WorldWideScience

Sample records for improved phage-display panning

  1. Efficient identification of phosphatidylserine-binding proteins by ORF phage display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caberoy, Nora B.; Zhou, Yixiong; Alvarado, Gabriela; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Wei

    2009-01-01

    To efficiently elucidate the biological roles of phosphatidylserine (PS), we developed open-reading-frame (ORF) phage display to identify PS-binding proteins. The procedure of phage panning was optimized with a phage clone expressing MFG-E8, a well-known PS-binding protein. Three rounds of phage panning with ORF phage display cDNA library resulted in ∼300-fold enrichment in PS-binding activity. A total of 17 PS-binding phage clones were identified. Unlike phage display with conventional cDNA libraries, all 17 PS-binding clones were ORFs encoding 13 real proteins. Sequence analysis revealed that all identified PS-specific phage clones had dimeric basic amino acid residues. GST fusion proteins were expressed for 3 PS-binding proteins and verified for their binding activity to PS liposomes, but not phosphatidylcholine liposomes. These results elucidated previously unknown PS-binding proteins and demonstrated that ORF phage display is a versatile technology capable of efficiently identifying binding proteins for non-protein molecules like PS.

  2. Production of a phage-displayed single chain variable fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop specific single chain variable fragments (scFv) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) via phage display technology. Methods: Purified viruses were initially applied for iterative panning rounds of scFv phage display libraries. The binding ability of the selected scFv antibody fragments against the ...

  3. Identification of tumor associated single-chain Fv by panning and screening antibody phage library using tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yong-Zhan; He, Feng-Tian; Li, Zhi-Kui; Wu, Kai-Chun; Cao, Yun-Xin; Chen, Bao-Jun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feasibility of panning and screening phage-displaying recombinant single-chain variable fragment (ScFv) of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies for fixed whole cells as the carriers of mAb-binding antigens. METHODS: The recombinant phage displaying libraries for anti-colorectal tumor mAb MC3Ab, MC5Ab and anti-gastric tumor mAb MGD1 was constructed. Panning and screening were carried out by means of modified fixation of colorectal and gastric tumor cells expressed the mAb-binding antigens. Concordance of binding specificity to tumor cells between phage clones and parent antibodies was analyzed. The phage of positive clones was identified with competitive ELISA, and infected by E. coli HB2151 to express soluble ScFv. RESULTS: The ratio of positive clones to MC3-ScF-MC5-ScFv and MGD1-ScFv were 60%, 24% and 30%. MC3-ScFv had Mr 32000 confirmed by Western blot. The specificity to antigen had no difference between 4 positive recombinant phage antibodies and MC3Ab. CONCLUSION: The modified process of fixing whole tumor cells is efficient, convenient and feasible to pan and screen the phage-displaying ScFv of anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies. PMID:12174367

  4. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  5. Improved Fab presentation on phage surface with the use of molecular chaperone coplasmid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Qiuting; Leong, Siew Wen; Tye, Gee Jun; Choong, Yee Siew; Lim, Theam Soon

    2015-05-15

    The low presentation efficiency of Fab (fragment antigen binding) fragments during phage display is largely due to the complexity of disulphide bond formation. This can result in the presentation of Fab fragments devoid of a light chain during phage display. Here we propose the use of a coplasmid system encoding several molecular chaperones (DsbA, DsbC, FkpA, and SurA) to improve Fab packaging. A comparison was done using the Fab fragment from IgG and IgD. We found that the use of the coplasmid during phage packaging was able to improve the presentation efficiency of the Fab fragment on phage surfaces. A modified version of panning using the coplasmid system was evaluated and was successful at enriching Fab binders. Therefore, the coplasmid system would be an attractive alternative for improved Fab presentation for phage display. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, RMD; Beekwilder, J; Olsthoorn, R; Quax, WJ; Duin, Jan van

    2002-01-01

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display

  7. Basics of Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledsgaard, Line; Kilstrup, Mogens; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; McCafferty, John; Laustsen, Andreas H

    2018-06-09

    Antibody discovery has become increasingly important in almost all areas of modern medicine. Different antibody discovery approaches exist, but one that has gained increasing interest in the field of toxinology and antivenom research is phage display technology. In this review, the lifecycle of the M13 phage and the basics of phage display technology are presented together with important factors influencing the success rates of phage display experiments. Moreover, the pros and cons of different antigen display methods and the use of naïve versus immunized phage display antibody libraries is discussed, and selected examples from the field of antivenom research are highlighted. This review thus provides in-depth knowledge on the principles and use of phage display technology with a special focus on discovery of antibodies that target animal toxins.

  8. [Peptide phage display in biotechnology and biomedicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmicheva, G A; Belyavskaya, V A

    2016-07-01

    To date peptide phage display is one of the most common combinatorial methods used for identifying specific peptide ligands. Phage display peptide libraries containing billions different clones successfully used for selection of ligands with high affinity and selectivity toward wide range of targets including individual proteins, bacteria, viruses, spores, different kind of cancer cells and variety of nonorganic targets (metals, alloys, semiconductors etc.) Success of using filamentous phage in phage display technologies relays on the robustness of phage particles and a possibility to genetically modify its DNA to construct new phage variants with novel properties. In this review we are discussing characteristics of the most known non-commercial peptide phage display libraries of different formats (landscape libraries in particular) and their successful applications in several fields of biotechnology and biomedicine: discovery of peptides with diagnostic values against different pathogens, discovery and using of peptides recognizing cancer cells, trends in using of phage display technologies in human interactome studies, application of phage display technologies in construction of novel nano materials.

  9. Evolution of phage display technology: from discovery to application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbarnia, Leila; Farajnia, Safar; Babaei, Hossein; Majidi, Jafar; Veisi, Kamal; Ahmadzadeh, Vahideh; Akbari, Bahman

    2017-03-01

    Phage display technology as a selection-based system is an attractive method for evolution of new biological drugs. Unique ability of phage libraries for displaying proteins on bacteriophage surfaces enable them to make a major contribution in diverse fields of researches related to the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. One of the great challenges facing researchers is the modification of phage display technology and the development of new applications. This article reviews the molecular basis of phage display library, and summarizes the novel and specific applications of this technique in the field of biological drugs development including therapeutic antibodies, peptides, vaccines, and catalytic antibodies.

  10. Identifying Bacterial Immune Evasion Proteins Using Phage Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevre, Cindy; Scheepmaker, Lisette; Haas, Pieter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Methods aimed at identification of immune evasion proteins are mainly rely on in silico prediction of sequence, structural homology to known evasion proteins or use a proteomics driven approach. Although proven successful these methods are limited by a low efficiency and or lack of functional identification. Here we describe a high-throughput genomic strategy to functionally identify bacterial immune evasion proteins using phage display technology. Genomic bacterial DNA is randomly fragmented and ligated into a phage display vector that is used to create a phage display library expressing bacterial secreted and membrane bound proteins. This library is used to select displayed bacterial secretome proteins that interact with host immune components.

  11. Phage display peptide libraries: deviations from randomness and correctives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvkin, Arie; Ashkenazy, Haim; Weiss-Ottolenghi, Yael; Piller, Chen; Pupko, Tal; Gershoni, Jonathan M

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Peptide-expressing phage display libraries are widely used for the interrogation of antibodies. Affinity selected peptides are then analyzed to discover epitope mimetics, or are subjected to computational algorithms for epitope prediction. A critical assumption for these applications is the random representation of amino acids in the initial naïve peptide library. In a previous study, we implemented next generation sequencing to evaluate a naïve library and discovered severe deviations from randomness in UAG codon over-representation as well as in high G phosphoramidite abundance causing amino acid distribution biases. In this study, we demonstrate that the UAG over-representation can be attributed to the burden imposed on the phage upon the assembly of the recombinant Protein 8 subunits. This was corrected by constructing the libraries using supE44-containing bacteria which suppress the UAG driven abortive termination. We also demonstrate that the overabundance of G stems from variant synthesis-efficiency and can be corrected using compensating oligonucleotide-mixtures calibrated by mass spectroscopy. Construction of libraries implementing these correctives results in markedly improved libraries that display random distribution of amino acids, thus ensuring that enriched peptides obtained in biopanning represent a genuine selection event, a fundamental assumption for phage display applications. PMID:29420788

  12. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  13. Novel β-lactamase-random peptide fusion libraries for phage display selection of cancer cell-targeting agents suitable for enzyme prodrug therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Girja S.; Krag, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Novel phage-displayed random linear dodecapeptide (X12) and cysteine-constrained decapeptide (CX10C) libraries constructed in fusion to the amino-terminus of P99 β-lactamase molecules were used for identifying β-lactamase-linked cancer cell-specific ligands. The size and quality of both libraries were comparable to the standards of other reported phage display systems. Using the single-round panning method based on phage DNA recovery, we identified severalβ-lactamase fusion peptides that specifically bind to live human breast cancer MDA-MB-361 cells. The β-lactamase fusion to the peptides helped in conducting the enzyme activity-based clone normalization and cell-binding screening in a very time- and cost-efficient manner. The methods were suitable for 96-well readout as well as microscopic imaging. The success of the biopanning was indicated by the presence of ~40% cancer cell-specific clones among recovered phages. One of the binding clones appeared multiple times. The cancer cell-binding fusion peptides also shared several significant motifs. This opens a new way of preparing and selecting phage display libraries. The cancer cell-specific β-lactamase-linked affinity reagents selected from these libraries can be used for any application that requires a reporter for tracking the ligand molecules. Furthermore, these affinity reagents have also a potential for their direct use in the targeted enzyme prodrug therapy of cancer. PMID:19751096

  14. Phage display of the serpin alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor randomized at consecutive residues in the reactive centre loop and biopanned with or without thrombin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Scott

    Full Text Available In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2-P1 yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352-356 (P7-P3 was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7-P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection

  15. Advances in phage display technology for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidfar, Kobra; Daneshpour, Maryam

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, several library-based methods have been developed to discover ligands with strong binding affinities for their targets. These methods mimic the natural evolution for screening and identifying ligand-target interactions with specific functional properties. Phage display technology is a well-established method that has been applied to many technological challenges including novel drug discovery. This review describes the recent advances in the use of phage display technology for discovering novel bioactive compounds. Furthermore, it discusses the application of this technology to produce proteins and peptides as well as minimize the use of antibodies, such as antigen-binding fragment, single-chain fragment variable or single-domain antibody fragments like VHHs. Advances in screening, manufacturing and humanization technologies demonstrate that phage display derived products can play a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The effects of this technology are inevitable in the development pipeline for bringing therapeutics into the market, and this number is expected to rise significantly in the future as new advances continue to take place in display methods. Furthermore, a widespread application of this methodology is predicted in different medical technological areas, including biosensing, monitoring, molecular imaging, gene therapy, vaccine development and nanotechnology.

  16. Construction and Selection of Affilin® Phage Display Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settele, Florian; Zwarg, Madlen; Fiedler, Sebastian; Koscheinz, Daniel; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Affilin ® molecules represent a new class of so-called scaffold proteins. The concept of scaffold proteins is to use stable and versatile protein structures which can be endowed with de novo binding properties and specificities by introducing mutations in surface exposed amino acid residues. Complex variations and combinations are generated by genetic methods of randomization resulting in large cDNA libraries. The selection for candidates binding to a desired target can be executed by display methods, especially the very robust and flexible phage display. Here, we describe the construction of ubiquitin based Affilin ® phage display libraries and their use in biopanning experiments for the identification of novel protein ligands.

  17. Improved Soluble ScFv ELISA Screening Approach for Antibody Discovery Using Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidkia, Mohammad R; Sepehri, Maryam; Khajeh, Shirin; Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-09-01

    Phage display technology (PDT) is a powerful tool for the isolation of recombinant antibody (Ab) fragments. Using PDT, target molecule-specific phage-Ab clones are enriched through the "biopanning" process. The individual specific binders are screened by the monoclonal scFv enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that may associate with inevitable false-negative results. Thus, in this study, three strategies were investigated for optimization of the scFvs screening using Tomlinson I and J libraries, including (1) optimizing the expression of functional scFvs, (2) improving the sensitivity of ELISA, and (3) preparing different samples containing scFvs. The expression of all scFv Abs was significantly enhanced when scFv clones were cultivated in the terrific broth (TB) medium at the optimum temperature of 30 °C. The protein A-conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was found to be a well-suited reagent for the detection of Ag-bound scFvs in comparison with either anti-c-myc Ab or the mixing procedure. Based on our findings, it seems there is no universal media supplement for an improved expression of all scFvs derived from both Tomlinson I and J libraries. We thus propose that expression of scFv fragments in a microplate scale is largely dependent on a variety of parameters, in particular the scFv clones and relevant sequences.

  18. Challenges in Optimizing a Prostate Carcinoma Binding Peptide, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Debus

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of peptides identified through the phage display technology to clinical applications is difficult. Major drawbacks are the metabolic degradation and label instability. The aim of our work is the optimization of DUP-1, a peptide which was identified by phage display to specifically target human prostate carcinoma. To investigate the influence of chelate conjugation, DOTA was coupled to DUP-1 and labeling was performed with 111In. To improve serum stability cyclization of DUP-1 and targeted D-amino acid substitution were carried out. Alanine scanning was performed for identification of the binding site and based on the results peptide fragments were chemically synthesized. The properties of modified ligands were investigated in in vitro binding and competition assays. In vivo biodistribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying human prostate tumors subcutaneously. DOTA conjugation resulted in different cellular binding kinetics, rapid in vivo renal clearance and increased tumor-to-organ ratios. Cyclization and D-amino acid substitution increased the metabolic stability but led to binding affinity decrease. Fragment investigation indicated that the sequence NRAQDY might be significant for target-binding. Our results demonstrate challenges in optimizing peptides, identified through phage display libraries, and show that careful investigation of modified derivatives is necessary in order to improve their characteristics.

  19. Development of anti-infectives using phage display: biological agents against bacteria, viruses, and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Johnny X; Bishop-Hurley, Sharon L; Cooper, Matthew A

    2012-09-01

    The vast majority of anti-infective therapeutics on the market or in development are small molecules; however, there is now a nascent pipeline of biological agents in development. Until recently, phage display technologies were used mainly to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) targeted against cancer or inflammatory disease targets. Patent disputes impeded broad use of these methods and contributed to the dearth of candidates in the clinic during the 1990s. Today, however, phage display is recognized as a powerful tool for selecting novel peptides and antibodies that can bind to a wide range of antigens, ranging from whole cells to proteins and lipid targets. In this review, we highlight research that exploits phage display technology as a means of discovering novel therapeutics against infectious diseases, with a focus on antimicrobial peptides and antibodies in clinical or preclinical development. We discuss the different strategies and methods used to derive, select, and develop anti-infectives from phage display libraries and then highlight case studies of drug candidates in the process of development and commercialization. Advances in screening, manufacturing, and humanization technologies now mean that phage display can make a significant contribution in the fight against clinically important pathogens.

  20. Screening of synthetic phage display scFv libraries yields competitive ligands of human leptin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molek, Peter; Vodnik, Miha; Strukelj, Borut; Bratkovič, Tomaž

    2014-09-26

    Initially considered the main endogenous anorexigenic factor, fat-derived leptin turned out to be a markedly pleiotropic hormone, influencing diverse physiological processes. Moreover, hyperleptinemia in obese individuals has been linked to the onset or progression of serious disorders, such as cancer, autoimmune diseases, and atherosclerosis, and antagonizing peripheral leptin's signalization has been shown to improve these conditions. To develop an antibody-based leptin antagonist we have devised a tailored panning procedure and screened two phage display libraries of single chain variable antibody fragments (scFvs) against recombinant leptin receptor. One of the scFvs was expressed in Escherichia coli and its interaction with leptin receptor was characterized in more detail. It was found to recognize a discontinuous epitope and to compete with leptin for receptor binding with IC50 and Kd values in the nanomolar range. The reported scFv represents a lead for development of leptin antagonists that may ultimately find use in therapy of various hyperleptinemia-related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Corruption of phage-display libraries by target-unrelated clones: Diagnosis and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D.; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P.

    2010-01-01

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property—most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior, and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phage (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation-related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage, and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus strand origin. The founder’s infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption. PMID:20692225

  2. Plasmids and packaging cell lines for use in phage display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2012-07-24

    The invention relates to a novel phagemid display system for packaging phagemid DNA into phagemid particles which completely avoids the use of helper phage. The system of the invention incorporates the use of bacterial packaging cell lines which have been transformed with helper plasmids containing all required phage proteins but not the packaging signals. The absence of packaging signals in these helper plasmids prevents their DNA from being packaged in the bacterial cell, which provides a number of significant advantages over the use of both standard and modified helper phage. Packaged phagemids expressing a protein or peptide of interest, in fusion with a phage coat protein such as g3p, are generated simply by transfecting phagemid into the packaging cell line.

  3. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  4. Corruption of phage display libraries by target-unrelated clones: diagnosis and countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William D; Golomb, Miriam; Smith, George P

    2010-12-15

    Phage display is used to discover peptides or proteins with a desired target property-most often, affinity for a target selector molecule. Libraries of phage clones displaying diverse surface peptides are subject to a selection process designed to enrich for the target behavior and subsequently propagated to restore phage numbers. A recurrent problem is enrichment of clones, called target-unrelated phages or peptides (TUPs), that lack the target behavior. Many TUPs are propagation related; they have mutations conferring a growth advantage and are enriched during the propagations accompanying selection. Unlike other filamentous phage libraries, fd-tet-based libraries are relatively resistant to propagation-related TUP corruption. Their minus-strand origin is disrupted by a large cassette that simultaneously confers resistance to tetracycline and imposes a rate-limiting growth defect that cannot be bypassed with simple mutations. Nonetheless, a new type of propagation-related TUP emerged in the output of in vivo selections from an fd-tet library. The founding clone had a complex rearrangement that restored the minus-strand origin while retaining tetracycline resistance. The rearrangement involved two recombination events, one with a contaminant having a wild-type minus-strand origin. The founder's infectivity advantage spread by simple recombination to clones displaying different peptides. We propose measures for minimizing TUP corruption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Probing ADAMTS13 substrate specificity using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl C Desch

    Full Text Available Von Willebrand factor (VWF is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2' and P11', for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13-VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73.

  6. Phage-Displayed Peptides Selected to Bind Envelope Glycoprotein Show Antiviral Activity against Dengue Virus Serotype 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de la Guardia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is a growing public health threat that affects hundreds of million peoples every year and leave huge economic and social damage. The virus is transmitted by mosquitoes and the incidence of the disease is increasing, among other causes, due to the geographical expansion of the vector’s range and the lack of effectiveness in public health interventions in most prevalent countries. So far, no highly effective vaccine or antiviral has been developed for this virus. Here we employed phage display technology to identify peptides able to block the DENV2. A random peptide library presented in M13 phages was screened with recombinant dengue envelope and its fragment domain III. After four rounds of panning, several binding peptides were identified, synthesized, and tested against the virus. Three peptides were able to block the infectivity of the virus while not being toxic to the target cells. Blind docking simulations were done to investigate the possible mode of binding, showing that all peptides appear to bind domain III of the protein and may be mostly stabilized by hydrophobic interactions. These results are relevant to the development of novel therapeutics against this important virus.

  7. TfR Binding Peptide Screened by Phage Display Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To screen an hTfR affinity peptide and investigate its activity in vitro. Methods: hTfR ... Keywords: Peptide, hTfR, Transferrin receptor, Phage display technology, Enhanced green ..... mediated uptake of peptides that bind the human.

  8. Development of single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies against Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qing; Jordan, Ramon; Brlansky, Ronald H; Istomina, Olga; Hartung, John

    2015-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a member of the gamma proteobacteria. It is fastidious, insect-vectored and xylem-limited and causes a variety of diseases, some severe, on a wide range of economically important perennial crops, including grape and citrus. Antibody based detection assays are commercially available for X. fastidiosa, and are effective at the species, but not at the subspecies level. We have made a library of scFv antibody fragments directed against X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca strain 9a5c (citrus) by using phage display technology. Antibody gene repertoires were PCR-amplified using 23 primers for the heavy chain variable region (V(H)) and 21 primers for the light chain variable region (V(L)). The V(H) and V(L) were joined by overlap extension PCR, and then the genes of the scFv library were ligated into the phage vector pKM19. The library contained 1.2×10(7) independent clones with full-length scFv inserts. In each of 3cycles of affinity-selection with 9a5c, about 1.0×10(12) phage were used for panning with 4.1×10(6), 7.1×10(6), 2.1×10(7) phage recovered after the first, second and third cycles, respectively. Sixty-six percent of clones from the final library bound X. fastidiosa 9a5c in an ELISA. Some of these scFv antibodies recognized strain 9a5c and did not recognize X. fastidiosa strains that cause Pierce's disease of grapevine. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties.

  10. Next-generation phage display: integrating and comparing available molecular tools to enable cost-effective high-throughput analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Dias-Neto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Combinatorial phage display has been used in the last 20 years in the identification of protein-ligands and protein-protein interactions, uncovering relevant molecular recognition events. Rate-limiting steps of combinatorial phage display library selection are (i the counting of transducing units and (ii the sequencing of the encoded displayed ligands. Here, we adapted emerging genomic technologies to minimize such challenges.We gained efficiency by applying in tandem real-time PCR for rapid quantification to enable bacteria-free phage display library screening, and added phage DNA next-generation sequencing for large-scale ligand analysis, reporting a fully integrated set of high-throughput quantitative and analytical tools. The approach is far less labor-intensive and allows rigorous quantification; for medical applications, including selections in patients, it also represents an advance for quantitative distribution analysis and ligand identification of hundreds of thousands of targeted particles from patient-derived biopsy or autopsy in a longer timeframe post library administration. Additional advantages over current methods include increased sensitivity, less variability, enhanced linearity, scalability, and accuracy at much lower cost. Sequences obtained by qPhage plus pyrosequencing were similar to a dataset produced from conventional Sanger-sequenced transducing-units (TU, with no biases due to GC content, codon usage, and amino acid or peptide frequency. These tools allow phage display selection and ligand analysis at >1,000-fold faster rate, and reduce costs approximately 250-fold for generating 10(6 ligand sequences.Our analyses demonstrates that whereas this approach correlates with the traditional colony-counting, it is also capable of a much larger sampling, allowing a faster, less expensive, more accurate and consistent analysis of phage enrichment. Overall, qPhage plus pyrosequencing is superior to TU-counting plus Sanger

  11. Probing ADAMTS13 Substrate Specificity using Phage Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, Karl C.; Kretz, Colin; Yee, Andrew; Gildersleeve, Robert; Metzger, Kristin; Agrawal, Nidhi; Cheng, Jane; Ginsburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a large, multimeric protein that regulates hemostasis by tethering platelets to the subendothelial matrix at sites of vascular damage. The procoagulant activity of plasma VWF correlates with the length of VWF multimers, which is proteolytically controlled by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. To probe ADAMTS13 substrate specificity, we created phage display libraries containing randomly mutated residues of a minimal ADAMTS13 substrate fragment of VWF, termed VWF73. The libraries were screened for phage particles displaying VWF73 mutant peptides that were resistant to proteolysis by ADAMTS13. These peptides exhibited the greatest mutation frequency near the ADAMTS13 scissile residues. Kinetic assays using mutant and wild-type substrates demonstrated excellent agreement between rates of cleavage for mutant phage particles and the corresponding mutant peptides. Cleavage resistance of selected mutations was tested in vivo using hydrodynamic injection of corresponding full-length expression plasmids into VWF-deficient mice. These studies confirmed the resistance to cleavage resulting from select amino acid substitutions and uncovered evidence of alternate cleavage sites and recognition by other proteases in the circulation of ADAMTS13 deficient mice. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the key role of specific amino acids residues including P3-P2’ and P11’, for substrate specificity and emphasize the importance in flowing blood of other ADAMTS13–VWF exosite interactions outside of VWF73. PMID:25849793

  12. Screening and identification of RhD antigen mimic epitopes from a phage display random peptide library for the serodiagnosis of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Song, Jingjing; Zhou, Shuimei; Fu, Yourong; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Shen, Changxin

    2018-01-16

    Identification of RhD antigen epitopes is a key component in understanding the pathogenesis of haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn. Research has indicated that phage display libraries are useful tools for identifying novel mimic epitopes (mimotopes) which may help to determine antigen specificity. We selected the mimotopes of blood group RhD antigen by affinity panning a phage display library using monoclonal anti-D. After three rounds of biopanning, positive phage clones were identified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and then sent for sequencing and peptides synthesis. Next, competitive ELISA and erythrocyte haemagglutination inhibition tests were carried out to confirm the inhibitory activity of the synthetic peptide. To evaluate the diagnostic performance of the synthetic peptide, a diagnostic ELISA was examined. Fourteen of 35 phage clones that were chosen randomly from the titering plate were considered to be positive. Following DNA sequencing and translation, 11 phage clones were found to represent the same peptide - RMKMLMMLMRRK (P4) - whereas each of the other three clones represented a unique peptide. Through the competitive ELISA and erythrocyte haemagglutination inhibition tests, the peptide (P4) was verified to have the ability to mimic the RhD antigen. The diagnostic ELISA for P4 proved to be sensitive (82.61%) and specific (88.57%). This study reveals that the P4 peptide can mimic RhD antigen and paves the way for the development of promising targeted diagnostic and therapeutic platforms for haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn.

  13. Establishment of a sensitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay for detection of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ie toxin based nanobody from a phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Cunzheng; Zhang, Xiao; Zhong, Jianfeng; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Xiaodan; Lin, Manman; Liu, Xianjin

    2017-02-01

    Cry1Ie toxin was an insect-resistant protein used in genetically modified crops (GMC). In this study, a large human VH gene nanobodies phage displayed library was employed to select anti-Cry1Ie toxin antibody by affinity panning. After 5 rounds of panning, total 12 positive monoclonal phage particles were obtained. One of the identified positive phage nanobody was expressed in E.coli BL21 and the purified protein was indicated as a molecular mass of approximately 20 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Then a sensitive indirect competitive time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay (IC-TRFIA) was established for detection of Cry1Ie toxin by the purified protein. The working range of detection for Cry1Ie toxin standards in the IC-TRFIA were 0.08-6.44 ng mL -1 and the medium inhibition of control (IC 50 ) was 0.73 ng mL -1 . It showed a weak cross-reactivity with Cry1Ab toxin (at 5.6%), but did not recognize Cry1B, Cry1C, Cry1F, and Cry2A toxins (were <0.1%). The average recoveries of Cry1Ie toxin from respectively spiked in rice, corn and soil samples were in the range of 83.5%-96.6% and with a coefficient of variation (CV) among 2.0%-8.6%. These results showed the IC-TRFIA was promising for detection of Cry1Ie toxin in agricultural and environmental samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  15. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...

  16. Selection of phage-displayed peptides for the detection of imidacloprid in water and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiping; Liu, Jianfeng; Wang, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Shelver, Weilin L; Li, Qing X; Li, Ji; Xu, Ting

    2015-09-15

    Imidacloprid is the most widely used neonicotinoid insecticide in the world and shows widespread environment and human exposures. A phage clone designated L7-1 that selectively binds to imidacloprid was selected from a commercial phage display library containing linear 7-mer randomized amino acid residues. Using the clone L7-1, a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for imidacloprid was developed. The half-maximum signal inhibition concentration (IC50) and the limit of detection (LOD) of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid were 96 and 2.3 ng ml(-1), respectively. This phage ELISA showed relatively low cross-reactivity with all of the tested compounds structurally similar to imidacloprid, less than 2% with the exception of 6-chloronicotinic acid, a metabolite of imidacloprid that showed 11.5%. The average recoveries of the phage ELISA for imidacloprid in water and soil samples were in the ranges of 74.6 to 86.3% and 72.5 to 93.6%, respectively. The results of the competitive phage ELISA for imidacloprid in the fortified samples agreed well with those of a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. The simple phage-displayed peptide technology has been proven to be a convenient and efficient method for the development of an alternative format of ELISA for small molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A compact phage display human scFv library for selection of antibodies to a wide variety of antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Peter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display technology is a powerful new tool for making antibodies outside the immune system, thus avoiding the use of experimental animals. In the early days, it was postulated that this technique would eventually replace hybridoma technology and animal immunisations. However, since this technology emerged more than 20 years ago, there have only been a handful reports on the construction and application of phage display antibody libraries world-wide. Results Here we report the simplest and highly efficient method for the construction of a highly useful human single chain variable fragment (scFv library. The least number of oligonucleotide primers, electroporations and ligation reactions were used to generate a library of 1.5 × 108 individual clones, without generation of sub-libraries. All possible combinations of heavy and light chains, among all immunoglobulin isotypes, were included by using a mixture of primers and overlapping extension PCR. The key difference from other similar libraries was the highest diversity of variable gene repertoires, which was derived from 140 non-immunized human donors. A wide variety of antigens were successfully used to affinity select specific binders. These included pure recombinant proteins, a hapten and complex antigens such as viral coat proteins, crude snake venom and cancer cell surface antigens. In particular, we were able to use standard bio-panning method to isolate antibody that can bind to soluble Aflatoxin B1, when using BSA-conjugated toxin as a target, as demonstrated by inhibition ELISA. Conclusion These results suggested that by using an optimized protocol and very high repertoire diversity, a compact and efficient phage antibody library can be generated. This advanced method could be adopted by any molecular biology laboratory to generate both naïve or immunized libraries for particular targets as well as for high-throughput applications.

  18. Uses of Phage Display in Agriculture: A Review of Food-Related Protein-Protein Interactions Discovered by Biopanning over Diverse Baits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Kushwaha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions.

  19. Uses of phage display in agriculture: a review of food-related protein-protein interactions discovered by biopanning over diverse baits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Payne, Christina M; Downie, A Bruce

    2013-01-01

    This review highlights discoveries made using phage display that impact the use of agricultural products. The contribution phage display made to our fundamental understanding of how various protective molecules serve to safeguard plants and seeds from herbivores and microbes is discussed. The utility of phage display for directed evolution of enzymes with enhanced capacities to degrade the complex polymers of the cell wall into molecules useful for biofuel production is surveyed. Food allergies are often directed against components of seeds; this review emphasizes how phage display has been employed to determine the seed component(s) contributing most to the allergenic reaction and how it has played a central role in novel approaches to mitigate patient response. Finally, an overview of the use of phage display in identifying the mature seed proteome protection and repair mechanisms is provided. The identification of specific classes of proteins preferentially bound by such protection and repair proteins leads to hypotheses concerning the importance of safeguarding the translational apparatus from damage during seed quiescence and environmental perturbations during germination. These examples, it is hoped, will spur the use of phage display in future plant science examining protein-ligand interactions.

  20. Identification of keratinocyte specific markers using phage display and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K.B.; Jensen, O.N.; Ravn, P.

    2003-01-01

    and mass spectrometry that allows identification of cell type-specific protein markers. The most important features of the method are (i) reduction of experimental noise originating from background binding of phage particles and (ii) isolation of affinity binders after a single round of selection, which...... antigens were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry as laminin-5, plectin, and fibronectin. The combination of phage display technology with mass spectrometry methods for protein identification is a general and promising approach for proteomic analysis of cell surface complexity....

  1. Injected phage-displayed-VP28 vaccine reduces shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei mortality by white spot syndrome virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Lucero, G; Manoutcharian, K; Hernández-López, J; Ascencio, F

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most important viral pathogen for the global shrimp industry causing mass mortalities with huge economic losses. Recombinant phages are capable of expressing foreign peptides on viral coat surface and act as antigenic peptide carriers bearing a phage-displayed vaccine. In this study, the full-length VP28 protein of WSSV, widely known as potential vaccine against infection in shrimp, was successfully cloned and expressed on M13 filamentous phage. The functionality and efficacy of this vaccine immunogen was demonstrated through immunoassay and in vivo challenge studies. In ELISA assay phage-displayed VP28 was bind to Litopenaeus vannamei immobilized hemocyte in contrast to wild-type M13 phage. Shrimps were injected with 2 × 10(10) cfu animal(-1) single dose of VP28-M13 and M13 once and 48 h later intramuscularly challenged with WSSV to test the efficacy of the vaccine against the infection. All dead challenged shrimps were PCR WSSV-positive. The accumulative mortality of the vaccinated and challenged shrimp groups was significantly lower (36.67%) than the unvaccinated group (66.67%). Individual phenoloxidase and superoxide dismutase activity was assayed on 8 and 48 h post-vaccination. No significant difference was found in those immunological parameters among groups at any sampled time evaluated. For the first time, phage display technology was used to express a recombinant vaccine for shrimp. The highest percentage of relative survival in vaccinated shrimp (RPS = 44.99%) suggest that the recombinant phage can be used successfully to display and deliver VP28 for farmed marine crustaceans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Novel Affinity Tag, ABTAG, and Its Application to the Affinity Screening of Single-Domain Antibodies Selected by Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Hussack

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABTAG is a camelid single-domain antibody (sdAb that binds to bovine serum albumin (BSA with low picomolar affinity. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR analyses using BSA surfaces, bound ABTAG can be completely dissociated from the BSA surfaces at low pH, over multiple cycles, without any reduction in the capacity of the BSA surfaces to bind ABTAG. A moderate throughput, SPR-based, antibody screening assay exploiting the unique features of ABTAG is described. Anti-carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6 sdAbs were isolated from a phage-displayed sdAb library derived from the heavy chain antibody repertoire of a llama immunized with CEACAM6. Following one or two rounds of panning, enriched clones were expressed as ABTAG fusions in microtiter plate cultures. The sdAb-ABTAG fusions from culture supernatants were captured on BSA surfaces and CEACAM6 antigen was then bound to the captured molecules. The SPR screening method gives a read-out of relative expression levels of the fusion proteins and kinetic and affinity constants for CEACAM6 binding by the captured molecules. The library was also panned and screened by conventional methods and positive clones were subcloned and expressed for SPR analysis. Compared to conventional panning and screening, the SPR-based ABTAG method yielded a considerably higher diversity of binders, some with affinities that were three orders of magnitude higher affinity than those identified by conventional panning.

  3. Identification of human embryonic progenitor cell targeting peptides using phage display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola A Bignone

    together these data suggest that selection of phage display libraries against a clonal progenitor stem cell population can be used to identify progenitor stem cell targeting peptides. The peptides may be useful for monitoring hPS cell differentiation and for the development of cell enrichment procedures to improve the efficiency of directed differentiation toward clinically relevant human cell types.

  4. PuLSE: Quality control and quantification of peptide sequences explored by phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Steven; Mann, Stefan; Koszela, Joanna; Kerr, Alastair; Auer, Manfred

    2018-01-01

    The design of highly diverse phage display libraries is based on assumption that DNA bases are incorporated at similar rates within the randomized sequence. As library complexity increases and expected copy numbers of unique sequences decrease, the exploration of library space becomes sparser and the presence of truly random sequences becomes critical. We present the program PuLSE (Phage Library Sequence Evaluation) as a tool for assessing randomness and therefore diversity of phage display libraries. PuLSE runs on a collection of sequence reads in the fastq file format and generates tables profiling the library in terms of unique DNA sequence counts and positions, translated peptide sequences, and normalized 'expected' occurrences from base to residue codon frequencies. The output allows at-a-glance quantitative quality control of a phage library in terms of sequence coverage both at the DNA base and translated protein residue level, which has been missing from toolsets and literature. The open source program PuLSE is available in two formats, a C++ source code package for compilation and integration into existing bioinformatics pipelines and precompiled binaries for ease of use.

  5. Re-engineering of the PAM1 phage display monoclonal antibody to produce a soluble, versatile anti-homogalacturonan scFv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manfield, I. W.; Bernal Giraldo, Adriana Jimena; Møller, I.

    2006-01-01

    Antibody phage display is an increasingly important alternative method for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and involves the expression of antibody fragments (scFvs) at the surface of bacteriophage particles. We have previously used this technique to generate a phage mAb (PAM1phage...

  6. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  7. Dual-functioning peptides discovered by phage display increase the magnitude and specificity of BMSC attachment to mineralized biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaraju, Harsha; Miller, Sharon J; Kohn, David H

    2017-07-01

    Design of biomaterials for cell-based therapies requires presentation of specific physical and chemical cues to cells, analogous to cues provided by native extracellular matrices (ECM). We previously identified a peptide sequence with high affinity towards apatite (VTKHLNQISQSY, VTK) using phage display. The aims of this study were to identify a human MSC-specific peptide sequence through phage display, combine it with the apatite-specific sequence, and verify the specificity of the combined dual-functioning peptide to both apatite and human bone marrow stromal cells. In this study, a combinatorial phage display identified the cell binding sequence (DPIYALSWSGMA, DPI) which was combined with the mineral binding sequence to generate the dual peptide DPI-VTK. DPI-VTK demonstrated significantly greater binding affinity (1/K D ) to apatite surfaces compared to VTK, phosphorylated VTK (VTK phos ), DPI-VTK phos , RGD-VTK, and peptide-free apatite surfaces (p biomaterial surfaces and subsequently increase cell proliferation and differentiation. These new peptides expand biomaterial design methodology for cell-based regeneration of bone defects. This strategy of combining cell and material binding phage display derived peptides is broadly applicable to a variety of systems requiring targeted adhesion of specific cell populations, and may be generalized to the engineering of any adhesion surface. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modular Construction of Large Non-Immune Human Antibody Phage-Display Libraries from Variable Heavy and Light Chain Gene Cassettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Kyung; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and antibody-derived therapeutics have emerged as a rapidly growing class of biological drugs for the treatment of cancer, autoimmunity, infection, and neurological diseases. To support the development of human antibodies, various display techniques based on antibody gene repertoires have been constructed over the last two decades. In particular, scFv-antibody phage display has been extensively utilized to select lead antibodies against a variety of target antigens. To construct a scFv phage display that enables efficient antibody discovery, and optimization, it is desirable to develop a system that allows modular assembly of highly diverse variable heavy chain and light chain (Vκ and Vλ) repertoires. Here, we describe modular construction of large non-immune human antibody phage-display libraries built on variable gene cassettes from heavy chain and light chain repertoires (Vκ- and Vλ-light can be made into independent cassettes). We describe utility of such libraries in antibody discovery and optimization through chain shuffling.

  9. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, R R; Colli, W; Alves, M J M

    2012-01-01

    Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques. The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development, and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction. In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic organisms will be

  10. Binding of phage displayed Bacillus subtilis lipase A to a phosphonate suicide inhibitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dröge, M.J; Ruggeberg, C.J.; van der Sloot, Almer Martinus; Schimmel, J.; Dijkstra, Durk; Verhaert, R.M D; Reetz, M.T.; Quax, Wim; Droge, MJ; Dijkstra, DS

    2003-01-01

    Phage display can be used as a protein engineering tool to select proteins with desirable binding properties from a library of randomly constructed mutants. Here, we describe the development of this method for the directed evolution of Bacillus subtilis lipase A, an enzyme that has marked properties

  11. Synthesis of tumor necrosis factor α for use as a mirror-image phage display target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Mark E; Jacobsen, Michael T; Kay, Michael S

    2016-06-21

    Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFα) is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disease. Here we describe the chemical synthesis of l-TNFα along with the mirror-image d-protein for use as a phage display target. The synthetic strategy utilized native chemical ligation and desulfurization to unite three peptide segments, followed by oxidative folding to assemble the 52 kDa homotrimeric protein. This synthesis represents the foundational step for discovering an inhibitory d-peptide with the potential to improve current anti-TNFα therapeutic strategies.

  12. Phage Display-Derived Cross-Reactive Neutralizing Antibody against Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Sun, Chunyun; Xiao, Xiangqian; Pang, Lin; Shen, Sisi; Zhang, Jie; Cen, Shan; Yang, Burton B; Huang, Yuming; Sheng, Wang; Zeng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) are members of the Picornaviridae family and are considered the main causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In recent decades large HFMD outbreaks caused by EV71 and CVA16 have become significant public health concerns in the Asia-Pacific region. Vaccines and antiviral drugs are unavailable to prevent EV71 and CVA16 infection. In the current study, a chimeric antibody targeting a highly conserved peptide in the EV71 VP4 protein was isolated by using a phage display technique. The antibody showed cross-neutralizing capability against EV71 and CVA16 in vitro. The results suggest that this phage display-derived antibody will have great potential as a broad neutralizing antibody against EV71 and CVA16 after affinity maturation and humanization.

  13. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui; Xiao, Gengfu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. → Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. → A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. → P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX n HX m HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  14. Blocking peptides against HBV: PreS1 protein selected from a phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Yang; Zu, Xiangyang; Jin, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Xiao, Gengfu, E-mail: xiaogf@wh.iov.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Successfully selected specific PreS1-interacting peptides by using phage displayed library. {yields} Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a consensus PreS1 binding motif. {yields} A highly enriched peptide named P7 had a strong binding ability for PreS1. {yields} P7 could block PreS1 attachment. -- Abstract: The PreS1 protein is present on the outermost part of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface and has been shown to have a pivotal function in viral infectivity and assembly. The development of reagents with high affinity and specificity for PreS1 is of great significance for early diagnosis and treatment of HBV infection. A phage display library of dodecapeptide was screened for interactions with purified PreS1 protein. Alignment of the positive phage clones revealed a putative consensus PreS1 binding motif of HX{sub n}HX{sub m}HP/R. Moreover, a peptide named P7 (KHMHWHPPALNT) was highly enriched and occurred with a surprisingly high frequency of 72%. A thermodynamic study revealed that P7 has a higher binding affinity to PreS1 than the other peptides. Furthermore, P7 was able to abrogate the binding of HBV virions to the PreS1 antibody, suggesting that P7 covers key functional sites on the native PreS1 protein. This newly isolated peptide may, therefore, be a new therapeutic candidate for the treatment of HBV. The consensus motif could be modified to deliver imaging, diagnostic, and therapeutic agents to tissues affected by HBV.

  15. Modular and aggregation resistant Vh antibodies from a phage display library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Niels Anton; Mandrup, Ole Aalund; Lykkemark, Simon

    2012-01-01

    through immunisation of sharks or camels, or alternatively from recombinant libraries1. The domain antibodies have certain advantages, both pharmacologically and technically. Here we report the construction of a semi-synthetic and highly modular antibody library, based on a human framework (V3-23/D47......Directed evolution of antibodies through phage display is a powerful technique for producing binders of various biological targets. One of the recent innovations in the fi eld is the domain antibody, an antibody consisting only of a single variable domain. These anti bodies can be obtained either......). The antibody scaffold has been codon optimised to improve expression, and the CDR’s have been created using trinucleotide synthesis. These methods give a strict control over the randomisations, and the ability to design a library with minimal aggregation propensity. To facilitate further manipulation, unique...

  16. Identification of novel inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa MurC enzyme derived from phage-displayed peptide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Zoeiby, Ahmed; Sanschagrin, François; Darveau, André; Brisson, Jean-Robert; Levesque, Roger C

    2003-03-01

    The machinery of peptidoglycan biosynthesis is an ideal site at which to look for novel antimicrobial targets. Phage display was used to develop novel peptide inhibitors for MurC, an essential enzyme involved in the early steps of biosynthesis of peptidoglycan monomer. We cloned and overexpressed the murA, -B and -C genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the pET expression vector, adding a His-tag to their C termini. The three proteins were overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity in milligram quantities. MurA and -B were combinatorially used to synthesize the MurC substrate UDP-N-acetylmuramate, the identity of which was confirmed by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Two phage-display libraries were screened against MurC in order to identify peptide ligands to the enzyme. Three rounds of biopanning were carried out, successively increasing elution specificity from round 1 to 3. The third round was accomplished with both non-specific elution and competitive elution with each of the three MurC substrates, UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UNAM), ATP and L-alanine. The DNA of 10 phage, selected randomly from each group, was extracted and sequenced, and consensus peptide sequences were elucidated. Peptides were synthesized and tested for inhibition of the MurC-catalysed reaction, and two peptides were shown to be inhibitors of MurC activity with IC(50)s of 1.5 and 0.9 mM, respectively. The powerful selection technique of phage display allowed us to identify two peptide inhibitors of the essential bacterial enzyme MurC. The peptide sequences represent the basis for the synthesis of inhibitory peptidomimetic molecules.

  17. Isolation of llama antibody fragments for prevention of dandruff by phage display in shampoo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.; Vaart, M. van der; Lutje Hulsik, D.; Vriend, G.; Haard, H. de; Spinelli, S.; Cambillau, C.; Frenken, L.; Verrips, T.

    As part of research exploring the feasibility of using antibody fragments to inhibit the growth of organisms implicated in dandruff, we isolated antibody fragments that bind to a cell surface protein of Malassezia furfur in the presence of shampoo. We found that phage display of llama

  18. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display identifies peptides that bind mycobacteria

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngubane, NAC

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available . The displayed peptides are flanked by two cysteine residues, which are oxidized during phage assembly to a disulfide bond, resulting in a loop constrained peptide. We initially used the traditional clone picking method to identify the enriched clones... of the library, 1.236109 heptapeptides, it represented sufficient depth to measure the quantitative enrich- ment of relevant peptides. To confirm successful enrichment during selection, we characterized the reduction in diversity of the pool in the consecutive...

  19. Phage display selection of efficient glutamine-donor substrate peptides for transglutaminase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keresztessy, Zsolt; Csosz, Eva; Hársfalvi, Jolán; Csomós, Krisztián; Gray, Joe; Lightowlers, Robert N; Lakey, Jeremy H; Balajthy, Zoltán; Fésüs, László

    2006-11-01

    Understanding substrate specificity and identification of natural targets of transglutaminase 2 (TG2), the ubiquitous multifunctional cross-linking enzyme, which forms isopeptide bonds between protein-linked glutamine and lysine residues, is crucial in the elucidation of its physiological role. As a novel means of specificity analysis, we adapted the phage display technique to select glutamine-donor substrates from a random heptapeptide library via binding to recombinant TG2 and elution with a synthetic amine-donor substrate. Twenty-six Gln-containing sequences from the second and third biopanning rounds were susceptible for TG2-mediated incorporation of 5-(biotinamido)penthylamine, and the peptides GQQQTPY, GLQQASV, and WQTPMNS were modified most efficiently. A consensus around glutamines was established as pQX(P,T,S)l, which is consistent with identified substrates listed in the TRANSDAB database. Database searches showed that several proteins contain peptides similar to the phage-selected sequences, and the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain of SWI1/SNF1-related chromatin remodeling proteins was chosen for detailed analysis. MALDI/TOF and tandem mass spectrometry-based studies of a representative part of the domain, SGYGQQGQTPYYNQQSPHPQQQQPPYS (SnQ1), revealed that Q(6), Q(8), and Q(22) are modified by TG2. Kinetic parameters of SnQ1 transamidation (K(M)(app) = 250 microM, k(cat) = 18.3 sec(-1), and k(cat)/K(M)(app) = 73,200) classify it as an efficient TG2 substrate. Circular dichroism spectra indicated that SnQ1 has a random coil conformation, supporting its accessibility in the full-length parental protein. Added together, here we report a novel use of the phage display technology with great potential in transglutaminase research.

  20. Epitope Mapping of Metuximab on CD147 Using Phage Display and Molecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bifang He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metuximab is the generic name of Licartin, a new drug for radioimmunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. Although it is known to be a mouse monoclonal antibody against CD147, the complete epitope mediating the binding of metuximab to CD147 remains unknown. We panned the Ph.D.-12 phage display peptide library against metuximab and got six mimotopes. The following bioinformatics analysis based on mimotopes suggested that metuximab recognizes a conformational epitope composed of more than 20 residues. The residues of its epitope may include T28, V30, K36, L38, K57, F74, D77, S78, D79, D80, Q81, G83, S86, N98, Q100, L101, H102, G103, P104, V131, P132, and K191. The homology modeling of metuximab and the docking of CD147 to metuximab were also performed. Based on the top one docking model, the epitope was predicted to contain 28 residues: AGTVFTTV (23–30, I37, D45, E84, V88, EPMGTANIQLH (92–102, VPP (131–133, Q164, and K191. Almost half of the residues predicted on the basis of mimotope analysis also appear in the docking result, indicating that both results are reliable. As the predicted epitopes of metuximab largely overlap with interfaces of CD147-CD147 interactions, a structural mechanism of metuximab is proposed as blocking the formation of CD147 dimer.

  1. Random mutagenesis of BoNT/E Hc nanobody to construct a secondary phage-display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, B; Mousavi Gargari, S L; Rasooli, I; Rajabi Bazl, M; Hoseinpoor, R

    2014-08-01

    To construct secondary mutant phage-display library of recombinant single variable domain (VHH) against botulinum neurotoxin E by error-prone PCR. The gene coding for specific VHH derived from the camel immunized with binding domain of botulinum neurotoxin E (BoNT/E) was amplified by error-prone PCR. Several biopanning rounds were used to screen the phage-displaying BoNT/E Hc nanobodies. The final nanobody, SHMR4, with increased affinity recognized BoNT/E toxin with no cross-reactivity with other antigens especially with related BoNT toxins. The constructed nanobody could be a suitable candidate for VHH-based biosensor production to detect the Clostridium botulinum type E. Diagnosis and treatment of botulinum neurotoxins are important. Generation of high-affinity antibodies based on the construction of secondary libraries using affinity maturation step leads to the development of reagents for precise diagnosis and therapy. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Microcystin-LR nanobody screening from an alpaca phage display nanobody library and its expression and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Yang, Ying; Liu, Liwen; Li, Jianhong; Liu, Xiaoqin; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-30

    Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is a type of biotoxin that pollutes the ecological environment and food. The study aimed to obtain new nanobodies from phage nanobody library for determination of MC-LR. The toxin was conjugated to keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively, then the conjugates were used as coated antigens for enrichment (coated MC-LR-KLH) and screening (coated MC-LR-BSA) of MC-LR phage nanobodies from an alpaca phage display nanobody library. The antigen-specific phage particles were enriched effectively with four rounds of biopanning. At the last round of enrichment, total 20 positive monoclonal phage nanobodies were obtained from the library, which were analyzed after monoclonal phage enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), colony PCR and DNA sequencing. The most three positive nanobody genes, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were cloned into pET26b vector, then the nanobodies were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 respectively. After being purified, the molecular weight (M.W.) of all nanobodies were approximate 15kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The purified nanobodies, ANAb12, ANAb9 and ANAb7 were used to establish the indirect competitive ELISA (IC-ELISA) for MC-LR, and their half-maximum inhibition concentrations (IC 50 ) were 0.87, 1.17 and 1.47μg/L, their detection limits (IC 10 ) were 0.06, 0.08 and 0.12μg/L, respectively. All of them showed strong cross-reactivity (CRs) of 82.7-116.9% for MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-WR, and weak CRs of less than 4.56% for MC-LW, less than 0.1% for MC-LY and MC-LF. It was found that all the IC-ELISAs for MC-LR spiked in tap water samples detection were with good accuracy, stability and repeatability, their recoveries were 84.0-106.5%, coefficient of variations (CVs) were 3.4-10.6%. These results showed that IC-ELISA based on the nanobodies from the alpaca phage display antibody library were promising for high sensitive determination of multiple

  3. Construção de uma biblioteca de fragmentos de anticorpos monoclonais de galinhas com cadeia única (scFv por phage display com reatividade cruzada para estirpes heterólogas do vírus da bronquite infecciosa aviária Construction of an avian single chain monoclonal antibodies (scFv library by phage display that cross-reacted with heterologous avian infectious bronchitis virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Cesário Fernandes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Anticorpos monoclonais constituem a base de vários testes usados na detecção e na identificação de antígenos. Nesse contexto, tais imuno-reagentes têm sido extensivamente empregados na identificação de estirpes virais envolvidas na etiologia de surtos de bronquite infecciosa a campo, permitindo o aperfeiçoamento das técnicas de detecção e caracterização antigênica do vírus da bronquite infecciosa das galinhas (VBI. No presente estudo, uma biblioteca de fragmentos de anticorpos de galinha originalmente preparada por phage display contra a estirpe vacinal (H120 do VBI foi usada para a seleção de fragmentos de anticorpos recombinantes com reatividade cruzada para as estirpes heterólogas IBVPR01 e IBVPR05, isoladas de surtos a campo no Brasil e a estirpe SE-17, isolada nos Estados Unidos. Após três ciclos de panning, foi identificado, pelo ELISA, um conjunto de 15 anticorpos scFv expressos em fagos e com reatividade cruzada para essas mesmas estirpes do VBI. A análise por Western-blotting revelou que dois desses clones apresentavam fagos expressando fragmentos de anticorpos monoclonais com reatividade cruzada para a nucleoproteína N das três estirpes do VBI e também para a forma recombinante dessa nucleoproteína derivada da estirpe M41. Concluindo, os fragmentos de anticorpos monoclonais recombinantes scFv-N produzidos em fagos interagem com um epítopo mais conservado da proteína N do VBI e apresentam um grande potencial para utilização na detecção e no diagnóstico direto desse vírus.Monoclonal antibodies are the basis of various techniques used for antigen detection or characterization, and their use is specially recommended for the identification of viral strains involved in the etiology of infectious bronchitis outbreaks. These antibodies are homogeneous, highly specific and fully characterizable, allowing the improvement of immunological techniques detection and antigenic characterization of avian infectious

  4. [Screening serum response special antibodies of U251 cell line from surface display phage antibody library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Tan, De-Yong; Qian, Wei; Lai, Jian-Hua; Sun, Gui-Lin

    2004-05-01

    U251 cell is a sensitive cell line to serum, which stops at G0 phase of cell cycle in no-serum medium, and recovers growth when the serum is added into no-serum medium. The cell can express corresponding proteins in different phase of cell cycle. Therefore it is very signification for the study of cell cycle regulation mechanism that explores these proteins. In this paper, the mouse antibody phage display library was added into the bottle in which the serum starvation U251 cells had been cultured, and the special antibody phages were absorbed. Then the absorbed antibody phages were amplified by adding E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Amplified antibody phages were added into bottle in which the serum cultured cell after serum starvation (follow named as serum recovered cells) were incubated, so that the cell absorbed the no-special antibody phages for the serum starvation cell and the special antibody phages were in supernatant. The remaining no-special antibody phages in the supernatant were discarded by repeating above program 3-4 times. The pure special antibody phages were gotten, and amplified by adding the host cell E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Then the host bacterium infected special antibody phage was spread on the plate medium with ampicillin, and the monoclonal antibody phages were gotten. Using same as above program, the monoclonal antibody phages absorbed specially for serum recovered U251 cells were obtained when the serum recovered cells instead of serum starvation cells and serum starvation cells instead of serum recovered cells. In this study, ninety-six positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum starvation cells and eighty-two positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum recovered cells were obtained. By using cell immunochemistry assay, two special signification antibodies were obtained. one (No.11) was the strong response in serum starvation cells, the other (No.2) was the strong

  5. Raising an Antibody Specific to Breast Cancer Subpopulations Using Phage Display on Tissue Sections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Asbjørn; Meldgaard, Theresa; Fridriksdottir, Agla Jael Rubner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: Primary tumors display a great level of intra-tumor heterogeneity in breast cancer. The current lack of prognostic and predictive biomarkers limits accurate stratification and the ability to predict response to therapy. The aim of the present study was to select recombinant antibody...... fragments specific against breast cancer subpopulations, aiding the discovery of novel biomarkers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Recombinant antibody fragments were selected by phage display. A novel shadowstick technology enabled the direct selection using tissue sections of antibody fragments specific against...

  6. Thermal Stability of RNA Phage Virus-Like Particles Displaying Foreign Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peabody David S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To be useful for genetic display of foreign peptides a viral coat protein must tolerate peptide insertions without major disruption of subunit folding and capsid assembly. The folding of the coat protein of RNA phage MS2 does not normally tolerate insertions in its AB-loop, but an engineered single-chain dimer readily accepts them as long as they are restricted to one of its two halves. Results Here we characterize the effects of peptide insertions on the thermal stabilities of MS2 virus-like particles (VLPs displaying a variety of different peptides in one AB-loop of the coat protein single-chain dimer. These particles typically denature at temperatures around 5-10°C lower than unmodified VLPs. Even so, they are generally stable up to about 50°C. VLPs of the related RNA phage PP7 are cross-linked with intersubunit disulfide bonds and are therefore significantly more stable. An AB-loop insertion also reduces the stability of PP7 VLPs, but they only begin to denature above about 70°C. Conclusions VLPs assembled from MS2 single-chain dimer coat proteins with peptide insertions in one of their AB-loops are somewhat less stable than the wild-type particle, but still resist heating up to about 50°C. Because they possess disulfide cross-links, PP7-derived VLPs provide an alternate platform with even higher stability.

  7. Hybrid Nanomaterial Complexes for Advanced Phage-guided Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerapong Yata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing nanomaterials that are effective, safe, and selective for gene transfer applications is challenging. Bacteriophages (phage, viruses that infect bacteria only, have shown promise for targeted gene transfer applications. Unfortunately, limited progress has been achieved in improving their potential to overcome mammalian cellular barriers. We hypothesized that chemical modification of the bacteriophage capsid could be applied to improve targeted gene delivery by phage vectors into mammalian cells. Here, we introduce a novel hybrid system consisting of two classes of nanomaterial systems, cationic polymers and M13 bacteriophage virus particles genetically engineered to display a tumor-targeting ligand and carry a transgene cassette. We demonstrate that the phage complex with cationic polymers generates positively charged phage and large aggregates that show enhanced cell surface attachment, buffering capacity, and improved transgene expression while retaining cell type specificity. Moreover, phage/polymer complexes carrying a therapeutic gene achieve greater cancer cell killing than phage alone. This new class of hybrid nanomaterial platform can advance targeted gene delivery applications by bacteriophage.

  8. Phage Fab Display Selection In Vitro and In Vivo: Novel Means to Identify New Breast Cancer Avid Compounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meighan, Mark

    2001-01-01

    .... In this annual report we present preliminary results on the isolation of antibody fragments (Fabs), isolated from phage display libraries, when affinity selected against breast cancer cell lines...

