrones died from endotoxic shock. In the third group, cell-membrane stiffness (a sign of peroxidative damage) was measured by spin-probes and electron-spin resonance in mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. Cell membranes obtained from shocked rats were more rigid than those membranes of controls. However, the membranes obtained from rats that were submitted to trauma or endotoxin after pretreatment with N-tert-phenyl-butyl-nitrone had normal stiffness.

  4. Sepsis and Septic Shock Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Bracken A; Betzold, Richard D; May, Addison K

    2017-12-01

    Three therapeutic principles most substantially improve organ dysfunction and survival in sepsis: early, appropriate antimicrobial therapy; restoration of adequate cellular perfusion; timely source control. The new definitions of sepsis and septic shock reflect the inadequate sensitivity, specify, and lack of prognostication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria. Sequential (sepsis-related) organ failure assessment more effectively prognosticates in sepsis and critical illness. Inadequate cellular perfusion accelerates injury and reestablishing perfusion limits injury. Multiple organ systems are affected by sepsis and septic shock and an evidence-based multipronged approach to systems-based therapy in critical illness results in improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Vicky; Mitchell, Herschel K.; Young, Patricia; Petersen, Nancy S.

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  6. Hepatic Shock Differential Diagnosis and Risk Factors: A Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Safari, Saeid; Rahmani, Farzad; Nejabatian, Arezu; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-10-01

    Liver as an important organ has a vital role in physiological processes in the body. Different causes can disrupt normal function of liver. Factors such as hypo-perfusion, hypoxemia, infections and some others can cause hepatic injury and hepatic shock. Published research resources from 2002 to May 2015 in some databases (PubMed, Scopus, Index Copernicus, DOAJ, EBSCO-CINAHL, Science direct, Cochrane library and Google scholar and Iranian search database like SID and Iranmedex) were investigated for the present study. Different causes can lead to hepatic shock. Most of these causes can be prevented by early resuscitation and treatment of underlying factors. Hepatic shock is detected in ill patients, especially those with hemodynamic disorders. It can be prevented by early treatment of underlying disease. There is no definite treatment for hepatic shock and should be managed conservatively. Hepatic shock in patients can increase the mortality rate.

  7. On Modeling Risk Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    Dorofeenko, Victor; Lee, Gabriel; Salyer, Kevin; Strobel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of a financial accelerator model, we model time-varying uncertainty (i.e. risk shocks) through the use of a mixture Normal model with time variation in the weights applied to the underlying distributions characterizing entrepreneur productivity. Specifically, we model capital producers (i.e. the entrepreneurs) as either low-risk (relatively small second moment for productivity) and high-risk (relatively large second moment for productivity) and the fraction of both types is...

  8. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Miranda, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  9. On ion injection at quasiparallel shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholer, M.; Kucharek, H.; Kato, C.

    2002-01-01

    A large number of numerical experiments has been performed in order to study the interaction of interstellar pickup protons and helium ions with quasiparallel collisionless shocks. The shocks are modeled by a one-dimensional hybrid simulation method which treats the ions as macroparticles and the electrons as a massless fluid. Solar wind alpha particles and pickup protons are included self-consistently. In addition, the particle splitting method is used for the solar wind ions so that the distribution function can be followed over more than 10 orders of magnitude. A large part of the pickup ion distribution is reflected; the reflection efficiency is very high, and can reach in cases where the pickup ion density is low as much as 50%-60%. The reflection efficiency is almost independent of magnetic field-shock normal angle. This indicates that magnetic mirroring is unimportant and does not lead to larger reflection efficiencies. The reflection efficiency of pickup protons rapidly decreases when the pickup ion density exceeds a few percent of the solar wind density. An addition of 25% pickup protons decreases the reflection coefficient for these ions to ∼10%. This represents the fact that a quasiparallel shock cannot be considered as being uncoupled from the upstream region: at high additions of pickup ions the shock structure is changed in such a way as to reflect less pickup ions. The intensity of diffuse ions upstream of a quasiparallel shock does not depend on the temperature of the core distribution. Within the framework of the present model even solar wind distributions with a hard power law tail do not produce higher intensities of diffuse ions. It is argued that this can be understood by the fact that the intrinsic self-consistency between the processes in the upstream region and at the shock transition determines the injection and reflection properties of the core solar wind distribution

  10. Laser shock wave and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaojun; Zhang, Yongkang; Zhou, Jianzhong; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Aixin

    2007-12-01

    The technology of laser shock wave is used to not only surface modification but also metal forming. It can be divided into three parts: laser shock processing, laser shock forming (LSF) and laser peenforming(LPF). Laser shock processing as a surface treatment to metals can make engineering components have a residual compressive stress so that it obviously improves their fatigue strength and stress corrosion performances, while laser shock forming (LSF) is a novel technique that is used in plastic deformation of sheet metal recently and Laser peen forming (LPF) is another new sheet metal forming process presented in recent years. They all can be carried out by a high-power and repetition pulse Nd:Glass laser device made by Jiangsu University. Laser shock technology has characterized of ultrahigh pressure and high strain rate (10 6 - 10 7s -1). Now, for different materials, we are able to form different metals to contours and shapes and simultaneity leave their surfaces in crack-resistant compressive stress state. The results show that the technology of laser shock wave can strengthen surface property and prolong fatigue life and especially can deform metals to shapes that could not be adequately made using conventional methods. With the development of the technology of laser shock wave, the applied fields of laser will become greater and greater.

  11. IMPROVEMENT IN HANDWRITTEN NUMERAL STRING RECOGNITION BY SLANT NORMALIZATION AND CONTEXTUAL INFORMATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Britto jr., A. de S.; Sabourin, R.; Lethelier, E.; Bortolozzi, F.; Suen, C.Y.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes a way of enhancing handwritten numeral string recognition by considering slant normalization and contextual information to train an implicit segmentation­based system. A word slant normalization method is modified in order to improve the results for handwritten numeral strings.

  12. Integrated microelectromechanical gyroscope under shock loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, T. G.; Koleda, A. N.; Barbin, E. S.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents a new design of a shock-proof two-axis microelectromechanical gyroscope. Without stoppers, the shock load enables the interaction between the silicon sensor elements. Stoppers were installed in the gyroscope to prevent the contact interaction between electrodes and spring elements with fixed part of the sensor. The contact of stoppers occurs along the plane, thereby preventing the system from serious contact stresses. The shock resistance of the gyroscope is improved by the increase in its eigenfrequency at which the contact interaction does not occur. It is shown that the shock load directed along one axis does not virtually cause the movement of sensing elements along the crosswise axes. Maximum stresses observed in the proposed gyroscope at any loading direction do not exceed the value allowable for silicon.

  13. Mechanical analysis of a heat-shock induced developmental defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Sarah M.; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2014-03-01

    Embryonic development in Drosophila is a complex process involving coordinated movements of mechanically interacting tissues. Perturbing this system with a transient heat shock can result in a number of developmental defects. In particular, a heat shock applied during the earliest morphogenetic movements of gastrulation can lead to apparent recovery, but then subsequent morphogenetic failure 5-6 hours later during germ band retraction. The process of germ band retraction requires an intact amnioserosa - a single layered extra-embryonic epithelial tissue - and heat shock at gastrulation can induce the later opening of holes in the amnioserosa. These holes are highly correlated with failures of germ band retraction. These holes could be caused by a combination of mechanical weakness in the amnioserosa or local increases in mechanical stress. Here, we assess the role of mechanical stress using confocal imaging to compare cell and tissue morphology in the amnioserosa of normal and heat-shocked embryos and laser hole drilling to map the stress field around the times and locations at which heat-shock induced holes open.

  14. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  15. A team-based approach to patients in cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Jacob A; Ohman, E Magnus; Patel, Manesh R; Milano, Carmelo A; Rogers, Joseph G; Wohns, David H; Kapur, Navin K; Rao, Sunil V

    2016-09-01

    Cardiogenic shock is a common clinical condition with high in-hospital mortality. Early application of appropriate interventions for cardiogenic shock-including medical therapies, revascularization, temporary hemodynamic support devices, and durable mechanical circulatory support-may improve outcomes. The number and complexity of therapies for cardiogenic shock are increasing, making time-dependent decision-making more challenging. A multidisciplinary cardiogenic shock team is recommended to guide the rapid and efficient use of these available treatments. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structure of slow shocks in a magnetized plasma with heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.L.; Tsai, R.H.; Wu, B.H.; Lee, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    The structure of slow shocks in the presence of a heat conduction parallel to the local magnetic field is simulated from the set of magnetohydrodynamic equations. In this study, a pair of slow shocks is formed through the evolution of a current sheet initiated by the presence of a normal magnetic field. It is found that the slow shock consists of two parts: The isothermal main shock and foreshock. Significant jumps in plasma density, velocity and magnetic field occur across the main shock, but the temperature is found to be continuous across the main shock. The foreshock is featured by a smooth temperature variation and is formed due to the heat flow from downstream to upstream region. The plasma density downstream of the main shock decreases with time, while the downstream temperature increases with time, keeping the downstream pressure constant. It is shown that the jumps in plasma density, pressure, velocity, and magnetic field across the main shock are determined by the set of modified isothermal Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. It is also found that a jump in the temperature gradient is present across the main shock in order to satisfy the energy conservation. The present results can be applied to the heating in the solar corona and solar wind

  17. Anomalous elastic response of silicon to uniaxial shock compression on nanosecond time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge-Smith, A; Allen, A; Belak, J; Boehly, T; Hauer, A; Holian, B; Kalantar, D; Kyrala, G; Lee, R W; Lomdahl, P; Meyers, M A; Paisley, D; Pollaine, S; Remington, B; Swift, D C; Weber, S; Wark, J S

    2001-03-12

    We have used x-ray diffraction with subnanosecond temporal resolution to measure the lattice parameters of orthogonal planes in shock compressed single crystals of silicon (Si) and copper (Cu). Despite uniaxial compression along the (400) direction of Si reducing the lattice spacing by nearly 11%, no observable changes occur in planes with normals orthogonal to the shock propagation direction. In contrast, shocked Cu shows prompt hydrostaticlike compression. These results are consistent with simple estimates of plastic strain rates based on dislocation velocity data.

  18. Enhancement technology improves palatability of normal and callipyge lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, A K R; Wulf, D M; Wheeler, T L; Everts, A J; Weaver, A D; Daniel, J A

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if BPI Processing Technology (BPT) improved palatability of normal (NN) and callipyge (CN) lamb meat and to determine the mechanism by which palatability was improved. Ten ewe and 10 wether lambs of each phenotype were slaughtered, and carcass traits were assessed by a trained evaluator. The LM was removed at 2 d postmortem. Alternating sides served as controls (CON) or were treated with BPT. Muscles designated BPT were injected to a target 120% by weight with a patented solution containing water, ammonium hydroxide, carbon monoxide, and salt. Muscle pH, cooking loss, Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS), sarcomere length, cooked moisture retention, and desmin degradation were measured. A trained sensory panel and a take-home consumer panel evaluated LM chops. Callipyge had a heavier BW and HCW, less adjusted fat thickness, reduced yield grades, and greater conformation scores than NN (P cooked moisture retention, smaller WBS values, greater juiciness ratings, less off-flavors, and greater consumer ratings for raw characteristics (like of portion size, like of color, overall like of appearance) and eating characteristics (like of juiciness, like of flavor) than CON (P lamb by increasing cooked moisture retention, improving consumer acceptability of CN to near-normal levels.

  19. Individual and combined effects of organic, toxic, and hydraulic shocks on sequencing batch reactor in treating petroleum refinery wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizzouri, Nashwan Sh., E-mail: nashwan_mizzouri@yahoo.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Civil Engineering, University of Duhok, Kurdistan (Iraq); Shaaban, Md Ghazaly [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► This research focuses on the combined impact of shock loads on the PRWW treatment. ► System failure resulted when combined shock of organic and hydraulic was applied. ► Recovery was achieved by replacing glucose with PRWW and OLR was decreased to half. ► Worst COD removals were 68.9, and 57.8% for organic, and combined shocks. -- Abstract: This study analyzes the effects of toxic, hydraulic, and organic shocks on the performance of a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a capacity of 5 L. Petroleum refinery wastewater (PRWW) was treated with an organic loading rate (OLR) of approximately 0.3 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/kg MLSS d at 12.8 h hydraulic retention time (HRT). A considerable variation in the COD was observed for organic, toxic, hydraulic, and combined shocks, and the worst values observed were 68.9, 77.1, 70.2, and 57.8%, respectively. Improved control of toxic shock loads of 10 and 20 mg/L of chromium (VI) was identified. The system was adversely affected by the organic shock when a shock load thrice the normal value was used, and this behavior was repeated when the hydraulic shock was 4.8 h HRT. The empirical recovery period was greater than the theoretical period because of the inhibitory effects of phenols, sulfides, high oil, and grease in the PRWW. The system recovery rates from the shocks were in the following order: toxic, organic, hydraulic, and combined shocks. System failure occurred when the combined shocks of organic and hydraulic were applied. The system was resumed by replacing the PRWW with glucose, and the OLR was reduced to half its initial value.

  20. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Coronary Artery Disease: Relationship of Symptom Amelioration and Ischemia Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youko Takakuwa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: The current management of coronary artery disease (CAD relies on three major therapeutic options, namely medication, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. However, severe CAD that is not indicated for PCI or CABG still bears a poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatments. In 2006, extracorporeal cardiac shock wave (SW therapy reported on human for the first time. This treatment resulted in better myocardial perfusion as evaluated by dipyridamole stress thallium scintigraphy, angina symptoms, and exercise tolerance. The aim of the present study was to investigate myocardial perfusion images and evaluate the relationship between the ischemia improvement and symptom amelioration by SW therapy. Methods: We treated ten patients (i.e., nine males and one female with cardiac SW therapy who had CAD but not indicated for PCI or CABG and aged 63–89 years old. After the SW therapy, all patients were followed up for three months to evaluate any amelioration of the myocardial ischemia based on symptoms, adenosine stress thallium scintigraphy, transthoracic echocardiography, and blood biochemical examinations. Results: The changes in various parameters were evaluated before and after cardiac SW therapy. The cardiac SW therapy resulted in a significant improvement in the symptoms as evaluated by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society [CCS] class score (P=0.016 and a tendency to improve in summed stress score (SSS (P=0.068. However, no significant improvement was observed in the summed rest score (SRS, summed difference score (SDS, left ventricular wall motion score index (LVWMSI, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic, and troponin I. The difference of CCS class score (ΔCCS was significantly correlated with those of SSS (ΔSSS and SDS (ΔSDS (r=0.69, P=0.028 and r=0.70, P=0.025, respectively. There was no significant correlation between ΔCCS and other parameters. Furthermore, no significant

  1. Experimental Shock Transformation of Gypsum to Anhydrite: A New Low Pressure Regime Shock Indicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    ] reanalyzed the calcite and anhydrite shock wave experiments of Yang [9] using improved equations of state of porous materials and vaporized products. They determined the pressures for incipient and complete vaporization to be 32.5 and 122 GPa for anhydrite GPa which is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than reported earlier by Yang [9]. These studies are not in agreement regarding the onset of sulfate decomposition and documentation of shock effects in gypsum is incomplete.

  2. Simulations of Converging Shock Collisions for Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua; Dodd, Evan; Loomis, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Shock ignition (SI) has been proposed as an alternative to achieving high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. A central hot spot below the ignition threshold is created by an initial compression pulse, and a second laser pulse drives a strong converging shock into the fuel. The collision between the rebounding shock from the compression pulse and the converging shock results in amplification of the converging shock and increases the hot spot pressure above the ignition threshold. We investigate shock collision in SI drive schemes for cylindrical targets with a polystyrene foam interior using radiation-hydrodynamics simulations with the RAGE code. The configuration is similar to previous targets fielded on the Omega laser. The CH interior results in a lower convergence ratio and the cylindrical geometry facilitates visualization of the shock transit using an axial X-ray backlighter, both of which are important for comparison to potential experimental measurements. One-dimensional simulations are used to determine shock timing, and the effects of low mode asymmetries in 2D computations are also quantified. LA-UR-16-24773.

  3. Synthesis and thermotolerance of heat shock proteins in Campylobacter jejuni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.K.; Kim, H.O.; Lee, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    The heat shock responses of Campylobacter jejuni were studied by examination of their survival rates and synthesis of heat shock proteins. When C. jejuni cells were treated at the sublethal temperatures of 48C° for 30 minutes, most of the cells maintained their viabilities and synthesized the heat shock proteins of 90, 73, and 66 kD in molecular weight. By the method of two-dimensional electrophoresis, the heat shock proteins of C. jejuni were identified to be Hsp90, Hsp73, and Hsp66. During the heat shock at 48C°, the heat shock proteins were induced from about 5 minutes after the heat shock treatment. Their synthesis was continued upto 30 minutes, but remarkably retarded after 50 minutes. When C. jejune cells were heat shocked at 51C° for 30 minutes, the survival rates of the cells were decreased by about 10 3 fold and synthesis of heat shock proteins and normal proteins was also generally retarded. The cells exposed to 55C° for 30 minutes died off by more than 10 5 cells and the new protein synthesis was not observed. But when C. jejuni cells were heat-shocked at the sublethal temperature of 48C° for 15 to 20 minutes and then were exposed at the lethal temperature of 55C° for 30 minutes, their viabilities were higher than those exposed at 55C° for 30 minutes without pre-heat shock at 48C°. Therefore, the heat shock proteins synthesized at the sublethal temperature of 48C° in C. jejuni were thought to be responsible for thermotolerance. However, when C. jejuni cells heat-shocked at various ranges of sublethal and lethal temperatures were placed back to the optimum temperature of 42C°, the multiplication patterns of the cells pretreated at different temperatures were not much different each other

  4. MEMS based shock pulse detection sensor for improved rotary Stirling cooler end of life prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Münzberg, M.

    2018-05-01

    The widespread use of rotary Stirling coolers in high performance thermal imagers used for critical 24/7 surveillance tasks justifies any effort to significantly enhance the reliability and predictable uptime of those coolers. Typically the lifetime of the whole imaging device is limited due to continuous wear and finally failure of the rotary compressor of the Stirling cooler, especially due to failure of the comprised bearings. MTTF based lifetime predictions, even based on refined MTTF models taking operational scenario dependent scaling factors into account, still lack in precision to forecast accurately the end of life (EOL) of individual coolers. Consequently preventive maintenance of individual coolers to avoid failures of the main sensor in critical operational scenarios are very costly or even useless. We have developed an integrated test method based on `Micro Electromechanical Systems', so called MEMS sensors, which significantly improves the cooler EOL prediction. The recently commercially available MEMS acceleration sensors have mechanical resonance frequencies up to 50 kHz. They are able to detect solid borne shock pulses in the cooler structure, originating from e.g. metal on metal impacts driven by periodical forces acting on moving inner parts of the rotary compressor within wear dependent slack and play. The impact driven transient shock pulse analyses uses only the high frequency signal <10kHz and differs therefore from the commonly used broadband low frequencies vibrational analysis of reciprocating machines. It offers a direct indicator of the individual state of wear. The predictive cooler lifetime model based on the shock pulse analysis is presented and results are discussed.

  5. Nonstationarity of a two-dimensional quasiperpendicular supercritical collisionless shock by self-reformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembege, B.; Savoini, P.

    1992-01-01

    Two-dimensional electromagnetic particle simulations evidence a self-reformation of the shock front for a collisionless supercritical magnetosonic shock propagating at angle θ 0 around 90 degree, where θ 0 is the angle between the normal to the shock front and the upstream magnetostatic field. This self-reformation is due to reflected ions which accumulate in front of the shock and is observed (i) in both electric and magnetic components, (ii) for both resistive and nonresistive two-dimensional shocks, and (iii) over a cyclic time period equal to the mean ion gyroperiod measured downstream in the overshoot; resistive effects may be self-consistently included or excluded for θ 0 congruent 90 degree according to a judicious choice of the upstream magnetostatic field orientation. The self-reformation leads to a nonstationary behavior of the shock; however, present results show evidence that the shock becomes stationary for θ less than a critical value θ r , below which the self-reformation disappears. Present results are compared to previous works where one/two-dimensional hybrid and particle codes have been used, and to experimental measurements

  6. Experimental measurement of unsteady drag on shock accelerated micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Martinez, Adam; Prestridge, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    The unsteady drag history of shock accelerated micro-particles in air is investigated in the Horizontal Shock Tube (HST) facility at Los Alamos National laboratory. Drag forces are estimated based on particle size, particle density, and instantaneous velocity and acceleration measured on hundreds of post-shock particle tracks. We use previously implemented 8-frame Particle Tracking Velocimetry/Anemometry (PTVA) diagnostics to analyze particles in high spatiotemporal resolution from individual particle trajectories. We use a simultaneous LED based shadowgraph to register shock location with respect to a moving particle in each frame. To measure particle size accurately, we implement a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) in synchronization with the PTVA. In this presentation, we will corroborate with more accuracy our earlier observation that post-shock unsteady drag coefficients (CD(t)) are manifold times higher than those predicted by theoretical models. Our results will also show that all CD(t) measurements collapse on a master-curve for a range of particle size, density, Mach number and Reynolds number when time is normalized by a shear velocity based time scale, t* = d/(uf-up) , where d is particle diameter, and uf and up are post-shock fluid and particle velocities.

  7. Investigation of Heat Transfer to a Flat Plate in a Shock Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    2 Objectives and Scope . . . . . .. .. .. .... 5 11. Theory ............... ....... 7 Shock Tube Principles........... 7 Boundary Layer Theory ...in *excess of theory , but the rounded edge flat plate exhibited data which matched or was less than what theory predicted for each Mach number tested...normal shock advancing along an infinite flat plate. For x< Ugt there is a region of interaction between the downstream influence of the leading edge

  8. A transport equation for the evolution of shock amplitudes along rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Russo

    1991-05-01

    Full Text Available A new asymptotic method is derived for the study of the evolution of weak shocks in several dimension. The method is based on the Generalized Wavefront Expansion derived in [1]. In that paper the propagation of a shock into a known background was studied under the assumption that shock is weak, i.e. Mach Number =1+O(ε, ε ≪ 1, and that the perturbation of the field varies over a length scale O(ε. To the lowest order, the shock surface evolves along the rays associated with the unperturbed state. An infinite system of compatibility relations was derived for the jump in the field and its normal derivatives along the shock, but no valid criterion was found for a truncation of the system. Here we show that the infinite hierarchy is equivalent to a single equation that describes the evolution of the shock along the rays. We show that this method gives equivalent results to those obtained by Weakly Nonlinear Geometrical Optics [2].

  9. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  10. Pickup protons at quasi-perpendicular shocks: full particle electrodynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Matsukiyo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We have performed 3 one-dimensional full particle electromagnetic simulations of a quasi-perpendicular shock with the same Alfvén Mach number MA~5, shock normal-magnetic field angle ΘBn=87° and ion and electron beta (particle to magnetic field pressure of 0.1. In the first run we used an ion to electron mass ratio close to the physical one (mi/me=1024. As expected from previous high mass ratio simulations the Modified Two-Stream instability develops in the foot of the shock, and the shock periodically reforms itself. We have then self-consistently included in the simulation 10% pickup protons distributed on a shell in velocity space as a third component. In a run with an unrealistically low mass ratios of 200 the shock still reforms itself; reformation is due to accumulation of specularly reflected particles at the upstream edge of the foot. In a third run including pickup protons we used a mass ratio of 1024. The shock reforms periodically as in the low mass ratio run with a somewhat smaller time constant. The specular reflection of pickup protons results in an increase of the shock potential some distance ahead of the shock foot and ramp. The minimum scale of the cross shock potential during reformation is about 7 electron inertial length λe. We do not find any pickup proton acceleration in the ramp or downstream of the shock beyond the energy which specularly reflected ions gain by the motional electric field of the solar wind during their upstream gyration.

  11. Shock Dynamics in Stellar Outbursts. I. Shock Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Stephen; Matzner, Christopher D., E-mail: ro@astro.utoronto.ca [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)

    2017-05-20

    Wave-driven outflows and non-disruptive explosions have been implicated in pre-supernova outbursts, supernova impostors, luminous blue variable eruptions, and some narrow-line and superluminous supernovae. To model these events, we investigate the dynamics of stars set in motion by strong acoustic pulses and wave trains, focusing on nonlinear wave propagation, shock formation, and an early phase of the development of a weak shock. We identify the shock formation radius, showing that a heuristic estimate based on crossing characteristics matches an exact expansion around the wave front and verifying both with numerical experiments. Our general analytical condition for shock formation applies to one-dimensional motions within any static environment, including both eruptions and implosions. We also consider the early phase of shock energy dissipation. We find that waves of super-Eddington acoustic luminosity always create shocks, rather than damping by radiative diffusion. Therefore, shock formation is integral to super-Eddington outbursts.

  12. A shock absorber model for structure-borne noise analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaziz, Marouane; Nacivet, Samuel; Thouverez, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Shock absorbers are often responsible for undesirable structure-borne noise in cars. The early numerical prediction of this noise in the automobile development process can save time and money and yet remains a challenge for industry. In this paper, a new approach to predicting shock absorber structure-borne noise is proposed; it consists in modelling the shock absorber and including the main nonlinear phenomena responsible for discontinuities in the response. The model set forth herein features: compressible fluid behaviour, nonlinear flow rate-pressure relations, valve mechanical equations and rubber mounts. The piston, base valve and complete shock absorber model are compared with experimental results. Sensitivity of the shock absorber response is evaluated and the most important parameters are classified. The response envelope is also computed. This shock absorber model is able to accurately reproduce local nonlinear phenomena and improves our state of knowledge on potential noise sources within the shock absorber.

  13. Cardiogenic shock. Current concepts in management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumaran, K; Hugenholtz, P G

    1986-10-01

    This article presents a categorisation of circulatory shock and discusses the causes, haemodynamics, and clinical recognition of cardiogenic shock. The first step in the management strategy in cardiogenic shock is to guide the patient from the state of shock to one of managed haemodynamic stability. The therapeutic manoeuvres of this first step constitute the management tactics, which can be grouped under 3 general headings: (a) making the most of a malfunctioning heart; (b) improving the state of the heart; and (c) reducing the demands on the heart. In order to make the most of the heart, i.e. to get the highest possible output at the lowest possible cost, clinicians need to use their judgement in stimulating an overtaxed heart on the one hand, and in manipulating the loads on it (the preload and afterload) on the other, for although these methods may be advantageous, they are not without their pitfalls. Efforts to improve the state of the heart often necessitate surgical (e.g. mitral valve replacement) or semisurgical (e.g. coronary angiography and recanalisation) techniques, although intravenous antithrombotic agents may achieve comparable results in a few cases at the bedside. Reducing the demands on the heart is an active process involving the takeover of at least a part of the work of the heart by ancillary devices such as the intra-aortic balloon pump, and of the work of breathing by intubation and artificial ventilation. The individuality of each case of cardiogenic shock emphasises the need for empirical modulation of therapy based on feedback information obtained by haemodynamic monitoring.

  14. Bow Shock Generator Current Systems: MMS Observations of Possible Current Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrin, M.; Gunell, H.; Lindkvist, J.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Ergun, R. E.; Giles, B. L.

    2018-01-01

    We use data from the first two dayside seasons of the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission to study current systems associated with quasi-perpendicular bow shocks of generator type. We have analyzed 154 MMS bow shock crossings near the equatorial plane. We compute the current density during the crossings and conclude that the component perpendicular to the shock normal (J⊥) is consistent with a pileup of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) inside the magnetosheath. For predominantly southward IMF, we observe a component Jn parallel (antiparallel) to the normal for GSM Y > 0 (MMS probing region. For IMF clock angles near 90∘, we find indications of the current system being tilted toward the north-south direction, obtaining a significant Jz component, and we suggest that the current closes off the equatorial plane at higher latitudes where the spacecraft are not probing. The observations are complicated for several reasons. For example, variations in the solar wind and the magnetospheric currents and loads affect the closure, and Jn is distributed over large regions, making it difficult to resolve inside the magnetosheath proper.

  15. X-ray study of bow shocks in runaway stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Becker, M.; del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.

    2017-11-01

    Massive runaway stars produce bow shocks through the interaction of their winds with the interstellar medium, with the prospect for particle acceleration by the shocks. These objects are consequently candidates for non-thermal emission. Our aim is to investigate the X-ray emission from these sources. We observed with XMM-Newton a sample of five bow shock runaways, which constitutes a significant improvement of the sample of bow shock runaways studied in X-rays so far. A careful analysis of the data did not reveal any X-ray emission related to the bow shocks. However, X-ray emission from the stars is detected, in agreement with the expected thermal emission from stellar winds. On the basis of background measurements we derive conservative upper limits between 0.3 and 10 keV on the bow shocks emission. Using a simple radiation model, these limits together with radio upper limits allow us to constrain some of the main physical quantities involved in the non-thermal emission processes, such as the magnetic field strength and the amount of incident infrared photons. The reasons likely responsible for the non-detection of non-thermal radiation are discussed. Finally, using energy budget arguments, we investigate the detectability of inverse Compton X-rays in a more extended sample of catalogued runaway star bow shocks. From our analysis we conclude that a clear identification of non-thermal X-rays from massive runaway bow shocks requires one order of magnitude (or higher) sensitivity improvement with respect to present observatories.

  16. Radiating shocks and condensations in flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid energy release (by either ''thick target'' (beam) or ''thermal'' models of heating) in solar flare loop models usually leads to ''chromospheric evaporation,'' the process of heating cool chromospheric material to coronal temperatures, and the resulting increase in hot soft x-ray emitting plasma. The evaporated plasma flows up into the coronal portion of the loop because of the increased pressure in the evaporated region. However, the pressure increase also leads to a number of interesting phenomena in the flare chromosphere, which will be the subject of this paper. The sudden pressure increase in the evaporated plasma initiates a downward moving ''chromospheric condensation,'' an overdense region which gradually decelerates as it accretes material and propagates into the gravitationally stratified chromosphere. Solutions to an equation of motion for this condensation shows that its motion decays after about one minute of propagation into the chromosphere. When the front of this downflowing region is supersonic relative to the atmosphere ahead of it, a radiating shock will form. If the downflow is rapid enough, the shock strength should be sufficient to excite uv radiation normally associated with the transition region, and furthermore, the radiating shock will be brighter than the transition region. These results lead to a number of observationally testable relationships between the optical and ultraviolet spectra from the condensation and radiating shock

  17. The Acceleration of Charged Particles at a Spherical Shock Moving through an Irregular Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacalone, J. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-10-20

    We investigate the physics of charged-particle acceleration at spherical shocks moving into a uniform plasma containing a turbulent magnetic field with a uniform mean. This has applications to particle acceleration at astrophysical shocks, most notably, to supernovae blast waves. We numerically integrate the equations of motion of a large number of test protons moving under the influence of electric and magnetic fields determined from a kinematically defined plasma flow associated with a radially propagating blast wave. Distribution functions are determined from the positions and velocities of the protons. The unshocked plasma contains a magnetic field with a uniform mean and an irregular component having a Kolmogorov-like power spectrum. The field inside the blast wave is determined from Maxwell’s equations. The angle between the average magnetic field and unit normal to the shock varies with position along its surface. It is quasi-perpendicular to the unit normal near the sphere’s equator, and quasi-parallel to it near the poles. We find that the highest intensities of particles, accelerated by the shock, are at the poles of the blast wave. The particles “collect” at the poles as they approximately adhere to magnetic field lines that move poleward from their initial encounter with the shock at the equator, as the shock expands. The field lines at the poles have been connected to the shock the longest. We also find that the highest-energy protons are initially accelerated near the equator or near the quasi-perpendicular portion of the shock, where the acceleration is more rapid.

  18. Steady flow on to a conveyor belt - Causal viscosity and shear shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syer, D.; Narayan, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Some hydrodynamical consequences of the adoption of a causal theory of viscosity are explored. Causality is introduced into the theory by letting the coefficient of viscosity go to zero as the flow velocity approaches a designated propagation speed for viscous signals. Consideration is given to a model of viscosity which has a finite propagation speed of shear information, and it is shown that it produces two kinds of shear shock. A 'pure shear shock' corresponds to a transition from a superviscous to a subviscous state with no discontinuity in the velocity. A 'mixed shear shock' has a shear transition occurring at the same location as a normal adiabatic or radiative shock. A generalized version of the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions for mixed shear shocks is derived, and self-consistent numerical solutions to a model 2D problem in which an axisymmetric radially infalling stream encounters a spinning star are presented.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic shocks in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernoff, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    Part one develops the mathematical and physical theory of one-dimensional, time-independent subalfvenic flow in partially ionized gas with magnetic fields, for application to shocks in molecular clouds. Unlike normal gas-dynamic shocks, the neutral flow may be continuous and cool if the gas radiates efficiently and does not self-ionize. Analytic solutions are given in the limit that the neutral gas is either adiabatic or isothermal (cold). Numerical techniques are developed and applied to find the neutral flow under general circumstances. Part two extends the theory and results of part one in three ways: (1) to faster, superalfvenic flow, (2) to complex gases containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, containing heavy charged particles (grains) in addition to ions, electrons and neutrals, and (3) to the entire range in (Omega tau), the ratio of charged particle damping time to gyroperiod, expected in gas flows in molecular clouds

  20. Computations of the Shock Waves at Hypersonic Velocities Taken into Account the Chemical Reactions that Appear in the Air at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Leonida NICULESCU

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The temperature in the nose region of a hypersonic vehicle can be extremely high, for example, reaching approximately 11 000 K at a Mach number of 36 (Apollo reentry. The bow shock wave is normal, or nearly normal, in the nose region of a blunt body, and the gas temperature behind this shock wave can be enormous at hypersonic speeds. In this case, the assumption of a calorically perfect nonreacting gas with the ratio of specific heats  of 1.4 gives an unrealistically high value of temperature. Therefore, the proper inclusion of chemically reacting effects is vital to the calculation of an accurate normal shock wave temperature.

  1. Pickup protons at quasi-perpendicular shocks: full particle electrodynamic simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Matsukiyo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We have performed 3 one-dimensional full particle electromagnetic simulations of a quasi-perpendicular shock with the same Alfvén Mach number MA~5, shock normal-magnetic field angle ΘBn=87° and ion and electron beta (particle to magnetic field pressure of 0.1. In the first run we used an ion to electron mass ratio close to the physical one (mi/me=1024. As expected from previous high mass ratio simulations the Modified Two-Stream instability develops in the foot of the shock, and the shock periodically reforms itself. We have then self-consistently included in the simulation 10% pickup protons distributed on a shell in velocity space as a third component. In a run with an unrealistically low mass ratios of 200 the shock still reforms itself; reformation is due to accumulation of specularly reflected particles at the upstream edge of the foot. In a third run including pickup protons we used a mass ratio of 1024. The shock reforms periodically as in the low mass ratio run with a somewhat smaller time constant. The specular reflection of pickup protons results in an increase of the shock potential some distance ahead of the shock foot and ramp. The minimum scale of the cross shock potential during reformation is about 7 electron inertial length λe. We do not find any pickup proton acceleration in the ramp or downstream of the shock beyond the energy which specularly reflected ions gain by the motional electric field of the solar wind during their upstream gyration.

  2. Magnetic field fluctuations across the Earth's bow shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaykowska, A.; Bauer, T.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Treumann, R.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Garching (Germany); International Space Science Inst. (ISSI), Bern (Switzerland); Baumjohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Inst. fuer Weltraumforschung der Oesterreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, Graz (Austria)

    2001-03-01

    We present a statistical analysis of 132 dayside (LT 0700-1700) bow shock crossings of the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of low frequency, magnetic power spectra some minutes upstream and downstream of the bow shock. The events are devided into categories depending on the angle {theta}{sub Bn} between bow shock normal and interplanetary magnetic field, and on plasma-{beta}. In the foreshock upstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock, the power of the magnetic fluctuations is roughly 1 order of magnitude larger ({delta}B {proportional_to} 4 nT for frequencies 0.01-0.04 Hz) than upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock. There is no significant difference in the magnetic power spectra upstream and downstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock; only at the shock itself, is the magnetic power enhanced by a factor of 4. This enhancement may be due to either an amplification of convecting upstream waves or to wave generation at the shock interface. On the contrary, downstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock, the magnetic wave activity is considerably higher than upstream. Downstream of the quasi-perpendicular low-{beta} bow shock, we find a dominance of the left-hand polarized component at frequencies just below the ion-cyclotron frequency, with amplitudes of about 3 nT. These waves are identified as ion-cyclotron waves, which grow in a low-{beta} regime due to the proton temperature anisotropy. We find a strong correlation of this anisotropy with the intensity of the left-hand polarized component. Downstream of some nearly perpendicular ({theta}{sub Bn} {approx} 90 ) high-{beta} crossings, mirror waves are identified. However, there are also cases where the conditions for mirror modes are met downstream of the nearly perpendicular shock, but no mirror waves are observed. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic behavior of zirconium alloy E110 under submicrosecond shock-wave loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakov D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress waves have been measured under shock wave loading of zirconium alloy E110 samples with the 0.5 – 8 mm thickness at normal and elevated temperatures. Duration of shock loading pulses varied from ∼0.05 up to 1μs with the amplitude varying from 3.4 up to 23 GPa. Free-surface velocity profiles have been registered using VISAR and PDV interferometers with nanosecond resolution. Attenuation of the elastic precursor has been measured to determine plastic strain rate behind the elastic precursor front. The plastic strain rate was observed to decrease with propagation from 106 s−1 at the 0.46-mm distance down to 2 ⋅ 104 s−1 at the 8-mm distance. Spall strength has been measured under normal and elevated temperatures. Spall strength versus strain rate relationships have been constructed in the 105 s−1 – 106s−1 range. Under shock compression higher than 10.6 GPa, the three-wave configuration of the shock wave has been registered and the polymorphous α → ω transition is considered to be the reason of this phenomenon. This work was supported by State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” within State Contract # H.4x.44.90.13.1111

  4. Dynamic behavior of zirconium alloy E110 under submicrosecond shock-wave loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, D. N.; Kozelkov, O. E.; Mayorova, A. S.; Malyugina, S. N.; Mokrushin, S. S.; Pavlenko, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Stress waves have been measured under shock wave loading of zirconium alloy E110 samples with the 0.5 - 8 mm thickness at normal and elevated temperatures. Duration of shock loading pulses varied from ˜0.05 up to 1μs with the amplitude varying from 3.4 up to 23 GPa. Free-surface velocity profiles have been registered using VISAR and PDV interferometers with nanosecond resolution. Attenuation of the elastic precursor has been measured to determine plastic strain rate behind the elastic precursor front. The plastic strain rate was observed to decrease with propagation from 106 s-1 at the 0.46-mm distance down to 2 ṡ 104 s-1 at the 8-mm distance. Spall strength has been measured under normal and elevated temperatures. Spall strength versus strain rate relationships have been constructed in the 105 s-1 - 106s-1 range. Under shock compression higher than 10.6 GPa, the three-wave configuration of the shock wave has been registered and the polymorphous α → ω transition is considered to be the reason of this phenomenon. This work was supported by State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" within State Contract # H.4x.44.90.13.1111

  5. Absolute Hugoniot measurements from a spherically convergent shock using x-ray radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Damian C.; Kritcher, Andrea L.; Hawreliak, James A.; Lazicki, Amy; MacPhee, Andrew; Bachmann, Benjamin; Döppner, Tilo; Nilsen, Joseph; Collins, Gilbert W.; Glenzer, Siegfried; Rothman, Stephen D.; Kraus, Dominik; Falcone, Roger W.

    2018-05-01

    The canonical high pressure equation of state measurement is to induce a shock wave in the sample material and measure two mechanical properties of the shocked material or shock wave. For accurate measurements, the experiment is normally designed to generate a planar shock which is as steady as possible in space and time, and a single state is measured. A converging shock strengthens as it propagates, so a range of shock pressures is induced in a single experiment. However, equation of state measurements must then account for spatial and temporal gradients. We have used x-ray radiography of spherically converging shocks to determine states along the shock Hugoniot. The radius-time history of the shock, and thus its speed, was measured by radiographing the position of the shock front as a function of time using an x-ray streak camera. The density profile of the shock was then inferred from the x-ray transmission at each instant of time. Simultaneous measurement of the density at the shock front and the shock speed determines an absolute mechanical Hugoniot state. The density profile was reconstructed using the known, unshocked density which strongly constrains the density jump at the shock front. The radiographic configuration and streak camera behavior were treated in detail to reduce systematic errors. Measurements were performed on the Omega and National Ignition Facility lasers, using a hohlraum to induce a spatially uniform drive over the outside of a solid, spherical sample and a laser-heated thermal plasma as an x-ray source for radiography. Absolute shock Hugoniot measurements were demonstrated for carbon-containing samples of different composition and initial density, up to temperatures at which K-shell ionization reduced the opacity behind the shock. Here we present the experimental method using measurements of polystyrene as an example.

  6. Magnetic field fluctuations across the Earth’s bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czaykowska

    Full Text Available We present a statistical analysis of 132 dayside (LT 0700-1700 bow shock crossings of the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of low frequency, magnetic power spectra some minutes up-stream and downstream of the bow shock. The events are devided into categories depending on the angle θBn between bow shock normal and interplanetary magnetic field, and on plasma-β. In the foreshock upstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock, the power of the magnetic fluctuations is roughly 1 order of magnitude larger (δB ~ 4 nT for frequencies 0.01–0.04 Hz than upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock. There is no significant difference in the magnetic power spectra upstream and downstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock; only at the shock itself, is the magnetic power enhanced by a factor of 4. This enhancement may be due to either an amplification of convecting upstream waves or to wave generation at the shock interface. On the contrary, downstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock, the magnetic wave activity is considerably higher than upstream. Down-stream of the quasi-perpendicular low-β bow shock, we find a dominance of the left-hand polarized component at frequencies just below the ion-cyclotron frequency, with amplitudes of about 3 nT. These waves are identified as ion-cyclotron waves, which grow in a low-β regime due to the proton temperature anisotropy. We find a strong correlation of this anisotropy with the intensity of the left-hand polarized component. Downstream of some nearly perpendicular (θBn ≈ 90° high-β crossings, mirror waves are identified. However, there are also cases where the conditions for mirror modes are met downstream of the nearly perpendicular shock, but no mirror waves are observed.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath; plasma waves and

  7. Magnetic field fluctuations across the Earth’s bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Czaykowska

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical analysis of 132 dayside (LT 0700-1700 bow shock crossings of the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft. We perform a superposed epoch analysis of low frequency, magnetic power spectra some minutes up-stream and downstream of the bow shock. The events are devided into categories depending on the angle θBn between bow shock normal and interplanetary magnetic field, and on plasma-β. In the foreshock upstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock, the power of the magnetic fluctuations is roughly 1 order of magnitude larger (δB ~ 4 nT for frequencies 0.01–0.04 Hz than upstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock. There is no significant difference in the magnetic power spectra upstream and downstream of the quasi-parallel bow shock; only at the shock itself, is the magnetic power enhanced by a factor of 4. This enhancement may be due to either an amplification of convecting upstream waves or to wave generation at the shock interface. On the contrary, downstream of the quasi-perpendicular shock, the magnetic wave activity is considerably higher than upstream. Down-stream of the quasi-perpendicular low-β bow shock, we find a dominance of the left-hand polarized component at frequencies just below the ion-cyclotron frequency, with amplitudes of about 3 nT. These waves are identified as ion-cyclotron waves, which grow in a low-β regime due to the proton temperature anisotropy. We find a strong correlation of this anisotropy with the intensity of the left-hand polarized component. Downstream of some nearly perpendicular (θBn ≈ 90° high-β crossings, mirror waves are identified. However, there are also cases where the conditions for mirror modes are met downstream of the nearly perpendicular shock, but no mirror waves are observed.Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence – Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath; plasma waves and instabilities

  8. Shock and vibration environments for large shipping containers on rail cars and trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnuson, C.F.; Wilson, L.T.

