WorldWideScience

Sample records for improved laser trapping

  1. Experimental Improvement of Signal of a Single Laser-Cooled Trapped 40Ca+ Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Hua-Lin; QUO Bin; GUAN Hua; LIU Qu; HUANG Xue-Ren; GAO Ke-Lin

    2007-01-01

    A single 40Ca+ ion is loaded in a miniature Paul trap and the probability of directly loading a single ion is above 50%. The signal-to-noise ratio and the storage time for a single ion have been improved by minimizing the ion micromotion and locking a 397 nm cooling laser to a Fabry-Perot interferometer and optogalvanic signal. From the fluorescence spectrum, the ion temperature is estimated to be about 5mK.

  2. Trapping ions with lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Cormick, Cecilia; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    This work theoretically addresses the trapping an ionized atom with a single valence electron by means of lasers, analyzing qualitatively and quantitatively the consequences of the net charge of the particle. In our model, the coupling between the ion and the electromagnetic field includes the charge monopole and the internal dipole, within a multipolar expansion of the interaction Hamiltonian. Specifically, we perform a Power-Zienau-Woolley transformation, taking into account the motion of the center of mass. The net charge produces a correction in the atomic dipole which is of order $m_e/M$ with $m_e$ the electron mass and $M$ the total mass of the ion. With respect to neutral atoms, there is also an extra coupling to the laser field which can be approximated by that of the monopole located at the position of the center of mass. These additional effects, however, are shown to be very small compared to the dominant dipolar trapping term.

  3. Investigations of the ground-state hyperfine atomic structure and beta decay measurement prospects of 21Na with improved laser trapping techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Mary Anderson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which a neutral atom laser trap loaded with radioactive 21Na was improved and then used for measurements. The sodium isotope (half-life=22 sec) is produced on line at the 88 in. cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The author developed an effective magnesium oxide target system which is crucial to deliver a substantive beam of 21Na to the experiment. Efficient manipulation of the 21Na beam with lasers allowed 30,000 atoms to be contained in a magneto-optical trap. Using the cold trapped atoms, the author measured to high precision the hyperfine splitting of the atomic ground state of 21Na. She measured the 3S1/2(F=1,m=0)-3S1/2(F=2,m=0) atomic level splitting of 21Na to be 1,906,471,870±200 Hz. Additionally, she achieved initial detection of beta decay from the trap and evaluated the prospects of precision beta decay correlation studies with trapped atoms.

  4. Direct frequency comb laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Jayich, A M; Campbell, W C

    2016-01-01

    Continuous wave (CW) lasers are the enabling technology for producing ultracold atoms and molecules through laser cooling and trapping. The resulting pristine samples of slow moving particles are the de facto starting point for both fundamental and applied science when a highly-controlled quantum system is required. Laser cooled atoms have recently led to major advances in quantum information, the search to understand dark energy, quantum chemistry, and quantum sensors. However, CW laser technology currently limits laser cooling and trapping to special types of elements that do not include highly abundant and chemically relevant atoms such as hydrogen, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that Doppler cooling and trapping by optical frequency combs may provide a route to trapped, ultracold atoms whose spectra are not amenable to CW lasers. We laser cool a gas of atoms by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb, an efficient process to which every comb tooth coherently cont...

  5. Laser spectroscopy of trapped Th^3+ ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Adam; Campbell, Corey; Churchill, Layne; Depalatis, Michael; Naylor, David; Kuzmich, Alex; Chapman, Michael

    2008-05-01

    We are applying the techniques of laser cooling and ion trapping to investigate the low lying nuclear isomeric state in ^229Th. We will confine Th^3+ atoms in an RF trap [1] and sympathetically cool them with barium ions. The ions are produced by laser ablation from a thorium metal target by the third harmonic of a Q-switched YAG laser. Using mass-spectroscopic techniques we separate out the Th^3+ ions from the plume of ablation products. We once trapped we will observe fluorescence from the trapped ions using transitions at 984 nm and 690 nm. [1] Peik E. and Tamm Chr., Europhysics Letters, 61 (2) (2003)

  6. Laser cooling and trapping of barium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, Subhadeep

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping of heavy alkaline-earth element barium have been demonstrated for the first time ever. For any possible cycling transition in barium that could provide strong cooling forces, the excited state has a very large branching probability to metastable states. Additional lasers

  7. Laser cooling and trapping of barium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De, Subhadeep

    2008-01-01

    Laser cooling and trapping of heavy alkaline-earth element barium have been demonstrated for the first time ever. For any possible cycling transition in barium that could provide strong cooling forces, the excited state has a very large branching probability to metastable states. Additional lasers a

  8. Laser spectroscopy with an electrostatic ConeTrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, S., E-mail: sam.kelly@postgrad.manchester.ac.uk; Campbell, P. [University of Manchester, Nuclear Physics Group, Schuster Laboratory, Brunswick Street (United Kingdom); Cheal, B., E-mail: Bradley.Cheal@Liverpool.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory (United Kingdom); Eronen, T.; Geldhof, S.; Jokinen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilä, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Voss, A. [JYFL, University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2017-11-15

    A compact electrostatic trap has been designed and installed as part of the recent upgrades to the IGISOL IV facility. The ConeTrap provides an in vacuo optical pumping site for low energy (800 eV) ionic ensembles available for interaction periods of 10-100 ms. At present, 6.7(3) % of injected mass A=98 ions can be trapped, stored for 5 ms, extracted and transported to a laser-ion interaction region. This fraction represents those ions for which no perturbation to total energy or energy spread is observed. Proposed enhancements to the trap are designed to improve the trapping efficiency by up to a factor of 5. Differential pumping and reduction in background pressure below the present 10{sup −6} mbar will extend storage times beyond 100 ms.

  9. Laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ye XU; Wen-li WANG; Qing-hong ZHOU; Guo-hui LI; Hai-ling JIANG; Lin-fang CHEN; Jie YE; Zhi-hong ZHOU; Yin CAI; Hai-yao TANG; Min ZHOU

    2009-01-01

    The experiments on the laser cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms are reported, including the two-dimensional transversal cooling, longitudinal velocity Zeeman deceleration, and a magneto-optical trap with a broadband transition at a wavelength of 399 nm. The magnetic field distributions along the axis of a Zeeman slower were measured and in a good agreement with the calculated results. Cold ytterbium atoms were produced with a number of about 107 and a temperature of a few milli-Kelvin.In addition, using a 556-nm laser, the excitations of cold tterbium atoms at 1S0-3p1 transition were observed. The ytterbium atoms will be further cooled in a 556-nm magneto-optical trap and loaded into a three-dimensional optical lattice to make an ytterbium optical clock.

  10. Laser cooling and trapping of YO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shiqian; Collopy, Alejandra; Wu, Yewei; Chae, Eunmi; Ravi, Aakash; Anderegg, Loic; Augenbraun, Benjamin; Doyle, John; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Using microwave mixing of rotational states and only two vibrational repump lasers, we implement a cycling transition in the yttrium (II) monoxide (YO) molecule that is closed to the 106 level. With this cycling transition, a beam of YO from a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas cell is decelerated by the slowing lasers with broadband modulation and frequency chirping. The resulting decelerated molecules (less than 10 m/s) are slow enough to be loaded into a magneto-optical trap. We present progress towards loading into our radio frequency (5 MHz) MOT.

  11. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. G.

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron-positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  12. Radiative trapping in intense laser beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, J G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of electrons in counter-propagating, circularly polarized laser beams are shown to exhibit attractors whose ability to trap particles depends on the ratio of the beam intensities and a single parameter describing radiation reaction. Analytical expressions are found for the underlying limit cycles and the parameter range in which they are stable. In high-intensity optical pulses, where radiation reaction strongly modifies the trajectories, the production of collimated gamma-rays and the initiation of non-linear cascades of electron-positron pairs can be optimized by a suitable choice of the intensity ratio.

  13. Single-laser, one beam, tetrahedral magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeleyn, Matthieu; Griffin, Paul F; Riis, Erling; Arnold, Aidan S

    2009-08-03

    We have realized a 4-beam pyramidal magneto-optical trap ideally suited for future microfabrication. Three mirrors split and steer a single incoming beam into a tripod of reflected beams, allowing trapping in the four-beam overlap volume. We discuss the influence of mirror angle on cooling and trapping, finding optimum efficiency in a tetrahedral configuration. We demonstrate the technique using an ex-vacuo mirror system to illustrate the previously inaccessible supra-plane pyramid MOT configuration. Unlike standard pyramidal MOTs both the pyramid apex and its mirror angle are non-critical and our MOT offers improved molasses free from atomic shadows in the laser beams. The MOT scheme naturally extends to a 2-beam refractive version with high optical access. For quantum gas experiments, the mirror system could also be used for a stable 3D tetrahedral optical lattice.

  14. A Single Laser Cooled Trapped 40Ca+ Ion in a Miniature Paul Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Hua-Lin; GUAN Hua; HUANG Xue-Ren; LI Jiao-Mei; GAO Ke-Lin

    2005-01-01

    @@ We have observed the phenomenon of phase transition of a few trapped ions in a miniature Paul trap. Judging from the quantum jump signals, a single laser-cooled trapped Ca+ ion has been realized. The ion temperature is estimated to be 22mK. The result shows that the amplitude of ion micromotion is strongly dependent on the rf voltage.

  15. Improved magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    CERN Document Server

    McCarron, D J; Steinecker, M H; DeMille, D

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental results from a new scheme for magneto-optically trapping strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules, which provides increased confinement compared to our original work. The improved trap employs a new approach to magneto-optical trapping presented by M. Tarbutt, \\emph{arXiv preprint} 1409.0244, which provided insight for the first time into the source of the restoring force in magneto-optical traps (MOTs) where the cycling transition includes dark Zeeman sublevels (known as type-II MOTs). We measure a radial spring constant $20\\times$ greater than in our original work with SrF, comparable to the spring constants reported in atomic type-II MOTs. We achieve a trap lifetime $\\tau_{\\rm{MOT}}=136(2)$~ms, over $2\\times$ longer than originally reported for SrF. Finally, we demonstrate further cooling of the trapped molecules by briefly increasing the trapping lasers' detunings. Our trapping scheme remains a straightforward extension of atomic techniques and marks a step towards the direct product...

  16. Radiation-reaction trapping of electrons in extreme laser fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, L L; Pukhov, A; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-04-11

    A radiation-reaction trapping (RRT) of electrons is revealed in the near-QED regime of laser-plasma interaction. Electrons quivering in laser pulse experience radiation reaction (RR) recoil force by radiating photons. When the laser field reaches the threshold, the RR force becomes significant enough to compensate for the expelling laser ponderomotive force. Then electrons are trapped inside the laser pulse instead of being scattered off transversely and form a dense plasma bunch. The mechanism is demonstrated both by full three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations using the QED photonic approach and numerical test-particle modeling based on the classical Landau-Lifshitz formula of RR force. Furthermore, the proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  17. Radiation-Reaction Trapping of Electrons in Extreme Laser Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, L L; Kostyukov, I Yu; Shen, B F; Akli, K

    2014-01-01

    proposed analysis shows that the threshold of laser field amplitude for RRT is approximately the cubic root of laser wavelength over classical electron radius. Because of the pinching effect of the trapped electron bunch, the required laser intensity for RRT can be further reduced.

  18. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, V M; Gutierrez, M; Gomez, E; 10.1364/JOSAB.30.001205

    2013-01-01

    We present a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap produced using a single diode laser. We generate all the optical frequencies needed for trapping both species using a fiber intensity modulator. All the optical frequencies are amplified simultaneously using a tapered amplifier. The independent control of each frequency is on the RF side rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling applications that often require an acousto-optic modulator for each laser beam. Frequency changing capabilities are limited by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Traps for more isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator.

  19. Trapping, retention and laser cooling of Th3+ ions in a multisection linear quadrupole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisyuk, P. V.; Vasil'ev, O. S.; Derevyashkin, S. P.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Lebedinskii, Yu. Yu.; Poteshin, S. S.; Sysoev, A. A.; Tkalya, E. V.; Tregubov, D. O.; Troyan, V. I.; Khabarova, K. Yu.; Yudin, V. I.; Yakovlev, V. P.

    2017-06-01

    A multisection linear quadrupole trap for Th3+ ions is described. Multiply charged ions are obtained by the laser ablation method. The possibility of trapping and retention of ˜103 ions is demonstrated in macroscopic time scales of ˜30 s. Specific features of cooling Th3+ ions on the electron transitions with wavelengths of 1088, 690 and 984 nm in Th3+ ion are discussed; a principal scheme of a setup for laser cooling is presented.

  20. Improved magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrgard, Eric; McCarron, Daniel; Steinecker, Matthew; Demille, David

    2015-05-01

    The magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the workhorse technique for atomic physics in the ultracold regime, serving as the starting point in applications from optical clocks to quantum-degenerate gases. Recently, our group demonstrated the first magneto-optical trap for a molecule, strontium monofluoride (SrF). Here, we present experimental results of two variant trapping schemes which improve upon the original work. In the first, recent insights into the origin of the restoring force in Type-II MOTs (rarely used for atoms but requisite for SrF and other candidate molecules) led to a simple change in polarization scheme for the MOT lasers. In the second, states dark to the restoring MOT beams are diabatically transferred to bright states by synchronously reversing the magnetic field gradient and the laser polarization at RF frequencies. Although magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules is in its infancy, our results indicate that access to the ultracold regime may be possible for several molecular species, with potential applications from quantum simulation to tests of fundamental symmetries to ultracold chemistry. We acknowledge funding from ARO and ARO (MURI). E.B.N. acknowledges funding from the NSF GRFP.

  1. New directions in direct laser cooling and trapping of diatomic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinecker, Matthew; McCarron, Daniel; Norrgard, Eric; Edwards, Eustace; Demille, David

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in laser cooling and trapping of molecules. With the achievement of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for the diatomic molecule SrF, a range of novel experiments employing ultracold molecules may be within reach. Here we present planned improvements to our SrF MOT apparatus, including plans for more efficient MOT loading, sub-Doppler cooling, loading into a conservative trap, and co-trapping of atoms. These and other improvements should allow increases in trapped molecule number, lifetime, and phase-space density. We illustrate some of the experiments that will be enabled by these improvements, such as studies of inelastic and reactive atom-molecule collisions at ultracold temperatures and investigations of sympathetic and evaporative cooling of SrF.

  2. Micromanipulation of sperm by a laser generated optical trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadir, Y.; Wright, W.H.; Vafa, O.; Ord, T.; Asch, R.H.; Berns, M.W. (Univ. of California, Irvine (USA))

    1989-11-01

    The force generated by the radiation pressure of a low power laser beam induces an optical trap which may be used to manipulate sperm. We studied the effect of the optical trap on sperm motility. A Nd:YAG laser beam was coupled to a conventional microscope and focused into the viewing plane by the objective lens. Sperm were caught in the trap and manipulated by a joy stick controlled motorized stage. After different exposure periods, the velocity and patterns were analysed by a computerized image processor. There were minor changes in sperm velocity when exposed to the trap for 30 seconds or less. A gradual decrease in the mean linear velocity was observed after 45 seconds of exposure. This optical micromanipulator may also be useful for studying the force generated by a single spermatozoa and evaluating the influence of drugs on motility.

  3. Laser trapping of 21Na atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive 21Na (t1/2 = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped 21Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of 21Na → 21Ne + β+ + ve, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, 21Na atoms were produced by bombarding 24Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The 21Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  4. Resonantly Trapped Bound State in the Continuum Laser

    CERN Document Server

    Lepetit, Thomas; Kodigala, Ashok; Bahari, Babak; Fainman, Yeshaiahu; Kanté, Boubacar

    2015-01-01

    Cavities play a fundamental role in wave phenomena from quantum mechanics to electromagnetism and dictate the spatiotemporal physics of lasers. In general, they are constructed by closing all "doors" through which waves can escape. We report, at room temperature, a bound state in the continuum laser that harnesses optical modes residing in the radiation continuum but nonetheless may possess arbitrarily high quality factors. These counterintuitive cavities are based on resonantly trapped symmetry-compatible modes that destructively interfere. Our experimental demonstration opens exciting avenues towards coherent sources with intriguing topological properties for optical trapping, biological imaging, and quantum communication.

  5. Quantum Reservoir Engineering with Laser Cooled Trapped Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poyatos, J.; Cirac, J.I.; Zoller, P. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    1996-12-01

    We show how to design different couplings between a single ion trapped in a harmonic potential and an environment. The coupling is due to the absorption of a laser photon and subsequent spontaneous emission. The variation of the laser frequencies and intensities allows one to {open_quote}{open_quote}engineer{close_quote}{close_quote} the coupling and select the master equation describing the motion of the ion. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Direct frequency comb two-photon laser cooling and trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayich, Andrew; Long, Xueping; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2016-05-01

    Generating and manipulating high energy photons for spectroscopy on electric dipole transitions of atoms and molecules with deeply bound valence electrons is difficult. Further, laser cooling of such species is even more challenging for lack of laser power. A possible solution is to drive two-photon transitions. This may alleviate the photon energy problem and open the door to cold, trapped samples of highly desirable species with tightly bound electrons. We perform a proof of principle experiment with rubidium by driving a two-photon transition with an optical frequency comb. We perform optical cooling and extend this technique to trapping, where we are able to make a magneto-optical trap in one dimension. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation CAREER program.

  7. Multiple Isotope Magneto Optical Trap from a single diode laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Eduardo; Valenzuela, Victor; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutierrez, Monica

    2013-05-01

    We present a simple design for a Dual Isotope Magneto Optical Trap. The system requires a single diode laser, a fiber modulator and a tapered amplifier to trap and completely control both 85Rb and 87Rb. We generate all the frequencies needed for trapping both species using the fiber intensity modulator. All the frequencies are amplified simultaneously with the tapered amplifier. The position and power of each frequency is now controlled independently on the RF rather than on the optical side. This introduces an enormous simplification for laser cooling that often requires an acousto-optic modulator for each frequency. The range of frequency changes is much bigger than what is available with acousto-optic modulators since in our case is determined by the modulator bandwidth (10 GHz). Additional isotopes can be simply added by including additional RF frequencies to the modulator and extra beams for other uses can be produced the same way. Support from CONACYT, PROMEP and UASLP.

  8. Resolved-Sideband Laser Cooling in a Penning Trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, J F; Stutter, G; Thompson, R C; Segal, D M

    2016-04-08

    We report the laser cooling of a single ^{40}Ca^{+} ion in a Penning trap to the motional ground state in one dimension. Cooling is performed in the strong binding limit on the 729-nm electric quadrupole S_{1/2}↔D_{5/2} transition, broadened by a quench laser coupling the D_{5/2} and P_{3/2} levels. We find the final ground-state occupation to be 98(1)%. We measure the heating rate of the trap to be very low with n[over ¯][over ˙]≈0.3(2)  s^{-1} for trap frequencies from 150-400 kHz, consistent with the large ion-electrode distance.

  9. Laser trapping and spatial light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    INVITED: Robotics at the macro-scale typically uses light for carrying information in machine vision for monitoring and feedback in intelligent robotic guidance systems. With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robots down to the micro-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical...... optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction. The requirement of having tightly focused beams in optical tweezer systems exemplifies the need for optimal light-shaping in optical trapping. On the other hand, the recent report on stable optical lift shows that optical manipulation can be achieved...

  10. Optical trapping assembling of clusters and nanoparticles in solution by CW and femtosecond lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-02-01

    Laser trapping of molecular systems in solution is classified into three cases: JUST TRAPPING, EXTENDED TRAPPING, and NUCLEATION and GROWTH. The nucleation in amino acid solutions depends on where the 1064-nm CW trapping laser is focused, and crystallization and liquid–liquid phase separation are induced by laser trapping at the solution/air surface and the solution/glass interface, respectively. Laser trapping crystallization is achieved even in unsaturated solution, on which unique controls of crystallization are made possible. Crystal size is arbitrarily controlled by tuning laser power for a plate-like anhydrous crystal of l-phenylalanine. The α- or γ-crystal polymorph of glycine is selectively prepared by changing laser power and polarization. Further efficient trapping of nanoparticles and their following ejection induced by femtosecond laser pulses are introduced as unique trapping phenomena and finally future perspective is presented.

  11. Laser desorption lamp ionization source for ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Zare, Richard N

    2015-01-01

    A two-step laser desorption lamp ionization source coupled to an ion trap mass spectrometer (LDLI-ITMS) has been constructed and characterized. The pulsed infrared (IR) output of an Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) is directed to a target inside a chamber evacuated to ~15 Pa causing desorption of molecules from the target's surface. The desorbed molecules are ionized by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp (filled with xenon, major wavelength at 148 nm). The resulting ions are stored and detected in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap modified from a Finnigan Mat LCQ mass spectrometer operated at a pressure of ≥ 0.004 Pa. The limit of detection for desorbed coronene molecules is 1.5 pmol, which is about two orders of magnitude more sensitive than laser desorption laser ionization mass spectrometry using a fluorine excimer laser (157 nm) as the ionization source. The mass spectrum of four standard aromatic compounds (pyrene, coronene, rubrene and 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxy-29H,31H-phthalocyanine (OPC)) shows that parent ions dominate. By increasing the infrared laser power, this instrument is capable of detecting inorganic compounds.

  12. Laser trapping dynamics of L-alanine depending on the laser polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Ishiguro, Kei; Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    We successfully demonstrate crystallization and crystal rotation of L-alanine in D2O solution using a focused laser beam of 1064 nm with right- or left-handed circularly polarization. Upon focusing each laser beam into a solution/air interface of the solution thin film, one single crystal is generally formed from the focal spot. The necessary time for the crystallization is systematically examined against polarization and power of the trapping laser. The significant difference in the average time is observed between two polarization directions at a relatively high laser power, where the left-handed circularly polarized laser takes 3 times longer than the right-handed one. On the other hand, the prepared crystal is stably trapped and rotated at the focal point by circularly polarized lasers after the crystallization, and the rotation direction is completely controlled by the polarization of the trapping laser. The mechanisms for the crystallization and the crystal rotation are discussed in terms of trapping force and rotation torque of circularly polarized lasers acting on the liquid-like clusters and its bulk crystal, respectively.

  13. Laser Controlling Wavepacket Trains of a Paul Trapped Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Li-Hua; HAI Wen-Hua; WU Yun-Wen

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the quantum and classical motions of a single Paul trapped ion interacting with a timeperiodic laser field. By using the test-function method, we construct n exact solutions of quantum dynamics that describe the generalized squeezed coherent states with the expectation orbits being the corresponding classical ones. The spacetime evolutions of the exact probability densities show some wavepacket trains. It is demonstrated analytically that by adjusting the laser intensity and frequency, we can control the center motions of the wavepacket trains. We also discuss the other physical properties such as the expectation value of energy, the widths and heights of the wavepackets, and the resonance loss of stability.

  14. Laser trapping of radium for an electric dipole moment measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, P.; Sulai, I. A.; Trimble, W.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Bishof, M.; Greene, J. P.; Guest, J. R.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Gould, H. A.

    2008-05-01

    The best limits on time-reversal violation in the nuclear sector are currently set through electric dipole moment (EDM) searches on the neutron and Hg-199. Recent theoretical calculations predict that atomic EDM measurements of certain octupole-deformed nuclei, e.g., in the radium isotopic chain, are two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to the underlying time-reversal violation than the one in Hg-199. Ra-225, with nuclear spin 1/2 and a radioactive half-life of 15 days, is a particularly attractive candidate for a tabletop EDM measurement based on a laser-cooling and trapping approach. Towards this end, we have successfully cooled and trapped atoms of Ra-225 and Ra-226 in a magneto-optical trap -- a first for this rare element -- and have identified black-body radiation as a beneficial source of optical repumping. We will present our laser cooling scheme and ongoing measurements of atomic level energies, lifetimes, isotope shifts and hyperfine structure in radium and discuss our progress towards an EDM measurement of Ra-225 based on an optical dipole trap. This work is supported by DOE, Office of Nuclear Physics, under contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  15. An improved trap design for decoupling multinuclear RF coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerspeer, Martin; Serés Roig, Eulalia; Gruetter, Rolf; Magill, Arthur W

    2014-08-01

    Multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging require a radiofrequency probe capable of transmitting and receiving at the proton and non-proton frequencies. To minimize coupling between probe elements tuned to different frequencies, LC (inductor-capacitor) traps blocking current at the (1)H frequency can be inserted in non-proton elements. This work compares LC traps with LCC traps, a modified design incorporating an additional capacitor, enabling control of the trap reactance at the low frequency while maintaining (1)H blocking. Losses introduced by both types of trap were analysed using circuit models. Radiofrequency coils incorporating a series of LC and LCC traps were then built and evaluated at the bench. LCC trap performance was then confirmed using (1)H and (13)C measurements in a 7T human scanner. LC and LCC traps both effectively block interaction between non-proton and proton coils at the proton frequency. LCC traps were found to introduce a sensitivity reduction of 5±2%, which was less than half of that caused by LC traps. Sensitivity of non-proton coils is critical. The improved trap design, incorporating one extra capacitor, significantly reduces losses introduced by the trap in the non-proton coil. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Laser ablation loading of a radiofrequency ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, K; Herrera-Sancho, O A; Peik, E

    2012-01-01

    The production of ions via laser ablation for the loading of radiofrequency (RF) ion traps is investigated using a nitrogen laser with a maximum pulse energy of 0.17 mJ and a peak intensity of about 250 MW/cm^2. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is used to measure the ion yield and the distribution of the charge states. Singly charged ions of elements that are presently considered for the use in optical clocks or quantum logic applications could be produced from metallic samples at a rate of the order of magnitude 10^5 ions per pulse. A linear Paul trap was loaded with Th+ ions produced by laser ablation. An overall ion production and trapping efficiency of 10^-7 to 10^-6 was attained. For ions injected individually, a dependence of the capture probability on the phase of the RF field has been predicted. In the experiment this was not observed, presumably because of collective effects within the ablation plume.

  17. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo Ganzalez, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy S.; Wahlström C-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  18. Laser tweezers: spectroscopy of optically trapped micron-sized particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, K.M.; Livett, M.K.; Nugent, K.W. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Information is often obtained about biological systems by analysis of single cells in the system. The optimum conditions for this analysis are when the cells are living and in their natural surroundings as they will be performing their normal functions and interactions. Analysis of cells can be difficult due to their mobility. Laser tweezing is a non contact method that can be employed to overcome this problem and provides a powerful tool in the analysis of functions and interactions at single cell level. In this investigation Raman spectra of a molecule of {beta} - carotene, dissolved in microdroplets of oil was obtained. The droplets were trapped using Nd-YAG beam and a low intensity Ar{sup +} beam was used to analyse the trapped particles. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Laser cooling, slowing and trapping of a diatomic molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, John

    2015-05-01

    Roughly three decades ago, laser cooling and trapping succeeded in producing ultracold ions and atoms, sparking a revolution in atomic physics and subsequently becoming workhorse techniques within the field. These techniques require a ``cycling transition,'' where the particle of interest is repeatedly driven by a photon into an excited electronic state and quickly decays back to the initial ground state, allowing the process to repeat. Because photon absorption transfers momentum to the particle, application of force is possible. Adjusting the geometry and frequency of the applied photons allows creation of a damping (cooling) force. Further addition of a quadrupole magnetic field allows for a restoring (trapping) force. Prior to this thesis, straightforward extension of these methods to molecules was considered a practical impossibility; electronic decays in molecules tend to populate multiple rotational and vibrational states, preventing creation of a cycling transition. While a variety of ultracold molecular species is desirable to satisfy a range of applications, the only other production method is limited to species where the constituent atoms are themselves amenable to laser cooling. For other species, a different technique is required. Here we outline the methods and experiments in which laser cooling and trapping were first applied to molecules. By careful molecule choice, by using a cooling transition that exploits selection rules, and by counteracting dark states with a magnetic field, we create a cycling transition for the diatomic molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). We show the power of this technique by demonstrating Doppler and sub-Doppler cooling in 1-D, radiation pressure slowing and stopping of a molecular beam, and finally a 3-D magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our MOT produces the coldest trapped sample of directly-cooled molecules to date, with a temperature of T ~ 2.5 mK. This method is viable for several classes of diatomic molecules with a

  20. SQUEEZING PROPERTIES OF A TRAPPED ION IN THE STANDING-WAVE LASER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG MAO-FA; LIU XIANG

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the squeezing properties of a trapped ion in a standing-wave laser. Our results show that the squeezing of a trapped ion in the standing-wave laser is dependent on its position in the latter, the detuning parameter and the initial average phonon number.

  1. Measuring evaporation rates of laser-trapped droplets by use of fluorescent morphology-dependent resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R; Struthers, A

    2001-05-20

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are used to measure accurately the evaporation rates of laser-trapped 1- to 2-mum droplets of ethylene glycol. Droplets containing 3 x 10(-5) M Rhodamine-590 laser dye are optically trapped in a 20-mum hollow fiber by two counterpropagating 150-mW, 800-nm laser beams. A weaker 532-nm laser excites the dye, and fluorescence emission is observed near 560 nm as the droplet evaporates. A complete series of first-order TE and TM MDRs dominates the fluorescent output. MDR mode identification sizes the droplets and provides accurate evaporation rates. We verify the automated MDR mode identification by counting fringes in a videotape of the experiment. The longitudinal spring constant of the trap, measured by analysis of the videotaped motion of droplets perturbed from the trap center, provides independent verification of the laser's intensity within the trap.

  2. Secondary laser cooling and capturing of thulium atoms in traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Fedorov, S A; Vishnyakova, G A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, N N; Sorokin, V N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-06-30

    Secondary laser cooling has been realised on the weak dipole transition 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sup o})6s{sup 2}, J = 7/2, F=4 → 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6}) 5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2}, J' = 9/2, F' = 5 with the wavelength of 530.7 nm and natural width of 350 kHz. The temperature of the atomic cloud in a magnetooptical trap (MOT) was 30 μK at the lifetime of 2 s and the number of atoms 10{sup 5}. Approximately 1% of atoms from the MOT have been reloaded to an optical dipole trap and to one-dimensional optical lattice at the wavelength of 532 nm. The atom lifetime in the optical lattice was 320 ms. We propose to employ thulium atoms captured in an optical lattice as an optical frequency reference. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  3. Simulation of Laser Cooling and Trapping in Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Kohel, James; Thompson, Robert; Yu, Nan; Lunblad, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    An advanced computer code is undergoing development for numerically simulating laser cooling and trapping of large numbers of atoms. The code is expected to be useful in practical engineering applications and to contribute to understanding of the roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and numbers of particles play in experiments using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms. The code is based on semiclassical theories of the forces exerted on atoms by magnetic and optical fields. Whereas computer codes developed previously for the same purpose account for only a few physical mechanisms, this code incorporates many more physical mechanisms (including atomic collisions, sub-Doppler cooling mechanisms, Stark and Zeeman energy shifts, gravitation, and evanescent-wave phenomena) that affect laser-matter interactions and the cooling of atoms to submillikelvin temperatures. Moreover, whereas the prior codes can simulate the interactions of at most a few atoms with a resonant light field, the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation by the present code is limited only by computer memory. Hence, the present code represents more nearly completely the complex physics involved when using laser-cooled and -trapped atoms in engineering applications. Another advantage that the code incorporates is the possibility to analyze the interaction between cold atoms of different atomic number. Some properties that cold atoms of different atomic species have, like cross sections and the particular excited states they can occupy when interacting with each other and light fields, play important roles not yet completely understood in the new experiments that are under way in laboratories worldwide to form ultracold molecules. Other research efforts use cold atoms as holders of quantum information, and more recent developments in cavity quantum electrodynamics also use ultracold atoms to explore and expand new information-technology ideas. These experiments give a hint

  4. LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE TECHNOLOGY IMPROVES INSECT TRAPPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    GILLEN, JONATHON I.; MUNSTERMANN, LEONARD E.

    2008-01-01

    In a climate of increased funding for vaccines, chemotherapy, and prevention of vector-borne diseases, fewer resources have been directed toward improving disease and vector surveillance. Recently developed light-emitting diode (LED) technology was applied to standard insect-vector traps to produce a more effective lighting system. This approach improved phlebotomine sand fly capture rates by 50%, and simultaneously reduced the energy consumption by 50–60%. The LEDs were incorporated into 2 lighting designs, 1) a LED combination bulb for current light traps and 2) a chip-based LED design for a modified Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap. Detailed descriptions of the 2 designs are presented. PMID:18666546

  5. Improved Traps for Removing Gases From Coolant Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, John; Ritchie, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Two documents discuss improvements in traps for removing noncondensable gases (e.g., air) from heat-transfer liquids (e.g., water) in spacecraft cooling systems. Noncondensable gases must be removed because they can interfere with operation. A typical trap includes a cylindrical hydrophobic membrane inside a cylindrical hydrophilic membrane, all surrounded by an outer cylindrical impermeable shell. The input mixture of gas bubbles and liquid flows into the annular volume between the membranes. Bubbles pass into the central hollow of the hydrophobic membrane and are vented. The liquid flows outward through the hydrophilic membrane and is recirculated.

  6. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  7. Infrared ion spectroscopy in a modified quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer at the FELIX free electron laser laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Jonathan; Berden, Giel; Gebhardt, Christoph R.; Oomens, Jos

    2016-10-01

    We report on modifications made to a Paul-type quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer and discuss its application in infrared ion spectroscopy experiments. Main modifications involve optical access to the trapped ions and hardware and software coupling to a variety of infrared laser sources at the FELIX infrared free electron laser laboratory. In comparison to previously described infrared ion spectroscopy experiments at the FELIX laboratory, we find significant improvements in efficiency and sensitivity. Effects of the trapping conditions of the ions on the IR multiple photon dissociation spectra are explored. Enhanced photo-dissociation is found at lower pressures in the ion trap. Spectra obtained under reduced pressure conditions are found to more closely mimic those obtained in the high-vacuum conditions of an Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. A gas-mixing system is described enabling the controlled addition of a secondary gas into helium buffer gas flowing into the trap and allows for ion/molecule reactions in the trap. The electron transfer dissociation (ETD) option of the mass spectrometer allows for IR structure characterization of ETD-generated peptide dissociation products.

  8. Efficient optical trapping of CdTe quantum dots by femtosecond laser pulses

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Weiyi

    2014-12-11

    The development in optical trapping and manipulation has been showing rapid progress, most of it is in the small particle sizes in nanometer scales, substituting the conventional continuous-wave lasers with high-repetition-rate ultrashort laser pulse train and nonlinear optical effects. Here, we evaluate two-photon absorption in optical trapping of 2.7 nm-sized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with high-repetition-rate femtosecond pulse train by probing laser intensity dependence of both Rayleigh scattering image and the two-photon-induced luminescence spectrum of the optically trapped QDs. The Rayleigh scattering imaging indicates that the two-photon absorption (TPA) process enhances trapping ability of the QDs. Similarly, a nonlinear increase of the two-photon-induced luminescence with the incident laser intensity fairly indicates the existence of the TPA process.

  9. Laser-Based Optical Trap for Remote Sampling of Interplanetary and Atmospheric Particulate Matter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Phase 1 of this study intends to leverage advances in laser optical trapping technology in order to study the feasibility of a system that could remotely capture a...

  10. Magnetic trapping of superconducting submicron particles produced by laser ablation in superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuta; Suzuki, Junpei; Yoneyama, Naoya; Tokawa, Yurina; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Kumakura, Mitsutaka; Ashida, Masaaki; Moriwaki, Yoshiki

    2017-02-01

    We produced spherical superconducting submicron particles by laser ablation of their base metal tips in superfluid helium, and trapped them using a quadrupole magnetic field owing to the diamagnetism caused by the Meissner effect. We also measured their critical temperatures of superconductivity, by observing the threshold temperatures for the confinement of superconducting submicron particles in the trap.

  11. Electron-positron cascades in multiple-laser optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of multiple-laser QED cascades induced with linearly polarised laser pulses. We analyse different polarisation orientations and propose a configuration that maximises cascade multiplicity and favours laser absorption. We generalise the analytical estimate for the cascade growth rate previously calculated in the field of two colliding linearly polarised laser pulses and account for multiple laser interaction. The estimate is verified by a comprehensive numerical study of four-laser QED cascades across a range of different laser intensities with QED PIC module of OSIRIS. We show that by using four linearly polarised 30 fs laser pulses, one can convert more than 50% of the total energy to gamma-rays at laser intensity I≃ {{10}24}~\\text{W}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2} . In this configuration, the laser conversion efficiency is higher compared with the case with two colliding lasers.

  12. Electron - positron cascades in multiple-laser optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of multiple-laser QED cascades induced with linearly polarised laser pulses. We analyse different polarisation orientations and propose a configuration that maximises the cascade multiplicity and favours the laser absorption. We generalise the analytical estimate for the cascade growth rate previously calculated in the field of two colliding linearly polarised laser pulses and account for multiple laser interaction. The estimate is verified by a comprehensive numerical study of four-laser QED cascades across a range of different laser intensities with QED PIC module of OSIRIS. We show that by using four linearly polarised 30 fs laser pulses, one can convert more than 50 % of the total energy to gamma-rays already at laser intensity $I\\simeq10^{24}\\ \\mathrm{W/cm^2}$. In this configuration, the laser conversion efficiency is higher compared with the case with two colliding lasers.

  13. Laser-trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 with repumping by room temperature blackbody radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Guest, J R; Bailey, K; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Lu, Z T; O'Connor, T P; Potterveld, D H; Scielzo, N D

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated Zeeman slowing and capture of neutral Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination transition 1S0-3P1 is the only quasi-cycling transition in radium and was used for laser-cooling and trapping. Repumping along the 3D1-1P1 transition extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds. Room-temperature blackbody radiation was demonstrated to provide repumping from the metastable 3P0 level. We measured the isotope shift and hyperfine splittings on the 3D1-1P1 transition with the laser-cooled atoms, and set a limit on the lifetime of the 3D1 level based on the measured blackbody repumping rate. Laser-cooled and trapped radium is an attractive system for studying fundamental symmetries.

  14. Observation of cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap using a laser-pulse-train technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menegatti, Carlos R.; Marangoni, Bruno S.; Marcassa, Luis G. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-970, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-11-15

    In this work, we have developed and characterized a laser-pulse-train technique to observe cold Rb{sub 2} molecules trapped in an optical dipole trap. The molecules are produced in a magneto-optical trap, and then loaded into a crossed optical dipole trap. The time evolution of the molecular population is obtained by applying a laser pulse train, which photoionizes the ground-state molecules through intermediate molecular bands. Our results show that this technique allows us to obtain a faster data acquisition rate of the time evolution of the molecule population than other techniques.

  15. Theoretical investigation on nonlinear optical effects in laser trapping of dielectric nanoparticles with ultrafast pulsed excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; De, Arijit K

    2016-09-19

    The use of low-power high-repetition-rate ultrafast pulsed excitation in stable optical trapping of dielectric nanoparticles has been demonstrated in the recent past; the high peak power of each pulse leads to instantaneous trapping of a nanoparticle with fast inertial response and the high repetition-rate ensures repetitive trapping by successive pulses However, with such high peak power pulsed excitation under a tight focusing condition, nonlinear optical effects on trapping efficiency also become significant and cannot be ignored. Thus, in addition to the above mentioned repetitive instantaneous trapping, trapping efficiency under pulsed excitation is also influenced by the optical Kerr effect, which we theoretically investigate here. Using dipole approximation we show that with an increase in laser power the radial component of the trapping potential becomes progressively more stable but the axial component is dramatically modulated due to increased Kerr nonlinearity. We justify that the relevant parameter to quantify the trapping efficiency is not the absolute depth of the highly asymmetric axial trapping potential but the height of the potential barrier along the beam propagation direction. We also discuss the optimal excitation parameters leading to the most stable dipole trap. Our results show excellent agreement with previous experiments.

  16. Laser trapping dynamics of 200 nm-polystyrene particles at a solution surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    We present laser trapping behaviors of 200 nm-polystyrene particles in D2O solution and at its surface using a focused continuous-wave laser beam of 1064 nm. Upon focusing the laser beam into the solution surface, the particles are gathered at the focal spot, and their assembly is expanded to the outside and becomes much larger than the focal volume. The resultant assembly is observed colored under halogen lamp illumination, which is due to a periodic structure like a colloidal crystal. This trapping behavior is much different compared to the laser irradiation into the inside of the solution where a particle-like assembly with a size similar to that of the focal volume is prepared. These findings provide us new insights to consider how radiation pressure of a focused laser beam acts on nanoparticles at a solution surface.

  17. Laser trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 and progress towards an electric dipole moment measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.

    2006-10-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in atoms or molecules are signatures of Time (T)-and Parity (P)-violation and represent an important window onto physics beyond the Standard Model. We are developing a next generation EDM search around laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225 (t1/2 = 15 d). Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. We will discuss our progress, including the successful laser cooling and trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms. We have demonstrated transverse cooling, Zeeman slowing, and capture of Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). By driving a second atomic transition, we have extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds and performed necessary spectroscopic measurements.

  18. First application of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) for on-line experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, D A; Imai, N; Blaum, K; Rothe, S; Sjoedin, M; Rossel, R E; Kron, T; Marsh, B A; Richter, S D; Cocolios, T E; Lecesne, N; Ghys, L; Pauwels, D; Rapisarda, E; Seliverstov, M D; Stora, T; Ramos, J P; Mendonca, T M; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Wendt, K D A; Gottberg, A; Flanagan, K T; Van Beveren, C; Bastin, B; Fedorov, D V

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) provides a new mode of operation for the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) at ISOLDE/CERN, reducing the amount of surface-ionized isobaric contaminants by up to four orders of magnitude. After the first successful on-line test at ISOLDE in 2011 the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. The measurements of the improved LIST indicate more than a twofold increase in efficiency compared to the LIST of the 2011 run. The suppression of surface-ionized francium contaminants has enabled the first in-source laser spectroscopy of Po-217 and Po-219. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing, E-mail: liy@ecu.edu [Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858-4353 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4–20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ∼20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  20. Temperature Measurements of Laser-Cooled Ions in a Penning Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M. J.; Hasegawa, T.; Bollinger, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Between 104 and 106 9Be+ ions are trapped in a Penning trap. The ions are laser-cooled to ˜millikelvin temperatures, where they form ion crystals. This system is an example of a strongly coupled one-component plasma. By means of Doppler laser spectroscopy we have measured the temperature and heating rate of the plasma. Initially the heating rate is low, 60 ± 40 mK/s, but after about 100 ms the plasma heats up rapidly to a few kelvin. The onset of the rapid heating coincides with the solid-liquid phase transition.

  1. Squeezing properties of a trapped ion in the running-wave laser beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Chang-Ning; Fang Mao-Fa; Zheng Xiao-Juan; Hu Yao-Hua

    2007-01-01

    Beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit, this paper investigates the squeezing properties of the trapped ion in the travelling-wave laser. It shows that the squeezing properties of the trapped ion in the travelling-wave laser are strongly affected by the sideband number k, the Lamb- Dicke parameterηand the initial average phonon number.

  2. Magneto-Optical Trapping of 88Sr atoms with 689 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qiang; LIN Bai-Ke; ZHAO Yang; LI Ye; WANG Shao-Kai; WANG Min-Ming; ZANG Er-Jun; LI Tian-Chu; FANG Zhan-Jun

    2011-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of strontium magneto-optical trap(MOT) operating on the intercombination transition lSo-3 P1 at 689nm, namely red MOT. A 689nm laser used for cooling and trapping is injection locked to a master laser, whose linewidth is narrowed to 150 Hz by locking to a high finesse optical reference cavity.88 Sr atoms pre-cooled and trapped by the broad 1SO-1 Pl transition at 461 nm are transferred to the red MOT with the help of a time sequence controller. The transfer ratio is about 20% and the red MOT's temperature is estimated to be less than 20 μK by the time-of-flight(TOF) image analysis.

  3. Magneto-Optical Trapping of Ytterbium Atoms with a 398.9 nm Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Peng-Yi; XIONG Zhuan-Xian; LIANG Jie; HE Ling-Xiang; LU Bao-Long

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of ytterbium magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the dipole-allowed 1S0 - 1P1 transition at 398.9nm. The MOT is loaded by a slowed atomic beam produced by a Zeeman slower. All seven stable isotopes of Yb atoms could be trapped separately at different laser detuning values. Over 107 174Yb atoms are collected in the MOT, whereas the atom number of fermionic isotope 171Yb is roughly 2.3 × 106 due to a lower abundance. Without the Zeeman slower, the trapped atom numbers are one order of magnitude lower.Both the even and odd isotopes are recognized as excellent candidates of optical clock transition, so the cooling and trapping of ytterbium atoms by the blue MOT is an important step for building an optical clock.

  4. Improved optical planar waveguides for lasers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Demonstrate efficacy of a novel growth technique for planar waveguides (PWG) Enable PWG laser technology with improved performance, efficiency and manufacturability....

  5. Soft x-ray laser spectroscopy on trapped highly charged ions at FLASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, S W; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Brenner, G; Mäckel, V; Mokler, P H; Treusch, R; Kuhlmann, M; Yurkov, M V; Feldhaus, J; Schneider, J R; Wellhöfer, M; Martins, M; Wurth, W; Ullrich, J

    2007-05-04

    In a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrate high-resolution resonant laser excitation in the soft x-ray region at 48.6 eV of the 2 (2)S(1/2) to 2 (2)P(1/2) transition of Li-like Fe23+ ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap by using ultrabrilliant light from Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). High precision spectroscopic studies of highly charged ions at this and upcoming x-ray lasers with an expected accuracy gain up to a factor of a thousand, become possible with our technique, thus potentially yielding fundamental insights, e.g., into basic aspects of QED.

  6. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B. S., E-mail: ben.cooper.13@ucl.ac.uk; Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  7. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  8. Spectral narrowing of coherent population trapping resonance in laser-cooled and room-temperature atomic gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Pradhan; S Mishra; R Behera; N Kawade; A K Das

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated coherent population trapping (CPT) in laser-cooled as well as room-temperature (with and without buffer gas) rubidium atoms. The characteristic broad signal profile emerging from the two-photon Raman resonance for room-temperature atomic vapour is consistent with the theoretical calculation incorporating associated thermal averaging. The spectral width of the dark resonance obtained with cold atoms is found to be broadened, compared to roomtemperature vapour cell, due to the feeble role played by thermal averaging, although the cold atomic sample significantly overcomes the limitation of the transit time broadening. An alternative way to improve transit time is to use a buffer gas, with which we demonstrate that the coherent population trapping signal width is reduced to < 540 Hz.

  9. Field experiments to improve the efficacy of gargoor (fish trap) fishery in Kuwait's waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizhong; Al-Baz, Ali; Bishop, James M.; Al-Husaini, Mohsen

    2012-07-01

    Fish traps were investigated to understand the effects of season, bait type, trap size, and trap soak time on catch rates, catch composition, and trap loss rates from March 2004 to September 2005, to improve the performance and management of Kuwait's gargoor (cage style fish trap) fishery, which used to be the nation's most important one in terms of value and landings volume. Catch rates were the highest in April/May (5-8 kg/trap haul) and again in December (7 kg/trap haul). Bait type and trap size also affected catch rates and species composition. Of the seven baits tested, the best catch rates, >5 kg/trap haul, occurred with cuttlefish ( Sepia pharaonis), but wolf-herring ( Chirocentrus dorab) and mullet ( Liza klunzingeri) also produced good results (4-5 kg/trap haul). Within the five tested sizes, the two largest-sized traps captured more fish and larger size fish. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences of catch rate among traps with different baits as well as among traps of different sizes. Duncan test further revealed these differences between two specific baits and sizes. Cluster Analysis of species composition showed more differences among different baits than among different trap sizes. Longer soak times did not result in larger catch rates, but increased trap loss. About 10-day soak time resulted in trap loss 7%, while 40-day soak time could result in a loss of around 20%. Consequently, it is recommended that the gargoor be checked every 10 or fewer days. The average overall catch rate during the study period was lower than that of 1980s (4.5 vs. 5.8 kg/trap haul), indicating a possible decline of fish abundance in Kuwait's waters. It is recommended that the number of gargoor fishing boats and gargoors from each boat should be limited to allow stock rehabilitation.