  9. Construction of genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage for simultaneous phage display of gold binding peptide 1 and nuclear matrix protein 22 ScFv antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Farnaz; Amini, Seyed Mohammad; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Mazlomi, Mohammad Ali; Asadi-Ghalehni, Majid; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2017-11-01

    The most common techniques of antibody phage display are based on the use of M13 filamentous bacteriophages. This study introduces a new genetically engineered M13K07 helper phage displaying multiple copies of a known gold binding peptide on p8 coat proteins. The recombinant helper phages were used to rescue a phagemid vector encoding the p3 coat protein fused to the nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) ScFv antibody. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis revealed that the expression of gold binding peptide 1 (GBP1) on major coat protein p8 significantly enhances the gold-binding affinity of M13 phages. The recombinant bacteriophages at concentrations above 5×10 4 pfu/ml red-shifted the UV-vis absorbance spectra of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs); however, the surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles was not changed by the wild type bacteriophages at concentrations up to 10 12 pfu/ml. The phage ELISA assay demonstrated the high affinity binding of bifunctional bacteriophages to NMP22 antigen at concentrations of 10 5 and 10 6 pfu/ml. Thus, the p3 end of the bifunctional bacteriophages would be able to bind to specific target antigen, while the AuNPs were assembled along the coat of virus for signal generation. Our results indicated that the complex of antigen-bacteriophages lead to UV-vis spectral changes of AuNPs and NMP22 antigen in concentration range of 10-80μg/ml can be detected by bifunctional bacteriophages at concentration of 10 4 pfu/ml. The ability of bifunctional bacteriophages to bind to antigen and generate signal at the same time, makes this approach applicable for identifying different antigens in immunoassay techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Screening and Identification of Peptides Specifically Targeted to Gastric Cancer Cells from a Phage Display Peptide Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Deniz; Taflan, Sevket Onur; Yartas, Gizem; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T

    2018-04-25

    Background: Gastric cancer is the second most common cancer among the malign cancer types. Inefficiency of traditional techniques both in diagnosis and therapy of the disease makes the development of alternative and novel techniques indispensable. As an alternative to traditional methods, tumor specific targeting small peptides can be used to increase the efficiency of the treatment and reduce the side effects related to traditional techniques. The aim of this study is screening and identification of individual peptides specifically targeted to human gastric cancer cells using a phage-displayed peptide library and designing specific peptide sequences by using experimentally-eluted peptide sequences. Methods: Here, MKN-45 human gastric cancer cells and HFE-145 human normal gastric epithelial cells were used as the target and control cells, respectively. 5 rounds of biopannning with a phage display 12-peptide library were applied following subtraction biopanning with HFE-145 control cells. The selected phage clones were established by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence detection. We first obtain random phage clones after five biopanning rounds, determine the binding levels of each individual clone. Then, we analyze the frequencies of each amino acid in best binding clones to determine positively overexpressed amino acids for designing novel peptide sequences. Results: DE532 (VETSQYFRGTLS) phage clone was screened positive, showing specific binding on MKN-45 gastric cancer cells. DE-Obs (HNDLFPSWYHNY) peptide, which was designed by using amino acid frequencies of experimentally selected peptides in the 5th round of biopanning, showed specific binding in MKN-45 cells. Conclusion: Selection and characterization of individual clones may give us specifically binding peptides, but more importantly, data extracted from eluted phage clones may be used to design theoretical peptides with better binding properties than even experimentally selected ones

  11. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell

  12. Targeting mammalian organelles with internalizing phage (iPhage) libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Roberto; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Guzman-Rojas, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Techniques largely used for protein interaction studies and discovery of intracellular receptors, such as affinity capture complex purification and yeast two-hybrid, may produce inaccurate datasets due to protein insolubility, transient or weak protein interactions, or irrelevant intracellular context. A versatile tool to overcome these limitations as well as to potentially create vaccines and engineer peptides and antibodies as targeted diagnostic and therapeutic agents, is the phage display technique. We have recently developed a new technology for screening internalizing phage (iPhage) vectors and libraries utilizing a ligand/receptor-independent mechanism to penetrate eukaryotic cells. iPhage particles provide a unique discovery platform for combinatorial intracellular targeting of organelle ligands along with their corresponding receptors and to fingerprint functional protein domains in living cells. Here we explain the design, cloning, construction, and production of iPhage-based vectors and libraries, along with basic ligand-receptor identification and validation methodologies for organelle receptors. An iPhage library screening can be performed in ~8 weeks. PMID:24030441

  13. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer | Yang ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, an improved plating assay was developed for detection of the number of recombinant phage Cap-T7 present in a test solution at a certain dilution point by counting the plaque forming units. The data demonstrated that the improved plating assay is fast, useful, and convenient for the determination of the phage ...

  14. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... for absorption of the Fab phages. Soluble Fab fragments produced from the cloned material showed identical performance to the parental antibody in agglutination assays. Gel filtration confirmed that the Fab fragment consists of a kappa-Fd heterodimer. The successful use of intact cells for selection of specific...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  15. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnazza, S.; Gioffrè, G.; Felici, F.; Guglielmino, S.

    2007-10-01

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 104 cells ml-1. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  16. Practical Tips for Construction of Custom Peptide Libraries and Affinity Selection by Using Commercially Available Phage Display Cloning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Fukunaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phage display technology is undoubtedly a powerful tool for affinity selection of target-specific peptide. Commercially available premade phage libraries allow us to take screening in the easiest way. On the other hand, construction of a custom phage library seems to be inaccessible, because several practical tips are absent in instructions. This paper focuses on what should be born in mind for beginners using commercially available cloning kits (Ph.D. with type 3 vector and T7Select systems for M13 and T7 phage, respectively. In the M13 system, Pro or a basic amino acid (especially, Arg should be avoided at the N-terminus of peptide fused to gp3. In both systems, peptides containing odd number(s of Cys should be designed with caution. Also, DNA sequencing of a constructed library before biopanning is highly recommended for finding unexpected bias.

  17. A Genetically Modified Adenoviral Vector with a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Incorporated into Fiber Fibritin Chimera Prolongs Survival in Experimental Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julius W; Kane, J Robert; Young, Jacob S; Chang, Alan L; Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Miska, Jason; Ahmed, Atique U; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Curiel, David T; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-09-01

    The dismal clinical context of advanced-grade glioma demands the development of novel therapeutic strategies with direct patient impact. Adenovirus-mediated virotherapy represents a potentially effective approach for glioma therapy. In this research, we generated a novel glioma-specific adenovirus by instituting more advanced genetic modifications that can maximize the efficiency and safety of therapeutic adenoviral vectors. In this regard, a glioma-specific targeted fiber was developed through the incorporation of previously published glioma-specific, phage-panned peptide (VWT peptide) on a fiber fibritin-based chimeric fiber, designated as "GliomaFF." We showed that the entry of this virus was highly restricted to glioma cells, supporting the specificity imparted by the phage-panned peptide. In addition, the stability of the targeting moiety presented by fiber fibritin structure permitted greatly enhanced infectivity. Furthermore, the replication of this virus was restricted in glioma cells by controlling expression of the E1 gene under the activity of the tumor-specific survivin promoter. Using this approach, we were able to explore the combinatorial efficacy of various adenoviral modifications that could amplify the specificity, infectivity, and exclusive replication of this therapeutic adenovirus in glioma. Finally, virotherapy with this modified virus resulted in up to 70% extended survival in an in vivo murine glioma model. These data demonstrate that this novel adenoviral vector is a safe and efficient treatment for this difficult malignancy.

  18. Generation of human antibody fragments against Streptococcus mutans using a phage display chain shuffling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barth Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common oral diseases and dental caries can be prevented effectively by passive immunization. In humans, passive immunotherapy may require the use of humanized or human antibodies to prevent adverse immune responses against murine epitopes. Therefore we generated human single chain and diabody antibody derivatives based on the binding characteristics of the murine monoclonal antibody Guy's 13. The murine form of this antibody has been used successfully to prevent Streptococcus mutans colonization and the development of dental caries in non-human primates, and to prevent bacterial colonization in human clinical trials. Results The antibody derivatives were generated using a chain-shuffling approach based on human antibody variable gene phage-display libraries. Like the parent antibody, these derivatives bound specifically to SAI/II, the surface adhesin of the oral pathogen S. mutans. Conclusions Humanization of murine antibodies can be easily achieved using phage display libraries. The human antibody fragments bind the antigen as well as the causative agent of dental caries. In addition the human diabody derivative is capable of aggregating S. mutans in vitro, making it a useful candidate passive immunotherapeutic agent for oral diseases.

  19. Recombinant phage probes for Listeria monocytogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S; Gioffre, G; Felici, F; Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    Monitoring of food and environmental samples for biological threats, such as Listeria monocytogenes, requires probes that specifically bind biological agents and ensure their immediate and efficient detection. There is a need for robust and inexpensive affinity probes as an alternative to antibodies. These probes may be recruited from random peptide libraries displayed on filamentous phage. In this study, we selected from two phage peptide libraries phage clones displaying peptides capable of specific and strong binding to the L. monocytogenes cell surface. The ability of isolated phage clones to interact specifically with L. monocytogenes was demonstrated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and confirmed by co-precipitation assay. We also assessed the sensitivity of phage-bacteria binding by PCR on phage-captured Listeria cells, which could be detected at a concentration of 10{sup 4} cells ml{sup -1}. In addition, as proof-of-concept, we tested the possibility of immobilizing the affinity-selected phages to a putative biosensor surface. The quality of phage deposition was monitored by ELISA and fluorescent microscopy. Phage-bacterial binding was confirmed by high power optical phase contrast microscopy. Overall, the results of this work validate the concept of affinity-selected recombinant filamentous phages as probes for detecting and monitoring bacterial agents under any conditions that warrant their recognition, including in food products.

  20. Chemical Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of a Phage Display-Derived Peptide Active against Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Nicolás; Cárdenas, Constanza; Guzmán, Fanny; Marshall, Sergio H

    2016-04-01

    Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) is the etiological agent of the disease by the same name and causes major losses in the salmon industry worldwide. Epizootic ISAV outbreaks have occurred in Norway and, to a lesser degree, in Canada. In 2007, an ISAV outbreak in Chile destroyed most of the seasonal production and endangered the entire Chilean salmon industry. None of the existing prophylactic approaches have demonstrated efficacy in providing absolute protection from or even a palliative effect on ISAV proliferation. Sanitary control measures for ISAV, based on molecular epidemiology data, have proven insufficient, mainly due to high salmon culture densities and a constant presence of a nonpathogenic strain of the virus. This report describes an alternative treatment approach based on interfering peptides selected from a phage display library. The screening of a phage display heptapeptide library resulted in the selection of a novel peptide with significant in vitro antiviral activity against ISAV. This peptide specifically interacted with the viral hemagglutinin-esterase protein, thereby impairing virus binding, with plaque reduction assays showing a significant reduction in viral yields. The identified peptide acts at micromolar concentrations against at least two different pathogenic strains of the virus, without detectable cytotoxic effects on the tested fish cells. Therefore, antiviral peptides represent a novel alternative for controlling ISAV and, potentially, other fish pathogens. Identifying novel methods for the efficient control of infectious diseases is imperative for the future of global aquaculture. The present study used a phage display heptapeptide library to identify a peptide with interfering activity against a key protein of the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV). A piscine orthomyxovirus, ISAV is a continuous threat to the commercial sustainability of cultured salmon production worldwide. The complex epidemiological strategy of this

  1. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... peripheral blood lymphocytes caused by the low abundance of antigen-specific B cells in the circulation. The preselection of B cells is based on the specificity of the surface Ig receptor and is accomplished using the antigen of interest conjugated to magnetic beads. This method should significantly increase...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  2. Phage display as a promising approach for vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Bakhshinejad, Babak; Baradaran, Behzad; Motallebnezhad, Morteza; Aghebati-Maleki, Ali; Nickho, Hamid; Yousefi, Mehdi; Majidi, Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages are specific antagonists to bacterial hosts. These viral entities have attracted growing interest as optimal vaccine delivery vehicles. Phages are well-matched for vaccine design due to being highly stable under harsh environmental conditions, simple and inexpensive large scale production, and potent adjuvant capacities. Phage vaccines have efficient immunostimulatory effects and present a high safety profile because these viruses have made a constant relationship with the mamm...

  3. Application of phage peptide display technology for the study of food allergen epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueni; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2017-06-01

    Phage peptide display technology has been used to identify IgE-binding mimotopes (mimics of natural epitopes) that mimic conformational epitopes. This approach is effective in the characterization of those epitopes that are important for eliciting IgE-mediated allergic responses by food allergens and those that are responsible for cross-reactivity among allergenic food proteins. Application of this technology will increase our understanding of the mechanisms whereby food allergens elicit allergic reactions, will facilitate the discovery of diagnostic reagents and may lead to mimotope-based immunotherapy. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Selection of gonadotrophin surge attenuating factor phage antibodies by bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorsa-Leslie, Tarja; Mason, Helen D; Harris, William J; Fowler, Paul A

    2005-09-26

    We aimed to combine the generation of "artificial" antibodies with a rat pituitary bioassay as a new strategy to overcome 20 years of difficulties in the purification of gonadotrophin surge-attenuating factor (GnSAF). A synthetic single-chain antibody (Tomlinson J) phage display library was bio-panned with partially purified GnSAF produced by cultured human granulosa/luteal cells. The initial screening with a simple binding immunoassay resulted in 8 clones that were further screened using our in-vitro rat monolayer bioassay for GnSAF. Initially the antibodies were screened as pooled phage forms and subsequently as individual, soluble, single-chain antibody (scAbs) forms. Then, in order to improve the stability of the scAbs for immunopurification purposes, and to widen the range of labelled secondary antibodies available, these were engineered into full-length human immunoglobulins. The immunoglobulin with the highest affinity for GnSAF and a previously described rat anti-GnSAF polyclonal antiserum was then used to immunopurify bioactive GnSAF protein. The two purified preparations were electrophoresed on 1-D gels and on 7 cm 2-D gels (pH 4-7). The candidate GnSAF protein bands and spots were then excised for peptide mass mapping. Three of the scAbs recognised GnSAF bioactivity and subsequently one clone of the purified scAb-derived immunoglobulin demonstrated high affinity for GnSAF bioactivity, also binding the molecule in such as way as to block its bioactivity. When used for repeated immunopurification cycles and then Western blot, this antibody enabled the isolation of a GnSAF-bioactive protein band at around 66 kDa. Similar results were achieved using the rat anti-GnSAF polyclonal antiserum. The main candidate molecules identified from the immunopurified material by excision of 2-D gel protein spots was human serum albumin precursor and variants. This study demonstrates that the combination of bioassay and phage display technologies is a powerful tool in the

  5. Survey on the phage resistance mechanisms displayed by a dairy Lactobacillus helveticus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Orrù, Luigi; Rossetti, Lia; Lamontanara, Antonella; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Bonvini, Barbara; Meucci, Aurora; Carminati, Domenico; Cattivelli, Luigi; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2017-09-01

    In this study the presence and functionality of phage defence mechanisms in Lactobacillus helveticus ATCC 10386, a strain of dairy origin which is sensitive to ΦLh56, were investigated. After exposure of ATCC 10386 to ΦLh56, the whole-genome sequences of ATCC 10386 and of a phage-resistant derivative (LhM3) were compared. LhM3 showed deletions in the S-layer protein and a higher expression of the genes involved in the restriction/modification (R/M) system. Genetic data were substantiated by measurements of bacteriophage adsorption rates, efficiency of plaquing, cell wall protein size and by gene expression analysis. In LhM3 two phage resistance mechanisms, the inhibition of phage adsorption and the upregulation of Type I R/M genes, take place and explain its resistance to ΦLh56. Although present in both ATCC 10386 and LhM3 genomes, the CRISPR machinery did not seem to play a role in the phage resistance of LhM3. Overall, the natural selection of phage resistant strains resulted successful in detecting variants carrying multiple phage defence mechanisms in L. helveticus. The concurrent presence of multiple phage-resistance systems should provide starter strains with increased fitness and robustness in dairy ecosystems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ligand-directed profiling of organelles with internalizing phage libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Rangel, Roberto; Guzman-Roja, Liliana; Salmeron, Carolina C.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Bologa, Cristian G.; Oprea, Tudor I.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    Phage display is a resourceful tool to, in an unbiased manner, discover and characterize functional protein-protein interactions, to create vaccines, and to engineer peptides, antibodies, and other proteins as targeted diagnostic and/or therapeutic agents. Recently, our group has developed a new class of internalizing phage (iPhage) for ligand-directed targeting of organelles and/or to identify molecular pathways within live cells. This unique technology is suitable for applications ranging from fundamental cell biology to drug development. Here we describe the method for generating and screening the iPhage display system, and explain how to select and validate candidate internalizing homing peptide. PMID:25640897

  7. Discovery of Selective Nanobodies against α-elapitoxin Dpp2c from Black Mamba through Phage Display Screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milbo, Christina; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard; Lohse, Brian

    Feared for its highly neurotoxic venom and rapid attack technique, the Black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis) is Africa’s largest venomous snake. The clinical manifestations of a bitefrom D. polylepis include flaccid paralysis leading to respiratory failure and death due to postsynaptic blockade of ......-neurotoxins. Here, we report the discovery of selective nanobodies targeting α-elapitoxin Dpp2c from D. polylepis through phage display screening....

  8. Toward Understanding Phage:Host Interactions in the Rumen; Complete Genome Sequences of Lytic Phages Infecting Rumen Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind A. Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The rumen is known to harbor dense populations of bacteriophages (phages predicted to be capable of infecting a diverse range of rumen bacteria. While bacterial genome sequencing projects are revealing the presence of phages which can integrate their DNA into the genome of their host to form stable, lysogenic associations, little is known of the genetics of phages which utilize lytic replication. These phages infect and replicate within the host, culminating in host lysis, and the release of progeny phage particles. While lytic phages for rumen bacteria have been previously isolated, their genomes have remained largely uncharacterized. Here we report the first complete genome sequences of lytic phage isolates specifically infecting three genera of rumen bacteria: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, and Streptococcus. All phages were classified within the viral order Caudovirales and include two phage morphotypes, representative of the Siphoviridae and Podoviridae families. The phage genomes displayed modular organization and conserved viral genes were identified which enabled further classification and determination of closest phage relatives. Co-examination of bacterial host genomes led to the identification of several genes responsible for modulating phage:host interactions, including CRISPR/Cas elements and restriction-modification phage defense systems. These findings provide new genetic information and insights into how lytic phages may interact with bacteria of the rumen microbiome.

  9. Identification and characterisation of the proteins bound by specific phage-displayed recombinant antibodies (scFv) obtained against Brazil nut and almond extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Silvia; Madrid, Raquel; García-García, Aina; Alcocer, Marcos; Martín, Rosario; González, Isabel; García, Teresa

    2018-03-01

    Almonds and Brazil nuts are widely consumed allergenic nuts whose presence must be declared according to food labelling regulations. Their detection in food products has been recently achieved by ELISA methods with recombinant antibodies (scFv) isolated against complete Brazil nut and almond protein extracts. The screening of phage-scFv libraries against complete protein extracts confers a series of advantages over the use of purified proteins, as recombinant proteins might alter their native folding. However, using this strategy, the nature of the target detected by phage-displayed antibodies remains unknown, and requires further research to identify whether they are nut allergens or other molecules present in the extract, but not related to their allergenic potential. Electrophoretic, chromatographic, immunological and spectrometric techniques revealed that the Brazil nut (BE95) and almond (PD1F6 and PD2C9) specific phage-scFvs detected conformational epitopes of the Brazil nut and almond 11S globulins, recognised by WHO/IUIS as Ber e 2 and Pru du 6 major allergens. Circular dichroism data indicated that severe heat treatment would entail loss of epitope structure, disabling scFv for target detection. The presence of important Brazil nut and almond allergens (Ber e 2 and Pru du 6) in foodstuffs can be determined by using phage-display antibodies BE95, PD1F6 and PD2C9 as affinity probes in ELISA. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Selection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB)-binding peptide using phage display technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soykut, Esra Acar; Dudak, Fahriye Ceyda; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2008-01-01

    In this study, peptides were selected to recognize staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) which cause food intoxication and can be used as a biological war agent. By using commercial M13 phage library, single plaque isolation of 38 phages was done and binding affinities were investigated with phage-ELISA. The specificities of the selected phage clones showing high affinity to SEB were checked by using different protein molecules which can be found in food samples. Furthermore, the affinities of three selected phage clones were determined by using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. Sequence analysis was realized for three peptides showing high binding affinity to SEB and WWRPLTPESPPA, MNLHDYHRLFWY, and QHPQINQTLYRM amino acid sequences were obtained. The peptide sequence with highest affinity to SEB was synthesized with solid phase peptide synthesis technique and thermodynamic constants of the peptide-SEB interaction were determined by using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and compared with those of antibody-SEB interaction. The binding constant of the peptide was determined as 4.2 ± 0.7 x 10 5 M -1 which indicates a strong binding close to that of antibody

  11. Construction of naïve camelids VHH repertoire in phage display-based library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Atef, Ahmed; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Edris, Sherif; Hajrah, Nahid; Alzohairy, Ahmed M; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Camelids have unique antibodies, namely HCAbs (VHH) or commercially named Nanobodies(®) (Nb) that are composed only of a heavy-chain homodimer. As libraries based on immunized camelids are time-consuming, costly and likely redundant for certain antigens, we describe the construction of a naïve camelid VHHs library from blood serum of non-immunized camelids with affinity in the subnanomolar range and suitable for standard immune applications. This approach is rapid and recovers VHH repertoire with the advantages of being more diverse, non-specific and devoid of subpopulations of specific antibodies, which allows the identification of binders for any potential antigen (or pathogen). RNAs from a number of camelids from Saudi Arabia were isolated and cDNAs of the diverse vhh gene were amplified; the resulting amplicons were cloned in the phage display pSEX81 vector. The size of the library was found to be within the required range (10(7)) suitable for subsequent applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Two hundred clones were randomly selected and the inserted gene library was either estimated for redundancy or sequenced and aligned to the reference camelid vhh gene (acc. No. ADE99145). Results indicated complete non-specificity of this small library in which no single event of redundancy was detected. These results indicate the efficacy of following this approach in order to yield a large and diverse enough gene library to secure the presence of the required version encoding the required antibodies for any target antigen. This work is a first step towards the construction of phage display-based biosensors useful in disease (e.g., TB or tuberculosis) diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection and quantification of microcystins (cyanobacterial hepatotoxins) with recombinant antibody fragments isolated from a naïve human phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhiney, J; Lawton, L A; Porter, A J

    2000-12-01

    Single-chain antibody fragments against the cyanobacterial hepatotoxin microcystin-LR were isolated from a naive human phage display library and expressed in Escherichia coli. In competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the most sensitive antibody clone selected from the library detected free microcystin-LR with an IC(50) value of 4 microM. It was found to cross react with three other microcystin variants - microcystin-RR, microcystin-LW and microcystin-LF - and detected microcystins in extracts of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, found to contain the toxins by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The quantification of microcystins in these extracts by ELISA and HPLC showed good correlation. Although the antibody isolated in this study was considerably less sensitive than the polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies already available for microcystin detection, phage display technology represents a cheaper, more rapid alternative for the production of anti-microcystin antibodies than the methods currently in use.

  13. Synergy as a rationale for phage therapy using phage cocktails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerer, Matthew; Molineux, Ian J; Bull, James J

    2014-01-01

    Where phages are used to treat bacterial contaminations and infections, multiple phages are typically applied at once as a cocktail. When two or more phages in the cocktail attack the same bacterium, the combination may produce better killing than any single phage (synergy) or the combination may be worse than the best single phage (interference). Synergy is of obvious utility, especially if it can be predicted a priori, but it remains poorly documented with few examples known. This study addresses synergy in which one phage improves adsorption by a second phage. It first presents evidence of synergy from an experimental system of two phages and a mucoid E. coli host. The synergy likely stems from a tailspike enzyme produced by one of the phages. We then offer mathematical models and simulations to understand the dynamics of synergy and the enhanced magnitude of bacterial control possible. The models and observations complement each other and suggest that synergy may be of widespread utility and may be predictable from easily observed phenotypes.

  14. Synthetic Phage for Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlling structural organization and signaling motif display is of great importance to design the functional tissue regenerating materials. Synthetic phage, genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage has been recently introduced as novel tissue regeneration materials to display a high density of cell-signaling peptides on their major coat proteins for tissue regeneration purposes. Structural advantages of their long-rod shape and monodispersity can be taken together to construct nanofibrous scaffolds which support cell proliferation and differentiation as well as direct orientation of their growth in two or three dimensions. This review demonstrated how functional synthetic phage is designed and subsequently utilized for tissue regeneration that offers potential cell therapy.

  15. Identification of Novel Immunogenic Proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by Phage Display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel O Connor

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases worldwide with more than 100 million new infections per year. A lack of intense research over the last decades and increasing resistances to the recommended antibiotics call for a better understanding of gonococcal infection, fast diagnostics and therapeutic measures against N. gonorrhoeae. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify novel immunogenic proteins as a first step to advance those unresolved problems. For the identification of immunogenic proteins, pHORF oligopeptide phage display libraries of the entire N. gonorrhoeae genome were constructed. Several immunogenic oligopeptides were identified using polyclonal rabbit antibodies against N. gonorrhoeae. Corresponding full-length proteins of the identified oligopeptides were expressed and their immunogenic character was verified by ELISA. The immunogenic character of six proteins was identified for the first time. Additional 13 proteins were verified as immunogenic proteins in N. gonorrhoeae.

  16. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lisa Phipps

    Full Text Available Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1 ensure efficient display; 2 maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3 minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands.

  17. Chemical Strategies for the Covalent Modification of Filamentous Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Francis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Historically filamentous bacteriophage have been known to be the workhorse of phage display due to their ability to link genotype to phenotype. More recently, the filamentous phage scaffold has proved to be powerful outside the realms of phage display technology in fields such as molecular imaging, cancer research and materials and vaccine development. The ability of the virion to serve as a platform for a variety of applications heavily relies on the functionalization of the phage coat proteins with a wide variety of functionalities. Genetic modification of the coat proteins has been the most widely used strategy for functionalizing the virion; however complementary chemical modification strategies can help to diversify the range of materials that can be developed. This review emphasizes the recent advances that have been made in the chemical modification of filamentous phage as well as some of the challenges that are involved functionalizing the virion.

  18. Enhanced Sensitive Immunoassay: Noncompetitive Phage Anti-Immune Complex Assay for the Determination of Malachite Green and Leucomalachite Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To develop a more sensitive immunoassay for malachite green (MG) and leucomalachite green (LMG), we identified the immunocomplex binding phage-borne peptides for use in the noncompetitive phage anti-immunocomplex assay (PHAIA). An anti-LMG monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used to select immunocomplex binding peptides from a circular random eight-amino-acid phage-displayed library. After three rounds of panning-elution, five peptides that bound the LMG–mAb immunocomplex were obtained. One of the phage-borne peptide clones that resulted in an assay with the highest sensitivity was chosen for further research. The concentration of LMG producing 50% of the saturated signal and the limit of detection of the assay were 7.02 and 0.55 ng/mL, respectively, with a linear range of 1.35 to 21.56 ng/mL. The PHAIA based on the same antibody was 16 times more sensitive compared to the competitive immunoassay. PHAIA was used to analyze LMG, MG, and two mixtures of spiked fish samples, with validation by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detector. Results showed a good correlation (R2LMG = 0.9841; R2MG = 0.993; R2Mixture = 0.9903) between the data of PHAIA and HPLC, thus the assay was an efficient method for monitoring food safety. PMID:25077381

  19. Antibody phage display applications for nuclear medicine imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winthrop, M.D.; Denardo, G.L.; Denardo, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-based constructs genetically engineered from genes of diverse origin provide a remarkable opportunity to develop functional molecular imaging techniques and specific molecular targeted radionuclide therapies. Phage display libraries of antibody fragment genes can be used to select antibody-based constructs that bind any chosen epitope. A large naive human antibody-based library was used to illustrate binding of antibody constructs to a variety of common and unique antigens. Antibody-based libraries from hybridoma cells, lymphocytes from immunized humans or from mice and human antibody repertoires produced in transgenic mice have also been described. Several orders of magnitude of affinity enhancement can be achieved by random or site specific mutations of the selected binding peptide domains of the scFv. Affinities (K d ) as high as 10 - 11 M (10 pM) for affinity-matured scFv have been documented. Such gene libraries thus offer an almost limitless variety of antibody-based molecular binding peptide modules that can be used in creative ways for the construction of new targeting agents for functional or molecular imaging and therapy

  20. Detection of sulfur mustard adducts in human callus by phage antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, F.J.; Mars-Groenendijk, R.H.; Noort, D.; Fidder, A.; Schans, G.P. van der

    2007-01-01

    As part of a research program to develop novel methods for diagnosis of sulfur mustard exposure in the human skin the suitability of phage display was explored. Phage display is a relative new method that enables researchers to quickly evaluate a huge range of potentially useful antibodies, thereby

  1. A universal phage display system for the seamless construction of Fab libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Renae S; Valadon, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    The construction of Fab phage libraries requires the cloning of domains from both the light and the heavy chain of antibodies. Despite the advent of powerful strategies such as splicing-by-overlap extension PCR, obtaining high quality libraries with excellent coverage remains challenging. Here, we explored the use of type IIS restriction enzymes for the seamless cloning of Fab libraries. We analyzed human, murine and rabbit germline antibody repertoires and identified combinations of restriction enzymes that exhibit very few or no recognition sites in the antibody sequences. We describe three phagemid vectors, pUP-22Hb, pUP-22Mc and pUP-22Rc, which were employed for cloning the Fab repertoire of these hosts using BsmBI and SapI (human) or SapI alone (mouse and rabbit). Using human serum albumin as a model immunization, we built a mouse/human chimeric Fab library and a mouse Fab library in a single step ligation and successfully panned multiple cognate antibodies. The overall process is highly scalable and faster than PCR-based techniques, with a Fab insertion success rate of around 80%. By using carefully chosen overhangs on each end of the antibody domains, this approach paves the way to the universal, sequence- and vector-independent cloning and reformatting of antibody libraries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Monoclonal antibody proteomics: use of antibody mimotope displaying phages and the relevant synthetic peptides for mAb scouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdú, István; Flachner, Beáta; Bognár, Melinda; Végh, Barbara M; Dobi, Krisztina; Lőrincz, Zsolt; Lázár, József; Cseh, Sándor; Takács, László; Kurucz, István

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibody proteomics uses nascent libraries or cloned (Plasmascan™, QuantiPlasma™) libraries of mAbs that react with individual epitopes of proteins in the human plasma. At the initial phase of library creation, cognate protein antigen and the epitope interacting with the antibodies are not known. Scouting for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the best binding characteristics is of high importance for mAb based biomarker assay development. However, in the absence of the identity of the cognate antigen the task represents a challenge. We combined phage display, and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore) experiments to test whether specific phages and the respective mimotope peptides obtained from large scale studies are applicable to determine key features of antibodies for scouting. We show here that mAb captured phage-mimotope heterogeneity that is the diversity of the selected peptide sequences, is inversely correlated with an important binding descriptor; the off-rate of the antibodies and that represents clues for driving the selection of useful mAbs for biomarker assay development. Carefully chosen synthetic mimotope peptides are suitable for specificity testing in competitive assays using the target proteome, in our case the human plasma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Generation of a Highly Reactive Chicken-Derived Single-Chain Variable Fragment against Fusarium verticillioides by Phage Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Quan Hu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium verticillioides is the primary causal agent of Fusarium ear and kernel rot in maize, producing fumonisin mycotoxins that are toxic to humans and domestic animals. Rapid detection and monitoring of fumonisin-producing fungi are pivotally important for the prevention of mycotoxins from entering into food/feed products. Chicken-derived single-chain variable fragments (scFvs against cell wall-bound proteins from F. verticillioides were isolated from an immunocompetent phage display library. Comparative phage enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs and sequencing analyses identified four different scFv antibodies with high sensitivity. Soluble antibody ELISAs identified two highly sensitive scFv antibodies, FvCA3 and FvCA4, with the latter being slightly more sensitive. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the FvCA4 may hold a better overall structure with CDRH3, CDRL1 and CDRL3 centered in the core region of antibody surface compared with that of other scFvs. Immunofluorescence labeling revealed that the binding of FvCA4 antibody was localized to the cell walls of conidiospores and hyphae of F. verticillioides, confirming the specificity of this antibody for a surface target. This scFv antibody was able to detect the fungal mycelium as low as 10−2 μg/mL and contaminating mycelium at a quantity of 10−2 mg/g maize. This is the first report that scFv antibodies derived from phage display have a wide application for rapid and accurate detection and monitoring of fumonisin-producing pathogens in agricultural samples.

  4. Phage display-derived inhibitor of the essential cell wall biosynthesis enzyme MurF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blewett Ann

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop antibacterial agents having novel modes of action against bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, we targeted the essential MurF enzyme of the antibiotic resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. MurF catalyzes the formation of a peptide bond between D-Alanyl-D-Alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala and the cell wall precursor uridine 5'-diphosphoryl N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm with the concomitant hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate, yielding UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide. As MurF acts on a dipeptide, we exploited a phage display approach to identify peptide ligands having high binding affinities for the enzyme. Results Screening of a phage display 12-mer library using purified P. aeruginosa MurF yielded to the identification of the MurFp1 peptide. The MurF substrate UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glumeso-A2pm was synthesized and used to develop a sensitive spectrophotometric assay to quantify MurF kinetics and inhibition. MurFp1 acted as a weak, time-dependent inhibitor of MurF activity but was a potent inhibitor when MurF was pre-incubated with UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm or ATP. In contrast, adding the substrate D-Ala-D-Ala during the pre-incubation nullified the inhibition. The IC50 value of MurFp1 was evaluated at 250 μM, and the Ki was established at 420 μM with respect to the mixed type of inhibition against D-Ala-D-Ala. Conclusion MurFp1 exerts its inhibitory action by interfering with the utilization of D-Ala-D-Ala by the MurF amide ligase enzyme. We propose that MurFp1 exploits UDP-MurNAc-Ala-Glu-meso-A2pm-induced structural changes for better interaction with the enzyme. We present the first peptide inhibitor of MurF, an enzyme that should be exploited as a target for antimicrobial drug development.

  5. Identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists using phage display technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotaro Sakamoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ActRIIB (activin receptor type-2B is an activin receptor subtype constitutively expressed in the whole body, playing a role in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. For its various physiological activities, ActRIIB interacts with activin and multiple other ligands including myostatin (MSTN, growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11, and bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9. Notably, the protein-protein interaction (PPI between ActRIIB and MSTN negatively controls muscular development. Therefore, this PPI has been targeted for effective treatment of muscle degenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy and sarcopenia. Here, we report the identification of ligand-selective peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists by phage display technology. Our peptides bound to the extracellular domain of ActRIIB, inhibited PPIs between ActRIIB expressed on the cell surface and its ligands, and subsequently suppressed activation of Smad that serves as the downstream signal of the ActRIIB pathway. Interestingly, these peptidic antagonists displayed different ligand selectivities; the AR2mini peptide inhibited multiple ligands (activin A, MSTN, GDF11, and BMP9, AR9 inhibited MSTN and GDF11, while AR8 selectively inhibited MSTN. This is the first report of artificial peptidic ActRIIB-antagonists possessing ligand-selectivity.

  6. An improved plating assay for determination of phage titer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    antibiotics to control bacterial infections in swine (Thacker,. 2014). Phage therapy is re-valued by researchers to combat the growing menace of antibiotic-resistant infections (Torres-Barceló and Hochberg, 2016). Determination of phage titer in a sample is a key step in the study of the phage involved. It is very important to.

  7. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3-Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    Independent Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Larimer, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2016 – 19 August 2017 Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression 5a...highly specific peptide that targets HER3 for prostate cancer imaging. The peptide was labeled with a PET imaging radionuclide and injected into mice

  8. Identification of a novel aFGF-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on breast cancer from phage display library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiaoyong; Cai, Cuizan [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiao, Fei [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiong, Yaoling [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yadong; Zhang, Qihao [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Xiang, Qi [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lou, Guofeng [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Lian, Mengyang [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Su, Zhijian, E-mail: tjnuszj@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Biopharmaceutical Research and Development Centre, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China); Zheng, Qing, E-mail: tzhengq@jnu.edu.cn [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, Guangdong (China)

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • A specific aFGF-binding peptide AP8 was identified from a phage display library. • AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. • AP8 arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by suppressing Cyclin D1. • AP8 could block the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase. • AP8 counteracted proliferation and cell cycle via influencing PA2G4 and PCNA. - Abstract: It has been reported that acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) is expressed in breast cancer and via interactions with fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) to promote the stage and grade of the disease. Thus, aFGF/FGFRs have been considered essential targets in breast cancer therapy. We identified a specific aFGF-binding peptide (AGNWTPI, named AP8) from a phage display heptapeptide library with aFGF after four rounds of biopanning. The peptide AP8 contained two (TP) amino acids identical and showed high homology to the peptides of the 182–188 (GTPNPTL) site of high-affinity aFGF receptor FGFR1. Functional analyses indicated that AP8 specifically competed with the corresponding phage clone A8 for binding to aFGF. In addition, AP8 could inhibit aFGF-stimulated cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase by increasing PA2G4 and suppressing Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blocked the aFGF-induced activation of Erk1/2 and Akt kinase in both breast cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, these results indicate that peptide AP8, acting as an aFGF antagonist, is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Selection of phage-displayed accessible recombinant targeted antibodies (SPARTA): methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Sharma, Geetanjali; Tarleton, Christy A; Nguyen, Huynh; Naranjo, Leslie A; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Bradbury, Andrew Rm; Pasqualini, Renata

    2018-05-03

    We developed a potentially novel and robust antibody discovery methodology, termed selection of phage-displayed accessible recombinant targeted antibodies (SPARTA). This combines an in vitro screening step of a naive human antibody library against known tumor targets, with in vivo selections based on tumor-homing capabilities of a preenriched antibody pool. This unique approach overcomes several rate-limiting challenges to generate human antibodies amenable to rapid translation into medical applications. As a proof of concept, we evaluated SPARTA on 2 well-established tumor cell surface targets, EphA5 and GRP78. We evaluated antibodies that showed tumor-targeting selectivity as a representative panel of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) and were highly efficacious. Our results validate a discovery platform to identify and validate monoclonal antibodies with favorable tumor-targeting attributes. This approach may also extend to other diseases with known cell surface targets and affected tissues easily isolated for in vivo selection.

  10. Improving Security in the ATLAS PanDA System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, J; Maeno, T; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T; Nilsson, P; Stewart, G

    2011-01-01

    The security challenges faced by users of the grid are considerably different to those faced in previous environments. The adoption of pilot jobs systems by LHC experiments has mitigated many of the problems associated with the inhomogeneities found on the grid and has greatly improved job reliability; however, pilot jobs systems themselves must then address many security issues, including the execution of multiple users' code under a common 'grid' identity. In this paper we describe the improvements and evolution of the security model in the ATLAS PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system. We describe the security in the PanDA server which is in place to ensure that only authorized members of the VO are allowed to submit work into the system and that jobs are properly audited and monitored. We discuss the security in place between the pilot code itself and the PanDA server, ensuring that only properly authenticated workload is delivered to the pilot for execution. When the code to be executed is from a 'normal' ATLAS user, as opposed to the production system or other privileged actor, then the pilot may use an EGEE developed identity switching tool called gLExec. This changes the grid proxy available to the job and also switches the UNIX user identity to protect the privileges of the pilot code proxy. We describe the problems in using this system and how they are overcome. Finally, we discuss security drills which have been run using PanDA and show how these improved our operational security procedures.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. PMID:25002431

  12. Manipulating or superseding host recombination functions: a dilemma that shapes phage evolvability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Marie Bobay

    Full Text Available Phages, like many parasites, tend to have small genomes and may encode autonomous functions or manipulate those of their hosts'. Recombination functions are essential for phage replication and diversification. They are also nearly ubiquitous in bacteria. The E. coli genome encodes many copies of an octamer (Chi motif that upon recognition by RecBCD favors repair of double strand breaks by homologous recombination. This might allow self from non-self discrimination because RecBCD degrades DNA lacking Chi. Bacteriophage Lambda, an E. coli parasite, lacks Chi motifs, but escapes degradation by inhibiting RecBCD and encoding its own autonomous recombination machinery. We found that only half of 275 lambdoid genomes encode recombinases, the remaining relying on the host's machinery. Unexpectedly, we found that some lambdoid phages contain extremely high numbers of Chi motifs concentrated between the phage origin of replication and the packaging site. This suggests a tight association between replication, packaging and RecBCD-mediated recombination in these phages. Indeed, phages lacking recombinases strongly over-represent Chi motifs. Conversely, phages encoding recombinases and inhibiting host recombination machinery select for the absence of Chi motifs. Host and phage recombinases use different mechanisms and the latter are more tolerant to sequence divergence. Accordingly, we show that phages encoding their own recombination machinery have more mosaic genomes resulting from recent recombination events and have more diverse gene repertoires, i.e. larger pan genomes. We discuss the costs and benefits of superseding or manipulating host recombination functions and how this decision shapes phage genome structure and evolvability.

  13. Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3 Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Independent Prostate Cancer Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin Larimer, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Massachusetts General Hospital Boston...3. DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2016 – 31 July 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Cancer Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Quantitative PET Imaging with Novel HER3...Targeted Peptides Selected by Phage Display to Predict Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0447 5c

  14. The use of antibiotics to improve phage detection and enumeration by the double-layer agar technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Eugénio C

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Double-Layer Agar (DLA technique is extensively used in phage research to enumerate and identify phages and to isolate mutants and new phages. Many phages form large and well-defined plaques that are easily observed so that they can be enumerated when plated by the DLA technique. However, some give rise to small and turbid plaques that are very difficult to detect and count. To overcome these problems, some authors have suggested the use of dyes to improve the contrast between the plaques and the turbid host lawns. It has been reported that some antibiotics stimulate bacteria to produce phages, resulting in an increase in final titer. Thus, antibiotics might contribute to increasing plaque size in solid media. Results Antibiotics with different mechanisms of action were tested for their ability to enhance plaque morphology without suppressing phage development. Some antibiotics increased the phage plaque surface by up to 50-fold. Conclusion This work presents a modification of the DLA technique that can be used routinely in the laboratory, leading to a more accurate enumeration of phages that would be difficult or even impossible otherwise.

  15. The Salmonella enterica Pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Annika; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is divided into four subspecies containing a large number of different serovars, several of which are important zoonotic pathogens and some show a high degree of host specificity or host preference. We compare 45 sequenced S. enterica genomes that are publicly available (22......, and the core and pan-genome of Salmonella were estimated to be around 2,800 and 10,000 gene families, respectively. The constructed pan-genomic dendrograms suggest that gene content is often, but not uniformly correlated to serotype. Any given Salmonella strain has a large stable core, whilst...... there is an abundance of accessory genes, including the Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPIs), transposable elements, phages, and plasmid DNA. We visualize conservation in the genomes in relation to chromosomal location and DNA structural features and find that variation in gene content is localized in a selection...

  16. Molecular characterization of three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-09-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for one phage, transcriptional analysis by Northern hybridization, reverse transcription-PCR, and primer extension. The three obtained phage genomes display high levels of sequence identity to each other and to genomes of the so-called group b L. delbrueckii phages c5, LL-Ku, and phiLdb, where some of the observed differences are believed to be responsible for host range variations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Isolation of Osteosarcoma-Associated Human Antibodies from a Combinatorial Fab Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Dantas-Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma, a highly malignant disease, is the most common primary bone tumor and is frequently found in children and adolescents. In order to isolate antibodies against osteosarcoma antigens, a combinatorial osteosarcoma Fab library displayed on the surface of phages was used. After three rounds of selection on the surface of tumor cells, several osteosarcoma-reactive Fabs were detected. From these Fabs, five were better characterized, and despite having differences in their VH (heavy chain variable domain and Vκ (kappa chain variable domain regions, they all bound to a protein with the same molecular mass. Further analysis by cell ELISA and immunocytochemistry suggested that the Fabs recognize a membrane-associated tumor antigen expressed in higher amounts in neoplasic cells than in normal tissue. These results suggest that the human Fabs selected in this work are a valuable tool for the study of this neoplasia.

  18. Reliable cloning of functional antibody variable domains from hybridomas and spleen cell repertoires employing a reengineered phage display system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, A; Bornhauser, S; Burmester, J; Honegger, A; Willuda, J; Bosshard, H R; Plückthun, A

    1997-02-14

    A prerequisite for the use of recombinant antibody technologies starting from hybridomas or immune repertoires is the reliable cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes. For this purpose, a standard phage display system was optimized for robustness, vector stability, tight control of scFv-delta geneIII expression, primer usage for PCR amplification of variable region genes, scFv assembly strategy and subsequent directional cloning using a single rare cutting restriction enzyme. This integrated cloning, screening and selection system allowed us to rapidly obtain antigen binding scFvs derived from spleen-cell repertoires of mice immunized with ampicillin as well as from all hybridoma cell lines tested to date. As representative examples, cloning of monoclonal antibodies against a his tag, leucine zippers, the tumor marker EGP-2 and the insecticide DDT is presented. Several hybridomas whose genes could not be cloned in previous experimental setups, but were successfully obtained with the present system, expressed high amounts of aberrant heavy and light chain mRNAs, which were amplified by PCR and greatly exceeded the amount of binding antibody sequences. These contaminating variable region genes were successfully eliminated by employing the optimized phage display system, thus avoiding time consuming sequencing of non-binding scFv genes. To maximize soluble expression of functional scFvs subsequent to cloning, a compatible vector series to simplify modification, detection, multimerization and rapid purification of recombinant antibody fragments was constructed.

  19. Screening for single-chain variable fragment antibodies against multiple Cry1 toxins from an immunized mouse phage display antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sa; Bo, Zongyi; Zhang, Cunzheng; Feng, Jianguo; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-04-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) is a kind of antibody that possess only one chain of the complete antibody while maintaining the antigen-specific binding abilities and can be expressed in prokaryotic system. In this study, scFvs against Cry1 toxins were screened out from an immunized mouse phage displayed antibody library, which was successfully constructed with capacity of 6.25 × 10 7  CFU/mL. Using the mixed and alternative antigen coating strategy and after four rounds of affinity screening, seven positive phage-scFvs against Cry1 toxins were selected and characterized. Among them, clone scFv-3H9 (MG214869) showing relative stable and high binding abilities to six Cry1 toxins was selected for expression and purification. SDS-PAGE indicated that the scFv-3H9 fragments approximately 27 kDa were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli HB2151 strain. The purified scFv-3H9 was used to establish the double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method (DAS-ELISA) for detecting six Cry1 toxins, of which the lowest detectable limits (LOD) and the lowest quantitative limits (LOQ) were 3.14-11.07 and 8.22-39.44 ng mL -1 , respectively, with the correlation coefficient higher than 0.997. The average recoveries of Cry1 toxins from spiked rice leaf samples were ranged from 84 to 95%, with coefficient of variation (CV) less than 8.2%, showing good accuracy for the multi-residue determination of six Cry1 toxins in agricultural samples. This research suggested that the constructed phage display antibody library based on the animal which was immunized with the mixture of several antigens under the same category can be used for the quick and effective screening of generic antibodies.

  20. Generation of human antibody fragments recognizing distinct epitopes of the nucleocapsid (N SARS-CoV protein using a phage display approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grasso Felicia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV is a newly emerging virus that causes SARS with high mortality rate in infected people. Successful control of the global SARS epidemic will require rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests to monitor its spread, as well as, the development of vaccines and new antiviral compounds including neutralizing antibodies that effectively prevent or treat this disease. Methods The human synthetic single-chain fragment variable (scFv ETH-2 phage antibody library was used for the isolation of scFvs against the nucleocapsid (N protein of SARS-CoV using a bio panning-based strategy. The selected scFvs were characterized under genetics-molecular aspects and for SARS-CoV N protein detection in ELISA, western blotting and immunocytochemistry. Results Human scFv antibodies to N protein of SARS-CoV can be easily isolated by selecting the ETH-2 phage library on immunotubes coated with antigen. These in vitro selected human scFvs specifically recognize in ELISA and western blotting studies distinct epitopes in N protein domains and detect in immunohistochemistry investigations SARS-CoV particles in infected Vero cells. Conclusion The human scFv antibodies isolated and described in this study represent useful reagents for rapid detection of N SARS-CoV protein and SARS virus particles in infected target cells.

  1. Identification of a GTP-bound Rho specific scFv molecular sensor by phage display selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinestra Patrick

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho GTPases A, B and C proteins, members of the Rho family whose activity is regulated by GDP/GTP cycling, function in many cellular pathways controlling proliferation and have recently been implicated in tumorigenesis. Although overexpression of Rho GTPases has been correlated with tumorigenesis, only their GTP-bound forms are able to activate the signalling pathways implicated in tumorigenesis. Thus, the focus of much recent research has been to identify biological tools capable of quantifying the level of cellular GTP-bound Rho, or determining the subcellular location of activation. However useful, these tools used to study the mechanism of Rho activation still have limitations. The aim of the present work was to employ phage display to identify a conformationally-specific single chain fragment variable (scFv that recognizes the active, GTP-bound, form of Rho GTPases and is able to discriminate it from the inactive, GDP-bound, Rho in endogenous settings. Results After five rounds of phage selection using a constitutively activated mutant of RhoB (RhoBQ63L, three scFvs (A8, C1 and D11 were selected for subsequent analysis. Further biochemical characterization was pursued for the single clone, C1, exhibiting an scFv structure. C1 was selective for the GTP-bound form of RhoA, RhoB, as well as RhoC, and failed to recognize GTP-loaded Rac1 or Cdc42, two other members of the Rho family. To enhance its production, soluble C1 was expressed in fusion with the N-terminal domain of phage protein pIII (scFv C1-N1N2, it appeared specifically associated with GTP-loaded recombinant RhoA and RhoB via immunoprecipitation, and endogenous activated Rho in HeLa cells as determined by immunofluorescence. Conclusion We identified an antibody, C1-N1N2, specific for the GTP-bound form of RhoB from a phage library, and confirmed its specificity towards GTP-bound RhoA and RhoC, as well as RhoB. The success of C1-N1N2 in discriminating activated

  2. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Xin; The ATLAS collaboration; Wlodek, Tom; Wenaus, Torre; Frey, Jaime; Tannenbaum, Todd; Livny, Miron

    2010-01-01

    PanDA is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier 1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA "AutoPilot" scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this talk, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation...

  3. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, X; The ATLAS collaboration; Wlodek, T; Wenaus, T; Frey, J; Tannenbaum, T; Livny, M

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA “AutoPilot” scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resu...

  4. In vivo phage display screening for tumor vascular targets in glioblastoma identifies a llama nanobody against dynactin-1-p150Glued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lith, Sanne A M; Roodink, Ilse; Verhoeff, Joost J C; Mäkinen, Petri I; Lappalainen, Jari P; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Raats, Jos; van Wijk, Erwin; Roepman, Ronald; Letteboer, Stef J; Verrijp, Kiek; Leenders, William P J

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse gliomas are primary brain cancers that are characterised by infiltrative growth. Whereas high-grade glioma characteristically presents with perinecrotic neovascularisation, large tumor areas thrive on pre-existent vasculature as well. Clinical studies have revealed that pharmacological inhibition of the angiogenic process does not improve survival of glioblastoma patients. Direct targeting of tumor vessels may however still be an interesting therapeutic approach as it allows pinching off the blood supply to tumor cells. Such tumor vessel targeting requires the identification of tumor-specific vascular targeting agents (TVTAs).Here we describe a novel TVTA, C-C7, which we identified via in vivo biopanning of a llama nanobody phage display library in an orthotopic mouse model of diffuse glioma. We show that C-C7 recognizes a subpopulation of tumor blood vessels in glioma xenografts and clinical glioma samples. Additionally, C-C7 recognizes macrophages and activated endothelial cells in atherosclerotic lesions. By using C-C7 as bait in yeast-2-hybrid (Y2H) screens we identified dynactin-1-p150Glued as its binding partner. The interaction was confirmed by co-immunostainings with C-C7 and a commercial anti-dynactin-1-p150Glued antibody, and via co-immunoprecipitation/western blot studies. Normal brain vessels do not express dynactin-1-p150Glued and its expression is reduced under anti-VEGF therapy, suggesting that dynactin-1-p150Glued is a marker for activated endothelial cells.In conclusion, we show that in vivo phage display combined with Y2H screenings provides a powerful approach to identify tumor-targeting nanobodies and their binding partners. Using this combination of methods we identify dynactin-1-p150Glued as a novel targetable protein on activated endothelial cells and macrophages.

  5. Use of a Phage-Display Method to Identify Peptides that Bind to a Tin Oxide Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Hikaru; Seta, Yasuko; Hirose, Tatsuya; Masuda, Yoshitake; Umetsu, Mitsuo

    2018-01-01

    Nanosheets of SnO2 which an n-type semiconductor with a rutile-type crystalline structure are predominantly used as gas sensors. SnO2 nanosheets have a tetragonal crystal structure where growth along the c-axis is suppressed to form a sheet. The major exposed facets of SnO2 nanosheets have {110}, {101} and {211} crystal planes along the a-axis, with the reduced {110} surface having a particularly high surface energy. Identifying peptides that bind to specific crystal planes by using peptide phage-display approach will increase the potential applications of metal oxide nanomaterials by fusing proteins with desirable active sites to peptides that adsorb at high density on the major exposed crystal plane of nanosheets. It may be possible to construct highly sensitive biosensors. The main objective of the present study is to identify peptides that adsorb preferentially to a SnO2 nanosheet by using peptide-phage display approach. Four milligrams of SnO2 nanosheet were mixed with 1011 plaque-forming units of Ph.D.-12 Phage Display Peptide Library. Phage-bound nanosheet particles were washed 10 times with 1 mL of phosphatebuffered saline containing 0.5% Tween 20. Phages bound to the nanosheet were eluted with three different buffers: (1) high-salt buffer containing 2 M NaCl (pH 7.5); (2) acidic buffer containing 200 mM Gly-HCl (pH 2.2); and (3) high-phosphate-ion buffer containing 500 mM NaH2PO4 (pH 7.5). The eluted phages were subjected to four or five rounds of biopanning. At each round, individual plaques were picked from the plates, and the amino acid sequences of the peptides were identified by DNA sequencing. The identified SnO2-binding peptides labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate were synthesized. Adsorption isotherms were constructed at peptide concentrations ranging from 0.25 to 2.0 µM with 4mg of nanomaterials. We were determined the sequences of 11 clones with the high-salt buffer, 7 with the high-phosphateion buffers, and 6 with the acidic buffer and

  6. Altered specificity of single-chain antibody fragments bound to pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus after conversion of the phage-bound to the soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaku Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, a novel influenza A/H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm quickly spread worldwide and co-circulated with then-existing seasonal H1N1 virus (sH1N1. Distinguishing between these 2 viruses was necessary to better characterize the epidemiological properties of the emergent virus, including transmission patterns, pathogenesis, and anti-influenza drug resistance. This situation prompted us to develop a point-of-care virus differentiation system before entering the 2009–2010 influenza season. Aiming to establish H1N1pdm-specific detection tools rapidly, we employed phage display libraries to select H1N1pdm-specific single-chain variable fragments (scFvs. Findings Human single-fold scFv libraries (Tomlinson I + J underwent selection for the ability to bind H1N1pdm virus particles. Three rounds of panning brought 1152 phage-bound scFvs, of which 58 clones reacted with H1N1pdm specifically or preferentially over sH1N1 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. After conversion of the scFvs to soluble form, 7 clones demonstrating high/stable expression were finally obtained. However, all the soluble scFvs except No. 29 were found to have lost their specificity/preference for H1N1pdm in ELISA. The specificity/preference of No. 29 was also confirmed by immunofluorescence assay and immunoprecipitation, and the viral nucleoprotein was identified by ELISA as its target protein. The change in specificity associated with scFv conversion from phage-bound to soluble form could be due to loss of phage scaffold pIII protein, which likely provides structural support for the scFv antigen-binding site. It is also possible that the similar antigenic properties of H1N1pdm and sH1N1 led to the observed alterations in scFv specificity. Discussion Using a phage display library, we obtained 7 soluble scFv clones reactive against H1N1pdm; however, only 1 showed specificity/preference toward H1N1pdm. Our results confirmed that using phage display

  7. Recent Improvements in the ATLAS PanDA Pilot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P; De, K; Bejar, J Caballero; Maeno, T; Potekhin, M; Wenaus, T; Compostella, G; Contreras, C; Dos Santos, T

    2012-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) in the ATLAS experiment uses pilots to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. The pilots are designed to deal with different runtime conditions and failure scenarios, and support many storage systems. This talk will give a brief overview of the PanDA pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including CernVM File System integration, the job retry mechanism, advanced job monitoring including JEM technology, and validation of new pilot code using the HammerCloud stress-testing system. PanDA is used for all ATLAS distributed production and is the primary system for distributed analysis. It is currently used at over 130 sites worldwide. We analyze the performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, EGI and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS, and describe plans for its further evolution.

  8. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  9. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  10. The genomes and comparative genomics of Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riipinen, Katja-Anneli; Forsman, Päivi; Alatossava, Tapani

    2011-07-01

    Lactobacillus delbrueckii phages are a great source of genetic diversity. Here, the genome sequences of Lb. delbrueckii phages LL-Ku, c5 and JCL1032 were analyzed in detail, and the genetic diversity of Lb. delbrueckii phages belonging to different taxonomic groups was explored. The lytic isometric group b phages LL-Ku (31,080 bp) and c5 (31,841 bp) showed a minimum nucleotide sequence identity of 90% over about three-fourths of their genomes. The genomic locations of their lysis modules were unique, and the genomes featured several putative overlapping transcription units of genes. LL-Ku and c5 virions displayed peptidoglycan hydrolytic activity associated with a ~36-kDa protein similar in size to the endolysin. Unexpectedly, the 49,433-bp genome of the prolate phage JCL1032 (temperate, group c) revealed a conserved gene order within its structural genes. Lb. delbrueckii phages representing groups a (a phage LL-H), b and c possessed only limited protein sequence homology. Genomic comparison of LL-Ku and c5 suggested that diversification of Lb. delbrueckii phages is mainly due to insertions, deletions and recombination. For the first time, the complete genome sequences of group b and c Lb. delbrueckii phages are reported.

  11. PanDA Pilot Submission using Condor-G: Experience and Improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Xin; Hover, John; Wlodek, Tomasz; Wenaus, Torre; Frey, Jaime; Tannenbaum, Todd; Livny, Miron

    2011-01-01

    PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) is the workload management system of the ATLAS experiment, used to run managed production and user analysis jobs on the grid. As a late-binding, pilot-based system, the maintenance of a smooth and steady stream of pilot jobs to all grid sites is critical for PanDA operation. The ATLAS Computing Facility (ACF) at BNL, as the ATLAS Tier1 center in the US, operates the pilot submission systems for the US. This is done using the PanDA 'AutoPilot' scheduler component which submits pilot jobs via Condor-G, a grid job scheduling system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In this paper, we discuss the operation and performance of the Condor-G pilot submission at BNL, with emphasis on the challenges and issues encountered in the real grid production environment. With the close collaboration of Condor and PanDA teams, the scalability and stability of the overall system has been greatly improved over the last year. We review improvements made to Condor-G resulting from this collaboration, including isolation of site-based issues by running a separate Gridmanager for each remote site, introduction of the 'Nonessential' job attribute to allow Condor to optimize its behavior for the specific character of pilot jobs, better understanding and handling of the Gridmonitor process, as well as better scheduling in the PanDA pilot scheduler component. We will also cover the monitoring of the health of the system.

  12. Membrane insertion and assembly of epitope-tagged gp9 at the tip of the M13 phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous M13 phage extrude from infected Escherichia coli with a tip structure composed of gp7 and gp9. This tip structure is extended by the assembly of the filament composed of the major coat protein gp8. Finally, gp3 and gp6 terminate the phage structure at the proximal end. Up to now, gp3 has been the primary tool for phage display technology. However, gp7, gp8 and gp9 could also be used for phage display and these phage particles should bind to two different or more surfaces when the modified coat proteins are combined. Therefore, we tested here if the amino-terminal end of gp9 can be modified and whether the modified portion is exposed and detectable on the M13 phage particles. Results The amino-terminal region of gp9 was modified by inserting short sequences that encode antigenic epitopes. We show here that the modified gp9 proteins correctly integrate into the membrane using the membrane insertase YidC exposing the modified epitope into the periplasm. The proteins are then efficiently assembled onto the phage particles. Also extensions up to 36 amino acid residues at the amino-terminal end of gp9 did not interfere with membrane integration and phage assembly. The exposure of the antigenic tags on the phage was visualised with immunogold labelling by electron microscopy and verified by dot blotting with antibodies to the tags. Conclusions Our results suggest that gp9 at the phage tip is suitable for the phage display technology. The modified gp9 can be supplied in trans from a plasmid and fully complements M13 phage with an amber mutation in gene 9. The modified phage tip is very well accessible to antibodies.