    1977-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide definitions of shock and vibration environment to which fissile material shipping containers may be exposed during normal shipment by truck and rail cars. The definitions of vibration, shock superimposed on vibration and rail coupling shock result from existing data. The dependence of shock environment, from rail coupling operations, on parameters like cargo weight and shock attenuation couplers was also studied using spring-mass models. These studies show that for rail cars equipped with standard draft gear, the cargo response decreases with increased cargo weight until the springs bottom out. For rail cars equipped with shock attenuation couplers, cargo weight has little effect on cargo response. The study also shows the importance of matching couplers and tiedown stiffnesses to decrease the cargo response. Vibration and shock data samples have been obtained during truck shipment of heavy cargo and the data will be presented in subsequent reports. Similar data need to be obtained for rail shipment of heavy cargo and during rail coupling operations with heavy cargo

  9. Structure of fast shocks in the presence of heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C. L.; Chen, H. H.; Wu, B. H.; Lee, L. C.

    2007-01-01

    There are three types of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) shocks: the fast shock, intermediate shock, and slow shock. The structure of slow shocks and intermediate shocks in the presence of heat conduction has been studied earlier [C. L. Tsai, R. H. Tsai, B. H. Wu, and L. C. Lee, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1185 (2002); C. L. Tsai, B. H. Wu, and L. C. Lee, Phys. Plasmas 12, 82501 (2005)]. Based on one-dimensional MHD numerical simulations with a heat conduction term, the evolution and structure of fast shocks are studied. The fast shock will form a foreshock in the presence of heat conduction. The foreshock is formed due to the heat flow from downstream to upstream and located in the immediate upstream of the main shock. In the steady state, the value of diffusion velocity V d in the foreshock is found to nearly equal the upstream convection velocity in the fast shock frame. It is found that the density jump across the main shock in high Mach number case can be much larger than 4 in the early simulation time. However the density jump will gradually evolve to a value smaller than 4 at steady state. By using the modified Rankine-Hugoniot relations with heat flux, the density jump across the fast shock is examined for various upstream parameters. The results show that the calculated density jump with heat flux is very close to the simulation value and the density jump can far exceed the maximum value of 4 without heat conduction. The structure of foreshock and main shock is also studied under different plasma parameters, such as the heat conductivity K 0 , the ratio of upstream plasma pressure to magnetic pressure β 1 , Alfven Mach number M A1 , and the angle θ 1 between shock normal and magnetic field. It is found that as the upstream shock parameters K 0 , β 1 , and M A1 increase or θ 1 decreases, the width of foreshock L d increases. The present results can be applied to fast shocks in the solar corona, solar wind, and magnetosphere, in which the heat conduction effects are

  10. Structure of oblique subcritical bow shocks: ISEE 1 and 2 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellott, M.M.; Greenstadt, E.W.

    1984-01-01

    We have studied the structural elements, including shock ramps and precursor wave trains, of a series of oblique low-Mach number terrestrial bow shocks. We used magnetic field data from the dual ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft to determine the scale lengths of various elements of shock structure as well as wavelengths and wave polarizations. Bow shocks structure under these conditions is esstentially that of a large-amplitude damped whistler mode wave which extends upstream in the form of a precursor wave train. Shock thicknesses, which are determined by the dispersive properties of the ambient plasma, are too broad to support current-driven electrostatic waves, ruling out such turbulence as the source of dissipation in these shocks. Dissipative processes are reflected in the damping of the precursors, and dissipative scale lengths are approx.200--800 km (several times greater than shock thicknesses). Precursor damping is not related to shock normal angle or Mach number, but is correlated with T/sub e//T/sub t/. The source of the dissipation in the shocks does not appear to be wave-wave decay of the whistlers, for which no evidence is found. We cannot rule out the possibility of contribution to the dissipation from ion acoustic and, or lower hybrid mode turbulence, but interaction of the whistler itself with upstream electrons offers a simpler and more self-consistent explanation for the observed wave train damping

  11. DebtRank: A Microscopic Foundation for Shock Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Battiston, Stefano; Caccioli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The DebtRank algorithm has been increasingly investigated as a method to estimate the impact of shocks in financial networks, as it overcomes the limitations of the traditional default-cascade approaches. Here we formulate a dynamical "microscopic" theory of instability for financial networks by iterating balance sheet identities of individual banks and by assuming a simple rule for the transfer of shocks from borrowers to lenders. By doing so, we generalise the DebtRank formulation, both providing an interpretation of the effective dynamics in terms of basic accounting principles and preventing the underestimation of losses on certain network topologies. Depending on the structure of the interbank leverage matrix the dynamics is either stable, in which case the asymptotic state can be computed analytically, or unstable, meaning that at least one bank will default. We apply this framework to a dataset of the top listed European banks in the period 2008-2013. We find that network effects can generate an amplification of exogenous shocks of a factor ranging between three (in normal periods) and six (during the crisis) when we stress the system with a 0.5% shock on external (i.e. non-interbank) assets for all banks.

  12. Impact of Heat-Shock Treatment on Yellowing of Pak Choy Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiang-yang; SHEN Lian-qing; YUAN Hai-na

    2004-01-01

    The physiological mechanism of maintaining the green colour of pak choy leaves (Brassica rapa var chinensis) with heat-shock treatment was studied. Chlorophyll in the outer leaves of pak choy degraded rapidly during storage at ambient temperature (20 ± 2℃), a slight yellow appeared. Heat-shock treatment (46- 50℃) had a mild effect on maintaining the green colour of outer leaves. Normal chlorophyll degradation was associated with a binding of chlorophyll with chlorophyll-binding-protein preceding chlorophyll breakdown.Heat-shock treatment was found to reduce the binding-capacity between chlorophyllbinding-protein and chlorophyll. In the chlorophyll degradation pathway, pheide dioxygenase was synthesized during leaf senescence which was considered to be a key enzyme in chlorophyll degradation. Activity of this enzyme was reduced following heat-shock treatment, which might explain the observed reduction in chlorophyll breakdown. Two groups of heat-shock proteins were detected in treated leaves, the first group containing proteins from 54KDa to 74 Kda, and the second group contained proteins from 15 KDa to 29KDa. Heat-shock treatment was also found to retard the decline of glucose and fructose (the main energy substrates) of outer leaves.

  13. A schizophrenic patient with cerebral infarctions after hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yanagawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the fourth case of cerebral infarction, concomitant with hemorrhagic shock, in English literature. A 33-year-old male, who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and given a prescription for Olanzapine, was discovered with multiple self-inflicted bleeding cuts on his wrist. On arrival, he was in hemorrhagic shock without verbal responsiveness, but his vital signs were normalized following infusion of Lactate Ringer′s solution. The neuroradiological studies revealed multiple cerebral ischemic lesions without any vascular abnormality. He was diagnosed with speech apraxia, motor aphasia, and dysgraphia, due to multiple cerebral infarctions. As there was no obvious causative factor with regard to the occurrence of cerebral infarction in the patient, the hypoperfusion due to hemorrhagic shock, and the thromboembolic tendency due to Olanzapine, might have acted together to lead to the patient′s cerebral ischemia.

  14. Persistent adrenal enhancement may be the earliest CT sign of significant hypovolaemic shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S.C.W.; Lee, R.; Tung, H.K.S.; Chan, F.L

    2003-04-01

    AIM: To report two cases of intense and persistent adrenal enhancement on computed tomography (CT) examinations of the abdomen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two patients presented with septic shock, one due to pyogenic liver abscess and the other strangulated obturator hernia with gangrenous bowel. Both patients were resuscitated with fluid before undergoing unenhanced and enhanced CT. RESULTS: In both patients intravascular volume was not reduced as evident by normal calibre of the aorta and inferior vena cava. One patient had abnormal enhancement pattern in the liver and kidneys, suggesting hypoperfusion. The other patient had normal enhancement pattern of the other abdominal viscera. Both patient subsequently died with multi-organ failure. CONCLUSION: We propose that adrenal enhancement may be a sign of hyperperfusion in early stage of shock due to the crucial role of the adrenal glands in this clinical situation. This may not persist with further circulatory compromise due to vasoconstriction. If confirmed, its recognition has potential value of identifying a therapeutic window before irreversible shock set in.

  15. Medical and biomedical applications of shock waves

    CERN Document Server

    Loske, Achim M

    2017-01-01

    This book provides current, comprehensive, and clear explanations of the physics behind medical and biomedical applications of shock waves. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy is one of the greatest medical advances of our time, and its techniques and clinical devices are continuously evolving. Further research continues to improve the understanding of calculi fragmentation and tissue-damaging mechanisms. Shock waves are also used in orthopedics and traumatology. Possible applications in oncology, cardiology, dentistry, gene therapy, cell transfection, transformation of fungi and bacteria, as well as the inactivation of microorganisms are promising approaches for clinical treatment, industrial applications and research. Medical and Biomedical Applications of Shock Waves is useful as a guide for students, technicians and researchers working in universities and laboratories. Chemists, biologists, physicians and veterinarians, involved in research or clinical practice will find useful advice, but also engineer...

  16. Dissociative Functions in the Normal Mourning Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Sees dissociative functions in mourning process as occurring in conjunction with integrative trends. Considers initial shock reaction in mourning as model of normal dissociation in mourning process. Dissociation is understood to be related to traumatic significance of death in human consciousness. Discerns four psychological categories of…

  17. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  18. MMS observations of the Earth bow shock during magnetosphere compression and expansion: comparison of whistler wave properties around the shock ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Schwartz, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft, with their state-of-the-art plasma and field instruments onboard, allow us to investigate electromagnetic waves at the bow shock and their association with small-scale disturbances in the shocked plasmas. Understanding these waves could improve our knowledge on the heating of electrons and ions across the shock ramp and the energy dissipation of supercritical shocks. We have found broad-band and narrow band waves across the shock ramp and slightly downstream. The broad-band waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field direction and have frequencies up to the electron cyclotron frequency, while the narrow-band waves have frequencies of a few hundred Hertz, durations under a second, and are right-handed circularly polarized and propagate along the magnetic field lines. Both wave types are likely to be whistler mode with different generation mechanisms. When the solar wind pressure changes, MMS occasionally observed a pair of bow shocks when the magnetosphere was compressed and then expanded. We compare the wave observations under these two situations to understand their roles in the shock ramp as well as the upstream and downstream plasmas.

  19. Complex flow morphologies in shock-accelerated gaseous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Vorobieff, P.; Orlicz, G.; Palekar, A.; Tomkins, C.; Goodenough, C.; Marr-Lyon, M.; Prestridge, K. P.; Benjamin, R. F.

    2007-11-01

    A Mach 1.2 planar shock wave impulsively and simultaneously accelerates a row of three heavy gas (SF 6) cylinders surrounded by a lighter gas (air), producing pairs of vortex columns. The heavy gas cylinders (nozzle diameter D) are initially equidistant in the spanwise direction (center to center spacing S), with S/D=1.5. The interaction of the vortex columns is investigated with planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in the plane normal to the axes of the cylinders. Several distinct post-shock morphologies are observed, apparently due to rather small variations of the initial conditions. We report the variation of the streamwise and spanwise growth rates of the integral scales for these flow morphologies.

  20. Over-the-road shock and vibration testing of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert heat generated by radioactive decay into electricity through the use of thermocouples. The RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance, which make them particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). To meet these regulations, a RTG Transportation System (RTGTS) that fully complies with 10 CFR 71 has been developed, which protects RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock, vibration, and heat). To ensure the protection of RTGs from shock and vibration loadings during transport, extensive over-the-road testing was conducted on the RTG'S to obtain real-time recordings of accelerations of the air-ride suspension system trailer floor, packaging, and support structure. This paper provides an overview of the RTG'S, a discussion of the shock and vibration testing, and a comparison of the test results to the specified shock response spectra and power spectral density acceleration criteria

  1. demystifying the shock of shocking

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (with a pulse), atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The energy dose in cardioversion is less (0.5. - 2 J/kg) than in defibrillation (2 - 4 J/kg). In cardioversion the shock is discharged synchronously with the native R wave of the patient. Without synchronisation,. VF can be induced if a shock is delivered during the refractory period ...

  2. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L X , remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L X /L bol ). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  3. Shock absorbing structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Naoki; Matsushita, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    Small pieces of shock absorbers are filled in a space of a shock absorbing vessel which is divided into a plurality of sections by partitioning members. These sections function to prevent excess deformation or replacement of the fillers upon occurrence of falling accident. Since the shock absorbing small pieces in the shock absorbing vessel are filled irregularly, shock absorbing characteristics such as compression strength is not varied depending on the direction, but they exhibit excellent shock absorbing performance. They surely absorb shocks exerted on a transportation vessel upon falling or the like. If existing artificial fillers such as pole rings made of metal or ceramic and cut pieces such as alumium extrusion molding products are used as the shock absorbing pieces, they have excellent fire-proofness and cold resistance since the small pieces are inflammable and do not contain water. (T.M.)

  4. Use of nonlinear asymmetrical shock absorber to improve comfort on passenger vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M.; Pontes, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-03-01

    In this study the behaviour of two different types of shock absorbers, symmetrical (linear) and asymmetrical (nonlinear) is compared for use on passenger vehicles. The analyses use different standard road inputs and include variation of the severity parameter, the asymmetry ratio and the velocity of the vehicle. Performance indices and acceleration values are used to assess the efficacy of the asymmetrical systems. The comparisons show that the asymmetrical system, with nonlinear characteristics, tends to have a smoother and more progressive performance, both for vertical and angular movements. The half-car front asymmetrical system was introduced, and the simulation results show that the use of the asymmetrical system only at the front of the vehicle can further diminish the angular oscillations. As lower levels of acceleration are essential for improved ride comfort, the use of asymmetrical systems for vibrations and impact absorption can be a more advantageous choice for passenger vehicles.

  5. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, S. A.; Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-01-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25

  6. Study on Reflected Shock Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction in a Shock Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Tae Ho; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong Nat’l Univ., Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    The interaction between a shock wave and a boundary layer causes boundary layer separation, shock train, and in some cases, strong unsteadiness in the flow field. Such a situation is also observed in a shock tube, where the reflected shock wave interacts with the unsteady boundary layer. However, only a few studies have been conducted to investigate the shock train phenomenon in a shock tube. In the present study, numerical studies were conducted using the two-dimensional axisymmetric domain of a shock tube, and compressible Navier-Stokes equations were solved to clarify the flow characteristics of shock train phenomenon inside a shock tube. A detailed wave diagram was developed based on the present computational results, which were validated with existing experimental data.

  7. Shock fitting classical techniques, recent developments, and memoirs of Gino Moretti

    CERN Document Server

    Paciorri, Renato

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the revolutionary capabilities of new shock fitting algorithms; a great improvement in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for high-speed numerical simulations. Shock fitting methods provide a solution to the current difficulties and inaccuracies in shock-capturing approaches. This work traces the evolution of shock-fitting methods, from the pioneering methods based on the structured grids (boundary and floating shock-fitting) to recent developments on unstructured grids, illustrating algorithmic details, significant applications and potential developments.  Also, to celebrate the centenary birth of the father of shock-fitting techniques, the book also includes a tribute to Gino Moretti, as well as his unpublished manuscript. This book will appeal to professionals, researchers, and graduate students in the field of CFD.

  8. Numerical solutions of several reflected shock-wave flow fields with nonequilibrium chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, R. K.; Presley, L. L.; Williams, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    The method of characteristics for a chemically reacting gas is used in the construction of the time-dependent, one-dimensional flow field resulting from the normal reflection of an incident shock wave at the end wall of a shock tube. Nonequilibrium chemical reactions are allowed behind both the incident and reflected shock waves. All the solutions are evaluated for oxygen, but the results are generally representative of any inviscid, nonconducting, and nonradiating diatomic gas. The solutions clearly show that: (1) both the incident- and reflected-shock chemical relaxation times are important in governing the time to attain steady state thermodynamic properties; and (2) adjacent to the end wall, an excess-entropy layer develops wherein the steady state values of all the thermodynamic variables except pressure differ significantly from their corresponding Rankine-Hugoniot equilibrium values.

  9. The Shock and Vibration Digest. Volume 12, Number 10,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    171 calculations will allow safety checks of existing dams (1970). and the execution of dynamic designs of future dams. It will be possible to have...a Normal Shock Wave Contained limits are also presented, in an Aerodynamic Inlet (Pulsation d’un Choc Droit en Aerodynamique Interne) A. Agnes, E

  10. Regular shock refraction in planar ideal MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmont, P; Keppens, R

    2010-01-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest, in planar ideal (magneto)hydrodynamics. In the hydrodynamical case, 3 signals arise and the interface becomes Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable due to vorticity deposition on the shocked contact. In the magnetohydrodynamical case, on the other hand, when the normal component of the magnetic field does not vanish, 5 signals will arise. The interface then typically remains stable, since the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions in ideal MHD do not allow for vorticity deposition on a contact discontinuity. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase. Using grid-adaptive MHD simulations, we show that after reflection from the top wall, the interface remains stable.

  11. Overexpression of human SOD1 improves survival of mice susceptible to endotoxic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charchaflieh J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jean Charchaflieh,1,2 Georges I Labaze,1 Pulsar Li,1 Holly Van Remmen,3 Haekyung Lee,1 Helen Stutz,1 Arlan Richardson,3 Asher Emanuel,1 Ming Zhang1,41Department of Anesthesiology, State University of New York (SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 3Barshop Center for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA; 4Department of Cell Biology, State University of New York (SUNY Downstate Medical Center, New York, NY, USABackground: Protective effects of the antioxidant enzyme Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 against endotoxic shock have not been demonstrated in animal models. We used a murine model to investigate whether overexpression of SOD1 protects against endotoxic shock, and whether the genetic background of SOD1 affects its effective protective effects and susceptibility to endotoxic shock.Methods: Transgenic (tg mice overexpressing human SOD1 and control mice were divided into four groups based on their genetic background: (1 tg mice with mixed genetic background (tg-JAX; (2 wild-type (WT littermates of tg-JAX strain (WT-JAX; (3 tg mice with C57BL/6J background (tg-TX; (4 WT littermates of tg-TX strain (WT-TX. Activity of SOD1 in the intestine, heart, and liver of tg and control mice was confirmed using a polyacrylamide activity gel. Endotoxic shock was induced by intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide. Survival rates over 120 hours (mean, 95% confidence interval were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier survival curves.Results: Human SOD1 enzymatic activities were significantly higher in the intestine, heart, and liver of both tg strains (tg-JAX and tg-TX compared with their WT littermates (WT-JAX and WT-TX, respectively. Interestingly, the endogenous SOD1 activities in tg-JAX mice were decreased compared with their WT littermates (WT-JAX, but such aberrant changes were not

  12. Collisionless electrostatic shocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H.K.; Andersen, S.A.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1970-01-01

    An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth......An attempt was made in the laboratory to observe the standing collisionless electrostatic shocks in connection with the bow shock of the earth...

  13. Shock unsteadiness in a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S. B.

    2009-07-01

    This paper discusses the nature of shock unsteadiness, in an overexpanded thrust optimized parabolic nozzle, prevalent in various flow separation modes experienced during start up {(δ P0 /δ t > 0)} and shut down {(δ P0/δ t The results are based on simultaneously acquired data from real-time wall pressure measurements using Kulite pressure transducers, high-speed schlieren (2 kHz) of the exhaust flow-field and from strain-gauges installed on the nozzle bending tube. Shock unsteadiness in the separation region is seen to increase significantly just before the onset of each flow transition, even during steady nozzle operation. The intensity of this measure ( rms level) is seen to be strongly influenced by relative locations of normal and overexpansion shock, the decrease in radial size of re-circulation zone in the back-flow region, and finally, the local nozzle wall contour. During restricted shock separation, the pressure fluctuations in separation region exhibit periodic characteristics rather than the usually observed characteristics of intermittent separation. The possible physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of flow unsteadiness in various separation modes are discussed. The results are from an experimental study conducted in P6.2 cold-gas subscale test facility using a thrust optimized parabolic nozzle of area-ratio 30.

  14. DebtRank: A Microscopic Foundation for Shock Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Battiston, Stefano; Caccioli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2015-01-01

    The DebtRank algorithm has been increasingly investigated as a method to estimate the impact of shocks in financial networks, as it overcomes the limitations of the traditional default-cascade approaches. Here we formulate a dynamical “microscopic” theory of instability for financial networks by iterating balance sheet identities of individual banks and by assuming a simple rule for the transfer of shocks from borrowers to lenders. By doing so, we generalise the DebtRank formulation, both providing an interpretation of the effective dynamics in terms of basic accounting principles and preventing the underestimation of losses on certain network topologies. Depending on the structure of the interbank leverage matrix the dynamics is either stable, in which case the asymptotic state can be computed analytically, or unstable, meaning that at least one bank will default. We apply this framework to a dataset of the top listed European banks in the period 2008–2013. We find that network effects can generate an amplification of exogenous shocks of a factor ranging between three (in normal periods) and six (during the crisis) when we stress the system with a 0.5% shock on external (i.e. non-interbank) assets for all banks. PMID:26091013

  15. DebtRank: A Microscopic Foundation for Shock Propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bardoscia

    Full Text Available The DebtRank algorithm has been increasingly investigated as a method to estimate the impact of shocks in financial networks, as it overcomes the limitations of the traditional default-cascade approaches. Here we formulate a dynamical "microscopic" theory of instability for financial networks by iterating balance sheet identities of individual banks and by assuming a simple rule for the transfer of shocks from borrowers to lenders. By doing so, we generalise the DebtRank formulation, both providing an interpretation of the effective dynamics in terms of basic accounting principles and preventing the underestimation of losses on certain network topologies. Depending on the structure of the interbank leverage matrix the dynamics is either stable, in which case the asymptotic state can be computed analytically, or unstable, meaning that at least one bank will default. We apply this framework to a dataset of the top listed European banks in the period 2008-2013. We find that network effects can generate an amplification of exogenous shocks of a factor ranging between three (in normal periods and six (during the crisis when we stress the system with a 0.5% shock on external (i.e. non-interbank assets for all banks.

  16. Effect of effluent recycling and shock loading on the biodegradation of complex phenolic mixture in hybrid UASB reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, A.; Gupta, S.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2008-06-15

    This study describes the feasibility of anaerobic treatment of synthetic coal wastewater using four identical 13.5 L (effective volume) bench scale hybrid up flow anaerobic sludge blanket (HUASB) reactors (R1, R2, R3 and R4) under mesophilic (27 {+-} 5{sup o}C) conditions. Synthetic coal wastewater with an average chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 2240 mg/L and phenolics concentration of 752 mg/L was used as substrate. Effluent recirculation was employed at four different effluent to feed recirculation ratios (R/F) of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for 100 days to study the effect of recirculation on the performance of the reactors. Phenolics and COD removal was found to improve with increase in effluent recirculation. An effluent to feed recycle ratio of 1.0 resulted in maximum removal of phenolics and COD. Phenolics and COD removal improved from 88% and 92% to 95% each, respectively. The concentration of volatile fatty acids in the effluent was lower than the influent when effluent to feed recirculation was employed. Effect of shock loading on the reactors revealed that phenolics shock load up to 2.5 times increase in the normal input phenolics concentration in the form of continuous shock load for 4 days did not affect the reactors performance irreversibly.

  17. Motion Normalized Proportional Control for Improved Pattern Recognition-Based Myoelectric Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheme, Erik; Lock, Blair; Hargrove, Levi; Hill, Wendy; Kuruganti, Usha; Englehart, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes two novel proportional control algorithms for use with pattern recognition-based myoelectric control. The systems were designed to provide automatic configuration of motion-specific gains and to normalize the control space to the user's usable dynamic range. Class-specific normalization parameters were calculated using data collected during classifier training and require no additional user action or configuration. The new control schemes were compared to the standard method of deriving proportional control using a one degree of freedom Fitts' law test for each of the wrist flexion/extension, wrist pronation/supination and hand close/open degrees of freedom. Performance was evaluated using the Fitts' law throughput value as well as more descriptive metrics including path efficiency, overshoot, stopping distance and completion rate. The proposed normalization methods significantly outperformed the incumbent method in every performance category for able bodied subjects (p < 0.001) and nearly every category for amputee subjects. Furthermore, one proposed method significantly outperformed both other methods in throughput (p < 0.0001), yielding 21% and 40% improvement over the incumbent method for amputee and able bodied subjects, respectively. The proposed control schemes represent a computationally simple method of fundamentally improving myoelectric control users' ability to elicit robust, and controlled, proportional velocity commands.

  18. Modeling Business Cycle with Financial Shocks Basing on Kaldor-Kalecki Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghui Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of financial factors on real business cycle is rising to one of the most popular discussions in the field of macro business cycle theory. The objective of this paper is to discuss the features of business cycle under financial shocks by quantitative technology. More precisely, we introduce financial shocks into the classical Kaldor-Kalecki business cycle model and study dynamics of the model. The shocks include external shock and internal shock, both of which are expressed as noises. The dynamics of the model can help us understand the effects of financial shocks on business cycle and improve our knowledge about financial business cycle. In the case of external shock, if the intensity of shock is less than some threshold value, the economic system behaves randomly periodically. If the intensity of shock is beyond the threshold value, the economic system will converge to a normalcy. In the case of internal shock, if the intensity of shock is less than some threshold value, the economic system behaves periodically as the case without shock. If the intensity of shock exceeds the threshold value, the economic system either behaves periodically or converges to a normalcy. It is uncertain. The case with both two kinds of shocks is more complicated. We find conditions of the intensities of shocks under which the economic system behaves randomly periodically or disorderly, or converges to normalcy. Discussions about the effects of financial shocks on the business cycle are presented.

  19. Low-intensity Extracorporeal Shock Wave Treatment Improves Erectile Function: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhihua; Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Wang, Chunxi; Lee, Yung-Chin; Lue, Tom F

    2017-02-01

    As a novel therapeutic method for erectile dysfunction (ED), low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave treatment (LI-ESWT) has been applied recently in the clinical setting. We feel that a summary of the current literature and a systematic review to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of LI-ESWT for ED would be helpful for physicians who are interested in using this modality to treat patients with ED. A systematic review of the evidence regarding LI-ESWT for patients with ED was undertaken with a meta-analysis to identify the efficacy of the treatment modality. A comprehensive search of the PubMed and Embase databases to November 2015 was performed. Studies reporting on patients with ED treated with LI-ESWT were included. The International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the Erection Hardness Score (EHS) were the most commonly used tools to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of LI-ESWT. There were 14 studies including 833 patients from 2005 to 2015. Seven studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, in these studies, the setup parameters of LI-ESWT and the protocols of treatment were variable. The meta-analysis revealed that LI-ESWT could significantly improve IIEF (mean difference: 2.00; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-3.00; pwaves per treatment, and duration of LI-ESWT treatment were closely related to clinical outcome, especially regarding IIEF improvement. The number of studies of LI-ESWT for ED have increased dramatically in recent years. Most of these studies presented encouraging results, regardless of variation in LI-ESWT setup parameters or treatment protocols. These studies suggest that LI-ESWT could significantly improve the IIEF and EHS of ED patients. The publication of robust evidence from additional RCTs and longer-term follow-up would provide more confidence regarding use of LI-ESWT for ED patients. We reviewed 14 studies of men who received low-intensity extracorporeal shock wave treatment (LI-ESWT) for erectile dysfunction (ED

  20. SELF-REGULATED SHOCKS IN MASSIVE STAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkin, E. R.; Sim, S. A., E-mail: parkin@mso.anu.edu.au, E-mail: s.sim@qub.ac.uk [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-04-20

    In an early-type, massive star binary system, X-ray bright shocks result from the powerful collision of stellar winds driven by radiation pressure on spectral line transitions. We examine the influence of the X-rays from the wind-wind collision shocks on the radiative driving of the stellar winds using steady-state models that include a parameterized line force with X-ray ionization dependence. Our primary result is that X-ray radiation from the shocks inhibits wind acceleration and can lead to a lower pre-shock velocity, and a correspondingly lower shocked plasma temperature, yet the intrinsic X-ray luminosity of the shocks, L{sub X}, remains largely unaltered, with the exception of a modest increase at small binary separations. Due to the feedback loop between the ionizing X-rays from the shocks and the wind driving, we term this scenario as self-regulated shocks. This effect is found to greatly increase the range of binary separations at which a wind-photosphere collision is likely to occur in systems where the momenta of the two winds are significantly different. Furthermore, the excessive levels of X-ray ionization close to the shocks completely suppress the line force, and we suggest that this may render radiative braking less effective. Comparisons of model results against observations reveal reasonable agreement in terms of log (L{sub X}/L{sub bol}). The inclusion of self-regulated shocks improves the match for kT values in roughly equal wind momenta systems, but there is a systematic offset for systems with unequal wind momenta (if considered to be a wind-photosphere collision).

  1. PCI Strategies in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction and Cardiogenic Shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiele, Holger; Akin, Ibrahim; Sandri, Marcus; Fuernau, Georg; de Waha, Suzanne; Meyer-Saraei, Roza; Nordbeck, Peter; Geisler, Tobias; Landmesser, Ulf; Skurk, Carsten; Fach, Andreas; Lapp, Harald; Piek, Jan J.; Noc, Marko; Goslar, Tomaž; Felix, Stephan B.; Maier, Lars S.; Stepinska, Janina; Oldroyd, Keith; Serpytis, Pranas; Montalescot, Gilles; Barthelemy, Olivier; Huber, Kurt; Windecker, Stephan; Savonitto, Stefano; Torremante, Patrizia; Vrints, Christiaan; Schneider, Steffen; Desch, Steffen; Zeymer, Uwe; Tebbe, Ulrich; Wöhrle, Jochen; Pachinger, Otmar; Busch, Clemens; Pfeiffer, Nathalie; Neumer, Alexander; Ouarrak, Taoufik; Reimer, Thomas; Lober, Christiane; Clemmensen, Peter; Follath, Ferenc; Wegscheider, Karl; Zeitouni, M.; Overtchouk, P.; Guedeney, P.; Hage, G.; Hauguel-Moreau, N. N.; Eitel, Ingo; Weinschenk, Sabrina; Borggrefe, Martin; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Ferenc, Miroslaw; Olbrich, Hans-Gerd; Hopf, Hans-Bernd; Kastrati, Adnan; de Waha, Antoinette; Schunkert, Heribert; Richardt, Gert; Schwarz, Bettina; Abdel-Wahab, Mohamed; Toelg, Ralph; Geist, Volker; Bahnsen-Maaß, Monika; Hennersdorf, Marcus; Graf, Jochen; Riemann, Urs; Scharpf, Dominik; Empen, Klaus; Busch, Mathias C.; Werdan, Karl; Nuding, Sebastian; Hambrecht, Rainer; Fiehn, Eduard; Gitt, Anselm K.; Mark, Bernd; Winkler, Ralph; Lauer, Bernward; Möbius-Winkler, Sven; Schulze, Christian; Minden, Hans-Heinrich; Braun-Dullaeus, Rüdiger C.; Schmeißer, Alexander; Strasser, Ruth H.; Ebner, Bernd; Ertl, Georg; Mudra, Harald; Hug, Martin; Endemann, Dierk; Hamm, Christian; Walther, Claudia; Liebetrau, Christoph; Menck, Niels; Mehilli, Julinda; Orban, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Massberg, Steffen; Prondzinsky, Roland; Gielen, Stephan; Gawaz, Meinrad; Pauschinger, Matthias; Ademaj, Fadil; Bode, Christoph; Nickenig, Georg; Fichtlscherer, Stephan; Zeiher, Andreas; Viertel, Achim; Kelm, Malte; Jung, Christian; Sydow, Carsten; Karakas, Mahir; Rudolph, Volker; Baldus, Stephan; Jacobshagen, Claudius; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Dietrich; Buchter, Björn; Hügl, Burkhard; Nef, Holger; Dörr, Oliver; Reinig, Karsten; Kuck, Karl Heinz; Ghanem, Alexander; Katus, Hugo; Gori, Tommaso; Münzel, Thomas; Schnupp, Steffen; Brachmann, Johannes; Ferrari, Markus; Achenbach, Stephan; Carrié, Didier; Henry, Patrick; Manzo-Silberman, Stephane; Ledermann, Bertrand; Cayla, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jean-Louis; Windecker, Stefan; Frenk, André; Jeger, Raban; Eeckhout, Eric; Henriques, Jose P.; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; Voskuil, Michiel; Bax, M.; van der Harst, Pim; Serpytis, Rokas; Jarasuniene, Dalia; Lang, Irene Marthe; Pichler, Philipp; Weidinger, Franz; Zaruba, Marc-Michael; Dudek, Darius; Depukat, Rafal; Witkowski, Adam; Milewski, Krzysztof; Prokopczuk, Janusz; Gąsior, Mariusz; Gorycki, Bogdan; Ochała, Andrzej; Piatti, Luigi; Galvani, Marcello; Bossi, Irene; Emilia, Reggio; Pignatelli, Gianluca; Greenwood, John; Lockie, Tim; Mamas, Mamas

    2017-01-01

    In patients who have acute myocardial infarction with cardiogenic shock, early revascularization of the culprit artery by means of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) improves outcomes. However, the majority of patients with cardiogenic shock have multivessel disease, and whether PCI should be

  2. Changing the Window of Shock Wave Application. How it improves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this work is to study the impact of using multiple windows of shock wave application on the results of ESWL therapy for renal calculi. Patients and Methods: Between January 1996 and October 2002, 676 patients with single pelvic stones ≤ 2.5 cm and either no or mild back pressure changes were ...

  3. Design basis for resistance to shock and vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.; Gwinn, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, in conjunction with its participation in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) writing groups, has undertaken to provide an experimental and analytical basis for the design of components of radioactive materials packages to resist normal transport shock and vibration loads. Previous efforts have resulted in an overly conservative shock spectra description of the loads in the tie-downs and cask attachment points anticipated during normal shipment. The present effort is aimed at predicting the actual loads so that the design basis can be accurately determined. This goal is being accomplished with road simulator and over-the-road tests and the development of an analytical model. This model is used to parametrically evaluate and envelop the transportation systems' responses. The parameters to be varied include damping, stiffness, geometry, and cargo mass. The over-the-road tests provide operational data that are used to validate the selection of environments for the road simulator tests. The road simulator tests provide verification for the model. This verification is accomplished since the road simulator tests provide not only the system response which can be measured in over-the-road tests but also the system input. Finally, when the model has been verified, it can be used to vary parameters to envelop a wide range of normal transport conditions

  4. Design basis for resistance to shock and vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.E.; Gwinn, K.W.

    1989-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, in conjunction with its participation in the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) writing groups, has undertaken to provide an experimental and analytical basis for the design of components of radioactive materials packages to resist normal transport shock and vibration loads. Previous efforts have resulted in an overly conservative shock spectra description of the loads in the tie-downs and cask attachment points anticipated during normal shipment. The present effort is aimed at predicting the actual loads so that the design basis can be accurately determined. This goal is being accomplished with road simulator and over-the-road tests and the development of an analytical model. This model is used to parametrically evaluate and envelop the transportation systems responses. The parameters to be varied include damping, stiffness, geometry, and cargo mass. The over-the-road tests provide operational data that are used to validate the selection of environments for the road simulator tests. The road simulator tests provide verification for the model. This verification is accomplished since the road simulator tests provide not only the system response which can be measured in over-the-road tests but also the system input. Finally, when the model has been verified, it can be used to vary parameters to envelope a wide range of normal transport conditions

  5. Relative Shock Effects in Mixed Powders of Calcite, Gypsum, and Quartz: A Calibration Scheme from Shock Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary S.

    2009-01-01

    The shock behavior of calcite and gypsum is important in understanding the Cretaceous/Tertiary event and other terrestrial impacts that contain evaporite sediments in their targets. Most interest focuses on issues of devolatilization to quantify the production of CO2 or SO2 to better understand their role in generating a temporary atmosphere and its effects on climate and biota [e.g., papers in 1,2,3,4]. Devolatilization of carbonate is also important because the dispersion and fragmentation of ejecta is strongly controlled by the expansion of large volumes of gas during the impact process as well [5,6]. Shock recovery experiments for calcite yield seemingly conflicting results: early experimental devolatilization studies [7,8,9] suggested that calcite was substantially outgassed at 30 GPa (> 50%). However, the recent petrographic work of [10,11,12] presented evidence that essentially intact calcite is recovered from 60 GPa experiments. [13] reported results of shock experiments on anhydrite, gypsum, and mixtures of those phases with silica. Their observations indicate little or no devolatilization of anhydrite shocked to 42 GPa and that the fraction of sulfur, by mass, that degassed is approx.10(exp -2) of theoretical prediction. In another (preliminary) report of shock experiments on calcite, anhydrite, and gypsum, [14] observe calcite recrystallization when shock loaded at 61 GPa, only intensive plastic deformation in anhydrite shock loaded at 63 GPa, and gypsum converted to anhydrite when shock loaded at 56 GPa. [15] shock loaded anhydrite and quartz to a peak pressure of 60 GPa. All of the quartz grains were trans-formed to glass and the platy anhydrite grains were completely pseudomorphed by small crystallized anhydrite grains. However, no evidence of interaction between the two phases could be observed and they suggest that recrystallization of anhydrite grains is the result of a solid state transformation. [16] reanalyzed the calcite and anhydrite shock

  6. H2 emission from non-stationary magnetized bow shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tram, L. N.; Lesaffre, P.; Cabrit, S.; Gusdorf, A.; Nhung, P. T.

    2018-01-01

    When a fast moving star or a protostellar jet hits an interstellar cloud, the surrounding gas gets heated and illuminated: a bow shock is born that delineates the wake of the impact. In such a process, the new molecules that are formed and excited in the gas phase become accessible to observations. In this paper, we revisit models of H2 emission in these bow shocks. We approximate the bow shock by a statistical distribution of planar shocks computed with a magnetized shock model. We improve on previous works by considering arbitrary bow shapes, a finite irradiation field and by including the age effect of non-stationary C-type shocks on the excitation diagram and line profiles of H2. We also examine the dependence of the line profiles on the shock velocity and on the viewing angle: we suggest that spectrally resolved observations may greatly help to probe the dynamics inside the bow shock. For reasonable bow shapes, our analysis shows that low-velocity shocks largely contribute to H2 excitation diagram. This can result in an observational bias towards low velocities when planar shocks are used to interpret H2 emission from an unresolved bow. We also report a large magnetization bias when the velocity of the planar model is set independently. Our 3D models reproduce excitation diagrams in BHR 71 and Orion bow shocks better than previous 1D models. Our 3D model is also able to reproduce the shape and width of the broad H2 1-0S(1) line profile in an Orion bow shock (Brand et al. 1989).

  7. The Visual Shock of Francis Bacon: An essay in neuroesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semir eZeki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the work of Francis Bacon in the context of his declared aim of giving a visual shock. We explore what this means in terms of brain activity and what insights into the brain’s visual perceptive system his work gives. We do so especially with reference to the representation of faces and bodies in the human visual brain. We discuss the evidence that shows that both these categories of stimuli have a very privileged status in visual perception, compared to the perception of other stimuli, including man-made artifacts such as houses, chairs and cars. We show that viewing face and house stimuli that depart significantly from a normal representation of faces and bodies entails a significant difference in the pattern of brain activation. We argue that Bacon succeeded in delivering his visual shock because he subverted the normal neural representation of faces and bodies, without at the same time subverting the representation of man-made artifacts.

  8. The "Visual Shock" of Francis Bacon: an essay in neuroesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeki, Semir; Ishizu, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the work of Francis Bacon in the context of his declared aim of giving a "visual shock."We explore what this means in terms of brain activity and what insights into the brain's visual perceptive system his work gives. We do so especially with reference to the representation of faces and bodies in the human visual brain. We discuss the evidence that shows that both these categories of stimuli have a very privileged status in visual perception, compared to the perception of other stimuli, including man-made artifacts such as houses, chairs, and cars. We show that viewing stimuli that depart significantly from a normal representation of faces and bodies entails a significant difference in the pattern of brain activation. We argue that Bacon succeeded in delivering his "visual shock" because he subverted the normal neural representation of faces and bodies, without at the same time subverting the representation of man-made artifacts.

  9. Effects of Atwood number on shock focusing in shock-cylinder interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junfeng; Ding, Juchun; Luo, Xisheng; Zhai, Zhigang

    2018-02-01

    The evolution of shock-accelerated heavy-gas cylinder surrounded by the air with different Atwood numbers (A_t=0.28, 0.50, 0.63) is investigated, concentrating on shock focusing and jet formation. Experimentally, a soap film technique is used to generate an ideal two-dimensional discontinuous gas cylinder with a clear surface, which can guarantee the observation of shock wave movements inside the cylinder. Different Atwood numbers are realized by different mixing ratios of SF_6 and air inside the cylinder. A high-speed schlieren system is adopted to capture the shock motions and jet morphology. Numerical simulations are also performed to provide more information. The results indicate that an inward jet is formed for low Atwood numbers, while an outward jet is generated for high Atwood numbers. Different Atwood numbers will lead to the differences in the relative velocities between the incident shock and the refraction shock, which ultimately results in the differences in shock competition near the downstream pole. The morphology and feature of the jet are closely associated with the position and intensity of shock focusing. The pressure and vorticity contours indicate that the jet formation should be attributed to the pressure pulsation caused by shock focusing, and the jet development is ascribed to the vorticity induction. Finally, a time ratio proposed in the previous work for determining the shock-focusing type is verified by experiments.

  10. Shock parameter calculations at weak interplanetary shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Gloag

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A large set of interplanetary shock waves observed using the Ulysses spacecraft is analysed in order to determine their local parameters. For the first time a detailed analysis is extended to the thermodynamic properties of a large number of events. The intention is to relate the shock parameters to the requirements set by MHD shock theory. A uniform approach is adopted in the selection of up and downstream regions for this analysis and applied to all the shock waves. Initially, the general case of a 3 component adiabatic plasma is considered. However, the calculation of magnetosonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers and the ratio of downstream to upstream entropy produce some unexpected results. In some cases there is no clear increase in entropy across the shock and also the magnetosonic Mach number can be less than 1. It is found that a more discerning use of data along with an empirical value for the polytropic index can raise the distribution of downstream to upstream entropy ratios to a more acceptable level. However, it is also realised that many of these shocks are at the very weakest end of the spectrum and associated phenomena may also contribute to the explanation of these results.