  10. Fabrication of broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with ultra-light-trapping structures by picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Wang, Wenjun; Jiang, Gedong; Mei, Xuesong

    2016-06-01

    A hybrid method consisting of ultrafast laser-assisted texturing and chemical fluorination treatment was applied for efficiently enhancing the surface broadband antireflection to fabricate black titanium alloy surface with ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructure. Based on the theoretical analysis of surface antireflective principle of micro-nanostructures and fluoride film, the ultra-light-trapping micro-nanostructures have been processed using a picosecond pulsed ultrafast laser on titanium alloy surfaces. Then fluorination treatment has been performed by using fluoroalkyl silane solution. According to X-ray diffraction phase analysis of the surface compositions and measurement of the surface reflectance using spectrophotometer, the broadband antireflective properties of titanium alloy surface with micro-nano structural characteristics were investigated before and after fluorination treatment. The results show that the surface morphology of micro-nanostructures processed by picosecond laser has significant effects on the antireflection of light waves to reduce the surface reflectance, which can be further reduced using chemical fluorination treatment. The high antireflection of over 98 % in a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to infrared on the surface of metal material has been achieved for the surface structures, and the broadband antireflective black metal surfaces with an extremely low reflectance of ultra-light-trapping structures have been obtained in the wavelength range from ultraviolet-visible to near-infrared, middle-wave infrared. The average reflectance of microgroove groups structured surface reaches as low as 2.43 % over a broad wavelength range from 200 to 2600 nm. It indicates that the hybrid method comprising of picosecond laser texturing and chemical fluorination can effectively induce the broadband antireflective black metal surface. This method has a potential application for fabricating antireflective surface used to improve the

  11. RESONANT INTERACTION BETWEEN A PAUL-TRAPPED ION AND A STANDING WAVE LASER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG MANG; HAI WEN-HUA; ZHU XI-WEN; GAO KE-LIN; SHI LEI

    2000-01-01

    An ultracold two-level ion experiencing the standing wave of a resonant laser in a Paul trap is investigated in the Lamb-Dicke limit and weak excitation regime, with full consideration of the time-dependence of the trapping potential.The analytical forms of the wave functions of the system can be described with our approach, and the time evolution of the pseudo-energy of the system as well as the squeezing property of the quadrature components is studied in comparison with the treatment of harmonic oscillator model.

  12. Position-dependent dynamics of a trapped ion in a standing wave laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方卯发

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the position-dependent dynamics of a trapped ion in a standing wave laser by transforming it to the Jaynes-Cummings-type system under the Lamb-Dicke limit. A variety of novel phenomena are exhibited,e.g. periodic collapse and revival features and long-time scaled revivals of the ionic inversion, depending on its position in the standing wave. Our result provides a way of producing a system equivalent to the two-photon Jaynes-Cummings model in the trapped ion system, with its exact periodicities.

  13. Optical trapping of nanoparticles with significantly reduced laser powers by using counter-propagating beams (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chenglong; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNP) have wide applications ranging from nanoscale heating to cancer therapy and biological sensing. Optical trapping of GNPs as small as 18 nm has been successfully achieved with laser power as high as 855 mW, but such high powers can damage trapped particles (particularly biological systems) as well heat the fluid, thereby destabilizing the trap. In this article, we show that counter propagating beams (CPB) can successfully trap GNP with laser powers reduced by a factor of 50 compared to that with a single beam. The trapping position of a GNP inside a counter-propagating trap can be easily modulated by either changing the relative power or position of the two beams. Furthermore, we find that under our conditions while a single-beam most stably traps a single particle, the counter-propagating beam can more easily trap multiple particles. This (CPB) trap is compatible with the feedback control system we recently demonstrated to increase the trapping lifetimes of nanoparticles by more than an order of magnitude. Thus, we believe that the future development of advanced trapping techniques combining counter-propagating traps together with control systems should significantly extend the capabilities of optical manipulation of nanoparticles for prototyping and testing 3D nanodevices and bio-sensing.

  14. High-throughput sorting and analysis of human sperm with a ring-shaped laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bing; Shi, Linda Z; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Botvinick, Elliot L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Berns, Michael W; Esener, Sadik C

    2007-06-01

    Sperm motility is an important concept in fertility research. To this end, single spot laser tweezers have been used to quantitatively analyze the motility of individual sperm. However, this method is limited with throughput (single sperm per spot), lacks the ability of in-situ sorting based on motility and chemotaxis, requires high laser power (hundreds of milliWatts) and can not be used to dynamically monitor changes in sperm swimming behavior under the influence of a laser beam. Here, we report a continuous 3-D ring-shaped laser trap which could be used for multi-level and high-throughput (tens to hundred sperm per ring) sperm sorting based on their motility and chemotaxis. Under a laser power of only tens of milliWatts, human sperm with low to medium velocity are slowed down, stopped, or forced to change their trajectories to swim along the ring due to the optical gradient force in the radial direction. This is the first demonstration of parallel sperm sorting based on motility with optical trapping technology. In addition, by making the sperm swimming along the circumference of the ring, the effect of laser radiation, optical force and external obstacles on sperm energetics are investigated in a more gentle and quantitative way. The application of this method could be extended to motility and bio-tropism studies of other self-propelled cells, such as algae and bacteria.

  15. Design and Performance of an Improved Trapped Vortex Combustor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yi; HE Xiaomin; JIANG Bo; WU Zejun; DING Guoyu

    2012-01-01

    A trapped vortex combustor (TVC) has been a very promising novel concept for it offers improvements in lean blow out,altitude relight,operating range,as well as a potential to decrease NOx emissions compared to conventional combustors.The present paper discusses the improved designs of the new combustor over the prior ones of our research group,including that:a) the overall dimensions,both axial and radial,are reduced to those of an actual aero-engine combustor; b) the air flow distribution is optimized,and especially 15% of the air is fed into the liner as cooling air; c) a straight-wall diffuser with divergence angle 9° is added.A series of experiments (cavity-fueled only,under atmospheric pressure) has been conducted to investigate the performance of the improved TVC.Experimental results show that at the inlet temperature of 523 K,the inlet pressure of 0.1 MPa,stable operation of the TVC test rig is observed for the Mach number 0.15-0.34,indicating good flame stability; the combustion efficiency obtained in this paper falls into the range of 60%-96%; as the total excess air ratio increases,the combustion efficiency decreases,while the increase of the inlet temperature is beneficial to high combustion efficiency; besides,the optimal Mach numbers for high combustion efficiency under different inlet conditions are confirmed.The outlet temperature profiles feature a bottom in the mid-height of the exit.This paper demonstrates the feasibility for the TVC to be applied to a realistic aero-engine preliminarily and provides reference for TVC design.

  16. First application of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) for on-line experiments at ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D.A., E-mail: daniel.fink@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls Universität, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Richter, S.D. [Insitut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55122 Mainz (Germany); Bastin, B. [Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (GANIL), Bd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Catherall, R. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cocolios, T.E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Fedorov, D.V. [PNPI NRC KI, 188300 Orlova Roscha, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V.N. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Flanagan, K.T. [University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ghys, L. [IKS KU Leuven, Celestijnenlkn 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Gottberg, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Imai, N. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kron, T. [Insitut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55122 Mainz (Germany); Lecesne, N. [Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (GANIL), Bd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • First application of LIST target for on-line experiments at ISOLDE. • Reliable operation of LIST together with a strongly outgassing UCx target. • Suppression of isobaric contaminants by a factor of more than 10000 achieved. • Laser ionization efficiency of LIST improved by factor 2.5 compared to 2011 LIST. -- Abstract: The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) provides a new mode of operation for the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) at ISOLDE/CERN, reducing the amount of surface-ionized isobaric contaminants by up to four orders of magnitude. After the first successful on-line test at ISOLDE in 2011 the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. The measurements of the improved LIST indicate more than a twofold increase in efficiency compared to the LIST of the 2011 run. The suppression of surface-ionized francium contaminants has enabled the first in-source laser spectroscopy of {sup 217}Po and {sup 219}Po.

  17. Laser cooling and trapping of potassium at magic wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, M S; Clark, Charles W

    2013-01-01

    We carry out a systematic study of the static and dynamic polarizabilities of the potassium atom using a first-principles high-precision relativistic all-order method in which all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Recommended values are provided for a large number of electric-dipole matrix elements. Static polarizabilities of the 4s, 4p_j, 5s, 5p_j, and 3d_j states are compared with other theory and experiment where available. We use the results of the polarizability calculations to identify magic wavelengths for the 4s-np transitions for $n = 4, 5$, i.e. those wavelengths for which the two levels have the same ac Stark shifts. These facilitate state-insensitive optical cooling and trapping. The magic wavelengths for the $4s-5p$ transitions are of particular interest for attaining a quantum gas of potassium at high phase-space density. We find 20 such wavelengths in the technically interest region of 1050-1130 nm....

  18. A carbon-cluster laser ion source for TRIGA-TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smorra, C; Eberhardt, K [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Kernchemie, Fritz-Strassmann Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Blaum, K [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Philosophenweg 12, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Eibach, M; Ketelaer, J; Ketter, J; Knuth, K [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Physik, Staudingerweg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Nagy, Sz, E-mail: smorrac@uni-mainz.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-08-14

    A new laser ablation ion source was developed and tested for the Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP in order to provide carbon-cluster ions for absolute mass calibration. Ions of different cluster sizes up to C{sup +}{sub 24} were successfully produced, covering the mass range up to the heavy actinide elements. The ions were captured in a Penning trap, and their time-of-flight cyclotron resonances recorded in order to determine their cyclotron frequency. Furthermore, the same ion source was used to produce GdO{sup +} ions from a gadolinium target in sufficient amount for mass spectrometry purposes. The design of the source and its characteristics are presented.

  19. Laser trapping and assembling of nanoparticles at solution surface studied by reflection micro-spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Fa; Yuyama, Ken-ichi; Suigiyama, Teruki; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    We present the laser power dependent behavior of optical trapping assembling of 208-nm polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles at the solution surface layer. The assembling dynamics is examined by reflection microspectroscopy as well as transmission and backscattering imaging. The transmission imaging shows that the laser irradiation at the solution surface layer forms a nanoparticle assembly, whose diameter becomes large with the increase in the laser power. The backscattering image of the assembly gives structural color, meaning that nanoparticles are periodically arranged over the whole assembly region. In reflection microspectroscopy, one band appears at long wavelength and is gradually shifted to the short wavelength with the irradiation. After the blue shift, the reflection band is located at the shorter wavelength under the laser irradiation at the higher power. We discuss these spectral changes from the viewpoint of the inter-particle distance determined by the dynamic balance between attractive optical force and repulsive electrostatic force among nanoparticles.

  20. ACADEMIC TRAINING: Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    17, 18, 19 June LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg. 500 Probing nature with high precision; particle traps, laser spectroscopy and optical combs by G. GABRIELSE / Harvard University, USA Experiments with atomic energy scales probe nature and its symmetries with exquisite precision. Particle traps allow the manipulation of single charged particles for months at a time, allow the most accurate comparison of theory and experiment, and promise to allow better measurement of fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant. Ions and atoms can be probed with lasers that are phase locked to microwave frequency standards via optical combs, thus calibrating optical sources in terms of the official cesium second. A series of three lectures will illustrate what can be measured and discuss key techniques.  ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz Tel. 73127 francoise.benz@cern.ch

  1. A Linear Ion Trap with an Expanded Inscribed Diameter to Improve Optical Access for Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, Vaishnavi; Stokes, Chris; Ferzoco, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    We report a custom-geometry linear ion trap designed for fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions at ambient to cryogenic temperatures. Laser-induced fluorescence from trapped ions is collected from between the trapping rods, orthogonal to the excitation laser that runs along the axis of the linear ion trap. To increase optical access to the ion cloud, the diameter of the round trapping rods is 80% of the inscribed diameter, rather than the roughly 110% used to approximate purely quadrupolar electric fields. To encompass as much of the ion cloud as possible, the first collection optic has a 25.4 mm diameter and a numerical aperture of 0.6. The choice of geometry and collection optics yields 107 detected photons/s from trapped rhodamine 6G ions. The trap is coupled to a closed-cycle helium refrigerator, which in combination with two 50 Ohm heaters enables temperature control to below 25 K on the rod electrodes. The purpose of the instrument is to broaden the applicability of fluorescence spectroscopy of gas-phase ions to cases where photon emission is a minority relaxation pathway. Such studies are important to understand how the microenvironment of a chromophore influences excited state charge transfer processes. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. Recent trends in precision measurements of atomic and nuclear properties with lasers and ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, Michael, E-mail: m.block@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The X. international workshop on “Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research” took place in Poznan in May 2016. It addressed the latest experimental and theoretical achievements in laser and ion trap-based investigations of radionuclides, highly charged ions and antiprotons. The precise determination of atomic and nuclear properties provides a stringent benchmark for theoretical models and eventually leads to a better understanding of the underlying fundamental interactions and symmetries. This article addresses some general trends in this field and highlights select recent achievements presented at the workshop. Many of these are covered in more detail within the individual contributions to this special issue of Hyperfine Interactions.

  3. One single trapped and laser cooled radium ion: Towards an all-optical atomic clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, Oscar; Wansbeek, Lotje; Willmann, Lorenz; Timmermans, Rob; Jungmann, Klaus [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    One single trapped radium ion is an ideal candidate for an all-optical frequency standard (*clock*). This system provides a long coherence time and tractable systematics. If the ion is laser cooled to the Lamb-Dicke regime, first order Doppler shifts are eliminated. Ultra-narrow transitions in radium ions provide an excellent basis for such a high stability clock, using commercially available semiconductor lasers in the visible regime. In certain odd isotopes of radium, the nuclear electric quadrupole shift is absent. Further, the radium ion is an excellent candidate for a high sensitivity experiment to search for a time variation of the finestructure constant.

  4. Quantum Dynamics of a Single Trapped Ion Interacting with Standing Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fei; HAI Wen-Hua; CHONG Gui-Shu; XIE Qiong-Tao

    2004-01-01

    A classically chaotic system consisting of a Paul trapped ion and a sequences of standing laser pulses is treated quantum-mechanically. Under the circumstance of time-dependence, we derive the transition probability from the ion's motional state n to n', and find, in the first-order approximation, the classically chaotic character disappears.Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations show that by regulating the phase parameter φ we can control the transition probability. When φ reaches some specific values, the transition from the state n to n' is forbidden and, for some laser periods, resonance occurs, which leads to the corresponding transitions between different motional states.

  5. Laser trapping of Radium and progress towards an electric dipole moment measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.; Gould, H.

    2006-05-01

    Permanent electric dipole moments (EDMs) in atoms or molecules are signatures of Time (T)-and Parity (P)-violation and represent an important window onto physics beyond the Standard Model. We are developing a next generation EDM search around laser-cooled and trapped Ra-225. Due to octupole deformation of the nucleus, Ra-225 is predicted to be two to three orders of magnitude more sensitive to T-violating interactions than Hg-199, which currently sets the most stringent limits in the nuclear sector. We will discuss our progress, including the successful laser cooling and trapping of Ra-226 atoms. Using the ^1S0 F=0 -- ^3P1 F=1 transition, we have demonstrated transverse cooling, Zeeman slowing, and capture of Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). By repumping the ^3D1 dark state to the ^1P1 state, which decays back to ground ^1S0 state, we have extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds.

  6. A trapped ion with time-dependent frequency interaction with a laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, J M Vargas; Moya-Cessa, H [INAOE, Apartado Postal 51 y 216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2004-06-01

    We analyse the problem of a trapped ion with time-dependent frequency interacting with a laser field. By using a set of unitary time-dependent transformations we show that this system is equivalent to the interaction between a quantized field and a double level with time-dependent interaction parameters. In passing, we show that in the on-resonance case different vibrational transitions may be achieved by using time-dependent parameters.

  7. The Laser Cooling and Magneto-Optical Trapping of the YO Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Mark

    Laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of neutral atoms has revolutionized the field of atomic physics by providing an elegant and efficient method to produce cold dense samples of ultracold atoms. Molecules, with their strong anisotropic dipolar interaction promises to unlock even richer phenomenon. However, due to their additional vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom, laser cooling techniques have only been extended to a small set of diatomic molecules. In this thesis, we demonstrate the first magneto-optical trapping of a diatomic molecule using a quasi-cycling transition and an oscillating quadrupole magnetic field. The transverse temperature of a cryogenically produced YO beam was reduced from 25 mK to 10 mK via doppler cooling and further reduced to 2 mK with the addition of magneto-optical trapping forces. The optical cycling in YO is complicated by the presence of an intermediate electronic state, as decays through this state lead to optical pumping into dark rotational states. Thus, we also demonstrate the mixing of rotational states in the ground electronic state using microwave radiation. This technique greatly enhances optical cycling, leading to a factor of 4 increase in the YO beam fluorescence and is used in conjunction with a frequency modulated and chirped continuous wave laser to longitudinally slow the YO beam. We generate YO molecules below 10 m/s that are directly loadable into a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap. This mixing technique provides an alternative to maintaining rotational closure and should extend laser cooling to a larger set of molecules.

  8. Development of a dual joystick-controlled laser trapping and cutting system for optical micromanipulation of chromosomes inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsono, Marcellinus S; Zhu, Qingyuan; Shi, Linda Z; Duquette, Michelle; Berns, Michael W

    2013-02-01

    A multi-joystick robotic laser microscope system used to control two optical traps (tweezers) and one laser scissors has been developed for subcellular organelle manipulation. The use of joysticks has provided a "user-friendly" method for both trapping and cutting of organelles such as chromosomes in live cells. This innovative design has enabled the clean severing of chromosome arms using the laser scissors as well as the ability to easily hold and pull the severed arm using the laser tweezers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Improved Thermoelectrically Cooled Laser-Diode Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesne, Thomas R.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joe

    1994-01-01

    Cooling decreases wavelength and increases efficiency and lifetime. Two improved thermoelectrically cooled laser-diode assemblies incorporate commercial laser diodes providing combination of both high wavelength stability and broad wavelength tuning which are broadly tunable, highly stable devices for injection seeding of pulsed, high-power tunable alexandrite lasers used in lidar remote sensing of water vapor at wavelengths in vicinity of 727 nanometers. Provide temperature control needed to take advantage of tunability of commercial AlGaAs laser diodes in present injection-seeding application.

  10. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  11. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: Averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, Thue Bjerring; Kristensen, Martin V. G.; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    2013-01-01

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 polystyrene bead, the laser pulse......-bead interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead...... is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our...

  12. Field experiments to improve the efficacy of gargoor (fish trap) fishery in Kuwait's waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Weizhong; AL-BAZ Ali; BISHOP James M.; AL-HUSAINI Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Fish traps were investigated to understand the effects of season,bait type,trap size,and trap soak time on catch rates,catch composition,and trap loss rates from March 2004 to September 2005,to improve the performance and management of Kuwait's gargoor (cage style fish trap) fishery,which used to be the nation's most important one in terms of value and landings volume.Catch rates were the highest in April/May (5-8 kg/trap haul) and again in December (7 kg/trap haul).Bait type and trap size also affected catch rates and species composition.Of the seven baits tested,the best catch rates,>5 kg/trap haul,occurred with cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis),but wolf-herring (Chirocentrus dorab) and mullet (Liza klunzingerf) also produced good results (4-5 kg/trap haul).Within the five tested sizes,the two largest-sized traps captured more fish and larger size fish.Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant differences of catch rate among traps with different baits as well as among traps ofdifferent sizes.Duncan test further revealed these differences between two specific baits and sizes.Cluster Analysis of species composition showed more differences among different baits than among different trap sizes.Longer soak times did not result in larger catch rates,but increased trap loss.About 10-day soak time resulted in trap loss 7%,while 40-day soak time could result in a loss of around 20%.Consequently,it is recommended that the gargoor be checked every 10 or fewer days.The average overall catch rate during the study period was lower than that of 1980s (4.5 vs.5.8 kg/trap haul),indicating a possible decline of fish abundance in Kuwait's waters.It is recommended that the number of gargoor fishing boats and gargoors from each boat should be limited to allow stock rehabilitation.

  13. Vibronic "Rabi resonances" in harmonic and hard-wall ion-traps for arbitrary laser intensity and detuning

    CERN Document Server

    Lizuain, I

    2006-01-01

    We investigate laser-driven vibronic transitions of a single two-level atomic ion in harmonic and hard wall traps. In the Lamb-Dicke regime, for tuned or detuned lasers with respect to the internal frequency of the ion, and weak or strong laser intensities, the vibronic transitions occur at well isolated "Rabi Resonances", where the detuning-adapted Rabi frequency coincides with the level spacing of the vibrational modes. These vibronic resonances are characterized as avoided crossings of the dressed states (eigenstates of the full Hamiltonian). Their peculiarities due to symmetry constraints and trapping potential are also examined.

  14. Improvement of persistent magnetic field trapping in bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, In-Gann; Weinstein, Roy

    1993-01-01

    For type-II superconductors, magnetic field can be trapped due to persistent internal supercurrent. Quasi-persistent magnetic fields near 2 T at 60 K (and 1.4 T at 77 K) have been measured in minimagnets made of proton-irradiated melt-textured Y-Ba-Cu-O (MT-Y123) samples. Using the trapping effect, high-field permanent magnets with dipole, quadrupole, or more complicated configurations can be made of existing MT-Y123 material, thus bypassing the need for high-temperature superconductor (HTS) wires. A phenomenological current model has been developed to account for the trapped field intensity and profile in HTS samples. This model is also a guide to select directions of materials development to further improve field trapping properties. General properties such as magnetic field intensities, spatial distributions, stabilities, and temperature dependence of trapped field are discussed.

  15. Avalanche boron fusion by laser picosecond block ignition with magnetic trapping for clean and economic reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, H; Eliezer, S; Lalousis, N Nissim P; Giuffrida, L; Margarone, D; Picciotto, A; Miley, G H; Moustaizis, S; Martinez-Val, J -M; Barty, C P J; Kirchhoff, G J

    2016-01-01

    After the very long consideration of the ideal energy source by fusion of the protons of light hydrogen with the boron isotope 11 (boron fusion HB11) the very first two independent measurements of very high reaction gains by lasers basically opens a fundamental breakthrough. The non-thermal plasma block ignition with extremely high power laser pulses above petawatt of picosecond duration in combination with up to ten kilotesla magnetic fields for trapping has to be combined to use the measured high gains as proof of an avalanche reaction for an environmentally clean, low cost and lasting energy source as potential option against global warming. The unique HB11 avalanche reaction is are now based on elastic collisions of helium nuclei (alpha particles) limited only to a reactor for controlled fusion energy during a very short time within a very small volume.

  16. Quantum Dynamics of a Single Trapped Ion Interacting with Standing Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIFei; HAIWen-Hua; CHONGGui-Shu; XIEQiong-Tao

    2004-01-01

    A classically chaotic system consisting of a Paul trapped ion and a sequences of standing laser pulses is treated quantum-mechanically. Under the circumstance of time-dependence, we derive the transition probability from the ion's motional state n to n', and find, in the first-order approximation, the classically chaotic character disappears.Theoretical analysis and numerical calculations show that by regulating the phase parameter Ф we can control thetransition probability. When Ф reaches some specific values, the transition from the state n to n' is forbidden and, for some laser periods, resonance occurs, which leads to the corresponding transitions between different motional states.The time-evolution of an initial motional state |ψz) just over one period is also studied in detail.

  17. An ultraviolet laser system for laser cooling and trapping of metastable magnesium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulosa, A P; Riedmann, M P; Pape, A; Wübbena, T W; Fim, D B; Rühmann, S; Zipfel, K H; Kelkar, H; Ertmer, W; Rasel, E M

    2012-01-01

    We report on a reliable laser system for cooling magnesium in the metastable 3P manifold. The three relevant transitions coupling the 3P to the 3D manifold are separated by several hundred GHz and can be excited with light at 383 nm. The light is generated with master oscillator power amplifiers at 766 nm that feed resonant second harmonic generation stages each yielding 100 mW of UV light. The Pound-Drever-Hall stabilisation scheme is used to lock all three lasers to one stabilised reference cavity. We generate specific sidebands on each laser beam via diode current modulation in order to read out the error signals with a single photo diode. In addition, the same sidebands are used for locking the second harmonic generation cavities to the master oscillators. In this way, the complexity of the laser system is largely reduced providing a high reliability as necessary for experiments such as the magnesium lattice clock.

  18. Lasers techniques Improvement of classical accelerators by lasers. Laser accelerators with and without plasmas. Lasers accelerators in vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    1991-01-01

    Of the unconventional accelerator techniques those including lasers are reported. After explaining the advances by lasers for classical accelerator techniques, as FELs and other methods for 100 GHz generation of GW pulses, a survey is given of far field and near field laser acceleration. Problems of the beat-wave accelerator are discussed and schemes for particle interaction in vacuum without plasma are elaborated. One scheme is the Boreham experiment and another is the acceleration of "standing" wave fields where charged particles are trapped in the intensity minima. Another scheme uses the relativistic acceleration by half waves where the now available petawatt-picosecond laser pulses should produce GeV electron pulses of high luminosity. Increase of these electron enrgies would need very large lasers in the future.

  19. Automated multi-parametric sorting of micron-sized particles via multi-trap laser tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputa, Daniel S.

    The capabilities of laser tweezers have rapidly expanded since the first demonstration by Ashkin and co-workers in 1970 of the ability to trap particles using optical energy. Laser tweezers have been used to measure piconewton forces in many biological and material science application, sort bacteria, measure DNA bond strength, and even perform microsurgery. The laser tweezers system developed for this dissertation foreshadows the next generation of laser tweezer systems that provide automated particle sorted based upon multiple criteria. Many laser tweezer sorting applications today entail the operator sorting cells from a bulk sample, one by one. This dissertation demonstrates the technologies of pattern recognition and image processing that allow for an entire microscope slide to be sorted without any operator intervention. We already live in an automated world where the cars we drive are built by machines instead of humans. The technology is there, and the only factors limiting the advancements of fully automated biological instrumentation is the lack of developers with the appropriate knowledge sets. This dissertation introduces the concept of sorting particles via a multi-parametric approach where several parameters such as size, fluorescence, and Raman spectra are used as sorting criteria. Since the advent of laser tweezers, several groups have demonstrated the ability to sort cells and other particle by size, or by fluorescence, or by any other parameter, but to our knowledge there does not exist a laser tweezer sorting system that can sort particles based upon multiple parameters. Sorting via a single parameter can be a severe limitation as the method lacks the robustness and class specificity that exists when sorting based upon multiple parameters. Simply put, it makes more sense to determine the worth of a baseball card by considering it's condition as well as it's age, rather then solely upon its condition. By adding another parameter such as the name of

  20. Sub-diffraction Position Determination with Four Laser Diodes for Tracking/Trapping a Single Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, James A.; Canfield, Brian K.; King, Jason K.; Davis, Lloyd M.

    2013-03-01

    Prolonged observation of single biological molecules by overcoming diffusion can reveal interesting new properties. Observation times may be increased by physically confining a particle, but this often leads to interactions that affect molecular properties. Another way of increasing observation time is to trap a single molecule in solution three-dimensionally. However, optimal trapping of single particles relies on rapid determination of particle position for feedback to counteract Brownian diffusion. In our experiment, a tetrahedral region with foci located at the vertices is created by combining four modulated 635 nm laser diodes with three beam splitters. Fluorescence is measured with a single-photon avalanche diode and separated into bins corresponding to each excitation focus. A maximum-likelihood estimation algorithm is used to determine particle position with sub-diffraction precision in real time. To test the tracking capability of the four-focus setup, fluorescently labeled latex beads were tracked in an aqueous glycerol solution. Two setups, a piezoelectric stage and a three-dimensional electrokinetic trap, are being implemented to maintain a single fluorescent latex bead in the middle of the tetrahedral region.

  1. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, D.S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, int...

  2. Measurement of magic-wavelength optical dipole trap by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single cesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bei; Jin, Gang; Sun, Rui; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2017-07-01

    Based on the multi-level model, we have calculated light shifts for Zeeman states of hyperfine levels of cesium (Cs) 6S1/2 ground state and 6P3/2 excited state.The magic-wavelength linearly-polarized optical dipole trap (ODT) for Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition is experimentally constructed and characterized by using the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of trapped single Cs atoms. The magic wavelength is 937.7 nm which produces almost the same light shift for 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 ground state and 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 excited state with linearly-polarized ODT laser beam. Compared to undisturbed Cs 6S1/2 F=4, mF=+4 - 6P3/2 F'=5, mF=+5 transition frequency in free space, the differential light shift is less than 0.7 MHz in a linearly-polarized 937.7 nm ODT, which is less than 1.2% of the trap depth. We also discussed influence of the trap depth and the bias magnetic field on the measurement results.

  3. Arthur L. Schawlow Prize in Laser Science Talk: Trapped Ion Quantum Networks with Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Laser-cooled atomic ions are standards for quantum information science, acting as qubit memories with unsurpassed levels of quantum coherence while also allowing near-perfect measurement. When qubit state-dependent optical dipole forces are applied to a collection of trapped ions, their Coulomb interaction is modulated in a way that allows the entanglement of the qubits through quantum gates that can form the basis of a quantum computer. Similar optical forces allow the simulation of quantum many-body physics, where recent experiments are approaching a level of complexity that cannot be modelled with conventional computers. Scaling to much larger numbers of qubits can be accomplished by coupling trapped ion qubits through optical photons, where entanglement over remote distances can be used for quantum communication and large-scale distributed quantum computers. Laser sources and quantum optical techniques are the workhorse for such quantum networks, and will continue to lead the way as future quantum hardware is developed. This work is supported by the ARO with funding from the IARPA MQCO program, the DARPA Quiness Program, the ARO MURI on Hybrid Quantum Circuits, the AFOSR MURIs on Quantum Transduction and Quantum Verification, and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI.

  4. Laser-induced acoustic desorption coupled with a linear quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habicht, Steven C; Amundson, Lucas M; Duan, Penggao; Vinueza, Nelson R; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) coupled with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer has been demonstrated to provide a valuable technique for the analysis of a wide variety of nonvolatile, thermally labile compounds, including analytes that could not previously be analyzed by mass spectrometry. Although FT-ICR instruments are very powerful, they are also large and expensive and, hence, mainly used as research instruments. In contrast, linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometers are common due to several qualities that make these instruments attractive for both academic and industrial settings, such as high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and experimental versatility. Further, the relatively small size of the instruments, comparatively low cost, and the lack of a magnetic field provide some distinct advantages over FT-ICR instruments. Hence, we have coupled the LIAD technique with a commercial LQIT, the Thermo Fischer Scientific LTQ mass spectrometer. The LQIT was modified for a LIAD probe by outfitting the removable back plate of the instrument with a 6 in. ConFlat flange (CFF) port, gate valve, and sample lock. Reagent ions were created using the LQIT's atmospheric pressure ionization source and trapped in the mass analyzer for up to 10 s to allow chemical ionization reactions with the neutral molecules desorbed via LIAD. These initial experiments focused on demonstrating the feasibility of performing LIAD in the LQIT. Hence, the results are compared to those obtained using an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Despite the lower efficiency in the transfer of desorbed neutral molecules into the ion trap, and the smaller maximum number of available laser pulses, the intrinsically higher sensitivity of the LQIT resulted in a higher sensitivity relative to the FT-ICR.

  5. Chemical characterization of single micro- and nano-particles by optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, Francisco J.; Fernández-Bravo, Angel; Javier Laserna, J.

    2014-10-01

    Spectral identification of individual micro- and nano-sized particles by the sequential intervention of optical catapulting, optical trapping and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is presented. The three techniques are used for different purposes. Optical catapulting (OC) serves to put the particulate material under inspection in aerosol form. Optical trapping (OT) permits the isolation and manipulation of individual particles from the aerosol, which are subsequently analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Once catapulted, the dynamics of particle trapping depends both on the laser beam characteristics (power and intensity gradient) and on the particle properties (size, mass and shape). Particles are stably trapped in air at atmospheric pressure and can be conveniently manipulated for a precise positioning for LIBS analysis. The spectra acquired from the individually trapped particles permit a straightforward identification of the material inspected. Variability of LIBS signal for the inspection of Ni microspheres was 30% relative standard deviation. OC-OT-LIBS permits the separation of particles in a heterogeneous mixture and the subsequent analysis of the isolated particle of interest. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the approach, the number of absolute photons emitted by a single trapped particle was calculated. The limit of detection (LOD) for Al2O3 particles was calculated to be 200 attograms aluminium.

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ion trap mass spectrometry: efficient isolation and effective fragmentation of peptide ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, J; Chait, B T

    1996-07-01

    Effective analysis of the sequence of peptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tandem ion trap mass spectrometry requires efficient mass isolation and the ability to induce extensive sequence-specific fragmentation. The present paper describes a new excitation scheme, which we term red-shifted off-resonance large-amplitude excitation (RSORLAE), that can deposit higher amounts of internal energy in ions than is feasible with conventional resonant excitation. The new method provides an effective means for inducing fragmentation of MALDI-produced peptide ions with m/z values up to 3500. Prior to excitation, it is necessary to isolate ions of interest with high efficiency. We demonstrate that isolation efficiencies of > 95% can be achieved by careful design of the rf scan functions used during ion isolation. In particular, sudden transitions in the amplitude of the rf field (from low to high amplitudes) must be avoided. The combined improvements in the efficiency for ion isolation and the efficacy of ion activation make MALDI tandem ion trap mass spectrometry a practical tool for the characterization of proteins with high sensitivity.

  7. IMPROVEMENT OF THE CERN SPS ELECTROSTATIC SEPTA ION TRAPS

    CERN Multimedia

    Balhan, Bruno; Barlow, Roger Andrew; Raffaele, Graziano

    2016-01-01

    At CERN, the SPS synchrotron is equipped with a slow extraction channel towards the fixed target beam lines in the North Area This channel includes five consecutive electrostatic septa, where the field free region and the active high field region are separated by an array of tungsten-rhenium wires. The field-free region provides for the circulating beam, while the high field region is used to deflect the extracted beam. Since the residual gas can be ionized by the orbiting beam, low energy ions could cross the wire array and enter the high field region and cause high voltage breakdown when accelerated onto the cathode. To prevent low energy ions from entering this high electric field region, a vertical field is applied to the orbiting beam using so-called ‘ion traps’ for active protection. The vertical field is created by electrodes placed inside the region containing the circulating beam. Due to electromagnetic coupling onto the ion trap electrodes observed with the high frequency LHC beam (25 ns spaced ...

  8. Modification of the Suna Trap for Improved Survival and Quality of Mosquitoes in Support of Epidemiological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, N.O.; Bakker, J.W.; Hiscox, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring adult mosquito populations provides information that is critical for assessing risk of vector-borne disease transmission. The recently developed Suna trap was found to be a very effective trap when baited with an attractive odor blend. A modification of this trap was tested to improve its

  9. On-line Excited-State Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Short-Lived Ra$^+$ Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Versolato, O O; Wansbeek, L W; Berg, J E van den; van der Hoek, D J; Jungmann, K; Kruithof, W L; Onderwater, C J G; Sahoo, B K; Santra, B; Shidling, P D; Timmermans, R G E; Willmann, L; Wilschut, H W

    2010-01-01

    As an important step towards an atomic parity violation experiment in one single trapped Ra$^+$ ion, laser spectroscopy experiments were performed with on-line produced short-lived $^{212,213,214}$Ra$^+$ ions. The isotope shift of the $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$\\,-\\,$7\\,^2$P$_{1/2}$ and $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$\\,-\\,$7\\,^2$P$_{3/2}$ transitions and the hyperfine structure constant of the $7\\,^2$S$_{1/2}$ and $6\\,^2$D$_{3/2}$ states in $^{213}$Ra$^+$ were measured. These values provide a benchmark for the required atomic theory. A lower limit of $232(4)$ ms for the lifetime of the metastable $6\\,^2$D$_{5/2}$ state was measured by optical shelving.

  10. Laser spectroscopy on forbidden transitions in trapped highly charged Ar(13+) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäckel, V; Klawitter, R; Brenner, G; Crespo López-Urrutia, J R; Ullrich, J

    2011-09-30

    We demonstrate resonant fluorescence laser spectroscopy in highly charged ions (HCI) stored in an electron beam ion trap by investigating the dipole-forbidden 1s(2)2s(2)2p (2)P(3/2)-(2)P(1/2) transition in boronlike Ar(13+) ions. Forced evaporative cooling yielded a high resolving power, resulting in an accurate wavelength determination to λ=441.255 68(26)  nm. By applying stronger cooling and two-photon excitation, new optical frequency standards based upon ultrastable transitions in such HCI could be realized in the future, e.g., for the search of time variations of the fine-structure constant.

  11. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Kreim, S; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Aysto, J; Dickel, T; Geppert, C; Novikov, Y N; Tain, J L; Garcia-Ramos, J E; Bollen, G; Hobein, M; Audi, G; Beck, D; Winkler, M; Jesch, C; Vasiliev, A; Sanchez, R; Neidherr, D; Huber, G; Weber, C; Suhonen, M; Reinhard, P G; Jokinen, A; Lapierre, A; Bender, M; Martinez, T; Solders, A; Huyse, M; Matos, M; Szerypo, J; Seliverstov, M; Cortes, G; Cakirli, R B; Van Duppen, P; George, S; Block, M; Ahammed, M; Herfurth, F; Neyens, G; Habs, D; Thirolf, P G; Flanagan, K T; Roux, C; Schneider, D; Brodeur, M; Yordanov, D; Marx, G; Koudriavtsev, I; De, A; Boehm, C; Noertershaeuser, W; Blaum, K; Schabinger, B; Ettenauer, S; Plass, W R; Wendt, K; Nagy, S; Vorobjev, G; Minaya-Ramirez, E; Heenen, P-H; Quint, W; Kester, O; Le Blanc, F; Ray, A; Billowes, J; Kuehl, T; Kraemer, J; Lunney, D; Kolhinen, V; Rubio, B; Brunner, T; Nesterenko, D; Ferrer, R; Algora, A; Repp, J; Naimi, S; Eberhardt, K; Ziegler, F; Popov, A; Krieger, A; Campbell, P; Gartzke, E; Ketelaer, J; Heinz, S; Delheij, P; Ullrich, J; Dax, A; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J R; Eliseev, S; Das, P; Cano-Ott, D; Petrick, M; Moore, I; Litvinov, Y A; Schwarz, S; Dilling, J; Geissel, H; Bushaw, B A; Gusev, Y; Lallena, A M; Schweikhard, L; Schuch, R; Herlert, A

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique ``fingerprint{''}. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10(-5) to below 10(-8) for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for ...

  12. Trapped electron acceleration by a laser-driven relativistic plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Gordon, D.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.

    1994-04-01

    THE aim of new approaches for high-energy particle acceleration1 is to push the acceleration rate beyond the limit (~100 MeV m-1) imposed by radio-frequency breakdown in conventional accelerators. Relativistic plasma waves, having phase velocities very close to the speed of light, have been proposed2-6 as a means of accelerating charged particles, and this has recently been demonstrated7,8. Here we show that the charged particles can be trapped by relativistic plasma waves-a necessary condition for obtaining the maximum amount of energy theoretically possible for such schemes. In our experiments, plasma waves are excited in a hydrogen plasma by beats induced by two collinear laser beams, the difference in whose frequencies matches the plasma frequency. Electrons with an energy of 2 MeV are injected into the excited plasma, and the energy spectrum of the exiting electrons is analysed. We detect electrons with velocities exceeding that of the plasma wave, demonstrating that some electrons are 'trapped' by the wave potential and therefore move synchronously with the plasma wave. We observe a maximum energy gain of 28 MeV, corresponding to an acceleration rate of about 2.8 GeV m-1.

  13. Detecting trap leakage with ALF, the airborne laser fluorosensor; contrasting results from contrasting basin settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Alan [World Geoscience, Perth (Australia)

    1995-12-31

    The majority of the world`s onshore oil fields leak very small quantities of petroleum to the earth`s surface as seepage. In new basins such seeps mark the ends of migration pathways and indicate the presence of undiscovered oil and gas accumulations. In many offshore petroliferous basins, the seeped oil forms such thin films that they are invisible to the naked eye or to other airborne or satellite-mounted detectors. ALF, the Airborne Laser Fluorosensor, however, can detect oil films down to a thickness of 0.005 microns and also provides information on hydrocarbon phase. ALF has detected such low levels of seepage - microseepage - in three contrasting basin settings: the Gulf of Mexico Slope, a structured (diapiric) passive margin where normal gravity oils and condensates are the dominant hydrocarbon phase; the Dampier Basin, Northwest Shelf of Australia, a relatively unstructured passive margin where light oils and condensates are typical; the Faeroes Basin, West of Shetlands, a Tertiary passive margin overlying a failed Mesozoic rift where both heavy oils and condensates are trapped. In each case, ALF results are contributing important new information on the limits of the play-fairways and the phase of the trapped hydrocarbons. (author). 7 refs

  14. TrapTech R-Octenol Lure Does Not Improve the Capture Rates of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Other Container-Inhabiting Species in Biogents Sentinel Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Isik; Faraji, Ary; Indelicato, Nicholas; Rochlin, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and other container-inhabiting species have become important public health concerns due to the transmission of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Effective surveillance is dependent on the ability to collect a sufficient number of mosquitoes for population monitoring and pathogen isolation. The Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap supplied with a proprietary human skin lure has become the standard tool for container-inhabiting Aedes species collections worldwide. Recently, R-octenol, a single isomer of the well characterized mosquito attractant octenol, was shown to greatly improve the capture rate of some Aedes species when utilized with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps and Mosquito Magnet traps. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the TrapTech lure (TT lure), containing R-octenol, alone or in combination with the human skin lure in a BGS trap to capture Ae. albopictus and other species. BGS traps with human skin lures or a combination of the two lures collected approximately twice as many Ae. albopictus females compared to those with TT lures. Unlike previous studies, baiting BGS traps with TT lures did not result in increased diversity of mosquito species, or in higher numbers of other container-inhabiting Aedes species. Although human skin lures were clearly superior to TT R-octenol lures in BGS traps, R-octenol lures are more widely available and might still be used as an alternative lure, especially when Ae. albopictus populations are high.

  15. Optical Guiding of Trapped Atoms by a Blue-Detuned Hollow Laser Beam in the Horizontal Direction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Kai-Jun; LI Ke; WANG Jin; ZHAN Ming-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    @@ Optical guiding of 85 Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) by a blue-detuned horizontal hollow laser beam is demonstrated experimentally. The guiding efficiency and the velocity distribution of the guided atoms are found to have strong dependence on the detuning of the guiding laser. In particular, the optimum guiding occurs when the blue detuning of the hollow laser beam is approximately equal to the hyperfine structure splitting of the 85Rb ground states, in good agreement with the theoretical analysis based on a three-level model.

  16. Improved high-fidelity transport of trapped-ion qubits through a multi-dimensional array

    CERN Document Server

    Blakestad, R B; VanDevender, A P; Wesenberg, J H; Biercuk, M J; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated transport of Be+ ions through a 2D Paul-trap array that incorporates an X-junction, while maintaining the ions near the motional ground-state of the confining potential well. We expand on the first report of the experiment [1], including a detailed discussion of how the transport potentials were calculated. Two main mechanisms that caused motional excitation during transport are explained, along with the methods used to mitigate such excitation. We reduced the motional excitation below the results in Ref. [1] by a factor of approximately 50. The effect of a mu-metal shield on qubit coherence is also reported. Finally, we examined a method for exchanging energy between multiple motional modes on the few-quanta level, which could be useful for cooling motional modes without directly accessing the modes with lasers. These results establish how trapped ions can be transported in a large-scale quantum processor with high fidelity.

  17. Singlet-Oxygen Generation From Individual Semiconducting and Metallic Nanostructures During Near-Infrared Laser Trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Bennett E.; Roder, Paden B.; Hanson, Jennifer L.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Devaraj, Arun; Perea, Daniel E.; Kim, Woo-Joong; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Pauzauskie, Peter J.

    2015-03-13

    Photodynamic therapy has been used for several decades in the treatment of solid tumors through the generation of reactive singlet-oxygen species (1O2). Recently, nanoscale metallic and semiconducting materials have been reported to act as photosensitizing agents with additional diagnostic and therapeutic functionality. To date there have been no reports of observing the generation of singlet-oxygen at the level of single nanostructures, particularly at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths. Here we demonstrate that NIR laser-tweezers can be used to observe the formation of singlet-oxygen produced from individual silicon and gold nanowires via use of a commercially available reporting dye. The laser trap also induces 2-photon photoexcitation of the dye following a chemical reaction with singlet oxygen. Corresponding 2-photon emission spectra confirms the generation of singlet oxygen from individual silicon nanowires at room temperature (30°C), suggesting a range of applications in understanding the impact of 1O2 on individual cancer cells.

  18. High energy gain of trapped electrons in a tapered, diffraction-dominated inverse-free-electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, P; Tochitsky, S Ya; Boucher, S; Clayton, C E; Doyuran, A; England, R J; Joshi, C; Pellegrini, C; Ralph, J E; Rosenzweig, J B; Sung, C; Tolmachev, S; Travish, G; Varfolomeev, A A; Varfolomeev, A A; Yarovoi, T; Yoder, R B

    2005-04-22

    Energy gain of trapped electrons in excess of 20 MeV has been demonstrated in an inverse-free-electron-laser (IFEL) accelerator experiment. A 14.5 MeV electron beam is copropagated with a 400 GW CO2 laser beam in a 50 cm long undulator strongly tapered in period and field amplitude. The Rayleigh range of the laser, approximately 1.8 cm, is much shorter than the undulator length yielding a diffraction-dominated interaction. Experimental results on the dependence of the acceleration on injection energy, laser focus position, and laser power are discussed. Simulations, in good agreement with the experimental data, show that most of the energy gain occurs in the first half of the undulator at a gradient of 70 MeV/m and that the structure in the measured energy spectrum arises because of higher harmonic IFEL interaction in the second half of the undulator.

  19. MICRO-MOTION EFFECT OF A TRAPPED ULTRA-COLD ION IN A STANDING-WAVE LASER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG YU-RONG; FENG MANG; GAO KE-LIN; ZHU XI-WEN

    2001-01-01

    In the absence of the requirements of the Lamb-Dicke limit and rotating wave approximation, we semi-classically investigate the dynamics of a trapped ultra-cold ion in the standing-wave laser, with the consideration of the time- dependent potential and pseudo-potential of the Paul trap. The specific calculations show that the larger the Lamb-Dicke parameter η and the Rabi frequency Ω, the greater the difference between the dynamics in the time-dependent potential and the pseudo-potential.

  20. Using a Maxwell's demon to orient a microsphere in a laser trap and initiate thermodynamic assays of photonic nanofields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranek, Vaclav; Kuznetsov, Igor R.; Evans, Evan A.

    2016-09-01

    Seeking to control free rotations of a microsphere in a laser trap, we have created a "Maxwell's demon" that identifies and captures a preferred "up-or-down" polarity of the microsphere. Breaking rotational symmetry, we attach a single "Raleigh-size" nanoparticle to a micron-size sphere, which establishes a "nanodirector" defining microsphere orientations in a trap. With radius positions to polar angle (θ) distributions, we plot the results on a natural log scale versus sin(θ) to quantify the photonic potentials aligning the nanodirector to the optical axis. Then guided by principles of canonical thermodynamics, we invoke self-consistent methodology to reveal photonic potentials in the "down" state.

  1. Improved pulse laser ranging algorithm based on high speed sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuan-yi; Qian, Rui-hai; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; He, Shi-jie; Guo, Xiao-kang

    2016-10-01

    Narrow pulse laser ranging achieves long-range target detection using laser pulse with low divergent beams. Pulse laser ranging is widely used in military, industrial, civil, engineering and transportation field. In this paper, an improved narrow pulse laser ranging algorithm is studied based on the high speed sampling. Firstly, theoretical simulation models have been built and analyzed including the laser emission and pulse laser ranging algorithm. An improved pulse ranging algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines the matched filter algorithm and the constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. After the algorithm simulation, a laser ranging hardware system is set up to implement the improved algorithm. The laser ranging hardware system includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. Subsequently, using Verilog HDL language, the improved algorithm is implemented in the FPGA chip based on fusion of the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the improved algorithm ranging performance comparing to the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm using the laser ranging hardware system. The test analysis result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system realized the high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission. The algorithm analysis result presents that the improved algorithm achieves 0.3m distance ranging precision. The improved algorithm analysis result meets the expected effect, which is consistent with the theoretical simulation.