  13. An anti-tumor protein produced by Trichinella spiralis and identified by screening a T7 phage display library, induces apoptosis in human hepatoma H7402 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis infection confers effective resistance to tumor cell expansion. In this study, a T7 phage cDNA display library was constructed to express genes encoded by T. spiralis. Organic phase multi-cell screening was used to sort through candidate proteins in a transfected human chronic m...

  14. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu; Li, Xiaokun; Wu, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer

  15. Screening a phage display library for a novel FGF8b-binding peptide with anti-tumor effect on prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wenhui; Chen, Xilei; Li, Tao; Li, Yanmei; Wang, Ruixue; He, Dan; Luo, Wu [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Li, Xiaokun [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wu, Xiaoping, E-mail: twxp@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); School of Pharmaceutical Science, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8b (FGF8b) is the major isoform of FGF8 expressed in prostate cancer and it correlates with the stage and grade of the disease. FGF8b has been considered as a potential target for prostate cancer therapy. Here we isolated 12 specific FGF8b-binding phage clones by screening a phage display heptapeptide library with FGF8b. The peptide (HSQAAVP, named as P12) corresponding to one of these clones showed high homology to the immunoglobulin-like (Ig-like) domain II(D2) of high-affinity FGF8b receptor (FGFR3c), contained 3 identical amino acids (AVP) to the authentic FGFR3 D2 sequence aa 163–169 (LLAVPAA) directly participating in ligand binding, carried the same charges as its corresponding motif (aa163–169) in FGFR3c, suggesting that P12 may have a greater potential to interrupt FGF8b binding to its receptors than other identified heptapeptides do. Functional analysis indicated that synthetic P12 peptides mediate significant inhibition of FGF8b-induced cell proliferation, arrest cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA, and blockade of the activations of Erk1/2 and Akt cascades in both prostate cancer cells and vascular endothelial cells. The results demonstrated that the P12 peptide acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer. - Highlights: ► A novel FGF8b-binding peptide P12 was isolated from a phage display library. ► The mechanisms for P12 peptide inhibiting cell proliferation were proposed. ► P12 caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase via suppression of Cyclin D1 and PCNA. ► P12 suppressed FGF8b-induced activations of Akt and MAP kinases. ► P12 acting as an FGF8b antagonist may have therapeutic potential in prostate cancer.

  16. Utilization of Prickly Pear Peels to Improve Quality of Pan Bread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M.M.; Sallam, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation aimed to study utilization of prickly pear peels to improve quality of pan bread. Prickly pear peels powder added to wheat flour 72 % at levels 1.0 and 2.0% to make pan beard. In this study, evaluation of nutrients and chemical constitutes and functional properties of prickly pear peels as well as the rheological properties of dough contained prickly pear peels at levels 1% and 2% has been conducted. Then evaluated organoleptic characteristics of pan bread made of it also determined staling rate. Results showed that prickly pear peels had higher content of 32.67 % fiber, 14.25 % pectin and 87.82 % ascorbic acid, and higher contents of antioxidant components. It consists of 441.11 mg/100 g, total phenols, 35.2 flavonoids mg/100 g and DPPH radical-scavenging 62.14%, also water holding capacity was 1.8 ml H 2 O / g , oil holding capacity 2.35 (ml oil/g) and foam stability 7.15%. The major phenolic compounds Oleuro 1264.407, pyrogallo 1149.68, Benzoic 982.37, 3-oH Tyrosol 588.53, Ellagic 413.26, Chorogenic 271.10, Protocatechuic acid 176.02, P-oH- Benzoic 112.78, Epicatechin105.99, Gallic acid 61.26 ppm. The results revealed that addition of prickly pear peels to wheat flour increased the nutrition values of pan bread made of it due to high contents of fiber, ascorbic acid and natural antioxidants, and also decreased staling which improves the quality of pan bread, as well as increases shelf-life of pan bread.

  17. Human antibody fragments specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor selected from large non-immunised phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souriau, Christelle; Rothacker, Julie; Hoogenboom, Hennie R; Nice, Edouard

    2004-09-01

    Antibodies to EGFR have been shown to display anti-tumour effects mediated in part by inhibition of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis, and by enhancement of apoptosis. Humanised antibodies are preferred for clinical use to reduce complications with HAMA and HAHA responses frequently seen with murine and chimaeric antibodies. We have used depletion and subtractive selection strategies on cells expressing the EGFR to sample two large antibody fragment phage display libraries for the presence of human antibodies which are specific for the EGFR. Four Fab fragments and six scFv fragments were identified, with affinities of up to 2.2nM as determined by BIAcore analysis using global fitting of the binding curves to obtain the individual rate constants (ka and kd). This overall approach offers a generic screening method for the identification of growth factor specific antibodies and antibody fragments from large expression libraries and has potential for the rapid development of new therapeutic and diagnostic reagents.

  18. Performance evaluation of phage-displayed synthetic human single-domain antibody libraries: A retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A; Tanha, Jamshid

    2018-05-01

    Fully human synthetic single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are desirable therapeutic molecules but their development is a considerable challenge. Here, using a retrospective analysis of in-house historical data, we examined the parameters that impact the outcome of screening phage-displayed synthetic human sdAb libraries to discover antigen-specific binders. We found no evidence for a differential effect of domain type (V H or V L ), library randomization strategy, incorporation of a stabilizing disulfide linkage or sdAb display format (monovalent vs. multivalent) on the probability of obtaining any antigen-binding human sdAbs, instead finding that the success of library screens was primarily related to properties of target antigens, especially molecular mass. The solubility and binding affinity of sdAbs isolated from successful screens depended both on properties of the sdAb libraries (primarily domain type) and the target antigens. Taking attrition of sdAbs with major manufacturability concerns (aggregation; low expression) and sdAbs that do not recognize native cell-surface antigens as independent probabilities, we calculate the overall likelihood of obtaining ≥1 antigen-binding human sdAb from a single library-target screen as ~24%. Successful library-target screens should be expected to yield ~1.3 human sdAbs on average, each with average binding affinity of ~2 μM. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Construction of human phage antibody library and screening for human monoclonal antibodies of amylin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Li, Chang-ying; Chang, Ji-wu; Zhu, Tie-hong

    2012-06-01

    To screen monoclonal antibodies to amylin from a constructed human phage antibody library and identify their antigenic specificity and combining activities. The heavy chain Fd fragment and light chain of human immunoglobulin genes were amplified from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors using RT-PCR, and then inserted into phagemid pComb3XSS to generate a human phage antibody library. The insertion of light chain or heavy chain Fd genes were identified by PCR after the digestion of Sac I, Xba I, Xho Iand Spe I. One of positive clones was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The specific anti-amylin clones were screened from antibody library against human amylin antigens and then the positive clones were determined by Phage-ELISA analysis. A Fab phage antibody library with 0.8×10(8); members was constructed with the efficacy of about 70%. DNA sequence analysis indicated V(H); gene belonged to V(H);3 gene family and V(λ); gene belonged to the V(λ); gene family. Using human amylin as panning antigen, specific anti-amylin Fab antibodies were enriched by screening the library for three times. Phage-ELISA assay showed the positive clones had very good specificity to amylin antigen. The successful construction of a phage antibody library and the identification of anti-amylin Fab antibodies provide a basis for further study and preparation of human anti-amylin antibodies.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of a Bovine-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Phage Cocktail in a Murine Model of Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Breyne

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Overuse of antibiotics is a major problem in the treatment of bovine mastitis, and antibiotic treatment is frequently non-curative, thus alternative treatments are necessary. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a purified phage cocktail for treatment of bovine Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in a well-defined mouse model. Candidate phages were selected based on their in vitro performance and subsequently processed into an optimally composed phage cocktail. The highest scoring phages were further tested for efficacy and resistance suppression in broth and raw milk, with and without supplemental IgG. As these in vitro results displayed significant decreases in CFU, the cocktail was purified for testing in vivo. Lactating mice were intramammarily inoculated with S. aureus N305 (ATCC 29740, a clinical bovine mastitis isolate commonly used for experimental infection of dairy cows. The phage cocktail was applied via the same route 4 h post-inoculation. Treated mammary glands were graded for gross pathological appearance and excised for bacterial and phage load quantification as well as histopathology. Observation of gross macroscopic and histopathological changes and CFU quantification demonstrated that the phage cocktail treatment significantly improved mastitis pathology and decreased bacterial counts. Phage PFU quantification indicated that the tested phage cocktail treatment was able to maintain high intramammary phage titers without spreading systemically. The in vivo results complement the in vitro data and support our concept of phage therapy as an innovative alternative or supplementation therapy to antibiotics for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  1. Efficacy and Safety of a Bovine-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Phage Cocktail in a Murine Model of Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breyne, Koen; Honaker, Ryan W; Hobbs, Zachary; Richter, Manuela; Żaczek, Maciej; Spangler, Taylor; Steenbrugge, Jonas; Lu, Rebecca; Kinkhabwala, Anika; Marchon, Bruno; Meyer, Evelyne; Mokres, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Overuse of antibiotics is a major problem in the treatment of bovine mastitis, and antibiotic treatment is frequently non-curative, thus alternative treatments are necessary. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a purified phage cocktail for treatment of bovine Staphylococcus aureus mastitis in a well-defined mouse model. Candidate phages were selected based on their in vitro performance and subsequently processed into an optimally composed phage cocktail. The highest scoring phages were further tested for efficacy and resistance suppression in broth and raw milk, with and without supplemental IgG. As these in vitro results displayed significant decreases in CFU, the cocktail was purified for testing in vivo . Lactating mice were intramammarily inoculated with S. aureus N305 (ATCC 29740), a clinical bovine mastitis isolate commonly used for experimental infection of dairy cows. The phage cocktail was applied via the same route 4 h post-inoculation. Treated mammary glands were graded for gross pathological appearance and excised for bacterial and phage load quantification as well as histopathology. Observation of gross macroscopic and histopathological changes and CFU quantification demonstrated that the phage cocktail treatment significantly improved mastitis pathology and decreased bacterial counts. Phage PFU quantification indicated that the tested phage cocktail treatment was able to maintain high intramammary phage titers without spreading systemically. The in vivo results complement the in vitro data and support our concept of phage therapy as an innovative alternative or supplementation therapy to antibiotics for the treatment of bovine mastitis.

  2. Hyperthermostable binding molecules on phage: Assay components for point-of-care diagnostics for active tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ning; Spencer, John; Schmitt, Margaret A; Fisk, John D

    2017-03-15

    Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide. The low sensitivity, extended processing time, and high expense of current diagnostics are major challenges to the detection and treatment of tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis ornithine transcarbamylase (Mtb OTC, Rv1656) has been identified in the urine of patients with active TB infection and is a promising target for point-of-care diagnostics. Specific binding proteins with low nanomolar affinities for Mtb OTC were selected from a phage display library built upon a hyperthermostable Sso7d scaffold. Phage particles displaying Sso7d variants were utilized to generate a sandwich ELISA-based assay for Mtb OTC. The assay response is linear between 2 ng/mL and 125 ng/mL recombinant Mtb OTC and has a limit of detection of 400 pg/mL recombinant Mtb OTC. The assay employing a phage-based detection reagent is comparable to commercially-available antibody-based biosensors. Importantly, the assay maintains functionality at both neutral and basic pH in presence of salt and urea over the range of concentrations typical for human urine. Phage-based diagnostic systems may feature improved physical stability and cost of production relative to traditional antibody-based reagents, without sacrificing specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Basic Phage Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedon, Stephen T; Katsaounis, Tena I

    2018-01-01

    Basic mathematical descriptions are useful in phage ecology, applied phage ecology such as in the course of phage therapy, and also toward keeping track of expected phage-bacterial interactions as seen during laboratory manipulation of phages. The most basic mathematical descriptor of phages is their titer, that is, their concentration within stocks, experimental vessels, or other environments. Various phenomena can serve to modify phage titers, and indeed phage titers can vary as a function of how they are measured. An important aspect of how changes in titers can occur results from phage interactions with bacteria. These changes tend to vary in degree as a function of bacterial densities within environments, and particularly densities of those bacteria that are susceptible to or at least adsorbable by a given phage type. Using simple mathematical models one can describe phage-bacterial interactions that give rise particularly to phage adsorption events. With elaboration one can consider changes in both phage and bacterial densities as a function of both time and these interactions. In addition, phages along with their impact on bacteria can be considered as spatially constrained processes. In this chapter we consider the simpler of these concepts, providing in particular detailed verbal explanations toward facile mathematical insight. The primary goal is to stimulate a more informed use and manipulation of phages and phage populations within the laboratory as well as toward more effective phage application outside of the laboratory, such as during phage therapy. More generally, numerous issues and approaches to the quantification of phages are considered along with the quantification of individual, ecological, and applied properties of phages.

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing of Antibody Display Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Rouet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In vitro selection technology has transformed the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Using methods such as phage, ribosome, and yeast display, high affinity binders can be selected from diverse repertoires. Here, we review strategies for the next-generation sequencing (NGS of phage- and other antibody-display libraries, as well as NGS platforms and analysis tools. Moreover, we discuss recent examples relating to the use of NGS to assess library diversity, clonal enrichment, and affinity maturation.

  5. Differential screening of phage-ab libraries by oligonucleotide microarray technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Monaci

    Full Text Available A novel and efficient tagArray technology was developed that allows rapid identification of antibodies which bind to receptors with a specific expression profile, in the absence of biological information. This method is based on the cloning of a specific, short nucleotide sequence (tag in the phagemid coding for each phage-displayed antibody fragment (phage-Ab present in a library. In order to set up and validate the method we identified about 10,000 different phage-Abs binding to receptors expressed in their native form on the cell surface (10 k Membranome collection and tagged each individual phage-Ab. The frequency of each phage-Ab in a given population can at this point be inferred by measuring the frequency of its associated tag sequence through standard DNA hybridization methods. Using tiny amounts of biological samples we identified phage-Abs binding to receptors preferentially expressed on primary tumor cells rather than on cells obtained from matched normal tissues. These antibodies inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and tumor development in vivo, thus representing therapeutic lead candidates.

  6. Identification of antigenic regions on VP2 of African horsesickness virus serotype 3 by using phage-displayed epitope libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, L; Fehrsen, J; Jordaan, F; Huismans, H; du Plessis, D H

    2000-04-01

    VP2 is an outer capsid protein of African horsesickness virus (AHSV) and is recognized by serotype-discriminatory neutralizing antibodies. With the objective of locating its antigenic regions, a filamentous phage library was constructed that displayed peptides derived from the fragmentation of a cDNA copy of the gene encoding VP2. Peptides ranging in size from approximately 30 to 100 amino acids were fused with pIII, the attachment protein of the display vector, fUSE2. To ensure maximum diversity, the final library consisted of three sub-libraries. The first utilized enzymatically fragmented DNA encoding only the VP2 gene, the second included plasmid sequences, while the third included a PCR step designed to allow different peptide-encoding sequences to recombine before ligation into the vector. The resulting composite library was subjected to immunoaffinity selection with AHSV-specific polyclonal chicken IgY, polyclonal horse immunoglobulins and a monoclonal antibody (MAb) known to neutralize AHSV. Antigenic peptides were located by sequencing the DNA of phages bound by the antibodies. Most antigenic determinants capable of being mapped by this method were located in the N-terminal half of VP2. Important binding areas were mapped with high resolution by identifying the minimum overlapping areas of the selected peptides. The MAb was also used to screen a random 17-mer epitope library. Sequences that may be part of a discontinuous neutralization epitope were identified. The amino acid sequences of the antigenic regions on VP2 of serotype 3 were compared with corresponding regions on three other serotypes, revealing regions with the potential to discriminate AHSV serotypes serologically.

  7. A novel method for in Situ detection of hydrolyzable casein fragments in a cheese matrix by antibody phage display technique and CLSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    three small synthetic peptides of the alpha(s1)-casein sequence. These peptides traverse enzymatic cleavage sites of casein during cheese ripening. The specificity of the generated anti-peptide antibodies was determined by ELISA and Western blot. Finally, an immunofluorescent labeling protocol......A novel method to monitor in situ hydrolyzable casein fragments during cheese ripening by using immunofluorescent labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was developed. Monoclonal single chain variable fragments of antibody (scFvs) were generated by antibody phage display toward...

  8. Targeting of phage particles towards endothelial cells by antibodies selected through a multi-parameter selection strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Ole A; Lykkemark, Simon; Kristensen, Peter

    2017-02-10

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is sustained angiogenesis. Here, normal endothelial cells are activated, and their formation of new blood vessels leads to continued tumour growth. An improved patient condition is often observed when angiogenesis is prevented or normalized through targeting of these genomically stable endothelial cells. However, intracellular targets constitute a challenge in therapy, as the agents modulating these targets have to be delivered and internalized specifically to the endothelial cells. Selection of antibodies binding specifically to certain cell types is well established. It is nonetheless a challenge to ensure that the binding of antibodies to the target cell will mediate internalization. Previously selection of such antibodies has been performed targeting cancer cell lines; most often using either monovalent display or polyvalent display. In this article, we describe selections that isolate internalizing antibodies by sequential combining monovalent and polyvalent display using two types of helper phages, one which increases display valence and one which reduces background. One of the selected antibodies was found to mediate internalization into human endothelial cells, although our results confirms that the single stranded nature of the DNA packaged into phage particles may limit applications aimed at targeting nucleic acids in mammalian cells.

  9. Development of highly sensitive detection method for toxins and other pathogenic factors by phage-displayed monoclonal antibody using radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumiya, Hidemasa; Watanabe, Haruo

    2000-01-01

    To prepare anti-Shiga toxin (Stx) antibody, a recombinant strain of E coli that can produce the subunit B of Stx was constructed. DNA fragment coding the Stx subunit B, about 0.2 kb in length was amplified using a plasmid containing Stx gene as the template by PCR. After digesting with a restriction enzyme, the DNA fragment was inserted into pmal-c2 vector (New England Biolabs) to produce a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). E.coli K12 (DH5α) including the pmal-stx plasmid was cultured in the presence of isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) and thus, MBP-stx fusion protein was obtained. After purification by Millipore membrane filter, this fusion protein was used as the antigen. Then, mice BALB/c were immunized by intraperitoneal injection of the suspension of MBP-stx and adjuvant. The antibody purified from the spleen was submitted to phage display system. The phage specifically binding to the antigen was proliferated through repeated infection to E coli and the anti-Stx antibody was obtained from the culture of its colony grown on IPTG plate. Three different colonies specifically responding to the recombinant Stx antigen were obtained. In near future, labeled antibody would be produced by addition of 35 S compound in to the culture medium. (M.N.)

  10. Expert Opinion on Three Phage Therapy Related Topics: Bacterial Phage Resistance, Phage Training and Prophages in Bacterial Production Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rohde

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phage therapy is increasingly put forward as a “new” potential tool in the fight against antibiotic resistant infections. During the “Centennial Celebration of Bacteriophage Research” conference in Tbilisi, Georgia on 26–29 June 2017, an international group of phage researchers committed to elaborate an expert opinion on three contentious phage therapy related issues that are hampering clinical progress in the field of phage therapy. This paper explores and discusses bacterial phage resistance, phage training and the presence of prophages in bacterial production strains while reviewing relevant research findings and experiences. Our purpose is to inform phage therapy stakeholders such as policy makers, officials of the competent authorities for medicines, phage researchers and phage producers, and members of the pharmaceutical industry. This brief also points out potential avenues for future phage therapy research and development as it specifically addresses those overarching questions that currently call for attention whenever phages go into purification processes for application.

  11. Identification of amino acids involved in the Flo11p-mediated adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a polystyrene surface using phage display with competitive elution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Dupont, Kitt; Jespersen, Lene

    2007-01-01

    . cerevisiae FLO11 wild-type (TBR1) cells had a higher consensus than those from competitive panning with S. cerevisiae flo11¿ mutant (TBR5) cells, suggesting that the wild-type cells interact with the plastic surface in a stronger and more similar way than the mutant cells. Tryptophan and proline were more...... a phage with a hydrophobic peptide containing no tryptophan and only two proline residues. Conclusions: Our results suggest a key role of tryptophan and proline in the hydrophobic interactions between Flo11p on the S. cerevisiae cell surface and the PolySorp surface. Significance and Impact of the Study......: Our study may contribute to the development of novel strategies to limit yeast infections in hospitals and other medical environments....

  12. Simultaneous display of two large proteins on the head and tail of bacteriophage lambda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Consistent progress in the development of bacteriophage lambda display platform as an alternative to filamentous phage display system was achieved in the recent years. The lambda phage has been engineered to display efficiently multiple copies of peptides or even large protein domains providing a powerful tool for screening libraries of peptides, proteins and cDNA. Results In the present work we describe an original method for dual display of large proteins on the surface of lambda particles. An anti-CEA single-chain antibody fragment and green fluorescent protein or alkaline phosphatase were simultaneously displayed by engineering both gpD and gpV lambda proteins. Conclusions Here we show that such modified phage particles can be used for the detection of target molecules in vitro and in vivo. Dual expression of functional moieties on the surface of the lambda phage might open the way to generation of a new class of diagnostic and therapeutic targeted nanoparticles. PMID:24073829

  13. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  14. The Staphylococci Phages Family: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Van Melderen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to their crucial role in pathogenesis and virulence, phages of Staphylococcus aureus have been extensively studied. Most of them encode and disseminate potent staphylococcal virulence factors. In addition, their movements contribute to the extraordinary versatility and adaptability of this prominent pathogen by improving genome plasticity. In addition to S. aureus, phages from coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS are gaining increasing interest. Some of these species, such as S. epidermidis, cause nosocomial infections and are therefore problematic for public health. This review provides an overview of the staphylococcal phages family extended to CoNS phages. At the morphological level, all these phages characterized so far belong to the Caudovirales order and are mainly temperate Siphoviridae. At the molecular level, comparative genomics revealed an extensive mosaicism, with genes organized into functional modules that are frequently exchanged between phages. Evolutionary relationships within this family, as well as with other families, have been highlighted. All these aspects are of crucial importance for our understanding of evolution and emergence of pathogens among bacterial species such as Staphylococci.

  15. Characterization of Campylobacter phages including analysis of host range by selected Campylobacter Penner serotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vinni; Rosenquist, Hanne; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    2007-01-01

    range often displayed by phages. To identify the potential of phages as a Campylobacter reducing agent we needed to determine their infectivity on a panel of isolates representing the Campylobacter strains found in broilers as well as humans. Results: In this study, Campylobacter phages were isolated...... from the intestines of broilers and ducks and from abattoir sewage. Twelve phages were investigated to determine their ability to infect the Campylobacter Penner serotypes commonly present in Danish poultry and patients with campylobacteriosis. A total of 89% of the Campylobacter jejuni strains and 14...... range of 12 Danish Campylobacter phages. Due to their ability to infect the majority of the common serotypes in Denmark we suggest the phages can become an effective agent in the effort to reduce the incidence of campylobacteriosis in Denmark. This study provides the basis for future experiments...

  16. Phage nanofibers induce vascularized osteogenesis in 3D printed bone scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianglin; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Wang, Lin; Tomsia, Antoni P; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-08-06

    A virus-activated matrix is developed to overcome the challenge of forming vascularized bone tissue. It is generated by filling a 3D printed bioceramic scaffold with phage nanofibers displaying high-density RGD peptide. After it is seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and implanted into a bone defect, the phage nanofibers induce osteogenesis and angiogenesis by activating endothelialization and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. X-Windows Widget for Image Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deen, Robert G.

    2011-01-01

    XvicImage is a high-performance XWindows (Motif-compliant) user interface widget for displaying images. It handles all aspects of low-level image display. The fully Motif-compliant image display widget handles the following tasks: (1) Image display, including dithering as needed (2) Zoom (3) Pan (4) Stretch (contrast enhancement, via lookup table) (5) Display of single-band or color data (6) Display of non-byte data (ints, floats) (7) Pseudocolor display (8) Full overlay support (drawing graphics on image) (9) Mouse-based panning (10) Cursor handling, shaping, and planting (disconnecting cursor from mouse) (11) Support for all user interaction events (passed to application) (12) Background loading and display of images (doesn't freeze the GUI) (13) Tiling of images.

  18. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  19. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Hagit; Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:18387177

  20. Mining Naïve Rabbit Antibody Repertoires by Phage Display for Monoclonal Antibodies of Therapeutic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Haiyong; Nerreter, Thomas; Chang, Jing; Qi, Junpeng; Li, Xiuling; Karunadharma, Pabalu; Martinez, Gustavo J; Fallahi, Mohammad; Soden, Jo; Freeth, Jim; Beerli, Roger R; Grawunder, Ulf; Hudecek, Michael; Rader, Christoph

    2017-09-15

    Owing to their high affinities and specificities, rabbit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have demonstrated value and potential primarily as basic research and diagnostic reagents, but, in some cases, also as therapeutics. To accelerate access to rabbit mAbs bypassing immunization, we generated a large naïve rabbit antibody repertoire represented by a phage display library encompassing >10 billion independent antibodies in chimeric rabbit/human Fab format and validated it by next-generation sequencing. Panels of rabbit mAbs selected from this library against two emerging cancer targets, ROR1 and ROR2, revealed high diversity, affinity, and specificity. Moreover, ROR1- and ROR2-targeting rabbit mAbs demonstrated therapeutic utility as components of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells, further corroborating the value of the naïve rabbit antibody library as a rich and virtually unlimited source of rabbit mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The True Story and Advantages of RNA Phage Capsids as Nanotools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina; Dishlers, Andris; Kozlovska, Tatjana; Ose, Velta; Pushko, Peter; Tars, Kaspars; Grens, Elmars; Bachmann, Martin F

    2016-01-01

    RNA phages are often used as prototypes for modern recombinant virus-like particle (VLP) technologies. Icosahedral RNA phage VLPs can be formed from coat proteins (CPs) and are efficiently produced in bacteria and yeast. Both genetic fusion and chemical coupling have been successfully used for the production of numerous chimeras based on RNA phage VLPs. In this review, we describe advances in RNA phage VLP technology along with the history of the Leviviridae family, including its taxonomical organization, genomic structure, and important role in the development of molecular biology. Comparative 3D structures of different RNA phage VLPs are used to explain the level of VLP tolerance to foreign elements displayed on VLP surfaces. We also summarize data that demonstrate the ability of CPs to tolerate different organic (peptides, oligonucleotides, and carbohydrates) and inorganic (metal ions) compounds either chemically coupled or noncovalently added to the outer and/or inner surfaces of VLPs. Finally, we present lists of nanotechnological RNA phage VLP applications, such as experimental vaccines constructed by genetic fusion and chemical coupling methodologies, nanocontainers for targeted drug delivery, and bioimaging tools. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Engineered phages for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue

    2016-11-15

    Phages are traditionally widely studied in biology and chemistry. In recent years, engineered phages have attracted significant attentions for functionalization or construction of electronic devices, due to their specific binding, catalytic, nucleating or electronic properties. To apply the engineered phages in electronics, these are a number of interesting questions: how to engineer phages for electronics? How are the engineered phages characterized? How to assemble materials with engineered phages? How are the engineered phages micro or nanopatterned? What are the strategies to construct electronics devices with engineered phages? This review will highlight the early attempts to address these questions and explore the fundamental and practical aspects of engineered phages in electronics, including the approaches for selection or expression of specific peptides on phage coat proteins, characterization of engineered phages in electronics, assembly of electronic materials, patterning of engineered phages, and construction of electronic devices. It provides the methodologies and opens up ex-cit-ing op-por-tu-ni-ties for the development of a variety of new electronic materials and devices based on engineered phages for future applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Preliminary screening and identification of the hepatocarcinoma cell-binding peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaohua; Wu Hua

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of screening and isolating homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide library and to develop a new peptide which may be potentially used as targeting delivery carrier in the biological targeted diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptides that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and four rounds of subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones for human hepatocarcinoma cells were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with that to human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins, respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced through DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide, WH16, was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds of panning, the phages that were bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cells were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages for hepatocarcinoma cells. 56.67%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif . Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, that strongly support that cellular binding of the phage is mediated through its displayed peptide, and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusions: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide

  4. Preliminary screening and identification of the peptide binding to hepatocarcinoma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xiaohua; Wu Ha

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The present study was performed to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide library with the purpose of developing a new peptide which may be potentially used as target delivery carrier in the biological target diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A peptide 12-mer phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptide that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cell, and four rounds subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones to human hepatocarcinoma cell were determined with ELISA and compared with human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced though DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide WH16 was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds panning, the phages that bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cell were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages to hepatpcarcinoma cells 56.57%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif. Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, which strongly support that cellular binding of phage is mediated though its displayed peptide and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusion: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide libraries. The sequence of peptide that can bind to

  5. Preliminary screening and identification of the hepatocarcinoma cell-binding peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohua, Zhu; Hua, Wu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong Univ. of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2004-12-15

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of screening and isolating homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide library and to develop a new peptide which may be potentially used as targeting delivery carrier in the biological targeted diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A 12-mer peptide phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptides that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cells, and four rounds of subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones for human hepatocarcinoma cells were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared with that to human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins, respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced through DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide, WH16, was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds of panning, the phages that were bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cells were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages for hepatocarcinoma cells. 56.67%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif . Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, that strongly support that cellular binding of the phage is mediated through its displayed peptide, and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusions: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display random peptide

  6. Preliminary screening and identification of the peptide binding to hepatocarcinoma cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaohua, Zhu; Ha, Wu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2004-07-01

    Objective: The present study was performed to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide library with the purpose of developing a new peptide which may be potentially used as target delivery carrier in the biological target diagnosis or therapy for liver cancer. Methods: A peptide 12-mer phage display library was used to screen and isolate peptide that bind to human hepatocarcinoma cell, and four rounds subtractive panning were carried out with the human hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2 as the target. The affinities of selected phage clones to human hepatocarcinoma cell were determined with ELISA and compared with human liver cell and other tumor cells of different tissue origins respectively. In addition, the binding site in the tumor cells was observed with immunofluorescence analysis under confocal light microscopy. The amino acid sequences of phages that bind HepG2 specifically were deduced though DNA sequencing. Based on the results of DNA sequence, a 16-mer peptide (WH16) was designed and synthesized. Binding ability of the new peptide WH16 was determined with competitive inhibition test. Results: After four rounds panning, the phages that bound to and internalized in human hepatocarcinoma cell were isolated. ELISA and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the affinity of these phages to hepatpcarcinoma cells 56.57%(17/30) of the isolated phages displayed repeated sequence FLLEPHLMDTSM, and FLEP was defined as conservative motif. Binding of the selected phage to HepG2 cells was inhibited by synthesized peptide WH16, which strongly support that cellular binding of phage is mediated though its displayed peptide and WH16 can also bind to HepG2. Conclusion: It is feasible to screen and isolate homing peptides that bind specifically, or preferentially, to hepatocarcinoma cells using phage display of random peptide libraries. The sequence of peptide that can bind to

  7. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zu-Quan; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Huang, Tao; Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng; Wu, Ai-Bo; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding capacity to

  8. A phage-displayed chicken single-chain antibody fused to alkaline phosphatase detects Fusarium pathogens and their presence in cereal grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zu-Quan [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Li, He-Ping [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Zhang, Jing-Bo [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang, Tao [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Liu, Jin-Long; Xue, Sheng [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wu, Ai-Bo [Institute for Agri-food Standards and Testing Technology, Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Agro-products, Ministry of Agriculture, Shanghai Academy of Agricultural Sciences, 1000 Jinqi Road, Shanghai 201403 (China); Liao, Yu-Cai, E-mail: ycliao06@yahoo.com.cn [Molecular Biotechnology Laboratory of Triticeae Crops, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); National Center of Plant Gene Research, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2013-02-18

    Graphical abstract: A phage-displayed chicken scFv antibody, FvSG7, binds on the surface antigen of conidiospores and the mycelia of F. verticillioides. Its fusion with alkaline phosphatase (AP) through a 218 linker displayed a 4-fold higher affinity compared with the parent scFv antibody and efficiently detected toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. Highlights: ► Generation of a highly reactive scFv antibody against F. verticillioides. ► Localization of the antibody binding to the surface target of F. verticillioides. ► Expression of the antibody–alkaline phosphatase (AP) fusion linked by a 218 linker. ► The antibody–AP fusion has a higher affinity than the parental antibody. ► The antibody–AP fusion detects toxigenic Fusarium pathogens in cereal grains. -- Abstract: Fusarium and its poisonous mycotoxins are distributed worldwide and are of particular interest in agriculture and food safety. A simple analytical method to detect pathogens is essential for forecasting diseases and controlling mycotoxins. This article describes a proposed method for convenient and sensitive detection of Fusarium pathogens that uses the fusion of single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and alkaline phosphatase (AP). A highly reactive scFv antibody specific to soluble cell wall-bound proteins (SCWPs) of F. verticillioides was selected from an immunized chicken phagemid library by phage display. The antibody was verified to bind on the surface of ungerminated conidiospores and mycelia of F. verticillioides. The scFv–AP fusion was constructed, and soluble expression in bacteria was confirmed. Both the antibody properties and enzymatic activity were retained, and the antigen-binding capacity of the fusion was enhanced by the addition of a linker. Surface plasmon resonance measurements confirmed that the fusion displayed 4-fold higher affinity compared with the fusion's parental scFv antibody. Immunoblot analyses showed that the fusion had good binding

  9. Diversity of phage infection types and associated terminology: the problem with 'Lytic or lysogenic'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Zack; Abedon, Stephen T

    2016-04-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses of members of domain Bacteria. These viruses play numerous roles in shaping the diversity of microbial communities, with impact differing depending on what infection strategies specific phages employ. From an applied perspective, these especially are communities containing undesired or pathogenic bacteria that can be modified through phage-mediated bacterial biocontrol, that is, through phage therapy. Here we seek to categorize phages in terms of their infection strategies as well as review or suggest more descriptive, accurate or distinguishing terminology. Categories can be differentiated in terms of (1) whether or not virion release occurs (productive infections versus lysogeny, pseudolysogeny and/or the phage carrier state), (2) the means of virion release (lytic versus chronic release) and (3) the degree to which phages are genetically equipped to display lysogenic cycles (temperate versus non-temperate phages). We address in particular the use or overuse of what can be a somewhat equivocal phrase, 'Lytic or lysogenic', especially when employed as a means of distinguishing among phages types. We suggest that the implied dichotomy is inconsistent with both modern as well as historical understanding of phage biology. We consider, therefore, less ambiguous terminology for distinguishing between 'Lytic' versus 'Lysogenic' phage types. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. To 'display' or not to 'display'- that is the peptide

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Crampton, Michael C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems but has mainly focused around phages (Etz et al, 2001), yeast (Kondo and Ueda, 2004) and bacteria (Lee et al 2003). The central variable domain of the FliC protein is dispensable and can be used for the insertion and display...

  11. Aptamer-Phage Reporters for Ultrasensitive Lateral Flow Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Meena; Strych, Ulrich; Kim, Jinsu; Goux, Heather; Dhamane, Sagar; Poongavanam, Mohan-Vivekanandan; Hagström, Anna E V; Kourentzi, Katerina; Conrad, Jacinta C; Willson, Richard C

    2015-12-01

    We introduce the modification of bacteriophage particles with aptamers for use as bioanalytical reporters, and demonstrate the use of these particles in ultrasensitive lateral flow assays. M13 phage displaying an in vivo biotinylatable peptide (AviTag) genetically fused to the phage tail protein pIII were used as reporter particle scaffolds, with biotinylated aptamers attached via avidin-biotin linkages, and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reporter enzymes covalently attached to the pVIII coat protein. These modified viral nanoparticles were used in immunochromatographic sandwich assays for the direct detection of IgE and of the penicillin-binding protein from Staphylococcus aureus (PBP2a). We also developed an additional lateral flow assay for IgE, in which the analyte is sandwiched between immobilized anti-IgE antibodies and aptamer-bearing reporter phage modified with HRP. The limit of detection of this LFA was 0.13 ng/mL IgE, ∼100 times lower than those of previously reported IgE assays.

  12. Functional improvement of antibody fragments using a novel phage coat protein III fusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Bak; Larsen, Martin; Pedersen, Jesper Søndergaard

    2002-01-01

    Functional expressions of proteins often depend on the presence of host specific factors. Frequently recombinant expression strategies of proteins in foreign hosts, such as bacteria, have been associated with poor yields or significant loss of functionality. Improvements in the performance of het......(s) of the filamentous phage coat protein III. Furthermore, it will be shown that the observed effect is neither due to improved stability nor increased avidity....

  13. The Isolation of Novel Phage Display-Derived Human Recombinant Antibodies Against CCR5, the Major Co-Receptor of HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest. PMID:23941674

  14. Hidden Lineage Complexity of Glycan-Dependent HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Uncovered by Digital Panning and Native-Like gp140 Trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linling He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Germline precursors and intermediates of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs are essential to the understanding of humoral response to HIV-1 infection and B-cell lineage vaccine design. Using a native-like gp140 trimer probe, we examined antibody libraries constructed from donor-17, the source of glycan-dependent PGT121-class bNAbs recognizing the N332 supersite on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. To facilitate this analysis, a digital panning method was devised that combines biopanning of phage-displayed antibody libraries, 900 bp long-read next-generation sequencing, and heavy/light (H/L-paired antibodyomics. In addition to single-chain variable fragments resembling the wild-type bNAbs, digital panning identified variants of PGT124 (a member of the PGT121 class with a unique insertion in the heavy chain complementarity-determining region 1, as well as intermediates of PGT124 exhibiting notable affinity for the native-like trimer and broad HIV-1 neutralization. In a competition assay, these bNAb intermediates could effectively compete with mouse sera induced by a scaffolded BG505 gp140.681 trimer for the N332 supersite. Our study thus reveals previously unrecognized lineage complexity of the PGT121-class bNAbs and provides an array of library-derived bNAb intermediates for evaluation of immunogens containing the N332 supersite. Digital panning may prove to be a valuable tool in future studies of bNAb diversity and lineage development.

  15. Hidden Lineage Complexity of Glycan-Dependent HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Uncovered by Digital Panning and Native-Like gp140 Trimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Linling; Lin, Xiaohe; de Val, Natalia; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Mann, Colin J; Augst, Ryan; Morris, Charles D; Azadnia, Parisa; Zhou, Bin; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Ward, Andrew B; Burton, Dennis R; Zhu, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Germline precursors and intermediates of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are essential to the understanding of humoral response to HIV-1 infection and B-cell lineage vaccine design. Using a native-like gp140 trimer probe, we examined antibody libraries constructed from donor-17, the source of glycan-dependent PGT121-class bNAbs recognizing the N332 supersite on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. To facilitate this analysis, a digital panning method was devised that combines biopanning of phage-displayed antibody libraries, 900 bp long-read next-generation sequencing, and heavy/light (H/L)-paired antibodyomics. In addition to single-chain variable fragments resembling the wild-type bNAbs, digital panning identified variants of PGT124 (a member of the PGT121 class) with a unique insertion in the heavy chain complementarity-determining region 1, as well as intermediates of PGT124 exhibiting notable affinity for the native-like trimer and broad HIV-1 neutralization. In a competition assay, these bNAb intermediates could effectively compete with mouse sera induced by a scaffolded BG505 gp140.681 trimer for the N332 supersite. Our study thus reveals previously unrecognized lineage complexity of the PGT121-class bNAbs and provides an array of library-derived bNAb intermediates for evaluation of immunogens containing the N332 supersite. Digital panning may prove to be a valuable tool in future studies of bNAb diversity and lineage development.

  16. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun; Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan; Kim, Jungtae; Kim, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V 2 O 5 precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V 2 O 5 precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V 2 O 5 precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V x O x composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V 2 O 5 composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure, kinetics and the presence of a mineralizing

  17. The habits of highly effective phages: population dynamics as a framework for identifying therapeutic phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Bull

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of bacteriophages as antibacterial agents is being actively researched on a global scale. Typically, the phages used are isolated from the wild by plating on the bacteria of interest, and a far larger set of candidate phages is often available than can be used in any application. When an excess of phages is available, how should the best phages be identified? Here we consider phage-bacterial population dynamics as a basis for evaluating and predicting phage success. A central question is whether the innate dynamical properties of phages are the determinants of success, or instead, whether extrinsic, indirect effects can be responsible. We address the dynamical perspective, motivated in part by the absence of dynamics in previously suggested principles of phage therapy. Current mathematical models of bacterial-phage dynamics do not capture the realities of in vivo dynamics, nor is this likely to change, but they do give insight to qualitative properties that may be generalizable. In particular, phage adsorption rate may be critical to treatment success, so understanding the effects of the in vivo environment on host availability may allow prediction of useful phages prior to in vivo experimentation. Principles for predicting efficacy may be derived by developing a greater understanding of the in vivo system, or such principles could be determined empirically by comparing phages with known differences in their dynamic properties. The comparative approach promises to be a powerful method of discovering the key to phage success. We offer five recommendations for future study: (i compare phages differing in treatment efficacy to identify the phage properties associated with success, (ii assay dynamics in vivo, (iii understand mechanisms of bacterial escape from phages, (iv test phages in model infections that are relevant to the intended clinical applications, and (v develop new classes of models for phage growth in spatially heterogeneous

  18. Phage transposon mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Rubin, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    Phage transduction is an attractive method of genetic manipulation in mycobacteria. PhiMycoMarT7 is well suited for transposon mutagenesis as it is temperature sensitive for replication and contains T7 promoters that promote transcription, a highly active transposase gene, and an Escherichia coli oriR6 K origin of replication. Mycobacterial transposon mutant libraries produced by PhiMycoMarT7 transduction are amenable to both forward and reverse genetic studies. In this protocol, we detail the preparation of PhiMycoMarT7, including a description of the phage, reconstitution of the phage, purification of plaques, preparation of phage stock, and titering of phage stock. We then describe the transduction procedure and finally outline the isolation of individual transposon mutants.

  19. Biopanning and characterization of peptides with Fe3O4 nanoparticles-binding capability via phage display random peptide library technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fei; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Li, Yucan; Hu, Yang; Huang, Zhongbin; Liao, Xiaoming; Yao, Yadong; Chen, Xianchun

    2016-05-01

    Functionalization of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in biomedical applications. A proper functionalization of NPs can improve biocompatibility, avoid a loss of bioactivity, and further endow NPs with unique performances. Modification with vairous specific binding biomolecules from random biological libraries has been explored. In this work, two 7-mer peptides with sequences of HYIDFRW and TVNFKLY were selected from a phage display random peptide library by using ferromagnetic NPs as targets, and were verified to display strong binding affinity to Fe3O4 NPs. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, fluorescence microscopy, thermal analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptides on the surface of Fe3O4 NPs. Sequence analyses revealed that the probable binding mechanism between the peptide and Fe3O4 NPs might be driven by Pearson hard acid-hard base specific interaction and hydrogen bonds, accompanied with hydrophilic interactions and non-specific electrostatic attractions. The cell viability assay indicated a good cytocompatibility of peptide-bound Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, TVNFKLY peptide and an ovarian tumor cell A2780 specific binding peptide (QQTNWSL) were conjugated to afford a liner 14-mer peptide (QQTNWSLTVNFKLY). The binding and targeting studies showed that 14-mer peptide was able to retain both the strong binding ability to Fe3O4 NPs and the specific binding ability to A2780 cells. The results suggested that the Fe3O4-binding peptides would be of great potential in the functionalization of Fe3O4 NPs for the tumor-targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  1. Development of a T7 Phage Display Library to Detect Sarcoidosis and Tuberculosis by a Panel of Novel Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvinder Talwar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous inflammatory disease, diagnosed through tissue biopsy of involved organs in the absence of other causes such as tuberculosis (TB. No specific serologic test is available to diagnose and differentiate sarcoidosis from TB. Using a high throughput method, we developed a T7 phage display cDNA library derived from mRNA isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells and leukocytes of sarcoidosis patients. This complex cDNA library was biopanned to obtain 1152 potential sarcoidosis antigens and a microarray was constructed to immunoscreen two different sets of sera from healthy controls and sarcoidosis. Meta-analysis identified 259 discriminating sarcoidosis antigens, and multivariate analysis identified 32 antigens with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 83% to classify sarcoidosis from healthy controls. Additionally, interrogating the same microarray platform with sera from subjects with TB, we identified 50 clones that distinguish between TB, sarcoidosis and healthy controls. The top 10 sarcoidosis and TB specific clones were sequenced and homologies were searched in the public database revealing unique epitopes and mimotopes in each group. Here, we show for the first time that immunoscreenings of a library derived from sarcoidosis tissue differentiates between sarcoidosis and tuberculosis antigens. These novel biomarkers can improve diagnosis of sarcoidosis and TB, and may aid to develop or evaluate a TB vaccine.

  2. Production and evaluation of antibodies and phage display-derived peptide ligands for immunomagnetic separation of Mycobacterium bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Linda D; McNair, James; McCallan, Lyanne; Thompson, Suzan; Kulakov, Leonid A; Grant, Irene R

    2012-05-01

    This study describes the development and optimization of an immunomagnetic separation (IMS) method to isolate Mycobacterium bovis cells from lymph node tissues. Gamma-irradiated whole M. bovis AF2122/97 cells and ethanol-extracted surface antigens of such cells were used to produce M. bovis-specific polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in rabbits and mice. They were also used to generate M. bovis-specific peptide ligands by phage display biopanning. The various antibodies and peptide ligands obtained were used to coat MyOne tosyl-activated Dynabeads (Life Technologies), singly or in combination, and evaluated for IMS. Initially, M. bovis capture from Middlebrook 7H9 broth suspensions (concentration range, 10 to 10(5) CFU/ml) was evaluated by IMS combined with an M. bovis-specific touchdown PCR. IMS-PCR results and, subsequently, IMS-culture results indicated that the beads with greatest immunocapture capability for M. bovis in broth were those coated simultaneously with a monoclonal antibody and a biotinylated 12-mer peptide. These dually coated beads exhibited minimal capture (mean of 0.36% recovery) of 12 other Mycobacterium spp. occasionally encountered in veterinary tuberculosis (TB) diagnostic laboratories. When the optimized IMS method was applied to various M. bovis-spiked lymph node matrices, it demonstrated excellent detection sensitivities (50% limits of detection of 3.16 and 57.7 CFU/ml of lymph node tissue homogenate for IMS-PCR and IMS-culture, respectively). The optimized IMS method therefore has the potential to improve isolation of M. bovis from lymph nodes and hence the diagnosis of bovine tuberculosis.

  3. Heterogeneity in Induction Level, Infection Ability, and Morphology of Shiga Toxin-Encoding Phages (Stx Phages) from Dairy and Human Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O26:H11 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Ludivine; Petit, Marie-Agnès; Loukiadis, Estelle; Michel, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) bacteria are foodborne pathogens responsible for diarrhea and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxin, the main STEC virulence factor, is encoded by the stx gene located in the genome of a bacteriophage inserted into the bacterial chromosome. The O26:H11 serotype is considered to be the second-most-significant HUS-causing serotype worldwide after O157:H7. STEC O26:H11 bacteria and their stx-negative counterparts have been detected in dairy products. They may convert from the one form to the other by loss or acquisition of Stx phages, potentially confounding food microbiological diagnostic methods based on stx gene detection. Here we investigated the diversity and mobility of Stx phages from human and dairy STEC O26:H11 strains. Evaluation of their rate of in vitro induction, occurring either spontaneously or in the presence of mitomycin C, showed that the Stx2 phages were more inducible overall than Stx1 phages. However, no correlation was found between the Stx phage levels produced and the origin of the strains tested or the phage insertion sites. Morphological analysis by electron microscopy showed that Stx phages from STEC O26:H11 displayed various shapes that were unrelated to Stx1 or Stx2 types. Finally, the levels of sensitivity of stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 to six Stx phages differed among the 17 strains tested and our attempts to convert them into STEC were unsuccessful, indicating that their lysogenization was a rare event. PMID:26826235

  4. Restoring logic and data to phage-cures for infectious disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Serwer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic therapy for infectious disease is being compromised by emergence of multi-drug-resistant bacterial strains, often called superbugs. A response is to use a cocktail of several bacteria-infecting viruses (bacteriophages or phages to supplement antibiotic therapy. Use of such cocktails is called phage therapy, which has the advantage of response to bacterial resistance that is rapid and not exhaustible. A procedure of well-established success is to make cocktails from stockpiles of stored environmental phages. New phages are added to stockpiles when phage therapy becomes thwarted. The scientific subtext includes optimizing the following aspects: (1 procedure for rapidly detecting, purifying, storing and characterizing phages for optimization of phage cocktails, (2 use of directed evolution in the presence of bacteriostatic compounds to obtain phages that can be most efficiently used for therapy in the presence of these compounds, (3 phage genome sequencing technology and informatics to improve the characterization of phages, and (4 database technology to make optimal use of all relevant information and to rapidly retrieve phages for cocktails that will vary with the infection(s involved. The use of phage stockpiles has an established record, including a recent major human-therapy success by the US Navy. However, I conclude that most research is not along this track and, therefore, is not likely to lead to real world success. I find that a strong case exists for action to rectify this situation.

  5. Selection and characterization of naturally occurring single-domain (IgNAR) antibody fragments from immunized sharks by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Helen; Flajnik, Martin F; Porter, Andrew J

    2003-09-01

    The novel immunoglobulin isotype novel antigen receptor (IgNAR) is found in cartilaginous fish and is composed of a heavy-chain homodimer that does not associate with light chains. The variable regions of IgNAR function as independent domains similar to those found in the heavy-chain immunoglobulins of Camelids. Here, we describe the successful cloning and generation of a phage-displayed, single-domain library based upon the variable domain of IgNAR. Selection of such a library generated from nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum) immunized with the model antigen hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) enabled the successful isolation of intact antigen-specific binders matured in vivo. The selected variable domains were shown to be functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, extremely stable, and bind to antigen specifically with an affinity in the nanomolar range. This approach can therefore be considered as an alternative route for the isolation of minimal antigen-binding fragments with favorable characteristics.

  6. Antibody phage display assisted identification of junction plakoglobin as a potential biomarker for atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seraina Cooksley-Decasper

    Full Text Available To date, no plaque-derived blood biomarker is available to allow diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases. In this study, specimens of thrombendarterectomy material from carotid and iliac arteries were incubated in protein-free medium to obtain plaque and control secretomes for subsequent subtractive phage display. The selection of nine plaque secretome-specific antibodies and the analysis of their immunopurified antigens by mass spectrometry led to the identification of 22 proteins. One of them, junction plakoglobin (JUP-81 and its smaller isoforms (referred to as JUP-63, JUP-55 and JUP-30 by molecular weight were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting with independent antibodies to be present in atherosclerotic plaques and their secretomes, coronary thrombi of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS and macrophages differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes as well as macrophage-like cells differentiated from THP1 cells. Plasma of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD (n = 15 and ACS (n = 11 contained JUP-81 at more than 2- and 14-fold higher median concentrations, respectively, than plasma of CAD-free individuals (n = 13. In conclusion, this proof of principle study identified and verified JUP isoforms as potential plasma biomarkers for atherosclerosis. Clinical validation studies are needed to determine its diagnostic efficacy and clinical utility as a biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis or monitoring of atherosclerotic vascular diseases.

  7. Diversity and Geographical Distribution of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Isolates and Their Phages: Patterns of Susceptibility to Phage Infection and Phage Host Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, Daniel; Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Espejo, Romilio

    2014-01-01

    in disease control requires detailed knowledge about the diversity and dynamics of host susceptibility to phage infection. For this reason, we examined the genetic diversity of 49 F. psychrophilum strains isolated in three different areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) through direct genome restriction enzyme...... analysis (DGREA) and their susceptibility to 33 bacteriophages isolated in Chile and Denmark, thus covering large geographical (>12,000 km) and temporal (>60 years) scales of isolation. An additional 40 phage-resistant isolates obtained from culture experiments after exposure to specific phages were...... examined for changes in phage susceptibility against the 33 phages. The F. psychrophilum and phage populations isolated from Chile and Denmark clustered into geographically distinct groups with respect to DGREA profile and host range, respectively. However, cross infection between Chilean phage isolates...

  8. Three New Escherichia coli Phages from the Human Gut Show Promising Potential for Phage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Dalmasso

    Full Text Available With the emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria the use of bacteriophages (phages is gaining renewed interest as promising anti-microbial agents. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize phages from human fecal samples. Three new coliphages, ɸAPCEc01, ɸAPCEc02 and ɸAPCEc03, were isolated. Their phenotypic and genomic characteristics, and lytic activity against biofilm, and in combination with ciprofloxacin, were investigated. All three phages reduced the growth of E. coli strain DPC6051 at multiplicity of infection (MOI between 10-3 and 105. A cocktail of all three phages completely inhibited the growth of E. coli. The phage cocktail also reduced biofilm formation and prevented the emergence of phage-resistant mutants which occurred with single phage. When combined with ciprofloxacin, phage alone or in cocktail inhibited the growth of E. coli and prevented the emergence of resistant mutants. These three new phages are promising biocontrol agents for E. coli infections.

  9. Stumbling across the same phage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis; Rørbo, Nanna Iben; Castillo Bermúdez, Daniel Elías

    2017-01-01

    46,006 and 54,201 bp. All 19 phages showed high genetic similarity, and 13 phages were genetically identical. Apart from sporadically distributed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), genetic diversifications were located in three variable regions (VR1, VR2 and VR3) in six of the phage genomes...... was lysogenized by the temperate phages and a genomic analysis of a collection of 31 virulent V. anguillarum showed that the isolated phages were present as prophages in >50% of the strains covering large geographical distances. Further, phage sequences were widely distributed among CRISPR-Cas arrays of publicly...... available sequenced Vibrios. The observed distribution of these specific temperate Vibriophages across large geographical scales may be explained by efficient dispersal of phages and bacteria in the marine environment combined with a mutualistic interaction between temperate phages and their hosts which...

  10. Fuel and energy saving in open pan furnace used in jaggery making through modified juice boiling/concentrating pans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the concept of fins has been used for heating purpose for improving efficiency of open pan jaggery making furnace. Pan is the integral part of these furnaces where boiling/concentration of sugarcane juice take place. Parallel fins were provided to the bottom of main pan and gutter pan of IISR Lucknow 2-pan furnace. Choice for type of fins was based on movement of flames and hot flue gases generated due to combustion of bagasse. Fins helped in more heat transfer to the sugarcane juice being concentrated. Considerable improvement in heat utilization efficiency (9.44%) was observed which resulted in saving of fuel and energy (31.34%).

  11. Directed synthesis of bio-inorganic vanadium oxide composites using genetically modified filamentous phage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Michael; Baik, Seungyun [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Jeon, Hojeong; Kim, Yuchan [Center for Biomaterials, Biomedical Research Institute Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungtae [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany); Kim, Young Jun, E-mail: youngjunkim@kist-europe.de [Environmental Safety Group, Korea Institute of Science and Technology Europe (KIST-Europe) Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Campus E 7 1, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Phage is an excellent seeding for bio-templates for environmentally benign vanadium oxide nanocomposite synthesis. • The synthesized bio-inorganic vanadium oxide showed photodegradation activities. • The fabricated wt phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited bundle-like structure. • The fabricated RSTB-phage/vanadium oxide composite exhibited a ball with a fiber-like nanostructure. • The virus/vanadium oxide composite could be applied in photocatalysts, sensors and nanoelectronic applications. - Abstract: The growth of crystalline vanadium oxide using a filamentous bacteriophage template was investigated using sequential incubation in a V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor. Using the genetic modification of the bacteriophage, we displayed two cysteines that constrained the RSTB-1 peptide on the major coat protein P8, resulting in vanadium oxide crystallization. The phage-driven vanadium oxide crystals with different topologies, microstructures, photodegradation and vanadium oxide composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), quartz microbalance and dissipation (QCM-D) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Non-specific electrostatic attraction between a wild-type phage (wt-phage) and vanadium cations in the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursor caused phage agglomeration and fiber formation along the length of the viral scaffold. As a result, the addition of recombinant phage (re-phage) in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} precursors formed heterogeneous structures, which led to efficient condensation of vanadium oxide crystal formation in lines, shown by QCM-D analysis. Furthermore, re-phage/V{sub x}O{sub x} composites showed significantly enhanced photodegradation activities compared with the synthesized wt-phage-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} composite under illumination. This study demonstrates that peptide-mediated vanadium oxide mineralization is governed by a complicated interplay of peptide sequence, local structure

  12. The Caulobacter crescentus phage phiCbK: genomics of a canonical phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Jason J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a popular model for the study of cell cycle regulation and senescence. The large prolate siphophage phiCbK has been an important tool in C. crescentus biology, and has been studied in its own right as a model for viral morphogenesis. Although a system of some interest, to date little genomic information is available on phiCbK or its relatives. Results Five novel phiCbK-like C. crescentus bacteriophages, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma, CcrRogue and CcrColossus, were isolated from the environment. The genomes of phage phiCbK and these five environmental phage isolates were obtained by 454 pyrosequencing. The phiCbK-like phage genomes range in size from 205 kb encoding 318 proteins (phiCbK to 280 kb encoding 448 proteins (CcrColossus, and were found to contain nonpermuted terminal redundancies of 10 to 17 kb. A novel method of terminal ligation was developed to map genomic termini, which confirmed termini predicted by coverage analysis. This suggests that sequence coverage discontinuities may be useable as predictors of genomic termini in phage genomes. Genomic modules encoding virion morphogenesis, lysis and DNA replication proteins were identified. The phiCbK-like phages were also found to encode a number of intriguing proteins; all contain a clearly T7-like DNA polymerase, and five of the six encode a possible homolog of the C. crescentus cell cycle regulator GcrA, which may allow the phage to alter the host cell’s replicative state. The structural proteome of phage phiCbK was determined, identifying the portal, major and minor capsid proteins, the tail tape measure and possible tail fiber proteins. All six phage genomes are clearly related; phiCbK, CcrMagneto, CcrSwift, CcrKarma and CcrRogue form a group related at the DNA level, while CcrColossus is more diverged but retains significant similarity at the protein level. Conclusions Due to their lack of any apparent relationship to

  13. Phage Therapy: Eco-Physiological Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial virus use as antibacterial agents, in the guise of what is commonly known as phage therapy, is an inherently physiological, ecological, and also pharmacological process. Physiologically we can consider metabolic properties of phage infections of bacteria and variation in those properties as a function of preexisting bacterial states. In addition, there are patient responses to pathogenesis, patient responses to phage infections of pathogens, and also patient responses to phage virions alone. Ecologically, we can consider phage propagation, densities, distribution (within bodies, impact on body-associated microbiota (as ecological communities, and modification of the functioning of body “ecosystems” more generally. These ecological and physiological components in many ways represent different perspectives on otherwise equivalent phenomena. Comparable to drugs, one also can view phages during phage therapy in pharmacological terms. The relatively unique status of phages within the context of phage therapy as essentially replicating antimicrobials can therefore result in a confluence of perspectives, many of which can be useful towards gaining a better mechanistic appreciation of phage therapy, as I consider here. Pharmacology more generally may be viewed as a discipline that lies at an interface between organism-associated phenomena, as considered by physiology, and environmental interactions as considered by ecology.