  11. Superdiffusion of relativistic electrons at supernova remnant shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Silvia

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous transport has been observed in various systems as nonlinear systems, numerical simulations of plasma turbulence, in laboratory plasmas, and recently in the propagation of energetic particles in the interplanetary space. Thanks to in situ observations it has been possible to deduce transport properties directly from spacecraft data. This technique has further found applicability to remote observations of relativistic electrons accelerated at supernova remnants (SNRs) shocks, pointing out that far upstream of the blast waves, the x-ray synchrotron emission, as captured by the Chandra spacecraft, is consistent with models of superdiffusive transport (i.e., transport faster than normal diffusive). Here we present and summarize evidences of superdiffusion both in the interplanetary space and upstream of SNRs shock fronts, in particular by analyzing, for the first time in the framework of superdiffusion, the transport properties of electrons accelerated at the young G1.9+0.3 SNR. We also briefly describe how this new model can be used to interpret radio emissions from electrons accelerated at shocks forming during galaxy cluster mergers.

  12. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  13. Integration of regenerative shock absorber into vehicle electric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongxiao; Li, Peng; Xing, Shaoxu; Kim, Junyoung; Yu, Liangyao; Zuo, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Regenerative/Energy harvesting shock absorbers have a great potential to increase fuel efficiency and provide suspension damping simultaneously. In recent years there's intensive work on this topic, but most researches focus on electricity extraction from vibration and harvesting efficiency improvement. The integration of electricity generated from regenerative shock absorbers into vehicle electric system, which is very important to realize the fuel efficiency benefit, has not been investigated. This paper is to study and demonstrate the integration of regenerative shock absorber with vehicle alternator, battery and in-vehicle electrical load together. In the presented system, the shock absorber is excited by a shaker and it converts kinetic energy into electricity. The harvested electricity flows into a DC/DC converter which realizes two functions: controlling the shock absorber's damping and regulating the output voltage. The damping is tuned by controlling shock absorber's output current, which is also the input current of DC/DC converter. By adjusting the duty cycles of switches in the converter, its input impedance together with input current can be adjusted according to dynamic damping requirements. An automotive lead-acid battery is charged by the DC/DC converter's output. To simulate the working condition of combustion engine, an AC motor is used to drive a truck alternator, which also charges the battery. Power resistors are used as battery's electrical load to simulate in-vehicle electrical devices. Experimental results show that the proposed integration strategy can effectively utilize the harvested electricity and power consumption of the AC motor is decreased accordingly. This proves the combustion engine's load reduction and fuel efficiency improvement.

  14. Plasma wave profiles of Earth's bow shock at low Mach number: ISEE 3 observations on the far flank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstadt, E.W.; Coroniti, F.V.; Moses, S.L.; Smith, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's bow shock is weak along its distant flanks where the projected component of solar wind velocity normal to the hyperboloidal surface is only a fraction of the total free stream velocity, severely reducing the local Mach number. The authors present a survey of selected crossings far downstream from the subsolar shock, delineating the overall plasma wave (pw) behavior of a selected set of nearly perpendicular crossings and another set of limited Mach number but broad geometry; they include their immediate upstream regions. The result is a generalizable pw signature, or signatures, of low Mach number shocks and some likely implications of those signatures for the weak shock's plasma physical processes on the flank. They find the data consistent with the presence of ion beam interactions producing noise ahead of the shock in the ion acoustic frequency range. One subcritical case was found whose pw noise was presumably related to a reflected ion population just as in stronger events. The presence or absence, and the amplitudes, of pw activity are explainable by the presence or absence of a population of upstream ions controlled by the component of interplanetary magnetic field normal to the solar wind flow

  15. Shock Mechanism Analysis and Simulation of High-Power Hydraulic Shock Wave Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiu Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of regular shock wave (e.g., half-sine can be achieved by the traditional rubber shock simulator, but the practical high-power shock wave characterized by steep prepeak and gentle postpeak is hard to be realized by the same. To tackle this disadvantage, a novel high-power hydraulic shock wave simulator based on the live firing muzzle shock principle was proposed in the current work. The influence of the typical shock characteristic parameters on the shock force wave was investigated via both theoretical deduction and software simulation. According to the obtained data compared with the results, in fact, it can be concluded that the developed hydraulic shock wave simulator can be applied to simulate the real condition of the shocking system. Further, the similarity evaluation of shock wave simulation was achieved based on the curvature distance, and the results stated that the simulation method was reasonable and the structural optimization based on software simulation is also beneficial to the increase of efficiency. Finally, the combination of theoretical analysis and simulation for the development of artillery recoil tester is a comprehensive approach in the design and structure optimization of the recoil system.

  16. Myosin light chain kinase is necessary for post-shock mesenteric lymph drainage enhancement of vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity in hemorrhagic-shocked rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.P.; Niu, C.Y.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zhang, L.M.; Si, Y.H. [Institute of Microcirculation, Hebei North University, Hebei (China)

    2013-08-10

    Vascular hyporeactivity is an important factor in irreversible shock, and post-shock mesenteric lymph (PSML) blockade improves vascular reactivity after hemorrhagic shock. This study explored the possible involvement of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in PSML-mediated vascular hyporeactivity and calcium desensitization. Rats were divided into sham (n=12), shock (n=18), and shock+drainage (n=18) groups. A hemorrhagic shock model (40±2 mmHg, 3 h) was established in the shock and shock+drainage groups. PSML drainage was performed from 1 to 3 h from start of hypotension in shock+drainage rats. Levels of phospho-MLCK (p-MLCK) were determined in superior mesenteric artery (SMA) tissue, and the vascular reactivity to norepinephrine (NE) and sensitivity to Ca{sup 2+} were observed in SMA rings in an isolated organ perfusion system. p-MLCK was significantly decreased in the shock group compared with the sham group, but increased in the shock+drainage group compared with the shock group. Substance P (1 nM), an agonist of MLCK, significantly elevated the decreased contractile response of SMA rings to both NE and Ca{sup 2+} at various concentrations. Maximum contractility (E{sub max}) in the shock group increased with NE (from 0.179±0.038 to 0.440±0.177 g/mg, P<0.05) and Ca{sup 2+} (from 0.515±0.043 to 0.646±0.096 g/mg, P<0.05). ML-7 (0.1 nM), an inhibitor of MLCK, reduced the increased vascular response to NE and Ca{sup 2+} at various concentrations in the shock+drainage group (from 0.744±0.187 to 0.570±0.143 g/mg in E{sub max} for NE and from 0.729±0.037 to 0.645±0.056 g/mg in E{sub max} for Ca{sup 2+}, P<0.05). We conclude that MLCK is an important contributor to PSML drainage, enhancing vascular reactivity and calcium sensitivity in rats with hemorrhagic shock.

  17. Alfven shock trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkov, M.A.; Kennel, C.F.; Wu, C.C.; Pellat, R.; Shapiro, V.D.

    1991-01-01

    The Cohen--Kulsrud--Burgers equation (CKB) is used to consider the nonlinear evolution of resistive, quasiparallel Alfven waves subject to a long-wavelength, plane-polarized, monochromatic instability. The instability saturates by nonlinear steepening, which proceeds until the periodic waveform develops an interior scale length comparable to the dissipation length; a fast or an intermediate shock then forms. The result is a periodic train of Alfven shocks of one or the other type. For propagation strictly parallel to the magnetic field, there will be two shocks per instability wavelength. Numerical integration of the time-dependent CKB equation shows that an initial, small-amplitude growing wave asymptotes to a stable, periodic stationary wave whose analytic solution specifies how the type of shock embedded in the shock train, and the amplitude and speed of the shock train, depend on the strength and phase of the instability. Waveforms observed upstream of the Earth's bowshock and cometary shocks resemble those calculated here

  18. Spherical strong-shock generation for shock-ignition inertial fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Lafon, M.; Anderson, K. S.; Hohenberger, M.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Solodov, A. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Edgell, D. H.; Yaakobi, B.; Shvydky, A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Nora, R.; Betti, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics and Fusion Science Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Casner, A.; Reverdin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Ribeyre, X.; Vallet, A. [Université de Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications) UMR 5107 F-33400 Talence (France); Peebles, J.; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Recent experiments on the Laboratory for Laser Energetics' OMEGA laser have been carried out to produce strong shocks in solid spherical targets with direct laser illumination. The shocks are launched at pressures of several hundred Mbars and reach Gbar upon convergence. The results are relevant to the validation of the shock-ignition scheme and to the development of an OMEGA experimental platform to study material properties at Gbar pressures. The experiments investigate the strength of the ablation pressure and the hot-electron production at incident laser intensities of ∼2 to 6 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2} and demonstrate ablation pressures exceeding 300 Mbar, which is crucial to developing a shock-ignition target design for the National Ignition Facility. The timing of the x-ray flash from shock convergence in the center of the solid plastic target is used to infer the ablation and shock pressures. Laser–plasma instabilities produce hot-electrons with a moderate temperature (<100 keV). The instantaneous conversion efficiencies of laser power into hot-electron power reached up to ∼15% in the intensity spike. The large amount of hot electrons is correlated with an earlier x-ray flash and a strong increase in its magnitude. This suggests that hot electrons contribute to the augmentation of the shock strength.

  19. The shock tube as wave reactor for kinetic studies and material systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskaran, K.A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Chennai (India). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Roth, P. [Gerhard Mercator Universitat, Duisberg (Germany). Institut fur Verbrennung und Gasdynamik

    2002-07-01

    Several important reviews of shock tube kinetics have appeared earlier, prominent among them being 'Shock Tube Technique in Chemical Kinetics' by Belford and Strehlow (Ann Rev Phys Chem 20 (1969) 247), 'Chemical Reaction of Shock Waves' by Wagner (Proceedings of the Eighth International Shock Tube Symposium (1971) 4/1), 'Shock Tube and Shock Wave Research' by Bauer and Lewis (Proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on Shock Tubes and Waves (1977) 269), 'Shock Waves in Chemistry' edited by Assa Lifshitz (Shock Waves in Chemistry, 1981) and 'Shock Tube Techniques in Chemical Kinetics' by Wing Tsang and Assa Lifshitz (Annu Rev Phys Chem 41 (1990) 559). A critical analysis of the different shock tube techniques, their limitations and suggestions to improve the accuracy of the data produced are contained in these reviews. The purpose of this article is to present the current status of kinetic research with emphasis on the diagnostic techniques. Selected studies on homogeneous and dispersed systems are presented to bring out the versatility of the shock tube technique. The use of the shock tube as high temperature wave reactor for gas phase material synthesis is also highlighted. (author)

  20. Dynamics of Laser-Driven Shock Waves in Solid Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglitskiy, Y.; Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P.; Grun, J.; Metzler, N.; Zalesak, S. T.; Gardner, J. H.; Oh, J.; Harding, E. C.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate shock timing is a key issue of both indirect- and direct-drive laser fusions. The experiments on the Nike laser at NRL presented here were made possible by improvements in the imaging capability of our monochromatic x-ray diagnostics based on Bragg reflection from spherically curved crystals. Side-on imaging implemented on Nike makes it possible to observe dynamics of the shock wave and ablation front in laser-driven solid targets. We can choose to observe a sequence of 2D images or a continuous time evolution of an image resolved in one spatial dimension. A sequence of 300 ps snapshots taken using vanadium backlighter at 5.2 keV reveals propagation of a shock wave in a solid plastic target. The shape of the shock wave reflects the intensity distribution in the Nike beam. The streak records with continuous time resolution show the x-t trajectory of a laser-driven shock wave in a 10% solid density DVB foam.

  1. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  2. Focused and Radial Shock Wave Therapy in the Treatment of Tennis Elbow: A Pilot Randomised Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Król Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of radial and focused shock wave therapies applied to treat tennis elbow. Patients with tennis elbow were randomized into two comparative groups: focused shock wave therapy (FSWT; n=25 and radial shock wave therapy (RSWT; n=25. Subjects in the FSWT and RSWT groups were applied with a focused shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 shocks, 4 Hz, 0.2 mJ/mm2 and a radial shock wave (3 sessions, 2000 + 2000 shocks, 8 Hz, 2.5 bar, respectively. The primary study endpoints were pain relief and functional improvement (muscle strength one week after therapy. The secondary endpoint consisted of the results of the follow-up observation (3, 6 and 12 weeks after the study. Successive measurements showed that the amount of pain patients felt decreased in both groups. At the same time grip strength as well as strength of wrist extensors and flexors of the affected extremity improved significantly. Both focused and radial shock wave therapies can comparably and gradually reduce pain in subjects with tennis elbow. This process is accompanied by steadily improved strength of the affected extremity.

  3. Passive shock wave/boundary layer control of wing at transonic speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available At supercritical conditions a porous strip (or slot strip placed beneath a shock wave can reduce the drag by a weaker lambda shock system, and increase the buffet boundary, even may increase the lift. Passive shock wave/boundary layer control (PSBC for drag reduction was conducted by SC(2-0714 supercritical wing, with emphases on parameter of porous/slot and bump, such as porous distribution, hole diameter, cavity depth, porous direction and so on. A sequential quadratic programming (SQP optimization method coupled with adjoint method was adopted to achieve the optimized shape and position of the bumps. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD, force test and oil test with half model all indicate that PSBC with porous, slot and bump generally reduce the drag by weaker lambda shock at supercritical conditions. According to wind tunnel test results for angle of attack of 2° at Mach number M=0.8, the porous configuration with 6.21% porosity results in a drag reduction of 0.0002 and lift–drag ratio increase of 0.2, the small bump configuration results in a drag reduction of 0.0007 and lift–drag ratio increase of 0.3. Bump normally reduce drag at design point with shock wave position being accurately computed. If bump diverges from the position of shock wave, drag will not be easily reduced.

  4. Effects of the shock duration on the response of CFRP composite laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, Elise; Berthe, Laurent; Boustie, Michel; Arrigoni, Michel; Buzaud, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Shock loads induce a local tensile stress within a sample. The location and amplitude of this high strain rate stress can be monitored respectively by the duration and intensity of the shock. The process is applied to carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites, involved in aeronautic or defense industry. This paper describes the response of CFRP laminates of different thicknesses to a shock load normal to the fibres direction. The effects of the shock duration on the wave propagation are key issues of this work. Experiments have been performed on high power laser facilities and on a high power pulsed generator to get a wide range of pulse duration from fs to µs. Numerical simulation provides a comprehensive approach of the wave propagation and tensile stress generation within these complex materials. The main result concerns the relation between the load duration, the tensile stress and the induced delamination within 1, 4 and 8 ply composite laminates. (paper)

  5. Bright emissive core-shell spherical microparticles for shock compression spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the response to shock compression of rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye encapsulated in 1.25 μm diameter silica microspheres. When R6G was encapsulated in microspheres, the emission intensity under steady-state irradiation (the brightness) was 3.4 times greater than the same dye in solution (the free dye). At least part of the brightness improvement was caused by an enhanced radiative rate. When the microspheres were embedded in poly-methylmethacrylate subjected to planar shocks in the 3–8.4 GPa range by laser-driven flyer plates, the dye emission redshifted and lost intensity. The dye emission redshift represents an instantaneous response to changes in the local density. In free dye samples, the shock-induced intensity loss had considerably slower rise times and fall times than the redshift. When dye was encapsulated in microspheres, the time dependence of the intensity loss matched the redshift almost exactly over a range of shock pressures and durations. The faster response to shock of dye in silica microspheres was explained by dye photophysics. The microsphere environment decreased the singlet state lifetime, which decreased the rise time, and it also decreased the triplet state lifetime, which decreased the fall time. Since it is much easier and more convenient to make measurements of intensity rather than spectral shift, these microspheres represent a substantial improvement in optical sensors to monitor shock compression of microstructured materials.

  6. N-Acetylcysteine and Desferoxamine Reduce Pulmonary Oxidative Stress Caused by Hemorrhagic Shock in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Alexandra; Staikou, Chryssoula; Karmaniolou, Iosifina; Orfanos, Nikolaos; Mylonas, Anastassios; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Pafiti, Agathi; Papalois, Apostolos; Arkadopoulos, Nikolaos; Smyrniotis, Vassilios; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the pulmonary oxidative stress and possible protective effect of N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) and Desferoxamine (DFX)in a porcine model subjected to hemorrhagic shock. Twenty-one pigs were randomly allocated to Group-A (sham, n = 5), Group-B (fluid resuscitation, n = 8) and Group-C (fluid, NAC and DFX resuscitation, n = 8). Groups B and C were subjected to a 40-min shock period induced by liver trauma, followed by a 60-min resuscitation period. During shock, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was maintained at 30-40 mmHg. Resuscitation consisted of crystalloids (35 mL/kg) and colloids (18 mL/kg) targeting to MAP normalization (baseline values ± 10%). In addition, Group-C received pretreatment with NAC 200 mg/kg plus DFX 2 g as intravenous infusions. Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS), protein carbonyls and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity were determined in lung tissue homogenates. Also, histological examination of pulmonary tissue specimens was performed. TBARS were higher in Group-B than in Group-A or Group-C: 2.90 ± 0.47, 0.57 ± 0.10, 1.78 ± 0.47 pmol/μg protein, respectively (p 0.05). GPx activity did not differ significantly between the three groups (p > 0.05). Lung histology was improved in Group-C versus Group-B, with less alveolar collapse, interstitial edema and inflammation. NAC plus DFX prevented the increase of pulmonary oxidative stress markers and protein damage after resuscitated hemorrhagic shock and had beneficial effect on lung histology. NAC/DFX combination may be used in the multimodal treatment of hemorrhagic shock, since it may significantly prevent free radical injury in the lung.

  7. Cosmic-ray shock acceleration in oblique MHD shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.; Drury, L. OC.; Volk, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    A one-dimensional, steady-state hydrodynamical model of cosmic-ray acceleration at oblique MHD shocks is presented. Upstream of the shock the incoming thermal plasma is subject to the adverse pressure gradient of the accelerated particles, the J x B force, as well as the thermal gas pressure gradient. The efficiency of the acceleration of cosmic-rays at the shock as a function of the upstream magnetic field obliquity and upstream plasma beta is investigated. Astrophysical applications of the results are briefly discussed.

  8. 2-Shock layered tuning campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Laurent; Dittrich, T.; Khan, S.; Kyrala, G.; Ma, T.; MacLaren, S.; Ralph, J.; Salmonson, J.; Tipton, R.; Los Alamos Natl Lab Team; Lawrence Livermore Natl Lab Team

    2016-10-01

    The 2-Shock platform has been developed to maintain shell sphericity throughout the compression phase of an indirect-drive target implosion and produce a stagnating hot spot in a quasi 1D-like manner. A sub-scale, 1700 _m outer diameter, and thick, 200 _m, uniformly Silicon doped, gas-filled plastic capsule is driven inside a nominal size 5750 _m diameter ignition hohlraum. The hohlraum fill is near vacuum to reduce back-scatter and improve laser/drive coupling. A two-shock pulse of about 1 MJ of laser energy drives the capsule. The thick capsule prevents ablation front feed-through to the imploded core. This platform has demonstrated its efficiency to tune a predictable and reproducible 1-D implosion with a nearly round shape. It has been shown that the high foot performance was dominated by the local defect growth due to the ablation front instability and by the hohlraum radiation asymmetries. The idea here is to take advantage of this 2-Shock platform to design a 1D-like layered implosion and eliminates the deleterious effects of radiation asymmetries and ablation front instability growth. We present the design work and our first experimental results of this near one-dimensional 2-Shock layered design. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Contemporary Management of Cardiogenic Shock: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Sean; Katz, Jason N; Albert, Nancy M; Henry, Timothy D; Jacobs, Alice K; Kapur, Navin K; Kilic, Ahmet; Menon, Venu; Ohman, E Magnus; Sweitzer, Nancy K; Thiele, Holger; Washam, Jeffrey B; Cohen, Mauricio G

    2017-10-17

    Cardiogenic shock is a high-acuity, potentially complex, and hemodynamically diverse state of end-organ hypoperfusion that is frequently associated with multisystem organ failure. Despite improving survival in recent years, patient morbidity and mortality remain high, and there are few evidence-based therapeutic interventions known to clearly improve patient outcomes. This scientific statement on cardiogenic shock summarizes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, causes, and outcomes of cardiogenic shock; reviews contemporary best medical, surgical, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care practices; advocates for the development of regionalized systems of care; and outlines future research priorities. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. On the Unsteadiness of a Transitional Shock Wave-Boundary Layer Interaction Using Fast-Response Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, E. Lara; Schmisseur, John

    2017-11-01

    Pressure-sensitive paint has been used to evaluate the unsteady dynamics of transitional and turbulent shock wave-boundary layer interactions generated by a vertical cylinder on a flat plate in a Mach 2 freestream. The resulting shock structure consists of an inviscid bow shock that bifurcates into a separation shock and trailing shock. The primary features of interest are the separation shock and an upstream influence shock that is intermittently present in transitional boundary layer interactions, but not observed in turbulent interactions. The power spectral densities, frequency peaks, and normalized wall pressures are analyzed as the incoming boundary layer state changes from transitional to fully turbulent, comparing both centerline and outboard regions of the interaction. The present study compares the scales and frequencies of the dynamics of the separation shock structure in different boundary layer regimes. Synchronized high-speed Schlieren imaging provides quantitative statistical analyses as well as qualitative comparisons to the fast-response pressure sensitive paint measurements. Materials based on research supported by the U.S. Office of Naval Research under Award Number N00014-15-1-2269.

  11. EFFECT OF SHOCK WAVE THERAPYVERSUS CORTICOSTEROID INJECTION IN MANAGEMENT OFKNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Elerian

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: knee Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability. Shockwaves have been used as an alternative treatment for musculoskeletal disorders; intra-articular injection of steroid is a common treatment for osteoarthritis of the knee. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy of Shock wave therapy versus Corticosteroid intra articular injection in case of knee osteoarthritis. Methods: Sixty patients were diagnosed mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis; they were included in the study. Their ages were 43:65 years with mean age 50 ± 3.5 years. Patients were divided randomly into three equal groups, group (A received shock wave therapy, group (B received two intra-articular injections of corticosteroid at 1-month intervals and group (C received sham shock wave. The outcome measurements were Western Ontario and McMaster Universities arthritis index (WOMAC values, knee ROM, and pain severity using the visual analogue scale (VAS were recorded. The patients were evaluated for these parameters before allocated in their groups then after 1, 2, and 6months later. Results: compared to sham group there were significant improvement of VAS and ROM of shock wave group and corticosteroid injection group than sham (placebo group (p<0.000, (p<0.006, and 0.02 respectively. Furthermore there was significant improve of shock wave group than corticosteroid injection group where p was <0.000 for VAS, ROM and (WOMAC. Conclusion: The results of this study suggested that shock wave therapy may provide effective modality for relieving pain, increase Range of motion and improve function in knee osteoarthritis patient than intra articular corticosteroid injection.

  12. Shock Tube/Laser Absorption Studies of Jet Fuels at Low Temperatures (600-1200K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    Davidson, Ronald K. Hanson. A second-generation aerosol shock tube and its use in studying ignition delay times of large biodiesel surrogates, 28th... Biodiesel Surrogate behind Reflected Shock Waves,” 8th US National Combustion Meeting, Paper 070RK-0008 Park City, UT 5/2013.   These  studies provide...www.elsevier .com/locate / fuel 1. Introduction Normal alkanes have been widely used as fuels and are major components of many commercial transportation fuels

  13. Nonlinearity, Conservation Law and Shocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, genuine nonlinearity is always present in an ideal gas. The conservation form of the equation (25) brings in shocks which cut off the growing part of the amplitUde as shown in. Figure 15. Acknowledgements. The author sincerely thanks the two referees whose valuable comments led to an improvement of the ...

  14. Non-stationarity of the quasi-perpendicular bow shock: comparison between Cluster observations and simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Comişel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available We have performed full particle electromagnetic simulations of a quasi-perpendicular shock. The shock parameters have been chosen to be appropriate for the quasi-perpendicular Earth's bow shock observed by Cluster on 24 January 2001 (Lobzin et al., 2007. We have performed two simulations with different ion to electron mass ratio: run 1 with mi/me=1840 and run 2 with mi/me=100. In run 1 the growth rate of the modified two-stream instability (MTSI is large enough to get excited during the reflection and upstream gyration of part of the incident solar wind ions. The waves due to the MTSI are on the whistler mode branch and have downstream directed phase velocities in the shock frame. The Poynting flux (and wave group velocity far upstream in the foot is also directed in the downstream direction. However, in the density and magnetic field compression region of the overshoot the waves are refracted and the Poynting flux in the shock frame is directed upstream. The MTSI is suppressed in the low mass ratio run 2. The low mass ratio run shows more clearly the non-stationarity of the shock with a larger time scale of the order of an inverse ion gyrofrequency (Ωci: the magnetic field profile flattens and steepens with a period of ~1.5Ωci−1. This non-stationarity is different from reformation seen in previous simulations of perpendicular or quasi-perpendicular shocks. Beginning with a sharp shock ramp the large electric field in the normal direction leads to high reflection rate of solar wind protons. As they propagate upstream, the ion bulk velocity decreases and the magnetic field increases in the foot, which results in a flattening of the magnetic field profile and in a decrease of the normal electric field. Subsequently the reflection rate decreases and the whole shock profile steepens again. Superimposed on this 'breathing' behavior are in the realistic mass ratio case the waves due to the MTSI. The simulations lead us to a re-interpretation of

  15. Injection and acceleration of H+ and He2+ at Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Scholer

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a number of one-dimensional hybrid simulations (particle ions, massless electron fluid of quasi-parallel collisionless shocks in order to investigate the injection and subsequent acceleration of part of the solar wind ions at the Earth's bow shock. The shocks propagate into a medium containing magnetic fluctuations, which are initially superimposed on the background field, as well as generated or enhanced by the electromagnetic ion/ion beam instability between the solar wind and backstreaming ions. In order to study the mass (M and charge (Q dependence of the acceleration process He2+ is included self-consistently. The upstream differential intensity spectra of H+ and He2+ can be well represented by exponentials in energy. The e-folding energy Ec is a function of time: Ec increases with time. Furthermore the e-folding energy (normalized to the shock ramming energy Ep increases with increasing Alfvén Mach number of the shock and with increasing fluctuation level of the initially superimposed turbulence. When backstreaming ions leave the shock after their first encounter they exhibit already a spectrum which extends to more than ten times the shock ramming energy and which is ordered in energy per charge. From the injection spectrum it is concluded that leakage of heated downstream particles does not contribute to ion injection. Acceleration models that permit thermal particles to scatter like the non-thermal population do not describe the correct physics.Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks · Space plasma physics (charged particle motion and acceleration; numerical simulation studies

  16. Injection and acceleration of H+ and He2+ at Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-H. Trattner

    Full Text Available We have performed a number of one-dimensional hybrid simulations (particle ions, massless electron fluid of quasi-parallel collisionless shocks in order to investigate the injection and subsequent acceleration of part of the solar wind ions at the Earth's bow shock. The shocks propagate into a medium containing magnetic fluctuations, which are initially superimposed on the background field, as well as generated or enhanced by the electromagnetic ion/ion beam instability between the solar wind and backstreaming ions. In order to study the mass (M and charge (Q dependence of the acceleration process He2+ is included self-consistently. The upstream differential intensity spectra of H+ and He2+ can be well represented by exponentials in energy. The e-folding energy Ec is a function of time: Ec increases with time. Furthermore the e-folding energy (normalized to the shock ramming energy Ep increases with increasing Alfvén Mach number of the shock and with increasing fluctuation level of the initially superimposed turbulence. When backstreaming ions leave the shock after their first encounter they exhibit already a spectrum which extends to more than ten times the shock ramming energy and which is ordered in energy per charge. From the injection spectrum it is concluded that leakage of heated downstream particles does not contribute to ion injection. Acceleration models that permit thermal particles to scatter like the non-thermal population do not describe the correct physics.Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks · Space plasma physics (charged particle motion and acceleration; numerical simulation studies

  17. Radioisotopic studies on pulmonary function in experimental burn shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, W.; Barcikowski, S.; Maziarz, Z.; Zajgner, J.; Markiewicz, A.

    1980-01-01

    Disturbances in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion, which can initiate severe complications, often lead to many therapeutic failures in burn shock. Early recognition of respiratory disturbances is often required to improve results of treatment of burn shock. The authors investigated changes in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in napalm-burnt rabbits using 133 Xe. Simultaneously, they determined effect of treatment with cytochrome C on pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in animals burnt with napalm. It was found that in napalm-burnt rabbits burn shock was accompanied by a significant deterioration in pulmonary ventilation and perfusion. The most marked changes were observed one and two days after burn. It was also found a beneficial effect of treatment with cytochrome C on alveolar ventilation. The authors pointed out the usefulness of radioisotopic investigations of pulmonary ventilation and perfusion in burn shock. (author)

  18. Design and testing of a magnetorheological damper to control both vibration and shock loads for a vehicle crew seat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becnel, Andrew; Hu, Wei; Hiemenz, Gregory J.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2010-04-01

    A magnetorheological shock absorber (MRSA) prototype is designed, fabricated and tested to integrate semiactive shock and vibration mitigation technology into the existing Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle (EFV) forward seating positions. Utilizing Bingham-Plastic (BP) constitutive fluid relationships and a steady state fluid flow model, the MR valve parameters are determined using magnetic circuit analysis, and subsequently validated via electromagnetic finite element analysis (FEA). Low speed (up to 0.9 m/s) simulations of normal vibration mode operation are conducted on the MRSA prototype using single frequency sinusoidal displacements by a servohydraulic testing machine. The high speed (up to 2.2 m/s) design procedure is verified by using a rail-guided drop test stand to impact a known payload mass onto the damper shaft. A refined hydromechanical model of the MRSA under both cyclic and impact loadings is developed and validated using the measured test data. This ratedependent, mechanisms-based model predicts the time response of the MRSA under both loading conditions. The hydromechanical analysis marks a significant improvement over previous linear models. Key design considerations for the MRSA to accommodate both vibration and shock spectra using a single MR device are presented.

  19. Shock Producers and Shock Absorbers in the Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Sinn, Hans-Werner

    2009-01-01

    It is not surprising that the U.S. has been by far the world’s largest shock producer in this crisis. The big shock absorbers on the other hand were Japan, Russia and Germany, whose exports shrank more than their imports.

  20. Shock timing measurements in DT ice layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Ross, J. S.; Lepape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2013-10-01

    Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are routinely conducted using the keyhole target geometry, in which the strength and timing of multiple shocks are measured in a liquid-deuterium (D2) filled capsule interior. These targets have recently been modified to improve the surrogacy to ignition implosions by replacing the standard, continuous liquid D2 capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with a central DT gas fill. These experiments remove any possible material surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporating the physics of multiple shock release and recompression events from an ice layer of finite thickness, an effect that is absent in the liquid-filled targets. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Design basis for resistance to shock and vibration of radioactive material packages greater than one ton in truck transport (draft standard for trial use and comment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    This standard specifies minimum design values for shock and vibration in highway transport, by truck or by tractor-trailer combination, for fuel and irradiation experiments when package weight exceeds one ton. Shock values correspond to normal transport over rough roads and to minor accidents such as backing into a loading dock. Vibration values correspond to normal transport; any large-amplitude vibration resulting from rough road conditions or a minor accident is treated as shock. This standard includes recommended methods of application to the design of packaging and tiedown systems

  2. Shock Isolation Elements Testing for High Input Loadings. Volume II. Foam Shock Isolation Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*GUIDED MISSILE SILOS, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*EXPANDED PLASTICS, (*SHOCK(MECHANICS), REDUCTION), TEST METHODS, SHOCK WAVES, STRAIN(MECHANICS), LOADS(FORCES), MATHEMATICAL MODELS, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, HARDENING.

  3. Shock-wave structure based on the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, F. J.; Velasco, R. M.

    2018-04-01

    We use the Navier-Stokes-Fourier constitutive equations to study plane shock waves in dilute gases. It is shown that the experimental information on the normalized density profiles can be fit by using the so-called soft sphere model, in which the viscosity and thermal conductivity are proportional to a power of the temperature.

  4. Gravitational shock waves and extreme magnetomaterial shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichnerowicz, Andre.

    1975-01-01

    Within an astrophysical context corresponding to high densities, a self-gravitating model is studied, which is the set of an extreme material medium of infinite conductivity and of a magnetic field. Corresponding shock waves generate necessarily, in general, gravitational shock waves [fr

  5. Improvement of pump tubes for gas guns and shock tube drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    In a pump tube, a gas is mechanically compressed, producing very high pressures and sound speeds. The intensely heated gas produced in such a tube can be used to drive light gas guns and shock tubes. Three concepts are presented that have the potential to allow substantial reductions in the size and mass of the pump tube to be achieved. The first concept involves the use of one or more diaphragms in the pump tube, thus replacing a single compression process by multiple, successive compressions. The second concept involves a radical reduction in the length-to-diameter ratio of the pump tube and the pump tube piston. The third concept involves shock heating of the working gas by high explosives in a cyclindrical geometry reusable device. Preliminary design analyses are performed on all three concepts and they appear to be quite feasible. Reductions in the length and mass of the pump tube by factors up to about 11 and about 7, respectively, are predicted, relative to a benchmark conventional pump tube.

  6. A second-order shock-expansion method applicable to bodies of revolution near zero lift

    Science.gov (United States)

    1957-01-01

    A second-order shock-expansion method applicable to bodies of revolution is developed by the use of the predictions of the generalized shock-expansion method in combination with characteristics theory. Equations defining the zero-lift pressure distributions and the normal-force and pitching-moment derivatives are derived. Comparisons with experimental results show that the method is applicable at values of the similarity parameter, the ratio of free-stream Mach number to nose fineness ratio, from about 0.4 to 2.

  7. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  8. Development of methods and means to improve a performance of microprocessor shock sensors for car alarms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Vasyukov

    2014-01-01

    -line adjusting characteristic.The developed shock sensor is implemented as stock-produced items included in the car alarm systems of the trademark “Excellent” (made by JSC Magic Ring Ltd.. Operating experience (about 40 thousand pieces realized now allows a proper adjustment of sensors to be possible on cars with any body type. A sufficient level of the sensor sensitivity proves it. The reliability of sensors is confirmed by failures statistics in use (0,08%. Failures are, usually, caused by the SE coil wire break in a soldering point of the coil leads to the printed circuit. However a number of shortcomings are also revealed.Experimental data processing of a test batch of sensors has shown that existing SE of electromagnetic type have the frequency of free vibrations f 805Hz and a decay constant of transient under shock  0,2s. At these parameters a SE pass-band makes only f 1,5Hz, and the sensor responses only to the shock front, rather than to the secondary vibrations of a body. It is an essential drawback of the narrow-band sensors.The experiments conducted on test batch of sensors (10 samples have shown essentially different sensitivities of sensors under shock in the direction of the sensitivity axis and perpendicular to it. This difference reaches 4-6 gradations of sensitivity. It means that when mounting a sensor on the particular car the orientation of sensitivity axis of the sensor will be of crucial importance that is also a shortcoming.It is shown that overcoming the specified drawbacks is hardly because of the improvement of sensitive elements suspension of electromagnetic sensors. Three-axial accelerometers implemented using MEMS technologies seem to be the most perspective application here.

  9. Pseudo-shock waves and their interactions in high-speed intakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnani, F.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.

    2016-04-01

    In an air-breathing engine the flow deceleration from supersonic to subsonic conditions takes places inside the isolator through a gradual compression consisting of a series of shock waves. The wave system, referred to as a pseudo-shock wave or shock train, establishes the combustion chamber entrance conditions, and therefore influences the performance of the entire propulsion system. The characteristics of the pseudo-shock depend on a number of variables which make this flow phenomenon particularly challenging to be analysed. Difficulties in experimentally obtaining accurate flow quantities at high speeds and discrepancies of numerical approaches with measured data have been readily reported. Understanding the flow physics in the presence of the interaction of numerous shock waves with the boundary layer in internal flows is essential to developing methods and control strategies. To counteract the negative effects of shock wave/boundary layer interactions, which are responsible for the engine unstart process, multiple flow control methodologies have been proposed. Improved analytical models, advanced experimental methodologies and numerical simulations have allowed a more in-depth analysis of the flow physics. The present paper aims to bring together the main results, on the shock train structure and its associated phenomena inside isolators, studied using the aforementioned tools. Several promising flow control techniques that have more recently been applied to manipulate the shock wave/boundary layer interaction are also examined in this review.

  10. Are Credit Shocks Supply or Demand Shocks?

    OpenAIRE

    Bijapur, Mohan

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the relationship between the supply of credit and the macroeconomy. We present evidence that credit shocks constitute shocks to aggregate supply in that they have a permanent effect on output and cause inflation to rise in the short term. Our results also suggest that the effects on aggregate supply have grown stronger in recent decades.

  11. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  12. Effective Shear Viscosity of Iron under Shock-Loading Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiao-Juan; Liu Fu-Sheng; Sun Yan-Yun; Zhang Ming-Jian; Peng Xiao-Juan; Li Yong-Hong

    2011-01-01

    We combine the flyer-impact experiment and improve the finite difference method to solve whether the shear viscosity coefficient of shock iron is more reliable. We find that the numerical simulated profile agrees well with the measured one, from which the determined effective shear viscosity coefficients of shocked iron are 3000 ± 100 Pa·s and 4000 ± 100 Pa·s, respectively, at 103 GPa and 159 GPa. These values are more than 2000 ± 300 Pa·s of Li Y L et al.[Chin. Phys. Lett. 26 (2009) 038301] Our values are more reasonable because they are obtained from a comprehensive simulation for the full-shocked perturbation evolving process. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  13. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celliers, P.M.; Robey, H.F.; Boehly, T.R.; Alger, E.; Azevedo, S.; Berzins, L.V.; Bhandarkar, S.D.; Bowers, M.W.; Brereton, S.J.; Callahan, D.; Castro, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Choate, C.; Clark, D.; Coffee, K.R.; Datte, P.S.; Dewald, E.L.; DiNicola, P.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Dzenitis, E.; Edwards, M.J.; Eggert, J.H.; Fair, J.; Farley, D.R.; Frieders, G.; Gibson, C.R.; Giraldez, E.; Haan, S.; Haid, B.; Hamza, A.V.; Haynam, C.; Hicks, D.G.; Holunga, D.M.; Horner, J.B.; Jancaitis, K.; Jones, O.S.; Kalantar, D.; Kline, J.L.; Krauter, K.G.; Kroll, J.J.; LaFortune, K.N.; Pape, S.L.; Malsbury, T.; Maypoles, E.R.; Milovich, J.L.; Moody, J.D.; Moreno, K.; Munro, D.H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R.E.; Parham, T.; Pollaine, S.; Radousky, H.B.; Ross, G.F.; Sater, J.; Schneider, M.B.; Shaw, M.; Smith, R.F.; Thomas, C.A.; Throop, A.; Town, R.J.; Trummer, D.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Walters, C.F.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C.; Young, B.K.; Atherton, L.J.; Collins, G.W.; Landen, O.L.; Lindl, J.D.; MacGowan, B.J.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Moses, E.I.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a reentrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  14. Radiation- and pair-loaded shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2018-06-01

    We consider the structure of mildly relativistic shocks in dense media, taking into account the radiation and pair loading, and diffusive radiation energy transfer within the flow. For increasing shock velocity (increasing post-shock temperature), the first important effect is the efficient energy redistribution by radiation within the shock that leads to the appearance of an isothermal jump, whereby the flow reaches the final state through a discontinuous isothermal transition. The isothermal jump, on scales much smaller than the photon diffusion length, consists of a weak shock and a quick relaxation to the isothermal conditions. Highly radiation-dominated shocks do not form isothermal jump. Pair production can mildly increase the overall shock compression ratio to ≈10 (4 for matter-dominated shocks and 7 of the radiation-dominated shocks).

  15. A preventive maintenance policy based on dependent two-stage deterioration and external shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Li; Ma, Xiaobing; Peng, Rui; Zhai, Qingqing; Zhao, Yu

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a preventive maintenance policy for a single-unit system whose failure has two competing and dependent causes, i.e., internal deterioration and sudden shocks. The internal failure process is divided into two stages, i.e. normal and defective. Shocks arrive according to a non-homogeneous Poisson process (NHPP), leading to the failure of the system immediately. The occurrence rate of a shock is affected by the state of the system. Both an age-based replacement and finite number of periodic inspections are schemed simultaneously to deal with the competing failures. The objective of this study is to determine the optimal preventive replacement interval, inspection interval and number of inspections such that the expected cost per unit time is minimized. A case study on oil pipeline maintenance is presented to illustrate the maintenance policy. - Highlights: • A maintenance model based on two-stage deterioration and sudden shocks is developed. • The impact of internal system state on external shock process is studied. • A new preventive maintenance strategy combining age-based replacements and periodic inspections is proposed. • Postponed replacement of a defective system is provided by restricting the number of inspections.

  16. INTERFERENCE OF UNIDIRECTIONAL SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study.We consider interference of unidirectional shock waves or, as they are called, catching up shock waves. The scope of work is to give a classification of the shock-wave structures that arise in this type of interaction of shock waves, and the area of their existence. Intersection of unidirectional shock waves results in arising of a shock-wave structure at the intersection point, which contains the main shock wave, tangential discontinuity and one more reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity of unknown beforehand type. The problem of determining the type of reflected discontinuity is the main problem that one has to solve in the study of catching shock waves interference. Main results.The paper presents the pictures of shock-wave structures arising at the interaction of catching up shock waves. The areas with a regular and irregular unidirectional interaction of shocks are described. Characteristic shock-wave structures are of greatest interest, where reflected gas-dynamic discontinuity degenerates into discontinuous characteristics. Such structures have a number of extreme properties. We have found the areas of existence for such shock-wave structures. There are also areas in which the steady-state solution is not available. The latter has determined revival of interest for the theoretical study of the problem, because the facts of sudden shock-wave structure destruction inside the air intake of supersonic aircrafts at high Mach numbers have been discovered. Practical significance.The theory of interference for unidirectional shock waves and design procedure are usable in the design of supersonic air intakes. It is also relevant for application possibility investigation of catching up oblique shock waves to create overcompressed detonation in perspective detonation air-jet and rocket engines.