  2. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, C. J., E-mail: c.price10@imperial.ac.uk; Giltrap, S.; Stuart, N. H.; Parker, S.; Patankar, S.; Lowe, H. F.; Smith, R. A. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Donnelly, T. D. [Department of Physics, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, California 91711 (United States); Drew, D.; Gumbrell, E. T. [Radiation Physics, AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10{sup 17} W cm{sup −2}) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  3. An in-vacuo optical levitation trap for high-intensity laser interaction experiments with isolated microtargets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, C J; Donnelly, T D; Giltrap, S; Stuart, N H; Parker, S; Patankar, S; Lowe, H F; Drew, D; Gumbrell, E T; Smith, R A

    2015-03-01

    We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments. The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by optical tweezer systems. A high speed (10 kHz) optical imaging and signal acquisition system was implemented for tracking the levitated droplets position and dynamic behaviour under atmospheric and vacuum conditions, with ±5 μm spatial resolution. Optical trapping of 10 ± 4 μm oil droplets in vacuum was demonstrated, over timescales of >1 h at extended distances of ∼40 mm from the final focusing optic. The stability of the levitated droplet was such that it would stay in alignment with a ∼7 μm irradiating beam focal spot for up to 5 min without the need for re-adjustment. The performance of the trap was assessed in a series of high-intensity (10(17) W cm(-2)) laser experiments that measured the X-ray source size and inferred free-electron temperature of a single isolated droplet target, along with a measurement of the emitted radio-frequency pulse. These initial tests demonstrated the use of optically levitated microdroplets as a robust target platform for further high-intensity laser interaction and point source studies.

  4. Comparative study of methods to calibrate the stiffness of a single-beam gradient-force optical tweezers over various laser trapping powers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarshar, Mohammad; Wong, Winson T; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-01-01

    Optical tweezers have become an important instrument in force measurements associated with various physical, biological, and biophysical phenomena. Quantitative use of optical tweezers relies on accurate calibration of the stiffness of the optical trap. Using the same optical tweezers platform operating at 1064 nm and beads with two different diameters, we present a comparative study of viscous drag force, equipartition theorem, Boltzmann statistics, and power spectral density (PSD) as methods in calibrating the stiffness of a single beam gradient force optical trap at trapping laser powers in the range of 0.05 to 1.38 W at the focal plane. The equipartition theorem and Boltzmann statistic methods demonstrate a linear stiffness with trapping laser powers up to 355 mW, when used in conjunction with video position sensing means. The PSD of a trapped particle's Brownian motion or measurements of the particle displacement against known viscous drag forces can be reliably used for stiffness calibration of an optical trap over a greater range of trapping laser powers. Viscous drag stiffness calibration method produces results relevant to applications where trapped particle undergoes large displacements, and at a given position sensing resolution, can be used for stiffness calibration at higher trapping laser powers than the PSD method.

  5. Sub-millikelvin dipolar molecules in a radio-frequency magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Norrgard, E B; Steinecker, M H; Tarbutt, M R; DeMille, D

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a scheme for magneto-optically trapping strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules at temperatures one order of magnitude lower and phase space densities three orders of magnitude higher than obtained previously with laser-cooled molecules. In our trap, optical dark states are destabilized by rapidly and synchronously reversing the trapping laser polarizations and the applied magnetic field gradient. The number of molecules and trap lifetime are also significantly improved from previous work by loading the trap with high laser power and then reducing the power for long-term trapping. With this procedure, temperatures as low as 400 $\\mu$K are achieved.

  6. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Anderson, Sarah E; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-20

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes the multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is not often employed. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. Here we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants underlying physics. The spatial resolution of ponderomotive spectroscopy is orders of magnitude better than the transition frequency would suggest, promising single-site addressability in dense particle arrays for quantum computing applications.

  7. Forbidden atomic transitions driven by an intensity-modulated laser trap

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Kaitlin R; Raithel, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an essential tool in understanding and manipulating quantum systems, such as atoms and molecules. The model describing spectroscopy includes a multipole-field interaction, which leads to established spectroscopic selection rules, and an interaction that is quadratic in the field, which is often neglected. However, spectroscopy using the quadratic (ponderomotive) interaction promises two significant advantages over spectroscopy using the multipole-field interaction: flexible transition rules and vastly improved spatial addressability of the quantum system. For the first time, we demonstrate ponderomotive spectroscopy by using optical-lattice-trapped Rydberg atoms, pulsating the lattice light at a microwave frequency, and driving a microwave atomic transition that would otherwise be forbidden by established spectroscopic selection rules. This new ability to measure frequencies of previously inaccessible transitions makes possible improved determinations of atomic characteristics and constants un...

  8. Improving detection tools for the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of prism and multifunnel traps at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Crook, Damon J; Fraser, Ivich; Lance, David R; Mastro, Victor C

    2013-12-01

    The current emerald ash borer survey trap used in the United States is a prism trap constructed from a stock purple corrugated plastic. In recent years, several colors (particularly shades of green and purple) have been shown to be more attractive to the emerald ash borer than this stock color. Our goal was to determine if plastics produced with these colors and incorporated into prism traps can improve and serve as a new alternative to plastics already in use for the emerald ash borer survey. The plastics were tested in moderate to heavily infested areas in Michigan in two initial studies to test their effectiveness at catching the emerald ash borer. Because results from studies performed in heavily infested sites may not always correspond with what is found along the edges of the infestation, we compared trap catch and detection rates (recording at least one catch on a trap over the course of the entire trapping season) of several trap types and colors at sites outside the core of the currently known emerald ash borer infestation in a nine-state detection tool comparison study. Two of the new plastics, a (Sabic) purple and a medium-dark (Sabic) green were incorporated into prism traps and tested alongside a standard purple prism trap and a green multifunnel trap. In areas with lower emerald ash borer density, the new purple (Sabic) corrugated plastic caught more beetles than the current purple prism trap, as well as more than the medium-dark green (Sabic) prism and green multifunnel traps. Sabic purple traps in the detection tools comparison study recorded a detection rate of 86% compared with 73, 66, and 58% for the standard purple, Sabic green, and green multifunnel traps, respectively. These detection rates were reduced to 80, 63, 55, and 46%, respectively, at low emerald ash borer density sites.

  9. Atomic parity violation in one single trapped and laser cooled radium ion: a probe of electroweak running

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, G.S.; Boell, O.; Jungmann, K.; Sahoo, B.K.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    One single-trapped and laser cooled radium ion is an ideal candidate to investigate atomic parity non-conservation (APNC). APNC can serve as a low energy test of the Standard Model of particle physics. We aim for a precision measurement of the electroweak mixing angle, by probing the differential light shift of the 7S and 6D Zeeman sublevels. This shift is caused by the interaction of the ion with an off-resonant laser light field. With precision RF spectroscopy and subsequent electron shelving, the differential splitting can be determined to sub-Hertz accuracy. Recent calculations show that Ra{sup +} is a superior candidate for probing APNC. With an almost identical set-up and using the electron shelving technique, ultra-narrow transitions in this ion can be exploited for an all optical, high stability frequency standard clock. We have succeeded in the production and subsequent slowing down of radium isotopes around {sup 213}Ra. Further progress has been made in the development of ion traps and the necessary high precision optical laboratory. Laser spectroscopy of Ra{sup +} and the first ever trapping of this particle are being prepared.

  10. Information entropy of a time-dependent three-level trapped ion interacting with a laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2005-10-01

    Trapped and laser-cooled ions are increasingly used for a variety of modern high-precision experiments, frequency standard applications and quantum information processing. Therefore, in this communication we present a comprehensive analysis of the pattern of information entropy arising in the time evolution of an ion interacting with a laser field. A general analytic approach is proposed for a three-level trapped-ion system in the presence of the time-dependent couplings. By working out an exact analytic solution, we conclusively analyse the general properties of the von Neumann entropy and quantum information entropy. It is shown that the information entropy is affected strongly by the time-dependent coupling and exhibits long time periodic oscillations. This feature attributed to the fact that in the time-dependent region Rabi oscillation is time dependent. Using parameters corresponding to a specific three-level ionic system, a single beryllium ion in a RF-(Paul) trap, we obtain illustrative examples of some novel aspects of this system in the dynamical evolution. Our results establish an explicit relation between the exact information entropy and the entanglement between the multi-level ion and the laser field. We show that different nonclassical effects arise in the dynamics of the ionic population inversion, depending on the initial states of the vibrational motion/field and on the values of Lamb-Dicke parameter η.

  11. Atomization efficiency and photon yield in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis of single nanoparticles in an optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, Pablo; Fortes, Francisco J.; Laserna, J. Javier

    2017-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was employed for investigating the influence of particle size on the dissociation efficiency and the absolute production of photons per mass unit of airborne solid graphite spheres under single-particle regime. Particles of average diameter of 400 nm were probed and compared with 2 μm particles. Samples were first catapulted into aerosol form and then secluded in an optical trap set by a 532 nm laser. Trap stability was quantified before subjecting particles to LIBS analysis. Fine alignment of the different lines comprising the optical catapulting-optical trapping-laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy instrument and tuning of excitation parameters conditioning the LIBS signal such as fluence and acquisition delay are described in detail with the ultimate goal of acquiring clear spectroscopic data on masses as low as 75 fg. The atomization efficiency and the photon yield increase as the particle size becomes smaller. Time-resolved plasma imaging studies were conducted to elucidate the mechanisms leading to particle disintegration and excitation.

  12. Arbitrary multibeam laser scanning and trapping by use of a spatial light modulator and manual scripting interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xun, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaoguang; Cho, Doo Jin; Cohn, Robert W.

    2004-10-01

    A multi-beam, variable footprint, laser beam steering and shaping system is described and used with a microscope to demonstrate multi-particle laser trapping. It is built around a computer-interfaced 512x512 pixel analog phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) and a 1 W, 1064 nm wavelength laser. Hand sketches on paper made with a digital pen are used to prescribe the footprints, velocities and trajectories of multiple, independently-controlled diffracted spots. Continuous scanning is approximated by automatically designing a sequence of phase-patterns that are run through and diffracted by the SLM. Very complex scanning sequences of dozens of independently controlled spots can be quickly designed and run. The number of beams that we can trap with is necessarily limited due to the low throughput (~23 mW) of the IR light through the microscope optics. Among the trapping experiments done with the system a triangular shaped vortex ring tends to stop single particles at the apexes of the triangle. However, collision with a second particle pushes the first particle past the apex and sets it into motion, leaving the second particle stopped until collision with a third particle. The discrete motion conditioned on collisions is suggestive of a queuing process or a Markov chain.

  13. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Prof.S. Chu presents "the manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light" : a brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion.

  14. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Atomic Strontium

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D S; Pisenti, N C; Campbell, G K

    2015-01-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the 3P1 to 3S1 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  15. Enhanced magnetic trap loading for atomic strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, D. S.; Reschovsky, B. J.; Pisenti, N. C.; Campbell, G. K.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a magneto-optical trap. This is achieved by adding a depumping laser tuned to the P31→S31 (688-nm) transition. The depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65% for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30% for the fermionic isotope of strontium. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  16. Improved Monoblock laser brightness using external reflector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, A D; Nettleton, John; Barr, Nick; Hough, Nathaniel; Goldberg, Lew

    2014-03-01

    The Monoblock laser has become the laser of choice in long-range, eye-safe laser range finders. It is eye-safe with emission at 1570 nm, high pulse energy, simple construction, and high efficiency when pumped by a laser-diode stack. Although the output beam divergence of a typical Monoblock with a 3  mm×3  mm cross section is relatively large (10-12 mrad), it can be reduced to 2.5× reduction from the unmodified laser. Performance using this technique with various feedback and etalon spacings is presented.

  17. Short communication: Amino trap column improves the separation of methylimidazoles, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde, and sugars in Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xian-Bing; Liu, Ding-Bo; Yu, Shu-Juan; Zhao, Zhen-Gang; Yu, Pei

    2014-11-01

    A simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in the Maillard reaction was improved by use of an amino trap column. Analysis was carried out by using high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) coupled with an amino trap column. The amino trap column was a useful tool to improve the separation of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde. This technique is useful for simultaneous analysis of methylimidazoles, reducing sugars, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in risk assessment for dairy products.

  18. Transcranial laser stimulation improves human cerebral oxygenation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Transcranial laser stimulation of the brain with near‐infrared light is a novel form of non‐invasive photobiomodulation or low‐level laser therapy (LLLT) that has shown therapeutic potential in a variety of neurological and psychological conditions. Understanding of its neurophysiological effects is essential for mechanistic study and treatment evaluation. This study investigated how transcranial laser stimulation influences cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation in th...

  19. Decomposition of cyclohexane ion induced by intense femtosecond laser fields by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Takao; Watanabe, Yusuke; Kanya, Reika [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Yamanouchi, Kaoru, E-mail: kaoru@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); NANOQUINE, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-01-14

    Decomposition of cyclohexane cations induced by intense femtosecond laser fields at the wavelength of 800 nm is investigated by ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry in which cyclohexane cations C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} stored in an ion trap are irradiated with intense femtosecond laser pulses and the generated fragment ions are recorded by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The various fragment ion species, C{sub 5}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 7, 9), C{sub 4}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 5–8), C{sub 3}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 3–7), C{sub 2}H{sub n}{sup +} (n = 2–6), and CH{sub 3}{sup +}, identified in the mass spectra show that decomposition of C{sub 6}H{sub 12}{sup +} proceeds efficiently by the photo-irradiation. From the laser intensity dependences of the yields of the fragment ion species, the numbers of photons required for producing the respective fragment ions are estimated.

  20. Improving the Selectivity of the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source and In-Source Laser Spectroscopy of Polonium

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Daniel Andreas; Jochim, Selim

    Exotic atomic nuclei far away from stability are fascinating objects to be studied in many scientic elds such as atomic-, nuclear-, and astrophysics. Since these are often short-lived isotopes, it is necessary to couple their production with immediate extraction and delivery to an experiment. This is the purpose of the on-line isotope separator facility, ISOLDE, at CERN. An essential aspect of this laboratory is the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) because it provides a fast and highly selective means of ionizing the reaction products. This technique is also a sensitive laser-spectroscopy tool for the development and improvement of electron excitation schemes for the resonant laser photoionization and the study of the nuclear structure or fundamental atomic physics. Each of these aspects of the RILIS applications are subjects of this thesis work: a new device for the suppression of unwanted surface ionized contaminants in RILIS ion beams, known as the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST), was impleme...

  1. Improved modeling of GaN HEMTs for predicting thermal and trapping-induced-kink effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarndal, Anwar; Ghannouchi, Fadhel M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, an improved modeling approach has been developed and validated for GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). The proposed analytical model accurately simulates the drain current and its inherent trapping and thermal effects. Genetic-algorithm-based procedure is developed to automatically find the fitting parameters of the model. The developed modeling technique is implemented on a packaged GaN-on-Si HEMT and validated by DC and small-/large-signal RF measurements. The model is also employed for designing and realizing a switch-mode inverse class-F power amplifier. The amplifier simulations showed a very good agreement with RF large-signal measurements.

  2. Improved understanding of Diatom stratigraphy in a varved sediment through lake monitoring and sediment trap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Dominique Beatrice; Bigler, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Biological remains in lake sediments reflect past conditions in the lake itself and within its catchment. However, it is difficult to disentangle to which extent the environmental drivers are natural (e.g. population dynamics, climate) or human-induced (e.g. agriculture, forestry). Therefore, comprehensive lake monitoring is crucial to understand taphonomy and sediment formation, and enhances the value of the paleolimnological archive. In this study, we analyze survey data of a varved lake in northern Sweden (Nylandssjön, Nordingrå) with special focus on the diatom record. Different monitoring components are combined, i.e. (1) bi-weekly data of chemical parameters (chlorophyll a, nutrients) covering the period from 2012 to 2015, (2) physical parameters (temperature, oxygen, ice-cover) covering the period from 2000-2015, (3) high-resolution data from a sequential sediment trap covering the period from 2000-2015 and (4) annually resolved diatom data from the sediment varves. Early and intense spring mixing in 2012 translates into a short but vertically pervasive chlorophyll a band which is simultaneously recorded in the sequential trap with a high diatom peak (500 000 valves cm2 d-1). The years 2013 and 2014 show higher chlorophyll a concentrations in the water column, but diatoms do not form a peak flux (>100 000 diatoms cm2 d-1) at any time in the sediment trap, probably due to stratification patterns. The trap record from 2012 indicates a spring bloom dominating the sediment signal, but this is not repeated in 2013 and 2014. Future analyses will be directed towards linking the monitored in-lake processes to annually or even seasonally resolved environmental characteristics. The multiplicity of potential ecological and environmental drivers led us to reverse our analytical view by starting with the diatom stratigraphy in the varved sediment, continuing through the data from sediment trap and water column into the lake catchment to identify deviations (timing

  3. Diamonds levitating in a Paul trap under vacuum: Measurements of laser-induced heating via NV center thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Bodini, M.; Hétet, G.

    2017-07-01

    We present measurements of the electronic spin resonance (ESR) of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamonds that are levitating in a ring Paul trap under vacuum. We observe ESR spectra of NV centers embedded in micron-sized diamonds at vacuum pressures of 2 × 10-1 mbar and the NV photoluminescence down to 10-2 mbar. Further, we use the ESR to measure the temperature of the levitating diamonds and show that the green laser induces heating of the diamond at these pressures. We finally discuss the steps required to control the NV spin under ultra-high vacuum.

  4. Coherent control of ultracold molecule dynamics in a magneto-optical trap using chirped femtosecond laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, B L; Walmsley, I A; Brown, Benjamin L.; Dicks, Alexander J.; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the effects of chirped femtosecond laser pulses on the formation of ultracold molecules in a Rb magneto-optical trap. We have found that application of chirped femtosecond pulses suppressed the formation of 85Rb-2 and 87Rb-2 lowest triplet state molecules in contrast to comparable non-chirped pulses, cw illumination, and background formation rates. Variation of the amount of chirp indicated that this suppression is coherent in nature, suggesting that coherent control is likely to be useful for manipulating the dynamics of ultracold quantum molecular gases.

  5. Coherent control of ultracold molecule dynamics in a magneto-optical trap by use of chirped femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Benjamin L; Dicks, Alexander J; Walmsley, Ian A

    2006-05-05

    We have studied the effects of chirped femtosecond laser pulses on the formation of ultracold molecules in a Rb magneto-optical trap. We have found that application of chirped femtosecond pulses suppressed the formation of (85)Rb and (87)Rb(2) a(3)sigma(+)(u) molecules in contrast to comparable nonchirped pulses, cw illumination, and background formation rates. Variation of the amount of chirp indicated that this suppression is coherent in nature, suggesting that coherent control is likely to be useful for manipulating the dynamics of ultracold quantum molecular gases.

  6. Ground Band and Excited Band of Spin-1 BEC in Cigar Shaped Laser Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Wei; LI Zhi-Bing; BAO Cheng-Guang

    2007-01-01

    The wavefunctions that conserve the total spin are constructed for the fully condensed states and the states with one particle excited. A set of equations are deduced for the spatial longitudinal wavefunctions and the chemical potentials. These equations are solved numerically for 23Na and 87Rb condensates. The deformed trap shows significant effects on the spectrum. This implies that the spin effect of the spinor BEC are more easily detected in an optical trap of larger aspect ratio.

  7. Optical interface created by laser-cooled atoms trapped in the evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Vetsch, E; Sagué, G; Schmidt, R; Dawkins, S T; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2009-01-01

    Trapping and optically interfacing laser-cooled neutral atoms is an essential requirement for their use in advanced quantum technologies. Here we simultaneously realize both of these tasks with cesium atoms interacting with a multi-color evanescent field surrounding an optical nanofiber. The atoms are localized in a one-dimensional optical lattice about 200 nm above the nanofiber surface and can be efficiently interrogated with a resonant light field sent through the nanofiber. Our technique opens the route towards the direct integration of laser-cooled atomic ensembles within fiber networks, an important prerequisite for large scale quantum communication schemes. Moreover, it is ideally suited to the realization of hybrid quantum systems that combine atoms with, e.g., solid state quantum devices.

  8. In-Source Laser Spectroscopy with the Laser Ion Source and Trap: First Direct Study of the Ground-State Properties of ^{217,219}Po

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Fink

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST for a thick-target, isotope-separation on-line facility has been implemented at CERN ISOLDE for the production of pure, laser-ionized, radioactive ion beams. It offers two modes of operation, either as an ion guide, which performs similarly to the standard ISOLDE resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS, or as a more selective ion source, where surface-ionized ions from the hot ion-source cavity are repelled by an electrode, while laser ionization is done within a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide. The first physics application of the LIST enables the suppression of francium contamination in ion beams of neutron-rich polonium isotopes at ISOLDE by more than 1000 with a reduction in laser-ionization efficiency of only 20. Resonance ionization spectroscopy is performed directly inside the LIST device, allowing the study of the hyperfine structure and isotope shift of ^{217}Po for the first time. Nuclear decay spectroscopy of ^{219}Po is performed for the first time, revealing its half-life, α-to-β-decay branching ratio, and α-particle energy. This experiment demonstrates the applicability of the LIST at radioactive ion-beam facilities for the production and study of pure beams of exotic isotopes.

  9. Unpolarized, incoherent repumping light for prevention of dark states in a trapped and laser-cooled single ion

    CERN Document Server

    Lindvall, T; Tittonen, I; Merimaa, M

    2013-01-01

    Many ion species commonly used for laser-cooled ion trapping studies have a low-lying metastable 2D3/2 state that can become populated due to spontaneous emission from the 2P1/2 excited state. This requires a repumper laser to maintain the ion in the Doppler cooling cycle. Typically the 2D3/2 state, or some of its hyperfine components if the ion has nuclear spin, has a higher multiplicity than the upper state of the repumping transition. This can lead to dark states, which have to be destabilized by an external magnetic field or by modulating the polarization of the repumper laser. We propose using unpolarized, incoherent amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) to drive the repumping transition. An ASE source offers several advantages compared to a laser. It prevents the buildup of dark states without external polarization modulation even in zero magnetic field, it can drive multiple hyperfine transitions simultaneously, and it requires no frequency stabilization. These features make it very compact and robust, ...

  10. Optical Tweezers and Optical Trapping Improved for Future Automated Micromanipulation and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrbanek, Susan Y.; Decker, Arthur J.

    2005-01-01

    Optical trap arrays are being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center for holding, manipulating, and optically interrogating arrays of nanotube sensors. The trap arrays, for example, might be used to arrange arrays of chemical sensors for insertion onto a chip in liquid, air, and vacuum environments. Neural-network-controlled spatial light modulators (SLMs) are to generate and control the trap positions and trap profiles in three dimensions.

  11. Dark-state suppression and optimization of laser cooling and fluorescence in a trapped alkaline-earth-metal single ion

    CERN Document Server

    Lindvall, T; Tittonen, I; Madej, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.033403

    2012-01-01

    We study the formation and destabilization of dark states in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion caused by the cooling and repumping laser fields required for Doppler cooling and fluorescence detection of the ion. By numerically solving the time-dependent density matrix equations for the eight-level system consisting of the sublevels of the 5s 2S1/2, 5p 2P1/2, and 4d 2D3/2 states, we analyze the different types of dark states and how to prevent them in order to maximize the scattering rate, which is crucial for both the cooling and the detection of the ion. The influence of the laser linewidths and ion motion on the scattering rate and the dark resonances is studied. The calculations are then compared with experimental results obtained with an endcap ion trap system located at the National Research Council of Canada and found to be in good agreement. The results are applicable also to other alkaline earth ions and isotopes without hyperfine structure.

  12. Cold highly charged ions in a cryogenic Paul trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versolato, O.O.; Schwarz, M.; Windberger, A.

    2013-01-01

    17 + . However, lasers pectroscopy of HCIs is hindered by the large (∼ 106 K) temperatures at which they are produced and trapped. An unprecedented improvement in such laser spectroscopy can be obtained when HCIs are cooled down to the mK range in a linear Paul trap. We have developed a cryogenic...... linear Paul trap in which HCIs will be sympathetically cooled by 9Be +  ions. Optimized optical access for laser light is provided while maintaining excellent UHV conditions. The Paul trap will be connected to an electron beam ion trap (EBIT) which is able to produce a wide range of HCIs. This EBIT...... will also provide the first experimental input needed for the determination of the transition energies inIr 17+ , enabling further laser-spectroscopic investigations of this promising HCI....

  13. A dense gas of laser-cooled atoms for hybrid atom-ion trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höltkemeier, Bastian; Glässel, Julian; López-Carrera, Henry; Weidemüller, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    We describe the realization of a dark spontaneous-force trap of rubidium atoms. The atoms are loaded from a beam provided by a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap yielding a capture efficiency of 75%. The dense and cold atomic sample is characterized by saturated absorption imaging. Up to 10^9 atoms are captured with a loading rate of 3× 10^9 atoms/s into a cloud at a temperature of 250 μK with the density exceeding 10^{11} atoms/cm^3. Under steady-state conditions, more than 90% of the atoms can be prepared into the absolute atomic ground state, which provides favorable conditions for the investigation of sympathetic cooling of ions in a hybrid atom-ion trap.

  14. A power ramped pulsed mode laser piercing technique for improved CO 2 laser profile cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirumala Rao, B.; Ittoop, M. O.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2009-11-01

    Laser piercing is one of the inevitable requirements of laser profile cutting process and it has a direct bearing on the quality of the laser cut profiles. We have developed a novel power ramped pulsed mode (PRPM) laser piercing technique to produce much finer pierced holes and to achieve a better control on the process parameters compared to the existing methodology based on normal pulsed mode (NPM). Experiments were carried out with both PRPM and NPM laser piercing on 1.5-mm-thick mild steel using an in-house developed high-power transverse flow continuous wave (CW)-CO 2 laser. Significant improvements in the spatter, circularity of the pierced hole and reproducibility were achieved through the PRPM technique. We studied, in detail, the dynamics of processes involved in PRPM laser piercing and compared that with those of the NPM piercing.

  15. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Prebble, Clare E M; Marshall, Andrea D; Bennett, Michael B; Weeks, Scarla J; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Pierce, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    .... We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters...

  16. Applying low-energy multipulse excimer laser annealing to improve charge retention of Au nanocrystals embedded MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Ming; Liao, Ting-Wei; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-02-01

    The low-energy multipulse excimer laser annealing (LEM-ELA) is proposed to anneal the nanostructure of nanocrystal (NC) embedded in a SiO2 thin film without causing atomic diffusion and damaging the NCs, since the LEM-ELA combining the advantages of laser annealing and UV curing features rapid heating and increasing oxide network connectivity. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) characterization of SiO2 thin films annealed using LEM-ELA indicated that the quality was improved through the removal of water-related impurities and the reconstruction of the network Si-O-Si bonds. Then, LEM-ELA was applied to a SiO2 thin film embedded with Au NCs, which were fabricated as MOS capacitors. The charge retention was greatly improved and the percentage of retained charges was about 10% after 3  ×  108 s. To investigate and differentiate the effects of LEM-ELA on charges stored in both oxide traps and in the Au NCs, a double-mechanism charge relaxation analysis was performed. The results indicated that the oxide traps were removed and the confinement ability of Au NCs was enhanced. The separated memory windows contributed from the charges in Au NCs and those in oxide traps were obtained and further confirmed that the LEM-ELA removed oxide traps without damaging the Au NCs.

  17. State-insensitive dichromatic optical-dipole trap for rubidium atoms: calculation and the dicromatic laser's realization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junmin; Guo, Shanlong; Ge, Yulong; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Baodong; He, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Magic wavelength optical-dipole trap (ODT) allows confinement of neutral atoms and cancellation of the position-dependent spatially inhomogeneous differential light shift for a desired atomic transition. The light shift of the 87Rb 5P3/2 state can be expediently tailored to be equal to that of the 87Rb 5S1/2 state by employing dicromatic (λ1 + λ2 (here λ2 = 2λ1 ˜ 1.5 µm)) linearly polarized ODT lasers. In our calculation, two sets of state-insensitive dichromatic (784.3 + 1568.6 nm and 806.4 + 1612.8 nm) are obtained for the 87Rb 5S1/2 (F = 2) - 5P3/2 (F‧ = 3) transition. Further, 784.3 + 1568.6 nm dicromatic laser system with a moderate output power has been realized experimentally by marrying efficient second-harmonic generation using a PPMgO:LN bulk crystal with a fibre-amplified 1.5 µm telecom laser.

  18. Towards biomarker analysis of hydrocarbons trapped in individual fluid inclusions: First extraction by ErYAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Zebühr, Yngve; Broman, Curt

    2006-12-01

    Fluid inclusions act as sealed vessels containing information about the fluid environment in which the minerals precipitated, and until decrepitated, the chemical composition of the fluid inside the inclusion stays intact. In many cases fluid inclusions contain trapped hydrocarbons, which may provide useful information in paleontological, organic geochemical and astrobiological research since they act as containers of non-contaminated organic matter with a defined minimum age. Here we present a novel concept for extraction of fluid inclusions in preparation for application to extract single fluid inclusions. The method is based on the illumination of a sample with an ErYAG laser ( λ=2940nm). The wavelength of the laser is absorbed by water and organic material, and with the minerals encapsulating the inclusions transparent to the wavelength, the fluid will expand and the inclusion will decrepitate. The initial results of our study demonstrate that fluid inclusions can be extracted by the use of an ErYAG laser, and that organic biomarkers may survive the process, readily available for GC-MS analysis.

  19. Improving thermal barrier coatings by laser remelting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Múnez, C J; Gómez-García, J; Sevillano, F; Poza, P; Utrilla, M V

    2011-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are extensively used to protect metallic components in applications where the operating conditions include aggressive environment at high temperatures. These coatings are usually processed by thermal spraying techniques and the resulting microstructure includes thin and large splats, associated with the deposition of individual droplets, with porosity between splats. This porosity reduces the oxidation and corrosion resistance favouring the entrance of aggressive species during service. To overcome this limitation, the top coat could be modified by laser glazing reducing surface roughness and sealing open porosity. ZrO2(Y2O3) top coat and NiCrAlY bond coating were air plasma sprayed onto an Inconel 600 Ni base alloy. The top coat was laser remelted and a densified ceramic layer was induced in the top surface of the ceramic coating. This layer inhibited the ingress of aggressive species and delayed bond coat oxidation.

  20. New Technique for Improving Performance of LDPC Codes in the Presence of Trapping Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adnan Landolsi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Trapping sets are considered the primary factor for degrading the performance of low-density parity-check (LDPC codes in the error-floor region. The effect of trapping sets on the performance of an LDPC code becomes worse as the code size decreases. One approach to tackle this problem is to minimize trapping sets during LDPC code design. However, while trapping sets can be reduced, their complete elimination is infeasible due to the presence of cycles in the underlying LDPC code bipartite graph. In this work, we introduce a new technique based on trapping sets neutralization to minimize the negative effect of trapping sets under belief propagation (BP decoding. Simulation results for random, progressive edge growth (PEG and MacKay LDPC codes demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique. The hardware cost of the proposed technique is also shown to be minimal.

  1. Improving sodium laser guide star brightness by polarization switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Tingwei; Zhou, Tianhua; Feng, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Optical pumping with circularly polarized light has been used to enhance the brightness of sodium laser guide star. But the benefit is reduced substantially due to the precession of sodium atoms in geomagnetic field. Switching the laser between left and right circular polarization at the Larmor frequency is proposed to improve the return. With ESO’s laser guide star system at Paranal as example, numerical simulation shows that the return flux is increased when the angle between geomagnetic field and laser beam is larger than 60°, as much as 50% at 90°. The proposal is significant since most astronomical observation is at angle between 60° and 90° and it only requires a minor addition to the delivery optics of present laser system. PMID:26797503

  2. Management strategy evaluation of pheromone-baited trapping techniques to improve management of invasive sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Heather; Jones, Michael L.; Irwin, Brian J.; Johnson, Nicholas; Wagner, Michael C.; Szymanski, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    We applied a management strategy evaluation (MSE) model to examine the potential cost-effectiveness of using pheromone-baited trapping along with conventional lampricide treatment to manage invasive sea lamprey. Four pheromone-baited trapping strategies were modeled: (1) stream activation wherein pheromone was applied to existing traps to achieve 10−12 mol/L in-stream concentration, (2) stream activation plus two additional traps downstream with pheromone applied at 2.5 mg/hr (reverse-intercept approach), (3) trap activation wherein pheromone was applied at 10 mg/hr to existing traps, and (4) trap activation and reverse-intercept approach. Each new strategy was applied, with remaining funds applied to conventional lampricide control. Simulating deployment of these hybrid strategies on fourteen Lake Michigan streams resulted in increases of 17 and 11% (strategies 1 and 2) and decreases of 4 and 7% (strategies 3 and 4) of the lakewide mean abundance of adult sea lamprey relative to status quo. MSE revealed performance targets for trap efficacy to guide additional research because results indicate that combining lampricides and high efficacy trapping technologies can reduce sea lamprey abundance on average without increasing control costs.

  3. Design and fabrication of diffractive atom chips for laser cooling and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, J P; Griffin, P F; Rabey, I M; Docherty, K; Riis, E; Arnold, A S; Hinds, E A

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been shown that optical reflection gratings fabricated directly into an atom chip provide a simple and effective way to trap and cool substantial clouds of atoms [1,2]. In this article we describe how the gratings are designed and micro-fabricated and we characterise their optical properties, which determine their effectiveness as a cold atom source. We use simple scalar diffraction theory to understand how the morphology of the gratings determines the power in the diffracted beams.

  4. Recent brightness improvements of 976 nm high power laser bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Alexander; Lauer, Christian; Furitsch, Michael; König, Harald; Müller, Martin; Strauß, Uwe

    2017-02-01

    Pump modules for fiber lasers and fiber-coupled direct diode laser systems require laser diodes with a high beam quality. While in fast axis direction diode lasers exhibit a nearly diffraction limited output beam, the maximum usable output power is usually limited by the slow axis divergence blooming at high power levels. Measures to improve the lateral beam quality are subject of extensive research. Among the many influencing factors are the chip temperature, thermal crosstalk between emitters, thermal lensing, lateral waveguiding and lateral mode structure. We present results on the improvements of the lateral beam divergence and brightness of gain-guided mini-bars for emission at 976 nm. For efficient fiber coupling into a 200 μm fiber with NA 0.22, the upper limit of the lateral beam parameter product is 15.5 mm mrad. Within the last years, the power level at this beam quality has been improved from 44 W to 52 W for the chips in production, enabling more cost efficient pump modules and laser systems. Our work towards further improvements of the beam quality focuses on advanced chip designs featuring reduced thermal lensing and mode shaping. Recent R&D results will be presented, showing a further improvement of the beam quality by 15%. Also, results of a chip design with an improved lateral emitter design for highest brightness levels will be shown, yielding in a record high brightness saturation of 4.8 W/mm mrad.

  5. Towards Quantum Simulations Using a Chip Ion Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chenglin; Wright, Ken; Brennan, Daniel; Ji, Geoffrey; Monroe, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    We report our current experimental progress towards using chip ion traps for quantum simulation. Current progress is being made using a micro-fabricated symmetric trap from GTRI. This trap implements a novel two level design that combines the benefits of both surface traps and linear four-rod traps. The trap has 50 electrodes which allow for the fine control of the DC potential needed to create large anharmonic potentials, to join and split ion chains and to shuttle ions along the trapping axis similar to many surface traps. However this trap also has a much deeper trapping depth than conventional surface traps and improved optical access via an angled slot through the chip wide enough to accommodate higher power laser light which could cause surface charging or damage in a traditional chip trap. These advantages should allow trapping of long ion chains. We hope to use these features as the next step in increasing the size of current quantum simulations being done at Univ of Maryland, which are aimed at exploring quantum phenomena in spin systems in a regime inaccessible to classical simulation. This work is supported by grants from the U.S. Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, IARPA, and the MURI program; and the NSF Physics Frontier Center at JQI. We acknowledge the GTRI team of J. Amini, K. Brown, A. Harter, F. Shaikh, R. Slusher, and C. Volin for the fabrication of the trap.

  6. Laser frequency locking with 46 GHz offset using an electro-optic modulator for magneto-optical trapping of francium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Harada, K; Ezure, S; Kato, K; Hayamizu, T; Kawamura, H; Inoue, T; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Aoki, T; Uchiyama, A; Sakamoto, K; Ito, S; Itoh, M; Ando, S; Hatakeyama, A; Hatanaka, K; Imai, K; Murakami, T; Nataraj, H S; Shimizu, Y; Sato, T; Wakasa, T; Yoshida, H P; Sakemi, Y

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated a frequency offset locking between two laser sources using a waveguide-type electro-optic modulator (EOM) with 10th-order sidebands for magneto-optical trapping of Fr atoms. The frequency locking error signal was successfully obtained by performing delayed self-homodyne detection of the beat signal between the repumping frequency and the 10th-order sideband component of the trapping light. Sweeping the trapping-light and repumping-light frequencies with keeping its frequency difference of 46 GHz was confirmed over 1 GHz by monitoring the Doppler absorption profile of I2. This technique enables us to search for a resonance frequency of magneto-optical trapping of Fr.

  7. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  8. Velocity selective trapping of atoms in a frequency-modulated standing laser wave

    CERN Document Server

    Argonov, V Yu

    2013-01-01

    The wave function of a moderately cold atom in a stationary near-resonant standing light wave delocalizes very fast due to wave packet splitting. However, we show that frequency modulation of the field may suppress packet splitting for some atoms having specific velocities in a narrow range. These atoms remain localized in a small space for a long time. We propose that in a real experiment with cold atomic gas this effect may decrease the velocity distribution of atoms (the field traps the atoms with such specific velocities while all other atoms leave the field)

  9. Continuously rotating chiral liquid crystal droplets in a linearly polarized laser trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Brimicombe, P D; Roberts, N W; Dickinson, M R; Osipov, M; Gleeson, H F

    2008-05-12

    The transfer of optical angular momentum to birefringent particles via circularly polarized light is common. We report here on the unexpected, continuous rotation of chiral nematic liquid crystal droplets in a linearly polarized optical trap. The rotation is non-uniform, occurs over a timescale of seconds, and is observed only for very specific droplet sizes. Synchronized vertical motion of the droplet occurs during the rotation. The motion is the result of photo-induced molecular reorganization, providing a micron sized opto-mechanical transducer that twists and translates.

  10. Dynamics of Two-Level Trapped Ion in a Standing Wave Laser in Noncommutative Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-Xue; WU Ying

    2007-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a two-level trapped ion in a standing wave electromagnetic field in two-dimensional (2D) noncommutative spaces in the Lamb-Dicke regime under the rotating wave approximation. We obtain the explicit analytical expressions for the energy spectra, energy eigenstates, unitary time evolution operator, atomic inversion, and phonon number operators. The Rabi oscillations, the collapse, and revivals in the average atomic inversion and the average phonon number are explicitly shown to contain the information of the parameter of the space noncommutativity,which sheds light on proposing new schemes based on the dynamics of trappedion to test the noncommutativity.

  11. A new optical trap and repump system for ultracold Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y.; Yan, M.; Desalvo, B. J.; Killian, T. C.

    2013-05-01

    Atoms can be trapped at the foci of intense laser beams, which can enable the study of interactions and dynamics of ultracold gases. In this poster, we will describe our new trap design. A large volume pancake-shaped optical dipole trap is initially used for loading large numbers of atoms from a Magneto-Optical Trap. Atoms are then evaporatively cooled and compressed into a superimposed crossed-beam dimple trap. This combination improves the reproducibility of the experiment and shortens the time required to create quantum degenerate samples. In the second part of the poster, we will discuss a new repump scheme for laser cooling of Sr that uses the 5s5p3P2-5p23P2 transition at 481nm. The availability of laser diodes at this wavelength makes this an appealing alternative to other schemes.

  12. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading for Alkaline-Earth Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Barker, Daniel S.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a technique to improve the continuous loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT). This is achieved by adding a depumping laser addressing the 3P1 level. For the 3P1 -->3S1 (688-nm) transition in strontium, the depumping laser increases atom number in the magnetic trap and subsequent cooling stages by up to 65 % for the bosonic isotopes and up to 30 % for the fermionic isotope. We optimize this trap loading strategy with respect to the 688-nm laser detuning, intensity, and beam size. To understand the results, we develop a one-dimensional rate equation model of the system, which is in good agreement with the data. We discuss the use of other transitions in strontium for accelerated trap loading and the application of the technique to other alkaline-earth-like atoms.

  13. Reactor for boron fusion with picosecond ultrahigh power laser pulses and ultrahigh magnetic field trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Miley, G H; Kirchhoff, G

    2015-01-01

    Compared with the deuterium tritium (DT) fusion, the environmentally clean fusion of protons with 11B is extremely difficult. When instead of nanosecond laser pulses for thermal-ablating driven ignition, picosecond pulses are used, a drastic change by nonlinearity results in ultrahigh acceleration of plasma blocks. This radically changes to economic boron fusion by a measured new avalanche ignition.

  14. Measurement of the beta-neutrino correlation in laser trapped 21Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scielzo, Nicholas David [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Trapped radioactive atoms are an appealing source for precise measurements of the beta-neutrino correlation coefficient, a, since the momentum of the neutrino can be inferred from the detection of the unperturbed low-energy recoil daughter nucleus. Sodium-21 is produced on-line at the 88'' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and 8e5 atoms have been maintained in a magneto-optical trap. A static electric field draws daughter Neon-21 ions to a microchannel plate detector and betas are detected in coincidence with a plastic scintillator beta detector. The Neon-21 time-of-flight distribution determines the beta neutrino correlation coefficient, a. The resulting charge-state distribution is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation which suggests a small but important contribution from nuclear recoil-induced ionization. A larger than expected fraction of the daughters are detected in positive charge-states, but no dependence on either the beta or recoil nucleus energy was observed. We find a = 0.5243 plus or minus 0.0092, which is in 3.6 sigma disagreement with the Standard Model prediction of a = 0.559 plus or minus 0.003. Aside from a deviation from the Standard Model, a possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the branching ratio to the first excited state is in error.

  15. Measurement of the beta-neutrino correlation in laser trapped {sup 21}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scielzo, Nicholas David

    2003-06-01

    Trapped radioactive atoms are an appealing source for precise measurements of the beta-neutrino correlation coefficient, a, since the momentum of the neutrino can be inferred from the detection of the unperturbed low-energy recoil daughter nucleus. Sodium-21 is produced on-line at the 88'' cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and 8e5 atoms have been maintained in a magneto-optical trap. A static electric field draws daughter Neon-21 ions to a microchannel plate detector and betas are detected in coincidence with a plastic scintillator beta detector. The Neon-21 time-of-flight distribution determines the beta neutrino correlation coefficient, a. The resulting charge-state distribution is compared to a simple model based on the sudden approximation which suggests a small but important contribution from nuclear recoil-induced ionization. A larger than expected fraction of the daughters are detected in positive charge-states, but no dependence on either the beta or recoil nucleus energy was observed. We find a = 0.5243 plus or minus 0.0092, which is in 3.6 sigma disagreement with the Standard Model prediction of a = 0.559 plus or minus 0.003. Aside from a deviation from the Standard Model, a possible explanation for the discrepancy is that the branching ratio to the first excited state is in error.

  16. Improving detection tools for emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): comparison of multifunnel traps, prism traps, and lure types at varying population densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Francese, Joseph A; Rietz, Michael L; Lance, David R; Hull-Sanders, Helen M; Mastro, Victor C; Silk, Peter J; Ryall, Krista L

    2014-08-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) that has caused devastating mortality since it was first identified in North America in 2002. In 2012, we conducted field trapping assays that tested the efficacy of purple prism and fluon-coated green multifunnel (Lindgren funnel) traps. Traps were baited with combinations of several lures that were previously shown to be attractive to A. planipennis: manuka oil--a sesquiterpene-rich oil, (3Z)-hexenol--a green leaf volatile, or (3Z)-dodecen-12-olide [= (3Z)-lactone], a sex pheromone. Eighty-nine blocks (trap lines) were tested throughout nine states along the outer edges of the currently known A. planipennis infestation in North America. Trap catch was highest on fluon-coated green multifunnel traps, and trap detections at sites with low A. planipennis population density ranged from 72 to 76% for all trap and lure types tested. (3Z)-hexenol and (3Z)-lactone baited traps functioned as well as (3Z)-hexenol and manuka oil-baited traps. Independent of the lure used, detection rates on green fluon-coated multifunnel traps were comparable with glued purple prism traps in areas with low A. planipennis population densities.

  17. On-line implementation and first operation of the Laser Ion Source and Trap at ISOLDE/CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, D.A., E-mail: daniel.fink@cern.ch [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Richter, S.D. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Catherall, R.; Crepieux, B.; Fedosseev, V.N. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gottberg, A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Kron, T. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Marsh, B.A. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mattolat, C.; Raeder, S. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Rossel, R.E. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Faculty of Design, Computer Science and Media, Hochschule RheinMain, 65197 Wiesbaden (Germany); Rothe, S. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Schwellnus, F. [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55099 Mainz (Germany); and others

    2015-02-01

    Highlights: • The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) was successfully operated on-line at ISOLDE. • LIST showed no signs of degradation after 48 h of intense proton irradiation. • Transmission, selectivity, efficiency, time structure were extensively characterized. • Suppression factor for surface-ionized isobaric contaminants is more than 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4}. • Loss in LIST efficiency compared to RILIS operation is only a factor of 20. - Abstract: At radioactive ion beam facilities like ISOLDE at CERN, a high purity of the element of interest in the ion beam is essential for most experiments on exotic nuclei. Due to its unique combination of high ionization efficiency and ultimate elemental selectivity, the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source, RILIS, has become the most frequently used ion source at ISOLDE and at the majority of similar facilities worldwide. However, isobaric contamination predominantly stemming from unspecific surface ionization may still introduce severe limitations. By applying the highly selective resonance ionization technique inside a radio-frequency quadrupole ion guide structure, the novel approach of the Laser Ion Source and Trap, LIST, suppresses surface ionized isobaric contaminants by an electrostatic repelling potential. Following extensive feasibility studies and off-line tests, the LIST device has been adapted and refined to match the stringent operational constraints and to survive the hostile environment of the ISOLDE front-end region enclosing the highly radioactive nuclear reaction target. The LIST operation was successfully demonstrated for the first time on-line at ISOLDE during two experiments, attesting its suitability for radioactive isotope production under routine conditions. Data of these on-line characterization measurements confirm a suppression of surface-ionized isobars by more than a factor of 1000 in accordance to off-line studies that were carried out for the preparation of the on-line experiments

  18. Laser Radar Receiver Performance Improvement by Inter Symbol Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuesong; Inoue, Daisuke; Matsubara, Hiroyuki; Kagami, Manabu

    The power of laser radar received echoes varies over a large range due to many factors such as target distance, size, reflection ratio, etc, which leads to the difficulty of decoding codes from the received noise buried signals for spectrum code modulated laser radar. Firstly, a pseudo-random noise (PN) code modulated laser radar model is given, and the problem to be addressed is discussed. Then, a novel method based on Inter Symbol Interference (ISI) is proposed for resolving the problem, providing that only Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN) exists. The ISI effect is introduced by using a high pass filter (HPF). The results show that ISI improves laser radar receiver decoding ratio, thus the peak of the correlation function of decoded codes and modulation codes. Finally, the effect of proposed method is verified by a simple experiment.

  19. Improving Consistency in Laser Ablation Geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstwood, Matt; Gehrels, George; Bowring, James

    2010-07-01

    Workshop on Data Handling in LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb Geochronology; San Francisco, California, 12-13 December 2009; The use of uranium-thorium-lead (U-Th-Pb) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) geochronology involves rapid analysis of U-and Th-rich accessory minerals. It routinely achieves 1-2% precision for U-Th-Pb dates constituting detrital mineral age spectra and for dating igneous and metamorphic events. The speed and low setup and analysis cost of LA-ICP-MS U-Th-Pb geochronology has led to a proliferation of active laboratories. Tens of thousands of analyses are produced per month, but there is little agreement on how to transform these data into accurate U-Th-Pb dates. Recent interlaboratory blind comparisons of zircon samples indicate that resolvable biases exist among laboratories and the sources of bias are not fully understood. Common protocols of data reduction and reporting are essential for scientists to be able to compare and interpret these data accurately.