  14. The complete genome sequence and proteomics of Yersinia pestis phage Yep-phi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangna; Wu, Weili; Qi, Zhizhen; Cui, Yujun; Yan, Yanfeng; Guo, Zhaobiao; Wang, Zuyun; Wang, Hu; Deng, Haijun; Xue, Yan; Chen, Weijun; Wang, Xiaoyi; Yang, Ruifu

    2011-01-01

    Yep-phi, a lytic phage of Yersinia pestis, was isolated in China and is routinely used as a diagnostic phage for the identification of the plague pathogen. Yep-phi has an isometric hexagonal head containing dsDNA and a short non-contractile conical tail. In this study, we sequenced the Yep-phi genome (GenBank accession no. HQ333270) and performed proteomics analysis. The genome consists of 38 ,616 bp of DNA, including direct terminal repeats of 222 bp, and is predicted to contain 45 ORFs. Most structural proteins were identified by proteomics analysis. Compared with the three available genome sequences of lytic phages for Y. pestis, the phages could be divided into two subgroups. Yep-phi displays marked homology to the bacteriophages Berlin (GenBank accession no. AM183667) and Yepe2 (GenBank accession no. EU734170), and these comprise one subgroup. The other subgroup is represented by bacteriophage ΦA1122 (GenBank accession no. AY247822). Potential recombination was detected among the Yep-phi subgroup.

  15. Colonisation of a phage susceptible Campylobacter jejuni population in two phage positive broiler flocks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Kittler

    Full Text Available The pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are commensals in the poultry intestine and campylobacteriosis is one of the most frequent foodborne diseases in developed and developing countries. Phages were identified to be effective in reducing intestinal Campylobacter load and this was evaluated, in the first field trials which were recently carried out. The aim of this study was to further investigate Campylobacter population dynamics during phage application on a commercial broiler farm. This study determines the superiority in colonisation of a Campylobacter type found in a field trial that was susceptible to phages in in vitro tests. The colonisation factors, i.e. motility and gamma glutamyl transferase activity, were increased in this type. The clustering in phylogenetic comparisons of MALDI-TOF spectra did not match the ST, biochemical phenotype and phage susceptibility. Occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni strains and phage susceptibility types with different colonisation potential seem to play a very important role in the success of phage therapy in commercial broiler houses. Thus, mechanisms of both, phage susceptibility and Campylobacter colonisation should be further investigated and considered when composing phage cocktails.

  16. Combining EL4-B5-based B-cell stimulation and phage display technology for the successful isolation of human anti-Scl-70 autoantibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Malte; Weiss, Etienne; Engel, Alfred M

    2003-07-01

    Scl-70 is the major antigen recognised by autoantibodies in the sera of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The autoantibodies that specifically react with Scl-70 are highly characteristic of the disease and represent valuable markers for the diagnosis of SSc. We describe a novel strategy for cloning autoantibody fragments starting with a small blood sample from an SSc patient. B cells isolated from the collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in vitro using the EL4-B5 system. Anti-Scl-70 IgG-producing cells were pooled for RNA preparation followed by the generation of phagemid libraries of approximately 10(7) independent single-chain Fvs (scFvs). The screening of these libraries by phage display allowed us to isolate four anti-Scl-70 scFvs following three rounds of biopanning. About 10 times more starting blood material was needed to generate scFv libraries of similar size from PBMCs of an SSc patient and only two anti-Scl-70 scFvs were isolated after three rounds of phage selection. Together, this work shows that functional autoantibody fragments can be advantageously cloned after in vitro expansion of B cells. The isolated anti-Scl-70 autoantibody fragments represent useful tools for calibrating SSc diagnostic assays.

  17. Phage-Host Interactions in Flavobacterium psychrophilum and the Potential for Phage Therapy in Aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb

    , the increasing problem with antibiotic resistance has led to increased attention to the use of phages for controlling F. psychrophilum infections in aquaculture. In a synopsis and four scientific papers, this PhD project studies the potential and optimizes the use of phage therapy for treatment and prevention......, studies of the genetic diversity and susceptibility patterns of F. psychrophilum strains and phages isolated in three geographically distinct areas (Chile, Denmark, and USA) showed that the strains and phages clustered into geographically distinct groups. However, cross-infectivity between Chilean phage......-phage. In the third paper, a detailed analysis of the resistance mechanisms in F. psychrophilum and six phage resistant mutants was done. The results revealed unique changes in the genomes in all the phage resistant strains and that some of these changes were related to cell surface properties which were suggested...

  18. Compositional Bias in Naïve and Chemically-modified Phage-Displayed Libraries uncovered by Paired-end Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bifang; Tjhung, Katrina F; Bennett, Nicholas J; Chou, Ying; Rau, Andrea; Huang, Jian; Derda, Ratmir

    2018-01-19

    Understanding the composition of a genetically-encoded (GE) library is instrumental to the success of ligand discovery. In this manuscript, we investigate the bias in GE-libraries of linear, macrocyclic and chemically post-translationally modified (cPTM) tetrapeptides displayed on the M13KE platform, which are produced via trinucleotide cassette synthesis (19 codons) and NNK-randomized codon. Differential enrichment of synthetic DNA {S}, ligated vector {L} (extension and ligation of synthetic DNA into the vector), naïve libraries {N} (transformation of the ligated vector into the bacteria followed by expression of the library for 4.5 hours to yield a "naïve" library), and libraries chemically modified by aldehyde ligation and cysteine macrocyclization {M} characterized by paired-end deep sequencing, detected a significant drop in diversity in {L} → {N}, but only a minor compositional difference in {S} → {L} and {N} → {M}. Libraries expressed at the N-terminus of phage protein pIII censored positively charged amino acids Arg and Lys; libraries expressed between pIII domains N1 and N2 overcame Arg/Lys-censorship but introduced new bias towards Gly and Ser. Interrogation of biases arising from cPTM by aldehyde ligation and cysteine macrocyclization unveiled censorship of sequences with Ser/Phe. Analogous analysis can be used to explore library diversity in new display platforms and optimize cPTM of these libraries.

  19. Fully synthetic phage-like system for screening mixtures of small molecules in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Gerardo; Partouche, Shirly; Weiss, Aryeh; Margel, Shlomo; Khandadash, Raz

    2010-05-10

    A synthetic "phage-like" system was designed for screening mixtures of small molecules in live cells. The core of the system consists of 2 mum diameter cross-linked monodispersed microspheres bearing a panel of fluorescent tags and peptides or small molecules either directly synthesized or covalently conjugated to the microspheres. The microsphere mixtures were screened for affinity to cell line PC-3 (prostate cancer model) by incubation with live cells, and as was with phage-display peptide methods, unbound microspheres were removed by repeated washings followed by total lysis of cells and analysis of the bound microspheres by flow-cytometry. Similar to phage-display peptide screening, this method can be applied even in the absence of prior information about the cellular targets of the candidate ligands, which makes the system especially interesting for selection of molecules with high affinity for desired cells, tissues, or tumors. The advantage of the proposed system is the possibility of screening synthetic non-natural peptides or small molecules that cannot be expressed and screened using phage display libraries. A library composed of small molecules synthesized by the Ugi reaction was screened, and a small molecule, Rak-2, which strongly binds to PC-3 cells was found. Rak-2 was then individually synthesized and validated in a complementary whole cell-based binding assay, as well as by live cell microscopy. This new system demonstrates that a mixture of molecules bound to subcellular sized microspheres can be screened on plated cells. Together with other methods using subcellular sized particles for cellular multiplexing, this method represents an important milestone toward high throughput screening of mixtures of small molecules in live cells and in vivo with potential applications in the fields of drug delivery and diagnostic imaging.

  20. Antibody production in response to staphylococcal MS-1 phage cocktail in patients undergoing phage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Żaczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate. Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  1. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties toward applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  2. A Conserved Epitope Mapped with a Monoclonal Antibody against the VP3 Protein of Goose Parvovirus by Using Peptide Screening and Phage Display Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Liu, Hongyu; Li, Jinzhe; Liu, Dafei; Meng, Runze; Zhang, Qingshan; Shaozhou, Wulin; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Waterfowl parvovirus (WPV) infection causes high mortality and morbidity in both geese (Anser anser) and Muscovy ducks (Cairina moschata), resulting in significant losses to the waterfowl industries. The VP3 protein of WPV is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in the waterfowl. However, B-cell epitopes on the VP3 protein of WPV have not been characterized. To understand the antigenic determinants of the VP3 protein, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 4A6 to screen a set of eight partially expressed overlapping peptides spanning VP3. Using western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we localized the VP3 epitope between amino acids (aa) 57 and 112. To identify the essential epitope residues, a phage library displaying 12-mer random peptides was screened with mAb 4A6. Phage clone peptides displayed a consensus sequence of YxRFHxH that mimicked the sequence 82Y/FNRFHCH88, which corresponded to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of VP3 protein of WPVs. mAb 4A6 binding to biotinylated fragments corresponding to amino acid residues 82 to 88 of the VP3 protein verified that the 82FxRFHxH88 was the VP3 epitope and that amino acids 82F is necessary to retain maximal binding to mAb 4A6. Parvovirus-positive goose and duck sera reacted with the epitope peptide by dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of these amino acids of the epitope in antibody-epitope binding reactivity. We identified the motif FxRFHxH as a VP3-specific B-cell epitope that is recognized by the neutralizing mAb 4A6. This finding might be valuable in understanding of the antigenic topology of VP3 of WPV.

  3. The Isolation of Novel Phage Display-Derived Human Recombinant Antibodies Against CCR5, the Major Co-Receptor of HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening s...

  4. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED successfully used for phage therapy in aquaculture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero, Jaime; Higuera, Gastón; Gajardo, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum phage CHOED was isolated from Chilean mussels. It is a virulent phage showing effective inhibition of V. anguillarum. CHOED has potential in phage therapy, because it can protect fish from vibriosis in fish farms. Here, we announce the completely sequenced genome of V....... anguillarum phage CHOED....

  5. Improvements for PanDA and intermediate layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Gen; Magradze, Erekle; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Nadal, Jordi; Quadt, Arnulf; Rzehorz, Gerhard [II. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The PanDA Production and Distributed Analysis system is handling the ATLAS workload management for production and distributed analysis processing. It was designed for analysis as well as production for High Energy Physics. One of the advantages of this pilot based system is, that it has its own integrated monitoring solution. Monitoring is a method used in computing, it means that a certain process is observed and overseen and is usually also protocolled. In the case of a process or system failure, a responsible person should be notified and countermeasures taken. Since PanDA is very versatile, it can also be used to process jobs on a computing Cloud, instead of just using the Grid(WLCG). Cloud computing resources can be provided by private companies, that bill the resources that are actually being used, for example CPU power over time. The advantage of this is obvious if one looks at the cost. They are basically the same, whether a huge task is done on little CPU power over a long time or on plenty of CPU power in a short time. For these reasons, a close monitoring, for example by the PanDA system for the usage of Cloud resources is important.

  6. Phage “delay” towards enhancing bacterial escape from biofilms: a more comprehensive way of viewing resistance to bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Abedon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In exploring bacterial resistance to bacteriophages, emphasis typically is placed on those mechanisms which completely prevent phage replication. Such resistance can be detected as extensive reductions in phage ability to form plaques, that is, reduced efficiency of plating. Mechanisms include restriction-modification systems, CRISPR/Cas systems, and abortive infection systems. Alternatively, phages may be reduced in their “vigor” when infecting certain bacterial hosts, that is, with phages displaying smaller burst sizes or extended latent periods rather than being outright inactivated. It is well known, as well, that most phages poorly infect bacteria that are less metabolically active. Extracellular polymers such as biofilm matrix material also may at least slow phage penetration to bacterial surfaces. Here I suggest that such “less-robust” mechanisms of resistance to bacteriophages could serve bacteria by slowing phage propagation within bacterial biofilms, that is, delaying phage impact on multiple bacteria rather than necessarily outright preventing such impact. Related bacteria, ones that are relatively near to infected bacteria, e.g., roughly 10+ µm away, consequently may be able to escape from biofilms with greater likelihood via standard dissemination-initiating mechanisms including erosion from biofilm surfaces or seeding dispersal/central hollowing. That is, given localized areas of phage infection, so long as phage spread can be reduced in rate from initial points of contact with susceptible bacteria, then bacterial survival may be enhanced due to bacteria metaphorically “running away” to more phage-free locations. Delay mechanisms—to the extent that they are less specific in terms of what phages are targeted—collectively could represent broader bacterial strategies of phage resistance versus outright phage killing, the latter especially as require specific, evolved molecular recognition of phage presence. The

  7. The genome and structural proteome of YuA, a new Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage resembling M6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim; Sykilinda, Nina; Briers, Yves; Roucourt, Bart; Lavigne, Rob; Robben, Johan; Domashin, Artem; Miroshnikov, Konstantin; Volckaert, Guido; Hertveldt, Kirsten

    2008-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage YuA (Siphoviridae) was isolated from a pond near Moscow, Russia. It has an elongated head, encapsulating a circularly permuted genome of 58,663 bp, and a flexible, noncontractile tail, which is terminally and subterminally decorated with short fibers. The YuA genome is neither Mu- nor lambda-like and encodes 78 gene products that cluster in three major regions involved in (i) DNA metabolism and replication, (ii) host interaction, and (iii) phage particle formation and host lysis. At the protein level, YuA displays significant homology with phages M6, phiJL001, 73, B3, DMS3, and D3112. Eighteen YuA proteins were identified as part of the phage particle by mass spectrometry analysis. Five different bacterial promoters were experimentally identified using a promoter trap assay, three of which have a sigma54-specific binding site and regulate transcription in the genome region involved in phage particle formation and host lysis. The dependency of these promoters on the host sigma54 factor was confirmed by analysis of an rpoN mutant strain of P. aeruginosa PAO1. At the DNA level, YuA is 91% identical to the recently (July 2007) annotated phage M6 of the Lindberg typing set. Despite this level of DNA homology throughout the genome, both phages combined have 15 unique genes that do not occur in the other phage. The genome organization of both phages differs substantially from those of the other known Pseudomonas-infecting Siphoviridae, delineating them as a distinct genus within this family.

  8. Current insights into phage biodiversity and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2009-10-01

    Phages exert tremendous ecological and evolutionary forces directly on their bacterial hosts. Phage induced cell lysis also indirectly contributes to organic and inorganic nutrient recycling. Phage abundance, diversity, and distribution are therefore important parameters in ecosystem function. The assumption that phage consortia are ubiquitous and homogenous across habitats (everything is everywhere) is currently being re-evaluated. New studies on phage biogeography have found that some phages are globally distributed while others are unique and perhaps endemic to specific environments. Furthermore, advances in technology have allowed scientists to conduct experiments aimed at analyzing phage consortia over temporal scales, and surprisingly have found reoccurring patterns. This review discusses currents in the field of phage ecology with particular focus on efforts to characterize phage diversity and biogeography across various spatial and temporal scales.

  9. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Villarroel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  10. Protein Expression Modifications in Phage-Resistant Mutants of Aeromonas salmonicida after AS-A Phage Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Moreirinha

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of infections by pathogenic bacteria is one of the main sources of financial loss for the aquaculture industry. This problem often cannot be solved with antibiotic treatment or vaccination. Phage therapy seems to be an alternative environmentally-friendly strategy to control infections. Recognizing the cellular modifications that bacteriophage therapy may cause to the host is essential in order to confirm microbial inactivation, while understanding the mechanisms that drive the development of phage-resistant strains. The aim of this work was to detect cellular modifications that occur after phage AS-A treatment in A. salmonicida, an important fish pathogen. Phage-resistant and susceptible cells were subjected to five successive streak-plating steps and analysed with infrared spectroscopy, a fast and powerful tool for cell study. The spectral differences of both populations were investigated and compared with a phage sensitivity profile, obtained through the spot test and efficiency of plating. Changes in protein associated peaks were found, and these results were corroborated by 1-D electrophoresis of intracellular proteins analysis and by phage sensitivity profiles. Phage AS-A treatment before the first streaking-plate step clearly affected the intracellular proteins expression levels of phage-resistant clones, altering the expression of distinct proteins during the subsequent five successive streak-plating steps, making these clones recover and be phenotypically more similar to the sensitive cells.

  11. Is the pan-genome also a pan-selectome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    . This meta-clonal diversity is maintained by a collection of phages that equalize the populations by preventing any individual clonal lineage from hoarding common resources. Thus, this polyclonal assemblage and the phages preying upon them constitute natural selection units. © 2012 Rodriguez-Valera F et al....

  12. SNAP dendrimers: multivalent protein display on dendrimer-like DNA for directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, Miriam; Stein, Viktor; Hollfelder, Florian

    2011-09-19

    Display systems connect a protein with the DNA encoding it. Such systems (e.g., phage or ribosome display) have found widespread application in the directed evolution of protein binders and constitute a key element of the biotechnological toolkit. In this proof-of-concept study we describe the construction of a system that allows the display of multiple copies of a protein of interest in order to take advantage of avidity effects during affinity panning. To this end, dendrimer-like DNA is used as a scaffold with docking points that can join the coding DNA with multiple protein copies. Each DNA construct is compartmentalised in water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The corresponding protein is expressed, in vitro, inside the droplets as a SNAP-tag fusion. The covalent bond between DNA and the SNAP-tag is created by reaction with dendrimer-bound benzylguanine (BG). The ability to form dendrimer-like DNA straightforwardly from oligonucleotides bearing BG allowed the comparison of a series of templates differing in size, valency and position of BG. In model selections the most efficient constructs show recoveries of up to 0.86 % and up to 400-fold enrichments. The comparison of mono- and multivalent constructs suggests that the avidity effect enhances enrichment by up to fivefold and recovery by up to 25-fold. Our data establish a multivalent format for SNAP-display based on dendrimer-like DNA as the first in vitro display system with defined tailor-made valencies and explore a new application for DNA nanostructures. These data suggest that multivalent SNAP dendrimers have the potential to facilitate the selection of protein binders especially during early rounds of directed evolution, allowing a larger diversity of candidate binders to be recovered. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Assembling filamentous phage occlude pIV channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, D K; Russel, M; Simon, S M

    2001-07-31

    Filamentous phage f1 is exported from its Escherichia coli host without killing the bacterial cell. Phage-encoded protein pIV, which is required for phage assembly and secretion, forms large highly conductive channels in the outer membrane of E. coli. It has been proposed that the phage are extruded across the bacterial outer membrane through pIV channels. To test this prediction, we developed an in vivo assay by using a mutant pIV that functions in phage export but whose channel opens in the absence of phage extrusion. In E. coli lacking its native maltooligosacharride transporter LamB, this pIV variant allowed oligosaccharide transport across the outer membrane. This entry of oligosaccharide was decreased by phage production and still further decreased by production of phage that cannot be released from the cell surface. Thus, exiting phage block the pIV-dependent entry of oligosaccharide, suggesting that phage occupy the lumen of pIV channels. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for viral exit through a large aqueous channel.

  14. SINGLE CHAIN VARIABLE FRAGMENTS OF ANTIBODIES AGAINST DIPHTHERIA TOXIN B-SUBUNIT ISOLATED FROM PHAGE DISPLAY HUMAN ANTIBODY LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliinyk O. S.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Diphtheria toxin is an exoantigen of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that inhibits protein synthesis and kills sensitive cells. The aim of this study was to obtain human recombinant single-chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies against receptor-binding B subunit of diphtheria toxin. 12 specific clones were selected after three rounds of a phage display naїve (unimmunized human antibody library against recombinant B-subunit. scFv DNA inserts from these 12 clones were digested with MvaI, and 6 unique restriction patterns were found. Single-chain antibodies were expressed in Escherichia coli XL1-blue. The recombinant proteins were characterized by immunoblotting of bacterial extracts and detection with an anti-E-tag antibody. The toxin B-subunit-binding function of the single-chain antibody was shown by ELISA. The affinity constants for different clones were found to be from 106 to 108 М–1. Due to the fact, that these antibody fragments recognized epitopes in the receptor-binding Bsubunit of diphtheria toxin, further studies are interesting to evaluate their toxin neutralization properties and potential for therapeutic applications. Obtained scFv-antibodies can also be used for detection and investigation of biological properties of diphtheria toxin.

  15. High-throughput sequencing enhanced phage display enables the identification of patient-specific epitope motifs in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Hansen, Christian Skjødt

    2015-01-01

    of the bioinformatic approach was demonstrated by identifying epitopes of a prominent peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in sera from patients with severe peanut allergy. The identified epitopes were confirmed by high-density peptide micro-arrays. The present study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing can empower phage...

  16. Phage inactivation by triplet acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The exposure of lambda phage to triplet acetone is studied. The triplet acetone is obtained from aerobic oxidation of isobutanal catalysed by peroxidase. A decrease of lambda phage ability to infect Escherichia coli is reported, perhaps, partially due to the possible production of lesions in the phage genome. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2018-03-01

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10 9 independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  18. RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage/PLGA nanofibers as cell-adhesive matrices for smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong Cheol; Lee, Jong Ho; Jin, Oh Seong; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Lin Hua; Kim, Chang Seok; Hong, Suck Won; Han, Dong Wook; Kim, Chun Tae; Oh, Jin Woo [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are network structures that play an essential role in regulating cellular growth and differentiation. In this study, novel nanofibrous matrices were fabricated by electrospinning M13 bacteriophage and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and were shown to be structurally and functionally similar to natural ECMs. A genetically-engineered M13 bacteriophage was constructed to display Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptides on its surface. The physicochemical properties of RGD peptide-displaying M13 bacteriophage (RGD-M13 phage)/PLGA nanofibers were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. We used immunofluorescence staining to confirm that M13 bacteriophages were homogenously distributed in RGD-M13 phage/PLGA matrices. Furthermore, RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices, having excellent biocompatibility, can enhance the behaviors of vascular smooth muscle cells. This result suggests that RGD-M13 phage/PLGA nanofibrous matrices have potentials to serve as tissue engineering scaffolds.

  19. Characterization of Two Virulent Phages of Lactobacillus plantarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggiler Marcó, Mariángeles; Garneau, Josiane E.; Tremblay, Denise; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We characterized two Lactobacillus plantarum virulent siphophages, ATCC 8014-B1 (B1) and ATCC 8014-B2 (B2), previously isolated from corn silage and anaerobic sewage sludge, respectively. Phage B2 infected two of the eight L. plantarum strains tested, while phage B1 infected three. Phage adsorption was highly variable depending on the strain used. Phage defense systems were found in at least two L. plantarum strains, LMG9211 and WCSF1. The linear double-stranded DNA genome of the pac-type phage B1 had 38,002 bp, a G+C content of 47.6%, and 60 open reading frames (ORFs). Surprisingly, the phage B1 genome has 97% identity with that of Pediococcus damnosus phage clP1 and 77% identity with that of L. plantarum phage JL-1; these phages were isolated from sewage and cucumber fermentation, respectively. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome of the cos-type phage B2 had 80,618 bp, a G+C content of 36.9%, and 127 ORFs with similarities to those of Bacillus and Lactobacillus strains as well as phages. Some phage B2 genes were similar to ORFs from L. plantarum phage LP65 of the Myoviridae family. Additionally, 6 tRNAs were found in the phage B2 genome. Protein analysis revealed 13 (phage B1) and 9 (phage B2) structural proteins. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing such high identity between phage genomes infecting different genera of lactic acid bacteria. PMID:23042172

  20. Identification of binding peptides of the ADAM15 disintegrin domain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    ADAM15 disintegrin domain (RADD) that could inhibit melanoma cell adhesion by using Escherichia coli. Second, four specific binding peptides (peptides A, B, C, and D) were selected using a phage display 12-mer peptide library. The screening protocol involved 4 rounds of positive panning on RADD and 2 rounds of ...

  1. Characterizing Phage Genomes for Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casandra W. Philipson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance is increasing at alarming rates. The efficacy of phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages alone or in combination with traditional antibiotics, has been demonstrated in emergency cases in the United States and in other countries, however remains to be approved for wide-spread use in the US. One limiting factor is a lack of guidelines for assessing the genomic safety of phage candidates. We present the phage characterization workflow used by our team to generate data for submitting phages to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA for authorized use. Essential analysis checkpoints and warnings are detailed for obtaining high-quality genomes, excluding undesirable candidates, rigorously assessing a phage genome for safety and evaluating sequencing contamination. This workflow has been developed in accordance with community standards for high-throughput sequencing of viral genomes as well as principles for ideal phages used for therapy. The feasibility and utility of the pipeline is demonstrated on two new phage genomes that meet all safety criteria. We propose these guidelines as a minimum standard for phages being submitted to the FDA for review as investigational new drug candidates.

  2. Characterizing Phage Genomes for Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, Casandra W; Voegtly, Logan J; Lueder, Matthew R; Long, Kyle A; Rice, Gregory K; Frey, Kenneth G; Biswas, Biswajit; Cer, Regina Z; Hamilton, Theron; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A

    2018-04-10

    Multi-drug resistance is increasing at alarming rates. The efficacy of phage therapy, treating bacterial infections with bacteriophages alone or in combination with traditional antibiotics, has been demonstrated in emergency cases in the United States and in other countries, however remains to be approved for wide-spread use in the US. One limiting factor is a lack of guidelines for assessing the genomic safety of phage candidates. We present the phage characterization workflow used by our team to generate data for submitting phages to the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for authorized use. Essential analysis checkpoints and warnings are detailed for obtaining high-quality genomes, excluding undesirable candidates, rigorously assessing a phage genome for safety and evaluating sequencing contamination. This workflow has been developed in accordance with community standards for high-throughput sequencing of viral genomes as well as principles for ideal phages used for therapy. The feasibility and utility of the pipeline is demonstrated on two new phage genomes that meet all safety criteria. We propose these guidelines as a minimum standard for phages being submitted to the FDA for review as investigational new drug candidates.

  3. Exploration of Phage-Host Interactions in Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and Anti-Phage Defense Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng

    The disease vibriosis is caused by the bacterial pathogen Vibrio anguillarum and results in large losses in aquaculture both in Denmark and around the world. Antibiotics have been widely used in antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of vibriosis. Recently, numerous multidrug-resistant strains...... of V. anguillarum have been isolated, indicating that antibiotic use has to be restricted and alternatives have to be developed. Lytic phages have been demonstrated to play an essential role in preventing bacterial infection. However, phages are also known to play a critical role in the evolution...... of bacterial pathogenicity development. Therefore, successful application of phage therapy in the treatment of vibriosis requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions, especially with regards to anti-phage defense mechanisms in the host. Part I. As a first approach, 24 V. anguillarum and 13...

  4. An integrated scheme to improve pan-sharpening visual quality of satellite images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Helmy

    2015-03-01

    In experiments with IKONOS, Quick Bird and GeoEye satellite data, we demonstrated that our scheme has good spectral quality and efficiency. Spectral and spatial quality metrics in terms of SAM, RASE, RMSE, CC, ERGAS and QNR are used in our experiments. We compared our scheme with the state-of-the-art pan-sharpening techniques and found that our new scheme improved quantitative and qualitative results.

  5. One-step production of phage-silicon nanoparticles by PLAL as fluorescent nanoprobes for cell identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Plano, Laura M.; Scibilia, Santi; Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Crea, Sara; Franco, Domenico; Mezzasalma, Angela M.; Guglielmino, Salvatore P. P.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs) are widely used as promising nanoplatform owing to their high specific surface area, optical properties and biocompatibility. Silicon nanoparticles find possible application in biomedical environment for their potential quantum effects and the functionalization with biomaterials, too. In this work, we propose a new approach for bio-functionalization of SiNPs and M13-engineered bacteriophage, displaying specific peptides that selectively recognize peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The "one-step" functionalization is conducted during the laser ablation of silicon plate in buffer solution with engineered bacteriophages, to obtain SiNPs binding bacteriophages (phage-SiNPs). The interaction between SiNPs and bacteriophage is investigated. Particularly, the optical and morphological characterizations of phage-SiNPs are performed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy operating in transmission mode (STEM) and X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The functionality of phage-SiNPs is investigated through the photoemissive properties in recognition test on PBMC. Our results showed that phage-SiNPs maintain the capability and the activity to bind PBMC within 30 min. The fluorescence of phage-SiNPs allowed to obtain an optical signal on cell type targets. Finally, the proposed strategy demonstrated its potential use in in vitro applications and could be exploited to realize an optical biosensor to detect a specific target.

  6. MVP: a microbe-phage interaction database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Na L; Zhang, Chengwei; Zhang, Zhanbing; Hu, Songnian; Lercher, Martin J; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Bork, Peer; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Wei-Hua

    2018-01-04

    Phages invade microbes, accomplish host lysis and are of vital importance in shaping the community structure of environmental microbiota. More importantly, most phages have very specific hosts; they are thus ideal tools to manipulate environmental microbiota at species-resolution. The main purpose of MVP (Microbe Versus Phage) is to provide a comprehensive catalog of phage-microbe interactions and assist users to select phage(s) that can target (and potentially to manipulate) specific microbes of interest. We first collected 50 782 viral sequences from various sources and clustered them into 33 097 unique viral clusters based on sequence similarity. We then identified 26 572 interactions between 18 608 viral clusters and 9245 prokaryotes (i.e. bacteria and archaea); we established these interactions based on 30 321 evidence entries that we collected from published datasets, public databases and re-analysis of genomic and metagenomic sequences. Based on these interactions, we calculated the host range for each of the phage clusters and accordingly grouped them into subgroups such as 'species-', 'genus-' and 'family-' specific phage clusters. MVP is equipped with a modern, responsive and intuitive interface, and is freely available at: http://mvp.medgenius.info. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Improvement of the cycling performance of LiCoO2 with assistance of cross-linked PAN for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xinhe; Shen, Lanyao; Wu, Bin; Zuo, Zicheng; Mu, Daobin; Wu, Borong; Zhou, Henghui

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Cross-linked PAN coating was prepared without damaging the surface of LiCoO 2 . • The coating layer owns good electronic conductivity and mechanical strength. • The cross-linked PAN coating layer is more sufficient than Al 2 O 3 coating. • It shows much improved cyclability than that of bare and Al 2 O 3 coated LiCoO 2 . - Abstract: LiCoO 2 has been widely used in lithium ion batteries for digital electronic products. However, the limited cycling performance under high cut-off voltage hinders its commercial application. Many metal oxides and/or phosphorus coating have been reported to improve the cycling performance of LiCoO 2 . In this paper, we report on cross-linked PAN coated LiCoO 2 composite as a cathode material for lithium ion batteries. The coating layer was obtained by intermolecular crosslinking of PAN polymer chain by heat treatment at high temperature in air. The air heating process avoids the possible damage arising from the carbon thermal reduction to the surface structure of LiCoO 2 . Electrochemical test indicates that the LiCoO 2 with the cross-linked PAN coating layer shows much improved cycle performance compared with that of bare and Al 2 O 3 coated LiCoO 2 . These findings might also open new avenues to explore polymer coating for other cathode materials of lithium ion batteries

  8. Control of Pierce's Disease by Phage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayukh Das

    Full Text Available Pierce's Disease (PD of grapevines, caused by Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (Xf, is a limiting factor in the cultivation of grapevines in the US. There are presently no effective control methods to prevent or treat PD. The therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy of a phage cocktail composed of four virulent (lytic phages was evaluated for control of PD. Xf levels in grapevines were significantly reduced in therapeutically or prophylactically treated grapevines. PD symptoms ceased to progress one week post-therapeutic treatment and symptoms were not observed in prophylactically treated grapevines. Cocktail phage levels increased in grapevines in the presence of the host. No in planta phage-resistant Xf isolates were obtained. Moreover, Xf mutants selected for phage resistance in vitro did not cause PD symptoms. Our results indicate that phages have great potential for biocontrol of PD and other economically important diseases caused by Xylella.

  9. Pan-pan Girls: Humiliating Liberation in Postwar Japanese Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi Sakamoto

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at some literary representations of the ‘pan-pan girls’ in postwar Japan. ‘Pan-pan’ is a derogatory term for street prostitutes who (mostly served the soldiers of the occupying forces. Immediately after World War II, the Japanese government established the RAA (Recreation Amusement Association and employed several thousand women to provide sexual services for foreign soldiers, ostensibly to protect Japanese women of middle and upper classes from rape and other violence. When the RAA was closed down in 1946 due to the US concern over widespread VD, many of the women who lost their jobs went out on the street and became private and illegal prostitutes – the pan-pan girls. With their red lipstick, cigarettes, nylon stockings and high-heel shoes, often holding onto the arms of tall, uniformed American GIs, the ‘pan-pan girls’ became a symbol of the occupation, and have been textually reproduced throughout the postwar period. This paper analyses the images and representations of the ‘pan-pan girls’ in postwar Japanese literature, to consider how the ‘pan-pan girls’ have functioned as a metaphor for the occupation and contributed to the public memory construction of the occupation. I identify some major codes of representations (victimisation, humiliation, and national trauma; eroticism and decadence; sexual freedom and materialism and argue that the highly gendered and sexualised bodies of the ‘pan-pan girls’ have continued to allow simplistic and selective remembering of the occupation at the expense of recalling the pivotal role of Japanese patriarchy in the postwar period.

  10. Phase variable expression of a single phage receptor in Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662 influences sensitivity toward several diverse CPS-dependent phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Sørensen, Martine C.H.; Wenzel, Cory Q.

    2018-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni NCTC12662 is sensitive to infection by many Campylobacter bacteriophages. Here we used this strain to investigate the molecular mechanism behind phage resistance development when exposed to a single phage and demonstrate how phase variable expression of one surface component...... influences phage sensitivity against many diverse C. jejuni phages. When C. jejuni NCTC12662 was exposed to phage F207 overnight, 25% of the bacterial cells were able to grow on a lawn of phage F207, suggesting that resistance develops at a high frequency. One resistant variant, 12662R, was further...... characterized and shown to be an adsorption mutant. Plaque assays using our large phage collection showed that seven out of 36 diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS)-dependent phages could not infect 12662R, whereas the remaining phages formed plaques on 12662R with reduced efficiencies. Analysis of the CPS...

  11. Phages in the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Ferran; Muniesa, Maite

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, viruses that infect bacteria, have re-emerged as powerful regulators of bacterial populations in natural ecosystems. Phages invade the human body, just as they do other natural environments, to such an extent that they are the most numerous group in the human virome. This was only revealed in recent metagenomic studies, despite the fact that the presence of phages in the human body was reported decades ago. The influence of the presence of phages in humans has yet to be evaluated; but as in marine environments, a clear role in the regulation of bacterial populations could be envisaged, that might have an impact on human health. Moreover, phages are excellent vehicles of genetic transfer, and they contribute to the evolution of bacterial cells in the human body by spreading and acquiring DNA horizontally. The abundance of phages in the human body does not pass unnoticed and the immune system reacts to them, although it is not clear to what extent. Finally, the presence of phages in human samples, which most of the time is not considered, can influence and bias microbiological and molecular results; and, in view of the evidences, some studies suggest that more attention needs to be paid to their interference.

  12. Current taxonomy of phages infecting lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer eMahony

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phages infecting lactic acid bacteria have been the focus of significant research attention over the past three decades. Through the isolation and characterization of hundreds of phage isolates, it has been possible to classify phages of the dairy starter and adjunct bacteria Lactococus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Leuconostoc spp. and Lactobacillus spp. Among these, phages of L. lactis have been most thoroughly scrutinized and serve as an excellent model system to address issues that arise when attempting taxonomic classification of phages infecting other LAB species. Here, we present an overview of the current taxonomy of phages infecting LAB genera of industrial significance, the methods employed in these taxonomic efforts and how these may be employed for the taxonomy of phages of currently underrepresented and emerging phage species.

  13. Formulation, stabilisation and encapsulation of bacteriophage for phage therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Danish J; Sokolov, Ilya J; Vinner, Gurinder K; Mancuso, Francesco; Cinquerrui, Salvatore; Vladisavljevic, Goran T; Clokie, Martha R J; Garton, Natalie J; Stapley, Andrew G F; Kirpichnikova, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Against a backdrop of global antibiotic resistance and increasing awareness of the importance of the human microbiota, there has been resurgent interest in the potential use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes, known as phage therapy. A number of phage therapy phase I and II clinical trials have concluded, and shown phages don't present significant adverse safety concerns. These clinical trials used simple phage suspensions without any formulation and phage stability was of secondary concern. Phages have a limited stability in solution, and undergo a significant drop in phage titre during processing and storage which is unacceptable if phages are to become regulated pharmaceuticals, where stable dosage and well defined pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are de rigueur. Animal studies have shown that the efficacy of phage therapy outcomes depend on the phage concentration (i.e. the dose) delivered at the site of infection, and their ability to target and kill bacteria, arresting bacterial growth and clearing the infection. In addition, in vitro and animal studies have shown the importance of using phage cocktails rather than single phage preparations to achieve better therapy outcomes. The in vivo reduction of phage concentration due to interactions with host antibodies or other clearance mechanisms may necessitate repeated dosing of phages, or sustained release approaches. Modelling of phage-bacterium population dynamics reinforces these points. Surprisingly little attention has been devoted to the effect of formulation on phage therapy outcomes, given the need for phage cocktails, where each phage within a cocktail may require significantly different formulation to retain a high enough infective dose. This review firstly looks at the clinical needs and challenges (informed through a review of key animal studies evaluating phage therapy) associated with treatment of acute and chronic infections and the drivers for phage encapsulation. An important driver

  14. Vibrio vulnificus phage PV94 is closely related to temperate phages of V. cholerae and other Vibrio species.

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    Mark Pryshliak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vibrio vulnificus is an important pathogen which can cause serious infections in humans. Yet, there is limited knowledge on its virulence factors and the question whether temperate phages might be involved in pathogenicity, as is the case with V. cholerae. Thus far, only two phages (SSP002 and VvAW1 infecting V. vulnificus have been genetically characterized. These phages were isolated from the environment and are not related to Vibrio cholerae phages. The lack of information on temperate V. vulnificus phages prompted us to isolate those phages from lysogenic strains and to compare them with phages of other Vibrio species. RESULTS: In this study the temperate phage PV94 was isolated from a V. vulnificus biotype 1 strain by mitomycin C induction. PV94 is a myovirus whose genome is a linear double-stranded DNA of 33,828 bp with 5'-protruding ends. Sequence analysis of PV94 revealed a modular organization of the genome. The left half of the genome comprising the immunity region and genes for the integrase, terminase and replication proteins shows similarites to V. cholerae kappa phages whereas the right half containing genes for structural proteins is closely related to a prophage residing in V. furnissii NCTC 11218. CONCLUSION: We present the first genomic sequence of a temperate phage isolated from a human V. vulnificus isolate. The sequence analysis of the PV94 genome demonstrates the wide distribution of closely related prophages in various Vibrio species. Moreover, the mosaicism of the PV94 genome indicates a high degree of horizontal genetic exchange within the genus Vibrio, by which V. vulnificus might acquire virulence-associated genes from other species.

  15. Phages of life - the path to pharma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Amanda; Hill, Colin

    2018-02-01

    Bacteriophage (phage) therapy has encountered both enthusiasm and scepticism in the past century. New antimicrobial strategies against lethal pathogens are now a top priority for the World Health Organization, and although compassionate use of phages recently met with significant success, regulated clinical interventions seem unlikely in the near future. The hundredth anniversary of their discovery seems an appropriate time for a revival of phage therapy, particularly as the dilemma of antibiotic resistance grows. Phages are ubiquitous in the environment, on our food and in and on our bodies. Their influence on human health is currently being evaluated, and in this mini-review, we examine data from recent metagenomic studies that propose a role for phages in the structure of the microbiome and in health and disease. We assess evidence for phages as vehicles for gene transfer in the context of antibiotic resistance and discuss challenges and opportunities along the critical path from phage discovery to a patient-focused pharmaceutical intervention. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Phage-Mediated Immuno-PCR for Ultrasensitive Detection of Cry1Ac Protein Based on Nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Dongjian; Lu, Xin; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yang; He, Qinghua

    2016-10-11

    The widespread use of Cry proteins in transgenic plants for insect control has raised concerns about the environment and food safety in the public. An effective detection method for introduced Cry proteins is of significance for environmental risk assessment and product quality control. This paper describes a novel phage mediated immuno-PCR (iPCR) for the ultrasensitive determination of Cry proteins based on nanobodies. Three nanobodies against Cry1Ac protein were obtained from a naı̈ve phage displayed nanobody library without animal immunization process and were applied to the iPCR assay for Cry1Ac. The phage-mediated iPCR for Cry1Ac based on nanobodies showed a dynamic range of 0.001-100 ng/mL and a limit detection of 0.1 pg/mL. Specific measurement of this established method was performed by testing cross-reativity of other Cry1Ac analogues, and the result showed negligible cross-reactivity with other test Cry proteins (Cry1Ab, Cry1F, Cry3B). Furthermore, the phage-mediated iPCR based on nanobody should be easily applicable to the detection of many other Cry proteins.

  17. Heat tolerance of dairy lactococcal c2 phages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cecilie Lykke Marvig; Basheer, Aideh; Neve, H.

    2011-01-01

    -order kinetics with correlation coefficients of 0.96–0.99. D70-values of 12 s and 16.6 min were calculated for the most sensitive and resistant phage, respectively. Release of phage DNA from capsids, and disintegration of phage heads and tails were among the first morphological changes observed for moderately...... thermal inactivated lysates (15% phage inactivation) of the heat tolerant phage P635....

  18. Share your sweets: Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus) willingness to share highly attractive, monopolizable food sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnit, Jill T; Høgh-Olesen, Henrik; Makransky, Guido

    2015-08-01

    All over the world, humans (Homo sapiens) display resource-sharing behavior, and common patterns of sharing seem to exist across cultures. Humans are not the only primates to share, and observations from the wild have long documented food sharing behavior in our closest phylogenetic relatives, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus). However, few controlled studies have been made in which groups of Pan are introduced to food items that may be shared or monopolized by a first food possessor, and very few studies have examined what happens to these sharing patterns if the food in question is a highly attractive, monopolizable food source. The one study to date to include food quality as the independent variable used different types of food as high- and low-value items, making differences in food divisibility and size potentially confounding factors. It was the aim of the present study to examine the sharing behavior of groups of captive chimpanzees and bonobos when introducing the same type of food (branches) manipulated to be of 2 different degrees of desirability (with or without syrup). Results showed that the large majority of food transfers in both species came about as sharing in which group members were allowed to cofeed or remove food from the stock of the food possessor, and the introduction of high-value food resulted in more sharing, not less. Food sharing behavior differed between species in that chimpanzees displayed significantly more begging behavior than bonobos. Bonobos, instead, engaged in sexual invitations, which the chimpanzees never did. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Development of a phage typing system for Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriophages were released by 98% of 100 Staphylococcus hyicus strains studied after treatment with mitomycin C. Twenty-three phages with different lytic spectra were included in a phage typing system and used f or typing S. hyicus. On a test-set of 100 epidemiologically unrelated S. hyicus...... strains isolated from Danish pig herds, the phages were able to type 92% of the strains, producing 16 different phage types. Reproducibility of the phage typing system after subculture of the strains and using fresh phage stock was 96%. Typability ranged from 52 to 80% when typing porcine strains...... originating from other countries. Although phages were isolated from porcine skin strains exclusively, the system produced phage types in S. hyicus strains of bovine origin. Ten strains of S. aureus and S. chromogenes were not typable by these phages. Strains belonging to one phage type (A/B/C/W) were...

  20. Immunogenicity evaluation of MS2 phage-mediated chimeric nanoparticle displaying an immunodominant B cell epitope of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals that has caused tremendous economic losses worldwide. In this study, we designed a chimeric nanoparticles (CNPs vaccine that displays the predominant epitope of the serotype O foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV VP1 131-160 on the surface of MS2 phage. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia Coli and can self-assemble into CNPs with diameter at 25–30 nm in vitro. A tandem repeat peptide epitopes (TRE was prepared as control. Mice were immunized with CNPs, TRE and commercialized synthetic peptide vaccines (PepVac, respectively. The ELISA results showed that CNPs stimulated a little higher specific antibody levels to PepVac, but was significantly higher than the TRE groups. Moreover, the results from specific IFN-γ responses and lymphocyte proliferation test indicated that CNP immunized mice exhibited significantly enhanced cellular immune response compared to TRE. These results suggested that the CNPs constructed in current study could be a potential alternative vaccine in future FMDV control.

  1. A variety of human monoclonal antibodies against epidermal growth factor receptor isolated from a phage antibody library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Gene; Kondo, Mariko; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-11-04

    When the technology for constructing human antibody (Ab) libraries using a phage-display system was developed, many researchers in Ab-related fields anticipated that it would be widely applied to the development of pharmaceutical drugs against various diseases, including cancers. However, successful examples of such applications are very limited. Moreover, researchers who utilize phage-display technology now show divergent ways of thinking about phage Ab libraries. For example, there is debate about what should be the source of V H and V L genes for the construction of libraries to cover the whole repertoire of Abs present in the human body. In the immune system, the introduction of mutations into V genes followed by selection based on binding activity, termed Ab maturation, is required for the production of Abs exhibiting high affinity to the antigen (Ag). Therefore, introduction of mutations and selection are required for isolation of Abs with high affinity after isolation of clones from phage Ab libraries. We constructed a large human Ab library termed AIMS, developed a screening method termed ICOS, and succeeded in isolating many human monoclonal Abs (mAbs) that specifically and strongly bind to various tumor-associated Ags. Eight anti-EGFR mAbs were included, which we characterized. These mAbs showed various different activities against EGFR-expressing cancer cells. In this paper, we describe these data and discuss the possibility and necessity that the mAbs isolated from the AIMS library might be developed as therapeutic drugs against cancers without introduction of mutations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Isolation and characterization of siphovirus phages infecting bovine Streptococcus agalactiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Qinqin; Yang, Yongchun; Lu, Chengping

    2016-02-04

    To isolate and identify Streptococcus agalactiae phages and screen candidate phages to control infection caused by bovine S. agalactiae. We used two methods for isolation of S. agalactiae phages, namely (1) isolation of phages from milk and environmental samples, and (2) isolation of phages via induction of lysogens with Mitomycin C. Double-layer agar culture method was used to purify phages. Then the newly obtained phages, with S. agalactiae phage JX01 isolated from mastitis milk, were comparatively analyzed in the following aspects: morphology of phages by transmission electron microscopy, host range of phages to 55 S. agalactiae strains and other Streptococcus strains, phages DNA using EcoR I, Xba I, Pst I and Sal I, the optical multiplicity of infection, absorption curve and one step growth curve, and the stability of phages at different storage conditions. The comparative analysis of the 3 novel phages LYGO9, HZ04 and pA11 (induced from S. agalctiae bovine clinical isolate HAJL2011070601) with JX01 showed that the 4 phages were classified as the member of Siphovirdae family. EcoR I, Sal I, Xba I and Pst I separately digested the 4 phages DNA provided 4, 3, 3 and 2 profiles, respectively. This suggested that they were different strains. All the 4 phages specifically infected bovine S. agalactiae isolates. LYGO9, pA11, JX01 and HZ04 could lyse 12, 13, 20 and 23 of 42 tested bovine S. agalctiae isolates, respectively. This clearly indicated that these 4 phages are closely related. The 3 new phages which specifically lyse bovine S. agalactiae isolates are siphovirus phages. Phage LYGO9 was shown having a short latent period and a larger burst size.

  3. Unique biological properties of catalytic domain directed human anti-CAIX antibodies discovered through phage-display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC, but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule.

  4. Phage-Bacterial Dynamics with Spatial Structure: Self Organization around Phage Sinks Can Promote Increased Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James J; Christensen, Kelly A; Scott, Carly; Jack, Benjamin R; Crandall, Cameron J; Krone, Stephen M

    2018-01-29

    Bacteria growing on surfaces appear to be profoundly more resistant to control by lytic bacteriophages than do the same cells grown in liquid. Here, we use simulation models to investigate whether spatial structure per se can account for this increased cell density in the presence of phages. A measure is derived for comparing cell densities between growth in spatially structured environments versus well mixed environments (known as mass action). Maintenance of sensitive cells requires some form of phage death; we invoke death mechanisms that are spatially fixed, as if produced by cells. Spatially structured phage death provides cells with a means of protection that can boost cell densities an order of magnitude above that attained under mass action, although the effect is sometimes in the opposite direction. Phage and bacteria self organize into separate refuges, and spatial structure operates so that the phage progeny from a single burst do not have independent fates (as they do with mass action). Phage incur a high loss when invading protected areas that have high cell densities, resulting in greater protection for the cells. By the same metric, mass action dynamics either show no sustained bacterial elevation or oscillate between states of low and high cell densities and an elevated average. The elevated cell densities observed in models with spatial structure do not approach the empirically observed increased density of cells in structured environments with phages (which can be many orders of magnitude), so the empirical phenomenon likely requires additional mechanisms than those analyzed here.

  5. Phage Therapy -- Everything Old Is New again

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Kropinski

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of bacterial viruses (bacteriophages or phages proved pivotal in the nascence of the disciplines of molecular biology and microbial genetics, providing important information on the central processes of the bacterial cell (DNA replication, transcription and translation and on how DNA can be transferred from one cell to another. As a result of the pioneering genetics studies and modern genomics, it is now known that phages have contributed to the evolution of the microbial cell and to its pathogenic potential. Because of their ability to transmit genes, phages have been exploited to develop cloning vector systems. They also provide a plethora of enzymes for the modern molecular biologist. Until the introduction of antibiotics, phages were used to treat bacterial infections (with variable success. Western science is now having to re-evaluate the application of phage therapy -- a therapeutic modality that never went out of vogue in Eastern Europe -- because of the emergence of an alarming number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present article introduces the reader to phage biology, and the benefits and pitfalls of phage therapy in humans and animals.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Phages Infecting Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been suggested as an alternative approach to reduce the amount of pathogens in various applications. Bacteriophages of various specificity and virulence were isolated as a means of controlling food-borne pathogens. We studied the interaction of bacteriophages with Bacillus species, which are very often persistent in industrial applications such as food production due to their antibiotic resistance and spore formation. A comparative study using electron microscopy, PFGE, and SDS-PAGE as well as determination of host range, pH and temperature resistance, adsorption rate, latent time, and phage burst size was performed on three phages of the Myoviridae family and one phage of the Siphoviridae family which infected Bacillus subtilis strains. The phages are morphologically different and characterized by icosahedral heads and contractile (SIOΦ, SUBω, and SPOσ phages or noncontractile (ARπ phage tails. The genomes of SIOΦ and SUBω are composed of 154 kb. The capsid of SIOΦ is composed of four proteins. Bacteriophages SPOσ and ARπ have genome sizes of 25 kbp and 40 kbp, respectively. Both phages as well as SUBω phage have 14 proteins in their capsids. Phages SIOΦ and SPOσ are resistant to high temperatures and to the acid (4.0 and alkaline (9.0 and 10.0 pH.

  7. Deoxynivalenol-mimic nanobody isolated from a naïve phage display nanobody library and its application in immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu-Lou; He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang; Bhunia, Arun K; Tu, Zhui; Chen, Bo; Liu, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-08-05

    In this study, using mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) as a model hapten, we developed a nanobody-based environmental friendly immunoassay for sensitive detection of DON. Two nanobodies (N-28 and N-31) which bind to anti-DON monoclonal antibody (MAb) were isolated from a naive phage display library. These nanobodies are clonable, thermally stable and mycotoxin-free products and can be served as coating antigen mimetics in heterologous immunoassay. The half inhibition concentration (IC50) of the immunoassay developed with N-28 and N-31 was 8.77 ± 0.41 ng mL(-1) and 19.97 ± 0.84 ng mL(-1), respectively, which were 18- and 8-fold more sensitive than the conventional coating antigen (DON-BSA) based immunoassay. In order to better understand the molecular mechanism of antigen mimicry by nanobody, the 3D structure of "nanobody (N-28) - anti-DON MAb" complex was presented and verified by molecular modeling and alanine-scanning mutagenesis. The results showed that hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction formed between Thr 102 - Ser 106 of N-28 and CDR H3 residues of anti-DON antibody may contribute to their binding. This novel concept of enhancing sensitivity of immunoassay for DON based on nanobody may provide potential applications in a general method for immunoassay of various food chemical contaminants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pseudomonas predators: understanding and exploiting phage-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Jeroen; Hendrix, Hanne; Blasdel, Bob G; Danis-Wlodarczyk, Katarzyna; Lavigne, Rob

    2017-09-01

    Species in the genus Pseudomonas thrive in a diverse set of ecological niches and include crucial pathogens, such as the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The bacteriophages that infect Pseudomonas spp. mirror the widespread and diverse nature of their hosts. Therefore, Pseudomonas spp. and their phages are an ideal system to study the molecular mechanisms that govern virus-host interactions. Furthermore, phages are principal catalysts of host evolution and diversity, which directly affects the ecological roles of environmental and pathogenic Pseudomonas spp. Understanding these interactions not only provides novel insights into phage biology but also advances the development of phage therapy, phage-derived antimicrobial strategies and innovative biotechnological tools that may be derived from phage-bacteria interactions.

  9. Isolation and characterization of numerous novel phages targeting diverse strains of the ubiquitous and opportunistic pathogen Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Wittmann

    Full Text Available The clinical relevance of nosocomially acquired infections caused by multi-resistant Achromobacter strains is rapidly increasing. Here, a diverse set of 61 Achromobacter xylosoxidans strains was characterized by MultiLocus Sequence Typing and Phenotype MicroArray technology. The strains were further analyzed in regard to their susceptibility to 35 antibiotics and to 34 different and newly isolated bacteriophages from the environment. A large proportion of strains were resistant against numerous antibiotics such as cephalosporines, aminoglycosides and quinolones, whereas piperacillin-tazobactam, ticarcillin, mezlocillin and imipenem were still inhibitory. We also present the first expanded study on bacteriophages of the genus Achromobacter that has been so far a blank slate with respect to phage research. The phages were isolated mainly from several waste water treatment plants in Germany. Morphological analysis of all of these phages by electron microscopy revealed a broad diversity with different members of the order Caudovirales, including the families Siphoviridae, Myoviridae, and Podoviridae. A broad spectrum of different host ranges could be determined for several phages that lysed up to 24 different and in part highly antibiotic resistant strains. Molecular characterisation by DNA restriction analysis revealed that all phages contain linear double-stranded DNA. Their restriction patterns display distinct differences underlining their broad diversity.

  10. Biotin-tagged proteins: Reagents for efficient ELISA-based serodiagnosis and phage display-based affinity selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vaishali; Kaur, Charanpreet; Grover, Payal; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K

    2018-01-01

    The high-affinity interaction between biotin and streptavidin has opened avenues for using recombinant proteins with site-specific biotinylation to achieve efficient and directional immobilization. The site-specific biotinylation of proteins carrying a 15 amino acid long Biotin Acceptor Peptide tag (BAP; also known as AviTag) is effected on a specific lysine either by co-expressing the E. coli BirA enzyme in vivo or by using purified recombinant E. coli BirA enzyme in the presence of ATP and biotin in vitro. In this paper, we have designed a T7 promoter-lac operator-based expression vector for rapid and efficient cloning, and high-level cytosolic expression of proteins carrying a C-terminal BAP tag in E. coli with TEV protease cleavable N-terminal deca-histidine tag, useful for initial purification. Furthermore, a robust three-step purification pipeline integrated with well-optimized protocols for TEV protease-based H10 tag removal, and recombinant BirA enzyme-based site-specific in vitro biotinylation is described to obtain highly pure biotinylated proteins. Most importantly, the paper demonstrates superior sensitivities in indirect ELISA with directional and efficient immobilization of biotin-tagged proteins on streptavidin-coated surfaces in comparison to passive immobilization. The use of biotin-tagged proteins through specific immobilization also allows more efficient selection of binders from a phage-displayed naïve antibody library. In addition, for both these applications, specific immobilization requires much less amount of protein as compared to passive immobilization and can be easily multiplexed. The simplified strategy described here for the production of highly pure biotin-tagged proteins will find use in numerous applications, including those, which may require immobilization of multiple proteins simultaneously on a solid surface.

  11. [Construction of a phage antibody library and screening of anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III single chain antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-gang; Duan, Xiao-yi; Guo, You-min; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Quan-ying; Yang, Guang-xiao

    2010-01-01

    To obtain specific anti-epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII) single chain antibody (ScFv) by phage antibody library display system. The total RNA was extracted from the spleen B cells of BALB/c mice immunized with pep-3-OVA protein, and the first-strand cDNA was synthesized by reverse transcription. Antibody VH and VL gene fragments were amplified and joined to a ScFv gene with the linker. The ScFv gene was ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB5E, which was transformed into competent E. coli TG1. The transformed cells were then infected with M13KO7 helper phage to yield the recombinant phage to construct the phage ScFv library. Pep-3-BSA protein was used to screen the phage antibody library and ELISA carried out to characterize the activity of the antibody. The VH and VL gene fragments of the antibody were about 350 bp and 320 bp in length as analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The ScFv gene was 780 bp, consistent with the expected length. The recombinant phagemid with ScFv gene insert was rescued, and an immune phage ScFv library with the content of 5.0x10(6) was constructed. The recombinant ScFv phage had a titer of 3.0x10(4) cfu/ml, and the fourth phage harvest yielded 56 times as much as that of the first one. SDS-PAGE demonstrated a molecular mass of the soluble ScFv of about 28 kD. ELISA results indicated good specificity of the ScFv to bind EGFRvIII. An immune phage ScFv library is successfully constructed, and the ScFv antibody fragment is capable of specific binding to EGFRvIII.

  12. Phage typing of Staphylococcus saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres Pereira, A.; Melo Cristino, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    This study included 502 staphylococcus strains; Staphylococcus saprophyticus (297 strains) S. cohnii (47), S. xylosus (10), S. epidermidis (67) and S. aureus (81). Mitomycin C induction was performed on 100 isolates of S. saprophyticus and all induced strains were reacted with each other. Twenty-six strains proved to be lysogenic. Phages were propagated and titrated. With 12 of the phages there were three frequent associations, named lytic groups A, B and C, which included 75% of all typable strains. Typability of the system was 45% and reproducibility was between 94.2% and 100%. Phages did not lyse S. aureus and S. epidermidis strains, but they lysed S. saprophyticus and only rare strains of other novobiocin resistant species. Effective S. saprophyticus typing serves ecological purposes and tracing the origin of urinary strains from the skin or mucous membranes. Phage typing in association with plasmid profiling previously described, are anticipated as complementary methods with strong discriminatory power for differentiating among S. saprophyticus strains. PMID:1752305

  13. Lateral flow assay for rapid detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using a phage-displayed peptide as bio-recognition probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulabhusan, Prabir Kumar; Rajwade, Jyutika M; Sahul Hameed, A S; Paknikar, Kishore M

    2017-06-01

    White spot disease caused by the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has a major socio-economic impact on shrimp farming in India. It has been realized that a field-usable diagnostic capable of rapid detection of WSSV can prevent huge economic losses in disease outbreaks. In this work, we explored the possibility of using a peptide as bio-recognition probe in a field-usable device for the detection of WSSV from infected shrimps and prawns. A commercially available random phage-display library was screened against rVP28 (a major structural protein of WSSV, expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli). A bacteriophage clone VP28-4L was obtained, and its binding to purified rVP28 protein as well as WSSV from infected shrimp Litopaeneus vannamei tissue was confirmed by ELISA and western blot. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (K d ,app) was calculated to be 810 nM. VP28-4L did not show cross-reactivity with any other shrimp viruses. A 12-mer peptide (pep28, with the sequence 'TFQAFDLSPFPS') displayed on the VP28-4L was synthesized, and its diagnostic potential was evaluated in a lateral flow assay (LFA). Visual detection of WSSV could be achieved using biotinylated-pep28 and streptavidin-conjugated gold nanoparticles. In LFA, 12.5 μg/mL of the virus could be detected from L. vannamei gill tissue homogenate within 20 min. Pep28 thus becomes an attractive candidate in bio-recognition of WSSV in field-usable diagnostic platforms benefitting the aquaculture sector.