  17. Shock/shock interactions between bodies and wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoxiang XIANG

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the Shock/Shock Interactions (SSI between the body and wing of aircraft in supersonic flows. The body is simplified to a flat wedge and the wing is assumed to be a sharp wing. The theoretical spatial dimension reduction method, which transforms the 3D problem into a 2D one, is used to analyze the SSI between the body and wing. The temperature and pressure behind the Mach stem induced by the wing and body are obtained, and the wave configurations in the corner are determined. Numerical validations are conducted by solving the inviscid Euler equations in 3D with a Non-oscillatory and Non-free-parameters Dissipative (NND finite difference scheme. Good agreements between the theoretical and numerical results are obtained. Additionally, the effects of the wedge angle and sweep angle on wave configurations and flow field are considered numerically and theoretically. The influences of wedge angle are significant, whereas the effects of sweep angle on wave configurations are negligible. This paper provides useful information for the design and thermal protection of aircraft in supersonic and hypersonic flows. Keywords: Body and wing, Flow field, Hypersonic flow, Shock/shock interaction, Wave configurations

  18. Shock wave plasticity in Mo at 293K and 1673K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    The shock wave plasticity of Mo is extracted from two VISAR wave profiles; of about 110 kbar strength at 293 K and of about 120 kbar strength at 1673 K. The Wallace weak shock analysis is used to obtain the plastic strain and deviatoric stress, and the normal stress and volumetric strain, through the shock rise from the velocity profile data. The Wallace analysis uses the steady wave assumption for the plastic portion of the shock rise, a plausible evolution for the precursor portion, a thermoelastic model, and the mechanical equations of motion. Comparison of the high and low temperature results is of interest in assessing the mechanisms of plastic flow. In the results, the (von Mises equivalent) peak deviatoric stresses are 12.8 kbar and 20.3 kbar, for the hot and cold Mo, respectively, while the peak plastic strain rate of the hot Mo is about 2.6 times that of the cold Mo. These values rule out thermal activation. In addition, they are not consistent with a simple phonon viscosity linear in the temperature. Additional effects are needed to explain the results, e.g. evolution of the mobile dislocation density. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. Effects on residual stresses of aluminum alloy LC4 by laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-kang; Lu, Jin-zhong; Kong, De-jun; Yao, Hui-xue; Yang, Chao-jun

    2007-12-01

    The influences of processing parameters on laser-induced shock waves in metal components are discussed and analyzed. The effects of different parameters of laser shock processing (LSP) on residual stress of aerospace aluminum alloy LC4 were investigated. LSP was performed by using an Nd: glass phosphate laser with 23 ns pulse width and up to ~45 J pulse energy at power densities above GW/mm -2. Special attention is paid to the residual stresses from laser shock processing. Modification of microstructure, surface morphology by laser shock processing is also discussed. Results to date indicate that laser shock processing has great potential as a means of improving the mechanical performance of components.

  20. Spent nuclear fuel system dynamic stability under normal conditions of transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Jy-An John, E-mail: wangja@ornl.gov

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A conformational potential effect of fuel assembly contact interaction induced transient shock. • Complex vibration modes and vibration load intensity were observed from fuel assembly system. • The project was able to link the periodic transient shock to spent fuel fatigue strength reduction. - Abstract: In a horizontal layout of a spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly under normal conditions of transportation (NCT), the fuel assembly’s skeleton formed by guide tubes and spacer grids is the primary load bearing structure for carrying and transferring the vibration loads within an SNF assembly. Therefore, the integrity of guide tubes and spacer grids will dictate the vibration amplitude/intensity of the fuel assembly during transport, and must be considered when designing multipurpose purpose canister (MPC) for safe SNF transport. This paper investigates the SNF assembly deformation dynamics during normal vibration mode, as well as the transient shock mode inside the cask during NCT. Dynamic analyses were performed in the frequency domain to study frequency characteristic of the fuel assembly system and in the time domain to simulate the transient dynamic response of the fuel assembly. To further evaluate the intensity of contact interaction induced by the local contacts’ impact loading at the spacer grid, detailed models of the actual spring and dimples of the spacer grids were created. The impacts between the fuel rod and springs and dimples were simulated with a 20 g transient shock load. The associated contact interaction intensities, in terms of reaction forces, were estimated from the finite element analyses (FEA) results. The bending moment estimated from the resultant stress on the clad under 20 g transient shock can be used to define the loading in cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) vibration testing for the equivalent condition. To estimate the damage potential of the transient shock to the SNF vibration

  1. Improving the dictionary lookup approach for disease normalization using enhanced dictionary and query expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Jue, Toni Rose; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing biomedical literature calls for the need of an automatic approach in the recognition and normalization of disease mentions in order to increase the precision and effectivity of disease based information retrieval. A variety of methods have been proposed to deal with the problem of disease named entity recognition and normalization. Among all the proposed methods, conditional random fields (CRFs) and dictionary lookup method are widely used for named entity recognition and normalization respectively. We herein developed a CRF-based model to allow automated recognition of disease mentions, and studied the effect of various techniques in improving the normalization results based on the dictionary lookup approach. The dataset from the BioCreative V CDR track was used to report the performance of the developed normalization methods and compare with other existing dictionary lookup based normalization methods. The best configuration achieved an F-measure of 0.77 for the disease normalization, which outperformed the best dictionary lookup based baseline method studied in this work by an F-measure of 0.13. Database URL: https://github.com/TCRNBioinformatics/DiseaseExtract PMID:27504009

  2. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco-Cano, X. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, CU, Coyoacan 04510 DF (Mexico); Kajdic, P. [IRAP-University of Toulouse, CNRS, Toulouse (France); Aguilar-Rodriguez, E. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Morelia (Mexico); Russell, C. T. [ESS and IGPP, University of California, Los Angeles, 603 Charles Young Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jian, L. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD and University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [SSL, University of California Berkeley (United States)

    2013-06-13

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and {theta}{sub Bn}{approx}20-86 Degree-Sign . We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr {<=}0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at {approx}1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  3. STEREO interplanetary shocks and foreshocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco-Cano, X.; Kajdič, P.; Aguilar-Rodríguez, E.; Russell, C. T.; Jian, L. K.; Luhmann, J. G.

    2013-01-01

    We use STEREO data to study shocks driven by stream interactions and the waves associated with them. During the years of the extended solar minimum 2007-2010, stream interaction shocks have Mach numbers between 1.1-3.8 and θ Bn ∼20-86°. We find a variety of waves, including whistlers and low frequency fluctuations. Upstream whistler waves may be generated at the shock and upstream ultra low frequency (ULF) waves can be driven locally by ion instabilities. The downstream wave spectra can be formed by both, locally generated perturbations, and shock transmitted waves. We find that many quasiperpendicular shocks can be accompanied by ULF wave and ion foreshocks, which is in contrast to Earth's bow shock. Fluctuations downstream of quasi-parallel shocks tend to have larger amplitudes than waves downstream of quasi-perpendicular shocks. Proton foreshocks of shocks driven by stream interactions have extensions dr ≤0.05 AU. This is smaller than foreshock extensions for ICME driven shocks. The difference in foreshock extensions is related to the fact that ICME driven shocks are formed closer to the Sun and therefore begin to accelerate particles very early in their existence, while stream interaction shocks form at ∼1 AU and have been producing suprathermal particles for a shorter time.

  4. Reflection of the solar wind ions at the earth's bow shock: energization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifazi, C.; Moreno, G.; Russell, C.T.

    1983-01-01

    The energies of the field-aligned proton beams observed upstream of the earth's bow shock are tested, on a statistical basis, against a simple reflection model. The comparison is carried out using both plasma and magnetic field data collected by the ISEE 2 spacecraft. The observations refer to the period from November 5 to December 20, 1977. According to this model, some of the solar wind protons incident upon the earth's shock front when reflected upstream gain energy by displacement parallel to the interplanetary electric field. The energy gained in the reflection can be described as a function of the angles between the interplanetary magnetic field, the solar wind bulk velocity, and the local shock normal. The task of finding these angles, i.e., the expected source point of the reflected ions at the earth's shock front, has been resolved using both the measured magnetic field direction and actual beam trajectory. The latter method, which takes into account the ion drift velocity, leads to a better agreement between theory and observations when far from the shock. In particular, it allows us to check the energies of the field-aligned beams even when they are observed far from the earth's bow shock (at distances up to 10-15 R/sub E/). We confirm, on a statistical basis, the test of the model recently carried out using the Los Alamos National Laboratory/Max-Planck-extraterrestrische observations on ISEE 1 and 2. We infer that reflected beams can sometimes propagate far upstream of the earth's bow shock without changing their energy properties

  5. IMPROVING QUALITY OF STATISTICAL PROCESS CONTROL BY DEALING WITH NON‐NORMAL DATA IN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana ANDRÁSSYOVÁ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Study deals with an analysis of data to the effect that it improves the quality of statistical tools in processes of assembly of automobile seats. Normal distribution of variables is one of inevitable conditions for the analysis, examination, and improvement of the manufacturing processes (f. e.: manufacturing process capability although, there are constantly more approaches to non‐normal data handling. An appropriate probability distribution of measured data is firstly tested by the goodness of fit of empirical distribution with theoretical normal distribution on the basis of hypothesis testing using programme StatGraphics Centurion XV.II. Data are collected from the assembly process of 1st row automobile seats for each characteristic of quality (Safety Regulation ‐S/R individually. Study closely processes the measured data of an airbag´s assembly and it aims to accomplish the normal distributed data and apply it the statistical process control. Results of the contribution conclude in a statement of rejection of the null hypothesis (measured variables do not follow the normal distribution therefore it is necessary to begin to work on data transformation supported by Minitab15. Even this approach does not reach a normal distributed data and so should be proposed a procedure that leads to the quality output of whole statistical control of manufacturing processes.

  6. Deformation of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 in sub-microsecond shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, D. N.; Kozelkov, O. E.; Mayorova, A. S.; Malyugina, A. S.; Mokrushin, S. S.; Pavlenko, A. V.

    2015-09-01

    Strength characteristics of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 were measured under shock - wave loading conditions at normal and elevated temperatures and results of these measurements are presented. Measurements were taken in conditions when samples were impacted by plane shock waves with the pressure up to 13 GPa and duration from ˜0.05 μs up to 1 μs. Free-surface velocity profiles were recorded with the help of VISAR and PDV laser Doppler velocimeters having nanosecond time resolution. Evolution of elastic precursors with samples thickness varying from 0.5 up to 8 mm is also considered. Measured attenuation of the elastic precursor was used to determine plastic strain rate behind the precursor front. Temperature effect on the value of dynamic elastic limit and spall strength at normal and elevated temperatures is studied. This work is implemented with the support of the State Atomic Energy Corporation "Rosatom" under State Contract H.4x.44.90.13.1111.

  7. Collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagdeev, R.Z.; Kennel, C.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collisionless shocks cannot occur naturally on the earth, because nearly all matter here consists of electrically neutral atoms and molecules. In space, however, high temperatures and ultraviolet radiation from hot stars decompose atoms into their constituent nuclei and electrons, producing a soup of electrically charged particles known as a plasma. Plasma physicists proposed that the collective electrical and magnetic properties of plasmas could produce interactions that take the place of collisions and permit shocks to form. In 1964 the theoretical work found its first experimental confirmation. Norman F. Ness and his colleagues at the Goddard Space Flight Center, using data collected from the iMP-1 spacecraft, detected clear signs that a collisionless shock exists where the solar wind encounters the earth's magnetic field. More recent research has demonstrated that collisionless shocks appear in a dazzling array of astronomical settings. For example, shocks have been found in the solar wind upstream (sunward) of all the planet and comets that have been visited by spacecraft. Violent flares on the sun generate shocks that propagate to the far reaches of the solar system; tremendous galactic outbursts create disruptions in the intergalactic medium that are trillions of times larger. In addition, many astrophysicists think that shocks from supernova explosions in our galaxy accelerate cosmic rays, a class of extraordinarily energetic elementary particles and atomic nuclei that rain down on the earth from all directions

  8. Influence of artificial shock absorbers on human gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, A; Wosk, J

    1981-10-01

    The effect of artificial shock absorbers on the human gait and the technique for its quantitative evaluation have been studied. The results obtained have shown that viscoelastic inserts reduced the amplitude of the incoming shock waves bearing upon the musculoskeletal system as a result of the heel strike, by 42 percent (mean value). Conservative treatment, using such inserts for patients with different clinical symptoms of degenerative joint diseases, has shown excellent results. Seventy-eight percent of the clinical symptoms disappeared, while satisfactory improvement was reported in 17 percent of the subjects.

  9. Evaluation of the Effect of Different Doses of Low Energy Shock Wave Therapy on the Erectile Function of Streptozotocin (STZ-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Cheng Xin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the therapeutic effect of different doses of low energy shock wave therapy (LESWT on the erectile dysfunction (ED in streptozotocin (STZ induced diabetic rats. SD rats (n = 75 were randomly divided into 5 groups (normal control, diabetic control, 3 different dose LESWT treated diabetic groups. Diabetic rats were induced by intra-peritoneal injection of STZ (60 mg/kg and rats with fasting blood glucose ≥ 300 mg/dL were selected as diabetic models. Twelve weeks later, different doses of LESWT (100, 200 and 300 shocks each time treatment on penises were used to treat ED (7.33 MPa, 2 shocks/s three times a week for two weeks. The erectile function was evaluated by intracavernous pressure (ICP after 1 week washout period. Then the penises were harvested for histological study. The results showed LESWT could significantly improve the erectile function of diabetic rats, increase smooth muscle and endothelial contents, up-regulate the expression of α-SMA, vWF, nNOS and VEGF, and down- regulate the expression of RAGE in corpus cavernosum. The therapeutic effect might relate to treatment dose positively, and the maximal therapeutic effect was noted in the LESWT300 group. Consequently, 300 shocks each time might be the ideal LESWT dose for diabetic ED treatment.

  10. Relativistic Shock Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, P.; Downes, T.P.; Gallant, Y.A.; Kirk, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we briefly review the basic theory of shock waves in relativistic hydrodynamics and magneto-hydrodynamics, emphasising some astrophysically interesting cases. We then present an overview of the theory of particle acceleration at such shocks describing the methods used to calculate the spectral indices of energetic particles. Recent results on acceleration at ultra-relativistic shocks are discussed. (author)

  11. EVALUATION OF SERUM LACTATE LEVELS AS A PROGNOSTIC INDICATOR IN VARIOUS TYPES OF SHOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddaraj Wali

    2017-08-01

    predict impending complications or grave outcome in patients of shock. Interventions that decrease lactate values to normal may improve chances of survival and can be considered effective therapy.

  12. Effect of back-pressure forcing on shock train structures in rectangular channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnani, F.; Zare-Behtash, H.; White, C.; Kontis, K.

    2018-04-01

    The deceleration of a supersonic flow to the subsonic regime inside a high-speed engine occurs through a series of shock waves, known as a shock train. The generation of such a flow structure is due to the interaction between the shock waves and the boundary layer inside a long and narrow duct. The understanding of the physics governing the shock train is vital for the improvement of the design of high-speed engines and the development of flow control strategies. The present paper analyses the sensitivity of the shock train configuration to a back-pressure variation. The complex characteristics of the shock train at an inflow Mach number M = 2 in a channel of constant height are investigated with two-dimensional RANS equations closed by the Wilcox k-ω turbulence model. Under a sinusoidal back-pressure variation, the simulated results indicate that the shock train executes a motion around its mean position that deviates from a perfect sinusoidal profile with variation in oscillation amplitude, frequency, and whether the pressure is first increased or decreased.

  13. Formation of fast shocks by magnetic reconnection in the solar corona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, M. H.; Tsai, C. L.; Ma, Z. W.; Lee, L. C.

    2009-01-01

    Reconnections of magnetic fields over the solar surface are expected to generate abundant magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) discontinuities and shocks, including slow shocks and rotational discontinuities. However, the generation of fast shocks by magnetic reconnection process is relatively not well studied. In this paper, magnetic reconnection in a current sheet is studied based on two-dimensional resistive MHD numerical simulations. Magnetic reconnections in the current sheet lead to the formation of plasma jets and plasma bulges. It is further found that the plasma bulges, the leading part of plasma jets, in turn lead to the generation of fast shocks on flanks of the bulges. The simulation results show that during the magnetic reconnection process, the plasma forms a series of structures: plasma jets, plasma bulges, and fast shocks. As time increases, the bulges spread out along the current sheet (±z direction) and the fast shocks move just ahead of the bulges. The effects of initial parameters ρ s /ρ m , β ∞ , and t rec on the fast shock generation are also examined, where ρ s /ρ m is the ratio of plasma densities on two sides of the initial current sheet, β ∞ =P ∞ /(B ∞ 2 /2μ 0 ), P ∞ is the plasma pressure and B ∞ is the magnetic field magnitude far from the current sheet, and t rec is the reconnection duration. In the asymmetric case with ρ s /ρ m =2, β ∞ =0.01 and t rec =1000, the maximum Alfven Mach number of fast shocks (M A1max ) is M A1max congruent with 1.1, where M A1 =V n1 /V A1 , and V n1 and V A1 are, respectively, the normal upstream fluid velocity and the upstream Alfven speed in the fast shocks frame. As the density ratio ρ s /ρ m (=1-8) and plasma beta β ∞ (=0.0001-1) increase, M A1max varies slightly. For the case with a large plasma beta β ∞ (=5), the fast shock is very weak. As the reconnection duration t rec increases, the bulges lead to generation of fast shocks with a higher M A1max . The present results can be

  14. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemeth, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    A shock absorber for the support of piping and components in a nuclear power plant is described. It combines a high degree of stiffness under sudden shocks, e.g. seismic disturbances, with the ability to allow for thermal expansion without resistance when so required. (JIW)

  15. Applied pressure-dependent anisotropic grain connectivity in shock consolidated MgB{sub 2} samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, Wataru [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Takenaka, Kenta [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kondo, Tadashi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Tamaki, Hideyuki [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Matsuzawa, Hidenori [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Takeda 4-3-11, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan)]. E-mail: matuzawa@mx3.nns.ne.jp; Kai, Shoichiro [Advanced Materials and Process Development Group, Explosive Division, Asahi Kasei Chemicals Corporation, Oita 870-0392 (Japan); Kakimoto, Etsuji [Advanced Materials and Process Development Group, Explosive Division, Asahi Kasei Chemicals Corporation, Oita 870-0392 (Japan); Takano, Yoshihiko [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Minehara, Eisuke [FEL Laboratory, Tokai Site, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Shirakata-shirane 2-4, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Three different cylindrical MgB{sub 2} bulk samples were prepared by the underwater shock consolidation method in which shock waves of several GPa, generated by detonation of explosives, were applied to a metallic cylinder containing commercially available MgB{sub 2} powders with no additives. Resistivity anisotropy of the samples increased with shock pressure. The highest- and medium-pressure applied samples had finite resistivities in the radial direction for the whole temperature range down to 12 K, whereas their axial and azimuthal resistivities dropped to zero at 32-35 K. By contrast, the lowest-pressure applied sample was approximately isotropic with a normal-state resistivity of {approx}40 {mu}{omega} cm, an onset temperature of {approx}38.5 K, and a transition width of {approx}4.5 K. These extremely anisotropic properties would have resulted from the distortion of grain boundaries and grain cores, caused by the shock pressures and their repeated bouncing.

  16. System Shock: The Archetype of Operational Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the battle space. They can also facilitate a much greater understanding of the variables involved in each party’s decision - making process. However...system shock nests within current US Army Unified Land Operations doctrine. In order to test the utility of system shock theory to Gray Zone...23 Neil E. Harrison, “Thinking about the World We Make ” in Chaos Theory in the Social Sciences: Foundations and Applications

  17. Significance of heel pad confinement for the shock absorption at heel strike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, U; Ekstrand, J

    1988-12-01

    Shock absorption (SA) is a simple way to reduce the body load and can be used in the prevention and treatment of injuries. The heel pad is the most important shock absorber in the shoe heel complex. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the SA at heel strike can be increased by heel support in people and shoes with high or low SA. The impact forces at heel strike were measured on an AMTI (R) force platform. Fourteen legs were tested in seven persons (nine with normal and five with low heel pad SA) in gait analysis and in human drop tests. The tests were performed barefooted, and in a soccer and a running shoe (selected by shoe drop test), with and without the distal 2 cm of the heel counter. The heel pad confinement produced by the heel counter (the heel counter effect) increased the SA in both shoe types significantly in both impact situations. The mean increase in SA was 8.8% (range 5.8%-15.5%). The heel counter effect was in all situations significantly higher in persons with low heel pad shock absorbency (LHPSA) than in those with normal heel pads. The barefoot impact peak force per kg body weight was significantly higher (6% mean) on the side with LHPSA. The running shoe provided the significantly greatest SA compared with the soccer shoe. It is concluded that the shock absorbency at heel strike can be increased significantly by heel support, with highest effect in persons with LHPSA, both in shoes with high and low SA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Optimizing thermal shock resistance of layered refractories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, Jarno; Kuna, Meinhard [Institute of Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, Lampadiusstrasse 4, 09599 Freiberg (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Severe thermal shocks may cause critical thermal stresses and failure in refractories or ceramic materials. To increase the thermal shock resistance, layered material structures are suggested. In order to optimize properties of these alternative structures, thermo-mechanical simulations are required. In this study, a finite difference method (FDM) is used for solving the partial differential equation of heat conduction with spatially varying parameters. The optimization of the strip's thermal shock resistance is exemplarily done on a 10 layered strip subjected to constant temperature jump on the top surface. Each layer can be set with different porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MgO ceramics, whose material properties are theoretically determined. In this study, an improved optimization method is developed that consists of a combination and sequence of Monte Carlo simulations and evolution strategies to overcome certain disadvantages of both techniques. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celliers P.M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a re-entrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

  20. Normal velocity freeze-out of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability when a rarefaction is reflected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouchuk, J. G.; Sano, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) develops when a shock front hits a rippled contact surface separating two different fluids. After the incident shock refraction, a transmitted shock is always formed and another shock or a rarefaction is reflected back. The pressure-entropy-vorticity fields generated by the rippled wave fronts are responsible for the generation of hydrodynamic perturbations in both fluids. In linear theory, the contact surface ripple reaches an asymptotic normal velocity which is dependent on the incident shock Mach number, fluids density ratio, and compressibilities. It was speculated in the past about the possibility of getting a zero value for the asymptotic normal velocity, a phenomenon that was called "freeze-out" [G. Fraley, Phys. Fluids 29, 376 (1986), 10.1063/1.865722; K. Mikaelian, Phys. Fluids 6, 356 (1994), 10.1063/1.868091, A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 592 (2001), 10.1063/1.1335829]. In a previous paper, freeze-out was studied for the case when a shock is reflected at the contact surface [J. G. Wouchuk and K. Nishihara, Phys. Rev. E 70, 026305 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevE.70.026305]. In this work the freeze-out of the RMI is studied for the case in which a rarefaction is reflected back. Two different regimes are found: nearly equal preshock densities at the interface at any shock intensity, and very large density difference for strong shocks. The contour curves that relate shock Mach number and preshock density ratio are obtained in both regimes for fluids with equal and different compressibilities. An analysis of the temporal evolution of different cases of freeze-out is shown. It is seen that the freeze-out is the result of the interaction between the unstable interface and the rippled wave fronts. As a general and qualitative criterion to look for freeze-out situations, it is seen that a necessary condition for freeze-out is the same orientation for the tangential velocities generated at each side of the contact

  1. Quantitative evaluation of the mechanical strength of titanium/composite bonding using laser-generated shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducousso, M.; Bardy, S.; Rouchausse, Y.; Bergara, T.; Jenson, F.; Berthe, L.; Videau, L.; Cuvillier, N.

    2018-03-01

    Intense acoustic shock waves were applied to evaluate the mechanical strength of structural epoxy bonds between a TA6V4 titanium alloy and a 3D woven carbon/epoxy composite material. Two bond types with different mechanical strengths were obtained from two different adhesive reticulations, at 50% and 90% of conversion, resulting in longitudinal static strengths of 10 and 39 MPa and transverse strengths of 15 and 35 MPa, respectively. The GPa shock waves were generated using ns-scale intense laser pulses and reaction principles to a confined plasma expansion. Simulations taking into account the laser-matter interaction, plasma relaxation, and non-linear shock wave propagation were conducted to aid interpretation of the experiments. Good correlations were obtained between the experiments and the simulation and between different measurement methods of the mechanical strength (normalized tests vs laser-generated shock waves). Such results open the door toward certification of structural bonding.

  2. Propagation of shock waves in elastic solids caused by cavitation microjet impact. I: Theoretical formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, P; Chuong, C J

    1993-07-01

    To understand the physical process of the impingement of cavitation microjet and the resultant shock wave propagation in an elastic solid, a theoretical model using geometrical acoustics was developed. Shock waves induced in both the jet head (water) and the solid were analyzed during a tri-supersonic impact configuration when the contact edge between the jet head and the elastic boundary expands faster than the longitudinal wave speed in the solid. Impact pressure at the boundary was solved using continuity conditions along the boundary normal. Reflection and refraction of shock waves from a solid-water interface were also included in the model. With this model, the impact pressure at the solid boundary and the stress, strain as well as velocity discontinuities at the propagating shock fronts were calculated. A comparison with results from previous studies shows that this model provides a more complete and general solution for the jet impact problem.

  3. A comparison of shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions: effect of increased cloud density contrast on cloud evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, K. J. A.; Pittard, J. M.

    2018-05-01

    The similarities, or otherwise, of a shock or wind interacting with a cloud of density contrast χ = 10 were explored in a previous paper. Here, we investigate such interactions with clouds of higher density contrast. We compare the adiabatic hydrodynamic interaction of a Mach 10 shock with a spherical cloud of χ = 103 with that of a cloud embedded in a wind with identical parameters to the post-shock flow. We find that initially there are only minor morphological differences between the shock-cloud and wind-cloud interactions, compared to when χ = 10. However, once the transmitted shock exits the cloud, the development of a turbulent wake and fragmentation of the cloud differs between the two simulations. On increasing the wind Mach number, we note the development of a thin, smooth tail of cloud material, which is then disrupted by the fragmentation of the cloud core and subsequent `mass-loading' of the flow. We find that the normalized cloud mixing time (tmix) is shorter at higher χ. However, a strong Mach number dependence on tmix and the normalized cloud drag time, t_{drag}^' }, is not observed. Mach-number-dependent values of tmix and t_{drag}^' } from comparable shock-cloud interactions converge towards the Mach-number-independent time-scales of the wind-cloud simulations. We find that high χ clouds can be accelerated up to 80-90 per cent of the wind velocity and travel large distances before being significantly mixed. However, complete mixing is not achieved in our simulations and at late times the flow remains perturbed.

  4. Effects of response-shock interval and shock intensity on free-operant avoidance responding in the pigeon1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marty; Rilling, Mark

    1972-01-01

    Two experiments investigated free-operant avoidance responding with pigeons using a treadle-pressing response. In Experiment I, pigeons were initially trained on a free-operant avoidance schedule with a response-shock interval of 32 sec and a shock-shock interval of 10 sec, and were subsequently exposed to 10 values of the response-shock parameter ranging from 2.5 to 150 sec. The functions relating response rate to response-shock interval were similar to the ones reported by Sidman in his 1953 studies employing rats, and were independent of the order of presentation of the response-shock values. Shock rates decreased as response-shock duration increased. In Experiment II, a free-operant avoidance schedule with a response-shock interval of 20 sec and a shock-shock interval of 5 sec was used, and shock intensities were varied over five values ranging from 2 to 32 mA. Response rates increased markedly as shock intensity increased from 2 to 8 mA, but rates changed little with further increases in shock intensity. Shock rates decreased as intensity increased from 2 to 8 mA, and showed little change as intensity increased from 8 to 32 mA. PMID:4652617

  5. Diaphragmless shock wave generators for industrial applications of shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, M. S.; Janardhanraj, S.; Saravanan, S.; Jagadeesh, G.

    2011-06-01

    The prime focus of this study is to design a 50 mm internal diameter diaphragmless shock tube that can be used in an industrial facility for repeated loading of shock waves. The instantaneous rise in pressure and temperature of a medium can be used in a variety of industrial applications. We designed, fabricated and tested three different shock wave generators of which one system employs a highly elastic rubber membrane and the other systems use a fast acting pneumatic valve instead of conventional metal diaphragms. The valve opening speed is obtained with the help of a high speed camera. For shock generation systems with a pneumatic cylinder, it ranges from 0.325 to 1.15 m/s while it is around 8.3 m/s for the rubber membrane. Experiments are conducted using the three diaphragmless systems and the results obtained are analyzed carefully to obtain a relation between the opening speed of the valve and the amount of gas that is actually utilized in the generation of the shock wave for each system. The rubber membrane is not suitable for industrial applications because it needs to be replaced regularly and cannot withstand high driver pressures. The maximum shock Mach number obtained using the new diaphragmless system that uses the pneumatic valve is 2.125 ± 0.2%. This system shows much promise for automation in an industrial environment.

  6. A child in a state of shock in emercency department: classification, mechanisms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Равіч Maрцін

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric shock is a life-threatening condition that can often be difficult to recognize in the emergency department, especially in early stages. Once recognized, the emphasis of therapy is to correct cellular metabolism and gas exchange by increasing oxygen and other substrate delivery to tissue beds. This review discusses various mechanisms and aetiology of shock are discussed, among them hypoxia in infancy, hypovolaemia, impaired distribution, obstruction of the cardiac outflow and sepsis.In septic shock providing oxygen, improving tissue perfusion through restoration in the intravascular volume, augmentation of cardiac output, preservation of kidney function, and administering antibiotics in a timely manner have all been shown to significantly improve outcomes in children. Simple  algorithms for first aid in emergency room are given, emphasizes the importance of effective surveillance and timely recognition of this disease process, to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality. The review indicates how to identify specific markers of septic shock, lays out the essential components of goal-directed therapy, and ways to avoid the devastating consequences of shock in paediatric patients

  7. Ground Shock Resistant of Buried Nuclear Power Plant Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornai, D.; Adar, A.; Gal, E.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) might be subjected to hostile attacks such as Earth Penetrating Weapons (EPW) that carry explosive charges. Explosions of these weapons near buried NPP facility might cause collapse, breaching, spalling, deflection, shear, rigid body motion (depending upon the foundations), and in-structure shock. The occupants and the equipment in the buried facilities are exposed to the in-structure motions, and if they are greater than their fragility values than occupants might be wounded or killed and the equipment might be damaged, unless protective measures will be applied. NPP critical equipment such as pumps are vital for the normal safe operation since it requires constant water circulation between the nuclear reactor and the cooling system, including in case of an immediate shut down. This paper presents analytical- semi empirical formulation and analysis of the explosion of a penetrating weapon with a warhead of 100kgs TNT (Trinitrotoluene) that creates ground shock effect on underground NPP structure containing equipment, such as a typical pump. If the in-structure spectral shock is greater than the pump fragility values than protective measures are required, otherwise a real danger to the NPP safety might occur

  8. Improving the dictionary lookup approach for disease normalization using enhanced dictionary and query expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Jue, Toni Rose; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing biomedical literature calls for the need of an automatic approach in the recognition and normalization of disease mentions in order to increase the precision and effectivity of disease based information retrieval. A variety of methods have been proposed to deal with the problem of disease named entity recognition and normalization. Among all the proposed methods, conditional random fields (CRFs) and dictionary lookup method are widely used for named entity recognition and normalization respectively. We herein developed a CRF-based model to allow automated recognition of disease mentions, and studied the effect of various techniques in improving the normalization results based on the dictionary lookup approach. The dataset from the BioCreative V CDR track was used to report the performance of the developed normalization methods and compare with other existing dictionary lookup based normalization methods. The best configuration achieved an F-measure of 0.77 for the disease normalization, which outperformed the best dictionary lookup based baseline method studied in this work by an F-measure of 0.13.Database URL: https://github.com/TCRNBioinformatics/DiseaseExtract. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Holographic interferometric observation of shock wave focusing to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Obara, Tetsuro; Onodera, Osamu

    1991-04-01

    Underwater shock wave focusing is successfully applied to disintegrate and remove kidney stones or gallbladder stones without using surgical operations. This treatment is one of the most peaceful applications ofshock waves and is named as the Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy. Ajoint research project is going on between the Institute ofFluid Science, Tohoku University and the School ofMedicine, Tohoku University. The paper describes a result of the fundamental research on the underwater shock wave focusing applied to the ESWL. Quantitatively to visualize the underwater shock waves, various optical flow visualization techniques were successfully used such as holographic interferometry, and shadowgraphs combined with Ima-Con high speed camera. Double exposure holographic interferometric observation revealed the mechanism of generation, propagation and focusing of underwater shock waves. The result of the present research was already used to manufacture a prototype machine and it has already been applied successfully to ESWL crinical treatments. However, despite of success in the clinical treatments, important fundamental questions still remain unsolved, i.e., effects of underwater shock wave focusing on tissue damage during the treatment. Model experiments were conducted to clarify mechanism of the tissue damage associated with the ESWL. Shock-bubble interactions were found responsible to the tissue damage during the ESWL treatment. In order to interprete experimental findings and to predict shock wave behavior and high pressures, a numerical simulation was carried. The numerical results agreed with the experiments.

  10. Second sound shock waves in rotating superfluid helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torczynski, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Second sound shock waves have been used to examine the breakdown of superfluidity in bulk He II. The maximum counterflow velocity achieved in this manner was measured at a variety of temperatures and pressures. The results are found to agree with predictions of vortex nucleation theories (Langer and Fisher, 1967) in their pressure and temperature dependences although it was shown that dissipation occurred only near the heater. A simple scaling argument is suggested, assuming breakdown occurs near the heater. A vortex dynamics model of breakdown (following the method of Turner, private communication) is developed. To examine the effect of vorticity on breakdown, second sound shocks were produced in rotating helium. Experiments were performed in which the shocks propagated either along or normal to the axis of rotation, called axial and transverse cases, respectively. In both cases the decay was seen to increase monotonically with the rotation rate. Furthermore, the decay was ongoing rather than being confined to a narrow region near the heater. However, the extraordinary dissipation in the transverse case seemed to be related primarily to the arrival of secondary waves from the heater-sidewall boundary. An explanation of this difference is put forth in terms of vortex nucleation in the bulk fluid, using ideas similar to Crocco's Theorem. In order to examine the breakdown of superfluidity away from walls in nonrotation fluid, spherically converging second shocks were produced. The temperature jumps of the waves were measured, and exact numerical solutions of the two-fluid jump conditions (Moody, 1983) were used to calculate the relative velocity in each case

  11. Shock Isolation Elements Testing for High Input Loadings. Volume III. Mechanical Shock Isolation Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*GUIDED MISSILE SILOS, SHOCK ABSORBERS ), (*SPRINGS, (*SHOCK(MECHANICS), REDUCTION), TORSION BARS, ELASTOMERS, DAMPING, EQUATIONS OF MOTION, MODEL TESTS, TEST METHODS, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS, HARDENING.

  12. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AT THE HELIOSPHERIC TERMINATION SHOCK WITH A STOCHASTIC SHOCK OBLIQUITY APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Aaron D.; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2013-01-01

    Observations by the plasma and magnetic field instruments on board the Voyager 2 spacecraft suggest that the termination shock is weak with a compression ratio of ∼2. However, this is contrary to the observations of accelerated particle spectra at the termination shock, where standard diffusive shock acceleration theory predicts a compression ratio closer to ∼2.9. Using our focused transport model, we investigate pickup proton acceleration at a stationary spherical termination shock with a moderately strong compression ratio of 2.8 to include both the subshock and precursor. We show that for the particle energies observed by the Voyager 2 Low Energy Charged Particle (LECP) instrument, pickup protons will have effective length scales of diffusion that are larger than the combined subshock and precursor termination shock structure observed. As a result, the particles will experience a total effective termination shock compression ratio that is larger than values inferred by the plasma and magnetic field instruments for the subshock and similar to the value predicted by diffusive shock acceleration theory. Furthermore, using a stochastically varying magnetic field angle, we are able to qualitatively reproduce the multiple power-law structure observed for the LECP spectra downstream of the termination shock

  13. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K

    2014-05-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  14. Calibration of PCB-132 Sensors in a Shock Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Dennis C.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    While PCB-132 sensors have proven useful for measuring second-mode instability waves in many hypersonic wind tunnels, they are currently limited by their calibration. Until now, the factory calibration has been all that was available, which is a single-point calibration at an amplitude three orders of magnitude higher than a second-mode wave. In addition, little information has been available about the frequency response or spatial resolution of the sensors, which is important for measuring high-frequency instability waves. These shortcomings make it difficult to compare measurements at different conditions and between different sensors. If accurate quantitative measurements could be performed, comparisons of the growth and breakdown of instability waves could be made in different facilities, possibly leading to a method of predicting the amplitude at which the waves break down into turbulence, improving transition prediction. A method for calibrating the sensors is proposed using a newly-built shock tube at Purdue University. This shock tube, essentially a half-scale version of the 6-Inch shock tube at the Graduate Aerospace Laboratories at Caltech, has been designed to attain a moderate vacuum in the driven section. Low driven pressures should allow the creation of very weak, yet still relatively thin shock waves. It is expected that static pressure rises within the range of second-mode amplitudes should be possible. The shock tube has been designed to create clean, planar shock waves with a laminar boundary layer to allow for accurate calibrations. Stronger shock waves can be used to identify the frequency response of the sensors out to hundreds of kilohertz.

  15. Thermal shock behavior of rare earth modified alumina ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junlong; Liu, Changxia [Ludong Univ., Yantai (China). School of Transportation

    2017-05-15

    Alumina matrix ceramic composites toughened by AlTiC master alloys, diopside and rare earths were fabricated by hot-pressing and their thermal shock behavior was investigated and compared with that of monolithic alumina. Results showed that the critical thermal shock temperature (ΔT) of monolithic alumina was 400 C. However, it decreased to 300 C for alumina incorporating only AlTiC master alloys, and increased with further addition of diopside and rare earths. Improvement of thermal shock resistance was obtained for alumina ceramic composites containing 9.5 wt.% AlTiC master alloys and 0.5 wt.% rare earth additions, which was mainly attributed to the formation of elongated grains in the composites.

  16. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, Allison; Barker, Jocelyn; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline

  17. A method for normalizing pathology images to improve feature extraction for quantitative pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Allison [Stanford Institutes of Medical Research Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Barker, Jocelyn [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Rubin, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research), Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: With the advent of digital slide scanning technologies and the potential proliferation of large repositories of digital pathology images, many research studies can leverage these data for biomedical discovery and to develop clinical applications. However, quantitative analysis of digital pathology images is impeded by batch effects generated by varied staining protocols and staining conditions of pathological slides. Methods: To overcome this problem, this paper proposes a novel, fully automated stain normalization method to reduce batch effects and thus aid research in digital pathology applications. Their method, intensity centering and histogram equalization (ICHE), normalizes a diverse set of pathology images by first scaling the centroids of the intensity histograms to a common point and then applying a modified version of contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization. Normalization was performed on two datasets of digitized hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) slides of different tissue slices from the same lung tumor, and one immunohistochemistry dataset of digitized slides created by restaining one of the H&E datasets. Results: The ICHE method was evaluated based on image intensity values, quantitative features, and the effect on downstream applications, such as a computer aided diagnosis. For comparison, three methods from the literature were reimplemented and evaluated using the same criteria. The authors found that ICHE not only improved performance compared with un-normalized images, but in most cases showed improvement compared with previous methods for correcting batch effects in the literature. Conclusions: ICHE may be a useful preprocessing step a digital pathology image processing pipeline.

  18. Assessment of In Situ Time Resolved Shock Experiments at Synchrotron Light Sources*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belak, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Hessler, J. P.

    2005-07-01

    Prior to fielding in situ time resolved experiments of shock wave loading at the Advanced Photon Source, we have performed feasibility experiments assessing a single photon bunch. Using single and poly-crystal Al, Ti, V and Cu shock to incipient spallation on the gas gun, samples were prepared from slices normal to the spall plane of thickness 100-500 microns. In addition, single crystal Al of thickness 500 microns was shocked to incipient spallation and soft recovered using the LLNL e-gun mini-flyer system. The e-gun mini-flyer impacts the sample target producing a 10's ns flat-top shock transient. Here, we present results for imaging, small-angle scattering (SAS), and diffraction. In particular, there is little SAS away from the spall plane and significant SAS at the spall plane, demonstrating the presence of sub-micron voids. * Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 and work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Prediction of Massive Transfusion in Trauma Patients with Shock Index, Modified Shock Index, and Age Shock Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Shyuan Rau

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The shock index (SI and its derivations, the modified shock index (MSI and the age shock index (Age SI, have been used to identify trauma patients with unstable hemodynamic status. The aim of this study was to evaluate their use in predicting the requirement for massive transfusion (MT in trauma patients upon arrival at the hospital. Participants: A patient receiving transfusion of 10 or more units of packed red blood cells or whole blood within 24 h of arrival at the emergency department was defined as having received MT. Detailed data of 2490 patients hospitalized for trauma between 1 January 2009, and 31 December 2014, who had received blood transfusion within 24 h of arrival at the emergency department, were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System of a level I regional trauma center. These included 99 patients who received MT and 2391 patients who did not. Patients with incomplete registration data were excluded from the study. The two-sided Fisher exact test or Pearson chi-square test were used to compare categorical data. The unpaired Student t-test was used to analyze normally distributed continuous data, and the Mann-Whitney U-test was used to compare non-normally distributed data. Parameters including systolic blood pressure (SBP, heart rate (HR, hemoglobin level (Hb, base deficit (BD, SI, MSI, and Age SI that could provide cut-off points for predicting the patients’ probability of receiving MT were identified by the development of specific receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves. High accuracy was defined as an area under the curve (AUC of more than 0.9, moderate accuracy was defined as an AUC between 0.9 and 0.7, and low accuracy was defined as an AUC less than 0.7. Results: In addition to a significantly higher Injury Severity Score (ISS and worse outcome, the patients requiring MT presented with a significantly higher HR and lower SBP, Hb, and BD, as well as significantly increased SI, MSI, and Age SI. Among

  20. Effects of laser shock processing on electrochemical corrosion resistance of ANSI 304 stainless steel weldments after cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.K.; Lu, J.Z.; Dai, F.Z.; Feng, A.X.; Luo, K.Y.; Zhong, J.S.; Wang, Q.W.; Luo, M.; Qi, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Weldments were done with laser shock processing impacts after cavitation erosion. ► Laser shock processing enhanced the erosion and corrosion resistance of weldments. ► Tensile residual stress and surface roughness decreased by laser shock processing. ► Microstructure was observed to explain the improvement by laser shock processing. ► Obvious passivation areas occurred with laser shock processing impacts. - Abstract: Effects of laser shock processing (LSP) on electrochemical corrosion resistance of weldments after cavitation erosion were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technology, scanning electron microscope (SEM), roughness tester and optical microscope (OM). Some main factors to influence erosion and corrosion of weldments, residual stresses, surface roughness, grain refinements and slip, were discussed in detail. Results show that LSP impacts can induce compressive residual stresses, decrease surface roughness, refine grains and generate the slip. Thus, the erosion and corrosion resistance with LSP impacts is improved.