  20. Improvement of Microstomia in Scleroderma after Carbon Dioxide Laser Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imane Bennani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Limited mouth opening (LMO is a frequent complication of systemic sclerosis (SS. Its management is complex and there are limited treatment options. We report four patients with SS and severe LMO [interincisal distance (IID 2 laser. Pulsed CO2 laser treatment of the white lips was performed after all patients had signed a written informed consent in the absence of alternative treatment. Treatment was carried out under locoregional anaesthesia using a Sharplan 30C CO2 laser in the Silk Touch® resurfacing mode. One to three laser sessions were performed at intervals of 8-12 months between sessions. Assessments were performed at 3 and 12 months with measurement of the IID using a ruler, calculation of the Mouth Handicap in Systemic Sclerosis (MHISS scale and global evaluation by the patients. Adverse events were also reported. In all four patients, an improvement in IID occurred 3 months after the first session with a mean gain of +5 mm (range: 2-7. At 12 months, a mean gain of +8.5 mm (range: 7-10 in IID was observed. The MHISS score decreased by a mean of -14 (range: 11-17. All patients showed improvement of lip flexibility or mouth opening, allowing better phonation and mastication and easier dental care. Adverse effects were transient erythema and/or dyschromia. CO2 laser appears to be effective and well tolerated in the improvement of LMO in SS.

  1. Skin optical clearing for improvement of laser tattoo removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Gavrilova, Anna A.; Pravdin, Alexander B.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2007-06-01

    The removal of tattoo pigments by laser energy is effected through a process of selective photothermolysis. Dehydration and optical immersion based on refractive index matching of scattering centers with that of surrounding matter through introduction of an exogenous index-matching agent can improve laser tattoo removal by providing increased efficiency of laser delivery to embedded ink particles and enabling the use of shorter wavelength visible lasers more effective on certain inks. Effectiveness of a method of accelerating penetration of the index-matching compounds by enhancing skin permeability through creating a lattice of micro-zones of limited thermal damage in the stratum corneum was studied. As optical clearing agents 100% and 88%-aqueous glycerol solutions were used. The effect of stratum corneum perforation on the rate of the immersion clearing of skin was studied. Dynamics of refractive index alteration of glycerol solution during its interaction with skin samples was monitored. Improvement of tattoo visualization was observed. The results of the experiments have shown that the lattice of island damage method the is effective for transepidermal delivery of optical clearing agents and could be used successfully in in vivo conditions for the enhancement of optical clearing of treated skin area and as enabling improvement of laser tattoo removal.

  2. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  3. Photoacoustics of single laser-trapped nanodroplets for the direct observation of nanofocusing in aerosol photokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Johannes W.; Thaler, Klemens M.; Haisch, Christoph; Signorell, Ruth

    2016-03-01

    Photochemistry taking place in atmospheric aerosol droplets has a significant impact on the Earth's climate. Nanofocusing of electromagnetic radiation inside aerosols plays a crucial role in their absorption behaviour, since the radiation flux inside the droplet strongly affects the activation rate of photochemically active species. However, size-dependent nanofocusing effects in the photokinetics of small aerosols have escaped direct observation due to the inability to measure absorption signatures from single droplets. Here we show that photoacoustic measurements on optically trapped single nanodroplets provide a direct, broadly applicable method to measure absorption with attolitre sensitivity. We demonstrate for a model aerosol that the photolysis is accelerated by an order of magnitude in the sub-micron to micron size range, compared with larger droplets. The versatility of our technique promises broad applicability to absorption studies of aerosol particles, such as atmospheric aerosols where quantitative photokinetic data are critical for climate predictions.

  4. Measurement method for the nuclear anapole moment of laser trapped alkali atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, E; Sprouse, G D; Orozco, L A; De Mille, D P

    2004-01-01

    Weak interactions within a nucleus generate a nuclear spin dependent parity violating electromagnetic moment; the anapole moment. In heavy nuclei, the anapole moment is the dominant contribution to spin-dependent atomic parity violation. We analyze a method to measure the nuclear anapole moment through the electric dipole transition it induces between hyperfine states of the ground level. The method requires tight confinement of the atoms to position them at the anti-node of a standing wave driving the anapole-induced E1 transiton. We explore the necessary limits in the number of atoms, excitation fields, trap type, interrogation method, and systematic tests necessary for such measurements in francium, the heaviest alkali.

  5. Disorder improves nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paetzold, U. W., E-mail: u.paetzold@fz-juelich.de; Smeets, M.; Meier, M.; Bittkau, K.; Merdzhanova, T.; Smirnov, V.; Carius, R.; Rau, U. [IEK5—Photovoltaik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Michaelis, D.; Waechter, C. [Fraunhofer Institut für Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik, Albert Einstein Str. 7, D-07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    We present a systematic experimental study on the impact of disorder in advanced nanophotonic light-trapping concepts of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared on imprint-textured glass superstrates. For periodically textured superstrates of periods below 500 nm, the nanophotonic light-trapping effect is already superior to state-of-the-art randomly textured front contacts. The nanophotonic light-trapping effect can be associated to light coupling to leaky waveguide modes causing resonances in the external quantum efficiency of only a few nanometer widths for wavelengths longer than 500 nm. With increasing disorder of the nanotextured front contact, these resonances broaden and their relative altitude decreases. Moreover, overall the external quantum efficiency, i.e., the light-trapping effect, increases incrementally with increasing disorder. Thereby, our study is a systematic experimental proof that disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light-trapping concepts employing grating couplers in thin-film solar cells. The result is relevant for the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasi periodic textures.

  6. Investigation and improvements of flatbed laser engravers and cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, J.; Hager, P.; Schuöcker, D.

    2012-07-01

    Besides the industrially widely-used galvanometer scanner for laser marking especially flatbed laser engravers and cutters are well established in graphic and design branches. Compared to the vector based technology of galvo-systems most of the laser engravers are based on pixel data produced out of graphic-or photo-programs and mainly engrave large scale areas such as signboards or printing plates. The human organ of sight is very sensitive to unwanted picture effects or distortions. In order to get rid of such disturbing effects a flat bed laser engraver of a technology leading company has been analyzed to find out these errors, identify possible causes and ways to eliminate them. In addition to this vector image processing and cutting of non metal sheets is also an important feature which could be improved by modifying the motion algorithms. During this investigation the whole laser machine was reduced to a model in MatLab including the laser source, motion system and material data.

  7. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince–Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Dong; Yu He; Xiao Zhou; Shengchuang Bai [Department of Electronics Engineering, School of Information Science and Engineering, Xiamen, 361005 (China)

    2016-03-31

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  8. Improved resolution by mounting of tissue sections for laser microdissection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Rombout, P.D.M.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Ruiter, D.J.; Bernsen, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laser microbeam microdissection has greatly facilitated the procurement of specific cell populations from tissue sections. However, the fact that a coverslip is not used means that the morphology of the tissue sections is often poor. AIMS: To develop a mounting method that greatly improv

  9. Reduction of Radiative Trapping Effects in X-Ray Lasers Using Autoionizing Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-12

    the required energy density for pumping) that most work to date has been done dith laser-proC- ced plasmas of the type used also for pellet fision ...34ic Dati’a and Nuclear Data -,ab1l’ -- o I. . Safronova an,, 7. C. L’.sina, "Atcrrto Conistant s 3f Autn-~ilzatio, n States on Ions wit-h =38l-2in tne...Be Iscelectrc)nic Sec-lence," Atom.c Data and Nuclear Data Tables 2j, W49-9Q(r’, .. 1𔃾 L. A. Vainshtein and U. 1. Safronova, ’Dielectrcni2 and

  10. Modifying the Victor® easy Set® rat trap to improve the animal welfare of stoats and ship rats trapped in New Zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant A Morriss

    Full Text Available Stoats (Mustela erminea and ship rats (Rattus rattus in New Zealand are targeted by trapping to mitigate their predation on native wildlife. Internationally recognized guidelines for assessing the effectiveness and welfare performance of kill traps are supported by New Zealand legislation under the Animal Welfare Act 1999. The Victor® Easy Set® rat trap was tested and passed a similar standard for killing short-tailed weasels in Canada but failed for stoats when tested in New Zealand in 2002 (short-tailed weasels and stoats are the same species. We tested a modified version of the trap in 2011-12, modified by changing the treadle trigger to a pull trigger and adding a plastic shroud to direct and align approach by animals to the front of the trap. These traps, in vertical and horizontal sets, were tested with both stoats and ship rats. During each test the trap had to render 10 of 10 animals irreversibly unconscious within 3 minutes to meet approval requirements. The modified trap passed with both species in both trap sets. All stoats were struck across the cranium whereas rats were struck either on the cranium or neck. We recommend this trap design for use by community conservation groups for targeting stoats and ship rats in New Zealand.

  11. Self-trapping of intensities changing under SHG and SWG for high intensive femtosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Kharitonov, Dmitry M.; Fedotov, Mikhail V.

    2017-05-01

    SHG and SFG (SWG) and THG are used widely in many practical applications such as a substance diagnostics, and imaging of various physical, chemical and biological processes as well as for laser radiation frequency conversion. One of very interesting phenomena under the frequency conversion takes place if a basic wave incident intensity is enough high: a synchronic mode of the laser pulse intensities changing along a propagation coordinate appears under certain conditions. First of all, we investigate this phenomenon using the frame-work of long pulse duration approximation and plane wave approximation without applying the basic wave energy non-depletion approximation. Applying an original approach we derive the solution of Schr¨odinger equations describing the THG via a SHG process and summary frequency wave generation (SFG) process for femtosecond pulses. Among many modes of the frequency conversion process under consideration we found out analytically the mode corresponding to synchronous intensities changing for the interacting waves. We derive conditions of such mode realization in dependence of the problem parameters. After that we verify our analytical consideration using a computer simulation of the problem on the base of the corresponding Schr¨odinger equations. Computer simulation shown also a new phenomenon at three-wave interaction: interacting wave intensities changing with two (or more) oscillation periods.

  12. Laser surface modification of Ti implants to improve osseointegration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marticorena, M [Laboratorio de Ablacion Laser, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corti, G [Laboratorio de Ablacion Laser, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Olmedo, D [Catedra de Anatomia Patologica, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires. Marcelo T. de Alvear 2142, 2 piso Sector ' A' , 1122 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Guglielmotti, M B [Catedra de Anatomia Patologica, Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires. Marcelo T. de Alvear 2142, 2 piso Sector ' A' , 1122 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Duhalde, S [Laboratorio de Ablacion Laser, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo Colon 850, 1063 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-04-15

    Commercially Pure Titanium foils, were irradiated using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser under ambient air, in order to produce and characterize a well controlled surface texture (roughness and waviness) that enhances osseointegration. To study the 'peri-implant' reparative process response, the laser treated Ti foils were implanted in the tibia of 10 male Wistar rats. At 14 days post-implantation, the histological analysis showed a tendency to more bone formation compared to the untreated control implants. The formation of a layer of TiN on the surface and the obtained roughness, have been demonstrated to improve bone response.

  13. Highly efficient, versatile, self-Q-switched, high-repetition-rate microchip laser generating Ince-Gaussian modes for optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; He, Yu; Zhou, Xiao; Bai, Shengchuang

    2016-03-01

    Lasers operating in the Ince-Gaussian (IG) mode have potential applications for optical manipulation of microparticles and formation of optical vortices, as well as for optical trapping and optical tweezers. Versatile, self-Q-switched, high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate Cr, Nd:YAG microchip lasers operating in the IG mode are implemented under tilted, tightly focused laser-diode pumping. An average output power of over 2 W is obtained at an absorbed pump power of 6.4 W. The highest optical-to-optical efficiency of 33.2% is achieved at an absorbed pump power of 3.9 W. Laser pulses with a pulse energy of 7.5 μJ, pulse width of 3.5 ns and peak power of over 2 kW are obtained. A repetition rate up to 335 kHz is reached at an absorbed pump power of 5.8 W. Highly efficient, versatile, IG-mode lasers with a high repetition rate and a high peak power ensure a better flexibility in particle manipulation and optical trapping.

  14. A Differential Interference Contrast-Based Light Microscopic System for Laser Microsurgery and Optical Trapping of Selected Chromosomes during Mitosis In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Richard W.; Khodjakov, Alexey; Wright, William H.; Rieder, Conly L.

    1995-10-01

    Laser microsurgery and laser-generated optical force traps (optical tweezers) are both valuable light microscopic-based approaches for studying intra- and extracellular motility processes, including chromosome segregation during mitosis. Here we describe a system in use in our laboratory that allows living cells to be followed by high-resolution differential interference contrast (DIC) video-enhanced time-lapse light microscopy while selected mitotic organelles and spindle components are subjected to laser microsurgery and/or manipulation with an optical force trap. This system couples the output from two different Neodymium-YAG lasers to the same inverted light microscope equipped with both phase-contrast and de Senarmont compensation DIC optics, a motorized stage, and a high-resolution low-light-level CCD camera. Unlike similar systems using phase-contrast optics, our DIC-based system can image living cells in thin optical sections without contamination due to phase halos or out-of-focus object information. These advantages greatly facilitate laser-based light microscopic studies on mitotic organelles and components, including spindle poles (centrosomes) and kinetochores, which are at or below the resolution limit of the light microscope and buried within a large complex structure. When used in conjunction with image processing and high-resolution object-tracking techniques, our system provides new information on the roles that kinetochores and spindle microtubules play during chromosome segregation in plant and animal cells.

  15. Advanced stored waveform inverse Fourier transform technique for a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, V M; Cotter, R J

    1996-01-01

    The stored waveform inverse Fourier transform (SWIFT) technique is used for broadband excitation of ions in an ion-trap mass spectrometer to perform mass-selective accumulation, isolation, and fragmentation of peptide ions formed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization. Unit mass resolution is achieved for isolation of ions in the range of m/z up to 1300 using a two-step isolation technique with stretched-in-time narrow band SWIFT pulses at the second stage. The effect of 'stretched-in-time' waveforms is similar to that observed previously for mass-scan-rate reduction. The asymmetry phenomenon resulting from the stretched ion-trap electrode geometry is observed during application of normal and time-reversed waveforms and is similar to the asymmetry effects observed for forward and reverse mass scans in the resonance ejection mode. Mass-selective accumulation of ions from multiple laser shots was accomplished using a method described earlier that involves increasing the trapping voltage during ion introduction for more efficient trapping of ions.

  16. Submillikelvin Dipolar Molecules in a Radio-Frequency Magneto-Optical Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinecker, Matthew; Norrgard, Eric; McCarron, Daniel; Tarbutt, Michael; Demille, David

    2016-05-01

    The rich level structures of diatomic molecules enable a wide range of experiments in ultracold chemistry, precision measurement, and quantum simulation, but this same structure poses challenges in laser cooling and trapping. Here we present a scheme for magneto-optically trapping SrF molecules by rapidly and synchronously reversing the trapping laser polarizations and the applied magnetic field gradient to destabilize optical dark states. We achieve trapping of SrF at temperatures one order of magnitude lower and phase-space densities 3 orders of magnitude higher than obtained previously with laser-cooled molecules. The number of molecules and trap lifetime are also improved by loading the trap with high laser power and then reducing the power for long-term trapping. With this procedure, temperatures as low as 400 μK are achieved. We are currently pursuing several approaches to increase the phase-space density of the trapped sample, including applying sub-Doppler cooling and improving the efficiency of the laser slowing stage, prior to loading the molecules into a conservative trap. This work is supported by ARO and ARO (MURI). E. B. N. acknowledges support from NSF GRFP.

  17. Light trapping for flexible organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Will, Paul-Anton; Soldera, Marcos; Glatz, Bernhard; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Taretto, Kurt; Fery, Andreas; Lasagni, Andrés. Fabián.; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-09-01

    Here we investigate light trapping substrates and electrodes for enhancing the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Their power conversion efficiency (PCE) can be improved by a factor of 1.16 using laser patterned PET substrates and by a factor of 1.13 using commercial, structured display films. Furthermore, we prepare light trapping electrodes using as flexible conductive polymer with embedded TiO2 nanoparticles, improving the PCE by a factor of 1.08 as compared to a neat polymer electrode. However, nano-imprinted conductive polymer electrodes does not provide light trapping effect due to the small size (50 nm) of the structures. Moreover flexible OPV devices, integrating the above light trapping elements, show non-degraded performance after bending tests.

  18. Post pyrolysis trapping of molecular hydrogen improves precision for δD(CH4) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, M.; Schmitt, J.; Schneider, R.; Fischer, H.

    2012-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the third most important greenhouse gas after water vapour and carbon dioxide (CO2). Since the industrial revolution the mixing ratio of CH4 in the atmosphere rose to ~1800 ppb, a value never reached within the last 800 000 years. This CH4 increase can only be assessed compared to its natural changes in the past. Firn air and air enclosures in polar ice cores represent the only direct paleoatmospheric archive. The latter show that atmospheric CH4 concentrations changed in concert with northern hemisphere temperature during both glacial/interglacial transitions as well as rapid climate changes (Dansgaard-Oeschger events). Since the different sources of atmospheric methane exhibit distinct carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition (δ13CH4 and δD(CH4)) reconstructions of these parameters on ice cores allow to constrain individual CH4 source/sink changes. δD(CH4) also reflects water cycle changes as hydrogen of precipitation is traced into methane produced from wetland/thermokarst/permafrost systems (Bock et al. 2010, Science). Here we present an updated high precision on line gas chromatography pyrolysis isotope ratio monitoring mass spectrometry technique (GC/P/irmMS) for analysis of δD(CH4) extracted from ice cores. It is based on earlier developments (Bock et al. 2010, RCM) and is improved concerning sample size and precision. The main achievement is post pyrolysis trapping (PPT) of molecular hydrogen after the high temperature conversion of methane leading to a better signal to noise ratio. Air from only 350 g of ice with CH4 concentrations as low as 350 ppb can now be measured with a precision of ~2‰. Such ice samples contain only approximately 30 mL of air and less than 1 nmol CH4. The new method was applied on ice samples from the EDML and EDC ice cores (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica, Dronning Maud Land, Dome Concordia). We present the first δD(CH4) records covering the penultimate termination and interglacial from EDML

  19. Performance improvement of charge-trap memory by using a stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Hu, Dan; Zhang, Xiwei; Zhao, Yage [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Li, Rong [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The postdeposition annealing (PDA)-treated charge-trap flash memory capacitor with stacked Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} charge-trapping layer flanked by a SiO{sub 2} tunneling oxide and an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} blocking oxide was fabricated and investigated. It is observed that the memory capacitor exhibits prominent memory characteristics with large memory windows 12.8 V in a ±10 V gate sweeping voltage range, faster program/erase speed, and good data-retention characteristics even at 125 C compared to a single charge-trapping layer (Zr{sub 0.46}Si{sub 0.54}O{sub 2}, Zr{sub 0.79}Si{sub 0.21}O{sub 2}, and Zr{sub 0.46}Al{sub 1.08}O{sub 2.54}). The quantum wells and introduced interfacial traps of the stacked trapping layer regulate the storage and loss behavior of charges, and jointly contribute to the improved memory characteristics. Hence, the memory capacitor with a stacked trapping layer is a promising candidate in future nonvolatile charge-trap memory device design and application. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Improving the intensity of a focused laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, Sofiane; Fromager, Michael; Louhibi, Djelloul; Hasnaoui, Abdelkrim; Harfouche, Ali; Cagniot, Emmanuel; ńit-Ameur, Kamel

    2015-03-01

    Let us consider the family of symmetrical Laguerre-Gaus modes of zero azimuthal order which will be denoted as LGp0 . The latter is made up of central lobe surrounded by p concentric rings of light. The fundamental mode LG00 is a Gaussian beam of width W. The focusing of a LGp0 beam of power P by a converging lens of focal length f produces a focal spot keeping the LGp0 -shape and having a central intensity I0= 2PW2/(λf)2 whatever the value of the radial order p. Many applications of lasers (laser marking, laser ablation, …) seek nowadays for a focal laser spot with the highest as possible intensity. For a given power P, increasing intensity I0 can be achieved by increasing W and reducing the focal length f. However, this way of doing is in fact limited because the ratio W/f cannot increase indefinitely at the risk of introducing a huge truncation upon the edge of the lens. In fact, it is possible to produce a single-lobed focal spot with a central intensity of about p times the intensity I0. This result has been obtained by reshaping (rectification) a LGp0 beam thanks to a proper Binary Diffractive Optical Element (BDOE). In addition, forcing a laser cavity to oscillate upon a LGp0 can improve the power extract due to a mode volume increasing with the mode order p. This could allow envisaging an economy of scale in term of laser pumping power for producing a given intensity I0. In addition, we have demonstrated that a rectified LGp0 beam better stand the lens spherical aberration than the usual Gaussian beam.

  1. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Rohner, Christoph A.; Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Geremy Cliff; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 11...

  2. Improved catalytic activity of laser generated bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rina; Soni, R K

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of silver nanoparticles, bimetallic (Al2O3@Ag) nanoparticles and trimetallic (Al2O3@AgAu) nanoparticles by nanosecond pulse laser ablation (PLA) in deionized water. Two-step laser ablation methodologies were adopted for the synthesis of bi- and tri-metallic nanoparticles. In this method a silver or gold target was ablated in colloidal solution of γ-alumina nanoparticles prepared by PLA. The TEM image analysis of bimetallic and trimetallic particles reveals deposition of fine silver particles and Ag-Au alloy particles, respectively, on large alumina particles. The laser generated nanoparticles were tested for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and showed excellent catalytic behaviour. The catalytic rate was greatly improved by incorporation of additional metal in silver nanoparticles. The catalytic efficiency of trimetallic Al2O3@AgAu for reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was remarkably enhanced and the catalytic reaction was completed in just 5 sec. Even at very low concentration, both Al2O3@Ag nanoparticles and Al2O3@AgAu nanoparticles showed improved rate of catalytic reduction than monometallic silver nanoparticles. Our results demonstrate that alumina particles in the solution not only provide the active sites for particle dispersion but also improve the catalytic activity.

  3. Optical trapping of coated microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormuth, Volker; Jannasch, Anita; Ander, Marcel; van Kats, Carlos M; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Howard, Jonathon; Schäffer, Erik

    2008-09-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering and lead to stronger trapping. We found that homogeneous silica and polystyrene microspheres had a sharp maximum trap stiffness at a diameter of around 800 nm--the trapping laser wavelength in water--and that a silica coating on a polystyrene microsphere was a substantial improvement for larger diameters. In addition, we noticed that homogeneous spheres of a correct size demonstrated anti-reflective properties. Our results quantitatively agreed with Mie scattering calculations and serve as a proof of principle. We used a DNA stretching experiment to confirm the large linear range in detection and force of the coated microspheres and performed a high-force motor protein assay. These measurements show that the surfaces of the coated microspheres are compatible with biophysical assays.

  4. Helium-neon laser improves skin repair in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccin, Maria Stella; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; de Oliveira, Flavia; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on skin injury in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral skin damage in leg. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluence of 6 J∕cm2 and wavelength of 632.8 nm, was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right leg lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections. The results showed little infiltration of inflammatory cells, with proliferation of fibroblasts forming a few fibrous connective tissue after 1 week post-injury. The lesion on the 3rd week was characterized by granulation tissue, which formed from proliferated fibrous connective tissue, congested blood vessels and mild mononuclear cell infiltration. On the 5th week, it was observed that debris material surrounded by a thick layer of connective tissue and dense collage, fibroblasts cells present in the dermis covered by a thick epidermal layer represented by keratinized epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that helium-neon laser is able to improve skin repair in rabbits at early phases of recovery.

  5. Transportation of a radioactive ion beam for precise laser-trapping experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, T. [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences (FRIS), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Köhler, L.; Sakamoto, K.; Uchiyama, A.; Sakemi, Y. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Francium is the heaviest species among the alkali elements. Due to its properties, francium is said to be of advantage in measurements of tiny observations, such as atomic parity violation and electric dipole moment. Before executing experiments with francium, it must be produced artificially because it is one of the most unstable elements. We produced francium with the nuclear fusion reaction of an oxygen beam and gold target, ionized the produced francium through a thermal ionization process, and extracted the ion with electrostatic fields. However, the thermal ionization process is known to ionize not only an objective atom but also other atomic species. Therefore, a Wien filter was installed to analyze the composition of the ion beam and purify the beam. This allowed us to improve the beam purity from ∼10{sup −6} to ∼10{sup −3}.

  6. Improved concentration and separation of particles in a 3D dielectrophoretic chip integrating focusing, aligning and trapping

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Ming

    2012-10-18

    This article presents a dielectrophoresis (DEP)-based microfluidic device with the three-dimensional (3D) microelectrode configuration for concentrating and separating particles in a continuous throughflow. The 3D electrode structure, where microelectrode array are patterned on both the top and bottom surfaces of the microchannel, is composed of three units: focusing, aligning and trapping. As particles flowing through the microfluidic channel, they are firstly focused and aligned by the funnel-shaped and parallel electrode array, respectively, before being captured at the trapping unit due to negative DEP force. For a mixture of two particle populations of different sizes or dielectric properties, with a careful selection of suspending medium and applied field, the population exhibits stronger negative DEP manipulated by the microelectrode array and, therefore, separated from the other population which is easily carried away toward the outlet due to hydrodynamic force. The functionality of the proposed microdevice was verified by concentrating different-sized polystyrene (PS) microparticles and yeast cells dynamically flowing in the microchannel. Moreover, separation based on size and dielectric properties was achieved by sorting PS microparticles, and isolating 5 μm PS particles from yeast cells, respectively. The performance of the proposed micro-concentrator and separator was also studied, including the threshold voltage at which particles begin to be trapped, variation of cell-trapping efficiency with respect to the applied voltage and flow rate, and the efficiency of separation experiments. The proposed microdevice has various advantages, including multi-functionality, improved manipulation efficiency and throughput, easy fabrication and operation, etc., which shows a great potential for biological, chemical and medical applications. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  7. Calculation of vibrational branching ratios and hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F and its suitability for laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Wei, Bin; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    More recently, laser cooling of the diatomic radical magnesium monofluoride (24Mg19F ) is being experimentally preformed [Appl. Phys. Express 8, 092701 (2015), 10.7567/APEX.8.092701 and Opt. Express 22, 28645 (2014), 10.1364/OE.22.028645] and was also studied theoretically [Phys. Rev. A 91, 042511 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.042511]. However, some important problems still remain unsolved, so, in our paper, we perform further theoretical study for the feasibility of laser cooling and trapping the 24Mg19F molecule. At first, the highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors of the main transitions are verified by the closed-form approximation, Morse approximation, and Rydberg-Klein-Rees inversion methods, respectively. Afterwards, we investigate the lower X 2Σ1/2 + hyperfine manifolds using a quantum effective Hamiltonian approach and obtain the zero-field hyperfine spectrum with an accuracy of less than 30 kHz ˜5 μ K compared with the experimental results, and then find out that one cooling beam and one or two repumping beams with their first-order sidebands are enough to implement an efficient laser slowing and cooling of 24Mg19F . Meanwhile, we also calculate the accurate hyperfine structure magnetic g factors of the rotational state (X 2Σ1/2 +,N =1 ) and briefly discuss the influence of the external fields on the hyperfine structure of 24Mg19F as well as its possibility of preparing three-dimensional magneto-optical trapping. Finally we give an explanation for the difference between the Stark and Zeeman effects from the perspective of parity and time reversal symmetry. Our study shows that, besides appropriate excitation wavelengths, the short lifetime for the first excited state A 2Π1 /2 , and lighter mass, the 24Mg19F radical could be a good candidate molecule amenable to laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping.

  8. Atomic Coherent Trapping and Properties of Trapped Atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guo-Jian; XIA Li-Xin; XIE Min

    2006-01-01

    Based on the theory of velocity-selective coherent population trapping, we investigate an atom-laser system where a pair of counterpropagating laser fields interact with a three-level atom. The influence of the parametric condition on the properties of the system such as velocity at which the atom is selected to be trapped, time needed for finishing the coherent trapping process, and possible electromagnetically induced transparency of an altrocold atomic medium,etc., is studied.

  9. Development of nanopatterned fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells with improved light trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengli; Subbaiyan, Navaneetha K; Wang, Qian; Rochford, Caitlin; Xu, Guowei; Lu, Rongtao; Elliot, Alan; D'Souza, Francis; Hui, Rongqing; Wu, Judy

    2012-03-01

    Transparent conductors (TCs) are an important component of optoelectronic devices and nanoscale engineering of TCs is important for optimization of the device performance through improved light trapping. In this work, patterned periodic arrays of nanopillars and nanolines of pitch size of ~700 nm were created on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) using nanoimprint lithography and reactive ion etching using environmentally friendly gases. The patterned FTO exhibits enhanced light trapping as compared to the unpatterned FTO, which agrees well with simulations based on Finite-Difference Time-Domain method for up to a distance of 4 μm. Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) fabricated on the patterned FTO exhibited improved performance (fill factor and power conversion efficiency), which can be attributed to enhanced light absorption in the range 400-650 nm. Further, electrochemical impedance measurements revealed lower recombination resistance for the patterned FTO/TiO(2) electrode compared to the unpatterned FTO electrode/TiO(2) electrode as a result of better light capturing properties of patterned FTO. The direct fabrication of nanopatterns on TCs developed in the present study is expected to be a viable scheme for achieving improved performance in many other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Testing relativity again, laser, laser, laser, laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Einstein, A.

    2015-01-01

    laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser, laser,

  11. Improved terahertz quantum cascade laser with variable height barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Alpar; Chashmahcharagh, Reza; Kovacs, Istvan; Lugli, Paolo; Vijayraghavan, Karun; Belkin, Mikhail A.; Jirauschek, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Using an ensemble Monte-Carlo analysis, it is found that relaxing the constraint of identical barrier heights can result in an improved temperature performance. Exploiting this additional design degree of freedom, modified structures with non-uniform barrier heights are developed based on the current record temperature design. For an optimized structure with reduced diagonality, we predict an increase of 31 K for the maximum operating temperature. Furthermore, we develop improved designs with the same oscillator strength as for the reference design. Using a genetic algorithm for optimization, an improvement of the maximum operating temperature by 38 K is obtained. These results aim to show the potential of varying the barrier heigths for the design of high temperature performance terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  12. Diode laser soft-tissue surgery: advancements aimed at consistent cutting, improved clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-01-01

    Laser dentistry and soft-tissue surgery, in particular, have become widely adopted in recent years. Significant cost reductions for dental lasers and the increasing popularity of CADCAM, among other factors, have contributed to a substantial increase in the installed base of dental lasers, especially soft-tissue lasers. New development in soft-tissue surgery, based on the modern understanding of laser-tissue interactions and contact soft-tissue surgery mechanisms, will bring a higher quality and consistency level to laser soft-tissue surgery. Recently introduced diode-laser technology enables enhanced control of side effects that result from tissue overheating and may improve soft-tissue surgical outcomes.

  13. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  14. Arbitrary waveform generator to improve laser diode driver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, Jr, Edward Steven

    2015-11-03

    An arbitrary waveform generator modifies the input signal to a laser diode driver circuit in order to reduce the overshoot/undershoot and provide a "flat-top" signal to the laser diode driver circuit. The input signal is modified based on the original received signal and the feedback from the laser diode by measuring the actual current flowing in the laser diode after the original signal is applied to the laser diode.

  15. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eBarrientos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme Alu I was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins (histone 3, lactoferrin were quantified by western blotting, and dsDNA was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, lactoferrin, elastase and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  16. An improved strategy to recover large fragments of functional human neutrophil extracellular traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Lorena; Marin-Esteban, Viviana; de Chaisemartin, Luc; Le-Moal, Vanessa Lievin; Sandré, Catherine; Bianchini, Elsa; Nicolas, Valerie; Pallardy, Marc; Chollet-Martin, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Netosis is a recently described neutrophil function that leads to the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to various stimuli. NETs are filaments of decondensed chromatin associated with granular proteins. In addition to their role against microorganisms, NETs have been implicated in autoimmunity, thrombosis, and tissue injury. Access to a standardized source of isolated NETs is needed to better analyze the roles of NETs. The aim of this study was to develop a procedure yielding soluble, well-characterized NET preparations from fresh human neutrophils. The calcium ionophore A23187 was chosen to induce netosis, and the restriction enzyme AluI was used to prepare large NET fragments. DNA and proteins were detected by electrophoresis and specific labeling. Some NET proteins [histone 3, lactoferrin (LF)] were quantified by western blotting, and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) was quantified by immunofluorescence. Co-existence of dsDNA and neutrophil proteins confirmed the quality of the NET preparations. Their biological activity was checked by measuring elastase (ELA) activity and bacterial killing against various strains. Interindividual differences in histone 3, LF, ELA, and dsDNA relative contents were observed in isolated NETs. However, the reproducibility of NET preparation and characterization was validated, suggesting that this interindividual variability was rather related to donor variation than to technical bias. This standardized protocol is suitable for producing, isolating, and quantifying functional NETs that could serve as a tool for studying NET effects on immune cells and tissues.

  17. Integrated optics architecture for trapped-ion quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielpinski, D.; Volin, C.; Streed, E. W.; Lenzini, F.; Lobino, M.

    2016-12-01

    Standard schemes for trapped-ion quantum information processing (QIP) involve the manipulation of ions in a large array of interconnected trapping potentials. The basic set of QIP operations, including state initialization, universal quantum logic, and state detection, is routinely executed within a single array site by means of optical operations, including various laser excitations as well as the collection of ion fluorescence. Transport of ions between array sites is also routinely carried out in microfabricated trap arrays. However, it is still not possible to perform optical operations in parallel across all array sites. The lack of this capability is one of the major obstacles to scalable trapped-ion QIP and presently limits exploitation of current microfabricated trap technology. Here we present an architecture for scalable integration of optical operations in trapped-ion QIP. We show theoretically that diffractive mirrors, monolithically fabricated on the trap array, can efficiently couple light between trap array sites and optical waveguide arrays. Integrated optical circuits constructed from these waveguides can be used for sequencing of laser excitation and fluorescence collection. Our scalable architecture supports all standard QIP operations, as well as photon-mediated entanglement channels, while offering substantial performance improvements over current techniques.

  18. Full Aperture CO2 Laser Process to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Fused Silica Optical Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved method is presented to scan the full-aperture optical surface rapidly by using galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous studies, the scanning velocity is faster by several orders of magnitude. The velocity is chosen to allow little thermodeposition thus providing small and uniform residual stress. An appropriate power density is set to obtain a lower processing temperature. The proper parameters can help to prevent optical surface from fracturing during operation at high laser flux. S-on-1 damage test results show that the damage threshold of scanned area is approximately 40% higher than that of untreated area.

  19. Self-Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double-Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Zhao-Xian; JIAO Zhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting witha single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential. When the atom-field system is initiallyin a coherent state, expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived. It is revealed thatatoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included. It is found that there is an alternating current with twodifferent sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells, but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field, both the population difference and the atomic tunnellingcurrent are only a single oscillation. But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with differentoscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field. For the two oscillations of the population difference, one alwayshas an increment in the oscillatory frequency, the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases. Theseconclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current. As a possible application, by measurement of theatomic tunnelling current between the two wells, the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated. lBy properlyselecting the laser field, the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.

  20. Improving friction performance of cast iron by laser shock peening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Zhou, Jianzhong; Huang, Shu; Sheng, Jie; Mei, Yufen; Zhou, Hongda

    2015-05-01

    According to different purpose, some high or low friction coefficient of the material surface is required. In this study, micro-dent texture was fabricated on cast iron specimens by a set of laser shock peening (LSP) experiments under different laser energy, with different patterns of micro dimples in terms of the depth over diameter. The mechanism of LSP was discussed and surface morphology of the micro dimples were investigated by utilizing a Keyence KS-1100 3D optical surface profilometer. The tests under the conditions of dry and lubricating sliding friction were accomplished on the UMT-2 apparatus. The performance of treated samples during friction and wear tests were characterized and analyzed. Based on theoretical analysis and experimental study, friction performance of textured and untextured samples were studied and compared. Morphological characteristics were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and compared after friction tests under dry condition. The results showed that friction coefficient of textured samples were obvious changed than smooth samples. It can be seen that LSP is an effective way to improve the friction performance of cast iron by fabricating high quality micro dimples on its surface, no matter what kind of engineering application mentioned in this paper.

  1. Generation of highly charged peptide and protein ions by atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted infrared laser desorption/ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Simone; Kollas, Oliver; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2007-07-15

    We show that highly charged ions can be generated if a pulsed infrared laser and a glycerol matrix are employed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry with a quadrupole ion trap. Already for small peptides like bradykinin, doubly protonated ions form the most abundant analyte signal in the mass spectra. The center of the charge-state distribution increases with the size of the analyte. For example, insulin is detected with a most abundant ion signal corresponding to a charge state of four, whereas for cytochrome c, the 10 times protonated ion species produces the most intense signal. Myoglobin is observed with up to 13 charges. The high m/z ratios allow us to use the Paul trap for the detection of MALDI-generated protein ions that are, owing to their high molecular weight, not amenable in their singly protonated charge state. Formation of multiple charges critically depends on the addition of diluted acid to the analyte-matrix solution. Tandem mass spectra generated by collision-induced dissociation of doubly charged peptides are also presented. The findings allow speculations about the involvement of electrospray ionization processes in these MALDI experiments.

  2. Trapping radioactive ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Heinz-Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Trapping devices for atomic and nuclear physics experiments with radioactive ions are becoming more and more important at accelerator facilities. While about ten years ago only one online Penning trap experiment existed, namely ISOLTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN, meanwhile almost every radioactive beam facility has installed or plans an ion trap setup. This article gives an overview on ion traps in the operation, construction or planing phase which will be used for fundamental studies with short-lived radioactive nuclides such as mass spectrometry, laser spectroscopy and nuclear decay spectroscopy. In addition, this article summarizes the use of gas cells and radiofrequency quadrupole (Paul) traps at different facilities as a versatile tool for ion beam manipulation like retardation, cooling, bunching, and cleaning.

  3. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Kotsifaki, Domna G; Lagoudakis, Pavlos G

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave (CW) near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force, the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, expected from the evanescent plasmon field.

  4. Near-field enhanced optical tweezers utilizing femtosecond-laser nanostructured substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsifaki, D. G., E-mail: dkotsif@eie.gr; Kandyla, M. [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, 48 Vasileos Constantinou Avenue, 11635 Athens (Greece); Lagoudakis, P. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-23

    We present experimental evidence of plasmonic-enhanced optical tweezers, of polystyrene beads in deionized water in the vicinity of metal-coated nanostructures. The optical tweezers operate with a continuous wave near-infrared laser. We employ a Cu/Au bilayer that significantly improves dissipation of heat generated by the trapping laser beam and avoid de-trapping from heat convection currents. We investigate the improvement of the optical trapping force and the effective trapping quality factor, and observe an exponential distance dependence of the trapping force from the nanostructures, indicative of evanescent plasmonic enhancement.

  5. Characterizing optical dipole trap via fluorescence of trapped cesium atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Tao; GENG Tao; YAN Shubin; LI Gang; ZHANG Jing; WANG Junmin; PENG Kunchi; ZHANG Tiancai

    2006-01-01

    Optical dipole trap (ODT) is becoming an important tool of manipulating neutral atoms. In this paper ODT is realized with a far-off resonant laser beam strongly focused in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) of cesium atoms. The light shift is measured by simply monitoring the fluorescence of the atoms in the magneto-optical trap and the optical dipole trap simultaneously. The advantages of our experimental scheme are discussed, and the effect of the beam waist and power on the potential of dipole trap as well as heating rate is analyzed.

  6. Obstacles to Laser Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barat, K

    2005-04-25

    The growth of laser development & technology has been remarkable. Unfortunately, a number of traps or obstacles to laser safety have also developed with that growth. The goal of this article is to highlight those traps, in the hope that an aware laser user will avoid them. These traps have been the cause or contributing factor of many a preventable laser accident.

  7. Detecting shake-off electron-ion coincidences to measure {beta}-decay correlations in laser trapped {sup 21}Na

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scielzo, N.D. [University of California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Freedman, S.J. [University of California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fujikawa, B.K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kominis, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Maruyama, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, P.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vieregg, J.R. [University of California and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2004-12-27

    The properties of a neutral atom trap are nearly ideal for precise measurements of nuclear {beta}-decay correlation coefficients. Following a radioactive decay, all particles emerge from the trap volume unperturbed and are available for study. However, for measurements online at existing accelerators, sufficient statistics will be difficult to acquire if precision significantly better than 0.01 in the correlation coefficients is desired. We have investigated the feasibility of detecting shake-off electrons in coincidence with the recoiling ions to decrease the statistical uncertainty of some measurements by nearly an order of magnitude.

  8. Improving the Self-Guiding of an Ultraintense Laser by Tailoring Its Longitudinal Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoufras, M.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.; Sahai, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Self-guiding of an ultraintense laser requires the refractive index to build up rapidly to a sufficient value before the main body of the pulse passes by. We show that placing a low-intensity precursor in front of the main pulse mitigates the diffraction of its leading edge and facilitates reaching a self-guided state that remains stable for more than 10 Rayleigh lengths. Furthermore, this precursor slows the phase slippage between the trapped electrons and the wakefield and leads to an accelerating structure that is more stable, contains more energy, and is sustained longer. Examples from three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the conversion efficiency from the laser to the self-trapped electrons increases by an order of magnitude when using the precursor.

  9. Improvement of disfiguring skin conditions by laser therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drooge, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in dermatology, lasers became a welcome addition to the therapeutic armentarium for disfiguring skin conditions. In this thesis, we evaluated laser therapy for the treatment of scars, of benign dermal tumours, and of port-wine stains. For scars, many different laser devices

  10. Improvement of disfiguring skin conditions by laser therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drooge, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in dermatology, lasers became a welcome addition to the therapeutic armentarium for disfiguring skin conditions. In this thesis, we evaluated laser therapy for the treatment of scars, of benign dermal tumours, and of port-wine stains. For scars, many different laser devices

  11. Montelukast improves air trapping, not airway remodeling, in patients with moderate-to-severe asthma: a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jin-ming; CAI Feng; PENG Min; MA Yi; WANG Bin

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence has demonstrated that the distal lung,which includes airways of <2 mm in diameter and lung parenchyma,constitutes an important component of asthma pathology.Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) are potent proinflammatory mediators and bronchoconstrictors involved in the asthmatic process.Guidelines recommend the leukotriene-modifying agents for asthma treatment.We hypothesized that a leukotriene receptor antagonist with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) and long-acting β2 agonist (LABA) combination would improve small airways function in moderate-tosevere asthmatics evaluated by physiological tests and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) analysis.This study was performed at a tertiary university hospital in Beijing.Methods This was a randomized,double-blind,parallel study performed in 38 patients with moderate-to-severe asthma treated with salmeterol/fluticasone (SFC) plus montelukast (SFC+M) or SFC plus placebo over 24 weeks.Small airway function was assessed by physiological studies and HRCT image analysis.Results Montelukast significantly improved air trapping as expressed by the residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC).Over 24 weeks of treatment,RV/TLC was improved by (15.41±6.67)% in patients receiving SFC+M while RV/TLC was decreased by (8.57±10.26)% in patients receiving SFC alone,the difference between the two groups was significant (P=0.02).There was a trend towards a significant difference in forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) in the SFC+M group compared to that in the SFC group ((17.87±8.17)% vs.(12.28±9.20)%,P=0.056).There was no significant change in percentage wall area (WA%) after 24 weeks of add-on treatment with montelukast.Patients receiving SFC+M showed significant improvement in the ratio of CT-determined values at full expiration to those at full inspiration (E/I ratio) (0.894±0.005 vs.0.871±0.003,P=0.002).Conclusion We have shown,using lung function tests

  12. Efficient fluorescence collection and ion imaging with the "tack" ion trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shu, G; Kurz, N; Dietrich, M R; Blinov, B B

    2011-01-01

    Trapped, laser-cooled ions produce intense fluorescence. Detecting this fluorescence enables efficient measurement of quantum state of qubits based on trapped atoms. It is desirable to collect a large fraction of the photons to make the detection faster and more reliable. Additionally, efficient fluorescence collection can improve speed and fidelity of remote ion entanglement and quantum gates. Here we show a novel ion trap design that incorporates metallic spherical mirror as the integral part of the trap itself, being its RF electrode. The mirror geometry enables up to 35% solid angle collection of trapped ion fluorescence; we measure a 25% effective solid angle, likely limited by imperfections of the mirror surface. We also study properties of the images of single ions formed by the mirror and apply aberration correction. Owing to the simplicity of its design, this trap structure can be adapted for micro-fabrication and integration into more complex trap architectures.

  13. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  14. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Prebble, Clare E.M.; Marshall, Andrea D.; Bennett, Michael B.; Weeks, Scarla J.; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P.; Pierce, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species. PMID:25870776

  15. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Rohner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432–917 cm total length (TL (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122 in southern Mozambique and from 420–990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46 in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347–1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania, the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania. The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species.

  16. Laser photogrammetry improves size and demographic estimates for whale sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Christoph A; Richardson, Anthony J; Prebble, Clare E M; Marshall, Andrea D; Bennett, Michael B; Weeks, Scarla J; Cliff, Geremy; Wintner, Sabine P; Pierce, Simon J

    2015-01-01

    Whale sharks Rhincodon typus are globally threatened, but a lack of biological and demographic information hampers an accurate assessment of their vulnerability to further decline or capacity to recover. We used laser photogrammetry at two aggregation sites to obtain more accurate size estimates of free-swimming whale sharks compared to visual estimates, allowing improved estimates of biological parameters. Individual whale sharks ranged from 432-917 cm total length (TL) (mean ± SD = 673 ± 118.8 cm, N = 122) in southern Mozambique and from 420-990 cm TL (mean ± SD = 641 ± 133 cm, N = 46) in Tanzania. By combining measurements of stranded individuals with photogrammetry measurements of free-swimming sharks, we calculated length at 50% maturity for males in Mozambique at 916 cm TL. Repeat measurements of individual whale sharks measured over periods from 347-1,068 days yielded implausible growth rates, suggesting that the growth increment over this period was not large enough to be detected using laser photogrammetry, and that the method is best applied to estimating growth rates over longer (decadal) time periods. The sex ratio of both populations was biased towards males (74% in Mozambique, 89% in Tanzania), the majority of which were immature (98% in Mozambique, 94% in Tanzania). The population structure for these two aggregations was similar to most other documented whale shark aggregations around the world. Information on small (<400 cm) whale sharks, mature individuals, and females in this region is lacking, but necessary to inform conservation initiatives for this globally threatened species.

  17. Ion Cleaning of Facets for Improving the Reliability of High Power 980 nm Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Xiong-Wen; XU Chen; TIAN Zeng-Xia; SHEN Guang-Di

    2006-01-01

    We report a simple and available way of improving the reliability of high power InGaAs 980 nm lasers by cleaning the facets using Ar ion before the protecting films have been coated. The Ar cleaning can remove the impurity and the oxide on the air-cleaved facets of laser diodes. It is proven that the way has marked effect on reducing the gradual degradation rate of laser diodes and improving the catastrophic-optical-damage threshold.

  18. Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radionuclides in an ion trap: MIRACLS’ proof-of-principle experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Franziska Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since 1978 Collinear Laser Spectroscopy is done at COLLAPS [1], which is located at ISOLDE,CERN’sfacilityforsynthesizingradioactiveions,toexplorethenuclearshell structure of the most exotic atomic nuclides far away from stability. At COLLAPS a laser beam is overlapped with a radioactive ion beam. If the wavelength of the laser corresponds to the energy difference of the electronic transitions, the laser excites the ions. The excited ions decay back to the ionic ground state and emit fluorescence photons that can be detected with photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). By measuring the hyperfine structure of the involved ionic states one obtains information about the nuclear spin, the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment. This hyperfine splitting is caused by the interaction of the bound electrons withtheatomicnucleus. Theelectronsinduceanelectromagneticfieldattheplaceof the nucleus that interacts with the electromagnetic nuclear moments and the nuclear spin. By calculating th...

  19. Improvement of thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    To improve the thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser a new design of laser head is developed. Thermal-induced phase distortions, small signal gain and lasing in the upgraded laser head are investigated and compared with previously published results. A substantial decrease of the thermal lens optical power and phase aberrations and increase of the laser slope efficiency are observed. A continuous-wave laser with 440 W average power and 44% slope efficiency is constructed.