  14. Improvements in or relating to information display arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blay, A.G.

    1975-01-01

    An information display arrangement for use in biomedical radiography with either X- or γ-radiation or ultrasonic waves is described. This invention overcomes the drawbacks of conventional three-dimensional displays where certain features may be partially or completely obscured from view by matter which is not of interest. This improvement is achieved by interactive means using a light pen on a cathode ray tube display to effectively draw boundaries between relevant and irrelevant features. The computerised display is then up-dated from the information store containing the transmission data. (U.K.)

  15. [Construction and screening of phage antibody libraries against epidermal growth factor receptor and soluble expression of single chain Fv].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wei-Jin; Miao, Qing-Fang; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2009-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important target for cancer therapy. The present study prepared single chain Fv (scFv) directed against EGFR. Balb/c mice were immunized by human carcinoma A431 cells, and total RNA of the splenic cells was extracted. VH and VL gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and further joined into scFv gene with a linker, then scFv gene fragments were ligated into the phagemid vector pCANTAB 5E. The phagemid containing scFv were transformed into electro-competent E. coli TG1 cells. The recombinant phage antibody library was constructed through rescuing the transformed cells with help phage M13K07. The specified recombinant phages were enriched through 5 rounds of affinity panning and the anti-EGFR phage scFv clones were screened and identified with ELISA. A total of 48 clones from the library were selected randomly and 45 clones were identified positive. After infecting E. coli HB2151 cells with one positive clone, soluble recombinant antibodies about 27 kD were produced and located in the periplasm and the supernatant. The result of sequencing showed that the scFv gene was 768 bp, which encoded 256 amino acid residues. VH and VL including 3 CDRs and 4 FRs, respectively, were all homologous to mouse Ig. The soluble scFv showed the specific binding activity to purified EGFR and EGFR located in carcinoma cell membrane. The successful preparation of anti-EGFR scFv will provide an EGFR targeted molecule for the development of antibody-based drugs and biological therapy of cancer.

  16. Novel chitosan film embedded with liposome-encapsulated phage for biocontrol of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haiying; Yuan, Lu; Lin, Lin

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, phages used for the reduction of pathogenic bacteria have fostered many attentions, but they are liable to lost bioactivity in food due to the presence of acidic compounds, enzymes and evaporite materials. To improve the stability of phages, a chitosan edible film containing liposome-encapsulated phage was engineered in the present study. The characteristics of liposome-encapsulated phage and the chitosan film containing liposome-encapsulated phage were investigated. The encapsulation efficiency of phages in liposome reached 57.66±0.12%. Besides, the desirable physical properties of chitosan film were obtained. The chitosan film embedded with liposome-encapsulated phage exhibited high antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157:H7, without the impact on the sensory properties of beef. Hence, chitosan film containing liposome-encapsulated phage could be a promising antibacterial packaging for beef preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteriophage prevalence in the genus Azospirillum and analysis of the first genome sequence of an Azospirillum brasilense integrative phage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mickaël; Haurat, Jacqueline; Samain, Sylvie; Segurens, Béatrice; Gavory, Frédérick; González, Víctor; Mavingui, Patrick; Rohr, René; Bally, René; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence

    2008-02-01

    The prevalence of bacteriophages was investigated in 24 strains of four species of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria belonging to the genus Azospirillum. Upon induction by mitomycin C, the release of phage particles was observed in 11 strains from three species. Transmission electron microscopy revealed two distinct sizes of particles, depending on the identity of the Azospirillum species, typical of the Siphoviridae family. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and hybridization experiments carried out on phage-encapsidated DNAs revealed that all phages isolated from A. lipoferum and A. doebereinerae strains had a size of about 10 kb whereas all phages isolated from A. brasilense strains displayed genome sizes ranging from 62 to 65 kb. Strong DNA hybridizing signals were shown for most phages hosted by the same species whereas no homology was found between phages harbored by different species. Moreover, the complete sequence of the A. brasilense Cd bacteriophage (phiAb-Cd) genome was determined as a double-stranded DNA circular molecule of 62,337 pb that encodes 95 predicted proteins. Only 14 of the predicted proteins could be assigned functions, some of which were involved in DNA processing, phage morphogenesis, and bacterial lysis. In addition, the phiAb-Cd complete genome was mapped as a prophage on a 570-kb replicon of strain A. brasilense Cd, and a region of 27.3 kb of phiAb-Cd was found to be duplicated on the 130-kb pRhico plasmid previously sequenced from A. brasilense Sp7, the parental strain of A. brasilense Cd.

  18. Twelve previously unknown phage genera are ubiquitous in global oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmfeldt, Karin; Solonenko, Natalie; Shah, Manesh; Corrier, Kristen; Riemann, Lasse; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-07-30

    Viruses are fundamental to ecosystems ranging from oceans to humans, yet our ability to study them is bottlenecked by the lack of ecologically relevant isolates, resulting in "unknowns" dominating culture-independent surveys. Here we present genomes from 31 phages infecting multiple strains of the aquatic bacterium Cellulophaga baltica (Bacteroidetes) to provide data for an underrepresented and environmentally abundant bacterial lineage. Comparative genomics delineated 12 phage groups that (i) each represent a new genus, and (ii) represent one novel and four well-known viral families. This diversity contrasts the few well-studied marine phage systems, but parallels the diversity of phages infecting human-associated bacteria. Although all 12 Cellulophaga phages represent new genera, the podoviruses and icosahedral, nontailed ssDNA phages were exceptional, with genomes up to twice as large as those previously observed for each phage type. Structural novelty was also substantial, requiring experimental phage proteomics to identify 83% of the structural proteins. The presence of uncommon nucleotide metabolism genes in four genera likely underscores the importance of scavenging nutrient-rich molecules as previously seen for phages in marine environments. Metagenomic recruitment analyses suggest that these particular Cellulophaga phages are rare and may represent a first glimpse into the phage side of the rare biosphere. However, these analyses also revealed that these phage genera are widespread, occurring in 94% of 137 investigated metagenomes. Together, this diverse and novel collection of phages identifies a small but ubiquitous fraction of unknown marine viral diversity and provides numerous environmentally relevant phage-host systems for experimental hypothesis testing.

  19. Three-dimensional display improves observer speed and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, J.A.; Rowberg, A.H.; Kuyper, S.; Choi, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    In an effort to evaluate the potential cost-effectiveness of three-dimensional (3D) display equipment, we compared the speed and accuracy of experienced radiologists identifying in sliced uppercase letters from CT scans with 2D and pseudo-3D display. CT scans of six capital letters were obtained and printed as a 2D display or as a synthesized pseudo-3D display (Pixar). Six observes performed a timed identification task. Radiologists read the 3D display an average of 16 times faster than the 2D, and the average error rate of 2/6 (± 0.6/6) for 2D interpretations was totally eliminated. This degree of improvement in speed and accuracy suggests that the expense of 3D display may be cost-effective in a defined clinical setting

  20. Phages of Listeria offer novel tools for diagnostics and biocontrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Loessner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, bacteriophages infecting their hosts have perhaps been best known and even notorious for being a nuisance in dairy-fermentation processes. However, with the rapid progress in molecular microbiology and microbial ecology, a new dawn has risen for phages. This review will provide an overview on possible uses and applications of Listeria phages, including phage-typing, reporter phage for bacterial diagnostics, and use of phage as biocontrol agents for food safety. The use of phage-encoded enzymes such as endolysins for the detection and as antimicrobial will also be addressed. Desirable properties of candidate phages for biocontrol will be discussed. While emphasizing the enormous future potential for applications, we will also consider some of the intrinsic limitations dictated by both phage and bacterial ecology.

  1. Development of two murine antibodies against Neospora caninum using phage display technology and application on the detection of N. caninum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Dong

    Full Text Available Neosporosis, caused by an intracellular parasite, Neospora caninum, is an infectious disease primarily of cattle and dogs. It occurs worldwide and causes huge damages to dairy farms. In this study, we immunized mice with recombinant surface-associated protein 1 of N. caninum (rNcSAG1 and developed two novel monoclonal antibodies, A10 and H3, against NcSAG1 using phage-display technology. Both clones bound to purified rNcSAG1 and the half maximal inhibitory concentrations of A10 and H3 are 50 and 72 nM of rNcSAG1, respectively. In immunofluorescence assays, both A10 and H3 Fabs bound to N. caninum parasites. Direct detection of N. caninum parasites was developed firstly using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with A10 and H3. Binding of A10 and H3 antibodies to rNcSAG1 was also inhibited by some certain anti-N. caninum antibodies in the neosporosis-positive cattle sera, suggesting they might bind to the same epitopes of NcSAG1 with those anti-N. caninum antibodies of bovine. These antibodies were demonstrated to have a potential for monitoring the N. caninum parasites in a dairy farm, which may lead to protect livestock from parasite-infection.

  2. A century of the phage: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmond, George P C; Fineran, Peter C

    2015-12-01

    Viruses that infect bacteria (bacteriophages; also known as phages) were discovered 100 years ago. Since then, phage research has transformed fundamental and translational biosciences. For example, phages were crucial in establishing the central dogma of molecular biology - information is sequentially passed from DNA to RNA to proteins - and they have been shown to have major roles in ecosystems, and help drive bacterial evolution and virulence. Furthermore, phage research has provided many techniques and reagents that underpin modern biology - from sequencing and genome engineering to the recent discovery and exploitation of CRISPR-Cas phage resistance systems. In this Timeline, we discuss a century of phage research and its impact on basic and applied biology.

  3. Multi-Column Xe/Kr Separation with AgZ-PAN and HZ-PAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenhalgh, Mitchell Randy; Garn, Troy Gerry; Welty, Amy Keil; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2016-01-01

    Previous multi-column xenon/krypton separation tests have demonstrated the capability of separating xenon from krypton in a mixed gas feed stream. The results of this initial testing with AgZ-PAN and HZ-PAN indicated that an excellent separation of xenon from krypton could be achieved. Building upon these initial results, a series of additional multi-column testing were performed in FY-16. The purpose of this testing was to scale up the sorbent beds, test a different composition of feed gas and attempt to improve the accuracy of the analysis of the individual capture columns' compositions. Two Stirling coolers were installed in series to perform this testing. The use of the coolers instead of the cryostat provided two desired improvements, 1) removal of the large dilution due to the internal volume of the cryostat adsorption chamber, and 2) ability to increase the sorbent bed size for scale-up. The AgZ-PAN sorbent, due to its xenon selectivity, was loaded in the first column to capture the xenon while allowing the krypton to flow through and be routed to a second column containing the HZ-PAN for capture and analysis. The gases captured on both columns were sampled with evacuated sample bombs and subsequently analyzed via GC-MS for both krypton and xenon. The results of these tests can be used to develop the scope of future testing and analysis using this test bed for demonstrating the capture and separation of xenon and krypton using sorbents, for demonstrating desorption and regeneration of the sorbents, and for determining compositions of the desorbed gases. They indicate a need for future desorption studies in order to better quantify co-adsorbed species and final krypton purity.

  4. Multi-Column Xe/Kr Separation with AgZ-PAN and HZ-PAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, Mitchell Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy Gerry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Welty, Amy Keil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Previous multi-column xenon/krypton separation tests have demonstrated the capability of separating xenon from krypton in a mixed gas feed stream. The results of this initial testing with AgZ-PAN and HZ-PAN indicated that an excellent separation of xenon from krypton could be achieved. Building upon these initial results, a series of additional multi-column testing were performed in FY-16. The purpose of this testing was to scale up the sorbent beds, test a different composition of feed gas and attempt to improve the accuracy of the analysis of the individual capture columns’ compositions. Two Stirling coolers were installed in series to perform this testing. The use of the coolers instead of the cryostat provided two desired improvements, 1) removal of the large dilution due to the internal volume of the cryostat adsorption chamber, and 2) ability to increase the sorbent bed size for scale-up. The AgZ-PAN sorbent, due to its xenon selectivity, was loaded in the first column to capture the xenon while allowing the krypton to flow through and be routed to a second column containing the HZ-PAN for capture and analysis. The gases captured on both columns were sampled with evacuated sample bombs and subsequently analyzed via GC-MS for both krypton and xenon. The results of these tests can be used to develop the scope of future testing and analysis using this test bed for demonstrating the capture and separation of xenon and krypton using sorbents, for demonstrating desorption and regeneration of the sorbents, and for determining compositions of the desorbed gases. They indicate a need for future desorption studies in order to better quantify co-adsorbed species and final krypton purity.

  5. Combinatorial synthesis and screening of cancer cell-specific nanomedicines targeted via phage fusion proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Gillespie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Active tumor targeting of nanomedicines has recently shown significant improvements in the therapeutic activity of currently existing drug delivery systems, such as liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil/Caelyx/Lipodox. Previously, we have shown that isolated pVIII major coat proteins of the fd tet filamentous phage vector, containing cancer cell-specific peptide fusions at their N terminus, can be used as active targeting ligands in a liposomal doxorubicin delivery system in vitro and in vivo. Here, we show a novel major coat protein isolation procedure in 2-propanol that allows spontaneous incorporation of the hydrophobic protein core into preformed liposomal doxorubicin with minimal damage or drug loss while still retaining the targeting ligand exposed for cell-specific targeting. Using a panel of 12 structurally unique ligands with specificity towards breast, lung, and/or pancreatic cancer, we showed the feasibility of pVIII major coat proteins to significantly increase the throughput of targeting ligand screening in a common nanomedicine core. Phage protein-modified Lipodox samples showed an average doxorubicin recovery of 82.8% across all samples with 100% of protein incorporation in the correct orientation (N-terminus exposed. Following cytotoxicity screening in a doxorubicin-sensitive breast cancer line (MCF-7, three major groups of ligands were identified. Ligands showing the most improved cytotoxicity included: DMPGTVLP, ANGRPSMT, VNGRAEAP, and ANDVYLD showing a 25-fold improvement (p < 0.05 in toxicity. Similarly DGQYLGSQ, ETYNQPYL, and GSSEQLYL ligands with specificity towards a doxorubicin-insensitive pancreatic cancer line (PANC-1 showed significant increases in toxicity (2-fold; p < 0.05. Thus, we demonstrated proof-of-concept that pVIII major coat proteins can be screened in significantly higher throughput to identify novel ligands displaying improved therapeutic activity in a desired cancer phenotype.

  6. Comparative Omics and Trait Analyses of Marine Pseudoalteromonas Phages Advance the Phage OTU Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B. Duhaime

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses influence the ecology and evolutionary trajectory of microbial communities. Yet our understanding of their roles in ecosystems is limited by the paucity of model systems available for hypothesis generation and testing. Further, virology is limited by the lack of a broadly accepted conceptual framework to classify viral diversity into evolutionary and ecologically cohesive units. Here, we introduce genomes, structural proteomes, and quantitative host range data for eight Pseudoalteromonas phages isolated from Helgoland (North Sea, Germany and use these data to advance a genome-based viral operational taxonomic unit (OTU definition. These viruses represent five new genera and inform 498 unaffiliated or unannotated protein clusters (PCs from global virus metagenomes. In a comparison of previously sequenced Pseudoalteromonas phage isolates (n = 7 and predicted prophages (n = 31, the eight phages are unique. They share a genus with only one other isolate, Pseudoalteromonas podophage RIO-1 (East Sea, South Korea and two Pseudoalteromonas prophages. Mass-spectrometry of purified viral particles identified 12–20 structural proteins per phage. When combined with 3-D structural predictions, these data led to the functional characterization of five previously unidentified major capsid proteins. Protein functional predictions revealed mechanisms for hijacking host metabolism and resources. Further, they uncovered a hybrid sipho-myovirus that encodes genes for Mu-like infection rarely described in ocean systems. Finally, we used these data to evaluate a recently introduced definition for virus populations that requires members of the same population to have >95% average nucleotide identity across at least 80% of their genes. Using physiological traits and genomics, we proposed a conceptual model for a viral OTU definition that captures evolutionarily cohesive and ecologically distinct units. In this trait-based framework, sensitive hosts are

  7. A wearable navigation display can improve attentiveness to the surgical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, James; Billinghurst, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Surgical navigation is typically shown on a computer display that is distant from the patient, making it difficult for the surgeon to watch the patient while performing a guided task. We investigate whether a light-weight, untracked, wearable display (such as Google Glass, which has the same size and weight as corrective glasses) can improve attentiveness to the surgical field in a simulated surgical task. Three displays were tested: a computer monitor; a peripheral display above the eye; and a through-the-lens display in front of the eye. Twelve subjects performed a task to position and orient a tracked tool on a plastic femur. Both wearable displays were tested on the dominant and non-dominant eyes of each subject. Attentiveness during the task was measured by the time taken to respond to randomly illuminated LEDs on the femur. Attentiveness was improved with the wearable displays at the cost of a decrease in accuracy. The through-the-lens display performed better than the peripheral display. The peripheral display performed better when on the dominant eye, while the through-the-lens display performed better when on the non-dominant eye. Attentiveness to the surgical field can be improved with the use of a light-weight, untracked, wearable display. A through-the-lens display performs better than a peripheral display, and both perform better than a computer monitor. Eye dominance should be considered when positioning the display.

  8. Morphological evidence for phages in Xylella fastidiosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Civerolo Edwin L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Presumptive phage particles associated with Xylella fastidiosa strain Temecula-1 grown in PW broth were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM in ultrathin sections of bacterial cell-containing low speed centrifugation pellets and in partially purified preparations from CsCl equilibrium centrifugation density gradients. Ultrathin-sectioned cell pellets contained icosahedral particles of about 45 nm in diameter. Samples collected from CsCl density gradients revealed mostly non-tailed icosahedral but also tailed particles. The icosahedral particles could be divided into two types: a large type (about 45 nm and a small type (about 30 nm. Filamentous phage-like particles (17 × 120 to 6,300 nm were also observed. The presence of different types of phage-like particles resembling to those in several bacteriophage families provides new physical evidence, in addition to X. fastidiosa genomic information, that X. fastidiosa possesses active phages. This is the first report of phage particles released in X. fastidiosa cultures.

  9. Supersize me: Cronobacter sakazakii phage GAP32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasifar, Reza; Griffiths, Mansel W. [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Sabour, Parviz M. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph Food Research Centre, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 5C9 (Canada); Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang [Department of Microbiology-Infectiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Vandersteegen, Katrien; Lavigne, Rob [Laboratory of Gene Technology, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Noben, Jean-Paul [Biomedical Research Institute and Transnational University Limburg, School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek (Belgium); Alanis Villa, Argentina; Abbasifar, Arash [Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nash, John H.E. [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Kropinski, Andrew M., E-mail: akropins@uoguelph.ca [Public Health Agency of Canada, Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 3W4 (Canada); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a Gram-negative pathogen found in milk-based formulae that causes infant meningitis. Bacteriophages have been proposed to control bacterial pathogens; however, comprehensive knowledge about a phage is required to ensure its safety before clinical application. We have characterized C. sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 (GAP32), which possesses the second largest sequenced phage genome (358,663 bp). A total of 571 genes including 545 protein coding sequences and 26 tRNAs were identified, thus more genes than in the smallest bacterium, Mycoplasma genitalium G37. BLASTP and HHpred searches, together with proteomic analyses reveal that only 23.9% of the putative proteins have defined functions. Some of the unique features of this phage include: a chromosome condensation protein, two copies of the large subunit terminase, a predicted signal-arrest-release lysin; and an RpoD-like protein, which is possibly involved in the switch from immediate early to delayed early transcription. Its closest relatives are all extremely large myoviruses, namely coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2, with whom it shares approximately 44% homologous proteins. Since the homologs are not evenly distributed, we propose that these three phages belong to a new subfamily. - Highlights: • Cronobacter sakazakii phage vB{sub C}saM{sub G}AP32 has a genome of 358,663 bp. • It encodes 545 proteins which is more than Mycoplasma genitalium G37. • It is a member of the Myoviridae. • It is peripherally related to coliphage PBECO4 and Klebsiella phage vB{sub K}leM-RaK2. • GAP32 encodes a chromosome condensation protein.

  10. Phage-Mediated Competitive Chemiluminescent Immunoassay for Detecting Cry1Ab Toxin by Using an Anti-Idiotypic Camel Nanobody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yulou; Li, Pan; Dong, Sa; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Yang, Qianru; Wang, Yulong; Ge, Jing; Hammock, Bruce D; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin

    2018-01-31

    Cry toxins have been widely used in genetically modified organisms for pest control, raising public concern regarding their effects on the natural environment and food safety. In this work, a phage-mediated competitive chemiluminescent immunoassay (c-CLIA) was developed for determination of Cry1Ab toxin using anti-idiotypic camel nanobodies. By extracting RNA from camels' peripheral blood lymphocytes, a naive phage-displayed nanobody library was established. Using anti-Cry1Ab toxin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the library for anti-idiotypic antibody screening, four anti-idiotypic nanobodies were selected and confirmed to be specific for anti-Cry1Ab mAb binding. Thereafter, a c-CLIA was developed for detection of Cry1Ab toxin based on anti-idiotypic camel nanobodies and employed for sample testing. The results revealed a half-inhibition concentration of developed assay to be 42.68 ± 2.54 ng/mL, in the linear range of 10.49-307.1 ng/mL. The established method is highly specific for Cry1Ab recognition, with negligible cross-reactivity for other Cry toxins. For spiked cereal samples, the recoveries of Cry1Ab toxin ranged from 77.4% to 127%, with coefficient of variation of less than 9%. This study demonstrated that the competitive format based on phage-displayed anti-idiotypic nanobodies can provide an alternative strategy for Cry toxin detection.

  11. Coevolution of CRISPR bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Pu; Deem, Michael

    2014-03-01

    CRISPR (cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) is a newly discovered adaptive, heritable immune system of prokaryotes. It can prevent infection of prokaryotes by phage. Most bacteria and almost all archae have CRISPR. The CRISPR system incorporates short nucleotide sequences from viruses. These incorporated sequences provide a historical record of the host and predator coevolution. We simulate the coevolution of bacteria and phage in 2 dimensions. Each phage has multiple proto-spacers that the bacteria can incorporate. Each bacterium can store multiple spacers in its CRISPR. Phages can escape recognition by the CRISPR system via point mutation or recombination. We will discuss the different evolutionary consequences of point mutation or recombination on the coevolution of bacteria and phage. We will also discuss an intriguing ``dynamic phase transition'' in the number of phage as a function of time and mutation rate. We will show that due to the arm race between phages and bacteria, the frequency of spacers and proto-spacers in a population can oscillate quite rapidly.

  12. Influence of environmental factors on phage-bacteria interaction and on the efficacy and infectivity of phage P100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Fister

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available When using bacteriophages to control food-borne bacteria in food production plants and processed food, it is crucial to consider that environmental conditions influence their stability. These conditions can also affect the physiological state of bacteria and consequently host-virus interaction and the effectiveness of the phage ability to reduce bacteria numbers. In this study we investigated the stability, binding and replication capability of phage P100 and its efficacy to control L. monocytogenes under conditions typically encountered in dairy plants. The influences of SDS, Lutensol AO 7, salt, smear water and different temperatures were investigated. Results indicate that phage P100 is stable and able to bind to the host under most conditions tested. Replication was dependent upon the growth of L. monocytogenes and efficacy was higher when bacterial growth was reduced by certain environmental conditions. In long-term experiments at different temperatures phages were initially able to reduce bacteria up to seven log10 units after two weeks at 4 °C. However, thereafter re-growth and development of phage-resistant L. monocytogenes isolates were encountered.

  13. Phage Display Breast Carcinoma cDNA Libraries: Isolation of Clones Which Specifically Bind to Membrane Glycoproteins, Mucins, and Endothelial Cell Surface

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2000-01-01

    .... Using blood- group H-expressing glycoprotein fraction as bait, we observed enrichment of phage clones expressing sequences from galectin-3, a lectin with an affinity with the blood-group substance...

  14. Status and Evolution of ATLAS Workload Management System PanDA

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2067365; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the LHC uses a sophisticated workload management system, PanDA, to provide access for thousands of physicists to distributed computing resources of unprecedented scale. This system has proved to be robust and scalable during three years of LHC operations. We describe the design and performance of PanDA in ATLAS. The features which make PanDA successful in ATLAS could be applicable to other exabyte scale scientific projects. We describe plans to evolve PanDA towards a general workload management system for the new BigData initiative announced by the US government. Other planned future improvements to PanDA will also be described

  15. Phage therapy reduces Campylobacter jejuni colonization in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, J.A.; Bergen, van M.A.P.; Mueller, M.A.; Wassenaar, T.M.; Carlton, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phage therapy in the control of Campylobacter jejuni colonization in young broilers, either as a preventive or a therapeutic measure, was tested. A prevention group was infected with C. jejuni at day 4 of a 10-day phage treatment. A therapeutic group was phage treated for 6 days,

  16. Error Analysis of Deep Sequencing of Phage Libraries: Peptides Censored in Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wadim L. Matochko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing techniques empower selection of ligands from phage-display libraries because they can detect low abundant clones and quantify changes in the copy numbers of clones without excessive selection rounds. Identification of errors in deep sequencing data is the most critical step in this process because these techniques have error rates >1%. Mechanisms that yield errors in Illumina and other techniques have been proposed, but no reports to date describe error analysis in phage libraries. Our paper focuses on error analysis of 7-mer peptide libraries sequenced by Illumina method. Low theoretical complexity of this phage library, as compared to complexity of long genetic reads and genomes, allowed us to describe this library using convenient linear vector and operator framework. We describe a phage library as N×1 frequency vector n=ni, where ni is the copy number of the ith sequence and N is the theoretical diversity, that is, the total number of all possible sequences. Any manipulation to the library is an operator acting on n. Selection, amplification, or sequencing could be described as a product of a N×N matrix and a stochastic sampling operator (Sa. The latter is a random diagonal matrix that describes sampling of a library. In this paper, we focus on the properties of Sa and use them to define the sequencing operator (Seq. Sequencing without any bias and errors is Seq=Sa IN, where IN is a N×N unity matrix. Any bias in sequencing changes IN to a nonunity matrix. We identified a diagonal censorship matrix (CEN, which describes elimination or statistically significant downsampling, of specific reads during the sequencing process.

  17. Characterisation of a novel enterobacteria phage, CAjan, isolated from rat faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Alexander B; Kot, Witold; Lametsch, Rene; Neve, Horst; Hansen, Lars H

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the novel enterobacteria phage CAjan. This phage belongs to the order Caudovirales and the family Siphoviridae. The phage possesses a linear, double-stranded DNA genome consisting of 59,670 bp with a G+C content of 44.7 % and 91 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). Putative functions were assigned to 39 of the ORFs (37.4 %). The phage structural genes were furthermore functionally characterised by LC MS/MS. CAjan, together with Escherichia phage Seurat and Escherichia phage slur01, represent a novel and genetically distinct clade of Siphoviridae phages that could be considered to constitute a new phage genus. Despite limited sequence similarity, the phages in this group share a number of other common features, including genome structure and the presence of queuosine biosynthesis genes.

  18. Advanced Analysis to Distinguish between Physical Decrease and Inactivation of Viable Phages in Aerosol by Quantitating Phage-Specific Particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimasaki, Noriko; Nojima, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Masaya; Kikuno, Ritsuko; Iizuka, Chiori; Okaue, Akira; Okuda, Shunji; Shinohara, Katsuaki

    2018-01-01

     Recent studies have investigated the efficacy of air-cleaning products against pathogens in the air. A standard method to evaluate the reduction in airborne viruses caused by an air cleaner has been established using a safe bacteriophage instead of pathogenic viruses; the reduction in airborne viruses is determined by counting the number of viable airborne phages by culture, after operating the air cleaner. The reduction in the number of viable airborne phages could be because of "physical decrease" or "inactivation". Therefore, to understand the mechanism of reduction correctly, an analysis is required to distinguish between physical decrease and inactivation. The purpose of this study was to design an analysis to distinguish between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable phi-X174 phages in aerosols. We established a suitable polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system by selecting an appropriate primer-probe set for PCR and validating the sensitivity, linearity, and specificity of the primer-probe set to robustly quantify phi-X174-specific airborne particles. Using this quantitative PCR system and culture assay, we performed a behavior analysis of the phage aerosol in a small chamber (1 m 3 ) at different levels of humidity, as humidity is known to affect the number of viable airborne phages. The results revealed that the reduction in the number of viable airborne phages was caused not only by physical decrease but also by inactivation under particular levels of humidity. Our study could provide an advanced analysis to differentiate between the physical decrease and inactivation of viable airborne phages.

  19. Therapeutic use of chimeric bacteriophage (phage) lysins in staphylococcal endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Phage endolysins are peptidoglycan hydrolases that are produced at the end of the phage lytic cycle to digest the host bacterial cell wall, facilitating the release of mature phage progeny. The aim of this study is to determine the antimicrobial activity of chimeric phage lysins against cli...

  20. Epitope selection from an uncensored peptide library displayed on avian leukosis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, Pranay D.; Rosales, Ana G.; Bailey, Kent R.; Russell, Stephen J.; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2003-01-01

    Phage display libraries have provided an extraordinarily versatile technology to facilitate the isolation of peptides, growth factors, single chain antibodies, and enzymes with desired binding specificities or enzymatic activities. The overall diversity of peptides in phage display libraries can be significantly limited by Escherichia coli protein folding and processing machinery, which result in sequence censorship. To achieve an optimal diversity of displayed eukaryotic peptides, the library should be produced in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells using a eukaryotic display platform. In the accompanying article, we presented experiments that demonstrate that polypeptides of various sizes could be efficiently displayed on the envelope glycoproteins of a eukaryotic virus, avian leukosis virus (ALV), and the displayed polypeptides could efficiently attach to cognate receptors without interfering with viral attachment and entry into susceptible cells. In this study, methods were developed to construct a model library of randomized eight amino acid peptides using the ALV eukaryotic display platform and screen the library for specific epitopes using immobilized antibodies. A virus library with approximately 2 x 10 6 different members was generated from a plasmid library of approximately 5 x 10 6 diversity. The sequences of the randomized 24 nucleotide/eight amino acid regions of representatives of the plasmid and virus libraries were analyzed. No significant sequence censorship was observed in producing the virus display library from the plasmid library. Different populations of peptide epitopes were selected from the virus library when different monoclonal antibodies were used as the target. The results of these two studies clearly demonstrate the potential of ALV as a eukaryotic platform for the display and selection of eukaryotic polypeptides libraries

  1. Generation of Novel Single-Chain Antibodies by Phage-Display Technology to Direct Imaging Agents Highly Selective to Pancreatic β- or α-Cells In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueberberg, Sandra; Meier, Juris J.; Waengler, Carmen; Schechinger, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Johannes W.; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmitz, Inge; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Köller, Manfred; Klein, Harald H.; Schneider, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Noninvasive determination of pancreatic β-cell mass in vivo has been hampered by the lack of suitable β-cell–specific imaging agents. This report outlines an approach for the development of novel ligands homing selectively to islet cells in vivo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS To generate agents specifically binding to pancreatic islets, a phage library was screened for single-chain antibodies (SCAs) on rat islets using two different approaches. 1) The library was injected into rats in vivo, and islets were isolated after a circulation time of 5 min. 2) Pancreatic islets were directly isolated, and the library was panned in the islets in vitro. Subsequently, the identified SCAs were extensively characterized in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS We report the generation of SCAs that bind highly selective to either β- or α-cells. These SCAs are internalized by target cells, disappear rapidly from the vasculature, and exert no toxicity in vivo. Specific binding to β- or α-cells was detected in cell lines in vitro, in rats in vivo, and in human tissue in situ. Electron microscopy demonstrated binding of SCAs to the endoplasmatic reticulum and the secretory granules. Finally, in a biodistribution study the labeling intensity derived from [125I]-labeled SCAs after intravenous administration in rats strongly predicted the β-cell mass and was inversely related to the glucose excursions during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. CONCLUSIONS Our data provide strong evidence that the presented SCAs are highly specific for pancreatic β-cells and enable imaging and quantification in vivo. PMID:19592622

  2. In vitro evolution and affinity-maturation with Coliphage qβ display.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Skamel

    Full Text Available The Escherichia coli bacteriophage, Qβ (Coliphage Qβ, offers a favorable alternative to M13 for in vitro evolution of displayed peptides and proteins due to high mutagenesis rates in Qβ RNA replication that better simulate the affinity maturation processes of the immune response. We describe a benchtop in vitro evolution system using Qβ display of the VP1 G-H loop peptide of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV. DNA encoding the G-H loop was fused to the A1 minor coat protein of Qβ resulting in a replication-competent hybrid phage that efficiently displayed the FMDV peptide. The surface-localized FMDV VP1 G-H loop cross-reacted with the anti-FMDV monoclonal antibody (mAb SD6 and was found to decorate the corners of the Qβ icosahedral shell by electron microscopy. Evolution of Qβ-displayed peptides, starting from fully degenerate coding sequences corresponding to the immunodominant region of VP1, allowed rapid in vitro affinity maturation to SD6 mAb. Qβ selected under evolutionary pressure revealed a non-canonical, but essential epitope for mAb SD6 recognition consisting of an Arg-Gly tandem pair. Finally, the selected hybrid phages induced polyclonal antibodies in guinea pigs with good affinity to both FMDV and hybrid Qβ-G-H loop, validating the requirement of the tandem pair epitope. Qβ-display emerges as a novel framework for rapid in vitro evolution with affinity-maturation to molecular targets.

  3. In Vivo Imaging of Molecularly Targeted Phage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Kelly

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid identification of in vivo affinity ligands would have far-reaching applications for imaging specific molecular targets, in vivo systems imaging, and medical use. We have developed a high-throughput method for identifying and optimizing ligands to map and image biologic targets of interest in vivo. We directly labeled viable phage clones with far-red fluorochromes and comparatively imaged them in vivo by multichannel fluorescence ratio imaging. Using Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (osteonectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 as model targets, we show that: 1 fluorescently labeled phage retains target specificity on labeling; 2 in vivo distribution can be quantitated (detection thresholds of ~ 300 phage/mm3 tissue throughout the entire depth of the tumor using fluorescent tomographic imaging; and 3 fluorescently labeled phage itself can serve as a replenishable molecular imaging agent. The described method should find widespread application in the rapid in vivo discovery and validation of affinity ligands and, importantly, in the use of fluorochrome-labeled phage clones as in vivo imaging agents.

  4. Are Phage Lytic Proteins the Secret Weapon To Kill Staphylococcus aureus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gutiérrez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most threatening microorganisms for global human health. The current strategies to reduce the impact of S. aureus include a restrictive control of worldwide antibiotic use, prophylactic measures to hinder contamination, and the search for novel antimicrobials to treat human and animal infections caused by this bacterium. The last strategy is currently the focus of considerable research. In this regard, phage lytic proteins (endolysins and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases [VAPGHs] have been proposed as suitable candidates. Indeed, these proteins display narrow-spectrum antimicrobial activity and a virtual lack of bacterial-resistance development. Additionally, the therapeutic use of phage lytic proteins in S. aureus animal infection models is yielding promising results, showing good efficacy without apparent side effects. Nonetheless, human clinical trials are still in progress, and data are not available yet. This minireview also analyzes the main obstacles for introducing phage lytic proteins as human therapeutics against S. aureus infections. Besides the common technological problems derived from large-scale production of therapeutic proteins, a major setback is the lack of a proper legal framework regulating their use. In that sense, the relevant health authorities should urgently have a timely discussion about these new antimicrobials. On the other hand, the research community should provide data to dispel any doubts regarding their efficacy and safety. Overall, the appropriate scientific data and regulatory framework will encourage pharmaceutical companies to invest in these promising antimicrobials.

  5. How to Name and Classify Your Phage: An Informal Guide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelien Adriaenssens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With this informal guide, we try to assist both new and experienced phage researchers through two important stages that follow phage discovery; that is, naming and classification. Providing an appropriate name for a bacteriophage is not as trivial as it sounds, and the effects might be long-lasting in databases and in official taxon names. Phage classification is the responsibility of the Bacterial and Archaeal Viruses Subcommittee (BAVS of the International Committee on the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. While the BAVS aims at providing a holistic approach to phage taxonomy, for individual researchers who have isolated and sequenced a new phage, this can be a little overwhelming. We are now providing these researchers with an informal guide to phage naming and classification, taking a “bottom-up” approach from the phage isolate level.

  6. Lysis-deficient phages as novel therapeutic agents for controlling bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempashanaiah Nanjundappa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in phage therapy has grown over the past decade due to the rapid emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens. However, the use of bacteriophages for therapeutic purposes has raised concerns over the potential for immune response, rapid toxin release by the lytic action of phages, and difficulty in dose determination in clinical situations. A phage that kills the target cell but is incapable of host cell lysis would alleviate these concerns without compromising efficacy. Results We developed a recombinant lysis-deficient Staphylococcus aureus phage P954, in which the endolysin gene was rendered nonfunctional by insertional inactivation. P954, a temperate phage, was lysogenized in S. aureus strain RN4220. The native endolysin gene on the prophage was replaced with an endolysin gene disrupted by the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (cat gene through homologous recombination using a plasmid construct. Lysogens carrying the recombinant phage were detected by growth in presence of chloramphenicol. Induction of the recombinant prophage did not result in host cell lysis, and the phage progeny were released by cell lysis with glass beads. The recombinant phage retained the endolysin-deficient genotype and formed plaques only when endolysin was supplemented. The host range of the recombinant phage was the same as that of the parent phage. To test the in vivo efficacy of the recombinant endolysin-deficient phage, immunocompromised mice were challenged with pathogenic S. aureus at a dose that results in 80% mortality (LD80. Treatment with the endolysin-deficient phage rescued mice from the fatal S. aureus infection. Conclusions A recombinant endolysin-deficient staphylococcal phage has been developed that is lethal to methicillin-resistant S. aureus without causing bacterial cell lysis. The phage was able to multiply in lytic mode utilizing a heterologous endolysin expressed from a plasmid in the propagation host

  7. Mutagenesis of lambda phage by tif-expression or host-irradiation functions is largely independent of damage in the phage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Wright, A.; Bridges, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The survival and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated phage lambda, as well as bacterial mutagenesis, are enhanced in tif mutants of Escherichia coli when these strains are grown at 43 0 C (Castellazzi et al., 1972). This was interpreted on the basis of a hypothesis (the SOS hypothesis) according to which the UV-inducible phenomena connected with reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophages (Weigle, 1953; Radman, 1975) are constitutively expressed in tif-bacteria at high temperature (Witkin, 1974). In unpublished experiments with phage T3 we found that the survival of UV-irradiated phage is also better at 43 0 C than at 32 0 C in tif + cells and this made us reexamine the significance and nature of tif expression and examine its effects on both unirradiated and UV-irradiated phage lambda. Our results indicate that tif-induced mutagenesis and possibly reactivation of UV-irradiated phage lambda should be reinterpreted. (orig./AJ)

  8. The phage-host arms race: Shaping the evolution of microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Adi [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics; Sorek, Rotem [Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Molecular Genetics

    2010-10-26

    Bacteria, the most abundant organisms on the planet, are outnumbered by a factor of 10 to 1 by phages that infect them. Faced with the rapid evolution and turnover of phage particles, bacteria have evolved various mechanisms to evade phage infection and killing, leading to an evolutionary arms race. The extensive co-evolution of both phage and host has resulted in considerable diversity on the part of both bacterial and phage defensive and offensive strategies. In this paper, we discuss the unique and common features of phage resistance mechanisms and their role in global biodiversity. Finally, the commonalities between defense mechanisms suggest avenues for the discovery of novel forms of these mechanisms based on their evolutionary traits.

  9. The Agricultural Antibiotic Carbadox Induces Phage-mediated Gene Transfer in Salmonella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley L. Bearson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are used for disease therapeutic or preventative effects in humans and animals, as well as for enhanced feed conversion efficiency in livestock. Antibiotics can also cause undesirable effects in microbial populations, including selection for antibiotic resistance, enhanced pathogen invasion, and stimulation of horizontal gene transfer. Carbadox is a veterinary antibiotic used in the U.S. during the starter phase of swine production for improved feed efficiency and control of swine dysentery and bacterial swine enteritis. Carbadox has been shown in vitro to induce phage-encoded Shiga toxin in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli and a phage-like element transferring antibiotic resistance genes in Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, but the effect of carbadox on prophages in other bacteria is unknown. This study examined carbadox exposure on prophage induction and genetic transfer in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a human foodborne pathogen that frequently colonizes swine without causing disease. S. Typhimurium LT2 exposed to carbadox induced prophage production, resulting in bacterial cell lysis and release of virions that were visible by electron microscopy. Carbadox induction of phage-mediated gene transfer was confirmed by monitoring the transduction of a sodCIII::neo cassette in the Fels-1 prophage from LT2 to a recipient Salmonella strain. Furthermore, carbadox frequently induced generalized transducing phages in multidrug-resistant phage type DT104 and DT120 isolates, resulting in the transfer of chromosomal and plasmid DNA that included antibiotic resistance genes. Our research indicates that exposure of Salmonella to carbadox induces prophages that can transfer virulence and antibiotic resistance genes to susceptible bacterial hosts. Carbadox-induced, phage-mediated gene transfer could serve as a contributing factor in bacterial evolution during animal production, with prophages being a reservoir for bacterial fitness

  10. Development of human antibody fragments using antibody phage display for the detection and diagnosis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hust Michael

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV belongs to the Alphavirus group. Several species of this family are also pathogenic to humans and are recognized as potential agents of biological warfare and terrorism. The objective of this work was the generation of recombinant antibodies for the detection of VEEV after a potential bioterrorism assault or an natural outbreak of VEEV. Results In this work, human anti-VEEV single chain Fragments variable (scFv were isolated for the first time from a human naïve antibody gene library using optimized selection processes. In total eleven different scFvs were identified and their immunological specificity was assessed. The specific detection of the VEEV strains TC83, H12/93 and 230 by the selected antibody fragments was proved. Active as well as formalin inactivated virus particles were recognized by the selected antibody fragments which could be also used for Western blot analysis of VEEV proteins and immunohistochemistry of VEEV infected cells. The anti-VEEV scFv phage clones did not show any cross-reactivity with Alphavirus species of the Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV and Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV antigenic complex, nor did they react with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, if they were used as detection reagent. Conclusion For the first time, this study describes the selection of antibodies against a human pathogenic virus from a human naïve scFv antibody gene library using complete, active virus particles as antigen. The broad and sensitive applicability of scFv-presenting phage for the immunological detection and diagnosis of Alphavirus species was demonstrated. The selected antibody fragments will improve the fast identification of VEEV in case of a biological warfare or terroristic attack or a natural outbreak.

  11. Using llama derived single domain antibodies to target botulinum neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Marla D.; Anderson, George P.; Bernstein, Rachael D.; Liu, Jinny L.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2010-04-01

    Llama serum contains both conventional IgG as well as unique forms of antibody that contain only heavy chains where antigen binding is mediated through a single variable domain. These variable domains can be expressed recombinantly and are referred to as single domain antibodies (sdAb). SdAb are among the smallest known naturally derived antigen binding fragments, possess good solubility, thermal stability, and can refold after heat and chemical denaturation. Llamas were immunized with either BoNT A or B toxoid and phage display libraries prepared. Single domain antibodies (sdAb) that were able to detect botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A and B were selected from their respective libraries. Here, the binders obtained by panning the BoNT B library on either BoNT B toxoid or BoNT B complex toxoid coated plates or BoNT B toxin coupled microspheres are described. Using these panning methods, we selected for binders that showed specificity for BoNT B. Phage displayed binders were screened, moved to a protein expression vector and soluble sdAb was produced. Using a Luminex flow cytometer binders were evaluated in direct binding assays. We have exploited the unique properties of sdAb and used them as biological recognition elements in immuno-based sensors that can detect BoNT B.

  12. Osteological histology of the Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes): correlates of wing-propelled diving and flightlessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N Adam; Clarke, Julia A

    2014-02-01

    Although studies of osteological morphology, gross myology, myological histology, neuroanatomy, and wing-scaling have all documented anatomical modifications associated with wing-propelled diving, the osteohistological study of this highly derived method of locomotion has been limited to penguins. Herein we present the first osteohistological study of the derived forelimbs and hind limbs of wing-propelled diving Pan-Alcidae (Aves, Charadriiformes). In addition to detailing differences between wing-propelled diving charadriiforms and nondiving charadriiforms, microstructural modifications to the humeri, ulnae and femora of extinct flightless pan-alcids are contrasted with those of volant alcids. Histological thin-sections of four species of pan-alcids (Alca torda, †Alca grandis, †Pinguinus impennis, †Mancalla cedrosensis) and one outgroup charadriiform (Stercorarius longicaudus) were compared. The forelimb bones of wing-propelled diving charadriiforms were found to have significantly thicker (∼22%) cortical bone walls. Additionally, as in penguins, the forelimbs of flightless pan-alcids are found to be osteosclerotic. However, unlike the pattern documented in penguins that display thickened cortices in both forelimbs and hind limbs, the forelimb and hind limb elements of pan-alcids display contrasting microstructural morphologies with thickened forelimb cortices and relatively thinner femoral cortices. Additionally, the identification of medullary bone in the sampled †Pinguinus impennis specimen suggests that further osteohistological investigation could provide an answer to longstanding questions regarding sexual dimorphism of Great Auks. Finally, these results suggest that it is possible to discern volant from flightless wing-propelled divers from fragmentary fossil remains. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Functional display of platelet-binding VWF fragments on filamentous bacteriophage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Yee

    Full Text Available von Willebrand factor (VWF tethers platelets to sites of vascular injury via interaction with the platelet surface receptor, GPIb. To further define the VWF sequences required for VWF-platelet interaction, a phage library displaying random VWF protein fragments was screened against formalin-fixed platelets. After 3 rounds of affinity selection, DNA sequencing of platelet-bound clones identified VWF peptides mapping exclusively to the A1 domain. Aligning these sequences defined a minimal, overlapping segment spanning P1254-A1461, which encompasses the C1272-C1458 cystine loop. Analysis of phage carrying a mutated A1 segment (C1272/1458A confirmed the requirement of the cystine loop for optimal binding. Four rounds of affinity maturation of a randomly mutagenized A1 phage library identified 10 and 14 unique mutants associated with enhanced platelet binding in the presence and absence of botrocetin, respectively, with 2 mutants (S1370G and I1372V common to both conditions. These results demonstrate the utility of filamentous phage for studying VWF protein structure-function and identify a minimal, contiguous peptide that bind to formalin-fixed platelets, confirming the importance of the VWF A1 domain with no evidence for another independently platelet-binding segment within VWF. These findings also point to key structural elements within the A1 domain that regulate VWF-platelet adhesion.

  14. Marine phages as excellent tracers for reactive colloidal transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2016-04-01

    Question: Here we evaluate marine phages as specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport of colloidal particles in the Earth's critical zone (CZ). Marine phages and their bacterial hosts are naturally absent in the CZ, and can be detected with extremely high sensitivity. In the framework of the DFG Collaborative Research Center AquaDiva, we asked the following questions: (1) Are marine phages useful specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport in porous media? and (2) Which phage properties are relevant drivers for the transport of marine phages in porous media? Methods: Seven marine phages from different families (as well two commonly used terrestrial phages) were selected based on their morphology, size and physico-chemical surface properties (surface charge and hydrophobicity). Phage properties were assessed by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and water contact angle analysis (CA). Sand-filled laboratory percolation columns were used to study transport. The breakthrough curves of the phages were analyzed using the clean bed filtration theory and the XDLVO theory of colloid stability, respectively. Phages were quantified by a modified high- throughput plaque assay and a culture-independent particle counting method approach. Results: Our data show that most marine tested phages exhibited highly variable transport rates and deposition efficiency, yet generally high colloidal stability and viability. We find that size, morphology and hydrophobicity are key factors shaping the transport efficiency of phages. Differing deposition efficiencies of the phages were also supported by calculated XDLVO interaction energy profile. Conclusion: Marine phages have a high potential for the use as sensitive tracers in terrestrial habitats with their surface properties playing a crucial role for their transport. Marine phages however, exhibit differences in their deposition efficiency depending on their morphology, hydrophobicity and

  15. Physicochemical and immunological characterization of chitosan-coated bacteriophage nanoparticles for in vivo mycotoxin modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Carla Yoko Tanikawa; Yamanaka, Isabel; Schlichta, Laís S; Silva, Sabrina Karim; Picheth, Guilherme F; Caron, Luiz Felipe; de Moura, Juliana; de Freitas, Rilton Alves; Alvarenga, Larissa Magalhães

    2018-04-01

    To propose a novel modeling of aflatoxin immunization and surrogate toxin conjugate from AFB1 vaccines, an immunogen based on the mimotope, (i.e. a peptide-displayed phage that mimics aflatoxins epitope without toxin hazards) was designed. The recombinant phage 3P30 was identified by phage display technology and exhibited the ability to bind, dose dependent, specifically to its cognate target - anti-AFB1 antibody. In immunization assay, the phage-displayed mimotope and its peptide chemically synthesized were able to induce specific anti-AFB1 antibodies, indicating the proof of concept for aflatoxin mimicry. Furthermore, the phage 3P30 was homogeneously coated with chitosan, which also provided a tridimensional matrix network for mucosal delivery. After intranasal immunization, chitosan coated phages improved specific immunogenicity compared to the free antigen. It can be concluded that affinity-selected phage may contribute to the rational design of epitope-based vaccines in a prospectus for the control of aflatoxins and possibly other mycotoxins, and that chitosan coating improved the vectorization of the vaccine by the mucosal route. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Phage lytic enzymes: a history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudil, David

    2015-02-01

    There are many recent studies regarding the efficacy of bacteriophage-related lytic enzymes: the enzymes of 'bacteria-eaters' or viruses that infect bacteria. By degrading the cell wall of the targeted bacteria, these lytic enzymes have been shown to efficiently lyse Gram-positive bacteria without affecting normal flora and non-related bacteria. Recent studies have suggested approaches for lysing Gram-negative bacteria as well (Briersa Y, et al., 2014). These enzymes include: phage-lysozyme, endolysin, lysozyme, lysin, phage lysin, phage lytic enzymes, phageassociated enzymes, enzybiotics, muralysin, muramidase, virolysin and designations such as Ply, PAE and others. Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria, do not contribute to antimicrobial resistance, are easy to develop, inexpensive to manufacture and safe for humans, animals and the environment. The current focus on lytic enzymes has been on their use as anti-infectives in humans and more recently in agricultural research models. The initial translational application of lytic enzymes, however, was not associated with treating or preventing a specific disease but rather as an extraction method to be incorporated in a rapid bacterial detection assay (Bernstein D, 1997).The current review traces the translational history of phage lytic enzymes-from their initial discovery in 1986 for the rapid detection of group A streptococcus in clinical specimens to evolving applications in the detection and prevention of disease in humans and in agriculture.

  17. Ultraviolet inactivation and photoreactivation of the cholera phage 'Kappa'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samad, S.A.; Bhattacharyya, S.C.; Chatterjee, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    The lysogenic cholera phage, 'Kappa' is some ten to twenty folds more resistant to UV (254 nm) than are most of the T. phages of E. coli, or the cholera phage PL 163/10, or the host V. cholerae strain H218 Sm r , the 37% (D 37 ) and 10% (D 10 ) survival doses being 255.8 J/m 2 and 633.6 J/m 2 respectively. The UV-irradiated 'Kappa' phages could be photoreactivated in the host V. cholerae strain H218 Sm r to a maximum extent of 40%. The removal of the number of lethal hits per phage by the survival-enhancement treatment (photoreactivation) with time followed an exponential relation, the constant probability of removal of lethal hit per unit time being 2.8x10 -2 min -1 . The UV-irradiated phages could also be Weigle reactivated in the host strain of H218 Sm r by a small degree, the maximum reactivation factor (ratio of survivals in UV-irradiated and non-irradiated hosts) being 1.50. (orig.)

  18. Are Phage Lytic Proteins the Secret Weapon To Kill Staphylococcus aureus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Fernández, Lucía; Rodríguez, Ana; García, Pilar

    2018-01-23

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most threatening microorganisms for global human health. The current strategies to reduce the impact of S. aureus include a restrictive control of worldwide antibiotic use, prophylactic measures to hinder contamination, and the search for novel antimicrobials to treat human and animal infections caused by this bacterium. The last strategy is currently the focus of considerable research. In this regard, phage lytic proteins (endolysins and virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolases [VAPGHs]) have been proposed as suitable candidates. Indeed, these proteins display narrow-spectrum antimicrobial activity and a virtual lack of bacterial-resistance development. Additionally, the therapeutic use of phage lytic proteins in S. aureus animal infection models is yielding promising results, showing good efficacy without apparent side effects. Nonetheless, human clinical trials are still in progress, and data are not available yet. This minireview also analyzes the main obstacles for introducing phage lytic proteins as human therapeutics against S. aureus infections. Besides the common technological problems derived from large-scale production of therapeutic proteins, a major setback is the lack of a proper legal framework regulating their use. In that sense, the relevant health authorities should urgently have a timely discussion about these new antimicrobials. On the other hand, the research community should provide data to dispel any doubts regarding their efficacy and safety. Overall, the appropriate scientific data and regulatory framework will encourage pharmaceutical companies to invest in these promising antimicrobials. Copyright © 2018 Gutiérrez et al.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus phage types and their correlation to antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most devastating human pathogen. The organism has a differential ability to spread and cause outbreak of infections. Characterization of these strains is important to control the spread of infection in the hospitals as well as in the community. Aim: To identify the currently existing phage groups of Staphylococcus aureus, their prevalence and resistance to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Study was undertaken on 252 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from clinical samples. Strains were phage typed and their resistance to antibiotics was determined following standard microbiological procedures. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test was used to compare the antibiotic susceptibility between methicillin resistant Staph. aureus (MRSA and methicillin sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strains. Results: Prevalence of MRSA and MSSA strains was found to be 29.36% and 70.65% respectively. Of these 17.56% of MRSA and 40.44% of MSSA strains were community acquired. All the MSSA strains belonging to phage type 81 from the community were sensitive to all the antibiotics tested including clindamycin and were resistant to penicillin. Forty five percent strains of phage group III and 39% of non-typable MRSA strains from the hospital were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Conclusion: The study revealed that predominant phage group amongst MRSA strains was phage group III and amongst MSSA from the community was phage group NA (phage type 81. MSSA strains isolated from the community differed significantly from hospital strains in their phage type and antibiotic susceptibility. A good correlation was observed between community acquired strains of phage type 81 and sensitivity to gentamycin and clindamycin.

  20. Non-targeted mutagenesis of unirradiated lambda phage in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F.

    1984-01-01

    Non-targeted mutagenesis of lambda phage by ultraviolet light is the increase over background mutagenesis when non-irradiated phage are grown in irradiated Escherichia coli host cells. Such mutagenesis is caused by different processes from targeted mutagenesis, in which mutations in irradiated phage are correlated with photoproducts in the phage DNA. Non-irradiated phage grown in heavily irradiated uvr + host cells showed non-targeted mutations, which were 3/4 frameshifts, whereas targeted mutations were 2/3 transitions. For non-targeted mutagenesis in heavily irradiated host cells, there were one or two mutant phage per mutant burst. From the results of a series of experiments with various mutant host cells, a major pathway of non-targeted mutagenesis by ultraviolet light was proposed which acts in addition to ''SOS induction''. This pathway involves binding of the enzyme DNA polymerase I to damaged genomic DNA, and low polymerase activity leads to frameshift mutations during semiconservative DNA replication. The data suggest that this process will play a much smaller role in ultraviolet mutagenesis of the bacterial genome than it does in the mutagenesis of lambda phage. (author)

  1. Analysis of high-throughput sequencing and annotation strategies for phage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Henn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial viruses (phages play a critical role in shaping microbial populations as they influence both host mortality and horizontal gene transfer. As such, they have a significant impact on local and global ecosystem function and human health. Despite their importance, little is known about the genomic diversity harbored in phages, as methods to capture complete phage genomes have been hampered by the lack of knowledge about the target genomes, and difficulties in generating sufficient quantities of genomic DNA for sequencing. Of the approximately 550 phage genomes currently available in the public domain, fewer than 5% are marine phage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To advance the study of phage biology through comparative genomic approaches we used marine cyanophage as a model system. We compared DNA preparation methodologies (DNA extraction directly from either phage lysates or CsCl purified phage particles, and sequencing strategies that utilize either Sanger sequencing of a linker amplification shotgun library (LASL or of a whole genome shotgun library (WGSL, or 454 pyrosequencing methods. We demonstrate that genomic DNA sample preparation directly from a phage lysate, combined with 454 pyrosequencing, is best suited for phage genome sequencing at scale, as this method is capable of capturing complete continuous genomes with high accuracy. In addition, we describe an automated annotation informatics pipeline that delivers high-quality annotation and yields few false positives and negatives in ORF calling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These DNA preparation, sequencing and annotation strategies enable a high-throughput approach to the burgeoning field of phage genomics.

  2. 68Ga-labeled phage-display selected peptides as tracers for positron emission tomography imaging of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections: Selection, radiolabelling and preliminary biological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, Karin M.; Kyneb, Majbritt H.; Alstrup, Aage K.O.; Jensen, Jakob J.; Bender, Dirk; Schønheyder, Henrik C.; Afzelius, Pia; Nielsen, Ole L.; Jensen, Svend B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of skin and deep-sited infections, often associated with the formation of biofilms. Early diagnosis and initiated therapy is essential to prevent disease progression and to reduce complications that can be serious. Imaging techniques are helpful combining anatomical with functional data in order to describe and characterize site, extent and activity of the disease. The purpose of the study was to identify and 68 Ga-label peptides with affinity for S. aureus biofilm and evaluate their potential as bacteria-specific positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents. Methods: Phage-displayed dodecapeptides were selected using an in vitro grown S. aureus biofilm as target. One cyclic (A8) and two linear (A9, A11) dodecapeptides were custom synthesized with 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N′,N″,N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated via a lysine linker (K), and for A11 also a glycine–serine–glycine spacer (GSG). The 68 Ga-labeling of A8-K-DOTA, A9-K-DOTA, and A11-GSGK-DOTA were optimized and in vitro bacterial binding was evaluated for 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA and 68 Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA. Stability of 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA was studied in vitro in human serum, while the in vivo plasma stability was analyzed in mice and pigs. Additionally, the whole-body distribution kinetics of 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA was measured in vivo by PET imaging of pigs and ex vivo in excised mice tissues. Results: The 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA and 68 Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA remained stable in product formulation, whereas 68 Ga-A8-K-DOTA was unstable. The S. aureus binding of 68 Ga-A11-GSGK-DOTA and 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA was observed in vitro, though blocking of the binding was not possible by excess of cold peptide. The 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA was degraded slowly in vitro, while the combined in vivo evaluation in pigs and mice showed a rapid blood clearance and renal excretion of the 68 Ga-A9-K-DOTA. Conclusion: The preliminary in vitro and in vivo studies of the phage-display S. aureus

  3. Filamentous phages of Ralstonia solanacearum: double-edged swords for pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Some phages from genus Inovirus use host or bacteriophage-encoded site-specific integrases or recombinases establish a prophage state. During integration or excision, a superinfective form can be produced. The three states (free, prophage, and superinfective) of such phages exert different effects on host bacterial phenotypes. In Ralstonia solanacearum, the causative agent of bacterial wilt disease of crops, the bacterial virulence can be positively or negatively affected by filamentous phages, depending on their state. The presence or absence of a repressor gene in the phage genome may be responsible for the host phenotypic differences (virulent or avirulent) caused by phage infection. This strategy of virulence control may be widespread among filamentous phages that infect pathogenic bacteria of plants.