  1. Subacute right ventricle perforation by pacemaker lead presenting with left hemothorax and shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Julianne; Berger, Natalie; Joseph, Praveen; Datta, Debapriya

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac perforation by pacemaker is a rare but potentially fatal complication. Acute perforations occurring within twenty-four hours of insertion of pacemaker can lead to hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and death. Hemothorax occurring as an acute complication of pacemaker insertion is reported but extremely rare. Previously, hemothorax and shock as a subacute complication following pacemaker insertion have not been reported. We report the case of an 85-year-old patient who presented with shock from hemothorax caused by pacemaker perforation, two weeks after insertion. Device interrogation showed normal function. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram missed lead dislocation and the diagnosis was made on computed tomogram (CT) of the chest. Following surgical repair, a new ventricular pacemaker was placed transvenously in the right ventricular septum. This case illustrates that CT scan of the chest should be performed in all patients in whom cardiac perforation by pacemaker is suspected but not diagnosed on chest X-ray and echocardiogram. Normal functioning of pacemaker on device interrogation does not exclude perforation.

  2. Deformation of zirconium – niobium alloy E635 in sub-microsecond shock waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakov D.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strength characteristics of zirconium - niobium alloy E635 were measured under shock - wave loading conditions at normal and elevated temperatures and results of these measurements are presented. Measurements were taken in conditions when samples were impacted by plane shock waves with the pressure up to 13 GPa and duration from ∼0.05 μs up to 1 μs. Free-surface velocity profiles were recorded with the help of VISAR and PDV laser Doppler velocimeters having nanosecond time resolution. Evolution of elastic precursors with samples thickness varying from 0.5 up to 8 mm is also considered. Measured attenuation of the elastic precursor was used to determine plastic strain rate behind the precursor front. Temperature effect on the value of dynamic elastic limit and spall strength at normal and elevated temperatures is studied. This work is implemented with the support of the State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” under State Contract H.4x.44.90.13.1111.

  3. The cosmic-ray shock structure problem for relativistic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    The time asymptotic behaviour of a relativistic (parallel) shock wave significantly modified by the diffusive acceleration of cosmic-rays is investigated by means of relativistic hydrodynamical equations for both the cosmic-rays and thermal gas. The form of the shock structure equation and the dispersion relation for both long and short wavelength waves in the system are obtained. The dependence of the shock acceleration efficiency on the upstream fluid spped, long wavelength Mach number and the ratio N = P sub co/cP sub co+P sub go)(Psub co and P sub go are the upstream cosmic-ray and thermal gas pressures respectively) are studied.

  4. Shock buffer for nuclear control element assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1977-01-01

    A shock buffer for a control element assembly in a nuclear reactor is described, comprising a piston and a cylinder. The piston is affixed to and extends upward from the control rod guide structure; the cylinder is supported by the upper portion of the control element assembly and is vertically oriented with open end downward for receiving the piston. Coolant liquid normally has free access to the cylinder. The piston displaces liquid from the cylinder when inserted, thereby decelerating the control element assembly near its lower extent of travel. (LL)

  5. Numerical Study of Shock Wave Attenuation in Two-Dimensional Ducts Using Solid Obstacles: How to Utilize Shock Focusing Techniques to Attenuate Shock Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Research on shock wave mitigation in channels has been a topic of much attention in the shock wave community. One approach to attenuate an incident shock wave is to use obstacles of various geometries arranged in different patterns. This work is inspired by the study from Chaudhuri et al. (2013, in which cylinders, squares and triangles placed in staggered and non-staggered subsequent columns were used to attenuate a planar incident shock wave. Here, we present numerical simulations using a different obstacle pattern. Instead of using a matrix of obstacles, an arrangement of square or cylindrical obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral curve is investigated, which is motivated by our previous work on shock focusing using logarithmic spirals. Results show that obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral can delay both the transmitted and the reflected shock wave. For different incident shock Mach numbers, away from the logarithmic spiral design Mach number, this shape is effective to either delay the transmitted or the reflected shock wave. Results also confirm that the degree of attenuation depends on the obstacle shape, effective flow area and obstacle arrangement, much like other obstacle configurations.

  6. The impact of kinetic effects on the properties of relativistic electron–positron shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockem, Anne; Fiúza, Frederico; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2012-01-01

    We assess the impact of non-thermally shock-accelerated particles on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) jump conditions of relativistic shocks. The adiabatic constant is calculated directly from first-principles particle-in-cell simulation data, enabling a semi-kinetic approach to improve the standard fluid model and allowing for an identification of the key parameters that define the shock structure. We find that the evolving upstream parameters have a stronger impact than the corrections due to non-thermal particles. We find that the decrease in the upstream bulk speed result in deviations from the standard MHD model up to 10%. Furthermore, we obtain a quantitative definition of the shock transition region from our analysis. For Weibel-mediated shocks the inclusion of a magnetic field in the MHD conservation equations is addressed for the first time. (paper)

  7. Electron Dropout Echoes Induced by Interplanetary Shock: A Statistical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Zong, Q.; Hao, Y.; Zhou, X.; Ma, X.; Liu, Y.

    2017-12-01

    "Electron dropout echo" as indicated by repeated moderate dropout and recovery signatures of the flux of energetic electron in the out radiation belt region has been investigated systematically. The electron dropout and its echoes are usually found for higher energy (> 300 keV) channels fluxes, whereas the flux enhancements are obvious for lower energy electrons simultaneously after the interplanetary shock arrives at the Earth's geosynchronous orbit. 104 dropout echo events have been found from 215 interplanetary shock events from 1998 to 2007 based on LANL satellite data. In analogy to substorm injections, these 104 events could be naturally divided into two categories: dispersionless (49 events) or dispersive (55 events) according to the energy dispersion of the initial dropout. It is found that locations of dispersionless events are distributed mainly in the duskside magnetosphere. Further, the obtained locations derived from dispersive events with the time-of-flight technique of the initial dropout regions are mainly located at the duskside as well. Statistical studies have shown that the effect of shock normal, interplanetary magnetic field Bz and solar wind dynamic pressure may be insignificant to these electron dropout events. We suggest that the electric field impulse induced by the IP shock produces a more pronounced inward migration of electrons at the dusk side, resulting in the observed dusk-side moderate dropout of electron flux and its consequent echoes.

  8. Self-similar solutions for implosion and reflection of strong and weak shocks in a plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, B.N.; Chavda, L.K.

    1980-06-01

    We present an improved approximation scheme for finding approximate solutions in analytic form to the self-similar equations of gas dynamics. The method gives better agreement with exact results not only for the weak shocks which were considered previously but also for strong shocks for which the previous method gave poor results. We have considered various shock configurations in spherical and cylindrical geometries. (author)

  9. Influence of laser shock peening on irradiation defects in austenitic stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiaofeng; Su, Qing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Chenfei; Lu, Yongfeng; Nastasi, Michael; Cui, Bai

    2017-06-01

    The laser shock peening process can generate a dislocation network, stacking faults, and deformation twins in the near surface of austenitic stainless steels by the interaction of laser-driven shock waves with metals. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) irradiation studies suggest that these dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries can serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. As a result, the irradiation resistance is improved as the density of irradiation defects in laser-peened stainless steels is much lower than that in untreated steels. After heating to 300 °C, a portion of the dislocations and stacking faults are annealed out while the deformation twins remain stable, which still provides improved irradiation resistance. These findings have important implications on the role of laser shock peening on the lifetime extension of austenitic stainless steel components in nuclear reactor environments.

  10. Improved Patient Outcomes by Normalizing Sympathovagal Balance: Differentiating Syncope—Precise Subtype Differentiation Leads to Improved Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is difficult to definitively diagnose, even with tilt-table testing and beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements, the gold-standard. Both are qualitative, subjective assessments. There are subtypes of syncope associated with autonomic conditions for which tilt-table testing is not useful. Heart rate variability analyses also include too much ambiguity. Three subtypes of syncope are differentiated: vasovagal syncope (VVS due to parasympathetic excess (VVS-PE, VVS with abnormal heart rate response (VVS-HR, and VVS without PE (VVS-PN. P&S monitoring (ANSAR, Inc., Philadelphia, PA differentiates subtypes in 2727 cardiology patients (50.5% female; average age: 57 years; age range: 12–100 years, serially tested over four years (3.3 tests per patient, average. P&S monitoring noninvasively, independently, and simultaneously measures parasympathetic and sympathetic (P&S activity, including the normal P-decrease followed by an S-increase with head-up postural change (standing. Syncope, as an S-excess (SE with stand, is differentiated from orthostatic dysfunction (e.g., POTS as S-withdrawal with stand. Upon standing, VVS-PE is further differentiated as SE with PE, VVS-HR as SE with abnormal HR, and VVS-PN as SE with normal P- and HR-responses. Improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology by more accurate subtyping leads to more precise therapy and improved outcomes.

  11. Fetus, fasting, and festival: the persistent effects of in utero social shocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi

    2014-09-01

    The Fetal Origins Hypothesis (FOH), put forward in the epidemiological literature and later flourished in the economics literature, suggests that the time in utero is a critical period for human development. However, much attention has been paid to the consequences of fetal exposures to more extreme natural shocks, while less is known about fetal exposures to milder but more commonly experienced social shocks. Using two examples of under-nutrition due to mild social shocks, i.e. Ramadan fasting and festival overspending, this paper summarizes our current knowledge, especially the contribution from economics, and key challenges in exploring fetal exposures to milder social shocks. I also discuss the salient added value of identifying milder versus more extreme fetal shocks. Finally, implications are drawn on individual decisions and public policy to improve children's well-being before they are born or even before their mothers realize that they are pregnant.

  12. Fetus, Fasting, and Festival: The Persistent Effects of In Utero Social Shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fetal Origins Hypothesis (FOH, put forward in the epidemiological literature and later flourished in the economics literature, suggests that the time in utero is a critical period for human development. However, much attention has been paid to the consequences of fetal exposures to more extreme natural shocks, while less is known about fetal exposures to milder but more commonly experienced social shocks. Using two examples of under-nutrition due to mild social shocks, i.e. Ramadan fasting and festival overspending, this paper summarizes our current knowledge, especially the contribution from economics, and key challenges in exploring fetal exposures to milder social shocks. I also discuss the salient added value of identifying milder versus more extreme fetal shocks. Finally, implications are drawn on individual decisions and public policy to improve children’s well-being before they are born or even before their mothers realize that they are pregnant.

  13. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Bell, R.G. III; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125-fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical system. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two part study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. This paper reports the first part of the shock mitigating materials study. A study to compare three thicknesses (0.125, 0.250, and 0.500 in.) of seventeen, unconfined materials for their shock mitigating characteristics has been completed with a split Hopkinson bar configuration. The nominal input as measured by strain gages on the incident Hopkinson bar is 50 fps at sign 100 micros for these tests. It is hypothesized that a shock mitigating material has four purposes: to lengthen the shock pulse, to attenuate the shock pulse, to mitigate high frequency content in the shock pulse, and to absorb energy. Both time domain and frequency domain analyses of the split Hopkinson bar data have been performed to compare the materials' achievement of these purposes

  14. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  15. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  16. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  17. The 60 kDa heat shock proteins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, H K; Osipiuk, J; Maltsev, N; Overbeek, R; Quaite-Randall, E; Joachimiak, A; Trent, J D

    1995-11-10

    One of the most abundant proteins in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae is the 59 kDa heat shock protein (TF55) that is believed to form a homo-oligomeric double ring complex structurally similar to the bacterial chaperonins. We discovered a second protein subunit in the S. shibatae ring complex (referred to as alpha) that is stoichiometric with TF55 (renamed beta). The gene and flanking regions of alpha were cloned and sequenced and its inferred amino acid sequence has 54.4% identity and 74.4% similarity to beta. Transcription start sites for both alpha and beta were mapped and three potential transcription regulatory regions were identified. Northern analyses of cultures shifted from normal growth temperatures (70 to 75 degrees C) to heat shock temperatures (85 to 90 degrees C) indicated that the levels of alpha and beta mRNAs increased during heat shock, but at all temperatures their relative proportions remained constant. Monitoring protein synthesis by autoradiography of total proteins from cultures pulse labeled with L(-)[35S]methionine at normal and heat shock temperatures indicated significant increases in alpha and beta synthesis during heat shock. Under extreme heat shock conditions (> or = 90 degrees C) alpha and beta appeared to be the only two proteins synthesized. The purified alpha and beta subunits combined to form high molecular mass complexes with similar mobilities on native polyacrylamide gels to the complexes isolated directly from cells. Equal proportions of the two subunits gave the greatest yield of the complex, which we refer to as a "rosettasome". It is argued that the rosettasome consists of two homo-oligomeric rings; one of alpha and the other of beta. Polyclonal antibodies against alpha and beta from S. shibatae cross-reacted with proteins of similar molecular mass in 10 out of the 17 archaeal species tested, suggesting that the two rosettasome proteins are highly conserved among the archaea. The archaeal sequences were

  18. Low back pain: conservative treatment with artificial shock absorbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosk, J; Voloshin, A S

    1985-03-01

    A new method of conservative treatment for low back pain (LBP) was studied by follow-up investigation of 382 patients during the last five years. The attempt to reduce repetitive impulsive intervertebral impact in the troublesome S1-L5-4 area by significant improvement of the foot's attenuational capacity through artificial viscoelastic shock absorbing was prompted by the authors' work on decreased capability of LBP spines to attenuate axially propagated walking stresses. Viscoelastic shoe inserts were used in addition to light flexible shoes as artificial shock absorbing devices. Maximal amplitudes of bone oscillation during walking were reduced by about 40% by the viscoelastic inserts. Rapid and surprisingly significant improvement of pain syndrome and patient mobility occurred in about 80% of the patients. The accelerographic patterns recorded on a sacrum of patient with LBP were unusual for a healthy subject; they usually disappeared after treatment in LBP cases. Results suggested that poor walking impact attenuation was a true cause for prolonging intervertebral structures overstrain and consequent degeneration. It seemed logical that as spine damage could be explained primarily by prolonged impulsive overstrain, treatment must include viscoelastic inserts which increase foot shock absorbing capacity and help cushion the spine.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF AREA CONTRACTION ON SHOCK WAVE STRENGTH AND PEAK PRESSURE IN SHOCK TUBE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Mohsen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation into the effects of area contraction on shock wave strength and peak pressure in a shock tube. The shock tube is an important component of the short duration, high speed fluid flow test facility, available at the Universiti Tenaga Nasional (UNITEN, Malaysia. The area contraction was facilitated by positioning a bush adjacent to the primary diaphragm section, which separates the driver and driven sections. Experimental measurements were performed with and without the presence of the bush, at various diaphragm pressure ratios, which is the ratio of air pressure between the driver (high pressure and driven (low pressure sections. The instantaneous static pressure variations were measured at two locations close to the driven tube end wall, using high sensitivity pressure sensors, which allow the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure to be analysed. The results reveal that the area contraction significantly reduces the shock wave strength, shock wave speed and peak pressure. At a diaphragm pressure ratio of 10, the shock wave strength decreases by 18%, the peak pressure decreases by 30% and the shock wave speed decreases by 8%.

  20. Structure of intermediate shocks and slow shocks in a magnetized plasma with heat conduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, C.L.; Wu, B.H.; Lee, L.C.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of slow shocks and intermediate shocks in the presence of a heat conduction parallel to the local magnetic field is simulated from the set of magnetohydrodynamic equations. This study is an extension of an earlier work [C. L. Tsai, R. H. Tsai, B. H. Wu, and L. C. Lee, Phys. Plasmas 9, 1185 (2002)], in which the effects of heat conduction are examined for the case that the tangential magnetic fields on the two side of initial current sheet are exactly antiparallel (B y =0). For the B y =0 case, a pair of slow shocks is formed as the result of evolution of the initial current sheet, and each slow shock consists of two parts: the isothermal main shock and the foreshock. In the present paper, cases with B y ≠0 are also considered, in which the evolution process leads to the presence of an additional pair of time-dependent intermediate shocks (TDISs). Across the main shock of the slow shock, jumps in plasma density, velocity, and magnetic field are significant, but the temperature is continuous. The plasma density downstream of the main shock decreases with time, while the downstream temperature increases with time, keeping the downstream pressure constant. The foreshock is featured by a smooth temperature variation and is formed due to the heat flow from downstream to upstream region. In contrast to the earlier study, the foreshock is found to reach a steady state with a constant width in the slow shock frame. In cases with B y ≠0, the plasma density and pressure increase and the magnetic field decreases across TDIS. The TDIS initially can be embedded in the slow shock's foreshock structure, and then moves out of the foreshock region. With an increasing B y , the propagation speed of foreshock leading edge tends to decrease and the foreshock reaches its steady state at an earlier time. Both the pressure and temperature downstreams of the main shock decrease with increasing B y . The results can be applied to the shock heating in the solar corona and

  1. Increased expression of heat shock protein 70 and heat shock factor 1 in chronic dermal ulcer tissues treated with laser-aided therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-da; Luo, Cheng-qun; Xie, Hui-qing; Nie, Xin-min; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Wang, Shao-hua; Xu, Yi; Pokharel, Pashupati Babu; Xu, Dan

    2008-07-20

    Chronic dermal ulcers are also referred to as refractory ulcers. This study was conducted to elucidate the therapeutic effect of laser on chronic dermal ulcers and the induced expression of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) in wound tissues. Sixty patients with 84 chronic dermal ulcers were randomly divided into traditional therapy and laser therapy groups. Laser treatment was performed in addition to traditional therapy in the laser therapy group. The treatment efficacy was evaluated after three weeks. Five tissue sections of healing wounds were randomly collected along with five normal skin sections as controls. HSP70-positive cells from HSP70 immunohistochemical staining were counted and the gray scale of positive cells was measured for statistical analysis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to determine the mRNA and protein expressions of HSF1 and HSP70. The cure rate of the wounds and the total efficacy in the laser therapy group were significantly higher than those in the traditional therapy group (P ulcers plays a facilitating role in healing due to the mechanism of laser-activated endogenous heat shock protection in cells in wound surfaces.

  2. High-order shock-fitted detonation propagation in high explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romick, Christopher M.; Aslam, Tariq D.

    2017-03-01

    A highly accurate numerical shock and material interface fitting scheme composed of fifth-order spatial and third- or fifth-order temporal discretizations is applied to the two-dimensional reactive Euler equations in both slab and axisymmetric geometries. High rates of convergence are not typically possible with shock-capturing methods as the Taylor series analysis breaks down in the vicinity of discontinuities. Furthermore, for typical high explosive (HE) simulations, the effects of material interfaces at the charge boundary can also cause significant computational errors. Fitting a computational boundary to both the shock front and material interface (i.e. streamline) alleviates the computational errors associated with captured shocks and thus opens up the possibility of high rates of convergence for multi-dimensional shock and detonation flows. Several verification tests, including a Sedov blast wave, a Zel'dovich-von Neumann-Döring (ZND) detonation wave, and Taylor-Maccoll supersonic flow over a cone, are utilized to demonstrate high rates of convergence to nontrivial shock and reaction flows. Comparisons to previously published shock-capturing multi-dimensional detonations in a polytropic fluid with a constant adiabatic exponent (PF-CAE) are made, demonstrating significantly lower computational error for the present shock and material interface fitting method. For an error on the order of 10 m /s, which is similar to that observed in experiments, shock-fitting offers a computational savings on the order of 1000. In addition, the behavior of the detonation phase speed is examined for several slab widths to evaluate the detonation performance of PBX 9501 while utilizing the Wescott-Stewart-Davis (WSD) model, which is commonly used in HE modeling. It is found that the thickness effect curve resulting from this equation of state and reaction model using published values is dramatically more steep than observed in recent experiments. Utilizing the present fitting

  3. Production of the small heat shock protein Lo18 from Oenococcus oeni in Lactococcus lactis improves its stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Stéphanie; Maitre, Magali; Laurent, Julie; Coucheney, Françoise; Rieu, Aurélie; Guzzo, Jean

    2017-04-17

    Lactococcus lactis is a lactic acid bacterium widely used in cheese and fermented milk production. During fermentation, L. lactis is subjected to acid stress that impairs its growth. The small heat shock protein (sHsp) Lo18 from the acidophilic species Oenococcus oeni was expressed in L. lactis. This sHsp is known to play an important role in protein protection and membrane stabilization in O. oeni. The role of this sHsp could be studied in L. lactis, since no gene encoding for sHsp has been detected in this species. L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain MG1363 was transformed with the pDLhsp18 plasmid, which is derived from pDL278 and contains the hsp18 gene (encoding Lo18) and its own promoter sequence. The production of Lo18 during stress conditions was checked by immunoblotting and the cellular distribution of Lo18 in L. lactis cells after heat shock was determined. Our results clearly indicated a role for Lo18 in cytoplasmic protein protection and membrane stabilization during stress. The production of sHsp in L. lactis improved tolerance to heat and acid conditions in this species. Finally, the improvement of the L. lactis survival in milk medium thanks to Lo18 was highlighted, suggesting an interesting role of this sHsp. These findings suggest that the expression of a sHsp by a L. lactis strain results in greater resistance to stress, and, can consequently enhance the performances of industrial strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Shock waves in gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, K.

    1996-01-01

    A shock wave is a discontinuous surface that connects supersonic flow with subsonic flow. After a shock wave, flow velocity is reduced, and pressure and temperature increase; entropy especially increases across a shock wave. Therefore, flow is in nonequilibrium, and irreversible processes occur inside the shock layer. The thickness of a shock wave in neutral gas is of the order of the mean free path of the fluid particle. A shock wave also appears in magnetized plasma. Provided that when the plasma flow is parallel to the magnetic field, a shock wave appears if the governing equation for velocity potential is in hyperbolic type in relation with the Mach number and the Alfven number. When the flow is perpendicular to the magnetic field, the Maxwell stress, in addition to the pressure, plays a role in the shock wave in plasma. When the plasma temperature is so high, as the plasma becomes collision-free, another type of shock wave appears. In a collision-free shock wave, gyromotions of electrons around the magnetic field lines cause the shock formation instead of collisions in a collision-dominant plasma or neutral gas. Regardless of a collision-dominant or collision-free shock wave, the fluid that passes through the shock wave is heated in addition to being compressed. In inertial confinement fusion, the fuel must be compressed. Really, implosion motion performs fuel compression. A shock wave, appearing in the process of implosion, compresses the fuel. The shock wave, however, heats the fuel more intensively, and it makes it difficult to compress the fuel further because high temperatures invite high pressure. Adiabatic compression of the fuel is the desired result during the implosion, without the formation of a shock wave. (Author)

  5. Normalization of coagulopathy is associated with improved outcome after isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Daniel S; Mitra, Biswadev; Cameron, Peter A; Fitzgerald, Mark; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V

    2016-07-01

    Acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC) has been reported in the setting of isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) and is associated with poor outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of procoagulant agents administered to patients with ATC and iTBI during resuscitation, hypothesizing that timely normalization of coagulopathy may be associated with a decrease in mortality. A retrospective review of the Alfred Hospital trauma registry, Australia, was conducted and patients with iTBI (head Abbreviated Injury Score [AIS] ⩾3 and all other body AIS normalized ratio ⩾1.3) were selected for analysis. Data on procoagulant agents used (fresh frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, prothrombin complex concentrates, tranexamic acid, vitamin K) were extracted. Among patients who had achieved normalization of INR or survived beyond 24hours and were not taking oral anticoagulants, the association of normalization of INR and death at hospital discharge was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 157 patients with ATC of whom 68 (43.3%) received procoagulant products within 24hours of presentation. The median time to delivery of first products was 182.5 (interquartile range [IQR] 115-375) minutes, and following administration of coagulants, time to normalization of INR was 605 (IQR 274-1146) minutes. Normalization of INR was independently associated with significantly lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.10; 95% confidence interval 0.03-0.38). Normalization of INR was associated with improved mortality in patients with ATC in the setting of iTBI. As there was a substantial time lag between delivery of products and eventual normalization of coagulation, specific management of coagulopathy should be implemented as early as possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Initial ISEE magnetometer results: shock observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.

    1979-01-01

    ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field profiles across 6 terrestrial bow shock and one interplanetary shock are examined. The inteplanetary shock illustrates the behavior of a low Mach number shock. Three examples of low or moderate β, high Mach number, quasi-perpendicular shocks are examined. These did not have upstream waves, but rather had waves growing in the field gradient. Two examples of high β shocks showed little coherence in field variation even though the two vehicles were only a few hundred kilometers apart. The authors present the joint behavior of wave, particle and field data across some of these shocks to show some of the myriad of shock features whose behavior they are now beginning to investigate. (Auth.)

  7. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh Prabhuji, Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah; Khaleelahmed, Shaeesta; Vasudevalu, Sujatha; Vinodhini, K.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome. PMID:25024562

  8. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in periodontics: A new paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munivenkatappa Lakshmaiah Venkatesh Prabhuji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The quest for exploring new frontiers in the field of medical science for efficient and improved treatment modalities has always been on a rise. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT has been enormously used in medical practice, principally, for the management of urolithiasis, cholelithiasis and also in various orthopedic and musculoskeletal disorders. The efficacy of ESWT in the stimulation of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, induction of neovascularization and increased expression of bone morphogenic proteins has been well documented in the literature. However, dentistry is no exception to this trend. The present article enlightens the various applications of ESWT in the field of dentistry and explores its prospective applications in the field of periodontics, and the possibility of incorporating the beneficial properties of shock waves in improving the treatment outcome.

  9. Heat-flow equation motivated by the ideal-gas shock wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, Brad Lee; Mareschal, Michel

    2010-08-01

    We present an equation for the heat-flux vector that goes beyond Fourier's Law of heat conduction, in order to model shockwave propagation in gases. Our approach is motivated by the observation of a disequilibrium among the three components of temperature, namely, the difference between the temperature component in the direction of a planar shock wave, versus those in the transverse directions. This difference is most prominent near the shock front. We test our heat-flow equation for the case of strong shock waves in the ideal gas, which has been studied in the past and compared to Navier-Stokes solutions. The new heat-flow treatment improves the agreement with nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of hard spheres under strong shockwave conditions.

  10. Mechanical shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrillon, Bernard.

    1973-01-01

    The mechanical shock absorber described is made of a constant thickness plate pierced with circular holes regularly distributed in such a manner that for all the directions along which the strain is applied during the shock, the same section of the substance forming the plate is achieved. The shock absorber is made in a metal standing up to extensive deformation before breaking, selected from a group comprising mild steels and austenitic stainless steels. This apparatus is used for handling pots of fast neutron reactor fuel elements [fr

  11. Shock-resistant scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, W.P.

    1979-01-01

    A unique scintillation detector unit is disclosed which employs a special light transfer and reflector means that encases and protects the scintillator crystal against high g forces. The light transfer means comprises a flexible silicon rubber optical material bonded between the crystal and the optical window and having an axial thickness sufficient to allow the scintillator to move axially inside the container under high g forces without destroying the bonds. The reflector means comprises a soft elastic silicone rubber sleeve having a multiplicity of closely arranged tapered protrusions radiating toward and engaging the periphery of the scintillator crystal to cushion shocks effectively and having a reflective material, such as aluminum oxide powder, in the spaces between the protrusions. The reflector means provides improved shock absorption because of the uniform support and cushioning action of the protrusions and also provides the detector with high efficiency. The silicon rubber composition is specially compounded to include a large amount of aluminum oxide which enables the rubber to function effectively as a light reflector

  12. Effects of Alfvénic Drift on Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Weak Cluster Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Ryu, Dongsu

    2018-03-01

    Non-detection of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters has challenged diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) of cosmic-ray (CR) protons at weak collisionless shocks that are expected to form in the intracluster medium. As an effort to address this problem, we here explore possible roles of Alfvén waves self-excited via resonant streaming instability during the CR acceleration at parallel shocks. The mean drift of Alfvén waves may either increase or decrease the scattering center compression ratio, depending on the postshock cross-helicity, leading to either flatter or steeper CR spectra. We first examine such effects at planar shocks, based on the transport of Alfvén waves in the small amplitude limit. For the shock parameters relevant to cluster shocks, Alfvénic drift flattens the CR spectrum slightly, resulting in a small increase of the CR acceleration efficiency, η. We then consider two additional, physically motivated cases: (1) postshock waves are isotropized via MHD and plasma processes across the shock transition, and (2) postshock waves contain only forward waves propagating along with the flow due to a possible gradient of CR pressure behind the shock. In these cases, Alfvénic drift could reduce η by as much as a factor of five for weak cluster shocks. For the canonical parameters adopted here, we suggest η ∼ 10‑4–10‑2 for shocks with sonic Mach number M s ≈ 2–3. The possible reduction of η may help ease the tension between non-detection of γ-rays from galaxy clusters and DSA predictions.

  13. The Heliospheric Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokipii, J. R.

    2013-06-01

    The heliospheric termination shock is a vast, spheroidal shock wave marking the transition from the supersonic solar wind to the slower flow in the heliosheath, in response to the pressure of the interstellar medium. It is one of the most-important boundaries in the outer heliosphere. It affects energetic particles strongly and for this reason is a significant factor in the effects of the Sun on Galactic cosmic rays. This paper summarizes the general properties and overall large-scale structure and motions of the termination shock. Observations over the past several years, both in situ and remote, have dramatically revised our understanding of the shock. The consensus now is that the shock is quite blunt, is with the front, blunt side canted at an angle to the flow direction of the local interstellar plasma relative to the Sun, and is dynamical and turbulent. Much of this new understanding has come from remote observations of energetic charged particles interacting with the shock, radio waves and radiation backscattered from interstellar neutral atoms. The observations and the implications are discussed.

  14. Effects of tham, isoprenaline and propranolol on blood flow and vascular resistances of the liver after in- and outflow occlusion. Relation with the splanchnic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoitchcov, E; Kawai, T; Bleser, F; Benichoux, R

    1976-01-01

    The responsibility of the portal and the hepatic artery circulations during shock states has been established by studying the effects of a 15-min occlusion of two of the following blood vessels on 23 dogs: inferior vena cava below the diaphragm, portal vein and hepatic artery. Intrahepatic vascular resistances were computed from blood pressure records in these vessels and transhepatic blood flow studies using the 133Xe clearance method. The animals were treated with THAM, plasmagel, isoprenaline, and propranolol. The tolerance of the occlusion is significantly improved when the animals are treated with the association of the four drugs. The portal and the systemic arterial blood pressures return to normal more promptly. Sinusoid and peribiliary resistances are remarkably stable if compared to the changes occurring in the control animals. The well-known benefit of THAM is improved by the apparently paradoxical association of isoprenaline and propranolol. In fact, at the doses which have been used, they counterbalance their mutual disadvantages. Finally, the analysis of the hepatic blood flow rates and vascular resistances suggests that the splanchnic shock has two components: hepatic and visceral.

  15. Effect of a transverse plasma jet on a shock wave induced by a ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu WANG

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted experiments in a wind tunnel with Mach number 2 to explore the evolution of a transverse plasma jet and its modification effect on a shock wave induced by a ramp with an angle of 24°. The transverse plasma jet was created by arc discharge in a small cylindrical cavity with a 2 mm diameter orifice. Three group tests with different actuator arrangements in the spanwise or streamwise direction upstream from the ramp were respectively studied to compare their disturbances to the shock wave. As shown by a time-resolved schlieren system, an unsteady motion of the shock wave by actuation was found: the shock wave was significantly modified by the plasma jet with an upstream motion and a reduced angle. Compared to spanwise actuation, a more intensive impact was obtained with two or three streamwise actuators working together. From shock wave structures, the control effect of the plasma jet on the shock motion based on a thermal effect, a potential cause of shock modification, was discussed. Furthermore, we performed a numerical simulation by using the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (IDDES method to simulate the evolution of the transverse plasma jet plume produced by two streamwise actuators. The results show that flow structures are similar to those identified in schlieren images. Two streamwise vortices were recognized, which indicates that the higher jet plume is the result of the overlap of two streamwise jets. Keywords: Flow control, Improved delayed detached eddy simulation (IDDES method, Plasma synthetic jet, Shock wave/boundary layer interaction, Time resolved schlieren system

  16. Influence of laser shock peening on irradiation defects in austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Qiaofeng [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Su, Qing [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Wang, Fei [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Zhang, Chenfei; Lu, Yongfeng [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nastasi, Michael [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Cui, Bai, E-mail: bcui3@unl.edu [Department of Mechanical & Materials Engineering, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States)

    2017-06-15

    The laser shock peening process can generate a dislocation network, stacking faults, and deformation twins in the near surface of austenitic stainless steels by the interaction of laser-driven shock waves with metals. In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) irradiation studies suggest that these dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries can serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. As a result, the irradiation resistance is improved as the density of irradiation defects in laser-peened stainless steels is much lower than that in untreated steels. After heating to 300 °C, a portion of the dislocations and stacking faults are annealed out while the deformation twins remain stable, which still provides improved irradiation resistance. These findings have important implications on the role of laser shock peening on the lifetime extension of austenitic stainless steel components in nuclear reactor environments. - Highlights: •Laser shock peening generates a dislocation network, stacking faults and deformation twins in stainless steels. •Dislocations and incoherent twin boundaries serve as effective sinks for the annihilation of irradiation defects. •Incoherent twin boundaries remain as stable and effective defect sinks at 300 °C.

  17. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is

  18. Shock as a determinant of poor patient-centered outcomes in implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Van Den Broek, Krista C; Van Den Berg, Martha

    2010-01-01

    as an outcome, and compare the influence of ICD shock with other factors (e.g., heart failure and psychological factors) as determinants of outcomes, with a view to providing recommendations for clinical practice and future research. Based on the large-scale primary and secondary prevention trials (i.e., CABG......-PATCH, CIDS, AVID, AMIOVIRT, SCD-HeFT, MADIT-II, and DEFINITE), evidence for an association between ICD shocks and quality of life is mixed, with some indication that the influence of shocks may depend largely on the interval between shocks and assessment of quality of life. In order to improve the clinical...... management of ICD patients, we need to adopt a more rigorous and standardized methodology in future studies in order to be able to draw firm conclusions about the impact of ICD shocks on individual patients. We also need to acknowledge that the impact of shocks on psychological functioning and quality...

  19. Shock Induced Melting in Aluminum: Wave Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabildas, Lalit C.; Furnish, Michael D.; Reinhart, William D.

    1999-06-23

    We have developed launch capabilities that can propel macroscopic plates to hypervelocities (8 to 16 km/s). This capability has been used to determine the first time-resolved wave profile measurements using velocity interferometry techniques at impact velocities of 10 km/s. These measurements show that alu- minum continues to exhibit normal release behavior to 161 GPa with complete loss of strength in the shocked state. Results of these experiments are discussed and compared with the results of lower pressure experi- ments conducted at lower impact velocities.

  20. Bubble Dynamics and Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This volume of the Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library is concerned with the interplay between bubble dynamics and shock waves. It is divided into four parts containing twelve chapters written by eminent scientists. Topics discussed include shock wave emission by laser generated bubbles (W Lauterborn, A Vogel), pulsating bubbles near boundaries (DM Leppinen, QX Wang, JR Blake), interaction of shock waves with bubble clouds (CD Ohl, SW Ohl), shock propagation in polydispersed bubbly liquids by model equations (K Ando, T Colonius, CE Brennen. T Yano, T Kanagawa,  M Watanabe, S Fujikawa) and by DNS (G Tryggvason, S Dabiri), shocks in cavitating flows (NA Adams, SJ Schmidt, CF Delale, GH Schnerr, S Pasinlioglu) together with applications involving encapsulated bubble dynamics in imaging (AA Doinikov, A Novell, JM Escoffre, A Bouakaz),  shock wave lithotripsy (P Zhong), sterilization of ships’ ballast water (A Abe, H Mimura) and bubbly flow model of volcano eruptions ((VK Kedrinskii, K Takayama...

  1. Macroeconomic Evolution after a Production Shock: the Role for Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Vinogradov, Dmitri V.

    2006-01-01

    Financial intermediaries may increase economic efficiency through intertemporal risk smoothing. However without an adequate regulation, intermediation may fail to do this. This paper studies the effects of a production shock in a closed economy and compares abilities of market-based and bank-based financial systems in processing the shock. Unregulated banking system may collapse in absence of a proper regulation. The paper studies several types of regulatory interventions, which may improve t...

  2. Shocks near Jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  3. Shock-wave induced mechanoluminescence: A new technique for studying effects of shock pressure on crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, B.P.; Parganiha, S.; Sonwane, V.D. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India); Chandra, V.K. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Shivaji Nagar, Kolihapuri, Durg 491001, Chhattisgarh (India); Jha, Piyush, E-mail: piyushjha22@rediffmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Raipur Institute of Technology, Chhatauna, Mandir Hasuad, Raipur 492101, Chhattisgarh (India); Baghel, R.N. [School of Studies in Physics and Astrophysics, Pt. Ravishankar Shukla University, Raipur 492010, Chhattisgarh (India)

    2016-10-15

    The impact of a projectile propelled to velocities in the range of 0.5–2.5 km/s on to a target (X-cut quartz crystal) produces shock waves travelling at velocity of nearly 10 km/s in target, in which intense mechanoluminescence (ML) pulses of microsecond duration are produced, both in compression and post-compression conditions. The piezoelectric field produced due to surface charges of fractured target, causes band bending and subsequently, the free charge carriers are generated in the respective bands and the emission of ML occurs. The ML appears after a delay time t{sub th} whose value decreases with increasing value of the shock pressure. Initially, the ML intensity increases with the shock pressure because of the creation of more surfaces; however, for higher values of the shock pressure, the ML intensity tends to attain a saturation value because of the hardening of the crystals due to the creation of small crystallites in which the creation of new surfaces becomes difficult. The ratio between peak ML intensity in the uncompressed region and the maximum ML intensity in the compressed region decreases with increasing shock pressure because more defects produced at high pressure generate higher barrier for the relaxation of blocked cracks under compression. The expressions derived for characteristics of shock-induced ML are able to explain satisfactorily the experimental results. Shock-wave velocity, shock pressure, transit time, lifetime of electrons in conduction band, etc. can be determined by the shock-induced ML.As such, the shock-induced ML provides a new optical technique for the studies of materials under shock pressure.

  4. [Effect of different volumes of fluid resuscitation on hemorrhagic shock with pulmonary edema at high altitude in the unacclimated rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang-ming; Hu, De-yao; Liu, Jian-cang; Li, Ping; Liu, Hou-dong; Xiao, Nan; Zhou, Xue-wu; Tian, Kun-lun; Huo, Xiao-ping; Shi, Quan-gui; He, Yan-mei; Yin, Zuo-ming

    2003-05-01

    To study the effects of different volumes of fluid resuscitation on hemorrhagic shock with pulmonary edema at high altitude in the unacclimated rat. One hundred and twenty-six SD rats transported to Lasa, Tibet, 3 760 meters above the sea level, were anesthetized one week later with sodium pentobarbital (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Hemorrhagic shock with pulmonary edema model was induced by hemorrhage (50 mm Hg for 1 hour, 1 mmHg=0.133 kPa) plus intravenous injection of oleic acid (50 microl/kg). Experiments were then conducted in two parts. Sixty-three rats in part I were equally divided into nine groups (n=7): normal control, hemorrhagic shock control, hemorrhagic shock with pulmonary edema (HSPE) without fluid infusion, HSPE plus infusing lactated Ringer's solution (LR) with 0.5-, 1-, 1.5-, 2- or 3- fold volume shed blood, and 1 volume of LR plus mannitol (10 ml/kg). Hemodynamic parameters including mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), left intraventricular systolic pressure (LVSP) and the maximal change rate of intraventricular pressure rise or decline (+/- dp/dt max) were observed at 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes after infusion, blood gases were measured at 30 and 120 minutes after infusion and the water content of lung and brain was determined at 120 minutes after infusion. In part II, additional 63 rats were used to observe the effect of different volumes of fluid resuscitation on survival time of HSPE rats. 0.5 volume of LR infusion significantly improved MAP, LVSP and +/- dp/dt max, prolonged the survival time of HSPE animals (all P<0.01), while it did not increase the water content of lung and brain and had no marked influence on blood gases. One volume of LR infusion slightly improved hemodynamic parameters, prolonged the survival time and increased the water content of lung. More than 1 volume of LR infusion including 1.5-, 2- and 3- fold volume LR deteriorated the hemodynamic parameters and decreased the survival time of shocked animal, meanwhile they

  5. Prediction of massive bleeding. Shock index and modified shock index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terceros-Almanza, L J; García-Fuentes, C; Bermejo-Aznárez, S; Prieto-Del Portillo, I J; Mudarra-Reche, C; Sáez-de la Fuente, I; Chico-Fernández, M

    2017-12-01

    To determine the predictive value of the Shock Index and Modified Shock Index in patients with massive bleeding due to severe trauma. Retrospective cohort. Severe trauma patient's initial attention at the intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital. Patients older than 14 years that were admitted to the hospital with severe trauma (Injury Severity Score >15) form January 2014 to December 2015. We studied the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive and negative predictive value (PV+ and PV-), positive and negative likelihood ratio (LR+ and LR-), ROC curves (Receiver Operating Characteristics) and the area under the same (AUROC) for prediction of massive hemorrhage. 287 patients were included, 76.31% (219) were male, mean age was 43,36 (±17.71) years and ISS was 26 (interquartile range [IQR]: 21-34). The overall frequency of massive bleeding was 8.71% (25). For Shock Index: AUROC was 0.89 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.84 to 0.94), with an optimal cutoff at 1.11, Se was 91.3% (95% CI: 73.2 to 97.58) and Sp was 79.69% (95% CI: 74.34 to 84.16). For the Modified Shock Index: AUROC was 0.90 (95% CI: 0.86 to 0.95), with an optimal cutoff at 1.46, Se was 95.65% (95% CI: 79.01 to 99.23) and Sp was 75.78% (95% CI: 70.18 to 80.62). Shock Index and Modified Shock Index are good predictors of massive bleeding and could be easily incorporated to the initial workup of patients with severe trauma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. A FOCUSED TRANSPORT APPROACH TO THE TIME-DEPENDENT SHOCK ACCELERATION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES AT A FAST TRAVELING SHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J. A.; Webb, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the most sophisticated models for solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration at coronal mass ejection driven shocks are based on standard diffusive shock acceleration theory. However, this theory, which only applies when SEP pitch-angle anisotropies are small, might have difficulty in describing first-order Fermi acceleration or the shock pre-heating and injection of SEPs into first-order Fermi acceleration accurately at lower SEP speeds where SEP pitch-angle anisotropies upstream near the shock can be large. To avoid this problem, we use a time-dependent focused transport model to reinvestigate first-order Fermi acceleration at planar parallel and quasi-parallel spherical traveling shocks between the Sun and Earth with high shock speeds associated with rare extreme gradual SEP events. The focused transport model is also used to investigate and compare three different shock pre-heating mechanisms associated with different aspects of the nonuniform cross-shock solar wind flow, namely, the convergence of the flow (adiabatic compression), the shear tensor of the flow, and the acceleration of the flow, and a fourth shock pre-heating mechanism associated with the cross-shock electric field, to determine which pre-heating mechanism contributes the most to injecting shock pre-heated source particles into the first-order Fermi acceleration process. The effects of variations in traveling shock conditions, such as increasing shock obliquity and shock slowdown, and variations in the SEP source with increasing shock distance from the Sun on the coupled processes of shock pre-heating, injection, and first-order Fermi acceleration are analyzed. Besides the finding that the cross-shock acceleration of the solar wind flow yields the dominant shock pre-heating mechanism at high shock speeds, we find that first-order Fermi acceleration at fast traveling shocks differs in a number of respects from the predictions and assumptions of standard steady-state diffusive shock

  7. 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Sadot, Oren; Igra, Ozer

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings collect the papers presented at the 30th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW30), which was held in Tel-Aviv Israel from July 19 to July 24, 2015. The Symposium was organized by Ortra Ltd. The ISSW30 focused on the state of knowledge of the following areas: Nozzle Flow, Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows with Shocks, Supersonic Jets, Chemical Kinetics, Chemical Reacting Flows, Detonation, Combustion, Ignition, Shock Wave Reflection and Interaction, Shock Wave Interaction with Obstacles, Shock Wave Interaction with Porous Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Granular Media, Shock Wave Interaction with Dusty Media, Plasma, Magnetohyrdrodynamics, Re-entry to Earth Atmosphere, Shock Waves in Rarefied Gases, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter (Solids and Liquids), Shock Waves in Dense Gases, Shock Wave Focusing, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock Boundary Layer Interaction, Multiphase Flow, Blast Waves, Facilities, Flow Visualization, and Numerical Methods. The two volumes serve as a reference ...