  20. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic strontium for ultracold atom physics, high-precision spectroscopy and quantum sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Sorrentino, F.; Ferrari, G.; Poli, N.; Drullinger, R. E.; G. M. Tino

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the production of atomic strontium samples at ultra-low temperature and at high phase-space density, and their possible use for physical studies and applications. We describe the process of loading a magneto-optical trap from an atomic beam and preparing the sample for high precision measurements. Particular emphasis is given to the applications of ultracold Sr samples, spanning from optical frequency metrology to force sensing at micrometer scale.

  1. Trapping truffle production in holes: a promising technique for improving production and unravelling truffle life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Murat

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Périgord black truffle, Tuber melanosporum Vittad., is an ectomycorrhizal fungus that forms edible hypogeous ascomata. It is now harvested in plantations and is recognized as an agricultural product by European policy. Empirical techniques without scientific demonstration of their efficiency are often used to improve the production of truffles in plantations. One of these techniques is “truffle trapping” which consists in practicing holes inside the potential productive area and to fill them with a substrate containing ascospores. We report an experiment in a truffle orchard where 784 holes were set under 196 trees. Two years after the installation of the holes, 95% of the truffles were found inside the holes corresponding to only 5% of the productive area. This study confirms the efficiency of this empirical technique and demonstrates new ways for in situ studies of the truffle life cycle.

  2. Penning trap mass measurements and laser spectroscopy on neutron-rich fission products extracted from the research reactor TRIGA-Mainz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibach, Martin; Ketelaer, Jens; Ketter, Jochen; Knuth, Konstantin [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Blaum, Klaus; Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhardt, Klaus; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Herfurth, Frank [GSI, Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Smorra, Christian [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, Universitaet Mainz (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    TRIGA-SPEC is a setup for Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy on short-lived neutron-rich nuclides located at the research reactor TRIGA-Mainz. It is dedicated to the determination of nuclear ground-state properties like masses and charge-radii. The nuclides are produced by neutron-induced fission of an actinide target located in a target chamber near the reactor core. It is required to extract the nuclides fast and with high efficiency from the target chamber in order to make precision experiments on short-living species with half-lives in the order of 1s. To this end, they are flushed out with a helium gas jet containing carbon aerosols and transported through a skimmer region to an ECR ion source. The characterisation of the carbon aerosol generator and the verification of transported fission products are presented.

  3. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nanoalloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for ultra-sensitive spectroscopy and optical trapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Neri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique, performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected as function of gold concentration in the nanoalloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The dependence of the increased Raman signals on the nanoparticle Au/Ag atomic ratio is presented and discussed. Finally preliminary studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  4. Self—Trapping State and Atomic Tunnelling Current of an Atomic Bose—Einstein Condensate Interacting with a Laser Field in a Double—Well Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUZhao-Xian; JIAOZhi-Yong

    2002-01-01

    We present a theoretical treatment of dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensation interacting with a single-mode quantized travelling-wave laser field in a double-well potential.When the atom-field system is initially in a coherent state,expressions for the energy exchange between atoms and photons are derived.It is revealed that atoms in the two wells can be in a self-trapping state when the tunnelling frequency satisfies two specific conditions,in which the resonant and far off-resonant cases are included.It is found that there is an alternating current with two different sinusoidal oscillations between the two wells,but no dc characteristic of the atomic tunnelling current occurs.It should be emphasized that when without the laser field,both the population difference and the atomic tunnelling current are only a single oscillation.But they will respectively become a superposition of two oscillations with different oscillatory frequencies in the presence of the laser field.For the two oscillations of the population difference,one always has an increment in the oscillatory frequency,the other can have an increment or a decrease under different cases.These conclusions are also suitable to those of the atomic tunnelling current.As a possible application,by measurement of the atomic tunnelling current between the two wells,the number of Bose-condensed atoms can be evaluated.By poperly selecting the laser field,the expected atomic tunnelling current can be obtained too.

  5. Diode-pumped laser with improved pumping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jim J.

    2004-03-09

    A laser wherein pump radiation from laser diodes is delivered to a pump chamber and into the lasing medium by quasi-three-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator light channels. The light channels have reflective side walls with a curved surface and reflective end walls with a curved surface. A flow tube between the lasing medium and the light channel has a roughened surface.

  6. Improved cutting performance in high power laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described.......Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described....

  7. Improved cutting performance in high power laser cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2003-01-01

    Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described.......Recent results in high power laser cutting especially with focus on cutting of mild grade steel types for shipbuilding are described....

  8. Direct laser cooling Al+ ions optical clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, J; Luo, J; Lu, Z H

    2016-01-01

    Al$^+$ ions optical clock is a very promising optical frequency standard candidate due to its extremely small blackbody radiation shift. It has been successfully demonstrated with indirect cooled, quantum-logic-based spectroscopy technique. Its accuracy is limited by second-order Doppler shift, and its stability is limited by the number of ions that can be probed in quantum logic processing. We propose a direct laser cooling scheme of Al$^+$ ions optical clocks where both the stability and accuracy of the clocks are greatly improved. In the proposed scheme, two Al$^+$ ions traps are utilized. The first trap is used to trap a large number of Al$^+$ ions to improve the stability of the clock laser, while the second trap is used to trap a single Al$^+$ ions to provide the ultimate accuracy. Both traps are cooled with a continuous wave 167 nm laser. The expected clock laser stability can reach $9.0\\times10^{-17}/\\sqrt{\\tau}$. For the second trap, in addition to 167 nm laser Doppler cooling, a second stage pulsed ...

  9. Improved biogas production from food waste by co-digestion with de-oiled grease trap waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Jie; Kobayashi, Takuro; Kuramochi, Hidetoshi; Li, Yu-You; Xu, Kai-Qin

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of co-digesting food waste (FW) and de-oiled grease trap waste (GTW) to improve the biogas production. A lab-scale mesophilic digester (MD), a temperature-phased anaerobic digester (TPAD) and a TPAD with recycling (TPAD-R) were synchronously operated under mono-digestion (FW) and co-digestion (FW+de-oiled GTW). Co-digestion increased the biogas yield by 19% in the MD and TPAD-R, with a biogas yield of 0.60L/g VS added. Specific methanogenic activity in the TPAD-R was much higher than that in the MD. In addition to methane, hydrogen at a yield of approximately 1mol/mol hexose was produced in the TPAD-R. Alkalinity was consumed more in the co-digestion than in mono-digestion. Co-digestion resulted in more lipid accumulation in each digester. The MD favored the degradation of lipid and conversion of long-chain fatty acids more than the TPAD and TPAD-R.

  10. Improved impact toughness of 13Cr martensitic stainless steel hardened by laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, L. W.; Chang, Y. M.; Torng, S.; Wu, H. C.

    2002-08-01

    The impact toughness of AISI 403 martensitic stainless steel plate and laser-hardened specimens tempered at various temperatures were examined. Phosphorus was the primary residual impurity responsible for tempered embrittlement of this alloy. The experimental result also indicated that AISI 403 stainless steel was very sensitive to reverse-temper embrittlement. The improved impact toughness of the laser-hardened specimen was attributed to the refined microstructure in the laser-hardened zone.

  11. Fabrication of mitigation pits for improving laser damage resistance in dielectric mirrors by femtosecond laser machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Justin E.; Qiu, S. Roger; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2011-03-20

    Femtosecond laser machining is used to create mitigation pits to stabilize nanosecond laser-induced damage in multilayer dielectric mirror coatings on BK7 substrates. In this paper, we characterize features and the artifacts associated with mitigation pits and further investigate the impact of pulse energy and pulse duration on pit quality and damage resistance. Our results show that these mitigation features can double the fluence-handling capability of large-aperture optical multilayer mirror coatings and further demonstrate that femtosecond laser macromachining is a promising means for fabricating mitigation geometry in multilayer coatings to increase mirror performance under high-power laser irradiation.

  12. Graphene for improved femtosecond laser based pluripotent stem cell transfection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available triphosphates (ATP) luminescence and breakages on the cell plasma membrane assessed using cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) screening. Secondly, the effects of fs laser irradiation on cell viability and cytotoxicity at 1064 and 532 nm for cells plated...

  13. Enhanced Magnetic Trap Loading and Coupled Optical Resonance Spectroscopy in Strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Daniel S.; Reschovsky, Benjamin J.; Pisenti, Neal C.; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2015-05-01

    We investigate a technique to improve the loading of atomic strontium into a magnetic trap using a 688 nm de-pump laser on the 3P1 - 3S1 transition. Strontium degenerate gas experiments typically use a magnetic trap continuously loaded from a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) operating on the 461 nm line. A slow (~1:50,000) leak from the MOT transition populates the magnetically trapped 3P2 state and the 3P1 state in a 1:2 ratio. Pumping 3P1 atoms into 3P2 accelerates magnetic trap loading. For this purpose, we stabilize a 688 nm laser using Coupled Optical Resonance Laser Locking (COReLL) to the 679 nm, 688 nm, and 707 nm lines. The technique allows us to lock multiple lasers while only detecting absorption on the 707 nm transition. Error signals are generated with incommensurate frequency modulation of the pump beams. Preliminary application of the 688 nm laser to our 88Sr MOT results in 20% enhancement of magnetic trap atom number. We discuss the limitations of the loading rate enhancement and the potential for loading enhancement with other repumping strategies.

  14. Magneto optical trapping of Barium

    CERN Document Server

    De, S; Jungmann, K; Willmann, L

    2008-01-01

    First laser cooling and trapping of the heavy alkaline earth element barium has been achieved based on the strong 6s$^2$ $^1$S$_0$ - 6s6p $^1$P$_1$ transition for the main cooling. Due to the large branching into metastable D-states several additional laser driven transitions are required to provide a closed cooling cycle. A total efficiency of $0.4(1) \\cdot 10^{-2}$ for slowing a thermal atomic beam and capturing atoms into a magneto optical trap was obtained. Trapping lifetimes of more than 1.5 s were observed. This lifetime is shortened at high laser intensities by photo ionization losses. The developed techniques will allow to extend significantly the number of elements that can be optically cooled and trapped.

  15. Improved CT-based estimate of pulmonary gas trapping accounting for scanner and lung-volume variations in a multicenter asthmatic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Hoffman, Eric A; Wenzel, Sally E; Castro, Mario; Lin, Ching-Long

    2014-09-15

    Lung air trapping is estimated via quantitative computed tomography (CT) using density threshold-based measures on an expiration scan. However, the effects of scanner differences and imaging protocol adherence on quantitative assessment are known to be problematic. This study investigates the effects of protocol differences, such as using different CT scanners and breath-hold coaches in a multicenter asthmatic study, and proposes new methods that can adjust intersite and intersubject variations. CT images of 50 healthy subjects and 42 nonsevere and 52 severe asthmatics at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) were acquired using three different scanners and two different coaching methods at three institutions. A fraction threshold-based approach based on the corrected Hounsfield unit of air with tracheal density was applied to quantify air trapping at FRC. The new air-trapping method was enhanced by adding a lung-shaped metric at TLC and the lobar ratio of air-volume change between TLC and FRC. The fraction-based air-trapping method is able to collapse air-trapping data of respective populations into distinct regression lines. Relative to a constant value-based clustering scheme, the slope-based clustering scheme shows the improved performance and reduced misclassification rate of healthy subjects. Furthermore, both lung shape and air-volume change are found to be discriminant variables for differentiating among three populations of healthy subjects and nonsevere and severe asthmatics. In conjunction with the lung shape and air-volume change, the fraction-based measure of air trapping enables differentiation of severe asthmatics from nonsevere asthmatics and nonsevere asthmatics from healthy subjects, critical for the development and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  16. The Aarhus Ion Micro-Trap Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Nielsen, Otto; Poulsen, Gregers

    As part of our involvement in the EU MICROTRAP project, we have designed, manufactured and assembled a micro-scale ion trap with integrated optical fibers. These prealigned fibers will allow delivering cooling laser light to single ions. Therefore, such a trap will not require any direct optical...... access for laser cooling. All the parts for the trap have been made in our institute [1]. The electrodes and the spacers were laser cut in the collaboration with the group of P.  Balling. In our group we have developed a technique to manufacture lensed optical fibers. The trap is now assembled...... and installed in an ultra high vacuum chamber, which includes an ablation oven for all-optical loading of the trap [2]. The next steps on the project are to demonstrate the operation of the micro-trap and the cooling of ions using fiber delivered light. [1] D. Grant, Development of Micro-Scale Ion traps, Master...

  17. Trapping of molecular Oxygen together with Lithium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Akerman, Nitzan; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap which brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m/s. We use a beam seeded with molecular Oxygen, and entrain it with Lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate $10^9$ trapped O$_2$ molecules and $10^5$ Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 second. With further improvements to Lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  18. Trapping of Molecular Oxygen together with Lithium Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akerman, Nitzan; Karpov, Michael; Segev, Yair; Bibelnik, Natan; Narevicius, Julia; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous deceleration and trapping of a cold atomic and molecular mixture. This is the first step towards studies of cold atom-molecule collisions at low temperatures as well as application of sympathetic cooling. Both atoms and molecules are cooled in a supersonic expansion and are loaded into a moving magnetic trap that brings them to rest via the Zeeman interaction from an initial velocity of 375 m /s . We use a beam seeded with molecular oxygen, and entrain it with lithium atoms by laser ablation prior to deceleration. The deceleration ends with loading of the mixture into a static quadrupole trap, which is generated by two permanent magnets. We estimate 1 09 trapped O2 molecules and 1 05 Li atoms with background pressure limited lifetime on the order of 1 sec. With further improvements to lithium entrainment we expect that sympathetic cooling of molecules is within reach.

  19. Trapping molecules on chips

    CERN Document Server

    Santambrogio, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, it was demonstrated that neutral molecules can be loaded on a microchip directly from a supersonic beam. The molecules are confined in microscopic traps that can be moved smoothly over the surface of the chip. Once the molecules are trapped, they can be decelerated to a standstill, for instance, or pumped into selected quantum states by laser light or microwaves. Molecules are detected on the chip by time-resolved spatial imaging, which allows for the study of the distribution in the phase space of the molecular ensemble.

  20. A Simple Method for Improving the Spatial Resolution in Infrared Laser Ablation Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieta, Juha-Pekka; Vaikkinen, Anu; Auno, Samuli; Räikkönen, Heikki; Haapala, Markus; Scotti, Gianmario; Kopra, Jaakko; Piepponen, Petteri; Kauppila, Tiina J.

    2017-01-01

    In mass spectrometry imaging of tissues, the size of structures that can be distinguished is determined by the spatial resolution of the imaging technique. Here, the spatial resolution of IR laser ablation is markedly improved by increasing the distance between the laser and the focusing lens. As the distance between the laser and the lens is increased from 1 to 18 m, the ablation spot size decreases from 440 to 44 μm. This way, only the collimated center of the divergent laser beam is directed on the focusing lens, which results in better focusing of the beam. Part of the laser energy is lost at longer distance, but this is compensated by focusing of the radiation to a smaller area on the sample surface. The long distance can also be achieved by a set of mirrors, between which the radiation travels before it is directed to the focusing lens and the sample. This method for improving the spatial resolution can be utilized in mass spectrometry imaging of tissues by techniques that utilize IR laser ablation, such as laser ablation electrospray ionization, laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization, and matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization.

  1. Rayleigh Laser Guide Star Systems: Application to the University of Illinois Seeing Improvement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laird A.; Teare, Scott W.

    2002-09-01

    Laser guide stars created by Rayleigh scattering provide a reasonable means to monitor atmospheric wavefront distortions for real-time correction by adaptive optics systems. Because of the λ-4 wavelength dependence of Rayleigh scattering, short-wavelength lasers are a logical first choice for astronomical laser guide star systems, and in this paper we describe the results from a sustained experimental effort to integrate into an adaptive optics system a 351 nm Rayleigh laser guide star created at an altitude of 20 km (above mean sea level) at the Mount Wilson 2.5 m telescope. In addition to providing obvious scientific benefits, the 351 nm laser guide star projected by the University of Illinois Seeing Improvement System is ``stealth qualified'' in terms of the Federal Aviation Administration and airplane avoidance. Because of the excellent return signal at the wavefront sensor, there is no doubt that future applications will be found for short-wavelength Rayleigh-scattered laser guide stars.

  2. Improvement of aluminum drilling efficiency and precision by shaped femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying; Qi, Hongxia; Chen, Anmin; Hu, Zhan

    2014-10-01

    Shaped femtosecond laser pulses with the plain phase (transform-limited pulse) and sine phase (A = 1.2566, T = 30, T = 10, and T = 5) were used to drill Al sheet in vacuum. Using different phase, the number of pulses required to drill through the sheet was different. With lower laser pulse energy, the ablation rate was the highest when plain phase (corresponding to transform limited pulse) was used. With higher laser energy, the optimized ablation rate can be achieved by increasing the time separation between the subpulses of pulse train produced from the sine phase function. And, with the shaped femtosecond laser, the diameter of ablation holes produced was smaller, the ablation precision was also improved. The results showed that shaped femtosecond laser pulse has great advantages in the context of femtosecond laser drilling.

  3. Laser Polishing: Green Path to Improved Accelerator Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Michael [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2015-10-06

    We pursued three paths toward reducing the initial cost and operating expense of particle accelerators. First, we investigated laser surface melting as an alternative to the present cavity processing approach using noxious chemicals. We successfully demonstrated a process that can be scaled up and defined the path to do so. Second, we sought to develop tailored laser pulsing as a way to simulate the thermal fatigue environment responsible for damaging accelerator components. Though the first three steps along the path were successfully accomplished, the final segment depended on collaborators with unique facilities, whose program was terminated. The third segment aimed to acquire a fundamental understanding of the widely used chemical process that yields the rough surfaces smoothed by laser melting. We found that the roughness is an inherent and unavoidable outcome that limits the performance of components processed thusly.

  4. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Seyedeh Hamideh; Mahmoud, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The optical trapping techniques have been extensively used in physics, biophysics, micro-chemistry, and micro-mechanics to allow trapping and manipulation of materials ranging from particles, cells, biological substances, and polymers to DNA and RNA molecules. In this Letter, we present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named trap split, in a conventional four-level double-$\\Lambda$ atomic system driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can be always achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating the particles and generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  5. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  6. Spatial-Resolution Improvement in Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry System Based on Tunable Linear Fiber Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Guoyu; Li Yan [Institute of Information Engineering, Handan College, Handan, 056005 (China); Zhao Peng, E-mail: guoyu_li@yahoo.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-01

    In optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) system, the spatial resolution is obtained by using the total frequency-sweep span of the tunable laser. However, in practice, the spatial resolution is severely limited by nonlinearity in the lightwave-frequency sweep of the tunable laser. A closed-loop PZT modulated DBR linear fiber laser is proposed to improve the spatial resolution of the OFDR system. Experimental results show that the spatial resolution of OFDR system has improved greatly. When the frequency sweep excursion is 66GHz and the fiber under test (FUT) is 7 m, the OFDR system has a spatial resolution of 1.5 m with open-loop PZT modulated laser. But the spatial resolution increases to 35 cm with closed-loop PZT modulated laser.

  7. Improved low-power semiconductor diode lasers for photodynamic therapy in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Susanne M.; Mueller, Eduard K.; Van de Workeen, Brian C.; Mueller, Otward M.

    2001-05-01

    Cryogenically cooling semiconductor diode lasers provides higher power output, longer device lifetime, and greater monochromaticity. While these effects are well known, such improvements have not been quantified, and thus cryogenically operated semiconductor lasers have not been utilized in photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report quantification of these results from laser power meter and photospectrometer data. The emission wavelengths of these low power multiple quantum well semiconductor lasers were found to decrease and become more monochromatic with decreasing temperature. Significant power output improvements also were obtained at cryogenic temperatures. In addition, the threshold current, i.e. the current at which lasing begins, decreased with decreasing temperature. This lower threshold current combined with the increased power output produced dramatically higher device efficiencies. It is proposed that cryogenic operation of semiconductor diode lasers will reduce the number of devices needed to produce the requisite output for many veterinary and medical applications, permitting significant cost reductions.

  8. Improvements in quantum cascade laser performance through comprehensive modeling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Scott Sheridan

    [4]. Further expanding this model above threshold operation to roll-over, we performed experiments and derived models for "thermal rollover" and "Stark-effect rollover," the two causes eliciting laser shutoff at high currents [5]. High-conversion efficiency lasers are designed, fabricated, and characterized at room temperature continuous wave operation using these comprehensive models. Various embodiments of these lasers exhibit wall-plug efficiencies of 28% in pulsed mode at 80 K [6] and 4% when operated continuous wave at room-temperature, an order of magnitude higher than before the work of this dissertation. Additional models for high-conversion efficiency lasers are developed to maximize quantum, optical extraction, carrier injection, and current efficiencies. Advanced models and experiments presented in this dissertation support the design and further improvement of high-performance QC lasers.

  9. Improved resolution by mounting of tissue sections for laser microdissection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, M.C.R.F. van; Rombout, P.D.M.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Ruiter, D.J.; Bernsen, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laser microbeam microdissection has greatly facilitated the procurement of specific cell populations from tissue sections. However, the fact that a coverslip is not used means that the morphology of the tissue sections is often poor. AIMS: To develop a mounting method that greatly

  10. Laser alloying of aluminium to improve surface properties - MSSA 2010

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available and microstructure of the surface without affecting the bulk properties of the material. The process involves melting the substrate surface and injecting the powder of the alloying material into the melt pool. Process parameters such as laser power, beam spot size...

  11. Improved laser applicators for interstitial thermotherapy of brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Goldbach, Thomas; Ulrich, Frank; Schober, Ralf; Kahn, Thomas; Kaufmann, Raimund; Wolbarsht, Myron L.

    1994-05-01

    Interstitial thermotherapy is a new treatment for deep seated brain tumors. To destroy large tissue volumes without adverse effects (vaporization, carbonization) a new laser catheter was developed. The device combines the radiative heating of distant tissue volumes with the conductive cooling of areas close to the optical fiber tip.

  12. Trap split with Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    We present a convenient and effective way to generate a novel phenomenon of trapping, named ‘trap split’, in a conventional four-level double-Λ atomic system, driven by four femtosecond Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses. We find that trap split can always be achieved when atoms are trapped by such laser pulses, as compared to Gaussian ones. This feature is enabled by the interaction of the atomic system and the Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses with zero intensity in the center. A further advantage of using Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses is the insensitivity to fluctuation in the intensity of the lasers in such a way that the separation between the traps remains constant. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the suggested scheme with Laguerre-Gaussian laser pulses can form optical traps with spatial sizes that are not limited by the wavelength of the laser, and can, in principle, become smaller than the wavelength of light. This work would greatly facilitate the trapping and manipulating of particles and the generation of trap split. It may also suggest the possibility of extension into new research fields, such as micro-machining and biophysics.

  13. Penning trap at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szerypo, J. E-mail: jerzy.szerypo@phys.jyu.fi; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Nieminen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J

    2002-04-22

    The IGISOL facility at the Department of Physics of the University of Jyvaeskylae (JYFL) is delivering radioactive beams of short-lived exotic nuclei, in particular the neutron-rich isotopes from the fission reaction. These nuclei are studied with the nuclear spectroscopy methods. In order to substantially increase the quality and sensitivity of such studies, the beam should undergo beam handling: cooling, bunching and isobaric purification. The first two processes are performed with the use of an RFQ cooler/buncher. The isobaric purification will be made by a Penning trap placed after the RF-cooler element. This contribution describes the current status of the Penning trap project and its future prospects. The latter comprise the precise nuclear mass measurements, nuclear spectroscopy in the Penning trap interior as well as the laser spectroscopy on the extracted beams.

  14. Controlling laser beam irradiation area using an optical duplicate system to improve satellite-ground laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tomoko; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Fujikawa, Chiemi; Kodate, Kashiko

    2016-08-01

    To improve the quality of ground to satellite laser communications, we propose an optical duplicate system of the optical ground station. Our proposed approach can be used to control the beam irradiation area for a satellite position without changing the total power of the output beam and the mechanical drive unit; this is performed by controlling the input pattern of a liquid crystal filter inserted in the input plane of the optical duplicate system. Most of the power of the diffracted laser beam emitted from the ground is focused on the optical axis. By distributing the power to side lobes, it is possible to extend the coverage area for a satellite position. This system allows the laser beam irradiation area to be controlled by a sufficient degree by adjusting the threshold of the satellite reception level. We verify the efficacy of the system using wave optics numerical calculations.

  15. APPLICATION OF PULSE-PERIODICAL MODE FOR IMPROVEMENT OF LASER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Apollonov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the paper is to estimate an application of pulse-periodical mode for improvement of laser treatment efficiency. Laser technologies have been widely used in the processes of material treatment with the purpose to provide them the required surface properties and also for high accuracy cutting of sheet materials. Application of complex treatment is of great interest and especially when it is used for worn-out surfaces with formation of a coating by gas-flame laying of powder mixture of specific composition and subsequent laser fusion.Increase of laser unit capacity is very important task for higher efficiency of laser technology application in mechanical engineering. Nowadays technological processes using lasers with high average power (more than 100 W have been applying only sources that are working in two modes, namely: continuous and pulse- periodical (P-P with pulse repetition rate from some units to several hundred hertz and pulse duration within dozens to hundreds of microseconds and even within milliseconds. On the other hand, in some cases shielding effect of plasma cloud formed during laser alloying, cladding or welding reduces the efficiency of laser treatment up to 50 % depending on plasma composition and laser beam length. High frequency P-P laser systems with high average power working in mode of Q-factor modulation allow to realize principally other mechanism of irradiation interaction with materials that is an ablation. In this case it is possible to provide local energy release both in space and time.The performed analysis has revealed that P-P mode of laser operation for a majority of treatment processes is much better and more efficient from energetic point of view in comparison with the continuous mode. On the basis of the developments it is possible to make a conclusion that there is a possibility to create laser systems working in high frequency P-P mode with high average power above hundreds watt.

  16. Improving accuracy and precision of ice core δD(CH4 analyses using methane pre-pyrolysis and hydrogen post-pyrolysis trapping and subsequent chromatographic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Firn and polar ice cores offer the only direct palaeoatmospheric archive. Analyses of past greenhouse gas concentrations and their isotopic compositions in air bubbles in the ice can help to constrain changes in global biogeochemical cycles in the past. For the analysis of the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane (δD(CH4 or δ2H(CH4 0.5 to 1.5 kg of ice was hitherto used. Here we present a method to improve precision and reduce the sample amount for δD(CH4 measurements in (ice core air. Pre-concentrated methane is focused in front of a high temperature oven (pre-pyrolysis trapping, and molecular hydrogen formed by pyrolysis is trapped afterwards (post-pyrolysis trapping, both on a carbon-PLOT capillary at −196 °C. Argon, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unpyrolysed methane and krypton are trapped together with H2 and must be separated using a second short, cooled chromatographic column to ensure accurate results. Pre- and post-pyrolysis trapping largely removes the isotopic fractionation induced during chromatographic separation and results in a narrow peak in the mass spectrometer. Air standards can be measured with a precision better than 1‰. For polar ice samples from glacial periods, we estimate a precision of 2.3‰ for 350 g of ice (or roughly 30 mL – at standard temperature and pressure (STP – of air with 350 ppb of methane. This corresponds to recent tropospheric air samples (about 1900 ppb CH4 of about 6 mL (STP or about 500 pmol of pure CH4.

  17. Improved Beam Jitter Control Methods for High Energy Laser Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour...7540-01-280-5500 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 2-89) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239-18 ii THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK iii Approved for public...Gyro FSM Fast Steering Mirror FX-LMS Filtered-X Least Mean Squares FX-RLS Filtered-X Recursive Least Square HEL High Energy Laser JCT

  18. An improved approach for process monitoring in laser material processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Hans-Georg; Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Process monitoring is used in many different laser material processes due to the demand for reliable and stable processes. Among different methods, on-axis process monitoring offers multiple advantages. To observe a laser material process it is unavoidable to choose a wavelength for observation that is different to the one used for material processing, otherwise the light of the processing laser would outshine the picture of the process. By choosing a different wavelength, lateral chromatic aberration occurs in not chromatically corrected optical systems with optical scanning units and f-Theta lenses. These aberrations lead to a truncated image of the process on the camera or the pyrometer, respectively. This is the reason for adulterated measurements and non-satisfying images of the process. A new approach for solving the problem of field dependent lateral chromatic aberration in process monitoring is presented. Therefore, the scanner-based optical system is reproduced in a simulation environment, to predict the occurring lateral chromatic aberrations. In addition, a second deflecting system is integrated into the system. By using simulation, a predictive control is designed that uses the additional deflecting system to introduce reverse lateral deviations in order to compensate the lateral effect of chromatic aberration. This paper illustrates the concept and the implementation of the predictive control, which is used to eliminate lateral chromatic aberrations in process monitoring, the simulation on which the system is based the optical system as well as the control concept.

  19. Ion-neutral chemistry at ultralow energies: Dynamics of reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms in an ion-atom hybrid trap

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Felix H J; Hegi, Gregor; Raoult, Maurice; Aymar, Mireille; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Cold chemical reactions between laser-cooled Ca^+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. Reaction rate constants were determined in the range of collision energies /k_B = 20 mK-20 K. The lowest energies were achieved in experiments using single localized Ca^+ ions. Product branching ratios were studied using resonant-excitation mass spectrometry. The dynamics of the reactive processes in this system (non-radiative and radiative charge transfer as well as radiative association leading to the formation of CaRb^+ molecular ions) have been analyzed using high-level quantum-chemical calculations of the potential energy curves of CaRb^+ and quantum-scattering calculations for the radiative channels. For the present low-energy scattering experiments, it is shown that the energy dependence of the reaction rate constants is governed by long-range interactions in line with the classical Langevin model, but their magnitude is determined by short-range non-adiabatic and radiative couplings which only ...

  20. Ion trap with integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Christian; Yu, Peter; Hudson, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported an ion trap experiment with an integrated time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) [Phys. Rev. Appl. 2, 034013 (2014)] focussing on the improvement of mass resolution and detection limit due to sample preparation at millikelvin temperatures. The system utilizes a radio-frequency (RF) ion trap with asymmetric drive for storing and manipulating laser-cooled ions and features radial extraction into a compact $275$ mm long TOF drift tube. The mass resolution exceeds $m / \\Delta m = 500$, which provides isotopic resolution over the whole mass range of interest in current experiments and constitutes an improvement of almost an order of magnitude over other implementations. In this manuscript, we discuss the experimental implementation in detail, which is comprised of newly developed drive electronics for generating the required voltages to operate RF trap and TOFMS, as well as control electronics for regulating RF outputs and synchronizing the TOFMS extraction.

  1. Improving Completeness of Geometric Models from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Nothegger

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of terrestrial laser scanning for the documentation of cultural heritage assets is becoming increasingly common. While the point cloud by itself is sufficient for satisfying many documentation needs, it is often desirable to use this data for applications other than documentation. For these purposes a triangulated model is usually required. The generation of topologically correct triangulated models from terrestrial laser scans, however, still requires much interactive editing. This is especially true when reconstructing models from medium range panoramic scanners and many scan positions. Because of residual errors in the instrument calibration and the limited spatial resolution due to the laser footprint, the point clouds from different scan positions never match perfectly. Under these circumstances many of the software packages commonly used for generating triangulated models produce models which have topological errors such as surface intersecting triangles, holes or triangles which violate the manifold property. We present an algorithm which significantly reduces the number of topological errors in the models from such data. The algorithm is a modification of the Poisson surface reconstruction algorithm. Poisson surfaces are resilient to noise in the data and the algorithm always produces a closed manifold surface. Our modified algorithm partitions the data into tiles and can thus be easily parallelized. Furthermore, it avoids introducing topological errors in occluded areas, albeit at the cost of producing models which are no longer guaranteed to be closed. The algorithm is applied to scan data of sculptures of the UNESCO World Heritage Site Schönbrunn Palace and data of a petrified oyster reef in Stetten, Austria. The results of the method’s application are discussed and compared with those of alternative methods.

  2. Laser texturing of Hastelloy C276 alloy surface for improved hydrophobicity and friction coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Ali, H.

    2016-03-01

    Laser treatment of Hastelloy C276 alloy is carried out under the high pressure nitrogen assisting gas environment. Morphological and metallurgical changes in the laser treated layer are examined using the analytical tools including, scanning electron and atomic force microscopes, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Microhardness is measured and the residual stress formed in the laser treated surface is determined from the X-ray data. The hydrophibicity of the laser treated surface is assessed using the sessile drop method. Friction coefficient of the laser treated layer is obtained incorporating the micro-tribometer. It is found that closely spaced laser canning tracks create a self-annealing effect in the laser treated layer and lowers the thermal stress levels through modifying the cooling rates at the surface. A dense structure, consisting of fine size grains, enhances the microhardness of the surface. The residual stress formed at the surface is compressive and it is in the order of -800 MPa. Laser treatment improves the surface hydrophobicity significantly because of the formation of surface texture composing of micro/nano-pillars.

  3. Improvement of Weld Quality Using a Weaving Beam in Laser Welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xudong ZHANG; Wuzhu CHEN; Gang BAO; Lin ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a way to improve the weld quality through suppressing the porosity formation and restraining the growth of columnar grains by using a weaving beam in laser welding. The experimental results show that the N2 porosity of beamweaving laser welding low carbon steel can be remarkably reduced with increasing weaving frequency, and porosity can be eliminated when the weaving amplitude is only 0.5 mm; and the Ar porosity in the weld metal is decreased with increasing weaving frequency and amplitude when the welding speed is higher than 0.5 m/min. The beam-weaving laser welding of ultrafine grained steel has been investigated. The experimental results show that beam-weaving laser welding with appropriate amplitude and frequency can partly restrain the growth of the columnar grain and improve the tensile strength of the weld metal.

  4. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): Seeing Improvement with a UV Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Cantarutti, Rolando; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1 m SOAR telescope, SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM), corrects ground-layer turbulence using an ultraviolet laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3‧ field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  5. SOAR Adaptive Module (SAM): seeing improvement with a UV laser

    CERN Document Server

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Tighe, Roberto; Schurter, Patricio; Martinez, Manuel; Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive module of the 4.1-m SOAR telescope, SAM, corrects ground-layer turbulence using a UV laser guide star. It has been commissioned in 2013 and it is in regular science operation since 2014. SAM works with the CCD imager covering a 3' field or with the speckle camera. It operates routinely and stably, delivering resolution in the I band equal to the free-atmosphere seeing. This paper describes the SAM system as a whole, providing essential reference for its users and technical information of interest to instrumentalists. Operation of the instrument, its performance, and science projects done with SAM so far are reviewed.

  6. Improved performance of high average power semiconductor arrays for applications in diode pumped solid state lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, R.; Emanuel, M.; Benett, W.; Freitas, B.; Ciarlo, D.; Carlson, N.; Sutton, S.; Skidmore, J.; Solarz, R.

    1994-01-01

    The average power performance capability of semiconductor diode laser arrays has improved dramatically over the past several years. These performance improvements, combined with cost reductions pursued by LLNL and others in the fabrication and packaging of diode lasers, have continued to reduce the price per average watt of laser diode radiation. Presently, we are at the point where the manufacturers of commercial high average power solid state laser systems used in material processing applications can now seriously consider the replacement of their flashlamp pumps with laser diode pump sources. Additionally, a low cost technique developed and demonstrated at LLNL for optically conditioning the output radiation of diode laser arrays has enabled a new and scalable average power diode-end-pumping architecture that can be simply implemented in diode pumped solid state laser systems (DPSSL`s). This development allows the high average power DPSSL designer to look beyond the Nd ion for the first time. Along with high average power DPSSL`s which are appropriate for material processing applications, low and intermediate average power DPSSL`s are now realizable at low enough costs to be attractive for use in many medical, electronic, and lithographic applications.

  7. Flexible, light trapping substrates for organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseok; Berger, Jana; Tang, Zheng; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Lasagni, Andrés Fabián; Vandewal, Koen; Leo, Karl

    2016-08-01

    Micro-structured organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices on polyethylene terephthalate substrates are produced using direct laser interference patterning (DLIP). The performance of organic solar cells on these substrates is improved by a factor of 1.16, and a power conversion efficiency of 7.70% is achieved. We show that a shorter spatial period of the pattern allows for a stronger light trapping effect in solar cell, as it leads to a longer light path. Moreover, since the patterned structures are located on the outside of the fully encapsulated OPV devices, there are no problems with the roughness induced shunts.

  8. Method and apparatus for improving the quality and efficiency of ultrashort-pulse laser machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Brent C.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Perry, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the quality and efficiency of machining of materials with laser pulse durations shorter than 100 picoseconds by orienting and maintaining the polarization of the laser light such that the electric field vector is perpendicular relative to the edges of the material being processed. Its use is any machining operation requiring remote delivery and/or high precision with minimal collateral dames.

  9. Integrated electroabsorption-modulated DFB laser by using an improved butt-joint method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoxia Li(李宝霞); Xiaohua Hu(胡小华); Hongliang Zhu(朱洪亮); Baojun Wang(王宝军); Lingjuan Zhao(赵玲娟); Wei Wang(王圩)

    2004-01-01

    An improved butt coupling method is used to fabricate an electroabsorption modulator (EAM) monolithically integrated with a distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The obtained electroabsorption-modulated laser (EML) chip with the traditional shallow ridge exhibits very low threshold current of 12 mA, output power of more than 8 mW, and static extinction ratio of -7 dB at the applied bias voltage from 0.5 to -2.0 V.

  10. Integrated electroabsorption-modulated DFB laser by using an improved butt-joint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoxia; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhu, Hongliang; Wang, Baojun; Zhao, Lingjuan; Wang, Wei

    2004-04-01

    An improved butt coupling method is used to fabricate an electroabsorption modulator (EAM) monolithically integrated with a distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The obtained electroabsorption-modulated laser (EML) chip with the traditional shallow ridge exhibits very low threshold current of 12 mA, output power of more than 8 mW, and static extinction ratio of -7 dB at the applied bias voltage from 0.5 to -2.0 V.

  11. Research of the image processing in dynamic flatness detection based on improved laser triangular method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As a commonly used non-contact flatness detection method, laser triangular detection method is designed with low cost, but it cannot avoid measurement errors caused by strip steel vibration effectively. This paper puts forward a dynamic flatness image processing method based on improved laser triangular detection method. According to the practical application of strip steel straightening, it completes the image pre-processing, image feature curve extraction and calculation of flatness elongation using digit...

  12. Improvement of copper vapor laser characteristics by zinc additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpenik, Yurij; Kelman, Volodymyr; Zhmenyak, Yurij

    2008-10-01

    The influence of Zn atom additive on ``pure'' copper vapor laser output characteristics was studied. Two-section discharge tube (DT) with an external heated Zn reservoir placed at the center between ceramic sections with Cu pieces was elaborated. The pulsed periodical longitudinal discharge was excited in the DT with Cu-Zn-Ne admixture by a traditional circuit using thyratron generator with resonant overcharge of a storage capacitor. Experimental investigations established that the width, energy and power of laser pulses increased when Zn atoms at appropriate temperature ˜ 500 ^oC of zinc containing reservoir diffuse into discharge. The registered increasing of pulse energy was up to 50% comparatively with the energy without additive with peak energy at ˜ 600 ^oC. Additional absorption experiments and modeling the absorption of Zn atom resonant line in the DT (taking into account Doppler and dispersion line broadening) consistent with the conclusion that not only optical resonant pumping by 213.9 nm Zn atom line, but other processes also might be taken into account to explain the influence effects (second kind collisions between resonance state zinc and metastable copper state atoms).

  13. Laser surface alloying (LSA) of aluminium (AA 1200) with TiB2 for hardness improvement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Popoola, AP

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the development of Aluminium metal matrix composite (MMC) using TiB2 reinforcement. The aim is to improve the microhardness property of the substrate. The surface of the aluminium was sand blasted to improve its laser...

  14. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  15. Pattern formation with trapped ions

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Tony E

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experiment to study collective behavior in a nonlinear medium of trapped ions. Using laser cooling and heating and an anharmonic trap potential, one can turn an ion into a nonlinear van der Pol-Duffing oscillator. A chain of ions interacting electrostatically has stable plane waves for all parameters. The system also behaves like an excitable medium, since a sufficiently large perturbation generates a travelling pulse. Small chains exhibit multistability and limit cycles. We account for noise from spontaneous emission in the amplitude equation and find that the patterns are observable for realistic experimental parameters. The tunability of ion traps makes them an exciting setting to study nonequilibrium statistical physics.

  16. Optical trapping and manipulation of viruses and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkin, A.; Dziedzic, J.M.

    1987-03-20

    Optical trapping and manipulation of viruses and bacteria by laser radiation pressure were demonstrated with single-beam gradient traps. Individual tobacco mosaic viruses and dense oriented arrays of viruses were trapped in aqueous solution with no apparent damage using approximately 120 milliwatts of argon laser power. Trapping and manipulation of single live motile bacteria and Escherichia coli bacteria were also demonstrated in a high-resolution microscope at powers of a few milliwatts.

  17. IMPROVING THE SURFACE PROPERTY OF TC4 ALLOY BY LASER NITRIDING AND ITS MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.L. Yang; G.J. Zhao; D. Zhang; C.S. Liu

    2006-01-01

    The mixing technology of laser and heated nitrogen was applied to improve the surface hardaccelerate the nitriding process. Some interested samples were tested with XRD method (X-ray diffraction) to analyze the composition of nitrides, and the surface hardness of HV was measured.The results show that TiN and Ti2N were formed on the surface of Ti alloy with proper nitriding parameters, but TiN is the main composition. The surface hardness increased by three times, which sidered mainly of the activation of nitrogen by laser power and the pre-heated process which accelerated the nitriding process. The nitridation process can be considered as six steps given in detail. The result by analyzing the mechanism of improving the surface property of TiAl alloy shows the improvement of surface property due to two factors: the first reason is the result of laser annealing, and the second one is the formation of TiN.

  18. Improved performance of the laser guide star adaptive optics system at Lick Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, J R; Avicola, K; Bauman, B J; Brase, J M; Campbell, E W; Carrano, C; Cooke, J B; Freeze, G J; Friedman, H W; Max, C E; Gates, E L; Gavel, D T; Kanz, V K; Kuklo, T C; Macintosh, B A; Newman, M J; Olivier, S S; Pierce, E L; Waltjen, K E; Watson, A

    1999-07-20

    Results of experiments with the laser guide star adaptive optics system on the 3-meter Shane telescope at Lick Observatory have demonstrated a factor of 4 performance improvement over previous results. Stellar images recorded at a wavelength of 2 {micro}m were corrected to over 40% of the theoretical diffraction-limited peak intensity. For the previous two years, this sodium-layer laser guide star system has corrected stellar images at this wavelength to {approx}10% of the theoretical peak intensity limit. After a campaign to improve the beam quality of the laser system, and to improve calibration accuracy and stability of the adaptive optics system using new techniques for phase retrieval and phase-shifting diffraction interferometry, the system performance has been substantially increased. The next step will be to use the Lick system for astronomical science observations, and to demonstrate this level of performance with the new system being installed on the 10-meter Keck II telescope.

  19. Reduction of trapped ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. While the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that surface contaminants may be largely responsible. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of four in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially-available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally-activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  20. Trapped antihydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, E.; Andresen, G. B.; Ashkezari, M. D.; Baquero-Ruiz, M.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S.; Fajans, J.; Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C.; Gill, D. R.; Gutierrez, A.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jonsell, S.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kemp, S. L.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Menary, S.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif el Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; So, C.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ˜1 T (˜0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be `born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released—the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  1. Laser surface preparation for adhesive improvement of Ti6Al4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loumena, C.; Cherif, M.; Taleb Ali, M.; Jumel, J.; Kling, R.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium alloys are generally noticed for their high specific strength and their good corrosion resistance. They are widely used in light-weight structures especially in the aerospace industry. Surface preparation of Ti6Al4V for bonding improvement is conventionally performed by chemical, electrochemical pre-treatments (chromic acid anodizing, phosphate-fluoride, sol-gel,…) and/or sandblasting in order to modify the morphology and the chemistry of the surface. However, these processes produce a large volume of hazardous chemical or abrasive waste. They require high technical efforts and are therefore economically and environmentally inefficient. Laser processes could lead to a good alternative solution in terms of eco-compatibility, repeatability and ease of manufacturing. In this paper, we report on the latest developments of the collaboration between ALPhANOV and I2M institute on the laser surface preparation for adhesive bonding improvement of Ti6Al4V. We focus our investigations on the effect of pulsed laser irradiation (fluence, scan speed and lateral overlap) with a visible (515 nm) nanosecond "rod-type fibre" laser on the surface morphology and its bonding behaviour (cohesive or adhesive failure). The penetration of the adhesive in the roughness induced by laser irradiation was characterized. For this study, the surfaces were inspected by different means as optical microscopy, 3D profilometer and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The adhesion performance of the laser treated surface was evaluated by means of DCB tests.

  2. Laser Shock Peening of Aluminum Alloy 7050 for Fatigue Life Improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian; Ming; Lian; Ying; Zou; Shikun; Gong; Shuili

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser shock peening (LSP) on improving fatigue life of aluminum alloy 7050 are investigated.Surface hardness is increased corresponding to a high dislocation density induced by LSP.The X-ray diffraction stress measurement shows that LSP results in prominent increase of surface compressive stress,quasi-symmetrically distributed in the laser peened region.The fatigue life of the alloy 7050 in rivet fastener hole structure is notably improved owing to LSP.The sequence of LSP and fastener hole preparation also influence the fatigue cycle life of the alloy.

  3. Trapping of defect point to improve response time via controlled azimuthal anchoring in a vertically aligned liquid crystal cell with polymer wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Sung Min; Kim, Youn Sik; Lee, Hee Kyu; Lee, Seung Hee [Polymer BIN Fusion Research Center, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Chonju, Chonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lyu, Jae-Jin; Kim, Kyeong Hyeon [AMLCD Division, Samsung Electronics, Kiheung, Kyunggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lu, Ruibo; Wu, Shin-Tson [College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, Orlando FL 32816 (United States)], E-mail: lsh1@chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-03-07

    Conventional multi-domain vertically aligned liquid crystal (LC) cells have defect points due to the collision of LC directors during the formation of multiple domains. In addition, the location of defects changes with time resulting in a slow response time. This paper proposes a robust vertically aligned LC cell, where the LCs are locked by polymer walls, and the azimuthal anchoring on the surface of the alignment layer is controlled by the polymerization of a UV curable reactive mesogen monomer. As a result, the defect points are trapped at a single position, resulting in a greatly improved response time.

  4. Ion trap system for radioactive ions at JYFL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolhinen, V.S.; Jokinen, A.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Szerypo, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Aeystoe, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2001-07-01

    The goal of the ion trap project in Jyvaeskylae is to improve the quality of radioactive beams at IGISOL (Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line), in terms of transverse emittance, energy spread and purity. This improvement is achieved with an aid of an RFQ cooler/buncher and a mass-selective cylindrical Penning trap (mass resolving power up to 10{sup 5}). Their final purpose is to produce cooled isobarically pure beams of exotic radioactivities mainly of exotic neutron-rich isotopes from fission (including refractory elements). In the Penning trap ions are confined in three dimensions in a superposition of static quadrupole electric and homogeneous magnetic fields. The magnetic field confines the ions in two dimensions in a plane perpendicular to the field direction. A confinement in the third, magnetic field direction (parallel to the trap axis) is done by a quadrupole electric field. The Penning trap system in Jyvaeskylae (JYFLTRAP) will contain two cylindrical Penning traps placed inside the same superconducting magnet (B=7 T). The first, purification trap, will accept cooled (continuous or bunched) beams from the RFQ cooler/buncher and perform the isobaric purification. The latter is - done using a combination of a buffer gas cooling and an azimuthal quadrupole RF-field providing mass- dependent centering of ions. This, in turn, allows mass-selective ejection of ions in short pulses. Clean monoisotopic bunched beams will be delivered for the nuclear spectroscopy studies, collinear laser spectroscopy experiments and precise nuclear mass measurements (10{sup -7} precision). The latter will be performed in the second, precision Penning trap (author)

  5. Laser Induced Forward Transfer for front contact improvement in silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, M., E-mail: monicacolinb@gmail.com; Morales-Vilches, A.; Voz, C.; Martín, I.; Ortega, P.; Orpella, A.; López, G.; Alcubilla, R.