  4. Mapping of epitopes for autoantibodies to the Type 1 diabetes autoantigen IA-2 by peptide phage display and molecular modelling: Overlap of antibody and T-cell determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Dromey, James; Weenink, Sarah M.; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2004-01-01

    IA-2 is a major target of autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes. IA-2 responsive T cells recognize determinants within regions represented by amino acids 787–817 and 841–869 of the molecule. Epitopes for IA-2 autoantibodies are largely conformational and not well defined. In this study, we used peptide......, and aromatic residues and amino acids contributing to the epitope investigated using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutation of each of amino acids Asn858, Glu836, and Trp799 reduced 96/3 Ab binding by >45%. Mutations of these residues also inhibited binding of serum autoantibodies from IA-2 Ab-positive type 1...... phage display and homology modeling to characterize the epitope of a monoclonal IA-2 Ab (96/3) from a human type 1 diabetic patient. This Ab competes for IA-2 binding with Abs from the majority of patients with type 1 diabetes and therefore binds a region close to common autoantibody epitopes. Alignment...

  5. Complete genome sequences of three Campylobacter jejuni phage-propagating strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophage therapy has the potential to reduce Campylobacter jejuni numbers in livestock, but requires a detailed understanding of phage-host interactions. Some C. jejuni strains are readily infected by certain phages, and are thus designated as phage-propagating strains. Here we report the compl...

  6. Non-targeted mutagenesis of unirradiated lambda phage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, R.D.; Hutchinson, F. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA). Dept. of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    1984-03-05

    Non-targeted mutagenesis of lambda phage by ultraviolet light is the increase over background mutagenesis when non-irradiated phage are grown in irradiated Escherichia coli host cells. Such mutagenesis is caused by different processes from targeted mutagenesis, in which mutations in irradiated phage are correlated with photoproducts in the phage DNA. Non-irradiated phage grown in heavily irradiated uvr/sup +/ host cells showed non-targeted mutations, which were 3/4 frameshifts, whereas targeted mutations were 2/3 transitions. For non-targeted mutagenesis in heavily irradiated host cells, there were one or two mutant phage per mutant burst. From the results of a series of experiments with various mutant host cells, a major pathway of non-targeted mutagenesis by ultraviolet light was proposed which acts in addition to ''SOS induction''. This pathway involves binding of the enzyme DNA polymerase I to damaged genomic DNA, and low polymerase activity leads to frameshift mutations during semiconservative DNA replication. The data suggest that this process will play a much smaller role in ultraviolet mutagenesis of the bacterial genome than it does in the mutagenesis of lambda phage.

  7. Phage Therapy Is Effective in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Equine Keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Takaaki; Iwano, Hidetomo; Hiyashimizu, Yutaro; Matsubara, Kazuki; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Nagahata, Hajime; Niwa, Hidekazu; Katayama, Yoshinari; Kinoshita, Yuta; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Tanji, Yasunori; Yokota, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial keratitis of the horse is mainly caused by staphylococci, streptococci, and pseudomonads. Of these bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa sometimes causes rapid corneal corruption and, in some cases, blindness. Antimicrobial resistance can make treatment very difficult. Therefore, new strategies to control bacterial infection are required. A bacteriophage (phage) is a virus that specifically infects and kills bacteria. Since phage often can lyse antibiotic-resistant bacteria because the killing mechanism is different, we examined the use of phage to treat horse bacterial keratitis. We isolated Myoviridae or Podoviridae phages, which together have a broad host range. They adsorb efficiently to host bacteria; more than 80% of the ΦR18 phage were adsorbed to host cells after 30 s. In our keratitis mouse model, the administration of phage within 3 h also could kill bacteria and suppress keratitis. A phage multiplicity of infection of 100 times the host bacterial number could kill host bacteria effectively. A cocktail of two phages suppressed bacteria in the keratitis model mouse. These data demonstrated that the phages in this study could completely prevent the keratitis caused by P. aeruginosa in a keratitis mouse model. Furthermore, these results suggest that phage may be a more effective prophylaxis for horse keratitis than the current preventive use of antibiotics. Such treatment may reduce the use of antibiotics and therefore antibiotic resistance. Further studies are required to assess phage therapy as a candidate for treatment of horse keratitis. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are emerging all over the world. Bacteriophages have great potential for resolution of this problem. A bacteriophage, or phage, is a virus that infects bacteria specifically. As a novel therapeutic strategy against racehorse keratitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we propose the application of phages for treatment. Phages isolated in this work had in vitro effectiveness for a broad

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2016 Andrade-Domínguez and Kolter.

  9. Isolation and characterization of φkm18p, a novel lytic phage with therapeutic potential against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwan-Han Shen

    Full Text Available AIMS: To isolate phages against extensively drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB and characterize the highest lytic capability phage as a model to evaluate the potential on phage therapy. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eight phages were isolated from hospital sewage and showed narrow host spectrum. Phage φkm18p was able to effectively lyse the most XDRAB. It has a dsDNA genome of 45 kb in size and hexagonal head of about 59 nm in diameter and no tail. Bacterial population decreased quickly from 10(8 CFU ml(-1 to 10(3 CFU ml(-1 in 30 min by φkm18p. The 185 kDa lysis protein encoded by φkm18p genome was detected when the extracted protein did not boil before SDS-PAGE; it showed that the lysis protein is a complex rather than a monomer. Phage φkm18p improved human lung epithelial cells survival rates when they were incubated with A. baumannii. Combination of phages (φkm18p, φTZ1 and φ314 as a cocktail could lyse all genotype-varying XDRAB isolates. CONCLUSION: Infections with XDRAB are extremely difficult to treat and development of a phage cocktails therapy could be a therapeutic alternative in the future. Phage φkm18p is a good candidate for inclusion in phage cocktails.

  10. Nongenetic individuality in the host-phage interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Pearl

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacteria can exhibit a range of phenotypes, even in homogeneous environmental conditions. Such nongenetic individuality has been observed in a wide range of biological processes, including differentiation and stress response. A striking example is the heterogeneous response of bacteria to antibiotics, whereby a small fraction of drug-sensitive bacteria can persist under extensive antibiotic treatments. We have previously shown that persistent bacteria enter a phenotypic state, identified by slow growth or dormancy, which protects them from the lethal action of antibiotics. Here, we studied the effect of persistence on the interaction between Escherichia coli and phage lambda. We used long-term time-lapse microscopy to follow the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP under the phage lytic promoter, as well as cellular fate, in single infected bacteria. Intriguingly, we found that, whereas persistent bacteria are protected from prophage induction, they are not protected from lytic infection. Quantitative analysis of gene expression reveals that the expression of lytic genes is suppressed in persistent bacteria. However, when persistent bacteria switch to normal growth, the infecting phage resumes the process of gene expression, ultimately causing cell lysis. Using mathematical models for these two host-phage interactions, we found that the bacteria's nongenetic individuality can significantly affect the population dynamics, and might be relevant for understanding the coevolution of bacterial hosts and phages.

  11. DNA damage and mutagenesis of lambda phage induced by gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertram, Heidi

    1988-01-01

    Lambda phage DNA was gamma irradiated in aqueous solution and strand breakage determined. Twice as much minor structural damage per lethal hit was found in this DNA compared with DNA from irradiated phage suspensions. The in vitro irradiated DNA was repackaged into infectious particles. Induction of mutations in the cI or cII cistron was scored using SOS-induced host cells. In vitro prepared particles were found to have second-order kinetics for mutagenesis induced by gamma rays indicating two pre-mutational events were necessary to produce a mutation, but bacteria-free phage suspensions ('lys-phage') showed single hit kinetics for mutagenesis after irradiation. Increase in the mutation rate in the phage particles was mainly due to minor lesions, i.e. ssb, als and unidentified base damage. In lys-phage, mutagenesis might be enhanced by clustered DNA damage - configuration not existing in pack-phage. Loss of infectivity was analysed in comparison with structural damage. All lesions contributed to biological inactivation. Minor lesions were tolerated by lambda phage to a limited extent. Major lesions (e.g. dsb) contributed most to infectivity loss and were considered lethal events. (U.K.)

  12. Changes of the Specific Infectivity of Tracer Phages during Transport in Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Trost, Manuel; Sánchez Fontanet, Laura; Harms, Hauke; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Wick, Lukas Y

    2018-03-20

    Phages (i.e., viruses infecting bacteria) are considered to be good indicators and tracers for fecal pollution, hydraulic flow, or colloidal transport in the subsurface. They are typically quantified as total virus particles (VLP) or plaque forming units (PFU) of infectious phages. As transport may lead to phage deactivation, VLP quantification can overestimate the number of infectious phages. In contrast, PFU counts may underestimate the transport of total virus particles. Using PFU and tunable resistive pulse sensing-based counting for active and total phages, respectively, we quantified the effect of transport through laboratory percolation columns on the specific infectivity (SI). The SI is defined by the ratio of total VLP to PFU and is a measure for the minimum particle numbers needed to create a single infection. Transport of three marine tracer phages and the coli-phage (T4) was described by colloidal filtration theory. We found that apparent collision efficiencies of active and total phages differed. Depending on the phage properties (e.g., morphology or hydrophobicity), passage through a porous medium led to either an increasing or decreasing SI of effluent phages. Our data suggest that both phage mass recovery and the SI should be considered in quantitative phage tracer experiments.

  13. Primary isolation strain determines both phage type and receptors recognised by Campylobacter jejuni bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine C Holst Sørensen

    Full Text Available In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated using NCTC12662 as the indicator strain, which may have biased the selection of phages. A large group of C. jejuni phages rely on the highly diverse capsular polysaccharide (CPS for infection and recent work identified the O-methyl phosphoramidate modification (MeOPN of CPS as a phage receptor. We therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb, host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according to C. jejuni phage grouping, NCTC12662 and NCTC12658 selected for CP81-type phages, while RM1221 selected for CP220-type phages. Furthermore, using acapsular ∆kpsM mutants we demonstrated that phages isolated on NCTC12658 and NCTC12662 were dependent on the capsule for infection. In contrast, CP220-type phages isolated on RM1221 were unable to infect non-motile ∆motA mutants, hence requiring motility for successful infection. Hence, the primary phage isolation strain determines both phage type (CP81 or CP220 as well as receptors (CPS or flagella recognised by the isolated phages.

  14. Vibrio Phage KVP40 Encodes a Functional NAD+ Salvage Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Yun; Li, Zhiqun; Miller, Eric S

    2017-05-01

    The genome of T4-type Vibrio bacteriophage KVP40 has five genes predicted to encode proteins of pyridine nucleotide metabolism, of which two, nadV and natV , would suffice for an NAD + salvage pathway. NadV is an apparent nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAmPRTase), and NatV is an apparent bifunctional nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNATase) and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide pyrophosphatase (Nudix hydrolase). Genes encoding the predicted salvage pathway were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli , the proteins were purified, and their enzymatic properties were examined. KVP40 NadV NAmPRTase is active in vitro , and a clone complements a Salmonella mutant defective in both the bacterial de novo and salvage pathways. Similar to other NAmPRTases, the KVP40 enzyme displayed ATPase activity indicative of energy coupling in the reaction mechanism. The NatV NMNATase activity was measured in a coupled reaction system demonstrating NAD + biosynthesis from nicotinamide, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, and ATP. The NatV Nudix hydrolase domain was also shown to be active, with preferred substrates of ADP-ribose, NAD + , and NADH. Expression analysis using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme assays of infected Vibrio parahaemolyticus cells demonstrated nadV and natV transcription during the early and delayed-early periods of infection when other KVP40 genes of nucleotide precursor metabolism are expressed. The distribution and phylogeny of NadV and NatV proteins among several large double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) myophages, and also those from some very large siphophages, suggest broad relevance of pyridine nucleotide scavenging in virus-infected cells. NAD + biosynthesis presents another important metabolic resource control point by large, rapidly replicating dsDNA bacteriophages. IMPORTANCE T4-type bacteriophages enhance DNA precursor synthesis through reductive reactions that use NADH/NADPH as the electron donor and NAD

  15. The Human Gut Phage Community and Its Implications for Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Pilar; Dills, Michael; Young, Mark J

    2017-06-08

    In this review, we assess our current understanding of the role of bacteriophages infecting the human gut bacterial community in health and disease. In general, bacteriophages contribute to the structure of their microbial communities by driving host and viral diversification, bacterial evolution, and by expanding the functional diversity of ecosystems. Gut bacteriophages are an ensemble of unique and shared phages in individuals, which encompass temperate phages found predominately as prophage in gut bacteria (prophage reservoir) and lytic phages. In healthy individuals, only a small fraction of the prophage reservoir is activated and found as extracellular phages. Phage community dysbiosis is characterized by a shift in the activated prophage community or an increase of lytic phages, and has been correlated with disease, suggesting that a proper balance between lysis and lysogeny is needed to maintain health. Consequently, the concept of microbial dysbiosis might be extended to the phage component of the microbiome as well. Understanding the dynamics and mechanisms to restore balance after dysbiosis is an active area of research. The use of phage transplants to re-establish health suggests that phages can be used as disease treatment. Such advances represent milestones in our understanding of gut phages in human health and should fuel research on their role in health and disease.

  16. Comparison of the efficiency of antibody selection from semi-synthetic scFv and non-immune Fab phage display libraries against protein targets for rapid development of diagnostic immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Conrad E Z; Chan, Annie H Y; Lim, Angeline P C; Hanson, Brendon J

    2011-10-28

    Rapid development of diagnostic immunoassays against novel emerging or genetically modified pathogens in an emergency situation is dependent on the timely isolation of specific antibodies. Non-immune antibody phage display libraries are an efficient in vitro method for selecting monoclonal antibodies and hence ideal in these circumstances. Such libraries can be constructed from a variety of sources e.g. B cell cDNA or synthetically generated, and use a variety of antibody formats, typically scFv or Fab. However, antibody source and format can impact on the quality of antibodies generated and hence the effectiveness of this methodology for the timely production of antibodies. We have carried out a comparative screening of two antibody libraries, a semi-synthetic scFv library and a human-derived Fab library against the protective antigen toxin component of Bacillus anthracis and the epsilon toxin of Clostridium botulinum. We have shown that while the synthetic library produced a diverse collection of specific scFv-phage, these contained a high frequency of unnatural amber stops and glycosylation sites which limited their conversion to IgG, and also a high number which lost specificity when expressed as IgG. In contrast, these limitations were overcome by the use of a natural human library. Antibodies from both libraries could be used to develop sandwich ELISA assays with similar sensitivity. However, the ease and speed with which full-length IgG could be generated from the human-derived Fab library makes screening this type of library the preferable method for rapid antibody generation for diagnostic assay development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Targeting the HER family with Pan-HER effectively overcomes resistance to cetuximab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Mari; Bahrar, Harsh; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Coan, John P; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Swick, Adam D; Prabakaran, Prashanth; Lantto, Johan; Horak, Ivan D.; Kragh, Michael; Salgia, Ravi; Kimple, Randy J; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab, an antibody against the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) has shown efficacy in treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), metastatic colorectal cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the clinical success of cetuximab, many patients do not respond to cetuximab. Furthermore, virtually all patients who do initially respond become refractory, highlighting both intrinsic and acquired resistance to cetuximab as significant clinical problems. To understand mechanistically how cancerous cells acquire resistance, we previously developed models of acquired resistance using the H226 NSCLC and UM-SCC1 HNSCC cell lines. Cetuximab-resistant clones showed a robust upregulation and dependency on the HER family receptors EGFR, HER2 and HER3. Here, we examined Pan-HER, a mixture of six antibodies targeting these receptors on cetuximab-resistant clones. In cells exhibiting acquired or intrinsic resistance to cetuximab, Pan-HER treatment decreased all three receptors’ protein levels and down-stream activation of AKT and MAPK. This correlated with decreased cell proliferation in cetuximab-resistant clones. To determine whether Pan-HER had a therapeutic benefit in vivo, we established de novo cetuximab-resistant mouse xenografts and treated resistant tumors with Pan-HER. This regimen resulted in a superior growth delay of cetuximab-resistant xenografts compared to mice continued on cetuximab. Furthermore, intrinsically cetuximab-resistant HNSCC patient-derived xenograft tumors treated with Pan-HER exhibited significant growth delay compared to vehicle/cetuximab controls. These results suggest that targeting HER family receptors simultaneously with Pan-HER is a promising treatment strategy for tumors displaying intrinsic or acquired resistance to cetuximab. PMID:27422810

  18. Exploiting Nanobodies in the Detection and Quantification of Human Growth Hormone via Phage-Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Murad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMonitoring blood levels of human growth hormone (hGH in most children with short stature deficiencies is crucial for taking a decision of treatment with extended course of daily and expensive doses of recombinant hGH (rhGH or Somatropin®. Besides, misusing of rhGH by sportsmen is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency and thus sensitive GH-detecting methods are highly welcome in this field. Nanobodies are the tiniest antigen-binding entity derived from camel heavy chain antibodies. They were successfully generated against numerous antigens including hormones.MethodsA fully nanobody-based sandwich ELISA method was developed in this work for direct measurement of GH in biological samples.ResultsTwo major characteristics of nanobody were exploited for this goal: the robust and stable structure of the nanobody (NbGH04 used to capture hGH from tested samples, and the great ability of tailoring, enabling the display of the anti-GH detector nanobody (NbGH07 on the tip of M13-phage. Such huge, stable, and easy-to-prepare phage-Nb was used in ELISA to provide an amplified signal. Previously, NbGH04 was retrieved on immobilized hGH by phage display from a wide “immune” cDNA library prepared from a hGH-immunized camel. Here, and in order to assure epitope heterogeneity, NbGH07 was isolated from the same library using NbGH04-captured hGH as bait. Interaction of both nanobodies with hGH was characterized and compared with different anti-GH nanobodies and antibodies. The sensitivity (~0.5 ng/ml and stability of the nanobody-base sandwich ELISA were assessed using rhGH before testing in the quantification of hGH in blood sera and cell culture supernatants.ConclusionIn regard to all advantages of nanobodies; stability, solubility, production affordability in Escherichia coli, and gene tailoring, nanobody-based phage sandwich ELISA developed here would provide a valuable method for hGH detection and quantification.

  19. Phage Therapy in the Era of Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, E Magda; Cady, Kyle C; Hubby, Bolyn

    2016-10-03

    For more than a century, bacteriophage (or phage) research has enabled some of the most important discoveries in biological sciences and has equipped scientists with many of the molecular biology tools that have advanced our understanding of replication, maintenance, and expression of genetic material. Phages have also been recognized and exploited as natural antimicrobial agents and nanovectors for gene therapy, but their potential as therapeutics has not been fully exploited in Western medicine because of challenges such as narrow host range, bacterial resistance, and unique pharmacokinetics. However, increasing concern related to the emergence of bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics has heightened interest in phage therapy and the development of strategies to overcome hurdles associated with bacteriophage therapeutics. Recent progress in sequencing technologies, DNA manipulation, and synthetic biology allowed scientists to refactor the entire bacterial genome of Mycoplasma mycoides, thereby creating the first synthetic cell. These new strategies for engineering genomes may have the potential to accelerate the construction of designer phage genomes with superior therapeutic potential. Here, we discuss the use of phage as therapeutics, as well as how synthetic biology can create bacteriophage with desirable attributes. Copyright © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Three Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus Phages

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; O'Connell-Motherway, Mary; Bottacini, Francesca; Cornelissen, Anneleen; Neve, Horst; Heller, Knut J.; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    In this study, three phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, named Ld3, Ld17, and Ld25A, were isolated from whey samples obtained from various industrial fermentations. These phages were further characterized in a multifaceted approach: (i) biological and physical characterization through host range analysis and electron microscopy; (ii) genetic assessment through genome analysis; (iii) mass spectrometry analysis of the structural components of the phages; and (iv), for ...

  1. Superficial Velocity Effects on HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN for Kr/Xe Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, Amy Keil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy Gerry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, Mitchell Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Nearly all previous testing of HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN was conducted at the same flow rate in order to maintain consistency among tests. This testing was sufficient for sorbent capacity determinations, but did not ensure that sorbents were capable of functioning under a range of flow regimes. Tests were conducted on both HZ-PAN and AgZ-PAN at superficial velocities between 20 and 700 cm/min. For HZ-PAN, Kr capacity increased from 60 mmol/kg to 110 mmol/kg as superficial velocity increased from 21 to 679 cm/min. Results for AgZ-PAN were similar, with capacity ranging from 72 to 124 mmol/kg over the same range of superficial. These results are promising for scaling up to process flows, demonstrating flexibility to operate in a broad range of superficial velocities while maintaining sorbent capacity. While preparing for superficial velocity testing it was also discovered that AgZ-PAN Xe capacity, previously observed to diminish over time, could be recovered with increased desorption temperature. Further, a substantial Xe capacity increase was observed. Previous room temperature capacities in the range of 22-25 mmol Xe/kg AgZ-PAN were increased to over 60 mmol Xe/kg AgZ-PAN. While this finding has not yet been fully explored to optimize activation and desorption temperatures, it is encouraging.

  2. Phage therapy in the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endersen, Lorraine; O'Mahony, Jim; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; Coffey, Aidan

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in modern technologies, the food industry is continuously challenged with the threat of microbial contamination. The overuse of antibiotics has further escalated this problem, resulting in the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant foodborne pathogens. Efforts to develop new methods for controlling microbial contamination in food and the food processing environment are extremely important. Accordingly, bacteriophages (phages) and their derivatives have emerged as novel, viable, and safe options for the prevention, treatment, and/or eradication of these contaminants in a range of foods and food processing environments. Whole phages, modified phages, and their derivatives are discussed in terms of current uses and future potential as antimicrobials in the traditional farm-to-fork context, encompassing areas such as primary production, postharvest processing, biosanitation, and biodetection. The review also presents some safety concerns to ensure safe and effective exploitation of bacteriophages in the future.

  3. Next Generation PanDA Pilot for ATLAS and Other Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; De, K; Hover, J; Love, P; Maeno, T; Medrano Llamas, R; Walker, R; Wenaus, T

    2013-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) has been in use in the ATLAS Experiment since 2005. It uses a sophisticated pilot system to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. While originally designed for ATLAS, the PanDA Pilot has recently been refactored to facilitate use outside of ATLAS. Experiments are now handled as plug-ins such that a new PanDA Pilot user only has to implement a set of prototyped methods in the plug-in classes, and provide a script that configures and runs the experiment specific payload. We will give an overview of the Next Generation PanDA Pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including live user payload debugging, data access via the Federated XRootD system, stage-out to alternative storage elements, support for the new ATLAS DDM system (Rucio), and an improved integration with glExec, as well as a description of the experiment specific plug-in classes. The performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, LCG and Nord...

  4. Next Generation PanDA Pilot for ATLAS and Other Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, P; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; De, K; Hover, J; Love, P; Maeno, T; Medrano Llamas, R; Walker, R; Wenaus, T

    2014-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) has been in use in the ATLAS Experiment since 2005. It uses a sophisticated pilot system to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. While originally designed for ATLAS, the PanDA Pilot has recently been refactored to facilitate use outside of ATLAS. Experiments are now handled as plug-ins such that a new PanDA Pilot user only has to implement a set of prototyped methods in the plug-in classes, and provide a script that configures and runs the experiment specific payload. We will give an overview of the Next Generation PanDA Pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including live user payload debugging, data access via the Federated XRootD system, stage-out to alternative storage elements, support for the new ATLAS DDM system (Rucio), and an improved integration with glExec, as well as a description of the experiment specific plug-in classes. The performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, LCG and Nord...

  5. Tales of diversity: Genomic and morphological characteristics of forty-six Arthrobacter phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Klyczek

    Full Text Available The vast bacteriophage population harbors an immense reservoir of genetic information. Almost 2000 phage genomes have been sequenced from phages infecting hosts in the phylum Actinobacteria, and analysis of these genomes reveals substantial diversity, pervasive mosaicism, and novel mechanisms for phage replication and lysogeny. Here, we describe the isolation and genomic characterization of 46 phages from environmental samples at various geographic locations in the U.S. infecting a single Arthrobacter sp. strain. These phages include representatives of all three virion morphologies, and Jasmine is the first sequenced podovirus of an actinobacterial host. The phages also span considerable sequence diversity, and can be grouped into 10 clusters according to their nucleotide diversity, and two singletons each with no close relatives. However, the clusters/singletons appear to be genomically well separated from each other, and relatively few genes are shared between clusters. Genome size varies from among the smallest of siphoviral phages (15,319 bp to over 70 kbp, and G+C contents range from 45-68%, compared to 63.4% for the host genome. Although temperate phages are common among other actinobacterial hosts, these Arthrobacter phages are primarily lytic, and only the singleton Galaxy is likely temperate.

  6. Tales of diversity: Genomic and morphological characteristics of forty-six Arthrobacter phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyczek, Karen K; Bonilla, J Alfred; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Adair, Tamarah L; Afram, Patricia; Allen, Katherine G; Archambault, Megan L; Aziz, Rahat M; Bagnasco, Filippa G; Ball, Sarah L; Barrett, Natalie A; Benjamin, Robert C; Blasi, Christopher J; Borst, Katherine; Braun, Mary A; Broomell, Haley; Brown, Conner B; Brynell, Zachary S; Bue, Ashley B; Burke, Sydney O; Casazza, William; Cautela, Julia A; Chen, Kevin; Chimalakonda, Nitish S; Chudoff, Dylan; Connor, Jade A; Cross, Trevor S; Curtis, Kyra N; Dahlke, Jessica A; Deaton, Bethany M; Degroote, Sarah J; DeNigris, Danielle M; DeRuff, Katherine C; Dolan, Milan; Dunbar, David; Egan, Marisa S; Evans, Daniel R; Fahnestock, Abby K; Farooq, Amal; Finn, Garrett; Fratus, Christopher R; Gaffney, Bobby L; Garlena, Rebecca A; Garrigan, Kelly E; Gibbon, Bryan C; Goedde, Michael A; Guerrero Bustamante, Carlos A; Harrison, Melinda; Hartwell, Megan C; Heckman, Emily L; Huang, Jennifer; Hughes, Lee E; Hyduchak, Kathryn M; Jacob, Aswathi E; Kaku, Machika; Karstens, Allen W; Kenna, Margaret A; Khetarpal, Susheel; King, Rodney A; Kobokovich, Amanda L; Kolev, Hannah; Konde, Sai A; Kriese, Elizabeth; Lamey, Morgan E; Lantz, Carter N; Lapin, Jonathan S; Lawson, Temiloluwa O; Lee, In Young; Lee, Scott M; Lee-Soety, Julia Y; Lehmann, Emily M; London, Shawn C; Lopez, A Javier; Lynch, Kelly C; Mageeney, Catherine M; Martynyuk, Tetyana; Mathew, Kevin J; Mavrich, Travis N; McDaniel, Christopher M; McDonald, Hannah; McManus, C Joel; Medrano, Jessica E; Mele, Francis E; Menninger, Jennifer E; Miller, Sierra N; Minick, Josephine E; Nabua, Courtney T; Napoli, Caroline K; Nkangabwa, Martha; Oates, Elizabeth A; Ott, Cassandra T; Pellerino, Sarah K; Pinamont, William J; Pirnie, Ross T; Pizzorno, Marie C; Plautz, Emilee J; Pope, Welkin H; Pruett, Katelyn M; Rickstrew, Gabbi; Rimple, Patrick A; Rinehart, Claire A; Robinson, Kayla M; Rose, Victoria A; Russell, Daniel A; Schick, Amelia M; Schlossman, Julia; Schneider, Victoria M; Sells, Chloe A; Sieker, Jeremy W; Silva, Morgan P; Silvi, Marissa M; Simon, Stephanie E; Staples, Amanda K; Steed, Isabelle L; Stowe, Emily L; Stueven, Noah A; Swartz, Porter T; Sweet, Emma A; Sweetman, Abigail T; Tender, Corrina; Terry, Katrina; Thomas, Chrystal; Thomas, Daniel S; Thompson, Allison R; Vanderveen, Lorianna; Varma, Rohan; Vaught, Hannah L; Vo, Quynh D; Vonberg, Zachary T; Ware, Vassie C; Warrad, Yasmene M; Wathen, Kaitlyn E; Weinstein, Jonathan L; Wyper, Jacqueline F; Yankauskas, Jakob R; Zhang, Christine; Hatfull, Graham F

    2017-01-01

    The vast bacteriophage population harbors an immense reservoir of genetic information. Almost 2000 phage genomes have been sequenced from phages infecting hosts in the phylum Actinobacteria, and analysis of these genomes reveals substantial diversity, pervasive mosaicism, and novel mechanisms for phage replication and lysogeny. Here, we describe the isolation and genomic characterization of 46 phages from environmental samples at various geographic locations in the U.S. infecting a single Arthrobacter sp. strain. These phages include representatives of all three virion morphologies, and Jasmine is the first sequenced podovirus of an actinobacterial host. The phages also span considerable sequence diversity, and can be grouped into 10 clusters according to their nucleotide diversity, and two singletons each with no close relatives. However, the clusters/singletons appear to be genomically well separated from each other, and relatively few genes are shared between clusters. Genome size varies from among the smallest of siphoviral phages (15,319 bp) to over 70 kbp, and G+C contents range from 45-68%, compared to 63.4% for the host genome. Although temperate phages are common among other actinobacterial hosts, these Arthrobacter phages are primarily lytic, and only the singleton Galaxy is likely temperate.

  7. Effects of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) on vegetation. I. Herbaceous plants PAN injury symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouchi, I.; Iijima, T.; Oodaira, T.

    1975-01-01

    A series of exposure experiments were conducted in a controlled-atmosphere exposure chamber equipped with artificial light apparatus, using PAN synthesized from ultraviolet irradiation of ethyl nitrite vapor in oxygen. Exposures of 6 approx. 16 hours and 10 pphm PAN caused serious damage like caving with glazing or bronzing in caved lesions to the lower surface of younger leaves. Leaves of white-flowered petunia were found to be most sensitive to PAN and were damaged even by a 3 pphm exposure. Microscopic examinations showed that the PAN characteristically caused injuries of spongy cells and that these cells collapsed and turned brown. Leaf injury symptoms on herbaceous plants caused by synthesized PAN in the exposure experiments were found to be quite similar to those seen in the field under high oxidant emergence. Therefore, it seems that the said type of injuries to leaf beet, kidney bean, and head lettuce observed in the field were caused by PAN. 21 references. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Concentration of uranium on TiO-PAN and NaTiO-PAN composite absorbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, Alois; Sebesta, Ferdinand; John, Jan; Spendlikova, Irena; Nemec, Mojmir

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic ion exchangers have been extensively tested for use in separation and concentration of uranium from Surface water. Except for separation of uranium from uranium -Contaminated waste water (e.g. waste water from mining and milling of uranium, Waste from nuclear fuel reprocessing) their main area of application has been foreseen to be their use for extraction of uranium from sea water which could partially cover future needs of uranium. Another perspective area of application is pre-concentration of uranium from natural waters followed by uranium determination via various specialized techniques such as TRLFS or AMS. Possibilities of uranium extraction from sea water have been subject of several international conferences (e.g. Topical meetings on the Recovery of Uranium from Seawater in 1980's, ACS National Meetings 2012 etc.) and are critically evaluated in a review by Bitte or recently by Kim. In the Czech Republic uranium-selective inorganic ion exchangers might be applied for treatment of various wastes from uranium industry, namely underground Water, uranium milling over-balance water, or acid waste water from underground uranium leaching and also like in other countries for determination of uranium isotopic composition focusing on anthropogenic and natural 236 U content. Among the best performing inorganic ion exchangers for the above listed purposes hydrated titanium dioxide (abbreviated as TiO) and sodium titanate (abbreviated as NaTiO) can be listed. Properties of TiO and NaTiO were reviewed by Lehto. From the point of view of ion-exchange, properties of hydrated titanium oxide and sodium titanate are very similar. The main disadvantage of these ion exchangers for industrial-scale application is their insufficient mechanical stability. To improve this property, the sorption materials can be embedded into a binding matrix. Modified polyacrylonitrile (PAN) has been proposed at the Czech Technical University in Prague as a universal binding matrix for

  9. Ciprofloxacin and Trimethoprim Cause Phage Induction and Virulence Modulation in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerke, Christiane; Köller, Johanna; Wolz, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus strains of human origin, phages which integrate into the chromosomal gene coding for β-hemolysin (hlb) are widely distributed. Most of them encode accessory virulence determinants such as staphylokinase (sak) or enterotoxins. Here, we analyzed the effects of ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim on phage induction and expression of phage-encoded virulence factors by using isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis for which the induction of hlb-converting phages was demonstrated in vivo (C. Goerke, S. Matias y Papenberg, S. Dasbach, K. Dietz, R. Ziebach, B. C. Kahl, and C. Wolz, J. Infect. Dis. 189:724-734, 2004) as well as a φ13 lysogen of phage-cured strain 8325-4. Treatment of lysogens with subinhibitory concentrations of either antibiotic resulted in (i) delysogenization of strains resembling the isolates picked up after chronic lung infection and (ii) replication of phages in the bacterial host in a dose-dependent manner. Ciprofloxacin treatment resulted in enhanced recA transcription, indicating involvement of the SOS response in phage mobilization. Induction of φ13 was linked to elevated expression of the phage-encoded virulence gene sak, chiefly due to the activation of latent phage promoters. In summary, we could show the induction of hlb-converting phages and a subsequent virulence modulation of the host bacterium by ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim. PMID:16377683

  10. Microstructural characterization of PAN based carbon fiber reinforced nylon 6 polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirathnamma, L. M.; Ningaraju, S.; Kumar, K. V. Aneesh; Ravikumar, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    Microstructural characterization of nylon 6/polyacrolonitrile based carbon fibers (PAN-CFs) of 10 to 40 wt% has been performed by positron lifetime technique (PLT). The positron lifetime parameters viz., o-Ps lifetime (τ3), o-Ps intensity (I3) and fractional free volume (Fv) of nylon 6/PAN-CF composites are correlated with the mechanical properties viz., Tensile strength and Young's modulus. The Fv show negative deviation with the reinforcement of 10 to 40 wt% of PAN-CF from the linear additivity relation. The negative deviation in nylon 6/PAN-CF composite suggests the induced molecular packing due to the chemical interaction between the polymeric chains of nylon 6 and PAN-CF. This is evident from Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) studies. The FTIR results suggests that observed negative deviation in PALS results of nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to the induced chemical interaction at N-H-O sites. The improved tensile strength (TS) and Young's modulus (YM) in nylon 6/PAN-CF reinforced polymer composites is due to AS4C (surface treated and epoxy coated) PAN-CF has shown highest adhesion level due to better stress transfer between nylon 6 and PAN-CF.

  11. Inhaled phage therapy: a promising and challenging approach to treat bacterial respiratory infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodier-Montagutelli, Elsa; Morello, Eric; L'Hostis, Guillaume; Guillon, Antoine; Dalloneau, Emilie; Respaud, Renaud; Pallaoro, Nikita; Blois, Hélène; Vecellio, Laurent; Gabard, Jérôme; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are increasingly difficult to treat due to evolving antibiotic resistance. In this context, bacteriophages (or phages) are part of the foreseen alternatives or combination therapies. Delivering phages through the airways seems more relevant to accumulate these natural antibacterial viruses in proximity to their bacterial host, within the infectious site. Areas covered: This review addresses the potential of phage therapy to treat RTIs and discusses preclinical and clinical results of phages administration in this context. Recent phage formulation and aerosolization attempts are also reviewed, raising technical challenges to achieve efficient pulmonary deposition via inhalation. Expert opinion: Overall, the inhalation of phages as antibacterial treatment seems both clinically relevant and technically feasible. Several crucial points still need to be investigated, such as phage product pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity. Furthermore, given phage-specific features, appropriate regulatory and manufacturing guidelines will need to be defined. Finally, randomized controlled clinical trials should be carried out to establish phage therapy's clinical positioning in the antimicrobial arsenal against RTIs.

  12. Analysis list: pan [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pan Embryo,Larvae,Pupae + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target.../pan.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/pan.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/dm3/target/pan.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/pan.Embryo.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/pan.Larvae.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/pan.Pupae.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Embryo.gml,http://dbarchive.bioscience

  13. Improvements in data display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    An analog signal processor is described in this patent for connecting a source of analog signals to a cathode ray tube display in order to extend the dynamic range of the display. This has important applications in the field of computerised X-ray tomography since significant medical information, such as tumours in soft tissue, is often represented by minimal level changes in image density. Cathode ray tube displays are limited to approximately 15 intensity levels. Thus if both strong and weak absorption of the X-rays occurs, the dynamic range of the transmitted signals will be too large to permit small variations to be examined directly on a cathode ray display. Present tomographic image reconstruction methods are capable of quantising X-ray absorption density measurements into 256 or more distinct levels and a description is given of the electronics which enables the upper and lower range of intensity levels to be independently set and continuously varied. (UK)

  14. Genomics of phages with therapeutic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zschach, Henrike

    Bacteriophages, viruses that prey on bacteria, have been applied since the 1920’s to treat and prevent bacterial infection. After the discovery of antibiotics, this route was however largely abandoned. Now, with antimicrobial resistance in human-pathogenic bacteria on the rise and a dire need...... for alternatives, phage therapy once again takes center stage. Phage therapy holds the promise of substantial benefits both from the economic as well as the public health perspective but also holds distinct challenges. The aim of this PhD was to address how bioinformatics tools, specifically genomics...... and mathematical modelling, can be applied to move the field towards a future of actual phage therapy in humans. It is composed of three related research projects. The first part of this thesis is an introduction to various topics and methods relevant to the research projects that jointedly make up this Ph...

  15. Identification of the host determinant of two prolate-headed phages infecting lactococcus lactis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Janzen, Thomas; Schnabl, Jannie; Johansen, Eric

    2003-01-01

    A gene responsible for host determination was identified in two prolate-headed bacteriophages of the c2 species infecting strains of Lactococcus lactis. The identification of the host determinant gene was based on low DNA sequence homology in a specific open reading frame (ORF) between prolate-headed phages with different host ranges. When a host carrying this ORF from one phage on a plasmid was infected with another phage, we obtained phages with an altered host range at a frequency of 10 -6 to 10 -7 . Sequencing of phage DNA originating from 10 independent single plaques confirmed that a genetic recombination had taken place at different positions between the ORF on the plasmid and the infecting phage. The adsorption of the recombinant phages to their bacterial hosts had also changed to match the phage origin of the ORF. Consequently, it is concluded that this ORF codes for the host range determinant

  16. Phage therapy against Enterococcus faecalis in dental root canals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leron Khalifa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic resistance is an ever-growing problem faced by all major sectors of health care, including dentistry. Recurrent infections related to multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE in hospitals are untreatable and question the effectiveness of notable drugs. Two major reasons for these recurrent infections are acquired antibiotic resistance genes and biofilm formation. None of the traditionally known effective techniques have been able to efficiently resolve these issues. Hence, development of a highly effective antibacterial practice has become inevitable. One example of a hard-to-eradicate pathogen in dentistry is Enterococcus faecalis, which is one of the most common threats observed in recurrent root canal treatment failures, of which the most problematic to treat are its biofilm-forming VRE strains. An effective response against such infections could be the use of bacteriophages (phages. Phage therapy was found to be highly effective against biofilm and multidrug-resistant bacteria and has other advantages like ease of isolation and possibilities for genetic manipulations. The potential of phage therapy in dentistry, in particular against E. faecalis biofilms in root canals, is almost unexplored. Here we review the efforts to develop phage therapy against biofilms. We also focus on the phages isolated against E. faecalis and discuss the possibility of using phages against E. faecalis biofilm in root canals.

  17. Phage Genetic Engineering Using CRISPR–Cas Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Hatoum-Aslan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Since their discovery over a decade ago, the class of prokaryotic immune systems known as CRISPR–Cas have afforded a suite of genetic tools that have revolutionized research in model organisms spanning all domains of life. CRISPR-mediated tools have also emerged for the natural targets of CRISPR–Cas immunity, the viruses that specifically infect bacteria, or phages. Despite their status as the most abundant biological entities on the planet, the majority of phage genes have unassigned functions. This reality underscores the need for robust genetic tools to study them. Recent reports have demonstrated that CRISPR–Cas systems, specifically the three major types (I, II, and III, can be harnessed to genetically engineer phages that infect diverse hosts. Here, the mechanisms of each of these systems, specific strategies used, and phage editing efficacies will be reviewed. Due to the relatively wide distribution of CRISPR–Cas systems across bacteria and archaea, it is anticipated that these immune systems will provide generally applicable tools that will advance the mechanistic understanding of prokaryotic viruses and accelerate the development of novel technologies based on these ubiquitous organisms.

  18. Recombinant lambda-phage nanobioparticles for tumor therapy in mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Amir; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Gill, Pooria; Hassan, Zuhair; Jahromi, Soodeh Razeghi M; Roohvand, Farzin

    2010-05-12

    Lambda phages have considerable potential as gene delivery vehicles due to their genetic tractability, low cost, safety and physical characteristics in comparison to other nanocarriers and gene porters. Little is known concerning lambda phage-mediated gene transfer and expression in mammalian hosts. We therefore performed experiments to evaluate lambda-ZAP bacteriophage-mediated gene transfer and expression in vitro. For this purpose, we constructed recombinant lambda-phage nanobioparticles containing a mammalian expression cassette encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and E7 gene of human papillomavirus type 16 (lambda-HPV-16 E7) using Lambda ZAP- CMV XR vector. Four cell lines (COS-7, CHO, TC-1 and HEK-239) were transduced with the nanobioparticles. We also characterized the therapeutic anti-tumor effects of the recombinant lambda-HPV-16 E7 phage in C57BL/6 tumor mice model as a cancer vaccine. Obtained results showed that delivery and expression of these genes in fibroblastic cells (COS-7 and CHO) are more efficient than epithelial cells (TC-1 and HEK-239) using these nanobioparticles. Despite the same phage M.O.I entry, the internalizing titers of COS-7 and CHO cells were more than TC-1 and HEK-293 cells, respectively. Mice vaccinated with lambda-HPV-16 E7 are able to generate potent therapeutic antitumor effects against challenge with E7- expressing tumor cell line, TC-1 compared to group treated with the wild phage. The results demonstrated that the recombinant lambda-phages, due to their capabilities in transducing mammalian cells, can also be considered in design and construction of novel and safe phage-based nanomedicines.

  19. Ménage à trois in the human gut: interactions between host, bacteria and phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Mohammadali Khan; Maurice, Corinne F

    2017-07-01

    The human gut is host to one of the densest microbial communities known, the gut microbiota, which contains bacteria, archaea, viruses, fungi and other microbial eukaryotes. Bacteriophages in the gut are largely unexplored, despite their potential to regulate bacterial communities and thus human health. In addition to helping us understand gut homeostasis, applying an ecological perspective to the study of bacterial and phage communities in the gut will help us to understand how this microbial system functions. For example, temporal studies of bacteria, phages and host immune cells in the gut during health and disease could provide key information about disease development and inform therapeutic treatments, whereas understanding the regulation of the replication cycles of phages could help harness the gut microbiota to improve disease outcomes. As the most abundant biological entities in our gut, we must consider bacteriophages in our pursuit of personalized medicine.

  20. Extensive gene content variation in the Brachypodium distachyon pan-genome correlates with population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sean P; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Woods, Daniel P; Des Marais, David L; Burgess, Diane; Shu, Shengqiang; Stritt, Christoph; Roulin, Anne C; Schackwitz, Wendy; Tyler, Ludmila; Martin, Joel; Lipzen, Anna; Dochy, Niklas; Phillips, Jeremy; Barry, Kerrie; Geuten, Koen; Budak, Hikmet; Juenger, Thomas E; Amasino, Richard; Caicedo, Ana L; Goodstein, David; Davidson, Patrick; Mur, Luis A J; Figueroa, Melania; Freeling, Michael; Catalan, Pilar; Vogel, John P

    2017-12-19

    While prokaryotic pan-genomes have been shown to contain many more genes than any individual organism, the prevalence and functional significance of differentially present genes in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Whole-genome de novo assembly and annotation of 54 lines of the grass Brachypodium distachyon yield a pan-genome containing nearly twice the number of genes found in any individual genome. Genes present in all lines are enriched for essential biological functions, while genes present in only some lines are enriched for conditionally beneficial functions (e.g., defense and development), display faster evolutionary rates, lie closer to transposable elements and are less likely to be syntenic with orthologous genes in other grasses. Our data suggest that differentially present genes contribute substantially to phenotypic variation within a eukaryote species, these genes have a major influence in population genetics, and transposable elements play a key role in pan-genome evolution.

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of 44 Arthrobacter Phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyczek, Karen K; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Adair, Tamarah L; Adams, Sandra D; Ball, Sarah L; Benjamin, Robert C; Bonilla, J Alfred; Breitenberger, Caroline A; Daniels, Charles J; Gaffney, Bobby L; Harrison, Melinda; Hughes, Lee E; King, Rodney A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Lopez, A Javier; Monsen-Collar, Kirsten; Pizzorno, Marie C; Rinehart, Claire A; Staples, Amanda K; Stowe, Emily L; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Cresawn, Steven G; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F

    2018-02-01

    We report here the complete genome sequences of 44 phages infecting Arthrobacter sp. strain ATCC 21022. These phages have double-stranded DNA genomes with sizes ranging from 15,680 to 70,707 bp and G+C contents from 45.1% to 68.5%. All three tail types (belonging to the families Siphoviridae , Myoviridae , and Podoviridae ) are represented. Copyright © 2018 Klyczek et al.

  2. Significance of phage-host interactions for biocontrol of Campylobacter jejuni in food

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athina, Zampara; Sørensen, Martine Camilla Holst; Elsser-Gravesen, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Poultry meat is the main source of Campylobacter jejuni foodborne disease. Currently, no effective control measures prevent C. jejuni from contaminating poultry meat. However, post-harvest phage treatment is a promising biocontrol strategy that has not yet been explored. Here we identified phages....... A thorough understanding of phage-host interactions is prerequisite to further advance phage application as a post-harvest biocontrol strategy against C. jejuni....

  3. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy

    OpenAIRE

    Pope, Welkin H.; Bandla, Sharanya; Colbert, Alexandra K.; Eichinger, Fiona G.; Gamburg, Michelle B.; Horiates, Stavroula G.; Jamison, Jerrica M.; Julian, Dana R.; Moore, Whitney A.; Murthy, Pranav; Powell, Meghan C.; Smith, Sydney V.; Mezghani, Nadia; Milliken, Katherine A.; Thompson, Paige K.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy are newly characterized phages of Gordonia terrae, isolated from soil samples in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. These phages have genome lengths between 50,346 and 53,717?bp, and encode on average 84 predicted proteins. All have G+C content of 66.6%.

  4. Effect of Bacteriophages on the Growth of Flavobacterium psychrophilum and Development of Phage-Resistant Strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rói Hammershaimb; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2016-01-01

    The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage concentr......The controlling effect of single and multiple phages on the density of Flavobacterium psychrophilum at different initial multiplicity of infection (MOI) was assessed in batch cultures to explore the potential for phage-based treatment of this important fish pathogen. A high initial phage...... concentration (MOI = 0.3–4) was crucial for efficient viral lysis, resulting in a 104–105-fold reduction of phage-sensitive cells (both single phages and phage cocktails), which was maintained throughout the incubation (>10 days). Following cell lysis, regrowth of phage-resistant strains was examined...... and resistant strains were isolated for further characterization. The application of a mathematical model allowed simulation of phage-host interactions and resistance development, confirming indications from strain isolations that phage-sensitive strains dominated the regrowing population (>99.8 %) at low MOI...

  5. Next generation PanDA pilot for ATLAS and other experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, P; De, K; Megino, F Barreiro; Llamas, R Medrano; Bejar, J Caballero; Hover, J; Maeno, T; Wenaus, T; Love, P; Walker, R

    2014-01-01

    The Production and Distributed Analysis system (PanDA) has been in use in the ATLAS Experiment since 2005. It uses a sophisticated pilot system to execute submitted jobs on the worker nodes. While originally designed for ATLAS, the PanDA Pilot has recently been refactored to facilitate use outside of ATLAS. Experiments are now handled as plug-ins such that a new PanDA Pilot user only has to implement a set of prototyped methods in the plug-in classes, and provide a script that configures and runs the experiment-specific payload. We will give an overview of the Next Generation PanDA Pilot system and will present major features and recent improvements including live user payload debugging, data access via the Federated XRootD system, stage-out to alternative storage elements, support for the new ATLAS DDM system (Rucio), and an improved integration with glExec, as well as a description of the experiment-specific plug-in classes. The performance of the pilot system in processing LHC data on the OSG, LCG and Nordugrid infrastructures used by ATLAS will also be presented. We will describe plans for future development on the time scale of the next few years.

  6. Genetic characterization of ØVC8 lytic phage for Vibrio cholerae O1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Sánchez, Alejandro; Hernández-Chiñas, Ulises; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; De la Mora, Javier; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Eslava-Campos, Carlos

    2016-03-22

    Epidemics and pandemics of cholera, a diarrheal disease, are attributed to Vibrio cholera serogroups O1 and O139. In recent years, specific lytic phages of V. cholera have been proposed to be important factors in the cyclic occurrence of cholera in endemic areas. However, the role and potential participation of lytic phages during long interepidemic periods of cholera in non-endemic regions have not yet been described. The purpose of this study was to isolate and characterize specific lytic phages of V. cholera O1 strains. Sixteen phages were isolated from wastewater samples collected at the Endhó Dam in Hidalgo State, Mexico, concentrated with PEG/NaCl, and purified by density gradient. The lytic activity of the purified phages was tested using different V. cholerae O1 and O139 strains. Phage morphology was visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and phage genome sequencing was performed using the Genome Analyzer IIx System. Genome assembly and bioinformatics analysis were performed using a set of high-throughput programs. Phage structural proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Sixteen phages with lytic and lysogenic activity were isolated; only phage ØVC8 showed specific lytic activity against V. cholerae O1 strains. TEM images of ØVC8 revealed a phage with a short tail and an isometric head. The ØVC8 genome comprises linear double-stranded DNA of 39,422 bp with 50.8 % G + C. Of the 48 annotated ORFs, 16 exhibit homology with sequences of known function and several conserved domains. Bioinformatics analysis showed multiple conserved domains, including an Ig domain, suggesting that ØVC8 might adhere to different mucus substrates such as the human intestinal epithelium. The results suggest that ØVC8 genome utilize the "single-stranded cohesive ends" packaging strategy of the lambda-like group. The two structural proteins sequenced and analyzed are proteins of known function. ØVC8 is a lytic phage with specific activity against V. cholerae

  7. Popping the cork: mechanisms of phage genome ejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molineux, I.J.; Panja, D.

    2013-01-01

    Sixty years after Hershey and Chase showed that nucleic acid is the major component of phage particles that is ejected into cells, we still do not fully understand how the process occurs. Advances in electron microscopy have revealed the structure of the condensed DNA confined in a phage capsid, and

  8. Lytic phages obscure the cost of antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Hall, Alex R

    2015-03-17

    The long-term persistence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria depends on their fitness relative to other genotypes in the absence of drugs. Outside the laboratory, viruses that parasitize bacteria (phages) are ubiquitous, but costs of antibiotic resistance are typically studied in phage-free experimental conditions. We used a mathematical model and experiments with Escherichia coli to show that lytic phages strongly affect the incidence of antibiotic resistance in drug-free conditions. Under phage parasitism, the likelihood that antibiotic-resistant genetic backgrounds spread depends on their initial frequency, mutation rate and intrinsic growth rate relative to drug-susceptible genotypes, because these parameters determine relative rates of phage-resistance evolution on different genetic backgrounds. Moreover, the average cost of antibiotic resistance in terms of intrinsic growth in the antibiotic-free experimental environment was small relative to the benefits of an increased mutation rate in the presence of phages. This is consistent with our theoretical work indicating that, under phage selection, typical costs of antibiotic resistance can be outweighed by realistic increases in mutability if drug resistance and hypermutability are genetically linked, as is frequently observed in clinical isolates. This suggests the long-term distribution of antibiotic resistance depends on the relative rates at which different lineages adapt to other types of selection, which in the case of phage parasitism is probably extremely common, as well as costs of resistance inferred by classical in vitro methods.

  9. HOW TO PAN-SHARPEN IMAGES USING THE GRAM-SCHMIDT PAN-SHARPEN METHOD – A RECIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maurer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its publication in 1998 (Laben and Brower, 2000, the Gram-Schmidt pan-sharpen method has become one of the most popular algorithms to pan-sharpen multispectral (MS imagery. It outperforms most other pan-sharpen methods in both maximizing image sharpness and minimizing color distortion. It is, on the other hand, also more complex and computationally expensive than most other methods, as it requires forward and backward transforming the entire image. Another complication is the lack of a clear recipe of how to compute the sensor dependent MS to Pan weights that are needed to compute the simulated low resolution pan band. Estimating them from the sensor’s spectral sensitivity curves (in different ways, or using linear regression or least square methods are typical candidates which can include other degrees of freedom such as adding a constant offset or not. As a result, most companies and data providers do it somewhat differently. Here we present a solution to both problems. The transform coefficients can be computed directly and in advance from the MS covariance matrix and the MS to Pan weights. Once the MS covariance matrix is computed and stored with the image statistics, any small section of the image can be pan-sharpened on the fly, without having to compute anything else over the entire image. Similarly, optimal MS to Pan weights can be computed directly from the full MS-Pan covariance matrix, guaranteeing optimal image quality and consistency.

  10. Phage typing or CRISPR typing for epidemiological surveillance of Salmonella Typhimurium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Manal

    2017-11-07

    Salmonella Typhimurium is the most dominant Salmonella serovar around the world. It is associated with foodborne gastroenteritis outbreaks but has recently been associated with invasive illness and deaths. Characterization of S. Typhimurium is therefore very crucial for epidemiological surveillance. Phage typing has been used for decades for subtyping of S. Typhimurium to determine the epidemiological relation among isolates. Recent studies however have suggested that high throughput clustered regular interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) typing has the potential to replace phage typing. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of high-throughput CRISPR typing over conventional phage typing in epidemiological surveillance and outbreak investigation of S. Typhimurium. In silico analysis of whole genome sequences (WGS) of well-documented phage types of S. Typhimurium reveals the presence of different CRISPR type among strains belong to the same phage type. Furthermore, different phage types of S. Typhimurium share identical CRISPR type. Interestingly, identical spacers were detected among outbreak and non-outbreak associated DT8 strains of S. Typhimurium. Therefore, CRISPR typing is not useful for the epidemiological surveillance and outbreak investigation of S. Typhimurium and phage typing, until it is replaced by WGS, is still the gold standard method for epidemiological surveillance of S. Typhimurium.

  11. A fast method for large-scale isolation of phages from hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This plaque-forming method could be adopted to isolate E. coli phage easily, rapidly and in large quantities. Among the 18 isolated E. coli phages, 10 of them had a broad host range in E. coli and warrant further study. Key words: Escherichia coli phages, large-scale isolation, drug resistance, biological properties.

  12. PD2P: PanDA Dynamic Data Placement for ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, T; Panitkin, S; De, K

    2012-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system plays a key role in the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. PanDA is the ATLAS workload management system for processing all Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation and data reprocessing jobs in addition to user and group analysis jobs. The PanDA Dynamic Data Placement (PD2P) system has been developed to cope with difficulties of data placement for ATLAS. We will describe the design of the new system, its performance during the past year of data taking, dramatic improvements it has brought about in the efficient use of storage and processing resources, and plans for the future.

  13. O pan das ánimas

    OpenAIRE

    Antón, Fina; Mandianes Castro, Manuel

    1996-01-01

    O pan, ademais de cumprir una función alimenticia de primeira orde, está revestido dunha significación simbólica importante. O pan durante a vida axuda a pasa-los límites, a da-lo paso, a integrarse entre os cristiáns por cousa do bautismo e a integrarse no grupo dos homes e mulleres co adaxo da boda, pero o pan axuda, sobre todo, a pasa-lo río Xordán, que é, sen dúbida o límite que separa este mundo do outro; a serpe e as ánimas constitúen un límite e o pan facilita o seu paso. O pan está in...

  14. Characterizing RecA-independent induction of Shiga toxin2-encoding phages by EDTA treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejla Imamovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bacteriophage life cycle has an important role in Shiga toxin (Stx expression. The induction of Shiga toxin-encoding phages (Stx phages increases toxin production as a result of replication of the phage genome, and phage lysis of the host cell also provides a means of Stx toxin to exit the cell. Previous studies suggested that prophage induction might also occur in the absence of SOS response, independently of RecA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The influence of EDTA on RecA-independent Stx2 phage induction was assessed, in laboratory lysogens and in EHEC strains carrying Stx2 phages in their genome, by Real-Time PCR. RecA-independent mechanisms described for phage λ induction (RcsA and DsrA were not involved in Stx2 phage induction. In addition, mutations in the pathway for the stress response of the bacterial envelope to EDTA did not contribute to Stx2 phage induction. The effect of EDTA on Stx phage induction is due to its chelating properties, which was also confirmed by the use of citrate, another chelating agent. Our results indicate that EDTA affects Stx2 phage induction by disruption of the bacterial outer membrane due to chelation of Mg(2+. In all the conditions evaluated, the pH value had a decisive role in Stx2 phage induction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chelating agents, such as EDTA and citrate, induce Stx phages, which raises concerns due to their frequent use in food and pharmaceutical products. This study contributes to our understanding of the phenomenon of induction and release of Stx phages as an important factor in the pathogenicity of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains.