  8. Advanced and Exploratory Shock Sensing Mechanisms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelsen, Nicholas H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kolb, James D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kulkarni, Akshay G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorscher, Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Habing, Clayton D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mathis, Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beller, Zachary J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical component response to shock environments must be predictable in order to ensure reliability and safety. Whether the shock input results from accidental drops during transportation to projectile impact scenarios, the system must irreversibly transition into a safe state that is incapable of triggering the component . With this critical need in mind, the 2017 Nuclear Weapons Summer Product Realization Institute (NW SPRINT) program objective sought the design of a passive shock failsafe with emphasis on additively manufactured (AM) components. Team Advanced and Exploratory (A&E) responded to the challenge by designing and delivering multiple passive shock sensing mech anisms that activate within a prescribed mechanical shock threshold. These AM failsafe designs were tuned and validated using analytical and computational techniques including the shock response spectrum (SRS) and finite element analysis (FEA). After rapid prototyping, the devices experienced physical shock tests conducted on Sandia drop tables to experimentally verify performance. Keywords: Additive manufacturing, dynamic system, failsafe, finite element analysis, mechanical shock, NW SPRINT, shock respon se spectrum

  9. Measurement and Analysis of the Extreme Physical Shock Environment Experienced by Crane-Mounted Radiation Detection Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, M [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Erchinger, J [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Marianno, C [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Kallenbach, Gene A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grypp, M [US Dept. of the Navy

    2017-09-01

    Potentially, radiation detectors at ports of entry could be mounted on container gantry crane spreaders to monitor cargo containers entering and leaving the country. These detectors would have to withstand the extreme physical environment experienced by these spreaders during normal operations. Physical shock data from the gable ends of a spreader were recorded during the loading and unloading of a cargo ship with two Lansmont SAVER 9X30 units (with padding) and two PCB Piezotronics model 340A50 accelerometers (hard mounted). Physical shocks in the form of rapid acceleration were observed in all accelerometer units with values ranging from 0.20 g’s to 199.99 g’s. The majority of the shocks for all the Lansmont and PCB accelerometers were below 50 g’s. The Lansmont recorded mean shocks of 21.83 ± 13.62 g’s and 24.78 ± 11.49 g’s while the PCB accelerometers experienced mean shocks of 34.39 ± 25.51 g’s and 41.77 ± 22.68 g’s for the landside and waterside units, respectively. Encased detector units with external padding should be designed to withstand at least 200 g’s of acceleration without padding and typical shocks of 30 g’s with padding for mounting on a spreader.

  10. Fluid dynamics of the shock wave reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masse, Robert Kenneth

    2000-10-01

    High commercial incentives have driven conventional olefin production technologies to near their material limits, leaving the possibility of further efficiency improvements only in the development of entirely new techniques. One strategy known as the Shock Wave Reactor, which employs gas dynamic processes to circumvent limitations of conventional reactors, has been demonstrated effective at the University of Washington. Preheated hydrocarbon feedstock and a high enthalpy carrier gas (steam) are supersonically mixed at a temperature below that required for thermal cracking. Temperature recovery is then effected via shock recompression to initiate pyrolysis. The evolution to proof-of-concept and analysis of experiments employing ethane and propane feedstocks are presented. The Shock Wave Reactor's high enthalpy steam and ethane flows severely limit diagnostic capability in the proof-of-concept experiment. Thus, a preliminary blow down supersonic air tunnel of similar geometry has been constructed to investigate recompression stability and (especially) rapid supersonic mixing necessary for successful operation of the Shock Wave Reactor. The mixing capabilities of blade nozzle arrays are therefore studied in the air experiment and compared with analytical models. Mixing is visualized through Schlieren imaging and direct photography of condensation in carbon dioxide injection, and interpretation of visual data is supported by pressure measurement and flow sampling. The influence of convective Mach number is addressed. Additionally, thermal behavior of a blade nozzle array is analyzed for comparison to data obtained in the course of succeeding proof-of-concept experiments. Proof-of-concept is naturally succeeded by interest in industrial adaptation of the Shock Wave Reactor, particularly with regard to issues involving the scaling and refinement of the shock recompression. Hence, an additional, variable geometry air tunnel has been constructed to study the parameter

  11. The MHD intermediate shock interaction with an intermediate wave: Are intermediate shocks physical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the authors have recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear steepening from a continuous wave. In this paper, he clarifies the differences between the conventional view and the results by studying the interaction of an MHD intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The study reaffirms his results. In addition, the study shows that there exists a larger class of shocklike solutions in the time-dependent dissiaptive MHD equations than are given by the MHD Rankine-Hugoniot relations. it also suggests a mechanism for forming rotational discontinuities through the interaction of an intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The results are of importance not only to the MHD shock theory but also to studies such as magnetic field reconnection models

  12. Shock wave generation in laser ablation studied using pulsed digital holographic interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Sjoedahl, Mikael [Division of Experimental Mechanics, Luleaa University of Technology, SE-971 87 Luleaa (Sweden)], E-mail: eynas.amer@ltu.se, E-mail: per.gren@ltu.se, E-mail: mikael.sjodahl@ltu.se

    2008-11-07

    Pulsed digital holographic interferometry has been used to study the shock wave induced by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser ({lambda} = 1064 nm and pulse duration 12 ns) on a polycrystalline boron nitride (PCBN) ceramic target under atmospheric air pressure. A special setup based on using two synchronized wavelengths from the same laser for processing and measurement simultaneously has been introduced. Collimated laser light ({lambda} = 532 nm) passed through the volume along the target and digital holograms were recorded for different time delays after processing starts. Numerical data of the integrated refractive index field were calculated and presented as phase maps showing the propagation of the shock wave generated by the process. The location of the induced shock wave front was observed for different focusing and time delays. The amount of released energy, i.e. the part of the incident energy of the laser pulse that is eventually converted to a shock wave has been estimated using the point explosion model. The released energy is normalized by the incident laser pulse energy and the energy conversion efficiency between the laser pulse and PCBN target has been calculated at different power densities. The results show that the energy conversion efficiency seems to be constant around 80% at high power densities.

  13. Thermal shock fatigue behavior of TiC/Al2O3 composite ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Tingzhi; LIU Ning; ZHANG Qingan; YOU Xianqing

    2008-01-01

    The thermal shock fatigue behaviors of pure hot-pressed alumina and 30 wt. % TiC/Al2O3 composites were studied. The effect of TiC and Al2O3 starting particle size on the mechanical properties of the composites was discussed. Indentation-quench test was conducted to evaluate the effect of thermal fatigue temperature difference (ΔT) and number of thermal cycles (N) on fatigue crack growth (Δα). The mechanical properties and thermal fatigue resistance of TiC/Al2O3 composites are remarkably improved by the addition of TiC. The thermal shock fatigue of monolithic alumina and TiC/Al2O3 composites is due to a "true" cycling effect (thermal fatigue). Crack deflection and bridging are the predominant reasons for the improvement of thermal shock fatigue resistance of the composites.

  14. The Septic Shock 3.0 Definition and Trials: A Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, James A; Lee, Terry; Singer, Joel; Boyd, John H; Walley, Keith R

    2017-06-01

    The Septic Shock 3.0 definition could alter treatment comparisons in randomized controlled trials in septic shock. Our first hypothesis was that the vasopressin versus norepinephrine comparison and 28-day mortality of patients with Septic Shock 3.0 definition (lactate > 2 mmol/L) differ from vasopressin versus norepinephrine and mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial. Our second hypothesis was that there are differences in plasma cytokine levels in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial for lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Retrospective analysis of randomized controlled trial. Multicenter ICUs. We compared vasopressin-to-norepinephrine group 28- and 90-day mortality in Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial in lactate subgroups. We measured 39 cytokines to compare patients with lactate less than or equal to 2 versus greater than 2 mmol/L. Patients with septic shock with lactate greater than 2 mmol/L or less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, randomized to vasopressin or norepinephrine. Concealed vasopressin (0.03 U/min.) or norepinephrine infusions. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition would have decreased sample size by about half. The 28- and 90-day mortality rates were 10-12 % higher than the original Vasopressin and Septic Shock Trial mortality. There was a significantly (p = 0.028) lower mortality with vasopressin versus norepinephrine in lactate less than or equal to 2 mmol/L but no difference between treatment groups in lactate greater than 2 mmol/L. Nearly all cytokine levels were significantly higher in patients with lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. The Septic Shock 3.0 definition decreased sample size by half and increased 28-day mortality rates by about 10%. Vasopressin lowered mortality versus norepinephrine if lactate was less than or equal to 2 mmol/L. Patients had higher plasma cytokines in lactate greater than 2 versus less than or equal to 2 mmol/L, a brisker cytokine response to infection. The Septic

  15. Motion of shocks through interplanetary streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlaga, L.F.; Scudder, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A model for the motion of flare-generated shocks through interplanetary streams is presented, illustrating the effects of a stream-shock interaction on the shock strength and geometry. It is a gas dynamic calculation based on Whitham's method and on an empirical approximation for the relevant characteristics of streams. The results show that the Mach number of a shock can decrease appreciably to near unity in the interaction region ahead of streams and that the interaction of a spherically symmetric shock with a spiral-shaped corotating stream can cause significant distortions of the initial shock front geometry. The geometry of the February 15--16, 1967, shock discussed by Lepping and Chao (1972) is qualitatively explained by this model

  16. Illumination normalization of face image based on illuminant direction estimation and improved Retinex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jizheng Yi

    Full Text Available Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1 we optimize the surround function; (2 we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques.

  17. Illumination normalization of face image based on illuminant direction estimation and improved Retinex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jizheng; Mao, Xia; Chen, Lijiang; Xue, Yuli; Rovetta, Alberto; Caleanu, Catalin-Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Illumination normalization of face image for face recognition and facial expression recognition is one of the most frequent and difficult problems in image processing. In order to obtain a face image with normal illumination, our method firstly divides the input face image into sixteen local regions and calculates the edge level percentage in each of them. Secondly, three local regions, which meet the requirements of lower complexity and larger average gray value, are selected to calculate the final illuminant direction according to the error function between the measured intensity and the calculated intensity, and the constraint function for an infinite light source model. After knowing the final illuminant direction of the input face image, the Retinex algorithm is improved from two aspects: (1) we optimize the surround function; (2) we intercept the values in both ends of histogram of face image, determine the range of gray levels, and stretch the range of gray levels into the dynamic range of display device. Finally, we achieve illumination normalization and get the final face image. Unlike previous illumination normalization approaches, the method proposed in this paper does not require any training step or any knowledge of 3D face and reflective surface model. The experimental results using extended Yale face database B and CMU-PIE show that our method achieves better normalization effect comparing with the existing techniques.

  18. Assessment of high-resolution methods for numerical simulations of compressible turbulence with shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Larsson, Johan; Bhagatwala, Ankit V.; Cabot, William H.; Moin, Parviz; Olson, Britton J.; Rawat, Pradeep S.; Shankar, Santhosh K.; Sjoegreen, Bjoern; Yee, H.C.; Zhong Xiaolin; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2010-01-01

    Flows in which shock waves and turbulence are present and interact dynamically occur in a wide range of applications, including inertial confinement fusion, supernovae explosion, and scramjet propulsion. Accurate simulations of such problems are challenging because of the contradictory requirements of numerical methods used to simulate turbulence, which must minimize any numerical dissipation that would otherwise overwhelm the small scales, and shock-capturing schemes, which introduce numerical dissipation to stabilize the solution. The objective of the present work is to evaluate the performance of several numerical methods capable of simultaneously handling turbulence and shock waves. A comprehensive range of high-resolution methods (WENO, hybrid WENO/central difference, artificial diffusivity, adaptive characteristic-based filter, and shock fitting) and suite of test cases (Taylor-Green vortex, Shu-Osher problem, shock-vorticity/entropy wave interaction, Noh problem, compressible isotropic turbulence) relevant to problems with shocks and turbulence are considered. The results indicate that the WENO methods provide sharp shock profiles, but overwhelm the physical dissipation. The hybrid method is minimally dissipative and leads to sharp shocks and well-resolved broadband turbulence, but relies on an appropriate shock sensor. Artificial diffusivity methods in which the artificial bulk viscosity is based on the magnitude of the strain-rate tensor resolve vortical structures well but damp dilatational modes in compressible turbulence; dilatation-based artificial bulk viscosity methods significantly improve this behavior. For well-defined shocks, the shock fitting approach yields good results.

  19. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  20. Parallel implementation of geometrical shock dynamics for two dimensional converging shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi; Liu, Kuang; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-10-01

    Geometrical shock dynamics (GSD) theory is an appealing method to predict the shock motion in the sense that it is more computationally efficient than solving the traditional Euler equations, especially for converging shock waves. However, to solve and optimize large scale configurations, the main bottleneck is the computational cost. Among the existing numerical GSD schemes, there is only one that has been implemented on parallel computers, with the purpose to analyze detonation waves. To extend the computational advantage of the GSD theory to more general applications such as converging shock waves, a numerical implementation using a spatial decomposition method has been coupled with a front tracking approach on parallel computers. In addition, an efficient tridiagonal system solver for massively parallel computers has been applied to resolve the most expensive function in this implementation, resulting in an efficiency of 0.93 while using 32 HPCC cores. Moreover, symmetric boundary conditions have been developed to further reduce the computational cost, achieving a speedup of 19.26 for a 12-sided polygonal converging shock.

  1. Shock dynamics in layered periodic media

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2012-01-01

    Solutions of constant-coeffcient nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs generically develop shocks, even if the initial data is smooth. Solutions of hyperbolic PDEs with variable coeffcients can behave very differently. We investigate formation and stability of shock waves in a one-dimensional periodic layered medium by a computational study of time-reversibility and entropy evolution. We find that periodic layered media tend to inhibit shock formation. For small initial conditions and large impedance variation, no shock formation is detected even after times much greater than the time of shock formation in a homogeneous medium. Furthermore, weak shocks are observed to be dynamically unstable in the sense that they do not lead to significant long-term entropy decay. We propose a characteristic condition for admissibility of shocks in heterogeneous media that generalizes the classical Lax entropy condition and accurately predicts the formation or absence of shocks in these media.

  2. Experience with extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furia, John P.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to summarize the literature and to report on single treatment, high-energy ESWT for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis and lateral epicondylitis. Fifty-three patients (60 heels) were treated with 3800 shock waves. Sixteen patients (19 heels) were active, 21 (22 heels), were moderately active, and 16 (19 heels) were sedentary. Twelve weeks post treatment, mean visual analog scores (VAS) for the entire group improved from 9.2 to 2.4 (plateral epicondylitis were treated with 3200 shock waves. There were 9 workers compensation and 27 non-workers compensation patients. Twelve weeks post treatment, the mean VAS for the entire group improved from 8.0 to 2.5 (plateral epicondylitis.

  3.  Alkaline phosphatase normalization is a biomarker of improved survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilscher, Moira; Enders, Felicity B; Carey, Elizabeth J; Lindor, Keith D; Tabibian, James H

    2016-01-01

     Introduction. Recent studies suggest that serum alkaline phosphatase may represent a prognostic biomarker in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, this association remains poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance and clinical correlates of alkaline phosphatase normalization in primary sclerosing cholangitis. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with a new diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis made at an academic medical center. The primary endpoint was time to hepatobiliaryneoplasia, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. Secondary endpoints included occurrence of and time to alkaline phosphatase normalization. Patients who did and did not achieve normalization were compared with respect to clinical characteristics and endpoint-free survival, and the association between normalization and the primary endpoint was assessed with univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analyses. Eighty six patients were included in the study, with a total of 755 patient-years of follow-up. Thirty-eight patients (44%) experienced alkaline phosphatase normalization within 12 months of diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase normalization was associated with longer primary endpoint-free survival (p = 0.0032) and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation (p = 0.033). Persistent normalization was associated with even fewer adverse endpoints as well as longer survival. In multivariate analyses, alkaline phosphatase normalization (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, p = 0.012) and baseline bilirubin (adjusted hazard ratio 4.87, p = 0.029) were the only significant predictors of primary endpoint-free survival. Alkaline phosphatase normalization, particularly if persistent, represents a robust biomarker of improved long-term survival and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  4. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  5. Shocks in fragile matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Non-linear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they unjam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit vanishing elastic moduli and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are continuously compressed, and demonstrate that the resulting excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than linear waves. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and compression speed by a surprisingly simple analytical model. We also treat shear shocks within a simplified viscoelastic model of nearly-isostatic random networks comprised of harmonic springs. In this case, anharmonicity does not originate locally from nonlinear interactions between particles, as in granular media; instead, it emerges from the global architecture of the network. As a result, the diverging width of the shear shocks bears a nonlinear signature of the diverging isostatic length associated with the loss of rigidity in these floppy networks.

  6. Energetic ion acceleration at collisionless shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, R. B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    An example is presented from a test particle simulation designed to study ion acceleration at oblique turbulent shocks. For conditions appropriate at interplanetary shocks near 1 AU, it is found that a shock with theta sub B n = 60 deg is capable of producing an energy spectrum extending from 10 keV to approx. 1 MeV in approx 1 hour. In this case total energy gains result primarily from several separate episodes of shock drift acceleration, each of which occurs when particles are scattered back to the shock by magnetic fluctuations in the shock vicinity.

  7. Energetic ion acceleration at collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R.B.; Vlahos, L.

    1985-01-01

    An example is presented from a test particle simulation designed to study ion acceleration at oblique turbulent shocks. For conditions appropriate at interplanetary shocks near 1 AU, it is found that a shock with theta sub B n = 60 deg is capable of producing an energy spectrum extending from 10 keV to approx 1 MeV in approx 1 hour. In this case total energy gains result primarily from several separate episodes of shock drift acceleration, each of which occurs when particles are scattered back to the shock by magnetic fluctuations in the shock vicinity

  8. Subacute Right Ventricle Perforation by Pacemaker Lead Presenting with Left Hemothorax and Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac perforation by pacemaker is a rare but potentially fatal complication. Acute perforations occurring within twenty-four hours of insertion of pacemaker can lead to hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and death. Hemothorax occurring as an acute complication of pacemaker insertion is reported but extremely rare. Previously, hemothorax and shock as a subacute complication following pacemaker insertion have not been reported. We report the case of an 85-year-old patient who presented with shock from hemothorax caused by pacemaker perforation, two weeks after insertion. Device interrogation showed normal function. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram missed lead dislocation and the diagnosis was made on computed tomogram (CT of the chest. Following surgical repair, a new ventricular pacemaker was placed transvenously in the right ventricular septum. This case illustrates that CT scan of the chest should be performed in all patients in whom cardiac perforation by pacemaker is suspected but not diagnosed on chest X-ray and echocardiogram. Normal functioning of pacemaker on device interrogation does not exclude perforation.

  9. Particle Acceleration in Two Converging Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Na; Shan, Hao [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Giacalone, Joe [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); Yan, Yihua [CAS Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing 100012 (China); Ding, Mingde, E-mail: wangxin@xao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics (Nanjing University) Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-06-20

    Observations by spacecraft such as ACE , STEREO , and others show that there are proton spectral “breaks” with energy E {sub br} at 1–10 MeV in some large CME-driven shocks. Generally, a single shock with the diffusive acceleration mechanism would not predict the “broken” energy spectrum. The present paper focuses on two converging shocks to identify this energy spectral feature. In this case, the converging shocks comprise one forward CME-driven shock on 2006 December 13 and another backward Earth bow shock. We simulate the detailed particle acceleration processes in the region of the converging shocks using the Monte Carlo method. As a result, we not only obtain an extended energy spectrum with an energy “tail” up to a few 10 MeV higher than that in previous single shock model, but also we find an energy spectral “break” occurring on ∼5.5 MeV. The predicted energy spectral shape is consistent with observations from multiple spacecraft. The spectral “break,” then, in this case is caused by the interaction between the CME shock and Earth’s bow shock, and otherwise would not be present if Earth were not in the path of the CME.

  10. Underwater electrical wire explosion: Shock wave from melting being overtaken by shock wave from vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liuxia; Qian, Dun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2018-05-01

    The shock waves generated by an underwater electrical wire explosion were investigated. A microsecond time-scale pulsed current source was used to trigger the electrical explosion of copper wires with a length of 5 cm and a diameter of 200 μm. The energy-storage capacitor was charged to a relatively low energy so that the energy deposited onto the wire was not large enough to fully vaporize the whole wire. Two shock waves were recorded with a piezoelectric gauge that was located at a position of 100 mm from the exploding wire. The first and weak shock wave was confirmed to be the contribution from wire melting, while the second and stronger shock wave was the contribution from wire vaporization. The phenomenon whereby the first shock wave generated by melting being overtaken by the shock wave due to vaporization was observed.

  11. INTERFERENCE OF COUNTERPROPAGATING SHOCK WAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Bulat

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of study. We examined the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves. The necessity of counterpropagating shock waves studying occurs at designing of high Mach number modern internal compression air intakes, Ramjets with subsonic and supersonic combustion, in asymmetrical supersonic nozzles and in some other cases. In a sense, this problem is a generalization of the case of an oblique shock reflection from the wall or from the plane of symmetry. With the renewed vigor, the interest to this problem emerged at the end of the 90s. This was due to the start of the programs for flight study at hypersonic speeds. The first experiments performed with air intakes, which realized the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves have shown that the change in flow velocity is accompanied by abrupt alteration of shock-wave structure, the occurrence of nonstationary and oscillatory phenomena. With an increase of flow velocity these phenomena undesirable for aircraft structure became more marked. The reason is that there are two fundamentally different modes of interaction of counterpropagating shock waves: a four-wave regular and a five-wave irregular. The transition from one mode to another can be nonstationary abrupt or gradual, it can also be accompanied by hysteresis. Main results. Criteria for the transition from regular reflection of counterpropagating shock waves to irregular are described: the criterion of von Neumann and the stationary Mach configuration criterion. We described areas in which the transition from one reflection type to another is possible only in abrupt way, as well as areas of possible gradual transition. Intensity dependences of the reflected shock waves from the intensity of interacting counterpropagating shocks were given. Qualitative pictures of shock-wave structures arising from the interaction of counterpropagating shock waves were shown. Calculation results of the intensity of outgoing gas

  12. Dose-Related Effect of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Jin; Kang, Jung-Ho; Kim, Ja-Young; Kim, Jin-Hong; Jung, Kwang-Ik

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the dose-related effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for plantar fasciitis. Methods Sixty patients with plantar fasciitis despite conservative treatment were enrolled. The patients were divided into a low-energy group (group L: n=30, 1,000 shocks/session, energy flux density [EFD] per shock 0.08 mJ/mm2) and a medium-energy group (group M: n=30, 1,000 shocks/session, EFD 0.16 mJ/mm2). The main outcome measures were visual analogue scale (VAS), Roles and Maudsley (RM) score, and thickness of plantar fascia (PF). To compare the effects between each group, follow-up was carried out 1 week after 3 and 6 sessions, and 1 and 3 months after ESWT. Results Significant VAS and RM score improvement, and PF thickness reduction were observed in both groups (p0.05). Conclusion Therapeutic effect might disclose a dose-related relationship; therefore, EFD and the times of the session are considerable factors when treating with ESWT. PMID:23869336

  13. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martillo, Miguel; Abed, Jean; Herman, Michael; Abed, Elie; Shi, Wenjing; Munot, Khushboo; Mankal, Pavan Kumar; Gurunathan, Rajan; Ionescu, Gabriel; Kotler, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  14. Enteral tranexamic acid attenuates vasopressor resistance and changes in α1-adrenergic receptor expression in hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Marco Henry; Aletti, Federico; Li, Joyce B; Tan, Aaron; Chang, Monica; Leon, Jessica; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Kistler, Erik B

    2017-08-01

    Irreversible hemorrhagic shock is characterized by hyporesponsiveness to vasopressor and fluid therapy. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms that contribute to this phenomenon. Previous studies have shown that decreased intestinal perfusion in hemorrhagic shock leads to proteolytically mediated increases in gut permeability, with subsequent egress of vasoactive substances systemically. Maintenance of blood pressure is achieved in part by α1 receptor modulation, which may be affected by vasoactive factors; we thus hypothesized that decreases in hemodynamic stability and vasopressor response in shock can be prevented by enteral protease inhibition. Rats were exposed to experimental hemorrhagic shock (35 mm Hg mean arterial blood pressure for 2 hours, followed by reperfusion for 2 hours) and challenged with phenylephrine (2 μg/kg) at discrete intervals to measure vasopressor responsiveness. A second group of animals received enteral injections with the protease inhibitor tranexamic acid (TXA) (127 mM) along the small intestine and cecum 1 hour after induction of hemorrhagic shock. Blood pressure response (duration and amplitude) to phenylephrine after reperfusion was significantly attenuated in animals subjected to hemorrhagic shock compared with baseline and control nonshocked animals and was restored to near baseline by enteral TXA. Arteries from shocked animals also displayed decreased α1 receptor density with restoration to baseline after enteral TXA treatment. In vitro, rat shock plasma decreased α1 receptor density in smooth muscle cells, which was also abrogated by enteral TXA treatment. Results from this study demonstrate that experimental hemorrhagic shock leads to decreased response to the α1-selective agonist phenylephrine and decreased α1 receptor density via circulating shock factors. These changes are mitigated by enteral TXA with correspondingly improved hemodynamics. Proteolytic inhibition in the lumen of the small intestine improves

  15. "Driverless" Shocks in the Interplanetary Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Kaiser, M. L.; Lara, A.

    1999-01-01

    Many interplanetary shocks have been detected without an obvious driver behind them. These shocks have been thought to be either blast waves from solar flares or shocks due to sudden increase in solar wind speed caused by interactions between large scale open and closed field lines of the Sun. We investigated this problem using a set of interplanetary shock detected {\\it in situ} by the Wind space craft and tracing their solar origins using low frequency radio data obtained by the Wind/WAVES experiment. For each of these "driverless shocks" we could find a unique coronal mass ejections (CME) event observed by the SOHO (Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) coronagraphs. We also found that these CMEs were ejected at large angles from the Sun-Earth line. It appears that the "driverless shocks" are actually driver shocks, but the drivers were not intercepted by the spacecraft. We conclude that the interplanetary shocks are much more extended than the driving CMEs.

  16. Inferior vena cava obstruction and shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megri Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock is one of the most challenging life-threatening conditions with high mortality and morbidity; the outcomes are highly dependent on the early detection and management of the condition. Septic shock is the most common type of shock in the Intensive Care Unit. While not as common as other subsets of shock, obstructive shock is a significant subtype due to well defined mechanical and pathological causes, including tension pneumothorax, massive pulmonary embolism, and cardiac tamponade. We are presenting a patient with obstructive shock due to inferior vena cava obstruction secondary to extensive deep venous thrombosis. Chance of survival from obstructive shock in our patient was small; however, there was complete and immediate recovery after treatment of the obstruction on recognizing the affected vessels. This case alerts the practicing intensivist and the emergency medicine physician to consider occlusion of the great vessels other than the pulmonary artery or aorta as causes of obstructive shock.

  17. Stress proteins in lymphocytes: Membrane stabilization does not affect the heat shock response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, C.S.; Repasky, E.A.; Subjeck, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Temperatures which have been used to induce heat shock proteins (hsps) have been at the upper physiologic limit or well above this limit. In addition, little attention has been given to the effects of physiologic heat exposures on hsp induction in lymphocytes. The author examined temperatures between 39 0 C and 41 0 C on protein synthesis in the following lymphoid cell lines and cells: BDK, EL-4, JM, DO.11, and in dispersed lymph nodes and thymic tissues. In these studies, 39.5 0 appears to be the threshold for hsp induction (as distinguished by gel electrophoresis). At this temperature the induction of the major hsps at 70 and 89 kDa are observed. Hsp 89 appears to be the most strongly induced in all cells examined. In JM cells, a human cell line, heat shock also induces hsp 68, the non-constitutive hsp at this size. These temperatures do not depress normal levels of protein synthesis. When stearic acid or cholesterol was added to lymphocyte cultures prior to heating (which stabilize membranes), hsp induction appears to occur in a manner indistinguishable from cells heated in normal media. This suggests that membrane fluidity (as influenced by these agents) does not affect or depress the heat shock response in these cells. Finally, the authors observed that 2-deoxyglucose and other inducers of glucose regulated proteins in fibroblasts also induce the major glucose regulated proteins in lymphocytes

  18. Hydraulic shock absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thatcher, G.; Davidson, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    A hydraulic shock absorber of the dash pot kind for use with electrically conducting liquid such as sodium, has magnet means for electro magnetically braking a stream of liquid discharged from the cylinder. The shock absorber finds use in a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor for arresting control rods

  19. Analytic MHD Theory for Earth's Bow Shock at Low Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    A previous MHD theory for the density jump at the Earth's bow shock, which assumed the Alfven M(A) and sonic M(s) Mach numbers are both much greater than 1, is reanalyzed and generalized. It is shown that the MHD jump equation can be analytically solved much more directly using perturbation theory, with the ordering determined by M(A) and M(s), and that the first-order perturbation solution is identical to the solution found in the earlier theory. The second-order perturbation solution is calculated, whereas the earlier approach cannot be used to obtain it. The second-order terms generally are important over most of the range of M(A) and M(s) in the solar wind when the angle theta between the normal to the bow shock and magnetic field is not close to 0 deg or 180 deg (the solutions are symmetric about 90 deg). This new perturbation solution is generally accurate under most solar wind conditions at 1 AU, with the exception of low Mach numbers when theta is close to 90 deg. In this exceptional case the new solution does not improve on the first-order solutions obtained earlier, and the predicted density ratio can vary by 10-20% from the exact numerical MHD solutions. For theta approx. = 90 deg another perturbation solution is derived that predicts the density ratio much more accurately. This second solution is typically accurate for quasi-perpendicular conditions. Taken together, these two analytical solutions are generally accurate for the Earth's bow shock, except in the rare circumstance that M(A) is less than or = 2. MHD and gasdynamic simulations have produced empirical models in which the shock's standoff distance a(s) is linearly related to the density jump ratio X at the subsolar point. Using an empirical relationship between a(s) and X obtained from MHD simulations, a(s) values predicted using the MHD solutions for X are compared with the predictions of phenomenological models commonly used for modeling observational data, and with the predictions of a

  20. Strength and deformation of shocked diamond single crystals: Orientation dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J. M.; Winey, J. M.; Gupta, Y. M.

    2018-03-01

    Understanding and quantifying the strength or elastic limit of diamond single crystals is of considerable scientific and technological importance, and has been a subject of long standing theoretical and experimental interest. To examine the effect of crystalline anisotropy on strength and deformation of shocked diamond single crystals, plate impact experiments were conducted to measure wave profiles at various elastic impact stresses up to ˜120 GPa along [110] and [111] crystal orientations. Using laser interferometry, particle velocity histories and shock velocities in the diamond samples were measured and were compared with similar measurements published previously for shock compression along the [100] direction. Wave profiles for all three orientations showed large elastic wave amplitudes followed by time-dependent inelastic deformation. From the measured wave profiles, the elastic limits were determined under well characterized uniaxial strain loading conditions. The measured elastic wave amplitudes for the [110] and [111] orientations were lower for higher elastic impact stress (stress attained for an elastic diamond response), consistent with the result reported previously for [100] diamond. The maximum resolved shear stress (MRSS) on the {111}⟨110⟩ slip systems was determined for each orientation, revealing significant orientation dependence. The MRSS values for the [100] and [110] orientations (˜33 GPa) are 25%-30% of theoretical estimates; the MRSS value for the [111] orientation is significantly lower (˜23 GPa). Our results demonstrate that the MRSS depends strongly on the stress component normal to the {111} planes or the resolved normal stress (RNS), suggesting that the RNS plays a key role in inhibiting the onset of inelastic deformation. Lower elastic wave amplitudes at higher peak stress and the effect of the RNS are inconsistent with typical dislocation slip mechanisms of inelastic deformation, suggesting instead an inelastic response

  1. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by Ti-doping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Lindig, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ti-doped isotropic graphite is a promising candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its reduced chemical erosion by hydrogen bombardment and its high thermal shock resistance, mainly due the catalytic effect of TiC on the graphitization leading to an increase of thermal conductivity and to higher mechanical strength. Several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in order to establish a relationship between these parameters and the final properties.

  2. Improvement of thermal shock resistance of isotropic graphite by Ti-doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Galilea, I. [Inmaculada Lopez-Galilea, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Po de Manuel Lardizabal, 15 E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain)], E-mail: ilopez@ceit.es; Ordas, N.; Garcia-Rosales, C. [Inmaculada Lopez-Galilea, CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), Po de Manuel Lardizabal, 15 E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Lindig, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2009-04-30

    Ti-doped isotropic graphite is a promising candidate material for the strike point area of the ITER divertor due to its reduced chemical erosion by hydrogen bombardment and its high thermal shock resistance, mainly due the catalytic effect of TiC on the graphitization leading to an increase of thermal conductivity and to higher mechanical strength. Several manufacturing parameters such as oxidative stabilization treatment, carbonization cycle, graphitization temperature and dwell time during graphitization have been investigated in order to establish a relationship between these parameters and the final properties.

  3. ACCRETION SHOCKS IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES AND THEIR SZ SIGNATURE FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Hearn, Nathan; Haiman, Zoltan; Bryan, Greg; Evrard, August E.; Lake, George

    2009-01-01

    Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical structure formation models predict the existence of large-scale accretion shocks between the virial and turnaround radii of clusters of galaxies. Kocsis et al. suggest that the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal associated with such shocks might be observable with the next generation radio interferometer, ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array). We study the three-dimensional distribution of accretion shocks around individual clusters of galaxies drawn from adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of ΛCDM (dark energy dominated CDM) models. In relaxed clusters, we find two distinct sets of shocks. One set ('virial shocks'), with Mach numbers of 2.5-4, is located at radii 0.9-1.3 R vir , where R vir is the spherical infall estimate of the virial radius, covering about 40%-50% of the total surface area around clusters at these radii. Another set of stronger shocks ( e xternal shocks ) is located farther out, at about 3 R vir , with large Mach numbers (∼100), covering about 40%-60% of the surface area. We simulate SZ surface brightness maps of relaxed massive galaxy clusters drawn from high-resolution AMR runs, and conclude that ALMA should be capable of detecting the virial shocks in massive clusters of galaxies. More simulations are needed to improve estimates of astrophysical noise and to determine optimal observational strategies.

  4. A comparative study on laser induced shock cleaning of radioactive contaminants in air and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Aniruddha; Prasad, Manisha; Bhatt, R. B.; Behere, P. G.; Biswas, D. J.

    2018-03-01

    Efficient removal of Uranium-di-oxide (UO2) particulates from stainless steel surface was effected by Nd-YAG laser induced plasma shock waves in air as well as in water environment. The propagation velocity of the generated shock wave was measured by employing the photo-acoustic probe deflection method. Monitoring of the alpha activity of the sample with a ZnS (Ag) scintillation detector before and after the laser exposure allowed the estimation of decontamination efficiency defined as the percentage removal of the initial activity. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of laser pulse energy, number of laser exposures, orientation of the sample, the separation between the substrate surface and the onset point of the shock wave on the de-contamination efficiency. The most optimised cleaning was found to occur when the laser beam impinged normally on the sample that was immersed in water and placed at a distance of ∼0.7 mm from the laser focal spot. Analysis of the cleaned surface by optical microscopes established that laser induced shock cleaning in no way altered the surface property. The shock force generated in both air and water has been estimated theoretically and has been found to exceed the Van der Waal's binding force for spherical contaminant particulate.

  5. MHD intermediate shock discontinuities: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, C.F.; Blandford, R.D.; Coppi, P.

    1989-01-01

    Recent numerical investigations have focused attention once more on the role of intermediate shocks in MHD. Four types of intermediate shock are identified using a graphical representation of the MHD Rankine-Hugoniot conditions. This same representation can be used to exhibit the close relationship of intermediate shocks to switch-on shocks and rotational discontinuities. The conditions under which intermediate discontinuities can be found are elucidated. The variations in velocity, pressure, entropy and magnetic-field jumps with upstream parameters in intermediate shocks are exhibited graphically. The evolutionary arguments traditionally advanced against intermediate shocks may fail because the equations of classical MHD are not strictly hyperbolic. (author)

  6. Perpendicular relativistic shocks in magnetized pair plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Illya; Grassi, Anna; Grech, Mickael

    2018-04-01

    Perpendicular relativistic (γ0 = 10) shocks in magnetized pair plasmas are investigated using two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations. A systematic survey, from unmagnetized to strongly magnetized shocks, is presented accurately capturing the transition from Weibel-mediated to magnetic-reflection-shaped shocks. This transition is found to occur for upstream flow magnetizations 10-3 10-2, it leaves place to a purely electromagnetic precursor following from the strong emission of electromagnetic waves at the shock front. Particle acceleration is found to be efficient in weakly magnetized perpendicular shocks in agreement with previous works, and is fully suppressed for σ > 10-2. Diffusive Shock Acceleration is observed only in weakly magnetized shocks, while a dominant contribution of Shock Drift Acceleration is evidenced at intermediate magnetizations. The spatial diffusion coefficients are extracted from the simulations allowing for a deeper insight into the self-consistent particle kinematics and scale with the square of the particle energy in weakly magnetized shocks. These results have implications for particle acceleration in the internal shocks of AGN jets and in the termination shocks of Pulsar Wind Nebulae.

  7. Electron velocity distributions near collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent studies of the amount of electron heating and of the shapes of electron velocity distributions across shocks near the earth are reviewed. It is found that electron heating increases with increasing shock strength but is always less than the ion heating. The scale length of electron heating is also less than that for the ions. Electron velocity distributions show characteristic shapes which depend on the strength of the shocks. At the weaker shocks, electron heating is mostly perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field, bar B, and results in Gaussian-shaped velocity distributions at low-to-moderate energies. At the stronger shocks, parallel heating predominates resulting in flat-topped velocity distributions. A reasonable interpretation of these results indicates that at the weaker shocks electron heating is dominated by a tendency toward conservation of the magnetic moment. At the stronger fast-mode shocks, this heating is thought to be dominated by an acceleration parallel to bar B produced by the macroscopic shock electric field followed by beam driven plasma instabilities. Some contribution to the heating at the stronger shocks from conservation of the magnetic moment and cross-field current-driven instabilities cannot be ruled out. Although the heating at slow-mode shocks is also dominated by instabilities driven by magnetic field-aligned electron beams, their acceleration mechanism is not yet established

  8. Shock absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Housman, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    A shock absorber is described for use in a hostile environment at the end of a blind passage for absorbing impact loads. The shock absorber includes at least one element which occupies the passage and which is comprised of a porous brittle material which is substantially non-degradable in the hostile environment. A void volume is provided in the element to enable the element to absorb a predetermined level of energy upon being crushed due to impact loading

  9. INJECTION TO RAPID DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION AT PERPENDICULAR SHOCKS IN PARTIALLY IONIZED PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohira, Yutaka, E-mail: ohira@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan)

    2016-08-10

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v {sub sh} ≈ 1333 km s{sup −1} and f {sub i} ∼ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ∼ 100 v {sub sh} ∼ 0.3 c within ∼100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 10{sup 15.5} eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  10. Improvements in the electromechanical conversion of energy using shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landure, Yves

    1971-01-01

    This report concerns the electrical mechanical conversion. In this study it was obtained by the depolarization of a ferroelectric ceramic. We are particularly interested by the high electrical horse-power. Shock wave which produces depolarization is created by a gun powder. The speed of the projectile is measured and the pressures generated in the ceramic is determined graphically. The energy freed is released on a linear resistive load. We were able to prove by different parameters how to obtain the maximum electrical energy. On a resistive load of 26 ohms, it was freed 0,91 J/cm 3 in less than 0,5 μs corresponding to an electrical horse-power superior to 2 MW/cm 3 . (author) [fr

  11. Ekspresi Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G dan Heat-Shock Protein-70 (Hsp-70 pada Pertumbuhan Janin Terhambat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sulistyowati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Intra uterine growth retardation (IUGR is one of the leading causes of higher morbidity and mortality in perinatal. Immune maladaptation affects trophoblast invasion and spiralis arteria remodeling that will cause placental tissue hypoxia. This research aimed to analyze human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G and heat-shock protein-70 (Hsp-70 expression on the IUGR trophoblast and normal pregnancy, by applying analytical observational method and cross sectional approach. This research was conducted at the Obstetric and Gynecology Department of Dr. Moewardi Hospital Surakarta from November to December 2011. The total samples were 30, divided into two groups. There were 15 samples trophoblast on IUGR and 15 samples trophoblast from normal pregnancy. All samples were tested for HLA-G and Hsp-70 using immunohistochemistry. The data were analyzed by using t-test. The mean of HLA-G expression on the IUGR groups was 32.42±8.90 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 43.92±14.91 (p=0.016. Heat-shock protein70 expression on the IUGR groups was 2.4355+0.26647 and on the normal pregnancy groups was 1.5920+0.17142 with p=0.008. In conclusion, in IUGR, the HLA-G expression is lower and the Hsp-70 expression is higher than in normal pregnancy.

  12. Improvements in containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guy, R.

    1977-01-01

    An improved container is described for transporting radioactive materials, such as irradiated Magnox fuel elements. It has a lid fixed to the container body and at the corners of the lid has shock absorbers that project from the corners and have part-spheroidal shape. The centre of curvature of the surface of the spheroid is positioned within the lid, so that impact loads on a shock absorber tend to hold it to the container rather than dislodge it. The shock absorbers may be Al-Si alloy castings. (U.K.)