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • LIFT technique is investigated to improve heterojunction HJ solar cells. • Doped silicon films are adequate precursors for LIFT application in HJ cells. • LIFT leads to a reduction of the series resistance of a-Si HJ diodes. • LIFT allows the improvement of the front contact resistance in a-Si HJ solar cells. - Abstract: In this work the Laser Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique is investigated to create n-doped regions on p-type c-Si substrates. The precursor source of LIFT consisted in a phosphorous-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer grown by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) onto a transparent substrate. Transfer of the doping atoms occurs when a sequence of laser pulses impinging onto the doped layer propels the material toward the substrate. The laser irradiation not only transfers the doping material but also produces a local heating that promotes its diffusion into the substrate. The laser employed was a 1064 nm, lamp-pumped system, working at pulse durations of 100 and 400 ns. In order to obtain a good electrical performance a comprehensive optimization of the applied laser fluency and number of pulses was carried out. Subsequently, arrays of n + p local junctions were created by LIFT and the resulting J–V curves demonstrated the formation of good quality n+ regions. These structures were finally incorporated to enhance the front contact in conventional silicon heterojunction solar cells leading to an improvement of conversion efficiency.

  6. Status and Outlook of CHIP-TRAP: the Central Michigan University High Precision Penning Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Redshaw, Matthew; Hawks, Paul; Gamage, Nadeesha D; Hunt, Curtis; Kandegedara, Rathnayake M E B; Ratnayake, Ishara S; Sharp, Lance

    2015-01-01

    At Central Michigan University we are developing a high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometer (CHIP-TRAP)that will focus on measurements with long-lived radioactive isotopes. CHIP-TRAP will consist of a pair of hyperbolic precision-measurement Penning traps, and a cylindrical capture/?filter trap in a 12 T magnetic field. Ions will be produced by external ion sources, including a laser ablation source, and transported to the capture trap at low energies enabling ions of a given m=q ratio to be selected via their time-of-flight. In the capture trap, contaminant ions will be removed with a mass-selective rf dipole excitation and the ion of interest will be transported to the measurement traps. A phase-sensitive image charge detection technique will be used for simultaneous cyclotron frequency measurements on single ions in the two precision traps, resulting in a reduction in statistical uncertainty due to magnetic field fluctuations.

  7. Trapped Ion Chain Thermometry and Mass Analysis Through Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Rajagopal, V; Kokish, M G; Odom, B C

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the temperature measurement of individual laser cooled ions in a linear Coulomb crystal by relating their imaged spatial extent along the linear Paul trap axis to the normal modes of vibration of coupled oscillators in a harmonic potential. We also use the thermal spatial spread of `bright' ions in the case of a two-species mixed chain to measure the secular resonance frequency of vibration of the center-of-mass mode of the entire chain and infer the molecular composition of the co-trapped `dark' ions. These techniques create new possibilities for better understanding of sympathetic cooling in mixed-ion chains and under conditions of non-uniform heat load, improving few-ion mass spectrometry, and making in-situ temperature measurements of individual trapped ions without requiring a scan over the Doppler cooling parameters.

  8. An Improved Local Equilibrium Contrast Enhancement Algorithm for Infrared Laser Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Li

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available An improved local equilibrium contrast enhancement algorithm based self-adaptive contrast enhancement algorithm is proposed for infrared laser images, in which the image pixel value histogram is divided into three parts: background and noise area, targets area, and uninterested area. The targets parts are highlighted, while the background and noise parts and the uninterested parts are restrained. A comprehensive qualitative and quantitative image enhancement performance evaluation is presented to verify the proposed theory and algorithm validity, efficiency and reasonability. The experimental results indicate that the proposed algorithm can greatly improve the global and local contrast for both near infrared images and far infrared laser images while efficiently reducing noise in the infrared laser images,and the visual quality of enhanced image is obviously better than the enhancement of the traditional histogram equalization, double plateaus histogram equalization algorithm, etc.

  9. Non-ablative fractional laser provides long-term improvement of mature burn scars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, Elisabeth H; Danielsen, Patricia L; Paulsen, Ida F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Non-ablative fractional laser-treatment is evolving for burn scars. The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical and histological long-term outcome of 1,540 nm fractional Erbium: Glass laser, targeting superficial, and deep components of mature burn scars......-Patient-and-Observer-Scar-Assessment-Scale (mPOSAS, 1 = "normal skin", 10 = "worst imaginable scar"). Secondary outcomes included histology, patient satisfaction (0-10), patient-assessed improvement, and safety. RESULTS: Study was completed by 17 of 20 randomized patients with normotrophic (n = 11), hypertrophic (n = 5) or atrophic (n = 1...... of scar-appearance. CONCLUSIONS: Combined superficial and deep non-ablative fractional laser-treatments induce long-term clinical and histological improvement of mature burn scars....

  10. Helium-neon laser improves bone repair in rabbits: comparison at two anatomic sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peccin, Maria Stella; de Oliveira, Flavia; Muniz Renno, Ana Claudia; Pacheco de Jesus, Gustavo Protasio; Pozzi, Renan; Gomes de Moura, Carolina Foot; Giusti, Paulo Ricardo; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of helium-neon laser on bone repair of femur and tibia in rabbits. For this purpose, 15 New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral bone damage (tibia and femur) using a spherical bur. Helium-neon laser light, at a fluency of 6 J∕cm(2) and wavelength of 632.8 nm was applied on the left legs (laser group). The right tibia or femur lesions (control group) served as negative control. All sections were histopathologically analyzed using HE sections and the morphometric data from bone tissue and hyaline cartilage were achieved. Histopathological analysis showed regular bone trabeculae covered by osteoblastic cells after 1 week in the group exposed to laser therapy from femur and tibia indistinctly. After 3 weeks, the laser group showed new bone formation coming from the bony walls in the femur and tibia as well. On the 5th week, well-defined trabecula undergoing remodeling process was detected for the most intense pattern in tibia only. Morphometric analysis revealed significant statistical differences (p helium-neon laser is able to improve bone repair in rabbits being the most pronounced effect in tibia.

  11. Performance Improvements of Selective Emitters by Laser Openings on Large-Area Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Shih Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the laser opening technique used to form a selective emitter (SE structure on multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si. This technique can be used in the large-area (156 × 156 mm2 solar cells. SE process of this investigation was performed using 3 samples SE1–SE3. Laser fluences can vary in range of 2–5 J/cm2. The optimal conversion efficiency of 15.95% is obtained with the SE3 (2 J/cm2 fluence after laser opening with optimization of heavy and light dopant, which yields a gain of 0.48%abs compared with that of a reference cell (without fluence. In addition, this optimal SE3 cell displays improved characteristics compared with other cells with a higher average value of external quantum efficiency (EQEavg = 68.6% and a lower average value of power loss (Ploss = 2.33 mW/cm2. For the fabrication of solar cells, the laser opening process comprises fewer steps than traditional photolithography does. Furthermore, the laser opening process decreases consumption of chemical materials; therefore, the laser opening process decreases both time and cost. Therefore, SE process is simple, cheap, and suitable for commercialization. Moreover, the prominent features of the process render it effective means to promote overall performance in the photovoltaic industry.

  12. Improvement of the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of high-density polyethylene by free radical trapping of rare earth compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Shiya; Zhao, Li; Han, Ligang [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: guozhenghong@nit.zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); Fang, Zhengping [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Polyethylene filled with ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared. • A low Yb loading improved thermal stability of PE obviously by radical trapping. • Yb(OTf){sub 3} is expected to be an efficient thermal stabilizer for the polymer. - Abstract: A kind of rare earth compound, ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Yb(OTf){sub 3}), was introduced into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by melt compounding to investigate the effect of Yb(OTf){sub 3} on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE. The results of thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the addition of Yb(OTf){sub 3} made the thermal degradation temperatures dramatically increased, the oxidative induction time (OIT) extended, and the enthalpy (ΔH{sub d}) reduced. Very low Yb(OTf){sub 3} loading (0.5 wt%) in HDPE could increase the onset degradation temperature in air from 334 to 407 °C, delay the OIT from 11.0 to 24.3 min, and decrease the ΔH{sub d} from 61.0 to 13.0 J/g remarkably. Electron spin resonance spectra (ESR), thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), rheological investigation and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) indicated that the free radicals-trapping ability of Yb(OTf){sub 3} was responsible for the improved thermal and thermo-oxidative stability.

  13. Trap-State Suppression and Improved Charge Transport in PbS Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Synergistic Mixed-Ligand Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Santanu; Stavrinadis, Alexandros; Gupta, Shuchi; Bi, Yu; Di Stasio, Francesco; Konstantatos, Gerasimos

    2017-06-01

    The power conversion efficiency of colloidal PbS-quantum-dot (QD)-based solar cells is significantly hampered by lower-than-expected open circuit voltage (VOC ). The VOC deficit is considerably higher in QD-based solar cells compared to other types of existing solar cells due to in-gap trap-induced bulk recombination of photogenerated carriers. Here, this study reports a ligand exchange procedure based on a mixture of zinc iodide and 3-mercaptopropyonic acid to reduce the VOC deficit without compromising the high current density. This layer-by-layer solid state ligand exchange treatment enhances the photovoltaic performance from 6.62 to 9.92% with a significant improvement in VOC from 0.58 to 0.66 V. This study further employs optoelectronic characterization, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy to understand the origin of VOC improvement. The mixed-ligand treatment reduces the sub-bandgap traps and significantly reduces bulk recombination in the devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Multiple scale physical and numerical modeling for improved understanding of mechanisms of trapping and leakage of CO2 in deep geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illangasekare, T.; Plampin, M.; Trevisan, L.; Agartan, E.; Mori, H.; Sakaki, T.; Cihan, A.; Birkholzer, J.; Zhou, Q.; Pawar, R.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2012-04-01

    The fundamental processes associated with trapping and leakage of CO2 in deep geologic formations are complex. Formation heterogeneity manifested at all scales is expected to affect capillary and dissolution trapping and leakage of gaseous CO2 to the shallow subsurface. Research is underway to improve our fundamental understanding of trapping and leakage. This research involves experimentation in multiple scales and modeling focusing on effects of formation heterogeneity. The primary hypothesis that drives this research is that when the effects of heterogeneity on entrapment and leakage are understood, it will be possible to design more effective and safe storage schemes. Even though field investigations have some value in understanding issues related to large scale behavior and performance assessment, a fundamental understanding of how the heterogeneity affects trapping is difficult or impossible to obtain in field settings. Factors that contribute to these difficulties are the inability to fully characterize the formation heterogeneity at all scales of interest and lack of experimental control at very high depths. Intermediate scale physical model testing provides an attractive alternative to investigate these processes in the laboratory. Heterogeneities can be designed using soils with known properties in test tanks and the experiments can be conducted under controlled conditions to obtain accurate data. Conducting laboratory experiments under ambient pressure and temperature conditions to understand the processes that occur in deep formations poses many challenges. This research attempts to address such challenges and demonstrates how this testing approach could be used to generate useful data. The experiments involve the use of test systems of hierarchy of scales from small to intermediate scale tanks (~ 5 m) and long columns (~ 4.5 m). These experiments use surrogate fluids to investigate both capillary and solubility trapping in homogeneous and heterogeneous

  15. Improvement of hardness of aluminium AA1200 by laser surface alloying

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium is vastly used in industry due to its low cost, light weight and excellent workability, but lacks in wear resistance and hardness. Laser alloying is used to improve the surface properties such as hardness by modifying the composition...

  16. Laser alloying of Al with mixed Ti and Ni powders to improve surface properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabhali, Luyolo AB

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium is used in industry for various applications due to its low cost, light weight and excellent workability, but lacks wear resistance and hardness. Laser alloying is used to improve surface properties such as hardness and wear resistance...

  17. Efficient cooling and trapping of strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, I; Quessada, A; Kovacich, R P; Zondy, J J; Landragin, A; Clairon, A; Lemonde, P

    2003-03-15

    We report the capture of cold strontium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) at a rate of 4 x 10(10) atoms/s. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower operating with a focused laser beam. The 461-nm laser, used for both cooling and trapping, was generated by sum-frequency mixing in a KTP crystal with diode lasers at 813 nm and a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. As much as 115 mW of blue light was obtained.

  18. Aspects of 1S-2S spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C. Ø.; Madsen, N.; Robicheaux, F.

    2017-09-01

    Antihydrogen atoms are now routinely trapped in small numbers. One of the purposes of this effort is to make precision comparisons of the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen and antihydrogen as a precision test of the CPT theorem. We investigate, through calculations and simulations, various methods by which the 1S-2S transition may be probed with only a few trapped atoms. We consider the known constraints from typical experimental geometries, detection methods, sample temperatures, laser light sources etc and we identify a viable path towards a measurement of this transition at the 10‑11 level in a realistic scenario. We also identify ways in which such a first measurement could be improved upon as a function of projected changes and improvements in antihydrogen synthesis and trapping. These calculations recently guided the first observation of the 1S-2S transition in trapped antihydrogen.

  19. Quantum Games in ion traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buluta, Iulia Maria [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: noa@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Fujiwara, Shingo [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: fujiwara@lyman.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Shuichi [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)]. E-mail: hasegawa@q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2006-10-09

    We propose a general, scalable framework for implementing two-choices-multiplayer Quantum Games in ion traps. In particular, we discuss two famous examples: the Quantum Prisoners' Dilemma and the Quantum Minority Game. An analysis of decoherence due to intensity fluctuations in the applied laser fields is also provided.

  20. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trappe...

  1. Optical trapping of coated microspheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bormuth, V.; Jannasch, A.; Ander, M.; van Kats, C.M.; van Blaaderen, A.; Howard, J.; Schäffer, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an optical trap, micron-sized dielectric particles are held by a tightly focused laser beam. The optical force on the particle is composed of an attractive gradient force and a destabilizing scattering force. We hypothesized that using anti-reflection-coated microspheres would reduce scattering a

  2. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jim J. (Dublin, CA); Bass, Isaac L. (Castro Valley, CA); Zapata, Luis E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  3. A high-precision Jacob's staff with improved spatial accuracy and laser sighting capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patacci, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A new Jacob's staff design incorporating a 3D positioning stage and a laser sighting stage is described. The first combines a compass and a circular spirit level on a movable bracket and the second introduces a laser able to slide vertically and rotate on a plane parallel to bedding. The new design allows greater precision in stratigraphic thickness measurement while restricting the cost and maintaining speed of measurement to levels similar to those of a traditional Jacob's staff. Greater precision is achieved as a result of: a) improved 3D positioning of the rod through the use of the integrated compass and spirit level holder; b) more accurate sighting of geological surfaces by tracing with height adjustable rotatable laser; c) reduced error when shifting the trace of the log laterally (i.e. away from the dip direction) within the trace of the laser plane, and d) improved measurement of bedding dip and direction necessary to orientate the Jacob's staff, using the rotatable laser. The new laser holder design can also be used to verify parallelism of a geological surface with structural dip by creating a visual planar datum in the field and thus allowing determination of surfaces which cut the bedding at an angle (e.g., clinoforms, levees, erosion surfaces, amalgamation surfaces, etc.). Stratigraphic thickness measurements and estimates of measurement uncertainty are valuable to many applications of sedimentology and stratigraphy at different scales (e.g., bed statistics, reconstruction of palaeotopographies, depositional processes at bed scale, architectural element analysis), especially when a quantitative approach is applied to the analysis of the data; the ability to collect larger data sets with improved precision will increase the quality of such studies.

  4. Diversity combining in laser Doppler vibrometry for improved signal reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dräbenstedt, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Because of the speckle nature of the light reflected from rough surfaces the signal quality of a vibrometer suffers from varying signal power. Deep signal outages manifest themselves as noise bursts and spikes in the demodulated velocity signal. Here we show that the signal quality of a single point vibrometer can be substantially improved by diversity reception. This concept is widely used in RF communication and can be transferred into optical interferometry. When two statistically independent measurement channels are available which measure the same motion on the same spot, the probability for both channels to see a signal drop-out at the same time is very low. We built a prototype instrument that uses polarization diversity to constitute two independent reception channels that are separately demodulated into velocity signals. Send and receive beams go through different parts of the aperture so that the beams can be spatially separated. The two velocity channels are mixed into one more reliable signal by a PC program in real time with the help of the signal power information. An algorithm has been developed that ensures a mixing of two or more channels with minimum resulting variance. The combination algorithm delivers also an equivalent signal power for the combined signal. The combined signal lacks the vast majority of spikes that are present in the raw signals and it extracts the true vibration information present in both channels. A statistical analysis shows that the probability for deep signal outages is largely decreased. A 60 fold improvement can be shown. The reduction of spikes and noise bursts reduces the noise in the spectral analysis of vibrations too. Over certain frequency bands a reduction of the noise density by a factor above 10 can be shown.

  5. Diversity combining in laser Doppler vibrometry for improved signal reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dräbenstedt, Alexander [Polytec GmbH, Polytec Platz 1-7. 76337 Waldbronn (Germany)

    2014-05-27

    Because of the speckle nature of the light reflected from rough surfaces the signal quality of a vibrometer suffers from varying signal power. Deep signal outages manifest themselves as noise bursts and spikes in the demodulated velocity signal. Here we show that the signal quality of a single point vibrometer can be substantially improved by diversity reception. This concept is widely used in RF communication and can be transferred into optical interferometry. When two statistically independent measurement channels are available which measure the same motion on the same spot, the probability for both channels to see a signal drop-out at the same time is very low. We built a prototype instrument that uses polarization diversity to constitute two independent reception channels that are separately demodulated into velocity signals. Send and receive beams go through different parts of the aperture so that the beams can be spatially separated. The two velocity channels are mixed into one more reliable signal by a PC program in real time with the help of the signal power information. An algorithm has been developed that ensures a mixing of two or more channels with minimum resulting variance. The combination algorithm delivers also an equivalent signal power for the combined signal. The combined signal lacks the vast majority of spikes that are present in the raw signals and it extracts the true vibration information present in both channels. A statistical analysis shows that the probability for deep signal outages is largely decreased. A 60 fold improvement can be shown. The reduction of spikes and noise bursts reduces the noise in the spectral analysis of vibrations too. Over certain frequency bands a reduction of the noise density by a factor above 10 can be shown.

  6. Improved gravity field and station-coordinate estimates from laser tracking data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of the long-wavelength features of the geopotential and the geocentric coordinates of satellite-tracking stations is significantly improved by the use of precision satellite tracking with lasers. Tracking data on nine satellites are combined with terrestrial gravimetry to obtain a spherical-harmonics representation of the geopotential complete through degree and order 24. Laser tracking data are used to determine the coordinates of tracking stations. This coordinate system is referred to an inertial reference frame by use of camera observations and observations of deep-space probes. Resulting geodetic parameters provide better satellite ephemerides and a reference for analyzing satellite-to-sea-surface altimetry.

  7. Faun tail nevus and spinal dysraphism: cosmetic improvement with alexandrite laser epilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptanoglu, Asli Feride; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2011-12-01

    Faun-tail presents as an abnormal lumbosacral hypertrischosis and may be associated with spinal dysrasphism. In addition to the problems due to spinal anomalies, patient's physico-social life may also be affected. Here, we report a case of 13 years old female patient with Faun-tail in association with sypinal dysraphism, in which cosmetic improvement was achieved with the help of Alexandrite laser. Alexandrite laser can be the method of choice for permanent hair removal method due to its safe, effective and easy to apply properties.

  8. Research of the image processing in dynamic flatness detection based on improved laser triangular method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As a commonly used non-contact flatness detection method, laser triangular detection method is designed with low cost, but it cannot avoid measurement errors caused by strip steel vibration effectively. This paper puts forward a dynamic flatness image processing method based on improved laser triangular detection method. According to the practical application of strip steel straightening, it completes the image pre-processing, image feature curve extraction and calculation of flatness elongation using digital image processing technology. Finally it eliminates elongation measurement errors caused by the vibration.

  9. Nonresonance adiabatic photon trap

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Burdakov, A V; Ushkova, M Yu

    2016-01-01

    Concept of high efficiency photon storage based on adiabatic confinement between concave mirrors is presented and experimentally investigated. The approach is insensitive to typical for Fabri-Perot cells requirements on quality of accumulated radiation, tolerance of resonator elements and their stability. Experiments have been carried out with the trap, which consists from opposed concave cylindrical mirrors and conjugated with them spherical mirrors. In result, high efficiency for accumulation of radiation with large angular spread and spectrum width has been confirmed. As radiation source a commercial fiber laser has been used.

  10. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  11. Accuracy improvement of quantitative analysis by spatial confinement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L B; Hao, Z Q; Shen, M; Xiong, W; He, X N; Xie, Z Q; Gao, M; Li, X Y; Zeng, X Y; Lu, Y F

    2013-07-29

    To improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, the plasma produced by a Nd:YAG laser from steel targets was confined by a cavity. A number of elements with low concentrations, such as vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), and manganese (Mn), in the steel samples were investigated. After the optimization of the cavity dimension and laser fluence, significant enhancement factors of 4.2, 3.1, and 2.87 in the emission intensity of V, Cr, and Mn lines, respectively, were achieved at a laser fluence of 42.9 J/cm(2) using a hemispherical cavity (diameter: 5 mm). More importantly, the correlation coefficient of the V I 440.85/Fe I 438.35 nm was increased from 0.946 (without the cavity) to 0.981 (with the cavity); and similar results for Cr I 425.43/Fe I 425.08 nm and Mn I 476.64/Fe I 492.05 nm were also obtained. Therefore, it was demonstrated that the accuracy of quantitative analysis with low concentration elements in steel samples was improved, because the plasma became uniform with spatial confinement. The results of this study provide a new pathway for improving the accuracy of quantitative analysis of LIBS.

  12. An improved method for interpretation of riverine concentration-discharge relationships indicates long-term shifts in reservoir sediment trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Harman, Ciaran J.; Ball, William P.

    2016-10-01

    Derived from river monitoring data, concentration-discharge (C-Q) relationships are powerful indicators of export dynamics. Proper interpretation of such relationships can be made complex, however, if the ln(C)-ln(Q) relationships are nonlinear or if the relationships change over time, season, or discharge. Methods of addressing these issues by "binning" data can introduce artifacts that obscure underlying interactions among time, discharge, and season. Here we illustrate these issues and propose an alternative method that uses the regression coefficients of the recently developed "Weighted Regressions on Time, Discharge, and Season" model for examining C-Q relationships in long-term, discretely sampled data for various water-quality constituents, including their uncertainties. The method is applied to sediment concentration data from Susquehanna River at Conowingo Dam, Maryland, to illustrate how the coefficients can be accessed and presented in ways that provide additional insights toward the interpretation of river water-quality data, which reaffirms the recently documented decadal-scale decline in reservoir trapping performance.

  13. Improved understanding of Diatom stratigraphy in a varved sediment through a sediment trap, lake monitoring and a catchment study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    Biological sediment remains reflect past lake surrounding conditions. Potential drivers of change in the biological sediment proxy can be environmental contributors like weather and temperature changes as well as man-made such as developments in agriculture and forestry. However we don't know how these different factors contribute to the biological sediment signal. Here we are monitoring a boreal lake with a varved sediment to understand how the biological signal of diatom remains is formed in the annually layered sediment. We compare the diatom stratigraphy with a sequential sediment trap. For a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms we look at three full years of bi-weekly monitoring of physical, chemical and biological parameters and 15 years of water stratification data. We seek to link the monitored in-lake processes with the yearly environmental characteristics. The diatom sediment stratigraphy of the two most abundant species Asterionella formosa and Fragilaria delicatissima indicates three periods with a contrasting trend for both species from 1975 until 2014. In the first period Asterionella formosa is almost not abundant spanning one decade (1975-1985), reaching elevated abundance with a decreasing trend in period 2 over the following 17 years to be followed by a tripling of Asterionella fromosa remains in the sediment during the third period. The opposite trend is found for Fragilaria delicatissima. Linking the recorded data with the corresponding sediment stratigraphy allows us to distinguish between weather changes and catchment disturbances as potential drivers for changes in a sedimentary diatom signal.

  14. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  15. Process improvement in laser hot wire cladding for martensitic stainless steel based on the Taguchi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zilin; Wang, Gang; Wei, Shaopeng; Li, Changhong; Rong, Yiming

    2016-09-01

    Laser hot wire cladding, with the prominent features of low heat input, high energy efficiency, and high precision, is widely used for remanufacturing metal parts. The cladding process, however, needs to be improved by using a quantitative method. In this work, volumetric defect ratio was proposed as the criterion to describe the integrity of forming quality for cladding layers. Laser deposition experiments with FV520B, one of martensitic stainless steels, were designed by using the Taguchi method. Four process variables, namely, laser power ( P), scanning speed ( V s), wire feed rate ( V f), and wire current ( I), were optimized based on the analysis of signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Metallurgic observation of cladding layer was conducted to compare the forming quality and to validate the analysis method. A stable and continuous process with the optimum parameter combination produced uniform microstructure with minimal defects and cracks, which resulted in a good metallurgical bonding interface.

  16. Study on improvement of the laser uniformity transformation of overlapping-image waveguide cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zebin Fan; Junchang Li; Chongguang Li; Kun Ma

    2005-01-01

    @@ After propagating through the overlapping-image integral mirror, the interference fringe is a major factor that affects the uniformity of the image plane. In this paper, a He-Ne laser is used as light source, and the complex amplitude of the incident laser beam is modulated by an alternating electric field controlled vibrating mirror that is placed before the optical system. The experimental results show that after propagating through the overlapping-image integral mirror, not only the contrast of the interference fringes on the image plane is depressed, but also the uniformity of the intensity distribution of the transformed light beam is improved. Finally, based on the experimental results, two optical systems that can be applied to high power laser uniformity transformation are presented.

  17. Use of satellite natural vibrations to improve performance of free-space satellite laser communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, S

    1998-07-20

    In some of the future laser communication satellites, it is plausible to assume that tracking and communication receivers will use the same detector array. The reason for dual use of the detector is to design simpler and less expensive satellites. Satellites vibrate continually because of their subsystems and environmental sources. The vibrations cause nonuniform spreading of the received energy on the detector array. In view of this, the information from the tracking system is used to adapt individually the communication signal gain of each of the detectors in the array. This adaptation of the gains improves communication system performance. It is important to emphasize that the communication performance improvement is achieved only by gain adaptation. Any additional vibrations decrease the tracking and laser pointing system performances, which decrease the return communication performances (two-way communication). A comparison of practical communication systems is presented. The novelty of this research is the utilization of natural satellite vibrations to improve the communication system performance.

  18. Enabling Technologies for Scalable Trapped Ion Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stephen; Gaultney, Daniel; Mount, Emily; Knoernschild, Caleb; Baek, Soyoung; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2013-05-01

    Scalability is one of the main challenges of trapped ion based quantum computation, mainly limited by the lack of enabling technologies needed to trap, manipulate and process the increasing number of qubits. Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows one to design movable micromirrors to focus laser beams on individual ions in a chain and steer the focal point in two dimensions. Our current MEMS system is designed to steer 355 nm pulsed laser beams to carry out logic gates on a chain of Yb ions with a waist of 1.5 μm across a 20 μm range. In order to read the state of the qubit chain we developed a 32-channel PMT with a custom read-out circuit operating near the thermal noise limit of the readout amplifier which increases state detection fidelity. We also developed a set of digital to analog converters (DACs) used to supply analog DC voltages to the electrodes of an ion trap. We designed asynchronous DACs to avoid added noise injection at the update rate commonly found in synchronous DACs. Effective noise filtering is expected to reduce the heating rate of a surface trap, thus improving multi-qubit logic gate fidelities. Our DAC system features 96 channels and an integrated FPGA that allows the system to be controlled in real time. This work was supported by IARPA/ARO.

  19. Improving Resolution of Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence in Argon Helicon Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderholm, Mark; Vandervort, Robert; Scime, Earl; McKee, John; McCarren, Dustin

    2014-10-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A dichroic mirror is used to separate the injected laser light from the collected emission. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. In the initial version of the confocal optical system, measurements were poorly resolved radially because they were integrated over a fairly large path length (~4 cm) centered at the focal point. Here we present collected data from a modified configuration that significantly improves the special resolution of confocal measurements. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range.

  20. Improved theory for relativistic transmittance of circularly polarized laser pulses in non-ideal, realistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Teyoun; Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup

    2016-10-01

    Owing to the rapid development of laser technologies, relativistically-induced transmittance (RT) of ultra-intense laser pulses in overdense plasmas is now a practically important matter. RT could give either deleterious or positive effects depending on the kinds of laser-plasma interactions. In radiation-pressure-acceleration (RPA), enhanced transmittance lowers the momentum transfer from the pulse to the ions. Meanwhile, in collisionless-electrostatic-shock, the acceleration efficiency can be increased owing to the effective heating of upstream electrons by transmitted laser fields. Previous theories mostly have handled RT in ideal plasmas, such as an infinitely long uniform plasma or a delta-function-like slab. In the actual applications, however, RT is generally combined with other dynamics, such as plasma density compression, leading to RT under a plasma in other cases. We developed one-dimensional RT theories for circularly polarized laser pulses, which would be used for such realistic plasma profiles. According to our theory, optimal thickness condition should be modified in RPA. Furthermore we developed our theory so that RT in the common two-step density plasma can be modeled. In this poster, we present the derivation and the comparison of the improved theory with PIC simulation results. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program (Grant Number NRF-2013R1A1A2006353).

  1. Can fiber laser improve high speed multi-pulse drilling of aeronautic alloy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M.; Loumena, C.; Bussière, A.; Kling, R.; Delor, C.; Freysz, E.

    2016-03-01

    Processing of helicopter engines faster, better and more reliably is the triptych which binds LOMA, ALPhANOV and TURBOMECA. In current production machines, flash lamp pumped lasers are employed to drill thousands of cooling holes with specific geometries and diameters to ensure a homogeneous air flow over the surface. However we aim to enhance the production process. Therefore, the three partners started an initiative to identify and overcome the shortcomings of the current process, where the laser source is a key element for improvement. In this paper, we report on the latest developments in multi-pulse drilling using an IPG fiber laser. The latter delivers, at a tunable repetition rate (from single shot up to 2 kHz), laser pulses whose width and peak power are adjustable in between 0.2 - 10 ms and 0 - 12 kW respectively. We have focused our work on drilling of thick sheets of metal alloys with different geometries and different processing strategies. We will show that using such laser system it is possible to decrease the processing time while limiting the heat affected zones and collateral effects. Finally, the impact of the different physical processes in play during the drilling on the geometry of the holes will be discussed.

  2. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  3. The improvement of laser induced damage resistance of optical workpiece surface by hydrodynamic effect polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wenqiang; Guan, Chaoliang; Li, Shengyi; Wang, Zhuo

    2016-10-01

    Surface and subsurface damage in optical element will greatly decrease the laser induced damage threshold (LIDT) in the intense laser optical system. Processing damage on the workpiece surface can be inevitably caused when the material is removed in brittle or plastic mode. As a non-contact polishing technology, hydrodynamic effect polishing (HEP) shows very good performance on generating an ultra-smooth surface without damage. The material is removed by chemisorption between nanoparticle and workpiece surface in the elastic mode in HEP. The subsurface damage and surface scratches can be effectively removed after the polishing process. Meanwhile ultra-smooth surface with atomic level surface roughness can be achieved. To investigate the improvement of LIDT of optical workpiece, polishing experiment was conducted on a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) silica glass sample. AFM measurement results show that all the MRF directional plastic marks have been removed clearly and the root-mean-square (rms) surface roughness has decreased from 0.673nm to 0.177nm after HEP process. Laser induced damage experiment was conducted with laser pulse of 1064nm wavelength and 10ns time width. Compared with the original state, the LEDT of the silica glass sample polished by HEP has increased from 29.78J/cm2 to 45.47J/cm2. It demonstrates that LIDT of optical element treated by HEP can be greatly improved for ultra low surface roughness and nearly defect-free surface/subsurface.

  4. Low Level Laser Therapy Versus Pharmacotherapy in Improving Myofascial Pain Disorder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalighi, Hamid Reza; Mortazavi, Hamed; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azari-Marhabi, Saranaz; Moradi Abbasabadi, Faranak

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) lead to masticatory muscle pain, jaw movement disability and limitation in mouth opening. Pain is the chief complaint in 90% of the TMD patients which leads to disability and severe socioeconomic costs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effects of low level laser therapy (LLLT) compared to pharmacotherapy with NSAIDs (naproxen) in myofascial pain disorder syndrome (MPDS). In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 40 MPDS patients were divided into two groups. One group received naproxen 500 mg bid for 3 weeks as treatment modality and also had placebo laser sessions. The other group received active laser (diode 810 nm CW) as treatment and placebo drug. Pain intensity was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS) and maximum painless mouth opening was also measured as a functional index every session and at 2 months follow up. Data was collected and analyzed with SPSS software. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Low level laser caused significant reduction in pain intensity (P < 0.05) and a significant increase in mouth opening. In naproxen group neither pain intensity nor maximum mouth opening had significant improvement. Pain relief, in subjective VAS was observed in third session in LLLT group, but did not occur in naproxen group. Maximum mouth opening increased significantly in laser group compared to the naproxen group from the eighth session. Treatment with LLLT caused a significant improvement in mouth opening and pain intensity in patients with MPDS. Similar improvement was not observed in naproxen group.

  5. Online spectroscopy of trapped radium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versolato, Oscar O.; Giri, Gouri S.; Berg, Joost van den; Hoek, Duurt Johan van der; Kruithof, Wilbert; Santra, Bodhaditya; Shidling, Praveen; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W.; Jungmann, Klaus [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    Radium ions are of particular interest for a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation. From a single cold and trapped ion one expects a significantly improved measurement of the weak mixing (Weinberg) angle through a determination of the light shift in the forbidden 7{sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-6{sup 2}D{sub 3/2} transition. In preparation of such precision measurements the transitions relevant for this (7S-7P, 6D-7P) were observed and measured in the isotopes {sup 212}Ra, {sup 213}Ra and {sup 214}Ra. The isotopes were produced at the TRI{mu}P facility of KVI, when a {sup 208}Pb beam hit a solid {sup 12}C target. The Ra isotopes were stopped and re-ionized to Ra{sup +} in a Thermal Ionizer, mass separated in a Wien Filter and cooled in a gas filled Radio Frequency Quadrupole. The ions were stored as a cloud in a Paul trap, where they also interacted with laser light. All necessary wavelengths were obtained by semiconductor lasers. The setup and the measurements will be discussed.

  6. In trap fragmentation and optical characterization of rotaxanes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijs, A. M.; Compagnon, I.; Silva, A.; Hannam, J. S.; Leigh, D. A.; Kay, E. R.; Dugourd, P.

    2010-01-01

    The first experiments on trapped rotaxanes are presented, combining collision induced fragmentation and in-trap laser spectroscopy. The intrinsic optical properties of three rotaxanes and their non-interlocked building blocks (thread and macrocycle) isolated in a quadrupolar ion trap are

  7. Magneto-optical trap for polar molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhl, Benjamin K; Sawyer, Brian C; Wang, Dajun; Ye, Jun

    2008-12-12

    We propose a method for laser cooling and trapping a substantial class of polar molecules and, in particular, titanium (II) oxide (TiO). This method uses pulsed electric fields to nonadiabatically remix the ground-state magnetic sublevels of the molecule, allowing one to build a magneto-optical trap based on a quasicycling J' = J'' -1 transition. Monte Carlo simulations of this electrostatically remixed magneto-optical trap demonstrate the feasibility of cooling TiO to a temperature of 10 micrpK and trapping it with a radiation-pumping-limited lifetime on the order of 80 ms.

  8. Active Stabilization of Ion Trap Radiofrequency Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, K G; Neyenhuis, B; Mizrahi, J; Monroe, C

    2016-01-01

    We actively stabilize the harmonic oscillation frequency of a laser-cooled atomic ion confined in a rf Paul trap by sampling and rectifying the high voltage rf applied to the trap electrodes. We are able to stabilize the 1 MHz atomic oscillation frequency to better than 10 Hz, or 10 ppm. This represents a suppression of ambient noise on the rf circuit by 34 dB. This technique could impact the sensitivity of ion trap mass spectrometry and the fidelity of quantum operations in ion trap quantum information applications.

  9. Precision spectroscopy of trapped radium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J.E. van den; Giri, G.S.; Hoek, D.J. van der; Hoekman, S.M.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Kruithof, W.L.; Nunez-Portela, M.; Onderwater, C.J.G.; Prinsen, E.B.; Sahoo, B.K.; Santra, B.; Sohani, M.; Shidling, P.D.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-07-01

    Radium ion is an ideal candidate for high precision experiments. Atomic Parity Violation (APV) can be measured in a single trapped and laser cooled Ra{sup +}, enabling a precise measurement of the electroweak mixing angle in the Standard Model of particle physics at the lowest possible momentum transfer. Ultra-narrow transitions in this system can also be exploited to realize a high stability frequency standard. As an important step towards such high precision experiments, excited-state laser spectroscopy is being performed with trapped short-lived {sup 209-214}Ra{sup +} ions. The results on hyperfine structure, isotope shift and lifetime provide benchmark for the required atomic theory. The experimental set up to perform laser cooling of the trapped radium ions and trapping of a single radium ion is under way.

  10. Cold Trapped Ions as Quantum Information Processors

    CERN Document Server

    Sasura, M; Sasura, Marek; Buzek, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    In this tutorial we review physical implementation of quantum computing using a system of cold trapped ions. We discuss systematically all the aspects for making the implementation possible. Firstly, we go through the loading and confining of atomic ions in the linear Paul trap, then we describe the collective vibrational motion of trapped ions. Further, we discuss interactions of the ions with a laser beam. We treat the interactions in the travelling-wave and standing-wave configuration for dipole and quadrupole transitions. We review different types of laser cooling techniques associated with trapped ions. We address Doppler cooling, sideband cooling in and beyond the Lamb-Dicke limit, sympathetic cooling and laser cooling using electromagnetically induced transparency. After that we discuss the problem of state detection using the electron shelving method. Then quantum gates are described. We introduce single-qubit rotations, two-qubit controlled-NOT and multi-qubit controlled-NOT gates. We also comment on...

  11. Improved spectral characteristics of 980 nm broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Zhuo; Wang Jun; Xiong Cong; Liu Yuanyuan; Liu Suping; Ma Xiaoyu

    2012-01-01

    A novel broad area slotted Fabry-Perot diode laser is designed and fabricated.Using a new semianalytical method,we introduce effective refractive index perturbations in the form of etched slot features into a conventional 980 nm broad area Fabry-Perot cavity,and the spectral characteristics of the device are expected to be noticeably improved.A low density of slot features is formed by using standard optical lithography and inductively coupled plasma dry etching.The experimental results show that the full spectral width at half-maximum is less than 0.4 nm,meanwhile,the thermal shift of the emission spectrum is decreased from 0.26 to 0.07 nm/℃ over a temperature range of 10 to 60 ℃.The improved spectral characteristics of the device are proved to be attributed to such slotted Fabry-Perot laser structures.

  12. Femtosecond Optical Trapping of Cells: Efficiency and Viability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Jixian; LI Fang; XING Qirong

    2009-01-01

    The femtosecond optical trapping capability and the effect of femtosecond laser pulses on cell viability were studied. The maximum lateral velocity at which the particles just failed to be trapped, together with the measured average trapping power, were used to calculate the lateral trapping force(Q-value). The viability of the cells after femtosecond laser trapping was ascertained by vital staining. Measurement of the Q-values shows that femtosecond optical tweezers are just as effective as continuous wave optical tweezers. The experiments demonstrate that there is a critical limit for expo-sure time at each corresponding laser power of femtosecond optical tweezers, and femtosecond laser tweezers are safe for optical trapping at low power with short exposure time.

  13. Application of N-Trap in Holium Laser Ureterolithotripsy for Different Site of the Ureter Stone%阻石篮联合输尿管镜钬激光碎石术在处理输尿管不同部位结石中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚豪

    2015-01-01

    目的探讨阻石篮联合输尿管镜钬激光碎石术治疗输尿管不同部位结石的疗效及安全性。方法回顾性分析2010年5月~2015年4月485例在我院行输尿管镜碎石取石术的患者资料,比较阻石篮在输尿管上段结石(153例)、中段结石(121例)、下段结石(211例)中的应用效果及安全性。结果485例患者,80例(16.5%)使用了阻石篮,其中上段结石40例、中段结石19例、下段结石21例,碎石成功率分别为95.0%(38/40)、94.7%(18/19)、100%(24/24),而未使用阻石篮碎石成功率分别为77.9%(88/113)、85.3%(87/102)、93.7%(178/190),上段结石阻石篮碎石成功率比较差异有统计学意义(<0.05)。结论阻石篮有效提高上段结石的碎石成功率,安全性好,但对于中下段结石并未显示出其优越性。%Objective To compare the ef iciency and safety for the application of N-Trap in Holium laser ureterolithotripsy for dif erent site of the ureter stone. Methods Retrospectively analyzing the clinical data of 485 patients who underwent Holium laser ureterolithotrips from May 2010 to April 2015 in our hospital, and comparing the ef iciency and safety of 153 proximal ureteral calculus, 121 middle calculus and 211 distal calculus. Results The 485 stone cases, N-Trap was applied in 80 cases while undergoing Holium laser ureterolithotripsy. The number of using N-Trap for proximal, middle and distal calculus were 40, 19 and 21 respectively. Stone-free rates for proximal, middle and distal calculus cases that using N-Trap were 95.0%, 94.7% and 100% respectively, while the non-using cases were 77.9%, 85.3%and 93.7%respectively. Conclusion The application of N-Trap in Holium laser ureterolithotripsy for proximal ureteral calculus could improve the stone-free rate, yet not for the middle and distal calculus.

  14. Improved algorithm for elemental analysis by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Subramanian, K P; Kumar, Ajai; Singh, R K

    2013-07-20

    We propose a calibration-free algorithm for retrieval of elemental concentrations using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. This is a simple and improved version of other ratio-based algorithms as it needs only one trial parameter to estimate all other concentrations. The present algorithm has been used to estimate the composition of a brass sample, and the results agree within 1% with electron probe microanalyzer measurements.

  15. Improvement of mechanical properties and life extension of high reliability structural components by laser shock processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Morales, M.; Porro, J. A.; Iordachescu, D.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; Correa, C.

    2011-05-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is being consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals and is being developed as a practical process amenable to production engineering. The main acknowledged advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Following a short description of the theoretical/computational and experimental methods developed by the authors for the predictive assessment and experimental implementation of LSP treatments, experimental results on the residual stress profiles and associated surface properties modification successfully reached in typical materials (specifically Al and Ti alloys) under different LSP irradiation conditions are presented. In particular, the analysis of the residual stress profiles obtained under different irradiation parameters and the evaluation of the corresponding induced surface properties as roughness and wear resistance are presented.

  16. Heterogeneous Integration for Reduced Phase Noise and Improved Reliability of Semiconductor Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sudharsanan

    Significant savings in cost, power and space are possible in existing optical data transmission networks, sensors and metrology equipment through photonic integration. Photonic integration can be broadly classified into two categories, hybrid and monolithic integration. The former involves assembling multiple single functionality optical devices together into a single package including any optical coupling and/or electronic connections. On the other hand monolithic integration assembles many devices or optical functionalities on a single chip so that all the optical connections are on chip and require no external alignment. This provides a substantial improvement in reliability and simplifies testing. Monolithic integration has been demonstrated on both indium phosphide (InP) and silicon (Si) substrates. Integration on larger 300mm Si substrates can further bring down the cost and has been a major area of research in recent years. Furthermore, with increasing interest from industry, the hybrid silicon platform is emerging as a new technology for integrating various active and passive optical elements on a single chip. This is both in the interest of bringing down manufacturing cost through scaling along with continued improvement in performance and to produce multi-functional photonic integrated circuits (PIC). The goal of this work is twofold. First, we show four laser demonstrations that use the hybrid silicon platform to lower phase noise due to spontaneous emission, based on the following two techniques, viz. confinement factor reduction and negative optical feedback. The first two demonstrations are of mode-locked lasers and the next two are of tunable lasers. Some of the key results include; (a) 14dB white frequency noise reduction of a 20GHz radio-frequency (RF) signal from a harmonically mode-locked long cavity laser with greater than 55dB supermode noise suppression, (b) 8dB white frequency noise reduction from a colliding pulse mode-locked laser by

  17. Trapped phonons

    CERN Document Server

    Mannarelli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the effect of restricted geometries on the contribution of Nambu-Goldstone bosons (phonons) to the shear viscosity, $\\eta$, of a superfluid. For illustrative purpose we examine a simplified system consisting of a circular boundary of radius $R$, confining a two-dimensional rarefied gas of phonons. Considering the Maxwell-type conditions, we show that phonons that are not in equilibrium with the boundary and that are not specularly reflected exert a shear stress on the boundary. In this case it is possible to define an effective (ballistic) shear viscosity coefficient $\\eta \\propto \\rho_{\\rm ph} \\chi R$, where $\\rho_{\\rm ph}$ is the density of phonons and $\\chi$ is a parameter which characterizes the type of scattering at the boundary. For an optically trapped superfluid our results corroborate the findings of Refs. \\cite{Mannarelli:2012su, Mannarelli:2012eg}, which imply that at very low temperature the shear viscosity correlates with the size of the optical trap and decreases with decreasing tempe...

  18. Development of a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Sohn, Hoon; Cheng, Jack C. P.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate dimension estimation is desired in many fields, but the traditional dimension estimation methods are time-consuming and labor-intensive. In the recent decades, 3D laser scanners have become popular for dimension estimation due to their high measurement speed and accuracy. Nonetheless, scan data obtained by amplitude-modulated continuous-wave (AMCW) laser scanners suffer from erroneous data called mixed pixels, which can influence the accuracy of dimension estimation. This study develops a mixed pixel filter for improved dimension estimation using AMCW laser scanners. The distance measurement of mixed pixels is firstly formulated based on the working principle of laser scanners. Then, a mixed pixel filter that can minimize the classification errors between valid points and mixed pixels is developed. Validation experiments were conducted to verify the formulation of the distance measurement of mixed pixels and to examine the performance of the proposed mixed pixel filter. Experimental results show that, for a specimen with dimensions of 840 mm × 300 mm, the overall errors of the dimensions estimated after applying the proposed filter are 1.9 mm and 1.0 mm for two different scanning resolutions, respectively. These errors are much smaller than the errors (4.8 mm and 3.5 mm) obtained by the scanner's built-in filter.

  19. Improving adhesion of copper/epoxy joints by pulsed laser ablation

    KAUST Repository

    Hernandez, Edwin

    2015-10-19

    The purpose of the present work is to analyze the effect of pulsed laser ablation on copper substrates (CuZn40) deployed for adhesive bonding. Surface pre-treatment was carried using an Yb-fiber laser beam. Treated surfaces were probed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The mechanical performance of CuZn40/epoxy bonded joints was assessed using the T-peel test coupon. In order to resolve the mechanisms of failure and adhesive penetration within surface asperities induced by the laser treatment, fracture surfaces were surveyed using SEM. Finite element simulations, based on the use of the cohesive zone model of fracture, were carried out to evaluate the variation of bond toughness. Results indicated that the laser ablation process effectively modifies surface morphology and chemistry and enables enhanced mechanical interlocking and cohesive failure within the adhesive layer. Remarkable improvements of apparent peel energy and bond toughness were observed with respect to control samples with sanded substrates.

  20. Random noise can help to improve synchronisation of excimer laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Mingesz, Robert; Gingl, Zoltan; Mellar, Janos

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have reported on a compact microcontroller-based unit developed to accurately synchronise excimer laser pulses (Robert Mingesz et al, Fluct. Noise Lett. 11, 1240007 (2012), DOI: 10.1142/S021947751240007X, arXiv:1109.2632). We have shown that dithering based on the random jitter noise plus pseudorandom numbers can be used in the digital control system to radically reduce the long-term drift of the laser pulse from the trigger and to improve the accuracy of the synchronisation. In this update paper we present our new experimental results obtained by the use of the delay controller unit to tune the timing of a KrF excimer laser as an addition to our previous numerical simulation results. The hardware was interfaced to the laser using optical signal paths in order to reduce sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and the control algorithm tested by simulations were applied in the experiments. We have found that the system is able to reduce the delay uncertainty very close to the theoretical limit ...