  15. Prevalence, Host Range, and Comparative Genomic Analysis of Temperate Ochrobactrum Phages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Jäckel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ochrobactrum and Brucella are closely related bacteria that populate different habitats and differ in their pathogenic properties. Only little is known about mobile genetic elements in these genera which might be important for survival and virulence. Previous studies on Brucella lysogeny indicated that active phages are rare in this genus. To gain insight into the presence and nature of prophages in Ochrobactrum, temperate phages were isolated from various species and characterized in detail. In silico analyses disclosed numerous prophages in published Ochrobactrum genomes. Induction experiments showed that Ochrobactrum prophages can be induced by various stress factors and that some strains released phage particles even under non-induced conditions. Sixty percent of lysates prepared from 125 strains revealed lytic activity. The host range and DNA similarities of 19 phages belonging to the families Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, or Podoviridae were determined suggesting that they are highly diverse. Some phages showed relationship to the temperate Brucella inopinata phage BiPB01. The genomic sequences of the myovirus POA1180 (41,655 bp and podovirus POI1126 (60,065 bp were analyzed. Phage POA1180 is very similar to a prophage recently identified in a Brucella strain isolated from an exotic frog. The POA1180 genome contains genes which may confer resistance to chromate and the ability to take up sulfate. Phage POI1126 is related to podoviruses of Sinorhizobium meliloti (PCB5, Erwinia pyrifoliae (Pep14, and Burkholderia cenocepacia (BcepIL02 and almost identical to an unnamed plasmid of the Ochrobactrum intermedium strain LMG 3301. Further experiments revealed that the POI1126 prophage indeed replicates as an extrachromosomal element. The data demonstrate for the first time that active prophages are common in Ochrobactrum and suggest that atypical brucellae also may be a reservoir for temperate phages.

  16. Stochasticity in the Expression of LamB and its Affect on λ phage Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Emily; Wu, Xiao-Lun

    2006-03-01

    λ phage binds to E. Coli's lamB protein and injects its DNA into the cell. The phage quickly replicates and after a latent period the bacteria bursts, emitting mature phages. We developed a mathematical model based on the known physical events that occur when a λ phage infects an E.Coli cell. The results of these models predict that the bacteria and phage populations become extinct unless the parameters of the model are very finely tuned, which is untrue in the nature. The lamB protein is part of the maltose regulon and can be repressed to minimal levels when grown in the absence of inducer. Therefore, a cell that is not expressing any lamB protein at that moment is resistant against phage infection. We studied the dynamic relationship between λ phage and E. Coli when the concentration of phage greatly outnumbers the concentration of bacteria. We study how the stochasticity of the expression of lamB affects the percentage of cells that the λ phage infects. We show that even in the case when the maltose regulon is fully induced a percentage of cells continue to persist against phage infection.

  17. Primary Isolation Strain Determines Both Phage Type and Receptors Recognised by Campylobacter jejuni Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Martine C. Holst; Gencay, Yilmaz Emre; Birk, Tina

    2015-01-01

    were identified based on host range analysis and genome restriction profiles. Most phages were isolated using C. jejuni strains NCTC12662 and RM1221 and interestingly phage genome size (140 kb vs. 190 kb), host range and morphological appearance correlated with the isolation strain. Thus, according......In this study we isolated novel bacteriophages, infecting the zoonotic bacterium Campylobacter jejuni. These phages may be used in phage therapy of C. jejuni colonized poultry to prevent spreading of the bacteria to meat products causing disease in humans. Many C. jejuni phages have been isolated...... therefore chose seven C. jejuni strains each expressing different CPS structures as indicator strains in a large screening for phages in samples collected from free-range poultry farms. Forty-three phages were isolated using C. jejuni NCTC12658, NCTC12662 and RM1221 as host strains and 20 distinct phages...

  18. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Nancy L; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) model provides a high-impact research experience to first-year students but is usually available to a limited number of students, and its implementation is costly in faculty time and laboratory space. To offer a research experience to all students taking introductory biology at Gonzaga University (n = 350/yr), we modified the traditional two-semester SEA-PHAGES course by streamlining the first-semester Phage Discovery lab and integrating the second SEA-PHAGES semester into other courses in the biology curriculum. Because most students in the introductory course are not biology majors, the Phage Discovery semester may be their only encounter with research. To discover whether students benefit from the first semester alone, we assessed the effects of the one-semester Phage Discovery course on students' understanding of course content. Specifically, students showed improvement in knowledge of bacteriophages, lab math skills, and understanding experimental design and interpretation. They also reported learning gains and benefits comparable with other course-based research experiences. Responses to open-ended questions suggest that students experienced this course as a true undergraduate research experience. © 2016 N. L. Staub et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  19. Genome Sequences of Gordonia Phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bandla, Sharanya; Colbert, Alexandra K; Eichinger, Fiona G; Gamburg, Michelle B; Horiates, Stavroula G; Jamison, Jerrica M; Julian, Dana R; Moore, Whitney A; Murthy, Pranav; Powell, Meghan C; Smith, Sydney V; Mezghani, Nadia; Milliken, Katherine A; Thompson, Paige K; Toner, Chelsea L; Ulbrich, Megan C; Furbee, Emily C; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Montgomery, Matthew T; Garlena, Rebecca A; Russell, Daniel A; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Hatfull, Graham F

    2016-08-11

    Gordonia phages BaxterFox, Kita, Nymphadora, and Yeezy are newly characterized phages of Gordonia terrae, isolated from soil samples in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. These phages have genome lengths between 50,346 and 53,717 bp, and encode on average 84 predicted proteins. All have G+C content of 66.6%. Copyright © 2016 Pope et al.

  20. Lambda-Display: A Powerful Tool for Antigen Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Gargano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since its introduction in 1985, phage display technology has been successfully used in projects aimed at deciphering biological processes and isolating molecules of practical value in several applications. Bacteriophage lambda, representing a classical molecular cloning and expression system has also been exploited for generating large combinatorial libraries of small peptides and protein domains exposed on its capsid. More recently, lambda display has been consistently and successfully employed for domain mapping, antigen discovery and protein interaction studies or, more generally, in functional genomics. We show here the results obtained by the use of large libraries of cDNA and genomic DNA for the molecular dissection of the human B-cell response against complex pathogens, including protozoan parasites, bacteria and viruses. Moreover, by reviewing the experimental work performed in recent investigations we illustrate the potential of lambda display in the diagnostics field and for identifying antigens useful as targets for vaccine development.

  1. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahony, Jennifer; Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen; Sinderen, Douwe van

    2012-01-01

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  2. Phages of lactic acid bacteria: The role of genetics in understanding phage-host interactions and their co-evolutionary processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahony, Jennifer, E-mail: j.mahony@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Ainsworth, Stuart; Stockdale, Stephen [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Sinderen, Douwe van, E-mail: d.vansinderen@ucc.ie [Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland); Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Western Road, Cork (Ireland)

    2012-12-20

    Dairy fermentations are among the oldest food processing applications, aimed at preservation and shelf-life extension through the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures, in particular strains of Lactococcus lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus, Lactobacillus spp. and Leuconostoc spp. Traditionally this was performed by continuous passaging of undefined cultures from a finished fermentation to initiate the next fermentation. More recently, consumer demands on consistent and desired flavours and textures of dairy products have led to a more defined approach to such processes. Dairy (starter) companies have responded to the need to define the nature and complexity of the starter culture mixes, and dairy fermentations are now frequently based on defined starter cultures of low complexity, where each starter component imparts specific technological properties that are desirable to the product. Both mixed and defined starter culture approaches create the perfect environment for the proliferation of (bacterio)phages capable of infecting these LAB. The repeated use of the same starter cultures in a single plant, coupled to the drive towards higher and consistent production levels, increases the risk and negative impact of phage infection. In this review we will discuss recent advances in tracking the adaptation of phages to the dairy industry, the advances in understanding LAB phage-host interactions, including evolutionary and genomic aspects.

  3. Investigation of the protective effect of whey proteins on lactococcal phages during heat treatment at various pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geagea, Hany; Gomaa, Ahmed I; Remondetto, Gabriel; Moineau, Sylvain; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-10-01

    The incorporation of whey protein concentrates (WPC) into cheese is a risky process due to the potential contamination with thermo-resistant phages of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Furthermore, whey proteins can protect phages during heat treatment, thereby increasing the above risk. The main objective of this work was to understand this protective effect in order to better control LAB phages and maximize whey recycling in the cheese industry. First, the inactivation of a previously characterized thermo-resistant lactococcal virulent phage (P1532) was investigated at 95 °C in WPC, in individual whey components β-lactoglobulin, α-lactalbumin, and bovine serum albumin as well as under different heat and pH conditions. The structural changes of the tested proteins were also monitored by transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Phage inactivation results indicated that the protective effect of whey proteins was pH and time dependent at 95 °C and was not restricted to one component. FTIR spectra suggest that the protection is related to protein molecular structures and to the level of protein aggregates, which was more pronounced in acidic conditions. Moreover, the molecular structure of the three proteins tested was differently influenced by pH and the duration of the heat treatment. This work confirms the protective effect of WPC on phages during heat treatment and offers the first hint to explain such phenomenon. Finding the appropriate treatment of WPC to reduce the phage risk is one of the keys to improving the cheese manufacturing process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genomic analysis of WCP30 Phage of Weissella cibaria for Dairy Fermented Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Duck; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report the morphogenetic analysis and genome sequence of a new WCP30 phage of Weissella cibaria , isolated from a fermented food. Based on its morphology, as observed by transmission electron microscopy, WCP30 phage belongs to the family Siphoviridae . Genomic analysis of WCP30 phage showed that it had a 33,697-bp double-stranded DNA genome with 41.2% G+C content. Bioinformatics analysis of the genome revealed 35 open reading frames. A BLASTN search showed that WCP30 phage had low sequence similarity compared to other phages infecting lactic acid bacteria. This is the first report of the morphological features and complete genome sequence of WCP30 phage, which may be useful for controlling the fermentation of dairy foods.

  5. Oral T4-like phage cocktail application to healthy adult volunteers from Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; McCallin, Shawna; Barretto, Caroline; Berger, Bernard; Pittet, Anne-Cécile; Sultana, Shamima; Krause, Lutz; Huq, Sayeda; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Bruttin, Anne; Reuteler, Gloria; Brüssow, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The genomic diversity of 99 T4-like coliphages was investigated by sequencing an equimolar mixture with Illumina technology and screening them against different databases for horizontal gene transfer and undesired genes. A 9-phage cocktail was given to 15 healthy adults from Bangladesh at a dose of 3×10 9 and 3×10 7 plaque-forming units and placebo respectively. Phages were detected in 64% of the stool samples when subjects were treated with higher titer phage, compared to 30% and 28% with lower-titer phage and placebo, respectively. No Escherichia coli was present in initial stool samples, and no amplification of phage was observed. One percent of the administered oral phage was recovered from the feces. No adverse events were observed by self-report, clinical examination, or from laboratory tests for liver, kidney, and hematology function. No impact of oral phage was seen on the fecal microbiota composition with respect to bacterial 16S rRNA from stool.

  6. Oral T4-like phage cocktail application to healthy adult volunteers from Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam, E-mail: sasarker@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); McCallin, Shawna; Barretto, Caroline [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Berger, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.berger@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Pittet, Anne-Cecile [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Sultana, Shamima, E-mail: shamima@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Krause, Lutz, E-mail: ltz.krause@gmail.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Huq, Sayeda, E-mail: sayeeda@mail.icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Bibiloni, Rodrigo, E-mail: Rodrigo.Bibiloni@agresearch.co.nz [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruttin, Anne, E-mail: anne.bruttin@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Reuteler, Gloria, E-mail: gloria.reuteler@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bruessow, Harald, E-mail: harald.bruessow@rdls.nestle.com [Nestle Research Centre, Nestec Ltd., Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2012-12-20

    The genomic diversity of 99 T4-like coliphages was investigated by sequencing an equimolar mixture with Illumina technology and screening them against different databases for horizontal gene transfer and undesired genes. A 9-phage cocktail was given to 15 healthy adults from Bangladesh at a dose of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} plaque-forming units and placebo respectively. Phages were detected in 64% of the stool samples when subjects were treated with higher titer phage, compared to 30% and 28% with lower-titer phage and placebo, respectively. No Escherichia coli was present in initial stool samples, and no amplification of phage was observed. One percent of the administered oral phage was recovered from the feces. No adverse events were observed by self-report, clinical examination, or from laboratory tests for liver, kidney, and hematology function. No impact of oral phage was seen on the fecal microbiota composition with respect to bacterial 16S rRNA from stool.

  7. Phage morphology recapitulates phylogeny: the comparative genomics of a new group of myoviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André M Comeau

    Full Text Available Among dsDNA tailed bacteriophages (Caudovirales, members of the Myoviridae family have the most sophisticated virion design that includes a complex contractile tail structure. The Myoviridae generally have larger genomes than the other phage families. Relatively few "dwarf" myoviruses, those with a genome size of less than 50 kb such as those of the Mu group, have been analyzed in extenso. Here we report on the genome sequencing and morphological characterization of a new group of such phages that infect a diverse range of Proteobacteria, namely Aeromonas salmonicida phage 56, Vibrio cholerae phages 138 and CP-T1, Bdellovibrio phage φ1422, and Pectobacterium carotovorum phage ZF40. This group of dwarf myoviruses shares an identical virion morphology, characterized by usually short contractile tails, and have genome sizes of approximately 45 kb. Although their genome sequences are variable in their lysogeny, replication, and host adaption modules, presumably reflecting differing lifestyles and hosts, their structural and morphogenesis modules have been evolutionarily constrained by their virion morphology. Comparative genomic analysis reveals that these phages, along with related prophage genomes, form a new coherent group within the Myoviridae. The results presented in this communication support the hypothesis that the diversity of phages may be more structured than generally believed and that the innumerable phages in the biosphere all belong to discrete lineages or families.

  8. The genome of the Erwinia amylovora phage PhiEaH1 reveals greater diversity and broadens the applicability of phages for the treatment of fire blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meczker, Katalin; Dömötör, Dóra; Vass, János; Rákhely, Gábor; Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    The enterobacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight. This study presents the analysis of the complete genome of phage PhiEaH1, isolated from the soil surrounding an E. amylovora-infected apple tree in Hungary. Its genome is 218 kb in size, containing 244 ORFs. PhiEaH1 is the second E. amylovora infecting phage from the Siphoviridae family whose complete genome sequence was determined. Beside PhiEaH2, PhiEaH1 is the other active component of Erwiphage, the first bacteriophage-based pesticide on the market against E. amylovora. Comparative genome analysis in this study has revealed that PhiEaH1 not only differs from the 10 formerly sequenced E. amylovora bacteriophages belonging to other phage families, but also from PhiEaH2. Sequencing of more Siphoviridae phage genomes might reveal further diversity, providing opportunities for the development of even more effective biological control agents, phage cocktails against Erwinia fire blight disease of commercial fruit crops.

  9. Characterization of novel virulent broad-host-range phages of Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Stephen J; Das, Mayukh; Bhowmick, Tushar Suvra; Young, Ry; Gonzalez, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    The xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the causal agent of several plant diseases, most notably Pierce's disease of grape and citrus variegated chlorosis. We report the isolation and characterization of the first virulent phages for X. fastidiosa, siphophages Sano and Salvo and podophages Prado and Paz, with a host range that includes Xanthomonas spp. Phages propagated on homologous hosts had observed adsorption rate constants of ~4 × 10(-12) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for X. fastidiosa strain Temecula 1 and ~5 × 10(-10) to 7 × 10(-10) ml cell(-1) min(-1) for Xanthomonas strain EC-12. Sano and Salvo exhibit >80% nucleotide identity to each other in aligned regions and are syntenic to phage BcepNazgul. We propose that phage BcepNazgul is the founding member of a novel phage type, to which Sano and Salvo belong. The lysis genes of the Nazgul-like phage type include a gene that encodes an outer membrane lipoprotein endolysin and also spanin gene families that provide insight into the evolution of the lysis pathway for phages of Gram-negative hosts. Prado and Paz, although exhibiting no significant DNA homology to each other, are new members of the phiKMV-like phage type, based on the position of the single-subunit RNA polymerase gene. The four phages are type IV pilus dependent for infection of both X. fastidiosa and Xanthomonas. The phages may be useful as agents for an effective and environmentally responsible strategy for the control of diseases caused by X. fastidiosa.

  10. Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devoret, R.; Blanco, M.; George, J.; Radman, M.

    1975-01-01

    Recovery of phage lambda from ultraviolet damage can occur, in the dark, through three types of repair processes as defined by microbiological tests: host-cell reactivation, prophage reactivation, and uv reactivation. This paper reviews the properties of the three repair processes, analyzes their dependence on the functioning of bacterial and phage genes, and discusses their relationship. Progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the three repair processes has been relatively slow, particularly for uv reactivation. It has been shown that host-cell reactivation is due to pyrimidine dimer excision and that prophage reactivation is due to genetic recombination (prereplicative). We provide evidence showing that neither of these mechanisms accounts for uv reactivation of phage lambda. Furthermore, uv reactivation differs from the other repair processes in that it is inducible and error-prone. Whether uv-damaged bacterial DNA is subject to a similar repair process is still an open question

  11. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  12. A spatial neural fuzzy network for estimating pan evaporation at ungauged sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Chung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporation is an essential reference to the management of water resources. In this study, a hybrid model that integrates a spatial neural fuzzy network with the kringing method is developed to estimate pan evaporation at ungauged sites. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS can extract the nonlinear relationship of observations, while kriging is an excellent geostatistical interpolator. Three-year daily data collected from nineteen meteorological stations covering the whole of Taiwan are used to train and test the constructed model. The pan evaporation (Epan at ungauged sites can be obtained through summing up the outputs of the spatially weighted ANFIS and the residuals adjusted by kriging. Results indicate that the proposed AK model (hybriding ANFIS and kriging can effectively improve the accuracy of Epan estimation as compared with that of empirical formula. This hybrid model demonstrates its reliability in estimating the spatial distribution of Epan and consequently provides precise Epan estimation by taking geographical features into consideration.

  13. Metagenomic recovery of phage genomes of uncultured freshwater actinobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Rohit; Mehrshad, Maliheh; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Low-GC Actinobacteria are among the most abundant and widespread microbes in freshwaters and have largely resisted all cultivation efforts. Consequently, their phages have remained totally unknown. In this work, we have used deep metagenomic sequencing to assemble eight complete genomes of the first tailed phages that infect freshwater Actinobacteria. Their genomes encode the actinobacterial-specific transcription factor whiB, frequently found in mycobacteriophages and also in phages infecting marine pelagic Actinobacteria. Its presence suggests a common and widespread strategy of modulation of host transcriptional machinery upon infection via this transcriptional switch. We present evidence that some whiB-carrying phages infect the acI lineage of Actinobacteria. At least one of them encodes the ADP-ribosylating component of the widespread bacterial AB toxins family (for example, clostridial toxin). We posit that the presence of this toxin reflects a 'trojan horse' strategy, providing protection at the population level to the abundant host microbes against eukaryotic predators.

  14. A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan J O'Hara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae-specific bacteriophages are common features of the microbial community during cholera infection in humans. Phages impose strong selective pressure that favors the expansion of phage-resistant strains over their vulnerable counterparts. The mechanisms allowing virulent V. cholerae strains to defend against the ubiquitous threat of predatory phages have not been established. Here, we show that V. cholerae PLEs (phage-inducible chromosomal island-like elements are widespread genomic islands dedicated to phage defense. Analysis of V. cholerae isolates spanning a 60-year collection period identified five unique PLEs. Remarkably, we found that all PLEs (regardless of geographic or temporal origin respond to infection by a myovirus called ICP1, the most prominent V. cholerae phage found in cholera patient stool samples from Bangladesh. We found that PLE activity reduces phage genome replication and accelerates cell lysis following ICP1 infection, killing infected host cells and preventing the production of progeny phage. PLEs are mobilized by ICP1 infection and can spread to neighboring cells such that protection from phage predation can be horizontally acquired. Our results reveal that PLEs are a persistent feature of the V. cholerae mobilome that are adapted to providing protection from a single predatory phage and advance our understanding of how phages influence pathogen evolution.

  15. A highly specific phage defense system is a conserved feature of the Vibrio cholerae mobilome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Brendan J; Barth, Zachary K; McKitterick, Amelia C; Seed, Kimberley D

    2017-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae-specific bacteriophages are common features of the microbial community during cholera infection in humans. Phages impose strong selective pressure that favors the expansion of phage-resistant strains over their vulnerable counterparts. The mechanisms allowing virulent V. cholerae strains to defend against the ubiquitous threat of predatory phages have not been established. Here, we show that V. cholerae PLEs (phage-inducible chromosomal island-like elements) are widespread genomic islands dedicated to phage defense. Analysis of V. cholerae isolates spanning a 60-year collection period identified five unique PLEs. Remarkably, we found that all PLEs (regardless of geographic or temporal origin) respond to infection by a myovirus called ICP1, the most prominent V. cholerae phage found in cholera patient stool samples from Bangladesh. We found that PLE activity reduces phage genome replication and accelerates cell lysis following ICP1 infection, killing infected host cells and preventing the production of progeny phage. PLEs are mobilized by ICP1 infection and can spread to neighboring cells such that protection from phage predation can be horizontally acquired. Our results reveal that PLEs are a persistent feature of the V. cholerae mobilome that are adapted to providing protection from a single predatory phage and advance our understanding of how phages influence pathogen evolution.

  16. Analysis of whole genome sequencing for the Escherichia coli O157:H7 typing phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Lauren A; Beckett, Stephen J; Chase-Topping, Margo; Perry, Neil; Dallman, Tim J; Gally, David L; Jenkins, Claire

    2015-04-08

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157 can cause severe bloody diarrhea and haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Phage typing of E. coli O157 facilitates public health surveillance and outbreak investigations, certain phage types are more likely to occupy specific niches and are associated with specific age groups and disease severity. The aim of this study was to analyse the genome sequences of 16 (fourteen T4 and two T7) E. coli O157 typing phages and to determine the genes responsible for the subtle differences in phage type profiles. The typing phages were sequenced using paired-end Illumina sequencing at The Genome Analysis Centre and the Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency and bioinformatics programs including Velvet, Brig and Easyfig were used to analyse them. A two-way Euclidian cluster analysis highlighted the associations between groups of phage types and typing phages. The analysis showed that the T7 typing phages (9 and 10) differed by only three genes and that the T4 typing phages formed three distinct groups of similar genomic sequences: Group 1 (1, 8, 11, 12 and 15, 16), Group 2 (3, 6, 7 and 13) and Group 3 (2, 4, 5 and 14). The E. coli O157 phage typing scheme exhibited a significantly modular network linked to the genetic similarity of each group showing that these groups are specialised to infect a subset of phage types. Sequencing the typing phage has enabled us to identify the variable genes within each group and to determine how this corresponds to changes in phage type.

  17. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  18. Tactile display landing safety and precision improvements for the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, John M.

    A tactile display belt using 24 electro-mechanical tactile transducers (tactors) was used to determine if a modified tactile display system, known as the Tactile Situation Awareness System (TSAS) improved the safety and precision of a complex spacecraft (i.e. the Space Shuttle Orbiter) in guided precision approaches and landings. The goal was to determine if tactile cues enhance safety and mission performance through reduced workload, increased situational awareness (SA), and an improved operational capability by increasing secondary cognitive workload capacity and human-machine interface efficiency and effectiveness. Using both qualitative and quantitative measures such as NASA's Justiz Numerical Measure and Synwork1 scores, an Overall Workload (OW) measure, the Cooper-Harper rating scale, and the China Lake Situational Awareness scale, plus Pre- and Post-Flight Surveys, the data show that tactile displays decrease OW, improve SA, counteract fatigue, and provide superior warning and monitoring capacity for dynamic, off-nominal, high concurrent workload scenarios involving complex, cognitive, and multi-sensory critical scenarios. Use of TSAS for maintaining guided precision approaches and landings was generally intuitive, reduced training times, and improved task learning effects. Ultimately, the use of a homogeneous, experienced, and statistically robust population of test pilots demonstrated that the use of tactile displays for Space Shuttle approaches and landings with degraded vehicle systems, weather, and environmental conditions produced substantial improvements in safety, consistency, reliability, and ease of operations under demanding conditions. Recommendations for further analysis and study are provided in order to leverage the results from this research and further explore the potential to reduce the risk of spaceflight and aerospace operations in general.

  19. Treatment of in vitro enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli infection using phage and probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, C; Bolla, P A; de Urraza, P J

    2016-07-01

    To assay the combination of phage and probiotics against EHEC in vitro on infected Hep-2 cells. Phage and probiotics treatments on EHEC O157:H7-infected Hep-2 cells were assayed individually or combined. The effect of freeze-drying on phage and probiotic antimicrobial activity was also studied. While treatment with phage alone increased cell detachment caused by EHEC infection, the treatments with MM alone or in combination with phage proved to effectively diminish cell damage caused by EHEC infection. Combined treatment showed a decrease in apoptotic cell count of 57·3% and a reduction in EHEC adhesion to cell monolayer of 1·2 log CFU. The simultaneous use of phage and probiotics showed no antagonistic effect, and freeze-drying did not affect their antipathogenic activity. The combination of phage and probiotics has great potential for reducing the number of pathogens adhered to epithelial cells during EHEC O157:H7 infection and attenuating the cytotoxic effect derived from it. Further in vivo assays are needed for assessing the actual effectiveness of the treatment. This study presents a freeze-dried formulation of phage and probiotics capable of controlling EHEC infections and reducing epithelial cell damage in vitro. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Novel Variants of Streptococcus thermophilus Bacteriophages Are Indicative of Genetic Recombination among Phages from Different Bacterial Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Paula; Janzen, Thomas; Neves, Ana Rute

    2017-01-01

    lactis P335 phages. Phage CHPC1151 was closely related to the atypical S. thermophilus phage 5093, homologous with a nondairy streptococcal prophage. By testing adsorption of the related streptococcal and lactococcal phages to the surface of S. thermophilus and L. lactis strains, we revealed....... thermophilus phages from the Chr. Hansen A/S collection, using PCR specific for the cos- or pac-type phages, as well as for the V2 antireceptor region. Three phages did not produce positive results with the assays. Analysis of phage morphologies indicated that two of these phages, CHPC577 and CHPC926, had...... the possibility of cross-interactions. Our data indicated that the use of S. thermophilus together with L. lactis, extensively applied for dairy fermentations, triggered the recombination between phages infecting different bacterial species. A notable diversity among S. thermophilus phage populations requires...

  1. Effect of Electrostatic Tactile Feedback on Accuracy and Efficiency of Pan Gestures on Touch Screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohong; Sun, Xiaoying; Wang, Dangxiao; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Yuru

    2018-01-01

    Recently, many studies examined electrostatic tactile feedback on touch screens to enrich interaction experience. However, it is unclear as to whether added tactile feedback during a sliding process increases the accuracy of pan gestures with velocity constraints. In this study, a custom-designed electrostatic tactile display was considered. Initially, the accuracy and efficiency of pan gestures were compared under two conditions, namely with and without electrostatic tactile feedback. This was followed by exploring the evolution of completion time (CT) with different indices of difficulties (ID). Experimental results with 12 participants indicated that the accuracy and completion time of pan gestures with added tactile feedback significantly exceeded those without tactile feedback. Furthermore, the relationship between CT and ID satisfied Fitts' Law with a correlation coefficient exceeding 0.9. Based on the findings, a "Tactile Fruit Sorting" game was designed, and subjective and objective evaluations were conducted. The results confirmed that the added tactile feedback enhanced both user performance and interest with respect to the game.

  2. Surface Modification of Electrospun PVDF/PAN Nanofibrous Layers by Low Vacuum Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Yalcinkaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofibres are very promising for water remediation due to their high porosity and small pore size. Mechanical properties of nanofibres restrict the application of pressure needed water treatments. Various PAN, PVDF, and PVDF/PAN nanofibre layers were produced, and mechanical properties were improved via a lamination process. Low vacuum plasma treatment was applied for the surface modification of nanofibres. Atmospheric air was used to improve hydrophilicity while sulphur hexafluoride gas was used to improve hydrophobicity of membranes. Hydrophilic membranes showed higher affinity to attach plasma particles compared to hydrophobic membranes.

  3. The future of PanDA in ATLAS distributed computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Nilsson, P.; Oleynik, D.; Panitkin, S.; Petrosyan, A.; Schovancova, J.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.

    2015-12-01

    Experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) face unprecedented computing challenges. Heterogeneous resources are distributed worldwide at hundreds of sites, thousands of physicists analyse the data remotely, the volume of processed data is beyond the exabyte scale, while data processing requires more than a few billion hours of computing usage per year. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed to meet the scale and complexity of LHC distributed computing for the ATLAS experiment. In the process, the old batch job paradigm of locally managed computing in HEP was discarded in favour of a far more automated, flexible and scalable model. The success of PanDA in ATLAS is leading to widespread adoption and testing by other experiments. PanDA is the first exascale workload management system in HEP, already operating at more than a million computing jobs per day, and processing over an exabyte of data in 2013. There are many new challenges that PanDA will face in the near future, in addition to new challenges of scale, heterogeneity and increasing user base. PanDA will need to handle rapidly changing computing infrastructure, will require factorization of code for easier deployment, will need to incorporate additional information sources including network metrics in decision making, be able to control network circuits, handle dynamically sized workload processing, provide improved visualization, and face many other challenges. In this talk we will focus on the new features, planned or recently implemented, that are relevant to the next decade of distributed computing workload management using PanDA.

  4. Understanding the enormous diversity of bacteriophages: the tailed phages that infect the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, Julianne H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophages are the predominant biological entity on the planet. The recent explosion of sequence information has made estimates of their diversity possible. We describe the genomic comparison of 337 fully sequenced tailed phages isolated on 18 genera and 31 species of bacteria in the Enterobacteriaceae. These phages were largely unambiguously grouped into 56 diverse clusters (32 lytic and 24 temperate) that have syntenic similarity over >50% of the genomes within each cluster, but substantially less sequence similarity between clusters. Most clusters naturally break into sets of more closely related subclusters, 78% of which are correlated with their host genera. The largest groups of related phages are superclusters united by genome synteny to lambda (81 phages) and T7 (51 phages). This study forms a robust framework for understanding diversity and evolutionary relationships of existing tailed phages, for relating newly discovered phages and for determining host/phage relationships. PMID:25240328

  5. Novel atomic force microscopy based biopanning for isolation of morphology specific reagents against TDP-43 variants in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephanie M; Venkataraman, Lalitha; Tian, Huilai; Khan, Galam; Harris, Brent T; Sierks, Michael R

    2015-02-12

    Because protein variants play critical roles in many diseases including TDP-43 in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), alpha-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and beta-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer's disease, it is critically important to develop morphology specific reagents that can selectively target these disease-specific protein variants to study the role of these variants in disease pathology and for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We have developed novel atomic force microscopy (AFM) based biopanning techniques that enable isolation of reagents that selectively recognize disease-specific protein variants. There are two key phases involved in the process, the negative and positive panning phases. During the negative panning phase, phages that are reactive to off-target antigens are eliminated through multiple rounds of subtractive panning utilizing a series of carefully selected off-target antigens. A key feature in the negative panning phase is utilizing AFM imaging to monitor the process and confirm that all undesired phage particles are removed. For the positive panning phase, the target antigen of interest is fixed on a mica surface and bound phages are eluted and screened to identify phages that selectively bind the target antigen. The target protein variant does not need to be purified providing the appropriate negative panning controls have been used. Even target protein variants that are only present at very low concentrations in complex biological material can be utilized in the positive panning step. Through application of this technology, we acquired antibodies to protein variants of TDP-43 that are selectively found in human ALS brain tissue. We expect that this protocol should be applicable to generating reagents that selectively bind protein variants present in a wide variety of different biological processes and diseases.

  6. Phage Therapy Approaches to Reducing Pathogen Persistence and Transmission in Animal Production Environments: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavecchio, Anna; Goodridge, Lawrence D

    2017-06-01

    The era of genomics has allowed for characterization of phages for use as antimicrobials to treat animal infections with a level of precision never before realized. As more research in phage therapy has been conducted, several advantages of phage therapy have been realized, including the ubiquitous nature, specificity, prevalence in the biosphere, and low inherent toxicity of phages, which makes them a safe and sustainable technology for control of animal diseases. These unique qualities of phages have led to several opportunities with respect to emerging trends in infectious disease treatment. However, the opportunities are tempered by several challenges to the successful implementation of phage therapy, such as the fact that an individual phage can only infect one or a few bacterial strains, meaning that large numbers of different phages will likely be needed to treat infections caused by multiple species of bacteria. In addition, phages are only effective if enough of them can reach the site of bacterial colonization, but clearance by the immune system upon introduction to the animal is a reality that must be overcome. Finally, bacterial resistance to the phages may develop, resulting in treatment failure. Even a successful phage infection and lysis of its host has consequences, because large amounts of endotoxin are released upon lysis of Gram-negative bacteria, which can lead to local and systemic complications. Overcoming these challenges will require careful design and development of phage cocktails, including comprehensive characterization of phage host range and assessment of immunological risks associated with phage treatment.

  7. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations in the Pectoral Muscles of Common Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Bonobos (Pan paniscus), and Humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potau, J M; Arias-Martorell, J; Bello-Hellegouarch, G; Casado, A; Pastor, J F; de Paz, F; Diogo, R

    2018-01-01

    We have analyzed anatomic variations in the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) and compared them to anatomic variations in these muscles in humans (Homo sapiens) . We have macroscopically dissected these muscles in six adult Pan troglodytes , five Pan paniscus of ages ranging from fetus to adult, and five adult Homo sapiens . Although Pan troglodytes are thought to lack a separate pectoralis abdominis muscle, we have identified this muscle in three of the Pan troglodytes ; none of the Pan paniscus , however, had this muscle. We have also found deep supernumerary fascicles in the pectoralis major of two Pan troglodytes and all five Pan paniscus . In all six Pan troglodytes , the pectoralis minor was inserted at the supraspinatus tendon, while, in Pan paniscus and Homo sapiens , it was inserted at the coracoid process of the scapula. Some of the anatomic features and variations of these muscles in common chimpanzees and bonobos are similar to those found in humans, therefore enhancing our knowledge of primate comparative anatomy and evolution and also shedding light on several clinical issues.

  8. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations in the Pectoral Muscles of Common Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, Bonobos (Pan paniscus, and Humans (Homo sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Potau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed anatomic variations in the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes and bonobos (Pan paniscus and compared them to anatomic variations in these muscles in humans (Homo sapiens. We have macroscopically dissected these muscles in six adult Pan troglodytes, five Pan paniscus of ages ranging from fetus to adult, and five adult Homo sapiens. Although Pan troglodytes are thought to lack a separate pectoralis abdominis muscle, we have identified this muscle in three of the Pan troglodytes; none of the Pan paniscus, however, had this muscle. We have also found deep supernumerary fascicles in the pectoralis major of two Pan troglodytes and all five Pan paniscus. In all six Pan troglodytes, the pectoralis minor was inserted at the supraspinatus tendon, while, in Pan paniscus and Homo sapiens, it was inserted at the coracoid process of the scapula. Some of the anatomic features and variations of these muscles in common chimpanzees and bonobos are similar to those found in humans, therefore enhancing our knowledge of primate comparative anatomy and evolution and also shedding light on several clinical issues.

  9. PAN-based carbon fiber negative electrodes for structural lithium-ion batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Hellqvist Kjell, Maria; Jacques, Eric; Zenkert, Dan; Behm, Mårten; Lindbergh, Göran

    2011-01-01

    Several grades of commercially-available polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers have been studied for structural lithium-ion batteries to understand how the sizing, different lithiation rates and number of fibers per tow affect the available reversible capacity, when used as both current collector and electrode, for use in structural batteries. The study shows that at moderate lithiation rates, 100 mA g-1, most of the carbon fibers display a reversible capacity close to or above 100 mAh ...

  10. Lactobacillus paracasei comparative genomics: towards species pan-genome definition and exploitation of diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Smokvina

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus paracasei is a member of the normal human and animal gut microbiota and is used extensively in the food industry in starter cultures for dairy products or as probiotics. With the development of low-cost, high-throughput sequencing techniques it has become feasible to sequence many different strains of one species and to determine its "pan-genome". We have sequenced the genomes of 34 different L. paracasei strains, and performed a comparative genomics analysis. We analysed genome synteny and content, focussing on the pan-genome, core genome and variable genome. Each genome was shown to contain around 2800-3100 protein-coding genes, and comparative analysis identified over 4200 ortholog groups that comprise the pan-genome of this species, of which about 1800 ortholog groups make up the conserved core. Several factors previously associated with host-microbe interactions such as pili, cell-envelope proteinase, hydrolases p40 and p75 or the capacity to produce short branched-chain fatty acids (bkd operon are part of the L. paracasei core genome present in all analysed strains. The variome consists mainly of hypothetical proteins, phages, plasmids, transposon/conjugative elements, and known functions such as sugar metabolism, cell-surface proteins, transporters, CRISPR-associated proteins, and EPS biosynthesis proteins. An enormous variety and variability of sugar utilization gene cassettes were identified, with each strain harbouring between 25-53 cassettes, reflecting the high adaptability of L. paracasei to different niches. A phylogenomic tree was constructed based on total genome contents, and together with an analysis of horizontal gene transfer events we conclude that evolution of these L. paracasei strains is complex and not always related to niche adaptation. The results of this genome content comparison was used, together with high-throughput growth experiments on various carbohydrates, to perform gene-trait matching analysis

  11. Construction of High-Quality Camel Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Ema; Poignavent, Vianney; Vincke, Cécile; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Muyldermans, Serge; Monsion, Baptiste

    2018-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies libraries of heavy-chain only immunoglobulins from camelids or shark are enriched for high-affinity antigen-specific binders by a short in vivo immunization. Thus, potent binders are readily retrieved from relatively small-sized libraries of 10 7 -10 8 individual transformants, mostly after phage display and panning on a purified target. However, the remaining drawback of this strategy arises from the need to generate a dedicated library, for nearly every envisaged target. Therefore, all the procedures that shorten and facilitate the construction of an immune library of best possible quality are definitely a step forward. In this chapter, we provide the protocol to generate a high-quality immune VHH library using the Golden Gate Cloning strategy employing an adapted phage display vector where a lethal ccdB gene has to be substituted by the VHH gene. With this procedure, the construction of the library can be shortened to less than a week starting from bleeding the animal. Our libraries exceed 10 8 individual transformants and close to 100% of the clones harbor a phage display vector having an insert with the length of a VHH gene. These libraries are also more economic to make than previous standard approaches using classical restriction enzymes and ligations. The quality of the Nanobodies that are retrieved from immune libraries obtained by Golden Gate Cloning is identical to those from immune libraries made according to the classical procedure.

  12. Epifluorescence and atomic force microscopy: Two innovative applications for studying phage-host interactions in Lactobacillus helveticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Miriam; Scaltriti, Erika; Fornasari, Maria Emanuela; Rivetti, Claudio; Grolli, Stefano; Giraffa, Giorgio; Ramoni, Roberto; Carminati, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages attacking lactic acid bacteria (LAB) still represent a crucial problem in industrial dairy fermentations. The consequences of a phage infection against LAB can lead to fermentation delay, alteration of the product quality and, in most severe cases, the product loss. Phage particles enumeration and phage-host interactions are normally evaluated by conventional plaque count assays, but, in many cases, these methods can be unsuccessful. Bacteriophages of Lactobacillus helveticus, a LAB species widely used as dairy starter or probiotic cultures, are often unable to form lysis plaques, thus impairing their enumeration by plate assay. In this study, we used epifluorescence microscopy to enumerate L. helveticus phage particles from phage-infected cultures and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to visualize both phages and bacteria during the different stages of the lytic cycle. Preliminary, we tested the sensitivity of phage counting by epifluorescence microscopy. To this end, phage particles of ΦAQ113, a lytic phage of L. helveticus isolated from a whey starter culture, were stained by SYBR Green I and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy. Values obtained by the microscopic method were 10 times higher than plate counts, with a lowest sensitivity limit of ≥6log phage/ml. The interaction of phage ΦAQ113 with its host cell L. helveticus Lh1405 was imaged by AFM after 0, 2 and 5h from phage-host adsorption. The lytic cycle was followed by epifluorescence microscopy counting and the concomitant cell wall changes were visualized by AFM imaging. Our results showed that these two methods can be combined for a reliable phage enumeration and for studying phage and host morphology during infection processes, thus giving a complete overview of phage-host interactions in L. helveticus strains involved in dairy productions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  14. Phage Conversion for β-Lactam Antibiotic Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus from Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Duck; Park, Jong-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Temperate phages have been suggested to carry virulence factors and other lysogenic conversion genes that play important roles in pathogenicity. In this study, phage TEM123 in wild-type Staphylococcus aureus from food sources was analyzed with respect to its morphology, genome sequence, and antibiotic resistance conversion ability. Phage TEM123 from a mitomycin C-induced lysate of S. aureus was isolated from foods. Morphological analysis under a transmission electron microscope revealed that it belonged to the family Siphoviridae. The genome of phage TEM123 consisted of a double-stranded DNA of 43,786 bp with a G+C content of 34.06%. A bioinformatics analysis of the phage genome identified 43 putative open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 encoded a protein that was nearly identical to the metallo-β-lactamase enzymes that degrade β-lactam antibiotics. After transduction to S. aureus with phage TEM123, the metallo-β-lactamase gene was confirmed in the transductant by PCR and sequencing analyses. In a β-lactam antibiotic susceptibility test, the transductant was more highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics than S. aureus S133. Phage TEM123 might play a role in the transfer of β-lactam antibiotic resistance determinants in S. aureus. Therefore, we suggest that the prophage of S. aureus with its exotoxin is a risk factor for food safety in the food chain through lateral gene transfer.

  15. ATLAS BigPanDA Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Padolski, Siarhei; The ATLAS collaboration; Klimentov, Alexei; Korchuganova, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    BigPanDA monitoring is a web based application which provides various processing and representation of the Production and Distributed Analysis (PanDA) system objects states. Analyzing hundreds of millions of computation entities such as an event or a job BigPanDA monitoring builds different scale and levels of abstraction reports in real time mode. Provided information allows users to drill down into the reason of a concrete event failure or observe system bigger picture such as tracking the computation nucleus and satellites performance or the progress of whole production campaign. PanDA system was originally developed for the Atlas experiment and today effectively managing more than 2 million jobs per day distributed over 170 computing centers worldwide. BigPanDA is its core component commissioned in the middle of 2014 and now is the primary source of information for ATLAS users about state of their computations and the source of decision support information for shifters, operators and managers. In this wor...

  16. ATLAS BigPanDA Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Padolski, Siarhei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    BigPanDA monitoring is a web-based application that provides various processing and representation of the Production and Distributed Analysis (PanDA) system objects states. Analysing hundreds of millions of computation entities such as an event or a job BigPanDA monitoring builds different scale and levels of abstraction reports in real time mode. Provided information allows users to drill down into the reason of a concrete event failure or observe system bigger picture such as tracking the computation nucleus and satellites performance or the progress of whole production campaign. PanDA system was originally developed for the Atlas experiment and today effectively managing more than 2 million jobs per day distributed over 170 computing centers worldwide. BigPanDA is its core component commissioned in the middle of 2014 and now is the primary source of information for ATLAS users about state of their computations and the source of decision support information for shifters, operators and managers. In this work...

  17. gLExec Integration with the ATLAS PanDA Workload Management System

    CERN Document Server

    Karavakis, Edward; Campana, Simone; De, Kaushik; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Litmaath, Maarten; Maeno, Tadashi; Medrano Llamas, Ramon; Nilsson, Paul; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS user jobs are executed on Worker Nodes (WNs) by pilots sent to sites by pilot factories. This paradigm serves to allow a high job reliability and although it has clear advantages, such as making the working environment homogeneous, the approach presents security and traceability challenges. To address these challenges, gLExec can be used to let the payloads for each user be executed under a different UNIX user id that uniquely identifies the ATLAS user. This paper describes the recent improvements and evolution of the security model within the ATLAS PanDA system, including improvements in the PanDA pilot, in the PanDA server and their integration with MyProxy, a credential caching system that entitles a person or a service to act in the name of the issuer of the credential. Finally, it presents results from ATLAS user jobs running with gLExec and describes the deployment campaign within ATLAS.

  18. Phage-inducible chromosomal islands are ubiquitous within the bacterial universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillol-Salom, Alfred; Martínez-Rubio, Roser; Abdulrahman, Rezheen F; Chen, John; Davies, Robert; Penadés, José R

    2018-06-06

    Phage-inducible chromosomal islands (PICIs) are a recently discovered family of pathogenicity islands that contribute substantively to horizontal gene transfer, host adaptation and virulence in Gram-positive cocci. Here we report that similar elements also occur widely in Gram-negative bacteria. As with the PICIs from Gram-positive cocci, their uniqueness is defined by a constellation of features: unique and specific attachment sites, exclusive PICI genes, a phage-dependent mechanism of induction, conserved replication origin organization, convergent mechanisms of phage interference, and specific packaging of PICI DNA into phage-like infectious particles, resulting in very high transfer frequencies. We suggest that the PICIs represent two or more distinct lineages, have spread widely throughout the bacterial world, and have diverged much more slowly than their host organisms or their prophage cousins. Overall, these findings represent the discovery of a universal class of mobile genetic elements.

  19. Novel type of specialized transduction for CTX phi or its satellite phage RS1 mediated by filamentous phage VGJ phi in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Javier; Martínez, Eriel; Marrero, Karen; Silva, Yussuan; Rodríguez, Boris L; Suzarte, Edith; Ledón, Talena; Fando, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    The main virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae, the cholera toxin, is encoded by the ctxAB operon, which is contained in the genome of the lysogenic filamentous phage CTX phi. This phage transmits ctxAB genes between V. cholerae bacterial populations that express toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), the CTX phi receptor. In investigating new forms of ctxAB transmission, we found that V. cholerae filamentous phage VGJ phi, which uses the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) pilus as a receptor, transmits CTX phi or its satellite phage RS1 by an efficient and highly specific TCP-independent mechanism. This is a novel type of specialized transduction consisting in the site-specific cointegration of VGJ phi and CTX phi (or RS1) replicative forms to produce a single hybrid molecule, which generates a single-stranded DNA hybrid genome that is packaged into hybrid viral particles designated HybP phi (for the VGJ phi/CTX phi hybrid) and HybRS phi (for the VGJ phi/RS1 hybrid). The hybrid phages replicate by using the VGJ phi replicating functions and use the VGJ phi capsid, retaining the ability to infect via MSHA. The hybrid phages infect most tested strains more efficiently than CTX phi, even under in vitro optimal conditions for TCP expression. Infection and lysogenization with HybP phi revert the V. cholerae live attenuated vaccine strain 1333 to virulence. Our results reinforce that TCP is not indispensable for the acquisition of CTX phi. Thus, we discuss an alternative to the current accepted evolutionary model for the emergence of new toxigenic strains of V. cholerae and the importance of our findings for the development of an environmentally safer live attenuated cholera vaccine.

  20. Longitudinal monitoring of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria phages in seafood processing environments in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vongkamjan, Kitiya; Benjakul, Soottawat; Kim Vu, Hue Thi; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2017-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen commonly found in environments of seafood processing, thus presenting a challenge for eradication from seafood processing facilities. Monitoring the prevalence and subtype diversity of L. monocytogenes together with phages that are specific to Listeria spp. ("Listeria phages") will provide knowledge on the bacteria-phage ecology in food processing plants. In this work, a total of 595 samples were collected from raw material, finished seafood products and environmental samples from different sites of a seafood processing plant during 17 sampling visits in 1.5 years of study. L. monocytogenes and Listeria spp. (non-monocytogenes) were found in 22 (3.7%) and 43 (7.2%) samples, respectively, whereas 29 Listeria phages were isolated from 9 (1.5%) phage-positive samples. DNA fingerprint analysis of L. monocytogenes isolates revealed 11 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiles, with two subtypes were frequently observed over time. Our data reveal a presence of Listeria phages within the same seafood processing environments where a diverse set of L. monocytogenes subtypes was also found. Although serotype 4b was observed at lower frequency, data indicate that isolates from this seafood processing plant belonged to both epidemiologically important serotypes 1/2a and 4b, which may suggest a potential public health risk. Phages (all showed a unique genome size of 65 ± 2 kb) were classified into 9 host range groups, representing both broad- and narrow-host range. While most L. monocytogenes isolates from this facility were susceptible to phages, five isolates showed resistance to 12-20 phages. Variations in phage host range among Listeria phages isolated from food processing plant may affect a presence of a diverse set of L. monocytogenes isolates derived from the same processing environment in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Lethal effects of 32P decay on transfecting activity of Bacillus subtillis phage phie DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loveday, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    Disintegration of 32 P present in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis phage phie (a phage containing double-strand DNA) results in the loss of viability of intact phage as well as transfecting activity of isolated DNA. Only 1/12 of the 32 P disintegrations per phage DNA equivalent inactivities the intact phage while nearly every disintegration inactivates the transfecting DNA. This result provides evidence for a single-strand intermediate in the transfection of B. subtilis by phie DNA

  2. Exploring the mycobacteriophage metaproteome: phage genomics as an educational platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham F Hatfull

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant forms of life in the biosphere and carry genomes characterized by high genetic diversity and mosaic architectures. The complete sequences of 30 mycobacteriophage genomes show them collectively to encode 101 tRNAs, three tmRNAs, and 3,357 proteins belonging to 1,536 "phamilies" of related sequences, and a statistical analysis predicts that these represent approximately 50% of the total number of phamilies in the mycobacteriophage population. These phamilies contain 2.19 proteins on average; more than half (774 of them contain just a single protein sequence. Only six phamilies have representatives in more than half of the 30 genomes, and only three-encoding tape-measure proteins, lysins, and minor tail proteins-are present in all 30 phages, although these phamilies are themselves highly modular, such that no single amino acid sequence element is present in all 30 mycobacteriophage genomes. Of the 1,536 phamilies, only 230 (15% have amino acid sequence similarity to previously reported proteins, reflecting the enormous genetic diversity of the entire phage population. The abundance and diversity of phages, the simplicity of phage isolation, and the relatively small size of phage genomes support bacteriophage isolation and comparative genomic analysis as a highly suitable platform for discovery-based education.

  3. Visual search by chimpanzees (Pan): assessment of controlling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, M

    1995-03-01

    Three experimentally sophisticated chimpanzees (Pan), Akira, Chloe, and Ai, were trained on visual search performance using a modified multiple-alternative matching-to-sample task in which a sample stimulus was followed by the search display containing one target identical to the sample and several uniform distractors (i.e., negative comparison stimuli were identical to each other). After they acquired this task, they were tested for transfer of visual search performance to trials in which the sample was not followed by the uniform search display (odd-item search). Akira showed positive transfer of visual search performance to odd-item search even when the display size (the number of stimulus items in the search display) was small, whereas Chloe and Ai showed a transfer only when the display size was large. Chloe and Ai used some nonrelational cues such as perceptual isolation of the target among uniform distractors (so-called pop-out). In addition to the odd-item search test, various types of probe trials were presented to clarify the controlling relations in multiple-alternative matching to sample. Akira showed a decrement of accuracy as a function of the display size when the search display was nonuniform (i.e., each "distractor" stimulus was not the same), whereas Chloe and Ai showed perfect performance. Furthermore, when the sample was identical to the uniform distractors in the search display, Chloe and Ai never selected an odd-item target, but Akira selected it when the display size was large. These results indicated that Akira's behavior was controlled mainly by relational cues of target-distractor oddity, whereas an identity relation between the sample and the target strongly controlled the performance of Chloe and Ai.

  4. Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives Special Display Opens at NLM | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives Special Display Opens at NLM ... Medicine Division. Photo Courtesy of Lisa Helfert Confronting Violence, Improving Women's Lives is on display in the ...

  5. Phage FR38 Treatment on Sprague Dawley Rat Inferred from Blood Parameters and Organ Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEWI SARTIKA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of phage FR38 to lysis indigenous Salmonella P38 from feces of diarrheal patient has been studied. However, effects of phage FR38 on organ system were not revealed as yet. This study was conducted to observe the effect of phage FR38 on blood chemistry, kidney functions, and liver functions. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were used as a model for this study that were divided into two groups; (i control and (ii treated group with phage FR38. For treated phage group, each rat was administered by 5 ml/kg bw of 1.59•107 pfu/ml of phage intragastric. The blood parameters were analysed on day 16. The results revealed that body and organs weight, erythrocyte, hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocyte, total protein, creatinine, SGOT, and SGPT of phage treatment rats were not significantly different with the control rats on day 16 (P > 0.05. Therefore, this study showed was no effect of phage FR38 on body weight, blood chemistry, kidney and liver functions of the rat (P > 0.05.

  6. Phage FR38 Treatment on Sprague Dawley Rat Inferred from Blood Parameters and Organ Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DEWI SARTIKA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of phage FR38 to lysis indigenous Salmonella P38 from feces of diarrheal patient has been studied. However, effects of phage FR38 on organ system were not revealed as yet. This study was conducted to observe the effect of phage FR38 on blood chemistry, kidney functions, and liver functions. Twelve Sprague-Dawley rats were used as a model for this study that were divided into two groups; (i control and (ii treated group with phage FR38. For treated phage group, each rat was administered by 5 ml/kg bw of 1.59-107 pfu/ml of phage intragastric. The blood parameters were analysed on day 16. The results revealed that body and organs weight, erythrocyte, hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocyte, total protein, creatinine, SGOT, and SGPT of phage treatment rats were not significantly different with the control rats on day 16 (P > 0.05. Therefore, this study showed was no effect of phage FR38 on body weight, blood chemistry, kidney and liver functions of the rat (P > 0.05.

  7. Bioinformatic analysis of phage AB3, a phiKMV-like virus infecting Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Liu, X; Li, X-J

    2015-01-16

    The phages of Acinetobacter baumannii has drawn increasing attention because of the multi-drug resistance of A. baumanni. The aim of this study was to sequence Acinetobacter baumannii phage AB3 and conduct bioinformatic analysis to lay a foundation for genome remodeling and phage therapy. We isolated and sequenced A. baumannii phage AB3 and attempted to annotate and analyze its genome. The results showed that the genome is a double-stranded DNA with a total length of 31,185 base pairs (bp) and 97 open reading frames greater than 100 bp. The genome includes 28 predicted genes, of which 24 are homologous to phage AB1. The entire coding sequence is located on the negative strand, representing 90.8% of the total length. The G+C mol% was 39.18%, without areas of high G+C content over 200 bp in length. No GC island, tRNA gene, or repeated sequence was identified. Gene lengths were 120-3099 bp, with an average of 1011 bp. Six genes were found to be greater than 2000 bp in length. Genomic alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA polymerase gene showed that similar to phage AB1, phage AB3 is a phiKMV-like virus in the T7 phage family.

  8. Parallax barrier engineering for image quality improvement in an autostereoscopic 3D display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Kyu; Yoon, Ki-Hyuk; Yoon, Seon Kyu; Ju, Heongkyu

    2015-05-18

    We present a image quality improvement in a parallax barrier (PB)-based multiview autostereoscopic 3D display system under a real-time tracking of positions of a viewer's eyes. The system presented exploits a parallax barrier engineered to offer significantly improved quality of three-dimensional images for a moving viewer without an eyewear under the dynamic eye tracking. The improved image quality includes enhanced uniformity of image brightness, reduced point crosstalk, and no pseudoscopic effects. We control the relative ratio between two parameters i.e., a pixel size and the aperture of a parallax barrier slit to improve uniformity of image brightness at a viewing zone. The eye tracking that monitors positions of a viewer's eyes enables pixel data control software to turn on only pixels for view images near the viewer's eyes (the other pixels turned off), thus reducing point crosstalk. The eye tracking combined software provides right images for the respective eyes, therefore producing no pseudoscopic effects at its zone boundaries. The viewing zone can be spanned over area larger than the central viewing zone offered by a conventional PB-based multiview autostereoscopic 3D display (no eye tracking). Our 3D display system also provides multiviews for motion parallax under eye tracking. More importantly, we demonstrate substantial reduction of point crosstalk of images at the viewing zone, its level being comparable to that of a commercialized eyewear-assisted 3D display system. The multiview autostereoscopic 3D display presented can greatly resolve the point crosstalk problem, which is one of the critical factors that make it difficult for previous technologies for a multiview autostereoscopic 3D display to replace an eyewear-assisted counterpart.

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Multidrug Resistance and Phage Pattern of Staphylococcus aureus in Pyoderma Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Wavare

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pyoderma is common in India and other tropical countries. Staphylococcus aureus is the commonest causative agent ofpyoderma. Aims and Objectives: To know the antibiotic susceptibility and bacteriophage pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from pyoderma infection. Materials and Methods: One hundred clinically diagnosed pyoderma cases were investigated bacteriologically. A total of 59 isolates of S. aureus were subjected to antibioticsusceptibility testing by Kirby Bauer’s disk diffusion method and phage typing by routine test dilution X 100 bacteriophages. Results: Most of the strains were resistant to penicillin, ampicillin and were susceptible to gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin. Multidrug resistance was also high among these strains. Regarding the phage types, Phage type 52 (15 strains, 96 (8 strains and 71(16strains were predominant among the typed strains (55.95% of S. aureus. The most common group was mixed phage group (17% followed by phage group I (13.55%. Conclusion: Knowledge of antibioticsusceptibility pattern is essential to give proper antibiotic therapy and avoid unnecessary medication with non-effective drugs, which may increase resistance. Gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin are the drugs of choice in that order. Association of phage typing and antibiotic sensitivity of S. aureus showed the predominance of phage group III with greater frequency of penicillin resistance.

  10. Precision Photometry and Astrometry from Pan-STARRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnier, Eugene A.; Pan-STARRS Team

    2018-01-01

    The Pan-STARRS 3pi Survey has been calibrated with excellent precision for both astrometry and photometry. The Pan-STARRS Data Release 1, opened to the public on 2016 Dec 16, provides photometry in 5 well-calibrated, well-defined bandpasses (grizy) astrometrically registered to the Gaia frame. Comparisons with other surveys illustrate the high quality of the calibration and provide tests of remaining systematic errors in both Pan-STARRS and those external surveys. With photometry and astrometry of roughly 3 billion astronomical objects, the Pan-STARRS DR1 has substantial overlap with Gaia, SDSS, 2MASS and other surveys. I will discuss the astrometric tie between Pan-STARRS DR1 and Gaia and show comparisons between Pan-STARRS and other large-scale surveys.

  11. Phenotypic resistance and the dynamics of bacterial escape from phage control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, James J.; Vegge, Christina Skovgaard; Schmerer, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The canonical view of phage - bacterial interactions in dense, liquid cultures is that the phage will eliminate most of the sensitive cells; genetic resistance will then ascend to restore high bacterial densities. Yet there are various mechanisms by which bacteria may remain sensitive to phages...... mathematical models of these processes and suggest how different types of this 'phenotypic' resistance may be elucidated. We offer preliminary in vitro studies of a previously characterized E. coli model system and Campylobacter jejuni illustrating apparent phenotypic resistance. As phenotypic resistance may...

  12. Analysis of Lactobacillus Products for Phages and Bacteriocins That Inhibit Vaginal Lactobacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Tao

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bacterial vaginosis is associated with an unexplained loss of vaginal lactobacilli. Previously, we have identified certain vaginal lactobacilli-released phages that can inhibit in vitro other vaginal lactobacilli. However, there is no apparent route for phages to be transmitted among women. The purpose of this study was to identify whether certain Lactobacillus products commonly used by women release phages or bacteriocins that can inhibit vaginal lactobacilli.