  13. Normal Impingement of a Supersonic Jet on a Plane - A Basic Study of Shock-Interference Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    George Xaler, Pail Zone Dr. H. Lew 28i0 Mr. J. W. Paust A . Mkrtallucci W. Daskin J. D. Cresaswell J. pvttu" J. Cor%.nto C. l!arri, F. GCOrge1. 4...NSWC/WOL/TR 75195 low zE ~ 1 WHITE OAK LABORATORY SNORMAL IMPINGEMENT OF A SUPERSONIC JET ON A PLANE - A BASIC STUDY OF SHOCK-INTERFERENCE HEATING...OF THIS PAGE ("oin DomejaE’ored) __________________ REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE READ INSTRUCTIONS4 2. OV ACE.~ CONTRAT O0GRN NUMBER~ a NS. P ER OR M I

  14. Measuring the shock impedance mismatch between high-density carbon and deuterium at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millot, M.; Celliers, P. M.; Sterne, P. A.; Benedict, L. X.; Correa, A. A.; Hamel, S.; Ali, S. J.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Biener, J.; Collins, G. W.; Coppari, F.; Divol, L.; Fernandez-Panella, A.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Haan, S. W.; Le Pape, S.; Meezan, N. B.; Moore, A. S.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Rygg, J. R.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Wild, C.; Eggert, J. H.

    2018-04-01

    Fine-grained diamond, or high-density carbon (HDC), is being used as an ablator for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate equation of state (EOS) knowledge over a wide range of phase space is critical in the design and analysis of integrated ICF experiments. Here, we report shock and release measurements of the shock impedance mismatch between HDC and liquid deuterium conducted during shock-timing experiments having a first shock in the ablator ranging between 8 and 14 Mbar. Using ultrafast Doppler imaging velocimetry to track the leading shock front, we characterize the shock velocity discontinuity upon the arrival of the shock at the HDC/liquid deuterium interface. Comparing the experimental data with tabular EOS models used to simulate integrated ICF experiments indicates the need for an improved multiphase EOS model for HDC in order to achieve a significant increase in neutron yield in indirect-driven ICF implosions with HDC ablators.

  15. Shock compression of diamond crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, Ken-ichi; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    Two shock wave experiments employing inclined mirrors have been carried out to determine the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), final shock state at 191 and 217 GPa, and the post-shock state of diamond crystal, which is shock-compressed along the intermediate direction between the and crystallographic axes. The HEL wave has a velocity of 19.9 ± 0.3 mm/µsec and an amplitude of 63 ± 28 GPa. An alternate interpretation of the inclined wedge mirror streak record suggests a ramp precursor wave and th...

  16. Electron transport and shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, A R; Tzoufras, M, E-mail: t.bell1@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) offers one possible route to commercial energy generation. In the proposed 'shock ignition' route to fusion, the target is compressed at a relatively low temperature and then ignited using high intensity laser irradiation which drives a strong converging shock into the centre of the fuel. With a series of idealized calculations we analyse the electron transport of energy into the target, which produces the pressure responsible for driving the shock. We show that transport in shock ignition lies near the boundary between ablative and heat front regimes. Moreover, simulations indicate that non-local effects are significant in the heat front regime and might lead to increased efficiency by driving the shock more effectively and reducing heat losses to the plasma corona.

  17. Application of Underwater Shock Wave Focusing to the Development of Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    1993-05-01

    This paper describes a summary of a research project for the development of extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), which has been carried out, under close collaboration between the Shock Wave Research Center of Tohoku University and the School of Medicine, Tohoku University. The ESWL is a noninvasive clinical treatment of disintegrating human calculi and one of the most peaceful applications of shock waves. Underwater spherical shock waves were generated by explosion of microexplosives. Characteristics of the underwater shock waves and of ultrasound focusing were studied by means of holographic interferometric flow visualization and polyvinyliden-difluoride (PVDF) pressure transducers. These focused pressures, when applied to clinical treatments, could effectively and noninvasively disintegrate urinary tract stones or gallbladder stones. However, despite clincal success, tissue damage occurs during ESWL treatments, and the possible mechanism of tissue damage is briefly described.

  18. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress – such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage – is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  19. Heat shock modulates the subcellular localization, stability, and activity of HIPK2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Mamta; Bhadauriya, Pratibha; Ganesh, Subramaniam, E-mail: sganesh@iitk.ac.in

    2016-04-15

    The homeodomain-interacting protein kinase-2 (HIPK2) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase and is involved in transcriptional regulation. HIPK2 is a highly unstable protein, and is kept at a low level under normal physiological conditions. However, exposure of cells to physiological stress – such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, or UV damage – is known to stabilize HIPK2, leading to the HIPK2-dependent activation of p53 and the cell death pathway. Therefore HIPK2 is also known as a stress kinase and as a stress-activated pro-apoptotic factor. We demonstrate here that exposure of cells to heat shock results in the stabilization of HIPK2 and the stabilization is mediated via K63-linked ubiquitination. Intriguingly, a sub-lethal heat shock (42 °C, 1 h) results in the cytoplasmic localization of HIPK2, while a lethal heat shock (45 °C, 1 h) results in its nuclear localization. Cells exposed to the lethal heat shock showed significantly higher levels of the p53 activity than those exposed to the sub-lethal thermal stress, suggesting that both the level and the nuclear localization are essential for the pro-apoptotic activity of HIPK2 and that the lethal heat shock could retain the HIPK2 in the nucleus to promote the cell death. Taken together our study underscores the importance of HIPK2 in stress mediated cell death, and that the HIPK2 is a generic stress kinase that gets activated by diverse set of physiological stressors.

  20. Early Radiosurgery Improves Hearing Preservation in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients With Normal Hearing at the Time of Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akpinar, Berkcan [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Mousavi, Seyed H., E-mail: mousavish@upmc.edu [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); McDowell, Michael M.; Niranjan, Ajay; Faraji, Amir H. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Flickinger, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Lunsford, L. Dade [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are increasingly diagnosed in patients with normal hearing because of advances in magnetic resonance imaging. We sought to evaluate whether stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) performed earlier after diagnosis improved long-term hearing preservation in this population. Methods and Materials: We queried our quality assessment registry and found the records of 1134 acoustic neuroma patients who underwent SRS during a 15-year period (1997-2011). We identified 88 patients who had VS but normal hearing with no subjective hearing loss at the time of diagnosis. All patients were Gardner-Robertson (GR) class I at the time of SRS. Fifty-seven patients underwent early (≤2 years from diagnosis) SRS and 31 patients underwent late (>2 years after diagnosis) SRS. At a median follow-up time of 75 months, we evaluated patient outcomes. Results: Tumor control rates (decreased or stable in size) were similar in the early (95%) and late (90%) treatment groups (P=.73). Patients in the early treatment group retained serviceable (GR class I/II) hearing and normal (GR class I) hearing longer than did patients in the late treatment group (serviceable hearing, P=.006; normal hearing, P<.0001, respectively). At 5 years after SRS, an estimated 88% of the early treatment group retained serviceable hearing and 77% retained normal hearing, compared with 55% with serviceable hearing and 33% with normal hearing in the late treatment group. Conclusions: SRS within 2 years after diagnosis of VS in normal hearing patients resulted in improved retention of all hearing measures compared with later SRS.

  1. Normalization of ADC does not improve correlation with overall survival in patients with high-grade glioma (HGG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Li, Angie; Qu, Jinrong; Reinshagen, Katherine; Li, Xiang; Cheng, Su-Chun; Bryant, Annie; Young, Geoffrey S

    2018-04-01

    Mixed reports leave uncertainty about whether normalization of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) to a within-subject white matter reference is necessary for assessment of tumor cellularity. We tested whether normalization improves the previously reported correlation of resection margin ADC with 15-month overall survival (OS) in HGG patients. Spin-echo echo-planar DWI was retrieved from 3 T MRI acquired between maximal resection and radiation in 37 adults with new-onset HGG (25 glioblastoma; 12 anaplastic astrocytoma). ADC maps were produced with the FSL DTIFIT tool (Oxford Centre for Functional MRI). 3 neuroradiologists manually selected regions of interest (ROI) in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and in non-enhancing tumor (NT) Normalized ADC (nADC) was computed as the ratio of absolute NT ADC to NAWM ADC. Reproducibility of nADC and absolute ADC among the readers' ROI was assessed using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and within-subject coefficient of variation (wCV). Correlations of ADC and nADC with OS were compared using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. A p value 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Both mean ADC and nADC differed significantly between patients subgrouped by 15-month OS (p = 0.0014 and 0.0073 respectively). wCV and ICC among the readers were similar for absolute and normalized ADC. In ROC analysis of correlation with OS, nADC did not perform significantly better than absolute ADC. Normalization does not significantly improve the correlation of absolute ADC with OS in HGG, suggesting that normalization is not necessary for clinical or research ADC analysis in HGG patients.

  2. Early Radiosurgery Improves Hearing Preservation in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients With Normal Hearing at the Time of Diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpinar, Berkcan; Mousavi, Seyed H.; McDowell, Michael M.; Niranjan, Ajay; Faraji, Amir H.; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are increasingly diagnosed in patients with normal hearing because of advances in magnetic resonance imaging. We sought to evaluate whether stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) performed earlier after diagnosis improved long-term hearing preservation in this population. Methods and Materials: We queried our quality assessment registry and found the records of 1134 acoustic neuroma patients who underwent SRS during a 15-year period (1997-2011). We identified 88 patients who had VS but normal hearing with no subjective hearing loss at the time of diagnosis. All patients were Gardner-Robertson (GR) class I at the time of SRS. Fifty-seven patients underwent early (≤2 years from diagnosis) SRS and 31 patients underwent late (>2 years after diagnosis) SRS. At a median follow-up time of 75 months, we evaluated patient outcomes. Results: Tumor control rates (decreased or stable in size) were similar in the early (95%) and late (90%) treatment groups (P=.73). Patients in the early treatment group retained serviceable (GR class I/II) hearing and normal (GR class I) hearing longer than did patients in the late treatment group (serviceable hearing, P=.006; normal hearing, P<.0001, respectively). At 5 years after SRS, an estimated 88% of the early treatment group retained serviceable hearing and 77% retained normal hearing, compared with 55% with serviceable hearing and 33% with normal hearing in the late treatment group. Conclusions: SRS within 2 years after diagnosis of VS in normal hearing patients resulted in improved retention of all hearing measures compared with later SRS.

  3. Shock dynamics of weak imploding cylindrical and spherical shock waves with non-ideal gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, R K

    2013-01-01

    The author (Anand 2012 Astrophys. Space Sci. 342 377–88) recently obtained jump relations across a shock front in non-ideal gas flow taking into consideration the equation of state for a non-ideal gas as given by Landau and Lifshitz. In this paper an analytical solution for one-dimensional adiabatic flow behind weak converging shock waves propagating in a non-ideal gas is obtained by using Whitham's (1974 Linear and Nonlinear Waves (New York: Wiley)) geometrical shock dynamics approach. The effects of an increase in (i) the propagation distance from the centre of convergence, (ii) the non-idealness parameter and (iii) the adiabatic index of the gas, on the shock velocity, pressure, density, particle velocity, adiabatic compressibility and the change in entropy across the shock front, are analyzed. The results provided a clear picture of whether and how the non-idealness parameter and the adiabatic index affect the flow field behind the imploding shock front. (paper)

  4. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for treatment of plantar fasciitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dastgir, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with chronic plantar faciitis. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Department of Orhopaedic, Regional Hospital, Limerick, Ireland from January to December 2004 and comprised 70 heels in 62 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis in whom conventional conservative treatment consisting of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, heel cup, orthoses and/or shoe modifications, local steroid injections had failed, and they were treated with low energy extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Patients were reviewed at 6, 12 and 24 weeks post treatment. Results: At follow-up there was significant decrease in pain on the visual analogue scale (p<0.027), with significant improvement in pain score (p<0.009) and in functional score (p<0.001). The comfortable walking distance had increased significantly and there were no reported side effects. Conclusion: Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is a new modality providing good pain relief and a satisfactory clinical outcome in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis. (author)

  5. Hugoniot measurements of double-shocked precompressed dense xenon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Chen, Q. F.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Z. Y.

    2012-12-01

    The current partially ionized plasmas models for xenon show substantial differences since the description of pressure and thermal ionization region becomes a formidable task, prompting the need for an improved understanding of dense xenon plasmas behavior at above 100 GPa. We performed double-shock compression experiments on dense xenon to determine accurately the Hugoniot up to 172 GPa using a time-resolved optical radiation method. The planar strong shock wave was produced using a flyer plate impactor accelerated up to ˜6 km/s with a two-stage light-gas gun. The time-resolved optical radiation histories were acquired by using a multiwavelength channel optical transience radiance pyrometer. Shock velocity was measured and mass velocity was determined by the impedance-matching methods. The experimental equation of state of dense xenon plasmas are compared with the self-consistent fluid variational calculations of dense xenon in the region of partial ionization over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.

  6. Shock progression and survival after use of a condom uterine balloon tamponade package in women with uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas F; Danso-Bamfo, Sandra; Guha, Moytrayee; Oguttu, Monica; Tarimo, Vincent; Nelson, Brett D

    2017-10-01

    To examine the outcomes of women in advanced shock from uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) who underwent placement of an Every Second Matters for Mothers and Babies Uterine Balloon Tamponade (ESM-UBT) device. In a prospective case series, data were collected for women who received an ESM-UBT device at healthcare facilities in Kenya, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania between September 1, 2012, and September 30, 2016. Shock class was assigned on the basis of recorded blood pressures and mental status at the time of UBT placement. Data for 306 women with uncontrolled PPH from uterine atony across 117 facilities were analyzed. Normal vital signs or class I/II shock were reported for 166 (54.2%). In this group, one death occurred and was attributed to PPH (survival rate 99.4%). There were no cases of shock progression. One hundred and eleven (36.3%) were in class III shock and 29 (9.5%) in class IV shock; the respective survival rates were 97.3% (n=108) and 86.2% (n=25). The ESM-UBT device arrests hemorrhage, prevents shock progression, and is associated with high survival rates among women with uncontrolled PPH from uterine atony. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs

  8. Converging shocks in elastic-plastic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, A López; Lombardini, M; Hill, D J

    2011-11-01

    We present an approximate description of the behavior of an elastic-plastic material processed by a cylindrically or spherically symmetric converging shock, following Whitham's shock dynamics theory. Originally applied with success to various gas dynamics problems, this theory is presently derived for solid media, in both elastic and plastic regimes. The exact solutions of the shock dynamics equations obtained reproduce well the results obtained by high-resolution numerical simulations. The examined constitutive laws share a compressible neo-Hookean structure for the internal energy e=e(s)(I(1))+e(h)(ρ,ς), where e(s) accounts for shear through the first invariant of the Cauchy-Green tensor, and e(h) represents the hydrostatic contribution as a function of the density ρ and entropy ς. In the strong-shock limit, reached as the shock approaches the axis or origin r=0, we show that compression effects are dominant over shear deformations. For an isothermal constitutive law, i.e., e(h)=e(h)(ρ), with a power-law dependence e(h) is proportional to ρ(α), shock dynamics predicts that for a converging shock located at r=R(t) at time t, the Mach number increases as M is proportional to [log(1/R)](α), independently of the space index s, where s=2 in cylindrical geometry and 3 in spherical geometry. An alternative isothermal constitutive law with p(ρ) of the arctanh type, which enforces a finite density in the strong-shock limit, leads to M is proportional to R(-(s-1)) for strong shocks. A nonisothermal constitutive law, whose hydrostatic part e(h) is that of an ideal gas, is also tested, recovering the strong-shock limit M is proportional to R(-(s-1)/n(γ)) originally derived by Whitham for perfect gases, where γ is inherently related to the maximum compression ratio that the material can reach, (γ+1)/(γ-1). From these strong-shock limits, we also estimate analytically the density, radial velocity, pressure, and sound speed immediately behind the shock. While the

  9. Experimental methods of shock wave research

    CERN Document Server

    Seiler, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive and carefully edited volume presents a variety of experimental methods used in Shock Waves research. In 14 self contained chapters this 9th volume of the “Shock Wave Science and Technology Reference Library” presents the experimental methods used in Shock Tubes, Shock Tunnels and Expansion Tubes facilities. Also described is their set-up and operation. The uses of an arc heated wind tunnel and a gun tunnel are also contained in this volume. Whenever possible, in addition to the technical description some typical scientific results obtained using such facilities are described. Additionally, this authoritative book includes techniques for measuring physical properties of blast waves and laser generated shock waves. Information about active shock wave laboratories at different locations around the world that are not described in the chapters herein is given in the Appendix, making this book useful for every researcher involved in shock/blast wave phenomena.

  10. Exploratory laser-driven shock wave studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.

    1977-11-01

    We show the results of a feasibility study for investigating shock structure and for measuring equation-of-state parameters using high-energy, short-pulse lasers. We discuss the temporal and spatial structure of the luminosity from laser-driven shock unloading in aluminum foils. We demonstrate that shock velocity can be measured by observing the time interval between shock emergence across two thicknesses and show data for shocks of 1.3 and 2.1 Mbar. The fact that we observe shock fronts cleanly breaking through steps as small as 3 μm indicates that the shock front thickness is very small in the few megabar region; this is the first experimental verification that these fronts are not more than a few micrometers thick. We present approximate measurements of free-surface velocity. Finally, we speculate on the use of these techniques to obtain detailed equation-of-state data

  11. Ions upstream of the earth's bow shock: a theoretical comparison of alternative source populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, S.J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Gosling, J.T.

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed for studying trajectories of ions reflected or leaked upstream from the earth's bow shock and subject solely to the Lorentz force in a steady interplanetary magnetic field B and the V x B electric field. We include the effects of a sharp shock potential rise. Expressions are derived for the guiding center motion and gyromotion in a frame (the Hoffman-Teller frame) moving parallel to the shock surface with sufficient speed to transform the incident solar wind velocity into motion entirely along the interplanetary magnetic field: the appropriate equations are also provided to transform these motions back to the observer's frame. The utility of these expressions is illustrated by comparing the predicted upstream motions for four different source models for upstream ions: magnetic moment-conserving reflection of the solar wind ions, specular reflection of solar wind ions, magnetic moment-conserving leakage of magnetosheath ions, and leakage of magnetosheath ions parallel to the shock normal. This comparison reveals that, for identical geometries, the reflection models produce higher energies and/or gyromotion than do the leakage models. We further argue that in a single simple encounter with the shock, an ion should behave in an unmagnetized manner and hence should not conserve its magnetic moment. Conservation of magnetic moment, if it is to occur, would seem to require multiple encounters with the shock. We investigate the conditions under which such multiple encounters can occur and find that under most quasi-parallel geometries neither leaked nor reflected ions should probably conserve their magnetic moments

  12. The upstream escape of energized solar wind protons from the bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstadt, E.W.

    1975-01-01

    Recently, there have been some systematic observations of backstreaming protons at the Earth's bow shock with parallel velocity components and total energies much too high to be associated with the usual long-period upstream waves or to be produced by Sonnerup's simple reflection process (Lin et al., 1974), and these protons (30-100keV) were attributed to some unknown acceleration mechanism in the upstream region. The observations of Lof et al. involved protons in high pitch angle, and, although their reasons for favoring an upstream acceleration were quite different, it may seem intuitive that high pitch angle particles would have difficulty escaping the shock, especially at large field-normal angles. Such an inference would superficially support the notion of energization outside the bow shock. It seems worthwhile therefore to examine the extent to which the geometry of individual particle motion alone might select among reflected particles those that can escape upstream and those that cannot. In this paper the geometry of escape is described and some simple numerical examples are worked out for a few special cases. It is found that protons with rather high energies and pitch angles can escape the shock at only marginally quasi-parallel field orientations (i.e., thetasub(nB) approximately 50 0 ), even if they have quite moderate speeds parallel to B. (Auth.)

  13. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Brouwer, Tom F; Barr, Craig

    2015-01-01

    shocks have been reported. METHODS: We analyzed the incidence, predictors and management of inappropriate shocks in the EFFORTLESS S-ICD Registry, which collects S-ICD implantation information and follow-up data from clinical centers in Europe and New Zealand. RESULTS: During a follow-up of 21 ± 13...... xyphoid to V6) reduced the risk. Reprogramming or optimization of SVT treatment after the first clinical event of inappropriate shock was successful in preventing further inappropriate shocks for cardiac oversensing and SVT events. CONCLUSIONS: Inappropriate shocks, mainly due to cardiac oversensing...

  14. Evolution of scalar and velocity dynamics in planar shock-turbulence interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukharfane, R.; Bouali, Z.; Mura, A.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the short residence time of air in supersonic combustors, achieving efficient mixing in compressible turbulent reactive flows is crucial for the design of supersonic ramjet (Scramjet) engines. In this respect, improving the understanding of shock-scalar mixing interactions is of fundamental importance for such supersonic combustion applications. In these compressible flows, the interaction between the turbulence and the shock wave is reciprocal, and the coupling between them is very strong. A basic understanding of the physics of such complex interactions has already been obtained through the analysis of relevant simplified flow configurations, including propagation of the shock wave in density-stratified media, shock-wave-mixing-layer interaction, and shock-wave-vortex interaction. Amplification of velocity fluctuations and substantial changes in turbulence characteristic length scales are the most well-known outcomes of shock-turbulence interaction, which may also deeply influence scalar mixing between fuel and oxidizer. The effects of the shock wave on the turbulence have been widely characterized through the use of so-called amplification factors, and similar quantities are introduced herein to characterize the influence of the shock wave on scalar mixing. One of the primary goals of the present study is indeed to extend previous analyses to the case of shock-scalar mixing interaction, which is directly relevant to supersonic combustion applications. It is expected that the shock wave will affect the scalar dissipation rate (SDR) dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the modification of the so-called turbulence-scalar interaction as a leading-order contribution to the production of mean SDR, i.e., a quantity that defines the mixing rate and efficiency. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this issue has never been addressed in detail in the literature, and the objective of the present study is to scrutinize this influence. The turbulent mixing of a

  15. Oscillating nonlinear acoustic shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri; Rasmussen, Anders Rønne; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2016-01-01

    We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show that at resona......We investigate oscillating shock waves in a tube using a higher order weakly nonlinear acoustic model. The model includes thermoviscous effects and is non isentropic. The oscillating shock waves are generated at one end of the tube by a sinusoidal driver. Numerical simulations show...... polynomial in the space and time variables, we find analytical approximations to the observed single shock waves in an infinitely long tube. Using perturbation theory for the driven acoustic system approximative analytical solutions for the off resonant case are determined....

  16. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bershader, D.; Hanson, R.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles

  17. Successful evacuation of large perirenal hematoma after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) - step 1 of the IDEAL recommendations of surgical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallmann, Steffen; Petersein, Jan; Ruttloff, Jürgen; Ecke, Thorsten H

    2017-02-01

    Larger perirenal hematomas after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) are sometimes related to the loss of renal function due to compression of the normal renal tissue. After computed tomography-guided drainage and locally applied urokinase, the hematoma was fractionally evacuated. This procedure is a save and fast way to recover normal renal function.

  18. An in situ Comparison of Electron Acceleration at Collisionless Shocks under Differing Upstream Magnetic Field Orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Sulaiman, A. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Stawarz, Ł. [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30-244 Krakow (Poland); Reville, B. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sergis, N. [Office of Space Research and Technology, Academy of Athens, Soranou Efesiou 4, 11527 Athens (Greece); Fujimoto, M. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Burgess, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Coates, A. J., E-mail: a.masters@imperial.ac.uk [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Department of Space and Climate Physics, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-10

    A leading explanation for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays is acceleration at high-Mach number shock waves in the collisionless plasma surrounding young supernova remnants. Evidence for this is provided by multi-wavelength non-thermal emission thought to be associated with ultrarelativistic electrons at these shocks. However, the dependence of the electron acceleration process on the orientation of the upstream magnetic field with respect to the local normal to the shock front (quasi-parallel/quasi-perpendicular) is debated. Cassini spacecraft observations at Saturn’s bow shock have revealed examples of electron acceleration under quasi-perpendicular conditions, and the first in situ evidence of electron acceleration at a quasi-parallel shock. Here we use Cassini data to make the first comparison between energy spectra of locally accelerated electrons under these differing upstream magnetic field regimes. We present data taken during a quasi-perpendicular shock crossing on 2008 March 8 and during a quasi-parallel shock crossing on 2007 February 3, highlighting that both were associated with electron acceleration to at least MeV energies. The magnetic signature of the quasi-perpendicular crossing has a relatively sharp upstream–downstream transition, and energetic electrons were detected close to the transition and immediately downstream. The magnetic transition at the quasi-parallel crossing is less clear, energetic electrons were encountered upstream and downstream, and the electron energy spectrum is harder above ∼100 keV. We discuss whether the acceleration is consistent with diffusive shock acceleration theory in each case, and suggest that the quasi-parallel spectral break is due to an energy-dependent interaction between the electrons and short, large-amplitude magnetic structures.

  19. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-01-01

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10 14 W cm −2 to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code

  20. Shock response of Ni/Al reactive inter-metallic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Germann, Timothy; Kober, Edward; Strachan, Alejandro

    2014-03-01

    Intermolecular reactive composites find diverse applications in defense, microelectronics and medicine, where strong, localized sources of heat are required. Motivated by experimental work which has shown that high-energy ball milling can significantly improve the reactivity as well as the ease of ignition of Ni/Al inter-metallic composites, we present large scale (~41 million atom) molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in porous, polycrystalline, lamellar Ni/Al nano-composites, which are designed to capture the microstructure that is obtained post milling. Shock propagation in these porous, lamellar materials is observed to be extremely diffuse, leading to substantial inhomogeneity in the local stress states of the material. We describe the importance of pores as sites of initiation, where local temperatures can rise to several thousands of degrees, and chemical mixing is accelerated by vortex formation and jetting in the pore. We also follow the evolution of the chemistry after the shock passage by allowing the sample to ``cook'' under the shock induced pressures and temperatures for up to 0.5 ns. Multiple ``tendril-like'' reaction fronts, born in the cauldron of the pores, propagate rapidly through the sample, consuming it within a nanosecond. US Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Contract No. HDTRA1-10-1-0119.

  1. Adaptive inertial shock-absorber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraj, Rami; Holnicki-Szulc, Jan; Knap, Lech; Seńko, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces and discusses a new concept of impact absorption by means of impact energy management and storage in dedicated rotating inertial discs. The effectiveness of the concept is demonstrated in a selected case-study involving spinning management, a recently developed novel impact-absorber. A specific control technique performed on this device is demonstrated to be the main source of significant improvement in the overall efficiency of impact damping process. The influence of various parameters on the performance of the shock-absorber is investigated. Design and manufacturing challenges and directions of further research are formulated. (paper)

  2. Characterization and modification of cavitation pattern in shock wave lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus Dieter; Liebler, Marko

    2004-01-01

    The temporal and spatial dynamics of cavitation bubble cloud growth and collapse in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is studied experimentally. The first objective is obtaining reproducible cloud patterns experimentally and comparing them with FDTD-calculations. Second, we describe a method to modify the cavitation pattern by timing two consecutive pressure waves at variable delays. It is found that the spatial and temporal dynamics of the cavitation bubble can be varied in large ranges. The ability to control cavitation dynamics allows discussing strategies for improvement of medical and biological applications of shock waves such as cell membrane poration and stone fragmentation.

  3. An Atypical Case of Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Presenting as Hypovolemic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Martillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic gastroenteritis is an uncommon condition characterized by focal or diffuse infiltration of eosinophils in the gastrointestinal tract in the absence of secondary causes. The pathogenesis of this condition is not well understood and its clinical presentation depends on the segment and layer of the gastrointestinal tract affected. The definition of eosinophilic gastroenteritis may be difficult, as the normal ranges of eosinophil numbers in normal and abnormal gastric and intestinal mucosa are not standardized. We present the case of a 59-year-old male who came to the hospital with hypovolemic shock and lethargy secondary to severe diarrhea. Laboratory analysis was significant for peripheral eosinophilia, and pathology from both the duodenum and colon showed marked eosinophilic infiltration.

  4. The effect of Y2O3 addition on thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pošarac Milica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of yttria additive on the thermal shock behavior of magnesium aluminate spinel has been investigated. As a starting material we used spinel (MgAl2O4 obtained by the modified glycine nitrate procedure (MGNP. Sintered products were characterized in terms of phase analysis, densities, thermal shock, monitoring the damaged surface area in the refractory specimen during thermal shock and ultrasonic determination of the Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity. It was found that a new phase between yttria and alumina is formed, which improved thermal shock properties of the spinel refractories. Also densification of samples is enhanced by yttria addition.

  5. Collisionless Electrostatic Shock Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    equations with piston -like boundary conditions gives a solution for the shock behavior. • Assumes cold upstream ions, therefore neglecting shock...temperature ratio (>10) – Wave Train Wavelength – Shock-Front Mach Number – Reflected Ion Beam Velocity Gathering Experiment Data – Double Plasma Device...experimental shock data. • Inconsistencies in published 1969 double -plasma device data hampered validation. Future Work: Extension to Moderately

  6. Experimental investigation of shock wave - bubble interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Mohsen

    2010-04-09

    In this work, the dynamics of laser-generated single cavitation bubbles exposed to lithotripter shock waves has been investigated experimentally. The energy of the impinging shock wave is varied in several steps. High-speed photography and pressure field measurements simultaneously with image acquisition provide the possibility of capturing the fast bubble dynamics under the effect of the shock wave impact. The pressure measurement is performed using a fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) which operates based on optical diagnostics of the shock wave propagating medium. After a short introduction in chapter 1 an overview of the previous studies in chapter 2 is presented. The reported literatures include theoretical and experimental investigations of several configurations of physical problems in the field of bubble dynamics. In chapter 3 a theoretical description of propagation of a shock wave in a liquid like water has been discussed. Different kinds of reflection of a shock wave at an interface are taken into account. Undisturbed bubble dynamics as well as interaction between a planar shock wave and an initially spherical bubble are explored theoretically. Some physical parameters which are important in this issue such as the velocity of the shock-induced liquid jet, Kelvin impulse and kinetic energy are explained. The shock waves are generated in a water filled container by a focusing piezoelectric generator. The shock wave profile has a positive part with pulse duration of ∼1 μs followed by a longer tension tail (i.e. ∼3 μs). In chapter 4 high-speed images depict the propagation of a shock wave in the water filled tank. The maximum pressure is also derived for different intensity levels of the shock wave generator. The measurement is performed in the free field (i.e. in the absence of laser-generated single bubbles). In chapter 5 the interaction between lithotripter shock waves and laserinduced single cavitation bubbles is investigated experimentally. An

  7. Multiple shocks, coping and welfare consequences: natural disasters and health shocks in the Indian Sundarbans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sumit; Mazumdar, Papiya Guha; Kanjilal, Barun; Singh, Prashant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Based on a household survey in Indian Sundarbans hit by tropical cyclone Aila in May 2009, this study tests for evidence and argues that health and climatic shocks are essentially linked forming a continuum and with exposure to a marginal one, coping mechanisms and welfare outcomes triggered in the response is significantly affected. The data for this study is based on a cross-sectional household survey carried out during June 2010. The survey was aimed to assess the impact of cyclone Aila on households and consequent coping mechanisms in three of the worst-affected blocks (a sub-district administrative unit), viz. Hingalganj, Gosaba and Patharpratima. The survey covered 809 individuals from 179 households, cross cutting age and gender. A separate module on health-seeking behaviour serves as the information source of health shocks defined as illness episodes (ambulatory or hospitalized) experienced by household members. Finding reveals that over half of the households (54%) consider that Aila has dealt a high, damaging impact on their household assets. Result further shows deterioration of health status in the period following the incidence of Aila. Finding suggests having suffered multiple shocks increases the number of adverse welfare outcomes by 55%. Whereas, suffering either from the climatic shock (33%) or the health shock (25%) alone increases such risks by a much lesser extent. The multiple-shock households face a significantly higher degree of difficulty to finance expenses arising out of health shocks, as opposed to their counterparts facing only the health shock. Further, these households are more likely to finance the expenses through informal loans and credit from acquaintances or moneylenders. This paper presented empirical evidence on how natural and health shocks mutually reinforce their resultant impact, making coping increasingly difficult and present significant risks of welfare loss, having short as well as long-run development manifestations.

  8. Health shocks and risk aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Simon; Schmitz, Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    We empirically assess whether a health shock influences individual risk aversion. We use grip strength data to obtain an objective health shock indicator. In order to account for the non-random nature of our data regression-adjusted matching is employed. Risk preferences are traditionally assumed to be constant. However, we find that a health shock increases individual risk aversion. The finding is robust to a series of sensitivity analyses and persists for at least four years after the shock. Income changes do not seem to be the driving mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Shock in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. METHODS: Population...... failures. Outcomes were annual incidence per 100,000 person-years at risk (pyar), all-cause mortality at 0-7, and 8-90 days and risk factors associated with death. RESULTS: We identified 1646 of 438,191 (0.4 %) ED patients with shock at arrival. Incidence of shock increased from 53.8 to 80.6 cases per 100...

  10. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To implement the 'plan-do-check-act' (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues ('gold' contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes {>=}8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose

  11. A System for Continual Quality Improvement of Normal Tissue Delineation for Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunig, Jennifer; Hernandez, Sophy; Lin, Jeffrey; Alsager, Stacy; Dumstorf, Christine; Price, Jennifer; Steber, Jennifer; Garza, Richard; Nagda, Suneel; Melian, Edward; Emami, Bahman; Roeske, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To implement the “plan-do-check-act” (PDCA) cycle for the continual quality improvement of normal tissue contours used for radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The CT scans of patients treated for tumors of the brain, head and neck, thorax, pancreas and prostate were selected for this study. For each scan, a radiation oncologist and a diagnostic radiologist, outlined the normal tissues (“gold” contours) using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines. A total of 30 organs were delineated. Independently, 5 board-certified dosimetrists and 1 trainee then outlined the same organs. Metrics used to compare the agreement between the dosimetrists' contours and the gold contours included the Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC), and a penalty function using distance to agreement. Based on these scores, dosimetrists were re-trained on those organs in which they did not receive a passing score, and they were subsequently re-tested. Results: Passing scores were achieved on 19 of 30 organs evaluated. These scores were correlated to organ volume. For organ volumes <8 cc, the average DSC was 0.61 vs organ volumes ≥8 cc, for which the average DSC was 0.91 (P=.005). Normal tissues that had the lowest scores included the lenses, optic nerves, chiasm, cochlea, and esophagus. Of the 11 organs that were considered for re-testing, 10 showed improvement in the average score, and statistically significant improvement was noted in more than half of these organs after education and re-assessment. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate the feasibility of applying the PDCA cycle to assess competence in the delineation of individual organs, and to identify areas for improvement. With testing, guidance, and re-evaluation, contouring consistency can be obtained across multiple dosimetrists. Our expectation is that continual quality improvement using the PDCA approach will ensure more accurate treatments and dose assessment in

  12. The source of real and nominal exchange rate fluctuations in Thailand: Real shock or nominal shock

    OpenAIRE

    Le Thanh, Binh

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the source of exchange rate fluctuations in Thailand. We employed a structural vector auto-regression (SVAR) model with the long-run neutrality restriction of Blanchard and Quah (1989) to investigate the changes in real and nominal exchange rates from 1994 to 2015. In this paper, we assume that there are two types of shocks which related to exchange rate movements: real shocks and nominal shocks. The empirical analysis indicates that real shocks are the fundamental compon...

  13. Chronic restraint stress after injury and shock is associated with persistent anemia despite prolonged elevation in erythropoietin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Letitia E; Pasupuleti, Latha V; Gore, Amy V; Sifri, Ziad C; Kannan, Kolenkode B; Mohr, Alicia M

    2015-07-01

    Following severe traumatic injury, critically ill patients have a prolonged hypercatacholamine state that is associated with bone marrow (BM) dysfunction and persistent anemia. However, current animal models of injury and shock result in a transient anemia. Daily restraint stress (chronic stress [CS]) has been shown to increase catecholamines. We hypothesize that adding CS following injury or injury and shock in rats will prolong the hypercatecholaminemia and prolong the initial anemia, despite elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-8 per group) underwent lung contusion (LC) or combined LC/hemorrhagic shock (LCHS) followed by 6 days of CS. CS consisted of a 2-hour restraint period interrupted with repositioning and alarms every 30 minutes. At 7 days, urine was assessed for norepinephrine (NE) levels, blood for EPO and hemoglobin (Hgb), and BM for erythroid progenitor growth. Animals undergoing LC or combined LCHS predictably recovered by Day 7; urine NE, EPO, and Hgb levels were normal. The addition of CS to LC and LCHS models was associated with a significant elevation in NE on Day 6. The addition of CS to LC led to a persistent 20% to 25% decrease in the growth of BM hematopoietic progenitor cells. These findings were further exaggerated when CS was added following LCHS, resulting in a 20%q to 40% reduction in BM erythroid progenitor colony growth and a 20% decrease in Hgb when compared with LCHS alone. Exposing injured animals to CS results in prolonged elevation of NE and EPO, which is associated with worsening BM erythroid function and persistent anemia. Chronic restraint stress following injury and shock provides a clinically relevant model to further evaluate persistent injury-associated anemia seen in critically ill trauma patients. Furthermore, alleviating CS after severe injury is a potential therapeutic target to improve BM dysfunction and anemia.

  14. Release path temperatures of shock-compressed tin from dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Lone, B. M., E-mail: lalonebm@nv.doe.gov; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, California 93111 (United States); Holtkamp, D. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Iverson, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hixson, R. S.; Veeser, L. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); National Security Technologies, LLC, Los Alamos Operations, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R{sub 0} are <2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are <5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of <2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

  15. Remote shock sensing and notification system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Britton, Charles L.; Pearce, James; Jagadish, Usha; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2008-11-11

    A low-power shock sensing system includes at least one shock sensor physically coupled to a chemical storage tank to be monitored for impacts, and an RF transmitter which is in a low-power idle state in the absence of a triggering signal. The system includes interference circuitry including or activated by the shock sensor, wherein an output of the interface circuitry is coupled to an input of the RF transmitter. The interface circuitry triggers the RF transmitting with the triggering signal to transmit an alarm message to at least one remote location when the sensor senses a shock greater than a predetermined threshold. In one embodiment the shock sensor is a shock switch which provides an open and a closed state, the open state being a low power idle state.

  16. Shock Analysis Method for Systematic Performance Evaluation of Component Embedded in Handheld Electronic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Chin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It is important to identify the robustness of product (or embedded component inside the product against shock due to free drop. With the increasing mobile and fast-paced lifestyle of the average consumer, much is required of the products; such as consumers expect mobile products to continue to operate after drop impact. Since free drop test is commonly used to evaluate the robustness of small component embedded in MP3 player, it is difficult to produce a repeatable shock reading due to highly uncontrolled orientation during the impact on ground. Hence attention has been focus on shock table testing, which produces a higher repeatable result. But it failed to demonstrate the actual shock with the presence of rotational movement due to free drop and also it suffers from a similar limitation of repeatability. From drop to drop, shock tables can vary about ± 5% in velocity change but suitable for making a consistent tracking the product improvement.

  17. [Analysis of the protective effect of shock-absorbing shoes for patients treated with hip and knee endoprostheses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, D; Cziuk, N

    1988-01-01

    Biomechanical loading of total knee and hip replacement is one of the essential factors which limit the longterm-function of the implant components. A simple and cheap safety provision to avoid mechanical overload seems to be wearing of shock-absorbing shoes. The performed study analyzes the effect of that type of shoe. For judgement the parameters: energy absorption while slow shock, damping while hard shock and safety against sliding were taken. The experiments showed the shock-absorbing shoe is an easy, inexpensive, but very efficient protection measure to improve the longterm-stability of endoprosthesis of the lower extremity.

  18. Bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, John

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we provide a unifying framework for a set of seemingly disparate models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies in financial markets. Markets operate by balancing intrinsic levels of risk and return. This seemingly simple observation is commonly over-looked by academics and practitioners alike. Our model shares its origins in statistical physics with others. However, under our approach, changes in market regime can be explicitly shown to represent a phase transition from random to deterministic behaviour in prices. This structure leads to an improved physical and econometric model. We develop models for bubbles, shocks and elementary technical trading strategies. The list of empirical applications is both interesting and topical and includes real-estate bubbles and the on-going Eurozone crisis. We close by comparing the results of our model with purely qualitative findings from the finance literature.

  19. Cylindrical shell under impact load including transverse shear and normal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakeri, M.; Eslami, M.R.; Ghassaa, M.; Ohadi, A.R.

    1993-01-01

    The general governing equations of shell of revolution under shock loads are reduced to equations describing the elastic behavior of cylindrical shell under axisymmetric impact load. The effect of lateral normal stress, transverse shear, and rotary inertia are included, and the equations are solved by Galerkin finite element method. The results are compared with the previous works of authors. (author)

  20. Performance evaluation and parameter sensitivity of energy-harvesting shock absorbers on different vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sijing; Liu, Yilun; Xu, Lin; Guo, Xuexun; Zuo, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Traditional shock absorbers provide favourable ride comfort and road handling by dissipating the suspension vibration energy into heat waste. In order to harvest this dissipated energy and improve the vehicle fuel efficiency, many energy-harvesting shock absorbers (EHSAs) have been proposed in recent years. Among them, two types of EHSAs have attracted much attention. One is a traditional EHSA which converts the oscillatory vibration into bidirectional rotation using rack-pinion, ball-screw or other mechanisms. The other EHSA is equipped with a mechanical motion rectifier (MMR) that transforms the bidirectional vibration into unidirectional rotation. Hereinafter, they are referred to as NonMMR-EHSA and MMR-EHSA, respectively. This paper compares their performances with the corresponding traditional shock absorber by using closed-form analysis and numerical simulations on various types of vehicles, including passenger cars, buses and trucks. Results suggest that MMR-EHSA provides better ride performances than NonMMR-EHSA, and that MMR-EHSA is able to improve both the ride comfort and road handling simultaneously over the traditional shock absorber when installed on light-damped, heavy-duty vehicles. Additionally, the optimal parameters of MMR-EHSA are obtained for ride comfort. The optimal solutions ('Pareto-optimal solutions') are also obtained by considering the trade-off between ride comfort and road handling.

  1. Life shocks and homelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Marah A; Corman, Hope; Noonan, Kelly; Reichman, Nancy E

    2013-12-01

    We exploited an exogenous health shock-namely, the birth of a child with a severe health condition-to investigate the effect of a life shock on homelessness in large cities in the United States as well as the interactive effects of the shock with housing market characteristics. We considered a traditional measure of homelessness, two measures of housing instability thought to be precursors to homelessness, and a combined measure that approximates the broadened conceptualization of homelessness under the 2009 Homeless Emergency Assistance and Rapid Transition to Housing Act (2010). We found that the shock substantially increases the likelihood of family homelessness, particularly in cities with high housing costs. The findings are consistent with the economic theory of homelessness, which posits that homelessness results from a conjunction of adverse circumstances in which housing markets and individual characteristics collide.