  1. An improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinping; Chen, Yuping, E-mail: ypchen@sjtu.edu.cn; Hu, Mengning; Chen, Xianfeng [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2015-02-14

    In this paper, an improved three-dimensional two-temperature model for multi-pulse femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum was proposed and proved in our experiment. Aiming to achieve hole-drilling with a high ratio of depth/entrance diameter in vacuum, this model can predict the depth and radius of the drilled holes precisely when employing different laser parameters. Additionally, for multi-pulse laser ablation, we found that the laser fluence and number of pulses are the dominant parameters and the multi-pulse ablation threshold is much lower than the single-pulse one, which will help to obtain high-quality holes.

  2. [Fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Gong, Xu; Tan, Li

    2015-03-01

    A fast screening method was established for the simultaneous determination of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods by high performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-IT MS). The method was based on the sonication assisted extraction of the improving sleep health food samples using methanol. The extract was then filtrated with 0.45 µm filter membrane and the filtrate was separated on a Phenomenex Luna C18 column with isocratic elution at a flow rate of 0.3 mL/min. A binary mobile phase was 0.05% (v/v) formic acid (solvent A)-methanol/acetonitrile (15:25, v/v, solvent B). The electrospray ionization (ESI) source in positive ion mode or negative ion mode was used to scan MS1-MS3 spectra for the 24 sedative hypnotics. The MS2 and MS3 spectra were used for qualitative analysis of samples. The calibration graphs were linear in their concentration ranges with the correlation coefficients (r2) more than 0.999. The limits of detection (LODs) were 4.0-446.6 µg/L. The recoveries for all the drugs in the improving sleep health foods were 88.6%-110.3% with the relative standard deviations no more than 9.8% at three spiked levels. Twenty-seven batches of the improving sleep health foods were tested. Melatonin was found in eighteen batches. The method is fast, specific, sensitive, easy and suitable for fast screening of 24 sedative hypnotics illegally added in improving sleep health foods.

  3. Strategy for improved NH2 detection in combustion environments using an Alexandrite laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackmann, Christian; Zhou, Bo; Samuelsson, Per; Alekseev, Vladimir A.; Konnov, Alexander A.; Li, Zhongshan; Aldén, Marcus

    2017-09-01

    A new scheme for NH2 detection by means of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) with excitation around wavelength 385 nm, accessible using the second harmonic of a solid-state Alexandrite laser, is presented. Detection of NH2 was confirmed by identification of corresponding lines in fluorescence excitation spectra measured in premixed NH3-air flames and on NH2 radicals generated through NH3 photolysis in a nonreactive flow at ambient conditions. Moreover, spectral simulations allow for tentative NH2 line identification. Dispersed fluorescence emission spectra measured in flames and photolysis experiments showed lines attributed to vibrational bands of the NH2 A2A1 ← X2B1 transition but also a continuous structure, which in flame was observed to be dependent on nitrogen added to the fuel, apparently also generated by NH2. A general conclusion was that fluorescence interferences need to be carefully considered for NH2 diagnostics in this spectral region. Excitation for laser irradiances up to 0.2 GW/cm2 did not result in NH2 fluorescence saturation and allowed for efficient utilization of the available laser power without indication of laser-induced photochemistry. Compared with a previously employed excitation/detection scheme for NH2 at around 630 nm, excitation at 385.7 nm showed a factor of 15 higher NH2 signal. The improved signal allowed for single-shot NH2 LIF imaging on centimeter scale in flame with signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for concentrations around 1000 ppm, suggesting a detection limit around 700 ppm. Thus, the presented approach for NH2 detection provides enhanced possibilities for characterization of fuel-nitrogen combustion chemistry.

  4. Nanowire Lasers of Formamidinium Lead Halide Perovskites and Their Stabilized Alloys with Improved Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongping; Zhu, Haiming; Schrader, Alex W; Liang, Dong; Ding, Qi; Joshi, Prakriti; Hwang, Leekyoung; Zhu, X-Y; Jin, Song

    2016-02-10

    The excellent intrinsic optoelectronic properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites (MAPbX3, X = Br, I), such as high photoluminescence quantum efficiency, long carrier lifetime, and high gain coupled with the facile solution growth of nanowires make them promising new materials for ultralow-threshold nanowire lasers. However, their photo and thermal stabilities need to be improved for practical applications. Herein, we report a low-temperature solution growth of single crystal nanowires of formamidinium lead halide perovskites (FAPbX3) that feature red-shifted emission and better thermal stability compared to MAPbX3. We demonstrate optically pumped room-temperature near-infrared (∼820 nm) and green lasing (∼560 nm) from FAPbI3 (and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3) and FAPbBr3 nanowires with low lasing thresholds of several microjoules per square centimeter and high quality factors of about 1500-2300. More remarkably, the FAPbI3 and MABr-stabilized FAPbI3 nanowires display durable room-temperature lasing under ∼10(8) shots of sustained illumination of 402 nm pulsed laser excitation (150 fs, 250 kHz), substantially exceeding the stability of MAPbI3 (∼10(7) laser shots). We further demonstrate tunable nanowire lasers in wider wavelength region from FA-based lead halide perovskite alloys (FA,MA)PbI3 and (FA,MA)Pb(I,Br)3 through cation and anion substitutions. The results suggest that formamidinium lead halide perovskite nanostructures could be more promising and stable materials for the development of light-emitting diodes and continuous-wave lasers.

  5. Modeling and Optimizing RF Multipole Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghaenel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Radio frequency (rf) ion traps are very well suited for spectroscopy experiments thanks to the long time storage of the species of interest in a well defined volume. The electrical potential of the ion trap is determined by the geometry of its electrodes and the applied voltages. In order to understand the behavior of trapped ions in realistic multipole traps it is necessary to characterize these trapping potentials. Commercial programs like SIMION or COMSOL, employing the finite difference and/or finite element method, are often used to model the electrical fields of the trap in order to design traps for various purposes, e.g. introducing light from a laser into the trap volume. For a controlled trapping of ions, e.g. for low temperature trapping, the time dependent electrical fields need to be known to high accuracy especially at the minimum of the effective (mechanical) potential. The commercial programs are not optimized for these applications and suffer from a number of limitations. Therefore, in our approach the boundary element method (BEM) has been employed in home-built programs to generate numerical solutions of real trap geometries, e.g. from CAD drawings. In addition the resulting fields are described by appropriate multipole expansions. As a consequence, the quality of a trap can be characterized by a small set of multipole parameters which are used to optimize the trap design. In this presentation a few example calculations will be discussed. In particular the accuracy of the method and the benefits of describing the trapping potentials via multipole expansions will be illustrated. As one important application heating effects of cold ions arising from non-ideal multipole fields can now be understood as a consequence of imperfect field configurations.

  6. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  7. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  8. Improvement of the Sintered Surface and Bulk of the Product Via Differentiating Laser Sintering (Melting) Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saprykina, N. A.; Saprykin, A. A.; Arkhipova, D. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    Selective laser sintering (melting) enables using metal powdered materials to manufacture products of any geometrical complexity, requiring no preliminary costs to prepare processing equipment. However, quality of the sintered surface is often inadequate as against the product manufactured traditionally. Manufacturing a high quality product requires solution of such vital task as prediction of the sintered surface roughness. The authors address to the effect of laser sintering modes on roughness of the surface, sintered of copper powdered material PMS-l (IIMC-1). The dependence of roughness of the surface layer sintered of copper powder material PMS-l upon sintering process conditions is expressed mathematically. The authors suggest differentiating sintering modes to improve the sintered surface and the bulk of the product and dividing them into rough, semi-finishing, and finishing ones.

  9. CO2 laser improves 45S5 bioglass interaction with dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, A S; Takahashi, H; Otsuki, M; Sadr, A; Yamashita, K; Tagami, J

    2011-02-01

    Bioglass 45S5 is a bioactive glass that can create a layer of calcium-phosphate crystals on mineralized hard tissues. In this study, 45S5 bioglass was mixed with phosphoric acid and irradiated with CO(2) laser and examined as a possible aid in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. The dentinal surface modified by the aforementioned technique was chemically and micro-morphologically examined with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the crystalline structures of the examined dentinal surfaces were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, the mechanical properties of the newly formed layer were examined by nanoindentation. The results showed that 45S5 bioglass could occlude the dentinal tubule orifices with calcium-phosphate crystals. The application of CO(2) laser potentially improved the mechanical organization of these crystals.

  10. Ultra rapid direct heating synthesis of ZnO nanorods with improved light trapping from stacked photoanodes for high efficiency photocatalytic water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheat Lee, Wei; Fang, Yuanxing; Commandeur, Daniel; Qian, Rong; Al-Abdullah, Zainab T. Y.; Chen, Qiao

    2017-09-01

    An ultra rapid growth method for vertically aligned ZnO nanorod (NR) thin films on metal meshes was developed using a direct heating synthesis technique. A typical NR growth rate of 10 μm h-1 was achieved. The effects of the applied heating power and growth duration on the morphologies of ZnO nanostructures were examined. High density surface defects were formed on the ZnO NRs, which is responsible for slow charge recombination and high efficiency in the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting process. The light absorption for a photoanode was significantly improved by light trapping using a 3D stacked metal mesh photoanode structure. With the internal reflection between the stacked photoanodes, the final light leakage is minimised. The light absorption in the stacked photoanode is improved without restricting the charge transportation. In comparison with a single mesh photoanode and a chemical bath deposition grown flat photoanode, the PEC water splitting efficiency from the stacked photoanode was increased by a factor of 2.6 and 6.1 respectively.

  11. Near-infrared laser irradiation improves the development of mouse pre-implantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Masaki; Mori, Miho

    2017-05-27

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of near-infrared laser irradiation on the in vitro development of mouse embryos. Female ICR mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and mated with male mice. Two-cell stage embryos were collected 40 h after administering hCG and cultured in M16 medium. Two-cell embryos (0 h after culture), 8-cell embryos (approx. 30 h after culture), morula (approx. 48 h after culture), and blastocysts (approx. 73 h after culture) were irradiated at 904 nm for 60 s. These embryos were cultured in a time-lapse monitoring system and the timing of blastocyst hatching was evaluated. Some of the irradiated blastocysts were transferred to the uterine horns of pseudopregnant recipients immediately after irradiation. Pregnancy rates, and offspring growth and fertility, were evaluated. Near-infrared laser irradiation increased the speed of in vitro mouse embryo development. In irradiated blastocysts, hatching was faster than in control (non-irradiated) blastocysts (18.4 vs. 28.2 h, P infrared laser irradiation improves the quality of mouse embryo development in vitro, and increases the live birth rate without affecting the normality of the offspring. Thus, the near-infrared laser method may enhance the quality of embryos and contribute to improvements in reproductive technologies in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beam-shaping technique for improving the beam quality of a high-power laser-diode stack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasaka, Masaomi; Shinoda, Kazunori

    2006-06-01

    We report a beam-shaping technique that reconfigures the beams to improve the beam quality and enhance the power density for a ten-array high-power laser-diode stack by using two optical rectangular cubes and two stripe-mirror plates. The reshaped beam has threefold improvement in beam quality, and its power density is effectively enhanced. On the basis of this technique, we focus the beam of the high-power laser-diode stack to effectively end pump a high-power fiber laser.

  13. Annual Trapping Proposal 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Annual Trapping Plan for the 1984-1985 trapping season at Clarence Cannon NWR outlines rules and regulations for the trapping of beaver and muskrat on the...

  14. Method of improving photoelectric efficiency for laser power beaming based on photovoltaic cell layout optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beibei; Li, Xiaojiang

    2017-02-01

    In accordance with the high impact of the uneven distribution of laser beam power on the photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic cell (PV) array, a method based on PV layout optimization is proposed to improve the photovoltaic efficiency. First of all, a mathematical model of series-parallel PV array is built, and by analyzing the influencing factors on photovoltaic efficiency, the idea and scheme to improve the photovoltaic efficiency based on PV layout optimization is provided; then, the MATLAB/Simulink simulation tool is used to simulate the effects of improving photoelectric efficiency. The simulation results show that compared to the traditional PV array, the optimized PV array can obtain higher photovoltaic efficiency, and compared to the situation with uneven temperature distribution, the array efficiency has higher efficiency under even temperature distribution.

  15. IMPROVE THE ZY-3 HEIGHT ACCURACY USING ICESAT/GLAS LASER ALTIMETER DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ZY-3 is the first civilian high resolution stereo mapping satellite, which has been launched on 9th, Jan, 2012. The aim of ZY-3 satellite is to obtain high resolution stereo images and support the 1:50000 scale national surveying and mapping. Although ZY-3 has very high accuracy for direct geo-locations without GCPs (Ground Control Points, use of some GCPs is still indispensible for high precise stereo mapping. The GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimetry System loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite, which is the first laser altimetry satellite for earth observation. GLAS has played an important role in the monitoring of polar ice sheets, the measuring of land topography and vegetation canopy heights after launched in 2003. Although GLAS has ended in 2009, the derived elevation dataset still can be used after selection by some criteria. In this paper, the ICESat/GLAS laser altimeter data is used as height reference data to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy. A selection method is proposed to obtain high precision GLAS elevation data. Two strategies to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy are introduced. One is the conventional bundle adjustment based on RFM and bias-compensated model, in which the GLAS footprint data is viewed as height control. The second is to correct the DSM (Digital Surface Model straightly by simple block adjustment, and the DSM is derived from the ZY-3 stereo imaging after freedom adjustment and dense image matching. The experimental result demonstrates that the height accuracy of ZY-3 without other GCPs can be improved to 3.0 meter after adding GLAS elevation data. What’s more, the comparison of the accuracy and efficiency between the two strategies is implemented for application.

  16. Improve the ZY-3 Height Accuracy Using Icesat/glas Laser Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoyuan; Tang, Xinming; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chongyang; Li, Tao

    2016-06-01

    ZY-3 is the first civilian high resolution stereo mapping satellite, which has been launched on 9th, Jan, 2012. The aim of ZY-3 satellite is to obtain high resolution stereo images and support the 1:50000 scale national surveying and mapping. Although ZY-3 has very high accuracy for direct geo-locations without GCPs (Ground Control Points), use of some GCPs is still indispensible for high precise stereo mapping. The GLAS (Geo-science Laser Altimetry System) loaded on the ICESat (Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite), which is the first laser altimetry satellite for earth observation. GLAS has played an important role in the monitoring of polar ice sheets, the measuring of land topography and vegetation canopy heights after launched in 2003. Although GLAS has ended in 2009, the derived elevation dataset still can be used after selection by some criteria. In this paper, the ICESat/GLAS laser altimeter data is used as height reference data to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy. A selection method is proposed to obtain high precision GLAS elevation data. Two strategies to improve the ZY-3 height accuracy are introduced. One is the conventional bundle adjustment based on RFM and bias-compensated model, in which the GLAS footprint data is viewed as height control. The second is to correct the DSM (Digital Surface Model) straightly by simple block adjustment, and the DSM is derived from the ZY-3 stereo imaging after freedom adjustment and dense image matching. The experimental result demonstrates that the height accuracy of ZY-3 without other GCPs can be improved to 3.0 meter after adding GLAS elevation data. What's more, the comparison of the accuracy and efficiency between the two strategies is implemented for application.

  17. Property improvement of pulsed laser deposited boron carbide films by pulse shortening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csako, T. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Budai, J. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary); Szoerenyi, T. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, P.O. Box 406, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)]. E-mail: t.szorenyi@physx.u-szeged.hu

    2006-04-30

    Growth characteristics and surface morphology of boron carbide films fabricated by ablating a B{sub 4}C target in high vacuum with a traditional KrF excimer laser and a high brightness hybrid dye/excimer laser system emitting at the same wavelength while delivering 700 fs pulses are compared. The ultrashort pulse processing is highly effective. Energy densities between 0.25 and 2 J cm{sup -2} result in apparent growth rates ranging from 0.017 to 0.085 nm/pulse. Ablation with nanosecond pulses of one order of magnitude higher energy densities yields smaller growth rates, the figures increase from 0.002 to 0.016 nm/pulse within the 2-14.3 J cm{sup -2} fluence window. 2D thickness maps derived from variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry reveal that, when ablating with sub-ps pulses, the spot size rather than the energy density determines both the deposition rate and the angular distribution of film material. Pulse shortening leads to significant improvement in surface morphology, as well. While droplets with number densities ranging from 1 x 10{sup 4} to 7 x 10{sup 4} mm{sup -2} deteriorate the surface of the films deposited by the KrF excimer laser, sub-ps pulses produce practically droplet-free films. The absence of droplets has also a beneficial effect on the stoichiometry and homogeneity of the films fabricated by ultrashort pulses.

  18. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical

  19. Laser-drilled micro-hole arrays on polyurethane synthetic leather for improvement of water vapor permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Wang, A.H., E-mail: ahwang@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Zheng, R.R. [State Key Laboratory of Material Processing and Die and Mould Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 (China); Tang, H.Q.; Qi, X.Y.; Ye, B. [Wuhan Huagong Laser Engineering CO., Ltd, Wuhan, 430223 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Three kinds of lasers at 1064, 532 and 355 nm wavelengths respectively were adopted to construct micro-hole arrays on polyurethane (PU) synthetic leather with an aim to improve water vapor permeability (WVP) of PU synthetic leather. The morphology of the laser-drilled micro-holes was observed to optimize laser parameters. The WVP and slit tear resistance of the laser-drilled leather were measured. Results show that the optimized pulse energy for the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers are 0.8, 1.1 and 0.26 mJ, respectively. The diameters of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized laser pulse energy were about 20, 15 and 10 μm, respectively. The depths of the micro-holes drilled with the optimized pulse energy were about 21, 60 and 69 μm, respectively. Compared with the untreated samples, the highest WVP growth ratio was 38.4%, 46.8% and 53.5% achieved by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. And the highest decreasing ratio of slit tear resistance was 11.1%, 14.8%, and 22.5% treated by the 1064, 532 and 355 nm lasers, respectively. Analysis of the interaction mechanism between laser beams at three kinds of laser wavelengths and the PU synthetic leather revealed that laser micro-drilling at 355 nm wavelength displayed both photochemical ablation and photothermal ablation, while laser micro-drilling at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths leaded to photothermal ablation only.

  20. Improved method for the feature extraction of laser scanner using genetic clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Jinxia; Cai Zixing; Duan Zhuohua

    2008-01-01

    Feature extraction of range images provided by ranging sensor is a key issue of pattern recognition. To automatically extract the environmental feature sensed by a 2D ranging sensor laser scanner, an improved method based on genetic clustering VGA-clustering is presented. By integrating the spatial neighbouring information of range data into fuzzy clustering algorithm, a weighted fuzzy clustering algorithm (WFCA) instead of standard clustering algorithm is introduced to realize feature extraction of laser scanner. Aimed at the unknown clustering number in advance, several validation index functions are used to estimate the validity of different clustering al-gorithms and one validation index is selected as the fitness function of genetic algorithm so as to determine the accurate clustering number automatically. At the same time, an improved genetic algorithm IVGA on the basis of VGA is proposed to solve the local optimum of clustering algorithm, which is implemented by increasing the population diversity and improving the genetic operators of elitist rule to enhance the local search capacity and to quicken the convergence speed. By the comparison with other algorithms, the effectiveness of the algorithm introduced is demonstrated.

  1. Improving the appearance of all textile products from clothing to home textile using laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondogan, Ziynet; Pamuk, Oktay; Ondogan, Ece Nuket; Ozguney, Arif

    2005-11-01

    Denim trousers, commonly known as "blue jeans", have maintained their popularity for many years. For the purpose of supporting customers' purchasing behaviour and to address their aesthetic taste, companies have been trying in recent years to develop various techniques to improve the visual aspects of denim fabrics. These techniques mainly include printing on fabrics, embroidery and washing the final product. Especially, fraying certain areas of the fabric by sanding and stone washing to create designs is a popular technique. However, due to certain inconveniences caused by these procedures and in response to growing demands, research is underway to obtain a similar appearance by creating better quality and more advantageous manufacturing conditions. As is known, the laser is a source of energy which can be directed on desired objects and whose power and intensity can be easily controlled. Use of the laser enables us to cut a great variety of material from metal to fabric. Starting off from this point, we thought it would be possible to transfer certain designs onto the surface of textile material by changing the dye molecules in the fabric and creating alterations in its colour quality values by directing the laser to the material at reduced intensity. This study mainly deals with a machine specially designed for making use of laser beams to transfer pictures, figures as well as graphics of desired variety, size and intensity on all kinds of surfaces in textile manufacturing such as knitted—woven fabrics, leather, etc. at desired precision and without damaging the texture of the material. In the designed system, computer-controlled laser beams are used to change the colour of the dye material on the textile surface by directing the laser beams at a desired wavelength and intensity onto various textile surfaces selected for application. For this purpose, a laser beam source that can reach the initial level of power and that can be controlled by means of a

  2. Theoretical comparison of optical traps created by standing wave and single beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemánek, Pavel; Jonáš, Alexandr; Jákl, Petr; Ježek, Jan; Šerý, Mojmír.; Liška, Miroslav

    2003-05-01

    We used generalised Lorenz-Mie scattering theory (GLMT) to compare submicron-sized particle optical trapping in a single focused beam and a standing wave. We focus especially on the study of maximal axial trapping force, minimal laser power necessary for confinement, axial trap position, and axial trap stiffness in dependency on trapped sphere radius, refractive index, and Gaussian beam waist size. In the single beam trap (SBT), the range of refractive indices which enable stable trapping depends strongly on the beam waist size (it grows with decreasing waist). On the contrary to the SBT, there are certain sphere sizes (non-trapping radii) that disable sphere confinement in standing wave trap (SWT) for arbitrary value of refractive index. For other sphere radii we show that the SWT enables confinement of high refractive index particle in wider laser beams and provides axial trap stiffness and maximal axial trapping force at least by two orders and one order bigger than in SBT, respectively.

  3. Beam shaping to improve the free-electron laser performance at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y.; Bane, K. L. F.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Guetg, M. W.; Huang, Z.; Iverson, R.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Ratner, D.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Zhou, F.

    2016-10-01

    A new operating mode has been developed for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) in which we shape the longitudinal phase space of the electron beam. This mode of operation is realized using a horizontal collimator located in the middle of the first bunch compressor to truncate the head and tail of the beam. With this method, the electron beam longitudinal phase space and current profile are reshaped, and improvement in lasing performance can be realized. We present experimental studies at the LCLS of the beam shaping effects on the free-electron laser performance.

  4. Improving the estimation of flow speed for laser speckle imaging with single exposure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wen, Dong; Chen, Xiao; Huang, Qin; Chen, Ming; Lu, Jinling; Li, Pengcheng

    2017-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging is a full-field imaging technique for measuring blood flow by mapping the speckle contrast with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, the statically scattered light from stationary tissues seriously degrades the accuracy of flow speed estimation. In this Letter, we present a simple calibration approach to calculate the proportions of dynamically scattered light and correct the effect of static scattering with single exposure time. Both the phantom and animal experimental results suggest that this calibration approach has the ability to improve the estimation of the relative blood flow in the presence of static scattering.

  5. Improved performance of the JAERI injection and free electron laser system

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimori, N; Hajima, R; Shizuma, T; Sawamura, M; Kikuzawa, N; Minehara, E J

    2000-01-01

    Several modifications have been made for the JAERI Free Electron Laser (FEL) system in order to extract greater average lasing power. The electron gun was improved to produce an electron beam with 1 ns pulse width, 600 mA peak current, amplitude fluctuation less than 1% and timing jitter less than 0.1 ns. In addition, the 180 deg. bending arc was modified to match the beam envelope inside the undulator. After these modifications, we obtained an FEL power of 180 W in macro-pulse average at wavelength of 23 mu m.

  6. Improvement of the surface finish obtained by laser ablation with a Nd: YAG laser on pre-ablated tool steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Steyn, J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface finish is an important requirement for tool and die makers and remains a challenge with conventional machining technologies. Nd: YAG lasers have been utilised for many years in the area of laser marking, engraving and micro machining...

  7. Computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials for improved corrosion performance: computational dynamics of laser alloyed metallic materials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fatoba, OS

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser alloying is a material processing method which utilizes the high power density available from defocused laser beam to melt both metal coatings and a part of the underlying substrate. Since melting occur solitary at the surface, large...

  8. Charged nanodiamonds in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik

    2015-05-01

    Colloidal nanodiamonds were ionized with atmospheric electrospray and loaded into a Paul trap. Fluorescence from atom-like NV0 and NV- colour centres has been observed. The very low intrinsic absorption of bulk diamond is favourable for reducing the heating of cooled, trapped, nanodiamond ions from the surrounding blackbody radiation of the trapping apparatus. The isolated environment of the ion trap is also favourable for in-situ modification of nanodiamond to reduce absorption inducing defects through either physical or chemical processes. The presence or intentional introduction of high luminescence atom-like colour centre defects such as NV or SiV offer the prospect of direct laser cooling in nanodiamonds with low emissivity. Such laser cooled nano-ions are of interest for sympathetically cooling ions of similar charge/mass ratios that lack closed optical transitions, such as large biomolecules. ARC Future Fellow.

  9. Enhanced trapping of colding lithium by using the multiple-sideband cooling in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Kai; Gao, Tianyou; Peng, Shi-Guo; Jiang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    Trapping lithium with a big number in a simplified experimental setup has difficulties and challenges today. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate the enhancement of \\textsuperscript{6}Li trapping efficiency in a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap (3D MOT) by using the multiple-sideband cooling in a two-dimensional magneto-optical trap (2D MOT). To improve the number of trapped atoms, we broaden the cooling light spectrum to 102 MHz composed of seven frequency components and then trap atoms with a number of $6.0\\times10^8$ which is about 4 times compared to that in the single-frequency cooling. The capture velocity and dependence of atomic number on the laser detuning have been analyzed, where the experimental result has a good agreement with the theoretical prediction based on a simple two-level model. We also analyze the loss rate of alkali metals due to fine-structure exchanging collisions and find that the multiple-sideband cooling is special valid for lithium.

  10. Tuning the structural and optical properties of gold/silver nano-alloys prepared by laser ablation in liquids for optical limiting, ultra-sensitive spectroscopy, and optical trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, E.; D'Urso, L.; Fazio, E.; Satriano, C.; Donato, M. G.; D'Andrea, C.; Maragò, O. M.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Compagnini, G.; Neri, F.

    2012-12-01

    The plasmon resonance of metallic Au/Ag nano-alloys in the colloidal state was tuned from 400 nm to 500 nm using a laser irradiated technique performed directly in the liquid state. Interesting optical nonlinearities, trapping effects and spectroscopic enhancements were detected by modifying the gold molar fraction in the nano-alloys. In particular a reduction of the limiting threshold was observed by increasing the gold amount. The SERS activity of the Au/Ag alloys was tested in liquid and in solid state in presence of linear carbon chains as probe molecules. The increased Raman signals for nanoparticles with different Au/Ag atomic ratio are presented. Finally, studies and prospects for optical and Raman tweezers experiments are discussed.

  11. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Laser-Guide Star AO Observations via Mesospheric Sodium Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, R.; Yavorski, J.; Jelks, C.; Colburn, W.; Berner, K.

    The use of modern Adaptive Optics (AO) systems allows large telescopes to approach diffraction limited seeing. This technique can improve the imaging resolution of a large telescope by more than an order of magnitude. Such a capability provides real improvement in ground-based space situational awareness (SSA) observations. The drawback to current adaptive optics systems is that they only improve resolution over small imaging regions, sometimes as small as a few tens of arc seconds. Such small imaging regions limit the availability of suitable guide stars, which in turn limits the availability and duty cycle of an AO system. This limitation has led to the development of systems for producing artificial guide stars, which can be created along a line of sight coincident with that of the telescope. The most commonly used artificial guide stars are created by tuning a laser to the frequency of the Sodium D1/D2 line complex, and exciting sodium atoms in the Earth's mesosphere. The mesospheric sodium layer is exceptionally rarified, and has densities that vary diurnally, seasonally, and geographically. Our investigation centers on the use of sounding rockets to deliver substantial quantities of atomic sodium to the mesospheric layer. This direct enhancement of the sodium layer could increase the number of nights that laser-guide star AO observations could be performed, as well as increasing guide star brightness. These improvements should yield better AO wavefront correction and faster imaging frame rates. For the SSA application, these improvements will lead to more and better imaging opportunities. We will present a basic overview of the relevant mesospheric dynamics, with emphasis on sodium dwell times and replenishment rates. We will present several possible mechanisms for delivery and deployment of atomic sodium in the mesosphere, and demonstrate the trade-offs in their use. We will present a possible concept of operation for notional delivery systems. Finally, we

  14. Improved photomask accuracy with a high-productivity DUV laser pattern generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öström, Thomas; Måhlén, Jonas; Karawajczyk, Andrzej; Rosling, Mats; Carlqvist, Per; Askebjer, Per; Karlin, Tord; Sallander, Jesper; Österberg, Anders

    2006-10-01

    A strategy for sub-100 nm technology nodes is to maximize the use of high-speed deep-UV laser pattern generators, reserving e-beam tools for the most critical photomask layers. With a 248 nm excimer laser and 0.82 NA projection optics, the Sigma7500 increases the application space of laser pattern generators. A programmable spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged with partially coherent optics to compose the photomask pattern. Image profiles are enhanced with phase shifting in the pattern generator, and features below 200 nm are reliably printed. The Sigma7500 extends the SLM-based architecture with improvements to CD uniformity and placement accuracy, resulting from an error budget-based methodology. Among these improvements is a stiffer focus stage design with digital servos, resulting in improved focus stability. Tighter climate controls and improved dose control reduce drift during mask patterning. As a result, global composite CD uniformity below 5 nm (3σ) has been demonstrated, with placement accuracy below 10 nm (3σ) across the mask. Self-calibration methods are used to optimize and monitor system performance, reducing the need to print test plates. The SLM calibration camera views programmed test patterns, making it possible to evaluate image metrics such as CD uniformity and line edge roughness. The camera is also used to characterize image placement over the optical field. A feature called ProcessEqualizer TM has been developed to correct long-range CD errors arising from process effects on production photomasks. Mask data is sized in real time to compensate for pattern-dependent errors related to local pattern density, as well as for systematic pattern-independent errors such as radial CD signatures. Corrections are made in the pixel domain in the advanced adjustments processor, which also performs global biasing, stamp distortion compensation, and corner enhancement. In the Sigma7500, the mask pattern is imaged with full edge addressability in each

  15. Optical Trapping of Gold Nanoparticles in Air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauffred, Liselotte; Taheri, S Mohammad-Reza; Schmitt, Regina; Linke, Heiner; Oddershede, Lene B

    2015-07-08

    Most progress on optical nanoparticle control has been in liquids, while optical control in air has proven more challenging. By utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a single laser beam with a minimum of aberration, we trapped individual 200 to 80 nm gold nanoparticles in air and quantified the corresponding trapping strengths. These results pave the way for construction of metallic nanostructures in air away from surfaces.

  16. Telecloning Quantum States with Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for telecloning quantum states with trapped ions. The scheme is based on a single ion interacting with a single laser pulse. In the protocol, an ion is firstly measured to determine whether the telecloning succeeds or not, and then another ion is detected to complete the whole procedure. The required experimental techniques are within the scope of what can be obtained in the ion-trap setup.

  17. Spectroscopy of a Synthetic Trapped Ion Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hucul, David; Christensen, Justin E.; Hudson, Eric R.; Campbell, Wesley C.

    2017-09-01

    133Ba+ has been identified as an attractive ion for quantum information processing due to the unique combination of its spin-1 /2 nucleus and visible wavelength electronic transitions. Using a microgram source of radioactive material, we trap and laser cool the synthetic A =133 radioisotope of barium II in a radio-frequency ion trap. Using the same, single trapped atom, we measure the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure of the 62P1 /2↔62S1 /2 and 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transitions that are needed for laser cooling, state preparation, and state detection of the clock-state hyperfine and optical qubits. We also report the 62P1 /2↔52D3 /2 electronic transition isotope shift for the rare A =130 and 132 barium nuclides, completing the spectroscopic characterization necessary for laser cooling all long-lived barium II isotopes.

  18. Multiple and sequential data acquisition method: an improved method for fragmentation and detection of cross-linked peptides on a hybrid linear trap quadrupole Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudashevskaya, Elena L; Breitwieser, Florian P; Huber, Marie L; Colinge, Jacques; Müller, André C; Bennett, Keiryn L

    2013-02-05

    The identification and validation of cross-linked peptides by mass spectrometry remains a daunting challenge for protein-protein cross-linking approaches when investigating protein interactions. This includes the fragmentation of cross-linked peptides in the mass spectrometer per se and following database searching, the matching of the molecular masses of the fragment ions to the correct cross-linked peptides. The hybrid linear trap quadrupole (LTQ) Orbitrap Velos combines the speed of the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) duty circle with high mass accuracy, and these features were utilized in the current study to substantially improve the confidence in the identification of cross-linked peptides. An MS/MS method termed multiple and sequential data acquisition method (MSDAM) was developed. Preliminary optimization of the MS/MS settings was performed with a synthetic peptide (TP1) cross-linked with bis[sulfosuccinimidyl] suberate (BS(3)). On the basis of these results, MSDAM was created and assessed on the BS(3)-cross-linked bovine serum albumin (BSA) homodimer. MSDAM applies a series of multiple sequential fragmentation events with a range of different normalized collision energies (NCE) to the same precursor ion. The combination of a series of NCE enabled a considerable improvement in the quality of the fragmentation spectra for cross-linked peptides, and ultimately aided in the identification of the sequences of the cross-linked peptides. Concurrently, MSDAM provides confirmatory evidence from the formation of reporter ions fragments, which reduces the false positive rate of incorrectly assigned cross-linked peptides.

  19. Trapping Triatominae in Silvatic Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noireau François

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale trials of a trapping system designed to collect silvatic Triatominae are reported. Live-baited adhesive traps were tested in various ecosystems and different triatomine habitats (arboreal and terrestrial. The trials were always successful, with a rate of positive habitats generally over 20% and reaching 48.4% for palm trees of the Amazon basin. Eleven species of Triatominae belonging to the three genera of public health importance (Triatoma, Rhodnius and Panstrongylus were captured. This trapping system provides an effective way to detect the presence of triatomines in terrestrial and arboreal silvatic habitats and represents a promising tool for ecological studies. Various lines of research are contemplated to improve the performance of this trapping system.

  20. Development of a quadrupole trap apparatus for UHV measurements of levitated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppock, Joyce; Nagornykh, Pavel; McAdams, Ian; Kane, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    Completely decoupling graphene from any substrate opens up new possibilities for measurement of its electrical and mechanical properties as well as the exploration of novel methods of crystal growth and fabrication of 2D materials. We levitate a charged micron-scale few-layer graphene-like flake in an electrical AC quadrupole trap and induce rotation using a circularly polarized laser beam. We aim to achieve an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) environment (stretching (via rotation at frequencies greater than 100 MHz), to perform thermodynamic measurements on the particles as they are heated by the laser, and to avoid chemical contamination of the particles. Measurements of particles in UHV require two technologies: (1) the reliable capture of particles and their introduction into a UHV environment, and (2) a center-of-mass cooling method to prevent particle loss. This talk will focus on the first challenge. We will discuss improvements to the sample preparation and to the trapping procedure, describe a method of transferring particles from the initial capture trap to a second trap in a UHV chamber, and present a model of the trap potential. Finally, we will discuss preliminary work on the deposition of particles onto a conducting substrate after they have been cooled and oriented parallel to the substrate.

  1. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Bromine Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the milliKelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br$_2$ molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are only lost by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential...

  2. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  3. Atomic laser-beam finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viering, Kirsten; Medellin, David; Mo, Jianyong; Raizen, Mark G

    2012-11-05

    We report on an experimental method to align a laser beam to a cloud of atoms trapped in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). We show how balanced lock-in detection leads to a very sensitive method to align the laser beam to the atoms in the plane perpendicular to the propagation direction. This provides a very reliable and fast way of aligning laser beams to atoms trapped in a MOT.

  4. Laser Modified ZnO/CdSSe Core-Shell Nanowire Arrays for Micro-Steganography and Improved Photoconduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Junpeng; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Minrui; Zhang, Hongji; Lim, Sharon Xiaodai; Tok, Eng Soon; Sow, Chorng Haur

    2014-09-01

    Arrays of ZnO/CdSSe core/shell nanowires with shells of tunable band gaps represent a class of interesting hybrid nanomaterials with unique optical and photoelectrical properties due to their type II heterojunctions and chemical compositions. In this work, we demonstrate that direct focused laser beam irradiation is able to achieve localized modification of the hybrid structure and chemical composition of the nanowire arrays. As a result, the photoresponsivity of the laser modified hybrid is improved by a factor of ~3. A 3D photodetector with improved performance is demonstrated using laser modified nanowire arrays overlaid with monolayer graphene as the top electrode. Finally, by controlling the power of the scanning focused laser beam, micropatterns with different fluorescence emissions are created on a substrate covered with nanowire arrays. Such a pattern is not apparent when imaged under normal optical microscopy but the pattern becomes readily revealed under fluorescence microscopy i.e. a form of Micro-Steganography is achieved.

  5. Double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of explosives: Initial study towards improved discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Lucia, Frank C. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)], E-mail: fdelucia@arl.army.mil; Gottfried, Jennifer L.; Munson, Chase A.; Miziolek, Andrzej W. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, AMSRD-ARL-WM-BD, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 21005-5069 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Detecting trace explosive residues at standoff distances in real-time is a difficult problem. One method ideally suited for real-time standoff detection is laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). However, atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen contributes to the LIBS signal from the oxygen- and nitrogen-containing explosive compounds, complicating the discrimination of explosives from other organic materials. While bathing the sample in an inert gas will remove atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen interference, it cannot practically be applied for standoff LIBS. Alternatively, we have investigated the potential of double pulse LIBS to improve the discrimination of explosives by diminishing the contribution of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen to the LIBS signal. These initial studies compare the close-contact (< 1 m) LIBS spectra of explosives using single pulse LIBS in argon with double pulse LIBS in atmosphere. We have demonstrated improved discrimination of an explosive and an organic interferent using double pulse LIBS to reduce the air entrained in the analytical plasma.

  6. Trapped Antihydrogen in Its Ground State

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Kolthammer, W S; McConnell, R; Richerme, P; Grzonka, D; Oelert, W; Sefzick, T; Zielinski, M; Fitzakerley, D W; George, M C; Hessels, E A; Storry, C H; Weel, M; Mullers, A; Walz, J

    2012-01-01

    Antihydrogen atoms are confined in an Ioffe trap for 15 to 1000 seconds -- long enough to ensure that they reach their ground state. Though reproducibility challenges remain in making large numbers of cold antiprotons and positrons interact, 5 +/- 1 simultaneously-confined ground state atoms are produced and observed on average, substantially more than previously reported. Increases in the number of simultaneously trapped antithydrogen atoms H are critical if laser-cooling of trapped antihydrogen is to be demonstrated, and spectroscopic studies at interesting levels of precision are to be carried out.

  7. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    Audiovideo service

    1998-01-01

    Prof. C. Cohen-Tannoudji presents "manipulating atoms with light" . By using quasi-resonant exchanges of energy, linear and angular momentum between atoms and photons, it is possible to polarize atoms, to displace their energy levels and to control their position and their velocity. A few physical mechanisms allowing one to trap atoms and to cool them in the microKelvin, and even in the nanoKelvin range, will be described. Various possible applications of such ultracold atoms will be also reviewed.

  8. Quantum computation with ions in microscopic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šašura, Marek; Steane, Andrew M.

    2002-12-01

    We discuss a possible experimental realization of fast quantum gates with high fidelity with ions confined in microscopic traps. The original proposal of this physical system for quantum computation comes from Cirac and Zoller (Nature 404, 579 (2000)). In this paper we analyse a sensitivity of the ion-trap quantum gate on various experimental parameters which was omitted in the original proposal. We address imprecision of laser pulses, impact of photon scattering, nonzero temperature effects and influence of laser intensity fluctuations on the total fidelity of the two-qubit phase gate.

  9. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap-ni...

  10. Dependence of loading time on control parameters in a standard vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yi-Chi; Wu Ji-Zhou; Li Yu-Qing; Ma Jie; Wang Li-Rong; Zhao Yan-Ting; Xiao Lian-Tuan; Jia Suo-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Loading time is one of the most important dynamic characteristics of a magneto-optical trap.In this paper,we primarily report on a detailed experimental study of the effects of some magneto-optical trap control parameters on loading time,including the background vacuum pressure,the magnetic field gradient,and the intensities of trapping and repumping lasers.We compare the results with previous theoretical and experimental results,and give qualitative analysis.These experimental investigations offer some useful guidelines to control the loading time of magneto-optical traps.The controllable loading time achieved is helpful to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of photoassociation spectroscopy,which is remarkably improved from 7 to 28.6.

  11. Improved accuracy in quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using sub-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan; Clegg, Samuel M.; Frydenvang, Jens; Wiens, Roger C.; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard V.; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Dyar, M. Darby

    2017-01-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of diverse geologic materials is one of the primary challenges faced by the Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)-based ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The SuperCam instrument on the Mars 2020 rover, as well as other LIBS instruments developed for geochemical analysis on Earth or other planets, will face the same challenge. Consequently, part of the ChemCam science team has focused on the development of improved multivariate analysis calibrations methods. Developing a single regression model capable of accurately determining the composition of very different target materials is difficult because the response of an element’s emission lines in LIBS spectra can vary with the concentration of other elements. We demonstrate a conceptually simple “sub-model” method for improving the accuracy of quantitative LIBS analysis of diverse target materials. The method is based on training several regression models on sets of targets with limited composition ranges and then “blending” these “sub-models” into a single final result. Tests of the sub-model method show improvement in test set root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) for almost all cases. The sub-model method, using partial least squares regression (PLS), is being used as part of the current ChemCam quantitative calibration, but the sub-model method is applicable to any multivariate regression method and may yield similar improvements.

  12. Improved accuracy in quantitative laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using sub-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ryan B.; Clegg, Samuel M.; Frydenvang, Jens; Wiens, Roger C.; McLennan, Scott; Morris, Richard V.; Ehlmann, Bethany; Dyar, M. Darby

    2017-03-01

    Accurate quantitative analysis of diverse geologic materials is one of the primary challenges faced by the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)-based ChemCam instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover. The SuperCam instrument on the Mars 2020 rover, as well as other LIBS instruments developed for geochemical analysis on Earth or other planets, will face the same challenge. Consequently, part of the ChemCam science team has focused on the development of improved multivariate analysis calibrations methods. Developing a single regression model capable of accurately determining the composition of very different target materials is difficult because the response of an element's emission lines in LIBS spectra can vary with the concentration of other elements. We demonstrate a conceptually simple "sub-model" method for improving the accuracy of quantitative LIBS analysis of diverse target materials. The method is based on training several regression models on sets of targets with limited composition ranges and then "blending" these "sub-models" into a single final result. Tests of the sub-model method show improvement in test set root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) for almost all cases. The sub-model method, using partial least squares (PLS) regression, is being used as part of the current ChemCam quantitative calibration, but the sub-model method is applicable to any multivariate regression method and may yield similar improvements.

  13. A two-photon laser induced fluorescence diagnostic with improved sensitivity, localization, and measurement rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-10-01

    A two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic has been developed for measuring neutrals in fusion plasmas. Implementation of this diagnostic on the HIT-SI3 spheromak has demonstrated the sensitivity of the diagnostic and shown that measurements taken over several plasma pulses are possible. These measurements yielded an unexpected loss of signal when complex collection optics were utilized. Simulations show that this loss of signal can be explained by chromatic aberrations caused by the disparate Kr and D emission. This loss of signal has been addressed with the development of a new calibration scheme involving xenon gas. The Xe calibration scheme emission occurs at 656.00 nm while the deuterium emission is 656.09 nm. This nearly identical emission allows for advanced optical techniques such as confocal collection/injection and spatial filtering to be employed without loss of signal. Spatial filtering has been demonstrated to decrease noise while improving measurement localization, while confocal collection/injection allows for probing and measuring to occur through one viewport. The Xe scheme also allows for a Doppler-free hydrogen measurement. Doppler-free measurements eliminate the need to scan the laser spectrally thus greatly increasing the rate of measurement.

  14. The study of corrosion behavior of laser induced surface improvement (LISI) on steel and aluminum substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsey, N.; Vasanth, K.L.

    1999-07-01

    Laser Induced Surface Improvement (LISI) is a new process developed by University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) which employs lasers to melt precursor coatings and portions of the substrate to form a durable corrosion resistant surface. The LISI surface can be tailored to yield a composition that provides minimum impact to the base substrate material while giving good corrosion characteristics. The LISI surface treatment of tungsten carbide was applied on 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys. The LISI treatment uses a chromium/nickel mixture and a stainless steel type mixture (pseudo stainless steel of 18 wt% chromium, 8 wt% nickel and a trace amount of manganese and silicon) on steel alloy 1010. The corrosion characteristics of these samples were determined in 3.5 wt% NaCl aqueous solution using linear polarization resistance technique. Potentiodynamic scans were run to determine the corrosion rates and optical microscopy was used to examine pitting characteristics of the different surface coatings. The effectiveness of the LISI modified surfaces to protect both steel and aluminum substrates is discussed.

  15. Study on improvement in distance accuracy of the chaos laser radar

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    As one of the in-car radar, a laser radar is widely studied. Since the laser radar has a characteristic that the received signal becomes to be buried in noise with increasing distance, it needs high power laser.Then, a new type oof the chao laser radar has been stuied.Using chaos signal for the transmitted signal,this laser radar is relatively resistant to noise and can simply process because of using only additional process However, a distance resolution of the chaos laser radar is limited ...

  16. Improved operation of a microwave pulse compressor with a laser-triggered high-pressure gas plasma switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlapakovski, A.; Gorev, S.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2016-08-01

    The influence of laser beam parameters on the output pulses of a resonant microwave compressor with a laser-triggered plasma switch was investigated. The S-band compressor, consisting of a rectangular waveguide-based cavity and H-plane waveguide tee with a shorted side arm, was filled with pressurized dry air and pumped by 1.8-μs-long microwave pulses of up to 450 kW power. A Nd:YAG laser was used to ignite the gas discharge in the tee side arm for output pulse extraction. The laser beam (at 213 nm or 532 nm) was directed along the RF electric field lines. It was found that the compressor operated most effectively when the laser beam was focused at the center of the switch waveguide cross-section. In this case, the power extraction efficiency reached ˜47% at an output power of ˜14 MW, while when the laser beam was not focused the maximal extraction efficiency was only ˜20% at ˜6 MW output power. Focusing the laser beam resulted also in a dramatic decrease (down to switch, and the jitter of the output pulses' appearance was minimized. In addition, the quality of the output pulses' waveform was significantly improved.

  17. Optimization of RF multipole ion trap geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanghänel, Sven; Asvany, Oskar; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2017-02-01

    Radio-frequency (rf) traps are ideal places to store cold ions for spectroscopic experiments. Specific multipole configurations are suited best for different applications but have to be modified to allow e.g. for a proper overlap of a laser beam waist with the ion cloud. Therefore the corresponding trapping fields should be shaped accordingly. To achieve this goal highly accurate electrical potentials of rf multipole traps and the resulting effective trapping potentials are calculated using the boundary element method (BEM). These calculations are used to evaluate imperfections and to optimize the field geometry. For that purpose the complex fields are reduced to a small set of multipole expansion coefficients. Desirable values for these coefficients are met by systematic changes of real trap dimensions from CAD designs. The effect of misalignment of a linear quadrupole, the optimization of an optically open Paul trap, the influence of steering electrodes (end electrode and ring electrode) on a 22-pole ion trap and the effect of the micro motion on the lowest reachable temperatures in such a trap are discussed.