  13. Pan-tropical monitoring of deforestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achard, F; DeFries, R; Eva, H; Hansen, M; Mayaux, P; Stibig, H-J

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the technical capabilities for monitoring deforestation from a pan-tropical perspective in response to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process, which is studying the technical issues surrounding the ability to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in developing countries. The successful implementation of such policies requires effective forest monitoring systems that are reproducible, provide consistent results, meet standards for mapping accuracy, and can be implemented from national to pan-tropical levels. Remotely sensed data, supported by ground observations, are crucial to such efforts. Recent developments in global to regional monitoring of forests can contribute to reducing the uncertainties in estimates of emissions from deforestation. Monitoring systems at national levels in developing countries can also benefit from pan-tropical and regional observations, mainly by identifying hot spots of change and prioritizing areas for monitoring at finer spatial scales. A pan-tropical perspective is also required to ensure consistency between different national monitoring systems. Data sources already exist to determine baseline periods in the 1990s as historical reference points. Key requirements for implementing such monitoring programs, both at pan-tropical and at national scales, are international commitment of resources to increase capacity, coordination of observations to ensure pan-tropical coverage, access to free or low-cost data, and standardized, consensus protocols for data interpretation and analysis

  14. Phage Types and Genotypes of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Isolates from Humans and Animals in Spain: Identification and Characterization of Two Predominating Phage Types (PT2 and PT8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Miguel; Blanco, Jesús E.; Alonso, M. Pilar; Dhabi, Ghizlane; Thomson-Carter, Fiona; Usera, Miguel A.; Bartolomé, Rosa; Prats, Guillermo; Blanco, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Phage typing and DNA macrorestriction fragment analysis by pulsed-field electrophoresis (PFGE) were used for the epidemiological subtyping of a collection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157:H7 strains isolated in Spain between 1980 and 1999. Phage typing distinguished a total of 18 phage types among 171 strains isolated from different sources (67 humans, 82 bovines, 12 ovines, and 10 beef products). However, five phage types, phage type 2 (PT2; 42 strains), PT8 (33 strains), PT14 (14 strains), PT21/28 (11 strains), and PT54 (16 strains), accounted for 68% of the study isolates. PT2 and PT8 were the most frequently found among strains from both humans (51%) and bovines (46%). Interestingly, we detected a significant association between PT2 and PT14 and the presence of acute pathologies. A group of 108 of the 171 strains were analyzed by PFGE, and 53 distinct XbaI macrorestriction patterns were identified, with 38 strains exhibiting unique PFGE patterns. In contrast, phage typing identified 15 different phage types. A total of 66 phage type-PFGE subtype combinations were identified among the 108 strains. PFGE subtyping differentiated between unrelated strains that exhibited the same phage type. The most common phage type-PFGE pattern combinations were PT2-PFGE type 1 (1 human and 11 bovine strains), PT8-PFGE type 8 (2 human, 6 bovine, and 1 beef product strains), PT2-PFGE subtype 4A (1 human, 3 bovine, and 1 beef product strains). Nine (29%) of 31 human strains showed phage type-PFGE pattern combinations that were detected among the bovine strains included in this study, and 26 (38%) of 68 bovine strains produced phage type-PFGE pattern combinations observed among human strains included in this study, confirming that cattle are a major reservoir of strains pathogenic for humans. PT2 and PT8 strains formed two groups which differed from each other in their motilities, stx genotypes, PFGE patterns, and the severity of the illnesses that they caused

  15. Asymmetric Electrodes Constructed with PAN-Based Activated Carbon Fiber in Capacitive Deionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhe Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Capacitive deionization (CDI method has drawn much attention for its low energy consumption, low pollution, and convenient manipulation. Activated carbon fibers (ACFs possess high adsorption ability and can be used as CDI electrode material. Herein, two kinds of PAN-based ACFs with different specific surface area (SSA were used for the CDI electrodes. The CDI performance was investigated; especially asymmetric electrodes’ effect was evaluated. The results demonstrated that PAN-based ACFs showed a high electrosorption rate (complete electrosorption in less than half an hour and moderate electrosorption capacity (up to 0.2 mmol/g. CDI experiments with asymmetric electrodes displayed a variation in electrosorption capacity between forward voltage and reverse voltage. It can be attributed to the electrical double layer (EDL overlap effect and inner pore potential; thus the ions with smaller hydrated ionic radius can be adsorbed more easily.

  16. Identification of operator sites of the CI repressor of phage TP901-1: evolutionary link to other phages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Annette H.; Broendsted, Lone; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    The repressor encoded by the cI gene of the temperate Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris bacteriophage TP901-1 has been purified. Gel-retardation and footprinting analyses identified three palindromic operator sites (O R , O L , and O D ). The operator site O R is located between the two divergent early promoters P R and P L , O L overlaps the transcriptional start of the lytic P L promoter, and O D is located downstream of the mor gene, the first gene in the lytic gene cluster. The function of O L was verified by mutational analysis. Binding was found to be specific and cooperative. Multimeric forms of the repressor were observed, thus indicating that the repressor may bind simultaneously to all three operator sites. Inverted repeats with homology to the operator sites of TP901-1 were identified in phage genomes encoding repressors homologous to CI of TP901-1. Interestingly, the locations of these repeats on the phage genomes correspond to those found in TP901-1, indicating that the same system of cooperative repression of early phage promoters has been inherited by modular evolution

  17. Transport of Escherichia coli phage through saturated porous media considering managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Li, Shuo; Wang, Shuang; Lei, Liancheng; Yu, Xipeng; Ma, Tianyi

    2018-03-01

    Virus is one of the most potentially harmful microorganisms in groundwater. In this paper, the effects of hydrodynamic and hydrogeochemical conditions on the transportation of the colloidal virus considering managed aquifer recharge were systematically investigated. Escherichia coli phage, vB_EcoM-ep3, has a broad host range and was able to lyse pathogenic Escherichia coli. Bacteriophage with low risk to infect human has been found extensively in the groundwater environment, so it is considered as a representative model of groundwater viruses. Laboratory studies were carried out to analyze the transport of the Escherichia coli phage under varying conditions of pH, ionic strength, cation valence, flow rate, porous media, and phosphate buffer concentration. The results indicated that decreasing the pH will increase the adsorption of Escherichia coli phage. Increasing the ionic strength, either Na + or Ca 2+ , will form negative condition for the migration of Escherichia coli phage. A comparison of different cation valence tests indicated that changes in transport and deposition were more pronounced with divalent Ca 2+ than monovalent Na + . As the flow rate increases, the release of Escherichia coli phage increases and the retention of Escherichia coli phage in the aquifer medium reduces. Changes in porous media had a significant effect on Escherichia coli phage migration. With increase of phosphate buffer concentration, the suspension stability and migration ability of Escherichia coli phage are both increased. Based on laboratory-scale column experiments, a one-dimensional transport model was established to quantitatively describe the virus transport in saturated porous medium.

  18. Inter- and Intraspecific Variations in the Pectoral Muscles of Common Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), Bonobos (Pan paniscus), and Humans (Homo sapiens)

    OpenAIRE

    Potau, J. M.; Arias-Martorell, J.; Bello-Hellegouarch, G.; Casado, A.; Pastor, J. F.; de Paz, F.; Diogo, R.

    2018-01-01

    We have analyzed anatomic variations in the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor muscles of common chimpanzees (Pan\\ud troglodytes) and bonobos(Pan paniscus) and compared them to anatomic variations in these muscles in humans(Homo sapiens). We\\ud have macroscopically dissected these muscles in six adult Pan troglodytes, five Pan paniscus of ages ranging from fetus to adult, and\\ud five adult Homo sapiens. Although Pan troglodytes are thought to lack a separate pectoralis abdominis muscle, we...

  19. Association between phage types and antimicrobial resistance among bovine Staphylococcus aureus from 10 countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintov, J.; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Zinn, C. E.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the diversity of phage types and associations between penicillin resistance and phage types among 815 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis in nine European countries and USA. All isolates were examined for susceptibility to antimicrobial agents...... associated with penicillin resistance in contrast to phage group I (P = 0.0023) and phage complex-80 (P = 0.0066). This study confirms that a large number of phage types of S. aureus cause bovine mastitis, but that some types predominate. In addition, these findings could indicate that the use of penicillin...... in the bovine environment has selected for specific types of S. aureus in countries with a high frequency of resistance....

  20. Form gene clustering method about pan-ethnic-group products based on emotional semantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengkai; Ding, Jingjing; Gao, Minzhuo; Ma, Danping; Liu, Donghui

    2016-09-01

    The use of pan-ethnic-group products form knowledge primarily depends on a designer's subjective experience without user participation. The majority of studies primarily focus on the detection of the perceptual demands of consumers from the target product category. A pan-ethnic-group products form gene clustering method based on emotional semantic is constructed. Consumers' perceptual images of the pan-ethnic-group products are obtained by means of product form gene extraction and coding and computer aided product form clustering technology. A case of form gene clustering about the typical pan-ethnic-group products is investigated which indicates that the method is feasible. This paper opens up a new direction for the future development of product form design which improves the agility of product design process in the era of Industry 4.0.

  1. “French Phage Network”—Second Meeting Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Barceló, Clara; Kaltz, Oliver; Froissart, Rémy; Gandon, Sylvain; Ginet, Nicolas; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    The study of bacteriophages (viruses of bacteria) includes a variety of approaches, such as structural biology, genetics, ecology, and evolution, with increasingly important implications for therapeutic and industrial uses. Researchers working with phages in France have recently established a network to facilitate the exchange on complementary approaches, but also to engage new collaborations. Here, we provide a summary of the topics presented during the second meeting of the French Phage Network that took place in Marseille in November 2016. PMID:28430166

  2. Transpressional granite-emplacement model: Structural and magnetic study of the Pan-African Bandja granitic pluton (West Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandjo, A. F. Yakeu; Njanko, T.; Njonfang, E.; Errami, E.; Rochette, P.; Fozing, E.

    2016-02-01

    The Pan-African NE-SW elongated Bandja granitic pluton, located at the western part of the Pan-African belt in Cameroon, is a K-feldspar megacryst granite. It is emplaced in banded gneiss and its NW border underwent mylonitization. The magmatic foliation shows NE-SW and NNE-SSW strike directions with moderate to strong dip respectively in its northern and central parts. This mostly, ferromagnetic granite displays magnetic fabrics carried by magnetite and characterized by (i) magnetic foliation with best poles at 295/34, 283/33 and 35/59 respectively in its northern, central and southern parts and (ii) a subhorizontal magnetic lineation with best line at 37/8, 191/9 and 267/22 respectively in the northern, central and southern parts. Magnetic lineation shows an `S' shape trend that allows to (1) consider the complete emplacement and deformation of the pluton during the Pan-African D 2 and D 3 events which occurred in the Pan-African belt in Cameroon and (2) reorganize Pan-African ages from Nguiessi Tchakam et al. (1997) compared with those of the other granitic plutons in the belt as: 686 ±17 Ma (Rb/Sr) for D 1 age of metamorphism recorded in gneiss; and the period between 604-557 Ma for D 2-D 3 emplacement and deformation age of the granitic pluton in a dextral ENE-WSW shear movement.

  3. Synergistic Interaction Between Phage Therapy and Antibiotics Clears Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infection in Endocarditis and Reduces Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Frank; Piccardi, Philippe; Mancini, Stefano; Gabard, Jérôme; Moreillon, Philippe; Entenza, José M; Resch, Gregory; Que, Yok-Ai

    2017-03-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance warrants therapeutic alternatives. Here we investigated the efficacy of bacteriophage-therapy (phage) alone or combined with antibiotics against experimental endocarditis (EE) due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an archetype of difficult-to-treat infection. In vitro fibrin clots and rats with aortic EE were treated with an antipseudomonas phage cocktail alone or combined with ciprofloxacin. Phage pharmacology, therapeutic efficacy, and resistance were determined. In vitro, single-dose phage therapy killed 7 log colony-forming units (CFUs)/g of fibrin clots in 6 hours. Phage-resistant mutants regrew after 24 hours but were prevented by combination with ciprofloxacin (2.5 × minimum inhibitory concentration). In vivo, single-dose phage therapy killed 2.5 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours (P 6 log CFUs/g of vegetations in 6 hours and successfully treating 64% (n = 7/11) of rats. Phage-resistant mutants emerged in vitro but not in vivo, most likely because resistant mutations affected bacterial surface determinants important for infectivity (eg, the pilT and galU genes involved in pilus motility and LPS formation). Single-dose phage therapy was active against P. aeruginosa EE and highly synergistic with ciprofloxacin. Phage-resistant mutants had impaired infectivity. Phage-therapy alone or combined with antibiotics merits further clinical consideration. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  4. Investigation of needleless electrospun PAN nanofiber mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabantina, Lilia; Mirasol, José Rodríguez; Cordero, Tomás; Finsterbusch, Karin; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) can be spun from a nontoxic solvent (DMSO, dimethyl sulfoxide) and is nevertheless waterproof, opposite to the biopolymers which are spinnable from aqueous solutions. This makes PAN an interesting material for electrospinning nanofiber mats which can be used for diverse biotechnological or medical applications, such as filters, cell growth, wound healing or tissue engineering. On the other hand, PAN is a typical base material for producing carbon nanofibers. Nevertheless, electrospinning PAN necessitates convenient spinning parameters to create nanofibers without too many membranes or agglomerations. Thus we have studied the influence of spinning parameters on the needleless electrospinning process of PAN dissolved in DMSO and the resulting nanofiber mats.

  5. PVP-SVM: Sequence-Based Prediction of Phage Virion Proteins Using a Support Vector Machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manavalan, Balachandran; Shin, Tae H; Lee, Gwang

    2018-01-01

    Accurately identifying bacteriophage virion proteins from uncharacterized sequences is important to understand interactions between the phage and its host bacteria in order to develop new antibacterial drugs. However, identification of such proteins using experimental techniques is expensive and often time consuming; hence, development of an efficient computational algorithm for the prediction of phage virion proteins (PVPs) prior to in vitro experimentation is needed. Here, we describe a support vector machine (SVM)-based PVP predictor, called PVP-SVM, which was trained with 136 optimal features. A feature selection protocol was employed to identify the optimal features from a large set that included amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, atomic composition, physicochemical properties, and chain-transition-distribution. PVP-SVM achieved an accuracy of 0.870 during leave-one-out cross-validation, which was 6% higher than control SVM predictors trained with all features, indicating the efficiency of the feature selection method. Furthermore, PVP-SVM displayed superior performance compared to the currently available method, PVPred, and two other machine-learning methods developed in this study when objectively evaluated with an independent dataset. For the convenience of the scientific community, a user-friendly and publicly accessible web server has been established at www.thegleelab.org/PVP-SVM/PVP-SVM.html.

  6. PVP-SVM: Sequence-Based Prediction of Phage Virion Proteins Using a Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balachandran Manavalan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Accurately identifying bacteriophage virion proteins from uncharacterized sequences is important to understand interactions between the phage and its host bacteria in order to develop new antibacterial drugs. However, identification of such proteins using experimental techniques is expensive and often time consuming; hence, development of an efficient computational algorithm for the prediction of phage virion proteins (PVPs prior to in vitro experimentation is needed. Here, we describe a support vector machine (SVM-based PVP predictor, called PVP-SVM, which was trained with 136 optimal features. A feature selection protocol was employed to identify the optimal features from a large set that included amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, atomic composition, physicochemical properties, and chain-transition-distribution. PVP-SVM achieved an accuracy of 0.870 during leave-one-out cross-validation, which was 6% higher than control SVM predictors trained with all features, indicating the efficiency of the feature selection method. Furthermore, PVP-SVM displayed superior performance compared to the currently available method, PVPred, and two other machine-learning methods developed in this study when objectively evaluated with an independent dataset. For the convenience of the scientific community, a user-friendly and publicly accessible web server has been established at www.thegleelab.org/PVP-SVM/PVP-SVM.html.

  7. The use of phage FCL-2 as an alternative to chemotherapy against columnaris disease in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina eLaanto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Flavobacterium columnare, the causative agent of columnaris disease in fish, causes millions of dollars of losses in the US channel catfish industry alone, not to mention aquaculture industry worldwide. Novel methods are needed for the control and treatment of bacterial diseases in aquaculture to replace traditionally used chemotherapies. A potential solution could be the use of phages, i.e., bacterial viruses, host-specific and self-enriching particles that can be can easily distributed via water flow. We examined the efficacy of phages to combat columnaris disease. A previously isolated phage, FCL-2, infecting F. columnare, was characterized by sequencing. The 47 142 bp genome of the phage had G + C content of 30.2%, and the closest similarities regarding the structural proteins were found in Cellulophaga phage phiSM. Under controlled experimental conditions, two host fish species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and zebrafish (Danio rerio, were used to study the success of phage therapy to prevent F. columnare infections. The survival of both fish species was significantly higher in the presence of the phage. Hundred percent of the zebrafish and 50 % of the rainbow trout survived in the phage treatment (survival without phage 0 % and 8.3 %, respectively. Most importantly, the rainbow trout population was rescued from infection by a single addition of the phage into the water in a flow-through fish tank system. Thus, F. columnare could be used as a model system to test the benefits and risks of phage therapy on a larger scale.

  8. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Durand Skottrup

    Full Text Available Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18 by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15, shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48. Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  9. A human gut phage catalog correlates the gut phageome with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingfei; You, Xiaoyan; Mai, Guoqin; Tokuyasu, Taku; Liu, Chenli

    2018-02-01

    Substantial efforts have been made to link the gut bacterial community to many complex human diseases. Nevertheless, the gut phages are often neglected. In this study, we used multiple bioinformatic methods to catalog gut phages from whole-community metagenomic sequencing data of fecal samples collected from both type II diabetes (T2D) patients (n = 71) and normal Chinese adults (n = 74). The definition of phage operational taxonomic units (pOTUs) and identification of large phage scaffolds (n = 2567, ≥ 10 k) revealed a comprehensive human gut phageome with a substantial number of novel sequences encoding genes that were unrelated to those in known phages. Interestingly, we observed a significant increase in the number of gut phages in the T2D group and, in particular, identified 7 pOTUs specific to T2D. This finding was further validated in an independent dataset of 116 T2D and 109 control samples. Co-occurrence/exclusion analysis of the bacterial genera and pOTUs identified a complex core interaction between bacteria and phages in the human gut ecosystem, suggesting that the significant alterations of the gut phageome cannot be explained simply by co-variation with the altered bacterial hosts. Alterations in the gut bacterial community have been linked to the chronic disease T2D, but the role of gut phages therein is not well understood. This is the first study to identify a T2D-specific gut phageome, indicating the existence of other mechanisms that might govern the gut phageome in T2D patients. These findings suggest the importance of the phageome in T2D risk, which warrants further investigation.

  10. Assessment of the microscreen phage-induction assay for screening hazardous wastes (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houk, V.S.; DeMarini, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The Microscreen phage-induction assay, which quantitatively measures the induction of prophage Lambda in Escherichia coli WP2s(Lambda), was used to test 14 crude (unfractionated) hazardous industrial-waste samples for genotoxic activity in the presence and absence of metabolic activation. Eleven of the 14 wastes induced prophage, and induction was observed at concentrations as low as 0.4 picograms per ml. Comparisons of the mutagenic activity of these waste samples in Salmonella and their ability to induce prophage Lambda indicate that the phage-induction assay was a more-sensitive indicator of genetic damage for this group of wastes. All but one of the wastes that were mutagenic to Salmonella were detected by the phage-induction assay, and 5 wastes not mutagenic to Salmonella were genetically active in the phage assay. The enhanced ability of the phage-induction assay to detect genotoxic activity may be related to the constituents comprising these waste samples. Partial chemical characterizations of the wastes showed high concentrations of carcinogenic metals, solvents, and chlorinated compounds, most of which are detected poorly by the Salmonella assay.

  11. Computational Modelling of Large Scale Phage Production Using a Two-Stage Batch Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Krysiak-Baltyn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cost effective and scalable methods for phage production are required to meet an increasing demand for phage, as an alternative to antibiotics. Computational models can assist the optimization of such production processes. A model is developed here that can simulate the dynamics of phage population growth and production in a two-stage, self-cycling process. The model incorporates variable infection parameters as a function of bacterial growth rate and employs ordinary differential equations, allowing application to a setup with multiple reactors. The model provides simple cost estimates as a function of key operational parameters including substrate concentration, feed volume and cycling times. For the phage and bacteria pairing examined, costs and productivity varied by three orders of magnitude, with the lowest cost found to be most sensitive to the influent substrate concentration and low level setting in the first vessel. An example case study of phage production is also presented, showing how parameter values affect the production costs and estimating production times. The approach presented is flexible and can be used to optimize phage production at laboratory or factory scale by minimizing costs or maximizing productivity.

  12. Next-Generation DNA Sequencing of VH/VL Repertoires: A Primer and Guide to Applications in Single-Domain Antibody Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Kevin A

    2018-01-01

    Immunogenetic analyses of expressed antibody repertoires are becoming increasingly common experimental investigations and are critical to furthering our understanding of autoimmunity, infectious disease, and cancer. Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) technologies have now made it possible to interrogate antibody repertoires to unprecedented depths, typically by sequencing of cDNAs encoding immunoglobulin variable domains. In this chapter, we describe simple, fast, and reliable methods for producing and sequencing multiplex PCR amplicons derived from the variable regions (V H , V H H or V L ) of rearranged immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We include complete protocols and primer sets for amplicon sequencing of V H /V H H/V L repertoires directly from human, mouse, and llama lymphocytes as well as from phage-displayed V H /V H H/V L libraries; these can be easily be adapted to other types of amplicons with little modification. The resulting amplicons are diverse and representative, even using as few as 10 3 input B cells, and their generation is relatively inexpensive, requiring no special equipment and only a limited set of primers. In the absence of heavy-light chain pairing, single-domain antibodies are uniquely amenable to NGS analyses. We present a number of applications of NGS technology useful in discovery of single-domain antibodies from phage display libraries, including: (i) assessment of library functionality; (ii) confirmation of desired library randomization; (iii) estimation of library diversity; and (iv) monitoring the progress of panning experiments. While the case studies presented here are of phage-displayed single-domain antibody libraries, the principles extend to other types of in vitro display libraries.

  13. Studying the Recent Improvements in Holograms for Three-Dimensional Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Displayers tend to become three-dimensional. The most advantage of holographic 3D displays is the possibility to observe 3D images without using glasses. The quality of created images by this method has surprised everyone. In this paper, the experimental steps of making a transmission hologram have been mentioned. In what follows, current advances of this science-art will be discussed. The aim of this paper is to study the recent improvements in creating three-dimensional images and videos by means of holographic techniques. In the last section we discuss the potentials of holography to be applied in future.

  14. Peter Pan-demien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Ungdommelig opførsel er moderne. I gamle dage skulle vi blive voksne. I dag skal selv gamle mænd og kvinder holde sig unge. Peter Pan-panikken er i os, og en af vores væsentligste sociale lidelser er umodenhed.......Ungdommelig opførsel er moderne. I gamle dage skulle vi blive voksne. I dag skal selv gamle mænd og kvinder holde sig unge. Peter Pan-panikken er i os, og en af vores væsentligste sociale lidelser er umodenhed....

  15. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    intestinal amplification and to improve diarrhea outcome, possibly due to insufficient phage coverage and too low E. coli pathogen titers requiring higher oral phage doses. More knowledge is needed on in vivo phage–bacterium interaction and the role of E. coli in childhood diarrhea for successful PT. Funding The study was supported by a grant from Nestlé Nutrition and Nestlé Health Science. The trial was registered with Identifier NCT00937274 at ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:26981577

  16. Safety analysis of a Russian phage cocktail: From MetaGenomic analysis to oral application in healthy human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCallin, Shawna, E-mail: semccallin@yahoo.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Alam Sarker, Shafiqul, E-mail: sasarker@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Barretto, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Barretto@rdls.nestle.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Sultana, Shamima, E-mail: shamima@icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Berger, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.berger@rdls.nestle.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Huq, Sayeda, E-mail: sayeeda@mail.icddrb.org [International Centre for Diarrhoeal Diseases Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b), 68 Shaheed Tajuddin Ahmed Sharani, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1212 (Bangladesh); Krause, Lutz, E-mail: ltz.krause@gmail.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Bibiloni, Rodrigo, E-mail: Rodrigo.Bibiloni@agresearch.co.nz [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Schmitt, Bertrand, E-mail: bertrand.schmitt@rdls.nestle.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Reuteler, Gloria, E-mail: gloria.reuteler@rdls.nestle.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland); Brüssow, Harald, E-mail: harald.bruessow@rdls.nestle.com [Nestlé Research Centre, Nestec Ltd, Vers-chez-les-Blanc, CH-1000 Lausanne 26 (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Phage therapy has a long tradition in Eastern Europe, where preparations are comprised of complex phage cocktails whose compositions have not been described. We investigated the composition of a phage cocktail from the Russian pharmaceutical company Microgen targeting Escherichia coli/Proteus infections. Electron microscopy identified six phage types, with numerically T7-like phages dominating over T4-like phages. A metagenomic approach using taxonomical classification, reference mapping and de novo assembly identified 18 distinct phage types, including 7 genera of Podoviridae, 2 established and 2 proposed genera of Myoviridae, and 2 genera of Siphoviridae. De novo assembly yielded 7 contigs greater than 30 kb, including a 147-kb Myovirus genome and a 42-kb genome of a potentially new phage. Bioinformatic analysis did not reveal undesired genes and a small human volunteer trial did not associate adverse effects with oral phage exposure. - Highlights: • We analyzed the composition of a commercial Russian phage cocktail. • The cocktail consists of at least 10 different phage genera. • No undesired genes were detected. • No adverse effects were seen upon oral application in a small human clinical trial.

  17. Safety analysis of a Russian phage cocktail: From MetaGenomic analysis to oral application in healthy human subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallin, Shawna; Alam Sarker, Shafiqul; Barretto, Caroline; Sultana, Shamima; Berger, Bernard; Huq, Sayeda; Krause, Lutz; Bibiloni, Rodrigo; Schmitt, Bertrand; Reuteler, Gloria; Brüssow, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Phage therapy has a long tradition in Eastern Europe, where preparations are comprised of complex phage cocktails whose compositions have not been described. We investigated the composition of a phage cocktail from the Russian pharmaceutical company Microgen targeting Escherichia coli/Proteus infections. Electron microscopy identified six phage types, with numerically T7-like phages dominating over T4-like phages. A metagenomic approach using taxonomical classification, reference mapping and de novo assembly identified 18 distinct phage types, including 7 genera of Podoviridae, 2 established and 2 proposed genera of Myoviridae, and 2 genera of Siphoviridae. De novo assembly yielded 7 contigs greater than 30 kb, including a 147-kb Myovirus genome and a 42-kb genome of a potentially new phage. Bioinformatic analysis did not reveal undesired genes and a small human volunteer trial did not associate adverse effects with oral phage exposure. - Highlights: • We analyzed the composition of a commercial Russian phage cocktail. • The cocktail consists of at least 10 different phage genera. • No undesired genes were detected. • No adverse effects were seen upon oral application in a small human clinical trial

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica-Specific Infection by Bacteriophages TG1 and ϕR1-RT Is Dependent on Temperature-Regulated Expression of the Phage Host Receptor OmpF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Velarde, Carlos G; Happonen, Lotta; Pajunen, Maria; Leskinen, Katarzyna; Kropinski, Andrew M; Mattinen, Laura; Rajtor, Monika; Zur, Joanna; Smith, Darren; Chen, Shu; Nawaz, Ayesha; Johnson, Roger P; Odumeru, Joseph A; Griffiths, Mansel W; Skurnik, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages present huge potential both as a resource for developing novel tools for bacterial diagnostics and for use in phage therapy. This potential is also valid for bacteriophages specific for Yersinia enterocolitica To increase our knowledge of Y. enterocolitica-specific phages, we characterized two novel yersiniophages. The genomes of the bacteriophages vB_YenM_TG1 (TG1) and vB_YenM_ϕR1-RT (ϕR1-RT), isolated from pig manure in Canada and from sewage in Finland, consist of linear double-stranded DNA of 162,101 and 168,809 bp, respectively. Their genomes comprise 262 putative coding sequences and 4 tRNA genes and share 91% overall nucleotide identity. Based on phylogenetic analyses of their whole-genome sequences and large terminase subunit protein sequences, a genus named Tg1virus within the family Myoviridae is proposed, with TG1 and ϕR1-RT (R1RT in the ICTV database) as member species. These bacteriophages exhibit a host range restricted to Y. enterocolitica and display lytic activity against the epidemiologically significant serotypes O:3, O:5,27, and O:9 at and below 25°C. Adsorption analyses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and OmpF mutants demonstrate that these phages use both the LPS inner core heptosyl residues and the outer membrane protein OmpF as phage receptors. Based on RNA sequencing and quantitative proteomics, we also demonstrate that temperature-dependent infection is due to strong repression of OmpF at 37°C. In addition, ϕR1-RT was shown to be able to enter into a pseudolysogenic state. Together, this work provides further insight into phage-host cell interactions by highlighting the importance of understanding underlying factors which may affect the abundance of phage host receptors on the cell surface. Only a small number of bacteriophages infecting Y. enterocolitica, the predominant causative agent of yersiniosis, have been previously described. Here, two newly isolated Y. enterocolitica phages were studied in detail, with the aim of

  19. Temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phages expressing superinfection exclusion proteins of the Ltp type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya eAli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipoprotein Ltp encoded by temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phage TP-J34 is the prototype of the wide-spread family of host cell surface-exposed lipoproteins involved in superinfection exclusion. When screening for other S. thermophilus phages expressing this type of lipoprotein, three temperate phages - TP-EW, TP-DSM20617 and TP-778 - were isolated. In this communication we present the total nucleotide sequences of TP-J34 and TP-778L. For TP-EW, a phage almost identical to TP-J34, besides the ltp gene only the two regions of deviation from TP-J34 DNA were analyzed: the gene encoding the tail protein causing an assembly defect in TP-J34 and the gene encoding the lysin, which in TP-EW contains an intron. For TP-DSM20617 only the sequence of the lysogeny module containing the ltp gene was determined. The region showed high homology to the same region of TP-778. For TP-778 we could show that absence of the attR region resulted in aberrant excision of phage DNA. The amino acid sequence of mature LtpTP-EW was shown to be identical to that of mature LtpTP-J34, whereas the amino acid sequence of mature LtpTP-778 was shown to differ from mature LtpTP-J34 in eight amino acid positions. LtpTP-DSM20617 was shown to differ from LtpTP-778 in just one amino acid position. In contrast to LtpTP-J34, LtpTP-778 did not affect infection of lactococcal phage P008 instead increased activity against phage P001 was noticed.

  20. Damage of plants due to peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, H.; Terakado, K.

    1974-02-01

    In Japan plant damages began to resemble those due to PAN about 1972. Exposure experiments with artifically synthesized PAN in an environment simulation room determined the concentration of PAN and its duration to examine the relationship between these data in the field and crop damage. Synthesized PAN created by irradiating a mixture of ethyl nitrate and oxygen with ultraviolet light gave results similar to those seen in fields. From the end of April to the end of November, damages to petunias seemingly due to PAN appeared 15 times. The symptoms differed with the variety of petunia. After 14 experiments in fields from September 20 to November 30 with a continuous determination of the environmental concentration of PAN, damages to petunia were confirmed on 6 days when the maximum PAN concentration range was 3.0-6.7 ppb. The duration of concentrations higher than 3 ppb was 2-13 hr. The most serious damage appeared on September 20 when a concentration of more than 5 ppb continued for 7 hours. No damage appeared with a long continuation (6-12 hr) of a lower concentration of PAN of 2 ppb. Inter-varietal grafting showed that the symptoms and the degree of damage due to PAN were influenced only by the physiological specificity of the aerial portion of the plant. Leaves which are most affected by PAN differed with the variety of petunia.

  1. Development of a Phage Cocktail to Control Proteus mirabilis Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luís D. R.; Veiga, Patrícia; Cerca, Nuno; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Almeida, Carina; Azeredo, Joana; Sillankorva, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is an enterobacterium that causes catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) due to its ability to colonize and form crystalline biofilms on the catheters surface. CAUTIs are very difficult to treat, since biofilm structures are highly tolerant to antibiotics. Phages have been used widely to control a diversity of bacterial species, however, a limited number of phages for P. mirabilis have been isolated and studied. Here we report the isolation of two novel virulent phages, the podovirus vB_PmiP_5460 and the myovirus vB_PmiM_5461, which are able to target, respectively, 16 of the 26 and all the Proteus strains tested in this study. Both phages have been characterized thoroughly and sequencing data revealed no traces of genes associated with lysogeny. To further evaluate the phages’ ability to prevent catheter’s colonization by Proteus, the phages adherence to silicone surfaces was assessed. Further tests in phage-coated catheters using a dynamic biofilm model simulating CAUTIs, have shown a significant reduction of P. mirabilis biofilm formation up to 168 h of catheterization. These results highlight the potential usefulness of the two isolated phages for the prevention of surface colonization by this bacterium. PMID:27446059

  2. Survival and mutagenesis in UV-irradiated phage: Multi-hit kinetics of mutation induction and lack of indirect induction by infection with UV-irradiated phage of error-prone repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, G.; Mennigmann, H.D.; Kaplan, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the question of whether Weigle-reactivation (WR) and Weigle-mutagenesis (WM) can be indirectly induced by infection with UV-irradiated phage. Experiments neither with phage lambda of Escherichia coli nor with phage kappa of Serratia marcescens show such induction. In this respect phage DNA differs from F'-DNA or Hfr-DNA; possible explanations are discussed. In both systems clear plaque mutations can also be induced by UV without irradiation of the host cells; they appear, in unirradiated and irradiated host cells, with an increase in frequency which is greater than proportional to the UV dose. It is concluded that mutation induction of phage in the unirradiated host cells is due to a low level constitutive mutagenic repair; this could either be due to 'spontaneous' induction of the mutagenic SOS function or it could be a mechanism different from this one. Host irradiation would give rise to additional activity by the induced SOS function leading to WR and WM. It is further concluded that deviation of the induction kinetics from a linear dose-dependence is not due to the necessary induction of SOS functions. (author)

  3. The promise of bacteriophage therapy for Burkholderia cepacia complex respiratory infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Dawn Semler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, increased attention has been given to evaluating the efficacy of phage therapy, especially in scenarios where the bacterial infectious agent of interest is highly antibiotic resistant. In this regard, phage therapy is especially applicable to infections caused by the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC since members of the BCC are antibiotic pan-resistant. Current studies in BCC phage therapy are unique from many other avenues of phage therapy research in that the research is not only comprised of phage isolation, in vitro phage characterization and in vivo infection model efficacy, but also adapting aerosol drug delivery techniques to aerosol phage formulation delivery and storage.

  4. Genomic Characterization of a Novel Phage Found in Black Abalone (Haliotis cracherodii) Infected with Withering Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closek, C. J.; Langevin, S.; Burge, C. A.; Crosson, L.; White, S.; Friedman, C. S.

    2016-02-01

    Withering syndrome (WS), caused by the bacterium Candidatus Xenohaliotis californiensis, a Rickettsia-like organism (RLO), infects many species of abalone. Black abalone (Haliotis cracherodii), one of two endangered species of abalone, has experienced high population losses along the California coast due to WS. Recently, we observed reduced pathogenicity and mortality events in RLO-infected abalone when a novel bacteriophage (phage) was also present. To better understand phage-bacterium dynamics and develop more informative diagnostic tools, we sequenced the genome of the novel phage associated with the RLO responsible for WS. Metagenomic sequencing libraries were prepared with extracted genomic DNA from two experimentally infected H. cracherodii and phage sequences were enriched using hydroxyapatite chromatography normalization. Normalized libraries were individually barcoded and sequenced with Illumina MiSeq. Raw sequence reads were processed using VIrominer and de novo assembly produced one single phage-like contig (35.7Kb) from the experimentally infected abalone. This highly divergent genome had closest homology with a virus associated with abalone shriveling syndrome (SS). Of the 34 predicted ORFs, overlapping homology with the SS virus ranged from 20-72%, demonstrating the phage sequenced is genetically distinct from any known phage. The phage-like sequences represented a significant portion of the total reads sequenced ( 2 million of the 12 million paired-end reads; 17%) and we obtained 94,000X coverage across the novel phage genome. Beyond characterization of this novel phage, which appears to reduce pathogenicity of the RLO, the genome enabled us to develop quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization assays as diagnostic tools. These tools allow us to detect and quantify this phage in the endangered H. cracherodii.

  5. Phage and bacteria support mutual diversity in a narrowing staircase of coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Härter, Jan Olaf Mirko; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    arms race will typically favor high growth rate, but a phage that infects two bacterial strains differently can occasionally eliminate the fastest growing bacteria. This context-dependent fitness allows abrupt resetting of the 'Red-Queen's race' and constrains the local diversity.......The competitive exclusion principle states that phage diversity M should not exceed bacterial diversity N. By analyzing the steady-state solutions of multistrain equations, we find a new constraint: the diversity N of bacteria living on the same resources is constrained to be M or M+1 in terms...... of the diversity of their phage predators. We quantify how the parameter space of coexistence exponentially decreases with diversity. For diversity to grow, an open or evolving ecosystem needs to climb a narrowing 'diversity staircase' by alternatingly adding new bacteria and phages. The unfolding coevolutionary...

  6. The Pan-STARRS PS1 Image Processing Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnier, E.

    The Pan-STARRS PS1 Image Processing Pipeline (IPP) performs the image processing and data analysis tasks needed to enable the scientific use of the images obtained by the Pan-STARRS PS1 prototype telescope. The primary goals of the IPP are to process the science images from the Pan-STARRS telescopes and make the results available to other systems within Pan-STARRS. It also is responsible for combining all of the science images in a given filter into a single representation of the non-variable component of the night sky defined as the "Static Sky". To achieve these goals, the IPP also performs other analysis functions to generate the calibrations needed in the science image processing, and to occasionally use the derived data to generate improved astrometric and photometric reference catalogs. It also provides the infrastructure needed to store the incoming data and the resulting data products. The IPP inherits lessons learned, and in some cases code and prototype code, from several other astronomy image analysis systems, including Imcat (Kaiser), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (REF), the Elixir system (Magnier & Cuillandre), and Vista (Tonry). Imcat and Vista have a large number of robust image processing functions. SDSS has demonstrated a working analysis pipeline and large-scale databasesystem for a dedicated project. The Elixir system has demonstrated an automatic image processing system and an object database system for operational usage. This talk will present an overview of the IPP architecture, functional flow, code development structure, and selected analysis algorithms. Also discussed is the HW highly parallel HW configuration necessary to support PS1 operational requirements. Finally, results are presented of the processing of images collected during PS1 early commissioning tasks utilizing the Pan-STARRS Test Camera #3.

  7. ATLAS BigPanDA Monitoring and Its Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wenaus, Torre; The ATLAS collaboration; Korchuganova, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    BigPanDA is the latest generation of the monitoring system for the Production and Distributed Analysis (PanDA) system. The BigPanDA monitor is a core component of PanDA and also serves the monitoring needs of the new ATLAS Production System Prodsys-2. BigPanDA has been developed to serve the growing computation needs of the ATLAS Experiment and the wider applications of PanDA beyond ATLAS. Through a system-wide job database, the BigPanDA monitor provides a comprehensive and coherent view of the tasks and jobs executed by the system, from high level summaries to detailed drill-down job diagnostics. The system has been in production and has remained in continuous development since mid 2014, today effectively managing more than 2 million jobs per day distributed over 150 computing centers worldwide. BigPanDA also delivers web-based analytics and system state views to groups of users including distributed computing systems operators, shifters, physicist end-users, computing managers and accounting services. Provi...

  8. Impedance Measurements Could Accelerate Phage-Based Identification of Bacillus anthracis and Other Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Impedance Measurements Could Accelerate Phage-Based Identification of Bacillus anthracis And Other Bacteria Thomas Brown, Salwa Shan, Teresa...infection can be detected as early as one hour after exposing as few as 105 CFU bacteria to the stressor. We predicted that similar responses could be used... bacteria to form confluent growth and for phage-induced plaques to appear. Techniques that permit faster detection of species-specific bacteria /phage

  9. Human recombinant Fab fragment from combinatorial libraries of a B-cell lymphoma patient recognizes core protein of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Yoko; Narushima, Yuta; Ohshima, Motohiro; Yoshida, Akira; Yoneta, Naruki; Masaki, Yasufumi; Itoh, Kunihiko

    2018-01-01

    CD antigens are well known as therapeutic targets of B-cell lymphoma. To isolate therapeutic antibodies that recognize novel targets other than CD antigens, we constructed a phage display combinatorial antibody Fab library from bone marrow lymphocytes of B-cell lymphoma patient. To eliminate antibodies reactive with known B-cell lymphoma antigen, non-hematopoietic and patient's sera reactive HeLaS3 cells was selected as a target of whole cell panning. Five rounds of panning against live HeLaS3 cells retrieved single Fab clone, termed AHSA (Antibody to HeLa Surface Antigen). Using phage display random peptide library, LSYLEP was identified as an epitope sequence of AHSA. LC-MS/MS analysis of AHSA-precipitated HeLaS3 cell lysates detected several fragments corresponding to the sequence of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) core protein. Since LSYLEP sequence was at the position of 313-318 of CSPG4, we considered that CSPG4 was AHSA-associated antigen. Double staining of CSPG4-postive MDA-MB-435S cells with AHSA and anti-CSPG4 rabbit antibody showed identical staining position, and reduced AHSA reactivity was observed in CSPG4-siRNA treated MDA-MB-435S cells. In conclusion, we retrieved a human Fab from antibody library of B-cell lymphoma patient, and identified CSPG4 as a recognizing antigen. AHSA may have potential benefits for development of CSPG4-targeting theranostics for B-cell lymphoma. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Development of phage/antibody immobilized magnetostrictive biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liling

    There is an urgent need for biosensors that are able to detect and quantify the presence of a small amount of pathogens in a real-time manner accurately and quickly to guide prevention efforts and assay food and water quality. Acoustic wave (AW) devices, whose performance is defined by mass sensitivity (Sm) and quality factor (Q value), have been extensively studied as high performance biosensor platforms. However, current AW devices still face some challenges such as the difficulty to be employed in liquid and low Q value in practical applications. The objective of this research is to develop magnetostrictive sensors which include milli/microcantilever type (MSMC) and particle type (MSP). Compared to other AW devices, MSMC exhibits the following advantages: (1) wireless/remote driving and sensing; (2) easy to fabricate; (3) works well in liquid; (4) exhibits a high Q value (> 500 in air). The fundamental study of the damping effect on MSMCs from the surrounding media including air and liquids were conducted to improve the Q value of MSMCs. The experiment results show that the Q value is dependent on the properties of surrounding media (e.g. viscosity, density), the geometry of the MSMCs, and the harmonic mode on the resonance behavior of MSMCs, etc. The phage-coated MSMC has high specificity and sensitivity even while used in water with a low concentration of targeted bacteria. Two currently developed phages, JRB7 and E2, respectively respond to Bacillus anthracis spores and Salmonella typhimurium, were employed as bio-recognition elements in this research. The phage-immobilized MSMC biosensors exhibited high performance and detection of limit was 5 x 104 cfu/ml for the MSMC in size of 1.4 x 0.8 x 0.035 mm. The MSMC-based biosensors were indicated as a very potential method for in-situ monitoring of the biological quality in water. The MSP combine antibody was used to detect Staphylococcus aureus in this experiment. The interface between MSPs and antibody was

  11. Isolation and Expression of the Lysis Genes of Actinomyces naeslundii Phage Av-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, Allan L.; Barcak, Gerard J.; Guo, Ming

    2006-01-01

    Like most gram-positive oral bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii is resistant to salivary lysozyme and to most other lytic enzymes. We are interested in studying the lysins of phages of this important oral bacterium as potential diagnostic and therapeutic agents. To identify the Actinomyces phage genes encoding these species-specific enzymes in Escherichia coli, we constructed a new cloning vector, pAD330, that can be used to enrich for and isolate phage holin genes, which are located adjacent to the lysin genes in most phage genomes. Cloned holin insert sequences were used to design sequencing primers to identify nearby lysin genes by using whole phage DNA as the template. From partial digestions of A. naeslundii phage Av-1 genomic DNA we were able to clone, in independent experiments, inserts that complemented the defective λ holin in pAD330, as evidenced by extensive lysis after thermal induction. The DNA sequence of the inserts in these plasmids revealed that both contained the complete lysis region of Av-1, which is comprised of two holin-like genes, designated holA and holB, and an endolysin gene, designated lysA. We were able to subclone and express these genes and determine some of the functional properties of their gene products. PMID:16461656

  12. Three-Dimensional Cockpit Display System for Improved Situational Awareness, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a 3D cockpit display (3D-COD) system for improved pilot situational awareness and safety in 3D airspace by...

  13. Viruses in the marine environment: community dynamics, phage-host interactions and genomic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lara de la Casa, Elena

    2014-01-01

    There are an estimated 1030 viruses in the world oceans, the majority of which are phages (viruses that infect bacteria). Extensive research has demonstrated the significant influence of marine phages on microbial abundance, community structure, genetic exchange and global biogeochemical cycles. In this thesis, we contribute to increase the knowledge about the ecological role of viruses in marine systems, but also we aimed to provide a better understanding about the interactions between phage...

  14. Phage type and sensitivity to antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus film-forming strains isolated from airway mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Voronkova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Today film-forming strains of bacteria play very important role in clinical pathology. Staphylococci are ones of most dangerous of them. This bacteria can determine different pathological processes, for example, complication of airway mucosa. The ability to form a biofilm is one of the main properties of nosocomial strains. These strains should be monitored and their carriers are to be properly treated. To determine the origin of staphylococci strains we used bacteriophages from the International kit. The aim of research was to determine the phage type of staphylococci film-forming strains, that were isolated from naso-pharingial mucosa. Phage typing has been carried out for 16 film-forming strains of S. aureus. To solve this problem, we used the International phage kit by Fisher’s method. As a result, sensitivity to phages from the International kit showed 53.8% of studied strains of S. aureus. 64.3% of sensitivity strains were lysed by one of the phage, 21.4% – were by two of the phages, 14.3% – by three of the phages. Isolates were sensitive to phages: 81 – 42.9%, 75 – 35.7%, 28.6% were sensitive to phages 47 and 53. All cases of detection of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with the ability to form biofilm. Among non-film-forming strains there was no sensitive strains for this phage. Film-forming strains resist to erythromycin (62.5%, ciprofloxacin (43.8%, gentamicin (56.3%, tetracycline (87.5%, amoxicillin (93.8%, and cefuroxime (37.5%. All cases of sensitivity to phage 47 coincided with resistance to erythromycin, amoxicillin and tetracycline. For two of these strains, we also defined resistance to gentamicin and for one of them – to ciprofloxacin. Results of research allowed to relate the bacterial cultures for determining the type. This may have implications for studying of film-forming ability, because surface structures of bacterial cell take place in this process. Belonging of an isolate to specific phage type may

  15. Use of phages to control Vibrio splendidus infection in the juvenile sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jiancheng; Wang, Xitao; Wang, Lili; Cao, Zhenhui; Xu, Yongping

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, we isolated 3 bacteriophages with the ability to control Vibrio splendidus, a bacterium known to cause disease in the juvenile sea cucumber. These bacteriophages were designated as vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-1 (PVS-1), vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-2 (PVS-2) and vB_VspS_VS-ABTNL-3 (PVS-3). The ability of the 3 phages to inhibit the growth of V. splendidus VS-ABTNL was tested in vitro using each of the 3 phages individually or in the form of a cocktail of all 3 phages in the proportion of 1:1:1. All treated cultures produced a significant (P sea cucumbers (23 ± 2 g) were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 treatments. Each treatment was housed in 3 PVC tanks (38 cm × 54 cm × 80 cm) with 20 sea cucumbers per tank. Six diets were prepared including an unsupplemented control diet, antibiotic treatment diet, 3 diets containing 1 of the 3 phages individually and a diet containing a cocktail of all 3 phages. After 60 days of feeding, all sea cucumber were challenged with V. splendidus VS-ABTNL by immersion in sea water containing a bacterial concentration of 6 × 10(6) CFU/mL for 2 days. The survival rate of sea cucumbers during the next 10 days was 18% for the unsupplemented diet, 82% for the antibiotic treatment, 82% for the phage cocktail, 65% for phage PVS-1, 58% for phage PVS-2 and 50% for phage PVS-3. There were no significant differences in weight gain, ingestion rate or feed conversion among sea cucumber fed the 4 phage treatments compared with those fed the unsupplemented diet (P > 0.05). The levels of nitric oxide synthase and acid phosphatase of sea cucumbers fed phage-containing diets were significantly (P  0.05) were detected among the 4 phage-fed treatments. An additional study was conducted in which 60 healthy sea cucumbers (23 ± 2 g) were randomly assigned to a control, an untreated group and a test group to investigate the effects of injecting phages by coelomic injection on the survival rate and enzyme activities in the coelomic fluid

  16. Metagenomic Analysis of Therapeutic PYO Phage Cocktails from 1997 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villarroel, Julia; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    in the two cocktails. One of these showed no similarity to publicly available phage genomes. Representatives of phages targeting E. faecalis, E. faecium, E. coli, Proteus, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were found in both cocktails. Finally, we estimated larger overlap of the PYO2000 cocktail to PYO97 compared...

  17. Photoreactivation of cells and phages inactivated by UV of ecological wave-lengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samojlova, K.A.; Yanovska, Eh.; Vizdalova, M.; Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Biofysikalni Ustav)

    1979-01-01

    It has been found that the photoreactivity of infusoria Paramecium caudatum and bacteria Escherichia coli is high and practically similar if they are irradiated with short-wave (254 nm) and mean-wave (300-315 nm) UV radiation. The cells damaged with long-wave (315-400 nm) UV rays are not photoactivated. The latter is caused by the appearance of nonphotoreactivated damages since the phages jrradiated with the same UV rays are reactivated extremely weakly in the intact cells of bacteria (phage T7) or are not reactivated at all (phage lambdasub(c1 857))

  18. Evolution of the ATLAS PanDA Production and Distributed Analysis System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeno, T; Wenaus, T; Fine, V; Potekhin, M; Panitkin, S; De, K; Nilsson, P; Stradling, A; Walker, R; Compostella, G

    2012-01-01

    The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system has been developed to meet ATLAS production and analysis requirements for a data-driven workload management system capable of operating at LHC data processing scale. PanDA has performed well with high reliability and robustness during the two years of LHC data-taking, while being actively evolved to meet the rapidly changing requirements for analysis use cases. We will present an overview of system evolution including automatic rebrokerage and reattempt for analysis jobs, adaptation for the CernVM File System, support for the multi-cloud model through which Tier-2 sites act as members of multiple clouds, pledged resource management and preferential brokerage, and monitoring improvements. We will also describe results from the analysis of two years of PanDA usage statistics, current issues, and plans for the future.

  19. Biology of the temperate Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophage TP-J34 and physical characterization of the phage genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve, Horst; Freudenberg, Wiebke; Diestel-Feddersen, Frederike; Ehlert, Regina; Heller, Knut J.

    2003-01-01

    The temperate Streptococcus thermophilus bacteriophage TP-J34 was identified in the lysogenic host strain J34. The majority of phage particles produced upon induction was defective and noninfectious, consisting of DNA-filled heads lacking tails. A physical map (45.6 kb) was established. Analysis of minor restriction bands of the DNA isolated from phage particles as well as the analysis of the protein pattern indicated that phage TP-J34 is a pac-type phage. This was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy using antisera raised against virulent cos- and pac-type S. thermophilus phages. The lysogenic host J34 but not its noninducible derivate J34-12 contained phage DNA in the nonintegrated state and exhibited autolysis at elevated temperatures. Prophage-carrying strains grew homogeneously while 16 of 20 prophage-cured derivatives aggregated and sedimented rapidly. When phage TP-J34 was propagated lytically on a prophage-cured host strain, a 2.7-kb site-specific deletion occurred in the phage genome. This deletion was also identified in the prophage DNAs of relysogenized strains

  20. Prevalence of oral lesions in pan vendor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Gadodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being a portal of entry to various smoking and smokeless tobacco products, oral cavity is prone to deleterious effects. Present study consist of epidemiological survey to elucidate oral lesions in pan vendors. Aims and objectives: To detect oral lesions in pan vendors and compare it with controls. To detect habit pattern and prevalence of OSMF and other lesions in pan vendors as compared to controls- To identify, recognize and evaluate the possible etiology for OSMF, encompassing various chewing and smoking habits. Materials and methods: Study population consist of 170 pan vendors with age ranging from 15 to 55 years and equal number of sex matched controls selected randomly. Results: Prevalence of oral lesions in pan vendors is statistically significantly higher as compared to controls. The habit of arecanut chewing in various forms was present in all cases. The habit of smoking and smokeless tobacco products was present in all cases. Conclusion: Pan vendors are at higher risk for oral lesions than controls. There is increase in relative risk with increase in duration and frequency of habit.

  1. Rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves using phage-immobilized magnetoelastic biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Shin; Li, Suiqiong; Chai, Yating; Park, Mi-Kyung; Shen, Wen; Barbaree, James M.; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents an investigation into the use of magnetoelastic biosensors for the rapid detection of Salmonella typhimurium on fresh spinach leaves. The biosensors used in this investigation were comprised of a strip-shaped, goldcoated sensor platform (2 mm-long) diced from a ferromagnetic, amorphous alloy and a filamentous fd-tet phage which specifically binds with S. typhimurium. After surface blocking with bovine serum albumin, these biosensors were, without any preceding sample preparation, directly placed on wet spinach leaves inoculated with various concentrations of S. typhimurium. Upon contact with cells, the phage binds S. typhimurium to the sensor thereby increasing the total mass of the sensor. This change in mass causes a corresponding decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. After 25 min, the sensors were collected from the leaf surface and measurements of the resonant frequency were performed immediately. The total assay time was less than 30 min. The frequency changes for measurement sensors (i.e., phageimmobilized) were found to be statistically different from those for control sensors (sensors without phage), down to 5 × 106 cells/ml. The detection limit may be improved by using smaller, micron-sized sensors that will have a higher probability of contacting Salmonella on the rough surfaces of spinach leaves.

  2. HEALTH INITIATIVES IN NATIONAL PAN-AMERICAN SWIMMING FEDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence Perez Diaz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: National Swimming Federations (NFs supervise a large number of athletes and have the duty to protect their health that implies also the opportunity to improve public health. Objective: 1 To determine if the health professionals, the priorities, activities, and researches of the Pan-American NFs are focused on protecting athletes’ health and promoting the health of the population in general. 2 To determine if the FINA rules, projects and programs are applied. Method: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among the 45 Pan-American NFs requesting information on the profile of the health professionals (dimension 1; D1, on programs, activities and research to promote health measures (dimension 2; D2, and on the importance of Pan-American NFs for the health of athletes and for the promotion of health in society in general (dimension 3; D3. We performed a similarity study according to the Rogers-Tanimoto coefficient (D1 and D2 and the chi-squared test (χ² (D3. Results: Thirty NFs answered the survey (response rate: 66.6%. For each dimension, the NFs were classified into five groups (A, B, C, D, E. Among the NFs, 33.3% have physicians and 33.3% have physical therapists. In each of the dimensions, Group A accounted for the majority of NFs but their results were lower. The groups with the highest rates in each dimension contained a maximum of two NFs. The health of the elite athletes was ranked as the fourth most important issue. The health of the recreational athletes and the health of the general population had the lowest priority. Drowning prevention programs were the most common. Conclusions: Pan-American NFs have few medical resources and only a few have injury prevention programs for elite athletes. There is a need to improve health promotion programs to achieve relevant social outcomes.

  3. Is phage therapy acceptable in the immunocompromised host?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysowski, Jan; Górski, Andrzej

    2008-09-01

    Over the last decade, bacteriophages (bacterial viruses) have emerged as the major alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. While a considerable body of evidence has accumulated for the efficacy and safety of phage therapy in immunocompetent patients, data remain relatively scarce regarding its use in the immunocompromised host. To our knowledge, the present article is the first to summarize all findings, of both experimental and clinical studies, that may be relevant to the employment of phage therapy in immunocompromised patients. The available data suggest that bacteriophages could also be an efficacious and safe therapeutic modality in such patients.

  4. Novel phage group infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis, as revealed by genomic and proteomic analysis of bacteriophage Ldl1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Eoghan; Mahony, Jennifer; Neve, Horst; Noben, Jean-Paul; Dal Bello, Fabio; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Ldl1 is a virulent phage infecting the dairy starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis LdlS. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that this phage exhibits a large head and a long tail and bears little resemblance to other characterized phages infecting Lactobacillus delbrueckii. In vitro propagation of this phage revealed a latent period of 30 to 40 min and a burst size of 59.9 +/- 1.9 phage particles. Comparative genomic and proteomic analyses showed remarkable similarity between the genome of Ldl1 and that of Lactobacillus plantarum phage ATCC 8014-B2. The genomic and proteomic characteristics of Ldl1 demonstrate that this phage does not belong to any of the four previously recognized L. delbrueckii phage groups, necessitating the creation of a new group, called group e, thus adding to the knowledge on the diversity of phages targeting strains of this industrially important lactic acid bacterial species.

  5. A human monoclonal antibody drug and target discovery platform for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Suschak, Jessica M; Samija, Ivan; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Childs, Richard W; Pavletic, Steven Z; Bishop, Michael R; Rader, Christoph

    2009-11-12

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only potentially curative treatment available for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Here, we show that post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires can be mined for the discovery of fully human monoclonal antibodies to B-CLL cell-surface antigens. Sera collected from B-CLL patients at defined times after alloHSCT showed selective binding to primary B-CLL cells. Pre-alloHSCT sera, donor sera, and control sera were negative. To identify post-alloHSCT serum antibodies and subsequently B-CLL cell-surface antigens they recognize, we generated a human antibody-binding fragment (Fab) library from post-alloHSCT peripheral blood mononuclear cells and selected it on primary B-CLL cells by phage display. A panel of Fab with B-CLL cell-surface reactivity was strongly enriched. Selection was dominated by highly homologous Fab predicted to bind the same antigen. One Fab was converted to immunoglobulin G1 and analyzed for reactivity with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from B-CLL patients and healthy volunteers. Cell-surface antigen expression was restricted to primary B cells and up-regulated in primary B-CLL cells. Mining post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires offers a novel route to discover fully human monoclonal antibodies and identify antigens of potential therapeutic relevance to B-CLL and possibly other cancers. Trials described herein were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as nos. NCT00055744 and NCT00003838.

  6. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  7. Restriction of phage T4 internal protein I mutants by a strain of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, L.W.; Abremski, K.

    1974-01-01

    Phage T4 internal protein I(IPI), a small (ca, 10,000 MW), basic protein injected into the host with the phage DNA, is not required for infection of most hosts, but mutants defective in IPI are restricted by at least one naturally occurring strain of Escherichia coli, CT 596 (CT). Phages lacking IPI (IPI - ) appear to inject their DNA and bind it to the membrane of CT cells as well as wild-type phage T4 does, but shutoff of host protein synthesis, initiation of T4 protein synthesis, and cell killing are abnormal in the IPI - mutant infected CT host. The injection of IPI appears to be important in allowing T4 DNA to carry out early steps involved in takeover of this host. Restriction of IPI - phage growth by CT cells appears to be due, at least in part, to a defective prophage it harbors which renders the host resistant to successful infection by phage T4 which lack IPI or rII functions. Bacteria cured of this prophage can be infected by mutants defective in these functions. The resistance of CT cells to other coliphages, and the questi