  2. Estradiol improves cardiac and hepatic function after trauma-hemorrhage: role of enhanced heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, László; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Suzuki, Takao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Schwacha, Martin G; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2006-03-01

    Although studies indicate that 17beta-estradiol administration after trauma-hemorrhage (T-H) improves cardiac and hepatic functions, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) can protect cardiac and hepatic functions, we hypothesized that these proteins contribute to the salutary effects of estradiol after T-H. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats ( approximately 300 g) underwent laparotomy and hemorrhagic shock (35-40 mmHg for approximately 90 min) followed by resuscitation with four times the shed blood volume in the form of Ringer lactate. 17beta-estradiol (1 mg/kg body wt) was administered at the end of the resuscitation. Five hours after T-H and resuscitation there was a significant decrease in cardiac output, positive and negative maximal rate of left ventricular pressure. Liver function as determined by bile production and indocyanine green clearance was also compromised after T-H and resuscitation. This was accompanied by an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and liver perfusate lactic dehydrogenase levels. Furthermore, circulating levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 were also increased. In addition to decreased cardiac and hepatic function, there was an increase in cardiac HSP32 expression and a reduction in HSP60 expression after T-H. In the liver, HSP32 and HSP70 were increased after T-H. There was no change in heart HSP70 and liver HSP60 after T-H and resuscitation. Estradiol administration at the end of T-H and resuscitation increased heart/liver HSPs expression, ameliorated the impairment of heart/liver functions, and significantly prevented the increase in plasma levels of ALT, TNF-alpha, and IL-6. The ability of estradiol to induce HSPs expression in the heart and the liver suggests that HSPs, in part, mediate the salutary effects of 17beta-estradiol on organ functions after T-H.

  3. Shock formation of HCO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elitzur, M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that shocks propagating in dense molecular regions will lead to a decrease in HCO + relative abundance, in agreement with previous results by Iglesias and Silk. The shock enhancement of HCO + detected in the supernova remnant IC 443 by Dickenson et al. is due to enhanced ionization in the shocked material. This is the result of the material penetrating the remnant cavity where it becomes exposed to the trapped cosmic rays. A similar enhancement appears to have been detected by Wootten in W28 and is explained by the same model

  4. Frequent Home Monitoring of ICD Is Effective to Prevent Inappropriate Defibrillator Shock Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bifulco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, in the context of telemedicine, telemonitoring services are gaining attention. They are offered, for example, to patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs. A major problem associated with ICD therapy is the occurrence of inappropriate shocks which impair patients’ quality of life and may also be arrhythmogenic. The telemonitoring can provide a valid support to intensify followup visits, in order to improve the prevention of inappropriate defibrillator shock, thus enhancing patient safety. Inappropriate shock generally depends on atrial fibrillation, supraventricular tachycardia, and abnormal sensing (such as those caused by electromagnetic interferences. As a practical example, an unusual case of an ICD patient who risked an inappropriate shock while taking a shower is reported. Continuous remote telemonitoring was able to timely warn cardiologist via GSM-SMS, who were able to detect improper sensing examining the intracardiac electrogram via Web. Patient was promptly contacted and warned to not further come in contact with the hydraulic system and any electrical appliance to prevent an inappropriate defibrillator shock. This demonstrates the effectiveness and usefulness of continuous remote telemonitoring in supporting ICD patients.

  5. ShockOmics: multiscale approach to the identification of molecular biomarkers in acute heart failure induced by shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletti, Federico; Conti, Costanza; Ferrario, Manuela; Ribas, Vicent; Bollen Pinto, Bernardo; Herpain, Antoine; Post, Emiel; Romay Medina, Eduardo; Barlassina, Cristina; de Oliveira, Eliandre; Pastorelli, Roberta; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Taccone, Fabio S; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W; Ferrer, Ricard; De Backer, Daniel; Bendjelid, Karim; Baselli, Giuseppe

    2016-01-28

    The ShockOmics study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02141607) is a multicenter prospective observational trial aimed at identifying new biomarkers of acute heart failure in circulatory shock, by means of a multiscale analysis of blood samples and hemodynamic data from subjects with circulatory shock. Ninety septic shock and cardiogenic shock patients will be recruited in three intensive care units (ICU) (Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium; Hospital Universitari Mutua Terrassa, Spain; Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève, Switzerland). Hemodynamic signals will be recorded every day for up to seven days from shock diagnosis (time T0). Clinical data and blood samples will be collected for analysis at: i) T1  5 and lactate levels ≥ 2 mmol/L. The exclusion criteria are: expected death within 24 h since ICU admission; > 4 units of red blood cells or >1 fresh frozen plasma transfused; active hematological malignancy; metastatic cancer; chronic immunodepression; pre-existing end stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy; recent cardiac surgery; Child-Pugh C cirrhosis; terminal illness. Enrollment will be preceded by the signature of the Informed Consent by the patient or his/her relatives and by the physician in charge. Three non-shock control groups will be included in the study: a) healthy blood donors (n = 5); b) septic patients (n = 10); c) acute myocardial infarction or patients with prolonged acute arrhythmia (n = 10). The hemodynamic data will be downloaded from the ICU monitors by means of dedicated software. The blood samples will be utilized for transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics ("-omics") analyses. ShockOmics will provide new insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying shock as well as new biomarkers for the timely diagnosis of cardiac dysfunction in shock and quantitative indices for assisting the therapeutic management of shock patients.

  6. Thermal shock resistance of ceramic fibre composites characterized by non-destructive methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dimitrijević

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Alumina based ceramic fibres and alumina based ceramic were used to produce composite material. Behaviour of composite ceramics after thermal shock treatments was investigated. Thermal shock of the samples was evaluated using water quench test. Surface deterioration level of samples was monitored by image analysis before and after a number of quenching cycles. Ultrasonic measurements were done on samples after quench tests. Dynamic Young modulus of elasticity and strength degradation were calculated using measured values of ultrasonic velocities. Strengths deterioration was calculated using the non-destructive measurements and correlated to degradation of surface area and number of quenches. The addition of small amount of ceramic fibres improves the strengths and diminishes the loss of mechanical properties of samples during thermal shock experiments.

  7. Comparative Study between Slow Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Fast Shock Wave Lithotripsy in the Management of Renal Stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Zamanul Islam Bhuiyan

    2013-01-01

    than in Group B and Group C. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that slow delivery rate (60 SW/min as well as age (younger, symptom (painful at onset, stone location (upper and middle calyx and size (small were independent prognostic factors determining stone clearance after ESWL of renal stone. Conclusion: Slow rate shock wave delivery improves efficacy of ESWL treatments of renal stone and decreased number of sessions, shock waves and treatment time.

  8. Particle acceleration at shocks in the inner heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Linda Neergaard

    This dissertation describes a study of particle acceleration at shocks via the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. Results for particle acceleration at both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks are presented to address the question of whether there are sufficient particles in the solar wind thermal core, modeled as either a Maxwellian or kappa- distribution, to account for the observed accelerated spectrum. Results of accelerating the theoretical upstream distribution are compared to energetic observations at 1 AU. It is shown that the particle distribution in the solar wind thermal core is sufficient to explain the accelerated particle spectrum downstream of the shock, although the shape of the downstream distribution in some cases does not follow completely the theory of diffusive shock acceleration, indicating possible additional processes at work in the shock for these cases. Results show good to excellent agreement between the theoretical and observed spectral index for one third to one half of both quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks studied herein. Coronal mass ejections occurring during periods of high solar activity surrounding solar maximum can produce shocks in excess of 3-8 shocks per day. During solar minimum, diffusive shock acceleration at shocks can generally be understood on the basis of single independent shocks and no other shock necessarily influences the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. In this sense, diffusive shock acceleration during solar minimum may be regarded as Markovian. By contrast, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at periods of high solar activity (e.g. solar maximum) see frequent, closely spaced shocks that include the effects of particle acceleration at preceding and following shocks. Therefore, diffusive shock acceleration of particles at solar maximum cannot be modeled on the basis of diffusive shock acceleration as a single, independent shock and the process is essentially non-Markovian. A

  9. Melting under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, B.I.

    1980-10-01

    A simple model, using experimentally measured shock and particle velocities, is applied to the Lindemann melting formula to predict the density, temperature, and pressure at which a material will melt when shocked from room temperature and zero pressure initial conditions

  10. Designing and testing computer based screening engine for severe sepsis/septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herasevich, V; Afessa, B; Chute, C G; Gajic, O

    2008-11-06

    This study addresses the role of a sepsis "sniffer", an automatic screening tool for the timely identification of patients with severe sepsis/septic shock, based electronic medical records. During the two months prospective implementation in a medical intensive care unit, 37 of 320 consecutive patients developed severe sepsis/septic shock. The sniffer demonstrated a sensitivity of 48% and specificity of 86%, and positive predictive value 32%. Further improvements are needed prior to the implementation of sepsis sniffer in clinical practice and research.

  11. 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Ranjan, Devesh

    2015-01-01

    This proceedings present the results of the 29th International Symposium on Shock Waves (ISSW29) which was held in Madison, Wisconsin, U.S.A., from July 14 to July 19, 2013. It was organized by the Wisconsin Shock Tube Laboratory, which is part of the College of Engineering of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The ISSW29 focused on the following areas: Blast Waves, Chemically Reactive Flows, Detonation and Combustion,  Facilities, Flow Visualization, Hypersonic Flow, Ignition, Impact and Compaction, Industrial Applications, Magnetohydrodynamics, Medical and Biological Applications, Nozzle Flow, Numerical Methods, Plasmas, Propulsion, Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability, Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction, Shock Propagation and Reflection, Shock Vortex Interaction, Shock Waves in Condensed Matter, Shock Waves in Multiphase Flow, as well as Shock Waves in Rarefield Flow. The two Volumes contain the papers presented at the symposium and serve as a reference for the participants of the ISSW 29 and individuals interes...

  12. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H; Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E; Katayama, S; Koyano, M

    2010-01-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO 4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO 2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  13. Focusing of Shear Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammarinaro, Bruno; Espíndola, David; Coulouvrat, François; Pinton, Gianmarco

    2018-01-01

    Focusing is a ubiquitous way to transform waves. Recently, a new type of shock wave has been observed experimentally with high-frame-rate ultrasound: shear shock waves in soft solids. These strongly nonlinear waves are characterized by a high Mach number, because the shear wave velocity is much slower, by 3 orders of magnitude, than the longitudinal wave velocity. Furthermore, these waves have a unique cubic nonlinearity which generates only odd harmonics. Unlike longitudinal waves for which only compressional shocks are possible, shear waves exhibit cubic nonlinearities which can generate positive and negative shocks. Here we present the experimental observation of shear shock wave focusing, generated by the vertical motion of a solid cylinder section embedded in a soft gelatin-graphite phantom to induce linearly vertically polarized motion. Raw ultrasound data from high-frame-rate (7692 images per second) acquisitions in combination with algorithms that are tuned to detect small displacements (approximately 1 μ m ) are used to generate quantitative movies of gel motion. The features of shear shock wave focusing are analyzed by comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations of a retarded-time elastodynamic equation with cubic nonlinearities and empirical attenuation laws for soft solids.

  14. Computations of slowly moving shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karni, S.; Canic, S.

    1997-01-01

    Computations of slowly moving shocks by shock capturing schemes may generate oscillations are generated already by first-order schemes, but become more pronounced in higher-order schemes which seem to exhibit different behaviors: (i) the first-order upwind (UW) scheme which generates strong oscillations and (ii) the Lax-Friedrichs scheme which appears not to generate any disturbances at all. A key observation is that in the UW case, the numerical viscosity in the shock family vanishes inside the slow shock layer. Simple scaling arguments show the third-order effects on the solution may no longer be neglected. We derive the third-order modified equation for the UW scheme and regard the oscillatory solution as a traveling wave solution of the parabolic modified equation for the perturbation. We then look at the governing equation for the perturbation, which points to a plausible mechanism by which postshock oscillations are generated. It contains a third-order source term that becomes significant inside the shock layer, and a nonlinear coupling term which projects the perturbation on all characteristic fields, including those not associated with the shock family. 5 refs., 8 figs

  15. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Okuno, M.; Okudera, H.; Mashimo, T.; Omurzak, E.; Katayama, S.; Koyano, M.

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO4 tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO2 glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  16. Shock compression of synthetic opal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, A; Okuno, M; Okudera, H [Department of Earth Sciences, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Mashimo, T; Omurzak, E [Shock Wave and Condensed Matter Research Center, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, 860-8555 (Japan); Katayama, S; Koyano, M, E-mail: okuno@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.j [JAIST, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1297 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Structural change of synthetic opal by shock-wave compression up to 38.1 GPa has been investigated by using SEM, X-ray diffraction method (XRD), Infrared (IR) and Raman spectroscopies. Obtained information may indicate that the dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole due to high shock and residual temperature are very important factors in the structural evolution of synthetic opal by shock compression. Synthetic opal loses opalescence by 10.9 and 18.4 GPa of shock pressures. At 18.4 GPa, dehydration and polymerization of surface silanole and transformation of network structure may occur simultaneously. The 4-membered ring of TO{sub 4} tetrahedrons in as synthetic opal may be relaxed to larger ring such as 6-membered ring by high residual temperature. Therefore, the residual temperature may be significantly high at even 18.4 GPa of shock compression. At 23.9 GPa, opal sample recovered the opalescence. Origin of this opalescence may be its layer structure by shock compression. Finally, sample fuse by very high residual temperature at 38.1 GPa and the structure closes to that of fused SiO{sub 2} glass. However, internal silanole groups still remain even at 38.1 GPa.

  17. Do oil shocks predict economic policy uncertainty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Mobeen Ur

    2018-05-01

    Oil price fluctuations have influential role in global economic policies for developed as well as emerging countries. I investigate the role of international oil prices disintegrated into structural (i) oil supply shock, (ii) aggregate demand shock and (iii) oil market specific demand shocks, based on the work of Kilian (2009) using structural VAR framework on economic policies uncertainty of sampled markets. Economic policy uncertainty, due to its non-linear behavior is modeled in a regime switching framework with disintegrated structural oil shocks. Our results highlight that Indian, Spain and Japanese economic policy uncertainty responds to the global oil price shocks, however aggregate demand shocks fail to induce any change. Oil specific demand shocks are significant only for China and India in high volatility state.

  18. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the dynamics of shock waves in weakly ionized argon plasmas has been performed using a pressure ruptured shock tube. The velocity of the shock is observed to increase when the shock traverses the plasma. The observed increases cannot be accounted for by thermal effects alone. Possible mechanisms that could explain the anomalous behavior include a vibrational/translational relaxation in the nonequilibrium plasma, electron diffusion across the shock front resulting from high electron mobility, and the propagation of ion-acoustic waves generated at the shock front. Using a turbulence model based on reduced kinetic theory, analysis of the observed results suggest a role for turbulence in anomalous shock dynamics in weakly ionized media and plasma-induced hypersonic drag reduction.

  19. Improvement in social function and health-related quality of life after shunt surgery for idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Jakob; Hellström, Per; Wikkelsø, Carsten; Lundgren-Nilsson, Asa

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the impact of shunt surgery on the activity, participation, autonomy, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with idiopathic normal-pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) as well as the effect on caregiver burden. Thirty-seven patients (median age 70 years, range 50-89 years) with iNPH were evaluated before and 6 months after surgery. Symptoms and signs were assessed by the iNPH scale, activities of daily living (ADL) with the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), autonomy and participation with Impact on Participation and Autonomy (IPA), and caregiver burden with the Caregiver Burden Scale (CBS). HRQOL was evaluated with the EQ-5D (EuroQol Group-5 Dimension health survey). Twenty-four patients (65%) improved clinically (iNPH scale score) and 31 (86%) improved their HRQOL after surgery, almost to the same level as found in the normal population. The patients became more independent in physical and cognitive activities, and participation and autonomy improved. The caregiver burden was decreased among caregivers to male patients but remained unchanged on the overall group level. After shunt surgery, patients with iNPH showed improvement in most aspects of social life, they became more independent, and their quality of life returned to nearly normal.

  20. What do we mean by the word ''Shock''?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runnels, Scott Robert

    2015-01-01

    From one vantage point, a shock is a continuous but drastic change in state variables that occurs over very small time and length scales. These scales and associated changes in state variables can be measured experimentally. From another vantage point, a shock is a mathematical singularity consisting of instantaneous changes in state variables. This more mathematical view gives rise to analytical solutions to idealized problems. And from a third vantage point, a shock is a structure in a hydrocode prediction. Its width depends on the simulation's grid resolution and artificial viscosity. These three vantage points can be in conflict when ideas from the associated fields are combined, and yet combining them is an important goal of an integrated modeling program. This presentation explores an example of how models for real materials in the presence of real shocks react to a hydrocode's numerical shocks of finite width. The presentation will include an introduction to plasticity for the novice, an historical view of plasticity algorithms, a demonstration of how pursuing the meaning of ''shock'' has resulted in hydrocode improvements, and will conclude by answering some of the questions that arise from that pursuit. After the technical part of the presentation, a few slides advertising LANL's Computational Physics Student Summer Workshop will be shown.

  1. The intensive care medicine research agenda on septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Gordon, Anthony C; Angus, Derek C

    2017-01-01

    Septic shock remains a global health challenge with millions of cases every year, high rates of mortality and morbidity, impaired quality of life among survivors and relatives, and high resource use both in developed and developing nations. Care and outcomes are improving through organisational i...... and translational work. In this review, international experts summarize the current position of clinical research in septic shock and propose a research agenda to advance this field....... initiatives and updated clinical practice guidelines based on clinical research mainly carried out by large collaborative networks. This progress is likely to continue through the collaborative work of the established and merging trials groups in many parts of the world and through refined trial methodology...

  2. Shock waves in weakly compressed granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wildenberg, Siet; van Loo, Rogier; van Hecke, Martin

    2013-11-22

    We experimentally probe nonlinear wave propagation in weakly compressed granular media and observe a crossover from quasilinear sound waves at low impact to shock waves at high impact. We show that this crossover impact grows with the confining pressure P0, whereas the shock wave speed is independent of P0-two hallmarks of granular shocks predicted recently. The shocks exhibit surprising power law attenuation, which we model with a logarithmic law implying that shock dissipation is weak and qualitatively different from other granular dissipation mechanisms. We show that elastic and potential energy balance in the leading part of the shocks.

  3. 4-Phenylbutyrate Benefits Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock in Rats by Attenuating Oxidative Stress, Not by Attenuating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangming; Peng, Xiaoyong; Hu, Yi; Lan, Dan; Wu, Yue; Li, Tao; Liu, Liangming

    2016-07-01

    Vascular dysfunction such as vascular hyporeactivity following severe trauma and shock is a major cause of death in injured patients. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress play an important role in vascular dysfunction. The objective of the present study was to determine whether or not 4-phenylbutyrate can improve vascular dysfunction and elicit antishock effects by inhibiting oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Prospective, randomized, controlled laboratory experiment. State key laboratory of trauma, burns, and combined injury. Five hundred and fifty-two Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats were anesthetized, and a model of traumatic hemorrhagic shock was established by left femur fracture and hemorrhage. The effects of 4-phenylbutyrate (5, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg) on vascular reactivity, animal survival, hemodynamics, and vital organ function in traumatic hemorrhagic shock rats and cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, and the relationship to oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress was observed. Lower doses of 4-phenylbutyrate significantly improved the vascular function, stabilized the hemodynamics, and increased the tissue blood flow and vital organ function in traumatic hemorrhagic shock rats, and markedly improved the survival outcomes. Among all dosages observed in the present study, 20 mg/kg of 4-phenylbutyrate had the best effect. Further results indicated that 4-phenylbutyrate significantly inhibited the oxidative stress, decreased shock-induced oxidative stress index such as the production of reactive oxygen species, increased the antioxidant enzyme levels such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione, and improved the mitochondrial function by inhibiting the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore in rat artery and vascular smooth muscle cells. In contrast, 4-phenylbutyrate did not affect the changes of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers following traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Furthermore, 4

  4. Recruitment of phosphorylated small heat shock protein Hsp27 to nuclear speckles without stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryantsev, A.L.; Chechenova, M.B.; Shelden, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    During stress, the mammalian small heat shock protein Hsp27 enters cell nuclei. The present study examines the requirements for entry of Hsp27 into nuclei of normal rat kidney (NRK) renal epithelial cells, and for its interactions with specific nuclear structures. We find that phosphorylation of Hsp27 is necessary for the efficient entry into nuclei during heat shock but not sufficient for efficient nuclear entry under control conditions. We further report that Hsp27 is recruited to an RNAse sensitive fraction of SC35 positive nuclear speckles, but not other intranuclear structures, in response to heat shock. Intriguingly, Hsp27 phosphorylation, in the absence of stress, is sufficient for recruitment to speckles found in post-anaphase stage mitotic cells. Additionally, pseudophosphorylated Hsp27 fused to a nuclear localization peptide (NLS) is recruited to nuclear speckles in unstressed interphase cells, but wildtype and nonphosphorylatable Hsp27 NLS fusion proteins are not. The expression of NLS-Hsp27 mutants does not enhance colony forming abilities of cells subjected to severe heat shock, but does regulate nuclear speckle morphology. These data demonstrate that phosphorylation, but not stress, mediates Hsp27 recruitment to an RNAse soluble fraction of nuclear speckles and support a site-specific role for Hsp27 within the nucleus

  5. Modeling secondary accidents identified by traffic shock waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junhua, Wang; Boya, Liu; Lanfang, Zhang; Ragland, David R

    2016-02-01

    The high potential for occurrence and the negative consequences of secondary accidents make them an issue of great concern affecting freeway safety. Using accident records from a three-year period together with California interstate freeway loop data, a dynamic method for more accurate classification based on the traffic shock wave detecting method was used to identify secondary accidents. Spatio-temporal gaps between the primary and secondary accident were proven be fit via a mixture of Weibull and normal distribution. A logistic regression model was developed to investigate major factors contributing to secondary accident occurrence. Traffic shock wave speed and volume at the occurrence of a primary accident were explicitly considered in the model, as a secondary accident is defined as an accident that occurs within the spatio-temporal impact scope of the primary accident. Results show that the shock waves originating in the wake of a primary accident have a more significant impact on the likelihood of a secondary accident occurrence than the effects of traffic volume. Primary accidents with long durations can significantly increase the possibility of secondary accidents. Unsafe speed and weather are other factors contributing to secondary crash occurrence. It is strongly suggested that when police or rescue personnel arrive at the scene of an accident, they should not suddenly block, decrease, or unblock the traffic flow, but instead endeavor to control traffic in a smooth and controlled manner. Also it is important to reduce accident processing time to reduce the risk of secondary accident. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigation of Dynamic Friction Induced by Shock Loading Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juanicotena, A.; Szarzynski, S.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the frictional sliding of one surface against another under high pressure is often required to correctly describe the response of complex systems to shock loading. In order to provide data for direct code and model comparison, a new friction experiment investigating dry sliding characteristics of metal on metal at normal pressures up to 10 GPa and sliding velocities up to 400 m/s has been developed. The test consists of a specifically designed target made of two materials. A plane shock wave generated by plate impact results in one material sliding against the other. The material velocity of the rear surface of the target is recorded versus time by Doppler Laser Interferometry. The dynamic friction coefficient μ is then indirectly determined by comparison with results of numerical simulations involving the conventional Coulomb law. Using this new experimental configuration, three dynamic friction experiments were performed on AA 5083-Al (H111) / AISI 321 stainless steel tribo-pair. Results suggest a decrease in the friction coefficient with increasing sliding velocity

  7. Analytic study of 1D diffusive relativistic shock acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keshet, Uri, E-mail: ukeshet@bgu.ac.il [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Be' er-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2017-10-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) by relativistic shocks is thought to generate the dN / dE ∝ E{sup −p} spectra of charged particles in various astronomical relativistic flows. We show that for test particles in one dimension (1D), p {sup −1}=1−ln[γ{sub d}(1+β{sub d})]/ln[γ{sub u}(1+β{sub u})], where β{sub u}(β{sub d}) is the upstream (downstream) normalized velocity, and γ is the respective Lorentz factor. This analytically captures the main properties of relativistic DSA in higher dimensions, with no assumptions on the diffusion mechanism. Unlike 2D and 3D, here the spectrum is sensitive to the equation of state even in the ultra-relativistic limit, and (for a J(üttner-Synge equation of state) noticeably hardens with increasing 1<γ{sub u}<57, before logarithmically converging back to p (γ{sub u→∞})=2. The 1D spectrum is sensitive to drifts, but only in the downstream, and not in the ultra-relativistic limit.

  8. Refractory Septic Shock Treated with Nephrectomy under the Support of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Kun Lee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Conventional medical therapies have not been very successful in treating adults with refractory septic shock. The effects of direct hemoperfusion using polymyxin B and veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO for refractory septic shock remain uncertain. A 66-year-old man was admitted to the emergency department and suffered from sepsis-induced hemodynamic collapse. For hemodynamic improvement, we performed direct hemoperfusion using polymyxin B. Computed tomography scan of this patient revealed emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN, for which he underwent emergent nephrectomy with veno-arterial ECMO support. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of EPN with refractory septic shock using polymyxin B hemoperfusion and nephrectomy under the support of ECMO.

  9. A comparative study on shock compression of nanocrystalline Al and Cu: Shock profiles and microscopic views of plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Wen; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Wenjun

    2013-01-01

    Shock compressions of nanocrystalline (nc) metals Al and Cu with the same grain size and texture are studied by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results have revealed that the shock front of both Al and Cu can be divided into three stages: elastic, grain-boundary-mediated, and dislocation-mediated plastic deformation. The transition planes among these three stages are proven to be non-planar by two-dimensional shock response analysis, including local stress, shear, temperature, and atom configuration. The difference between shocked Al and Cu is that the rise rate of the elastic stage of Cu is slightly higher than that of Al, and that the shock-front width of Al is wider than Cu at the same loading conditions. For the plastic stage, the dislocation density of shocked Al is lower than Cu, and the contribution of grain-boundary-mediated plasticity to shock front and strain for nc Al is more pronounced than for nc Cu. These results are explained through intrinsic material properties and atomistic analysis of the plastic process. In the case of the shocked Al sample, partial dislocations, perfect dislocations, and twins are observed, but few evidence of perfect dislocations and twins are observed in the shocked Cu

  10. Shock wave dynamics derivatives and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Emanuel, George

    2012-01-01

    "...this monograph develops an esoteric niche within shock wave theory. …treats shock waves from an analytical approach assuming perfect gas. Emanuel has made significant contributions to the theory of shock waves and has selected a number of topics that reflect those contributions."-Shock Waves, 2013.

  11. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  12. Role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. EL-Nawawy

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the role of echocardiography in reducing shock reversal time in pediatric septic shock. Methods: A prospective study conducted in the pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital from September 2013 to May 2016. Ninety septic shock patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio for comparing the serial echocardiography-guided therapy in the study group with the standard therapy in the control group regarding clinical course, timely treatment, and outcomes. Results: Shock reversal was significantly higher in the study group (89% vs. 67%, with significantly reduced shock reversal time (3.3 vs. 4.5 days. Pediatric intensive care unit stay in the study group was significantly shorter (8 ± 3 vs. 14 ± 10 days. Mortality due to unresolved shock was significantly lower in the study group. Fluid overload was significantly lower in the study group (11% vs. 44%. In the study group, inotropes were used more frequently (89% vs. 67% and initiated earlier (12[0.5-24] vs. 24[6-72] h with lower maximum vasopressor inotrope score (120[30-325] vs. 170[80-395], revealing predominant use of milrinone (62% vs. 22%. Conclusion: Serial echocardiography provided crucial data for early recognition of septic myocardial dysfunction and hypovolemia that was not apparent on clinical assessment, allowing a timely management and resulting in shock reversal time reduction among children with septic shock.

  13. Trauma as a case of hypovolemic shock: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drašković Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTODUCTION: Background shock syndrome represents an acute generalized disorder perfusion of all organ systems that result in disturbance of metabolism of cells. The time required to develop the shock through all its phases varies from patient to patient. In related to the health status and the ability of the organism to compensate disorder. As shock develops, the process accelerates the circulatory system is unable to provide an adequate amount of blood tissues. The performance cellular hypoxia and cell death. The objective of this paper is to describe the diagnosis, prevention shock and adequately care for patients with respect guide of good clinical medicine in primary health care. DESCRIPTION CASE:A man aged 74 years, was brought in ambulant around 23:15 h. The patient states that he hurt his left lower leg about 19 30 h, the cow kicked him while he was performing work in the barn. Status / conscious, occasionally disoriented, afebrile, pale, cold sweat, respirations Vitals: TA 90/60 mmHg, BLS 22,6mmol/l, HR 131/min., SpO2 92% , auscultatory findings: cardiac arrhythmic action, quieter tones, accelerated, normal breathing sum ECG HR 131 / min, BDG, negative T in V1, signs HLK. Local signs: on the left tibia, lateral side: there is lacero seriously injuries 25/30 cm in length and 5.6 cm depth of extensive bleeding . Tibia fully alterity coloured and cooler than other one: Sanitation injuries solution of NaCl 0.9% tamponade, rewind, amp. metoclopramide iv 1x1, 0.9% NaCl solution 500 ml infusion, Transport, Transportation time from the beginning to hosptal 30 min. DISCUSSION: This case is described to hours of bleeding due to injuries sustained impact of lower leg, cause by animal, in a patient aged 74 years, which has led to the deteriorated state of health, deterioration, generally condition, hypovolemia and origin shock. Considering that the patient did not report the doctor, comes to the development of compensatory phase shock with symptoms

  14. Inappropriate shocks in the subcutaneous ICD: Incidence, predictors and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Brouwer, Tom F.; Barr, Craig; Theuns, Dominic A. M. J.; Boersma, Lucas V. A.; Johansen, Jens B.; Neuzil, Petr; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Carter, Nathan; Husby, Michael; Lambiase, Pier D.; Knops, Reinoud E.

    2015-01-01

    The entirely subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) eliminates the need for transvenous leads, and therefore has the potential to improve lead-longevity and reduce lead-related complications. The S-ICD has a morphology-based sensing algorithm of which inappropriate shocks have

  15. Comparison of the effectiveness of local corticosteroid injection and extracorporeal shock wave therapy in patients with lateral epicondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyazal, Münevver Serdaroğlu; Devrimsel, Gül

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine and compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and local corticosteroid injection in patients with lateral epicondylitis. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-four patients with lateral epicondylitis were randomly divided into extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection groups. Patients were evaluated using hand grip strength, visual analog scale, and short-form McGill pain questionnaire at baseline and at 4 and 12 weeks post-treatment. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant increase in hand grip strength and decreases on the visual analog scale and short form McGill pain questionnaire overtime. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of improvement in hand grip strength and on the short-form McGill pain questionnaire between groups at 4 weeks post-treatment, whereas the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group showed better results on the visual analog scale. The percentages of improvements in all 3 parameters were higher in the extracorporeal shock wave therapy group than in the injection group at 12 weeks post-treatment. [Conclusion] Both the extracorporeal shock wave therapy and steroid injection were safe and effective in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis. However, extracorporeal shock wave therapy demonstrated better outcomes than steroid injection at the long-term follow-up.

  16. Shock waves in luminous early-type stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castor, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    Shock waves that occur in stellar atmospheres have their origin in some hydrodynamic instability of the atmosphere itself or of the stellar interior. In luminous early-type stars these two possibilities are represented by shocks due to an unstable radiatively-accelerated wind, and to shocks generated by the non-radial pulsations known to be present in many or most OB stars. This review is concerned with the structure and development of the shocks in these two cases, and especially with the mass loss that may be due specifically to the shocks. Pulsation-produced shocks are found to be very unfavorable for causing mass loss, owing to the great radiation efficiency that allows them to remain isothermal. The situation regarding radiatively-driven shocks remains unclear, awaiting detailed hydrodynamics calculations. 20 refs., 2 figs

  17. Computer simulations of collisionless shock waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the contributions of particle computer simulations to the understanding of the physics of magnetic shock waves in collisionless plasmas is presented. The emphasis is on the relation between the computer simulation results, spacecraft observations of shocks in space, and related theories, rather than on technical aspects of the numerics. It is shown that much has been learned from the comparison of ISEE spacecraft observations of the terrestrial bow shock and particle computer simulations concerning the quasi-perpendicular, supercritical shock (ion scale structure, ion reflection mechanism and ultimate dissipation processes). Particle computer simulations have also had an appreciable prospective role in the investigation of the physics of quasi-parallel shocks, about which still little is known observationally. Moreover, these numerical techniques have helped to clarify the process of suprathermal ion rejection by the shock into the foreshock, and the subsequent evolution of the ions in the foreshock. 95 references

  18. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitor (17-AAG) Induces Apoptosis and Decreases Cell Migration/Motility of Keloid Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, In Sik; Lee, Mi Hee; Rah, Dong Kyun; Lew, Dae Hyun; Park, Jong-Chul; Lee, Won Jai

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of apoptosis, proliferation, and migration of fibroblasts is altered in keloids. The 90-kDa heat shock protein (heat shock protein 90) is known to play a key role in such regulation. Therefore, the authors investigated whether the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could induce apoptosis and attenuate keloid fibroblast proliferation and migration. The authors evaluated heat shock protein 90 expression in keloid tissues with immunohistochemistry. The authors used cell viability [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assays and annexin V/propidium iodide staining for apoptosis, a wound healing model and cell tracking system to assess cell migration, and Akt Western blotting analysis in keloid fibroblasts after inhibition of heat shock protein 90 with 17-allylaminodemethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). The expression of heat shock protein 90 in keloid tissues was significantly increased compared with normal tissues. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts showed significantly decreased proliferation, promotion of apoptosis, and decreased expression of Akt. Furthermore, a dose-dependent decrease in cell migration was noted after 17-AAG treatment of keloid fibroblasts. The 17-AAG-treated keloid fibroblasts had less directionality to the wound center and migrated a shorter distance. The authors confirmed that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 in keloid fibroblasts could promote apoptosis and attenuate proliferation and migration of keloid fibroblasts. Therefore, the authors think that the inhibition of heat shock protein 90 is a key factor in the regulation of biological processes in keloids. With further preclinical study, the authors will be able to apply these results clinically for keloid treatment.

  19. A study of shock mitigating materials in a split Hopkinson bar configuration. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, V.I.; Brown, F.A.; Hansen, N.R.

    1998-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with electronics that must survive high shock environments. These mechanical systems include penetrators that must survive soil, rock, and ice penetration, nuclear transportation casks that must survive transportation environments, and laydown weapons that must survive delivery impact of 125 fps. These mechanical systems contain electronics that may operate during and after the high shock environment and that must be protected from the high shock environments. A study has been started to improve the packaging techniques for the advanced electronics utilized in these mechanical systems because current packaging techniques are inadequate for these more sensitive electronics. In many cases, it has been found that the packaging techniques currently used not only do not mitigate the shock environment but actually amplify the shock environment. An ambitious goal for this packaging study is to avoid amplification and possibly attenuate the shock environment before it reaches the electronics contained in the various mechanical systems. As part of the investigation of packaging techniques, a two phase study of shock mitigating materials is being conducted. The purpose of the first phase reported here is to examine the performance of a joint that consists of shock mitigating material sandwiched in between steel and to compare the performance of the shock mitigating materials. A split Hopkinson bar experimental configuration simulates this joint and has been used to study the shock mitigating characteristics of seventeen, unconfined materials. The nominal input for these tests is an incident compressive wave with 50 fps peak (1,500 micro var-epsilon peak) amplitude and a 100 micros duration (measured at 10% amplitude)

  20. Correlated wave and particle observations upstream of the earth's bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, C.C.; Bavassano-Cattaneo, M.B.; Dobrowolny, M.; Orsini, S.; Mangeney, A.; Russell, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Data from three ISEE experiments has been analyzed during several periods of turbulence observed in the solar wind upstream of the earth's quasi-parallel bow shock. Radio observations are used to validate a shock model, which is subsequently used to compute various geometrical parameters during all the periods studied. One typical 9-hour period on November 4, 1977, is discussed in some detail to illustrate the parameters studied and the correlations found. It is shown that during this period, the radio noise spectrum has two components, one centered around the local electron plasma frequency and the other at somewhat lower frequencies; the latter component has a shorter wavelength and correlates with the level of MHD turbulence. A multivariate canonical statistical analysis of particle and MHD data during a 2-week period shows that the proton anisotropy and turbulence level correlate well with the minimum backstreaming proton parallel velocity p/sub min/ which, as defined here, is a purely geometrical parameter. Trivariate analysis shows that the correlation of particles and turbulence with the angle between the magnetic field and the shock normal have their sense reversed when allowance is made for the strong correlations with p/sub min/. A very good correlation has been found between power and compressibility in magnetic fluctuations

  1. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  2. Shocking matter to extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Y.M.; Sharma, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    A good understanding of the thermodynamic response of matter at high compression and high energy densities is important to several areas of physics. Shock-wave experiments are uniquely suited for obtaining data at extreme conditions, and a shock-compressed matter can be viewed as a condensed system with or without dissociation or as a strongly coupled plasma. This article reviews work by Da Silva et al. in which irradiances ranging from 5x10 superscript 12 to 2x10 superscript 14 W/cm 2 were used to generate 8- to 10-ns square pulses in liquid deuterium. The authors demonstrated negligible pre-heating of the sample, steady propagation of the shock wave, and direct determination of the shock wave velocity along with particle velocity and density in the shocked state. Da Silva et al. results are compared with models and other experimental information, and the usefulness of the data in other areas is assessed. 11 refs., 1 fig

  3. A preventive maintenance model for leased equipment subject to internal degradation and external shock damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wu, Changjie; Li, Yanting; Xi, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    A periodic preventive maintenance modeling method is proposed for leased equipment with continuous internal degradation and stochastic external shock damage considered simultaneously, which can facilitate the equipment lessor to optimize the maintenance schedule for the same kind of equipment rented by different lessees. A novel interactive mechanism between the continuous internal degradation and the stochastic external shock damage is established on the hazard rate of the equipment with integrating the imperfect effect of maintenance. Two improvement factors are defined for the modeling of imperfect maintenance. The number of failures resulting from internal degradation and from external shocks are both mathematically deduced based on this interactive mechanism. The optimal preventive maintenance scheme is obtained by minimizing the cumulative maintenance cost throughout the lease period. Numerical example shows that the proposed preventive maintenance model not only can reflect the reliability status of the equipment but also can clearly distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. - Highlights: • We propose an imperfect periodic preventive maintenance model for leased equipment. • It can distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. • An internal–external interactive mechanism is proposed. • Two improvement factors are introduced into the modeling of imperfect maintenance. • The model is helpful for the PM scheduling of the same equipment rented by different lessees.

  4. Why the Nature of Oil Shocks Matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archanskaia, Elizaveta; Hubert, Paul; Creel, Jerome

    2009-03-01

    This article studies the impact of oil shocks on the macro-economy in two ways insofar unexploited in the literature. The analysis is conducted at the global level, and it explicitly accounts for the potentially changing nature of oil shocks. Based on an original world GDP series and a grouping of oil shocks according to their nature, we find that oil supply shocks negatively impact world growth, contrary to oil demand shocks, pro-cyclical in their nature. This result is robust at the national level for the US. Furthermore, endogenous monetary policy is shown to have no counter-cyclical effects in the context of an oil demand shock. (authors)

  5. The microphysics of collisionless shock waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcowith, Alexandre; Bret, Antoine; Bykov, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Collisionless shocks, that is shocks mediated by electromagnetic processes, are customary in space physics and in astrophysics. They are to be found in a great variety of objects and environments: magnetospheric and heliospheric shocks, supernova remnants, pulsar winds and their nebulæ, active ga...

  6. Lunar Surface Potential Increases during Terrestrial Bow Shock Traversals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Hills, H. Kent; Halekas, Jasper; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Greg T.; Espley, Jared; Freeman, John W.; Vondrak, Richard R.; Kasper, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Since the Apollo era the electric potential of the Moon has been a subject of interest and debate. Deployed by three Apollo missions, Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Apollo 15, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) determined the sunlit lunar surface potential to be about +10 Volts using the energy spectra of lunar ionospheric thermal ions accelerated toward the Moon. We present an analysis of Apollo 14 SIDE "resonance" events that indicate the lunar surface potential increases when the Moon traverses the dawn bow shock. By analyzing Wind spacecraft crossings of the terrestrial bow shock at approximately this location and employing current balancing models of the lunar surface, we suggest causes for the increasing potential. Determining the origin of this phenomenon will improve our ability to predict the lunar surface potential in support of human exploration as well as provide models for the behavior of other airless bodies when they traverse similar features such as interplanetary shocks, both of which are goals of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's Dynamic Response of the Environment At the Moon (DREAM) team.

  7. Comparisons of Air Radiation Model with Shock Tube Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; McCorkle, Evan; Bogdanoff, David W.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the predictive capability of shock layer radiation model appropriate for NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle lunar return entry. A detailed set of spectrally resolved radiation intensity comparisons are made with recently conducted tests in the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The spectral range spanned from vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 115 nm to infrared wavelength of 1400 nm. The analysis is done for 9.5-10.5 km/s shock passing through room temperature synthetic air at 0.2, 0.3 and 0.7 Torr. The comparisons between model and measurements show discrepancies in the level of background continuum radiation and intensities of atomic lines. Impurities in the EAST facility in the form of carbon bearing species are also modeled to estimate the level of contaminants and their impact on the comparisons. The discrepancies, although large is some cases, exhibit order and consistency. A set of tests and analyses improvements are proposed as forward work plan in order to confirm or reject various proposed reasons for the observed discrepancies.

  8. Relativistic shocks and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the fluid dynamics of relativistic shock waves, and use the results to calculate the spectral index of particles accelerated by the Fermi process in such shocks. We have calculated the distributions of Fermi-accelerated particles at shocks propagating into cold proton-electron plasma and also cold electron-positron plasma. We have considered two different power spectra for the scattering waves, and find, in contrast to the non-relativistic case, that the spectral index of the accelerated particles depends on the wave power spectrum. On the assumption of thermal equilibrium both upstream and downstream, we present some useful fits for the compression ratio of shocks propagating at arbitrary speeds into gas of any temperature. (author)

  9. The Normal Position of Umbilicus in the Newborn: An Aid to Improve Cosmetic Result in Exomphalos Major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Davari

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Position of umbilicus is an important esthetic landmark and its absence or deformity may be associated with poor self-image. In abdominoplasty, the creation of a normal-looking, well shaped and sufficiently deep umbilicus on a normal position seems essential. The aim of this study was to determine the normal position of umbilicus and hence to improve the cosmetic result of exomphalos major repair. Methods: In a cross-sectional study the position of umbilicus was determined in a random sample of 200 healthy and normal neonates (107 boys and 93 girls who were born in Isfahan University hospitals from Oct. 2002 till Mar. 2003, with respect to the xiphisternum and pubis. Results: The normal umbilical position was 59.3 ± 5.2 percent of the way from the inferior border of xiphisternum to the superior border of the pubis in the midline and it was independent of gender and neonatal Conclusions: Recent years have witnessed major