  18. A conformational study of protonated noradrenaline by UV-UV and IR dip double resonance laser spectroscopy combined with an electrospray and a cold ion trap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiromichi; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Kato, Daichi; Féraud, Géraldine; Dedonder-Lardeux, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Fujii, Masaaki

    2017-05-03

    The conformer-selected ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectra of protonated noradrenaline were measured using an electrospray/cryogenic ion trap technique combined with photo-dissociation spectroscopy. By comparing the UV photo dissociation (UVPD) spectra with the UV-UV hole burning (HB) spectra, it was found that five conformers coexist under ultra-cold conditions. Based on the spectral features of the IR dip spectra of each conformer, two different conformations on the amine side chain were identified. Three conformers (group I) were assigned to folded and others (group II) to extended structures by comparing the observed IR spectra with the calculated ones. Observation of the significantly less-stable extended conformers strongly suggests that the extended structures are dominant in solution and are detected in the gas phase by kinetic trapping. The conformers in each group are assignable to rotamers of OH orientations in the catechol ring. By comparing the UV-UV HB spectra and the calculated Franck-Condon spectra obtained by harmonic vibrational analysis of the S1 state, with the aid of relative stabilization energies of each conformer in the S0 state, the absolute orientations of catechol OHs of the observed five conformers were successfully determined. It was found that the 0-0 transition of one folded conformer is red-shifted by about 1000 cm(-1) from the others. The significant red-shift was explained by a large contribution of the πσ* state to S1 in the conformer in which an oxygen atom of the meta-OH group is close to the ammonium group.

  19. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Y; Feng, G; Nute, J; Piano, S; Hackermuller, L; Ma, J; Xiao, L; Jia, S

    2015-01-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loading magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load $1.5 \\times 10^7$ atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 $\\mu$K to 1.7 $\\mu$K within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about $1.2 \\times 10^7$. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  20. Enhanced Raman sideband cooling of caesium atoms in a vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wu, J.; Feng, G.; Nute, J.; Piano, S.; Hackermüller, L.; Ma, J.; Xiao, L.; Jia, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report enhanced three-dimensional degenerated Raman sideband cooling (3D DRSC) of caesium (Cs) atoms in a standard single-cell vapour-loaded magneto-optical trap. Our improved scheme involves using a separate repumping laser and optimized lattice detuning. We load 1.5 × 107 atoms into the Raman lattice with a detuning of -15.5 GHz (to the ground F = 3 state). Enhanced 3D DRSC is used to cool them from 60 µK to 1.7 µK within 12 ms and the number of obtained atoms is about 1.2 × 107. A theoretical model is proposed to simulate the measured number of trapped atoms. The result shows good agreement with the experimental data. The technique paves the way for loading a large number of ultracold Cs atoms into a crossed dipole trap and efficient evaporative cooling in a single-cell system.

  1. Enhanced performance of a repetitively pulsed 130 mJ KrF laser with improved pre-ionization parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N S Benerji; A Singh; N Varshnay; Bijendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Studies related to the effect of pre-ionizer on laser output energy of a repetitively pulsed KrF laser are presented. The dependence of laser output energy, spectral width and beam spot homogeneity on pre-ionization parameters, namely its current and voltage rise time are reported here. Here, effectiveness of pre-ionization is optimized by improving pre-ionization current and rise time of the pump pulse of the automatic UV pre-ionizer KrF laser. It is observed that by increasing pre-ionization current from 6 kA to 10.6 kA, the output energy increases by about 30% (from 100 to 130 mJ). It is also observed that the emission spectral width reduces by almost 60% by increasing the pre-ionization current. Regular homogeneous and well-developed beam spot (nearly Hat-Top profile) was achieved under these optimized conditions.

  2. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Repeatability and reproducibility of parts produced by selective laser melting is a standing issue, and coupled with a lack of standardized quality control presents a major hindrance towards maturing of selective laser melting as an industrial scale process. Consequently, numerical process...... modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures.In this paper, a systematic approach towards...... establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters...

  3. An improved method for stripping cladding light in high power fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tenglong; Wu, Juan; Sun, Yinghong; Wang, Yanshan; Ma, Yi

    2015-02-01

    In order to ensure the high power all-fiber laser reliability and excellent beam quality, it is necessary to strip the unwanted cladding light. The common method for stripping cladding light is to recoat the double cladding fiber with a high index gel, but localized heating and low thermal conductivity of the recoating gel are the prime factors limiting the power-handling capability of the cladding power stripper(CPS). An improved fabrication technique to manufacture the CPS is presented. Light stripping section of the fiber is fused with a transparent quartz tube, by applying different amount of etchant along the quartz tube, frosted surface is created and uniformly removal of the cladding light is achieved. The quartz tube is joined to water-cooled thermal enclosure tightly without the gel to avoid heat aggregation. The power-handling capability of the device is tested under 200W of cladding light, and attenuation of 20 dB is achieved.

  4. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Pinkard

    Full Text Available Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM, the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  5. Spatiotemporal Rank Filtering Improves Image Quality Compared to Frame Averaging in 2-Photon Laser Scanning Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkard, Henry; Corbin, Kaitlin; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-01-01

    Live imaging of biological specimens using optical microscopy is limited by tradeoffs between spatial and temporal resolution, depth into intact samples, and phototoxicity. Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2P-LSM), the gold standard for imaging turbid samples in vivo, has conventionally constructed images with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) generated by sequential raster scans of the focal plane and temporal integration of the collected signals. Here, we describe spatiotemporal rank filtering, a nonlinear alternative to temporal integration, which makes more efficient use of collected photons by selectively reducing noise in 2P-LSM images during acquisition. This results in much higher SNR while preserving image edges and fine details. Practically, this allows for at least a four fold decrease in collection times, a substantial improvement for time-course imaging in biological systems.

  6. Laser Ion Source Project at IGISOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieminen, A. [University of Manchester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Moore, I. D., E-mail: iain.moore@php.jyu.fi [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Flanagan, K. T. [University of Manchester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Geppert, Ch. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Huikari, J.; Jokinen, A. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Kessler, T. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Marsh, B. [University of Manchester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Penttilae, H.; Rinta-Antila, S. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland); Tordoff, B. [University of Manchester, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Wendt, K. D. A. [University of Mainz, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Aystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics (Finland)

    2005-04-15

    The application of laser ionisation is being developed for the IGISOL mass separator facility in Jyvaeskylae, Finland. The conceived laser ion source will have two independent pulsed laser systems based on all solid-state lasers and dye lasers for maximal coverage of ionisation schemes throughout the periodic table. A laser ion source trap, LIST, method will be pursued for optimal selectivity.

  7. Characteristics and optimization of 4H-SiC MESFET with a novel p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate structure based on improved trap models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Kun; Chai Changchun; Yang Yintang; Jia Hujun; Zhang Xianjun; Chen Bin

    2011-01-01

    A novel structure of 4H-SiC MESFETs is proposed that focuses on surface trap suppression.Characteristics of the device have been investigated based on physical models for material properties and improved trap models.By comparing with the performance of the well-utilized buried-gate incorporated with a field-plate (BG-FP) structure,it is shown that the proposed structure improves device properties in comprehensive aspects.A p-type spacer layer introduced in the channel layer suppresses the surface trap effect and reduces the gate-drain capacitance (Cgd) under a large drain voltage.A p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate improves the electric field distribution on the gate edge while the spacer layer induces less Cgd than a conventional FP.For microwave applications,4H-SiC MESFET for the proposed structure has a larger gate-lag ratio in the saturation region due to better surface trap isolation from the conductive channel.For high power applications,the proposed structure is able to endure higher operating voltage as well.The maximum saturation current density of 460 mA/mm is yielded.Also,the gate-lag ratio under a drain voltage of 20 V is close to 90%.In addition,5% and 17.8% improvements in fT and fmax are obtained compared with a BG-FP MESFET in AC simulation,respectively.Parameters and dimensions of the proposed structure are optimized to make the best of the device for microwave applications and to provide a reference for device design.

  8. Characteristics and optimization of 4H-SiC MESFET with a novel p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate structure based on improved trap models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Kun; Chai Changchun; Yang Yintang; Jia Hujun; Zhang Xianjun; Chen Bin, E-mail: sk88205853@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Wide Band-Gap Semiconductor Materials and Devices of the Ministry of Education, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, Xi' an 710071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    A novel structure of 4H-SiC MESFETs is proposed that focuses on surface trap suppression. Characteristics of the device have been investigated based on physical models for material properties and improved trap models. By comparing with the performance of the well-utilized buried-gate incorporated with a field-plate (BG-FP) structure, it is shown that the proposed structure improves device properties in comprehensive aspects. A p-type spacer layer introduced in the channel layer suppresses the surface trap effect and reduces the gate-drain capacitance (C{sub gd}) under a large drain voltage. A p-type spacer layer incorporated with a field-plate improves the electric field distribution on the gate edge while the spacer layer induces less C{sub gd} than a conventional FP. For microwave applications, 4H-SiC MESFET for the proposed structure has a larger gate-lag ratio in the saturation region due to better surface trap isolation from the conductive channel. For high power applications, the proposed structure is able to endure higher operating voltage as well. The maximum saturation current density of 460 mA/mm is yielded. Also, the gate-lag ratio under a drain voltage of 20 V is close to 90%. In addition, 5% and 17.8% improvements in f{sub T} and f{sub max} are obtained compared with a BG-FP MESFET in AC simulation, respectively. Parameters and dimensions of the proposed structure are optimized to make the best of the device for microwave applications and to provide a reference for device design. (semiconductor devices)

  9. Beam Profile Improvement of a High-Power Diode Laser Stack for Optoacoustic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Miguel; Rodríguez, Sergio; Leggio, Luca; Gawali, Sandeep; Gallego, Daniel; Lamela, Horacio

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances in high-power diode lasers (HPDLs) technology allow their use as potential sources for optoacoustic (OA) applications, due to their high repetition rates (a few kHz), low costs and sizes. However, some OA applications require pulse energies in the order of mJ that cannot be provided by the only HPDLs (several μJ). The employment of diode laser bars (DLBs) and stacks (DLSs) significantly increases the energy per pulse up to several mJ, but they require more optical elements for collimation in fast and slow axes. In this work, we show an 808 nm DLS emitting optical nanosecond pulses with currents of ˜ 200 A and supplied by a customized current driver. We only collimate the beam in the fast axis by disposing the core of 200 μm optical fibers as collimating lenses along each bar of the stack, and we discuss the improvement of the beam profile. The results demonstrate that the beam profile is notably improved with the optical fiber lenses, and a 6.4 mm × 4.3 mm light spot is obtained by using a conventional focusing lens. Measurements report a total energy per pulse of 630 μJ in the spot, considering a pulse width of 850 ns and a repetition rate of 1 kHz. Finally, we focus the light spot into an absorbing inclusion (graphene oxide) hosted in a semi-transparent phantom to generate and detect high OA signals ({˜ }355 mV_{pp}). The results achieved demonstrate the capability of our DLS system to be applied in multispectral OA systems with final application in OA endoscopy and microscopy.

  10. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation improves rule-based, but not information-integration, category learning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Nathaniel J; Saucedo, Celeste L; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2017-03-01

    This is the first randomized, controlled study comparing the cognitive effects of transcranial laser stimulation on category learning tasks. Transcranial infrared laser stimulation is a new non-invasive form of brain stimulation that shows promise for wide-ranging experimental and neuropsychological applications. It involves using infrared laser to enhance cerebral oxygenation and energy metabolism through upregulation of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase, the primary infrared photon acceptor in cells. Previous research found that transcranial infrared laser stimulation aimed at the prefrontal cortex can improve sustained attention, short-term memory, and executive function. In this study, we directly investigated the influence of transcranial infrared laser stimulation on two neurobiologically dissociable systems of category learning: a prefrontal cortex mediated reflective system that learns categories using explicit rules, and a striatally mediated reflexive learning system that forms gradual stimulus-response associations. Participants (n=118) received either active infrared laser to the lateral prefrontal cortex or sham (placebo) stimulation, and then learned one of two category structures-a rule-based structure optimally learned by the reflective system, or an information-integration structure optimally learned by the reflexive system. We found that prefrontal rule-based learning was substantially improved following transcranial infrared laser stimulation as compared to placebo (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 298)=5.117, p=0.024), while information-integration learning did not show significant group differences (treatment X block interaction: F(1, 288)=1.633, p=0.202). These results highlight the exciting potential of transcranial infrared laser stimulation for cognitive enhancement and provide insight into the neurobiological underpinnings of category learning.

  11. Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped HD$^+$ ions in the Lamb-Dicke regime

    CERN Document Server

    Tran, Vu Quang; Douillet, Albane; Koelemeij, Jeroen C J; Hilico, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We study the feasibility of nearly-degenerate two-photon rovibrational spectroscopy in ensembles of trapped, sympathetically cooled hydrogen molecular ions using a resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation (REMPD) scheme. Taking advantage of quasi-coincidences in the rovibrational spectrum, the excitation lasers are tuned close to an intermediate level to resonantly enhance two-photon absorption. Realistic simulations of the REMPD signal are obtained using a four-level model that takes into account saturation effects, ion trajectories, laser frequency noise and redistribution of population by blackbody radiation. We show that the use of counterpropagating laser beams enables optical excitation in an effective Lamb-Dicke regime. Sub-Doppler lines having widths in the 100 Hz range can be observed with good signal-to-noise ratio for an optimal choice of laser detunings. Our results indicate the feasibility of molecular spectroscopy at the $10^{-14}$ accuracy level for improved tests of molecular QED, a new det...

  12. Improving the fatigue performance of porous metallic biomaterials produced by Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Apers, Yanni; Lietaert, Karel; Kruth, Jean-Pierre

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides new insights into the fatigue properties of porous metallic biomaterials produced by additive manufacturing. Cylindrical porous samples with diamond unit cells were produced from Ti6Al4V powder using Selective Laser Melting (SLM). After measuring all morphological and quasi-static properties, compression-compression fatigue tests were performed to determine fatigue strength and to identify important fatigue influencing factors. In a next step, post-SLM treatments were used to improve the fatigue life of these biomaterials by changing the microstructure and by reducing stress concentrators and surface roughness. In particular, the influence of stress relieving, hot isostatic pressing and chemical etching was studied. Analytical and numerical techniques were developed to calculate the maximum local tensile stress in the struts as function of the strut diameter and load. With this method, the variability in the relative density between all samples was taken into account. The local stress in the struts was then used to quantify the exact influence of the applied post-SLM treatments on the fatigue life. A significant improvement of the fatigue life was achieved. Also, the post-SLM treatments, procedures and calculation methods can be applied to different types of porous metallic structures and hence this paper provides useful tools for improving fatigue performance of metallic biomaterials.

  13. Improved emission properties of polymer photonic crystal lasers by introducing a phase-shift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Buss, Thomas; Smith, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Introducing a phase-shift in nanoimprinted polymer dye lasers is shown to increase the probability of single mode lasing from 19% to 99%. Low-index lasers with only one longitudinal mode are thus superior to band-edge lasers....

  14. Cleanliness improvements of NIF (National Ignition Facility) amplifiers as compared to previous large-scale lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honig, J

    2004-06-09

    Prior to the recent commissioning of the first NIF (National Ignition Facility) beamline, full-scale laser-amplifier-glass cleanliness experiments were performed. Aerosol measurements and obscuration data acquired using a modified flatbed scanner compare favorably to historical large-scale lasers and indicate that NIF is the cleanest large-scale laser built to date.

  15. Design of a marine sediment trap and accessories

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Janakiraman, G.; Fernando, V.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajaraman, V.S.

    The marine sediment trap and the mooring accessories were developed indigenously and were used successfully for the collection of settling sediments in the Arabian Sea The experience gained in using sediment trap and further improvements...

  16. Improved light output from InGaN LEDs by laser-induced dumbbell-like air-voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Xie, Haizhong; Zheng, Haiyang; Dong, Peng; Yang, Hua; Yi, Xiaoyan; Wang, Guohong

    2013-12-30

    We report inducing an array of dumbbell-like air-voids inside the sapphire substrate in InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve the light extraction from LED device by a picosecond (Ps) pulse laser. At an injection current of 100 mA, the light output power (LOP) of packaged LEDs with laser-induced air-voids can be improved by 24.7% compared with conventional LEDs. Far-field radiation pattern has verified that this great improvement in LOP is due to the light scattering occurred at the interface of sapphire/air-voids. Current-Voltage curves show that the laser processing of air-voids will not degrade the LED electrical properties. Furthermore, leakage current at a level of ~5 nA at -10V has demonstrated an enhancement in the LED electrical performance with laser-induced air-voids. Second focusing mechanism, which is originated in the local heating effect around the laser focus, has been proposed to explain the formation of dumbbell-like air-voids.

  17. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaofeng Cheng; Xinxiang Miao; Hongbin Wang; Lang Qin; Yayun Ye; Qun He; Zhiqiang Ma; Longbiao Zhao; Shaobo He

    2014-01-01

    The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III) laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic su...

  18. Fast Preparation of W States for Hot Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGShi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is presented for generating W states for three or four trapped ions in thermal motion. The scheme works in the regime, where the Rabi frequency of the laser field is on the order of the trap frequency, resulting a fast entanglement speed, which is of importance in view of decoherence.

  19. Fast Preparation of W States for Hot Trapped Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is presented for generating W states for three o()four trapped ions in thermal motion. The scheme works in the regime, where the Rabi frequency of the laser field is on the order of the trap frequency, resulting a fast entanglement speed, which is of importance in view of decoherence.

  20. Efficient optical trapping and visualization of silver nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosanac, Lana; Aabo, Thomas; Bendix, Pól Martin

    2008-01-01

    We performed efficient optical trapping combined with sensitive optical detection of individual silver nanoparticles. The particles ranging in size from 20 to 275 nm in diameter were trapped in three dimensions using low laser power by minimizing spherical aberrations at the focus. The optical...

  1. A Novel Gravito-Optical Surface Trap for Neutral Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chun-Xia; WANG Zhengling; YIN Jian-Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ We propose a novel gravito-optical surface trap (GOST) for neutral atoms based on one-dimensional intensity gradient cooling. The surface optical trap is composed of a blue-detuned reduced semi-Gaussian laser beam (SGB), a far-blue-detuned dark hollow beam and the gravity field.

  2. Trapping and Sympathetic Cooling of Boron Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rugango, Rene; Shu, Gang; Brown, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping and sympathetic cooling of B$^{+}$ ions in a Coulomb crystal of laser-cooled Ca$^{+}$, We non-destructively confirm the presence of the both B$^+$ isotopes by resonant excitation of the secular motion. The B$^{+}$ ions are loaded by ablation of boron and the secular excitation spectrum also reveals features consistent with ions of the form B$_{n}^{+}$.

  3. Probing the interaction between two microspheres in a single Gaussian beam optical trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Praveen; Iyengar, Shruthi Subhash; Lakkegowda, Yogesha; Bhattacharya, Sarbari; Ananthamurthy, Sharath

    2016-09-01

    Interactions between trapped microspheres have been studied in two geometries so far: (i) using line optical tweezers and (ii) in traps using two counter propagating laser beams. In both trap geometries, the stable inter bead separations have been attributed to optical binding. One could also trap two such beads in a single beam Gaussian laser trap. While there are reports that address this configuration through theoretical or simulation based treatments, there has so far been no detailed experimental work that measures the interactions. In this work, we have recorded simultaneously the fluctuation spectra of two beads trapped along the laser propagation direction in a single Gaussian beam trap by measuring the back scattered signal from the trapping and a tracking laser beam that are counter propagating . The backscattering from the trapping laser monitors the bead encountered earlier in the propagation path. The counter propagating tracking laser, on the other hand, is used to monitor the fluctuations of the second bead. Detection is by using quadrant photo detectors placed at either end. The autocorrelation functions of both beads reveal marked departures from that obtained when there is only one bead in the trap. Moreover, the fall-off profiles of the autocorrelation indicates the presence of more than one relaxation time. This indicates a method of detecting the presence of a second bead in a trap without directly carrying out measurements on it. Further, a careful analysis of the relaxation times could also reveal the nature of interactions between the beads.

  4. Eliminating light shifts for single atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2017-02-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We implement a general solution to these limitations by loading, as well as cooling and imaging the atoms with temporally alternating beams, and present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single atom tweezer loading. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, it should enable the optical tweezer platform to be extended to nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped.

  5. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Daly, Mark; Phelan, Ciarán; Deasy, Kieran; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140 - 200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  6. Nanostructured optical nanofibres for atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M.; Truong, V. G.; Phelan, C. F.; Deasy, K.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2014-05-01

    We propose an optical dipole trap for cold, neutral atoms based on the electric field produced from the evanescent fields in a hollow, rectangular slot cut through an optical nanofibre. In particular, we discuss the trap performance in relation to laser-cooled rubidium atoms and show that a far off-resonance, blue-detuned field combined with the attractive surface-atom interaction potential from the dielectric material forms a stable trapping configuration. With the addition of a red-detuned field, we demonstrate how three dimensional confinement of the atoms at a distance of 140-200 nm from the fibre surface within the slot can be accomplished. This scheme facilitates optical coupling between the atoms and the nanofibre that could be exploited for quantum communication schemes using ensembles of laser-cooled atoms.

  7. Surface Contaminant Control Technologies to Improve Laser Damage Resistance of Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The large high-power solid lasers, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF of America and the Shenguang-III (SG-III laser facility of China, can output over 2.1 MJ laser pulse for the inertial confinement fusion (ICF experiments. Because of the enhancement of operating flux and the expansion of laser driver scale, the problem of contamination seriously influences their construction period and operation life. During irradiation by intense laser beams, the contaminants on the metallic surface of beam tubes can be transmitted to the optical surfaces and lead to damage of optical components. For the high-power solid-state laser facilities, contamination control focuses on the slab amplifiers, spatial filters, and final-optical assemblies. In this paper, an effective solution to control contaminations including the whole process of the laser driver is put forward to provide the safe operation of laser facilities, and the detailed technical methods of contamination control such as washing, cleanliness metrology, and cleanliness protecting are also introduced to reduce the probability of laser-induced damage of optics. The experimental results show that the cleanliness level of SG-III laser facility is much better to ensure that the laser facility can safely operate at high energy flux.

  8. Small Mammal Trapping 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Small mammal traps were placed in the Baring division and in the Edmunds division of Moosehom National Wildlife Refuge. There were a total of 98 traps set for up to...

  9. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  10. Fabrication and characterization of semiconductor ion traps for quantum information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stick, Daniel Lynn

    The electromagnetic manipulation of isolated ions has led to many advances in atomic physics, from laser cooling to precision metrology and quantum control. As technical capability in this area has grown, so has interest in building miniature electromagnetic traps for the development of large-scale quantum information processors. This thesis will primarily focus on using microfabrication techniques to build arrays of miniature ion traps, similar to techniques used in fabricating high component density microprocessors. A specific focus will be on research using a gallium arsenide/aluminum gallium arsenide heterostructure as a trap architecture, as well as the recent testing of different ion traps fabricated at outside foundries. The construction and characterization of a conventional ceramic trap capable of shuttling an ion through a junction will also be detailed, and reveal the need for moving towards lithographically fabricated traps. Combined, these serve as a set of proof-of-principle experiments pointing to methods for designing and building large scale arrays of ion traps capable of constituting a quantum information processor. As traps become smaller, electrical potentials on the electrodes have greater influence on the ion. This not only pertains to intentionally applied voltages, but also to deleterious noise sources, such as thermal Johnson noise and the more significant "patch potential" noise, which both cause motional heating of the ion. These problematic noise sources dovetail with my thesis research into trap miniaturization since their effects become more pronounced and impossible to ignore for small trap sizes. Therefore characterizing them and investigating ways to suppress them have become an important component of my research. I will describe an experiment using a pair of movable needle electrodes to measure the ion heating rate corresponding to the harmonic frequency of the trap, the ion-electrode distance, and the electrode temperature. This

  11. Magneto-Optical Trap for Thulium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sukachev, D; Chebakov, K; Akimov, A; Kanorsky, S; Kolachevsky, N; Sorokin, V

    2010-01-01

    Thulium atoms are trapped in a magneto-optical trap using a strong transition at 410 nm with a small branching ratio. We trap up to $7\\times10^{4}$ atoms at a temperature of 0.8(2) mK after deceleration in a 40 cm long Zeeman slower. Optical leaks from the cooling cycle influence the lifetime of atoms in the MOT which varies between 0.3 -1.5 s in our experiments. The lower limit for the leaking rate from the upper cooling level is measured to be 22(6) s$^{-1}$. The repumping laser transferring the atomic population out of the F=3 hyperfine ground-state sublevel gives a 30% increase for the lifetime and the number of atoms in the trap.

  12. Magneto-optical trapping of diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Hummon, Matthew T; Stuhl, Benjamin K; Collopy, Alejandra L; Xia, Yong; Ye, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The development of the magneto-optical trap revolutionized the fields of atomic and quantum physics by providing a simple method for the rapid production of ultracold, trapped atoms. A similar technique for producing a diverse set of dense, ultracold diatomic molecular species will likewise transform the study of strongly interacting quantum systems, precision measurement, and physical chemistry. We demonstrate one- and two-dimensional transverse laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the polar molecule yttrium (II) oxide (YO). Using a quasicycling optical transition we observe transverse Doppler cooling of a YO molecular beam to a temperature of 5 mK, limited by interaction time. With the addition of an oscillating magnetic quadrupole field we demonstrate a transverse magneto-optical trap and achieve temperatures of 2 mK.

  13. Doppler cooling and trapping on forbidden transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binnewies, T; Wilpers, G; Sterr, U; Riehle, F; Helmcke, J; Mehlstäubler, T E; Rasel, E M; Ertmer, W

    2001-09-17

    Ultracold atoms at temperatures close to the recoil limit have been achieved by extending Doppler cooling to forbidden transitions. A cloud of (40)Ca atoms has been cooled and trapped to a temperature as low as 6 microK by operating a magnetooptical trap on the spin-forbidden intercombination transition. Quenching the long-lived excited state with an additional laser enhanced the scattering rate by a factor of 15, while a high selectivity in velocity was preserved. With this method, more than 10% of precooled atoms from a standard magnetooptical trap have been transferred to the ultracold trap. Monte Carlo simulations of the cooling process are in good agreement with the experiments.

  14. Multi-location laser ignition using a spatial light modulator towards improving automotive gasoline engine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Zheng; Lyon, Elliott; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom; Dearden, Geoff

    2017-03-01

    We report on a study into multi-location laser ignition (LI) with a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), to improve the performance of a single cylinder automotive gasoline engine. Three questions are addressed: i/ How to deliver a multi-beam diffracted pattern into an engine cylinder, through a small opening, while avoiding clipping? ii/ How much incident energy can a SLM handle (optical damage threshold) and how many simultaneous beam foci could thus be created? ; iii/ Would the multi-location sparks created be sufficiently intense and stable to ignite an engine and, if so, what would be their effect on engine performance compared to single-location LI? Answers to these questions were determined as follows. Multi-beam diffracted patterns were created by applying computer generated holograms (CGHs) to the SLM. An optical system for the SLM was developed via modelling in ZEMAX, to cleanly deliver the multi-beam patterns into the combustion chamber without clipping. Optical damage experiments were carried out on Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) samples provided by the SLM manufacturer and the maximum safe pulse energy to avoid SLM damage found to be 60 mJ. Working within this limit, analysis of the multi-location laser induced sparks showed that diffracting into three identical beams gave slightly insufficient energy to guarantee 100% sparking, so subsequent engine experiments used 2 equal energy beams laterally spaced by 4 mm. The results showed that dual-location LI gave more stable combustion and higher engine power output than single-location LI, for increasingly lean air-fuel mixtures. The paper concludes by a discussion of how these results may be exploited.

  15. Low level laser intensity improves propulsive appliance effects on condylar cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Augusto C. R.; dos Santos, Fernanda C. A.; Capeletti, Lucas R.; Galdino, Marcos V. B.; Araújo, Renan V.; Marques, Mara R.

    2012-01-01

    Mandibular propulsive appliance (MPA) stimulates cell proliferation and gene expression on mandible condylar cartilage (Marques et al., 2008). However, its association with low level laser therapy (LLLT) is unknown. This study evaluated the effects of LLLT associated to MPA on mandibular condyle. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group I received any treatment. Group II was bilaterally irradiated on temporomandibular joint with 10 J/cm2 low level laser (780nm, 40mW and 10s) on alternate days. Group III used the propulsive appliance for ten hours daily and Group IV used the appliance daily and was irradiated on alternate days. After 15 days the animals were killed by lethal doses of anesthetics. The condyles were fixed in Methacarn solution and decalcified in 4.13% EDTA solution for 30 days. Seriate saggital 5 μm-thick sections were stained by the hematoxilin-eosin method. Morphological and morphometric analyses were performed to measure the length and the height of the mandibular condyle, the thickness of the condilar cartilage and the bone mass. Results were expressed as mean +/- standard deviation (one-way ANOVA, Tukey's post-test.) The appliance increased all measures compared to the control group, except bone mass. Alone, LLLT had no effects on all measures, however, the association of the appliance with the LLLT increased condylar cartilage and bone mass significantly compared to the others groups. These results suggest that LLLT improves the effects of mandibular propulsive appliance in the condylar cartilage growth and formation of bone mass.

  16. Cold atom trap with zero residual magnetic field: the ac magneto-optical trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Matthew; Murray, Andrew James

    2008-10-24

    A novel atom trap is described using alternating current to generate the magnetic B field, together with high speed polarization switching of the damping laser field. This combination produces a trap as effective as a standard magneto-optical trap (MOT), with the advantage that the average B field is zero. No net current is hence induced in surrounding conductive elements, and the B field produced by the ac MOT is found to switch off >300 times faster than a conventional MOT. New experiments can hence be performed, including charged particle probing or detection of the cold target ensemble.

  17. Global Liquidity Trap

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, Ippei; NAKAJIMA Tomoyuki; Sudo, Nao; Teranishi, Yuki

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a two-country New Open Economy Macroeconomics model, and analyze the optimal monetary policy when countries cooperate in the face of a "global liquidity trap" -- i.e., a situation where the two countries are simultaneously caught in liquidity traps. The notable features of the optimal policy in the face of a global liquidity trap are history dependence and international dependence. The optimality of history dependent policy is confirmed as in local liquidity trap. A ...

  18. Femtosecond laser treatment of 316L improves its surface nanoroughness and carbon content and promotes osseointegration: An in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenar, Halime; Akman, Erhan; Kacar, Elif; Demir, Arif; Park, Haiwoong; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Aktas, Cenk; Karaoz, Erdal

    2013-08-01

    Cell-material surface interaction plays a critical role in osseointegration of prosthetic implants used in orthopedic surgeries and dentistry. Different technical approaches exist to improve surface properties of such implants either by coating or by modification of their topography. Femtosecond laser treatment was used in this study to generate microspotted lines separated by 75, 125, or 175μm wide nanostructured interlines on stainless steel (316L) plates. The hydrophobicity and carbon content of the metallic surface were improved simultaneously through this method. In vitro testing of the laser treated plates revealed a significant improvement in adhesion of human endothelial cells and human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM MSCs), the cells involved in microvessel and bone formation, respectively, and a significant decrease in fibroblast adhesion, which is implicated in osteolysis and aseptic loosening of prostheses. The hBM MSCs showed an increased bone formation rate on the laser treated plates under osteogenic conditions; the highest mineral deposition was obtained on the surface with 125μm interline distance (292±18mg/cm(2) vs. 228±43mg/cm(2) on untreated surface). Further in vivo testing of these laser treated surfaces in the native prosthetic implant niche would give a real insight into their effectiveness in improving osseointegration and their potential use in clinical applications.

  19. Hollow fiber optics with improved durability for high-peak-power pulses of Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yuji; Tsuchiuchi, Akio; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2007-03-10

    To improve the damage threshold of hollow optical waveguides for transmitting Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pulses, we optimize the metallization processes for the inner coating of fibers. For silver-coated hollow fiber as the base, second, and third Nd:YAG lasers, drying silver films at a moderate temperature and with inert gas flow is found to be effective. By using this drying process, the resistance to high-peak-power optical pulse radiation is drastically improved for fibers fabricated with and without the sensitizing process. The maximum peak power transmitted in the fiber is greater than 20 MW. To improve the energy threshold of aluminum-coated hollow fibers for the fourth and fifth harmonics of Nd:YAG lasers, a thin silver film is added between the aluminum film and the glass substrate to increase adhesion of the aluminum coating. By using this primer layer, the power threshold improves to 3 MW for the fourth harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser light.

  20. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metbulut, M. M.; Renzoni, F.

    2015-12-01

    State-insensitive dipole trapping of multilevel atoms can be achieved by an appropriate choice of the wavelength of the trapping laser, so that the interaction with the different transitions results in equal AC Stark shifts for the ground and excited states of interest. However, this approach is severely limited by the availability of coherent sources at the required wavelength and of appropriate power. This work investigates state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms for which the required wavelength of 935.6 nm is inconvenient in terms of experimental realization. Bichromatic state-insensitive trapping is proposed to overcome the lack of suitable laser sources. We first consider pairs of laser wavelengths in the ratio 1:2 and 1:3, as obtained via second- and third-harmonic generation. We found that the wavelength combinations 931.8-1863.6 nm and 927.5-2782.5 nm are suitable for state-insensitive trapping of caesium atoms. In addition, we examine bichromatic state-insensitive trapping produced by pairs of laser wavelengths corresponding to currently available high-power lasers. These wavelength pairs were found to be in the range of 585-588 nm and 623-629 for one laser and 1064-1080 nm for the other.

  1. Colloidal Particle Geometry and Its Effect on Optical Trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Rachael; Levine, Alex

    2008-03-01

    Recent experiments by Wilking and Mason (Europhysics Letters, in press) on the laser trapping of colloids of various shapes (the letters of the alphabet) show that for identical chemistries the trapping force varies wildly with particle shape. In fact, certain shapes do not trap at all. Motivated by these experimental results, we explore the trapping of particle of variable shape using a ray-optics simulation. This numerical tool allows us to perform Monte Carlo integrations of the total trapping forces and torques for a series of objects such as a cross (the letter ``x'') or a beam (the letter ``I''). We find that certain shapes feature bi-stable trapping positions/orientations, and some, indeed, do not allow for trapping at all.

  2. Photodiode Based Detection for Multiple Trap Optical Tweezers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Dino

    This thesis is concerned with the position tracking of microscopic, optically trapped particles and the quantification of the forces acting on them. A new detection method for simultaneous, three-dimensional tracking of multiple particles is presented, its performance is evaluated, and its...... usefulness is illustrated in specific application examples. Optical traps enable contact-less, all-optical manipulation of microscopic objects. Over the last decades, this laser-based micro-manipulation tool has facilitated numerous exciting discoveries within biology and physics, and it is today regarded...... as one of the workhorses of biophysical research. There exists a variety of implementations of optical traps, from simple single traps to complex multiple traps with engineered three-dimensional light fields. In comparison to single beam optical traps, multiple beam optical traps offer more freedom...

  3. Ion trap simulation tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Benjamin Roger

    2009-02-01

    Ion traps present a potential architecture for future quantum computers. These computers are of interest due to their increased power over classical computers stemming from the superposition of states and the resulting capability to simultaneously perform many computations. This paper describes a software application used to prepare and visualize simulations of trapping and maneuvering ions in ion traps.

  4. Junction-less poly-Ge FinFET and charge-trap NVM fabricated by laser-enabled low thermal budget processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shieh, Jia-Min; Shen, Chang-Hong; Huang, Tzu-En; Wang, Hsing-Hsiang; Yang, Chih-Chao; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Hsieh, Jin-Long; Yeh, Wen-Kuan

    2016-06-01

    A doping-free poly-Ge film as channel material was implemented by CVD-deposited nano-crystalline Ge and visible-light laser crystallization, which behaves as a p-type semiconductor, exhibiting holes concentration of 1.8 × 1018 cm-3 and high crystallinity (Raman FWHM ˜ 4.54 cm-1). The fabricated junctionless 7 nm-poly-Ge FinFET performs at an Ion/Ioff ratio over 105 and drain-induced barrier lowering of 168 mV/V. Moreover, the fast programming speed of 100 μs-1 ms and reliable retention can be obtained from the junctionless poly-Ge nonvolatile-memory. Such junctionless poly-Ge devices with low thermal budget are compatible with the conventional CMOS technology and are favorable for 3D sequential-layer integration and flexible electronics.

  5. Ge nanocrystals with highly uniform size distribution deposited on alumina at room temperature by pulsed laser deposition: structural, morphological, and charge trapping properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Sanchez, J., E-mail: javier.martin.nano@gmail.com; Marques, L.; Vieira, E. M. F. [University of Minho, Department of Physics and Centre of Physics (Portugal); Doan, Q. T.; Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A. [LMEN, Universite de Reims Champagne-Ardenne (France); Rolo, A. G.; Pinto, S. R. C.; Ramos, M. M. D.; Chahboun, A.; Gomes, M. J. M. [University of Minho, Department of Physics and Centre of Physics (Portugal)

    2012-05-15

    In this work, we report on the synthesis of Ge nanocrystals (NCs) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at room temperature (RT) in an argon atmosphere without any further annealing process. Our results show that functional thin films of crystalline Ge nanoparticles with spherical shapes can be obtained by PLD directly on alumina layers deposited on n-doped Si (100) substrates. In addition, we also demonstrate that a uniform size distribution of NCs with an average diameter of about 3 nm and a density of 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} can be obtained by optimizing a shadow mask set-up, where a solid disk is introduced between the target and the substrate. Charge/discharge effects in Ge NCs deposited on a high-k amorphous alumina layer are also evidenced by conductive atomic force microscopy, which makes them suitable for memory applications.

  6. 3D Sisyphus Cooling of Trapped Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Ejtemaee, S

    2016-01-01

    Using a laser polarization gradient, we realize 3D Sisyphus cooling of $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ions confined in and near the Lamb-Dicke regime in a linear Paul trap. The cooling rate and final mean motional energy of a single ion are characterized as a function of laser intensity and compared to semiclassical and quantum simulations. Sisyphus cooling is also applied to a linear string of four ions to obtain a mean energy of 1-3 quanta for all vibrational modes, an approximately order-of-magnitude reduction below Doppler cooled energies. This is used to enable subsequent, efficient sideband laser cooling.

  7. 3D Sisyphus Cooling of Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejtemaee, S.; Haljan, P. C.

    2017-07-01

    Using a laser polarization gradient, we realize 3D Sisyphus cooling of Yb+ 171 ions confined in and near the Lamb-Dicke regime in a linear Paul trap. The cooling rate and final mean motional energy of a single ion are characterized as a function of laser intensity and compared to semiclassical and quantum simulations. Sisyphus cooling is also applied to a linear string of four ions to obtain a mean energy of 1-3 quanta for all vibrational modes, an approximately order of magnitude reduction below Doppler cooled energies. This is used to enable subsequent, efficient sideband laser cooling.

  8. Improved adhesion of diamond coating on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal by using pulsed-UV-laser substrate surface pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiejun, Li; Qihong, Lou; Jingxing, Dong; Yunrong, Wei; Jun, Zhou; Jingru, Liu; Zhiming, Zhang; Fanghong, Sun

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed-UV-laser surface ablation has been applied in substrate pretreatment in order to obtain good adhesion of diamond coating grown on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal. The dependence of diamond coating's adhesion on different shots of pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment has been studied experimentally. The results were compared with diamond coating deposited by using traditional acid-etching substrate pretreatment. It was shown that adhesion of diamond coating grown on tungsten carbide hardmetal has been greatly improved by using pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment. The corresponding laser pretreatment condition for the optimal adhesion of diamond coatings was finally obtained. It has been demonstrated that pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment should be a feasible and effective method for improving adhesion of diamond coating on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal. It is the characteristic surface morphology produced by pulsed-UV-laser surface ablation that subsequently results in this improved adhesion of diamond coating grown on tungsten carbide hardmetal. The number of laser shots being used in substrate pretreatment has a great influence to the adhesion of diamond coating deposited on tungsten carbide hardmetal. One should always apply proper number of laser shots in pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment when seeking for the optimal adhesion of diamond coating on tungsten carbide hardmetal. In this work, the corresponding number of laser shots for the optimal adhesion of diamond coating has found to be 300 laser shots.

  9. IMPROVEMENT OF 3D MONTE CARLO LOCALIZATION USING A DEPTH CAMERA AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kanai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective and accurate localization method in three-dimensional indoor environments is a key requirement for indoor navigation and lifelong robotic assistance. So far, Monte Carlo Localization (MCL has given one of the promising solutions for the indoor localization methods. Previous work of MCL has been mostly limited to 2D motion estimation in a planar map, and a few 3D MCL approaches have been recently proposed. However, their localization accuracy and efficiency still remain at an unsatisfactory level (a few hundreds millimetre error at up to a few FPS or is not fully verified with the precise ground truth. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to improve an accuracy and efficiency of 6DOF motion estimation in 3D MCL for indoor localization. Firstly, a terrestrial laser scanner is used for creating a precise 3D mesh model as an environment map, and a professional-level depth camera is installed as an outer sensor. GPU scene simulation is also introduced to upgrade the speed of prediction phase in MCL. Moreover, for further improvement, GPGPU programming is implemented to realize further speed up of the likelihood estimation phase, and anisotropic particle propagation is introduced into MCL based on the observations from an inertia sensor. Improvements in the localization accuracy and efficiency are verified by the comparison with a previous MCL method. As a result, it was confirmed that GPGPU-based algorithm was effective in increasing the computational efficiency to 10-50 FPS when the number of particles remain below a few hundreds. On the other hand, inertia sensor-based algorithm reduced the localization error to a median of 47mm even with less number of particles. The results showed that our proposed 3D MCL method outperforms the previous one in accuracy and efficiency.

  10. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures.In this paper, a systematic approach towards...... powder bed without support structures, by determining cumulative probability distribution functions for average layer thickness, sample density and thermal homogeneity....... establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters...

  11. Tunnel ionization, population trapping, filamentation and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leang Chin, See; Xu, Huailiang

    2016-11-01

    The advances in femtosecond Ti-sapphire laser technology have led to the discovery of a profusion of new physics. This review starts with a brief historical account of the experimental realization of tunnel ionization, followed by high harmonic generation and the prediction of attosecond pulses. Then, the unique phenomenon of dynamic population trapping during the ionization of atoms and molecules in intense laser fields is introduced. One of the consequences of population trapping in the highly excited states is the neutral dissociation into simple molecular fragments which fluoresce. Such fluorescence could be amplified in femtosecond laser filamentation in gases. The experimental observations of filament-induced fluorescence and lasing in the atmosphere and combustion flames are given. Excitation of molecular rotational wave packets (molecular alignment) and their relaxation and revival in a gas filament are described. Furthermore, filament-induced condensation and precipitation inside a cloud chamber is explained. Lastly, a summary and future outlook is given.

  12. Superconducting microfabricated ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shannon X; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Dauler, Eric; Berggren, Karl; Chuang, Isaac L

    2010-01-01

    We fabricate superconducting ion traps with niobium and niobium nitride and trap single 88Sr ions at cryogenic temperatures. The superconducting transition is verified and characterized by measuring the resistance and critical current using a 4-wire measurement on the trap structure, and observing change in the rf reflection. The lowest observed heating rate is 2.1(3) quanta/sec at 800 kHz at 6 K and shows no significant change across the superconducting transition, suggesting that anomalous heating is primarily caused by noise sources on the surface. This demonstration of superconducting ion traps opens up possibilities for integrating trapped ions and molecular ions with superconducting devices.

  13. Improvement in Surface Characterisitcs of Polymers for Subsequent Electroless Plating Using Liquid Assisted Laser Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marla, Deepak; Zhang, Yang; Jabbaribehnam, Mirmasoud

    2016-01-01

    Metallization of polymers is a widely used process in the electronic industry that involves their surface modification as a pre-treatment step. Laser-based surface modification is one of the commonly used techniques for polymers due to its speed and precision. The process involves laser heating...... of the polymer surface to generate a rough or porous surface. Laser processing in liquid generates superior surface characteristics that result in better metal deposition. In this study, a comparison of the surface characteristics obtained by laser processing in water vis-à-vis air along with the deposition...... of water, and it is because of these effects that causes an increase in surface porosity....

  14. Improve the Performance of Integrated Diode Laser Beam Combining Through Grating Regrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-30

    well suitable for high power diode lasers due to its excellent optical and electrical properties . However, AlGaAs is not ideal for the grating regrowth...combined lasers. However, the optical and electrical losses induced by the surface grating still limit the laser output power and efficiency. 3. Buried...design in GaAs We will demonstrate the buried grating design for integrated broad area laser beam combining in AlGaAs -GaAs materials to obtain high power

  15. Atom trap trace analysis of {sup 39}Ar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welte, Joachim

    2011-12-14

    Detection of {sup 39}Ar in natural water samples can be employed for radiometric dating on a timescale of 50 to 1000 years before present. This experimental work comprises the setup of an atomic beam and trap apparatus that captures and detects {sup 39}Ar atoms by the laser-cooling technique ''Atom Trap Trace Analysis''. With this approach, the limitations of low-level counting, regarding sample size and measurement time, could be overcome. In the course of this work, the hyperfine structure spectrum of the cooling transition 1s{sub 5}-2p{sub 9} has been experimentally determined. A high intensity, optically collimated beam of slow metastable argon atoms has been set up and fluorescence detection of individual {sup 39}Ar atoms in a magneto-optical trap is realized. {sup 39}Ar count rates of 1 atom in about 4 hours have been achieved for atmospheric argon. Recent improvements further suggest that even higher count rates of 1 atom/hour are within reach.

  16. Kinetic model of the bichromatic dark trap for atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnov, I. V.

    2017-08-01

    A kinetic model of atom confinement in a bichromatic dark trap (BDT) is developed with the goal of describing its dissipative properties. The operating principle of the deep BDT is based on using the combination of multiple bichromatic cosine-Gaussian optical beams (CGBs) for creating high-potential barriers, which is described in our previous work (Krasnov 2016 Laser Phys. 26 105501). In the indicated work, particle motion in the BDT is described in terms of classical trajectories. In the present study, particle motion is analyzed by means of the Wigner function (phase-space distribution function (DF)), which allows one to properly take into account the quantum fluctuations of optical forces. Besides, we consider an improved scheme of the BDT, where CGBs create, apart from plane potential barriers, a narrow cooling layer. We find an asymptotic solution of the Fokker-Planck equation for the DF and show that the DF of particles deeply trapped in a BDT with a cooling layer is the Tsallis distribution with the effective temperature, which can be considerably lower than in a BDT without a cooling layer. Moreover, it can be adjusted by slightly changing the CGBs’ radii. We also study the effect of particle escape from the trap due to the scattering of resonant photons and show that the particle lifetime in a BDT can exceed several tens of hours when it is limited by photon scattering.

  17. Scheme for teleportation of unknown states of trapped ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Mei-Feng; Ma Song-She

    2008-01-01

    A scheme is presented for teleporting an unknown state in a trapped ion system.The scheme only requires a single laser beam.It allows the trap to be in any state with a few phonons,e.g.a thermal motion.Furthermore,it works in the regime,where the Rabi frequency of the laser is on the order of the trap frequency.Thus,the teleportation speed is greatly increased,which is important for decreasing the decoherence effect.This idea can also be used to teleport an unknown ionic entangled state.

  18. Improving the quality of proton beams via double targets driven by an intense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme is proposed to improve the quality of proton beams via ultra-intense laser pulse interacting with double plasma targets, which consist of a pre-target with relatively low density and a main target with high density. Both one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that, the using of an appropriate pre-target can help to obtain a much stronger longitudinal charge separation field in contrast to using only the main target. And proton beam with lower momentum divergence, better monochromaticity and collimation, as well as higher current density is generated. Moreover, due to the strengthened coupling between the laser pulse and targets, the energy conversion from laser pulse to protons is also increased.

  19. Study on possibility for the improvement of corrosion resistance of metals using laser-formed oxide surface structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzankina, J. S.; Vasiliev, O. S.

    2016-08-01

    The laser processes of oxidation are currently known and used extensively, in particular, to improve corrosion resistance of metals possessing certain properties and composition. In this regard, actuality is the methods of laser oxidation of metals and the determination of their modes of treatment in each specific case. Increase of corrosion resistance ST20 can carried out with the formation on the surface oxide films, as well as by reducing surface roughness. Studied various modes of processing of the steel surface. Corrosion resistance investigated for protecting a metal. Defocusing the beam to allow the surface treatment of a wide beam in the low temperature mode of processing. For further study of the irradiated surface on the corrosion resistance was conducted by chemical treatment in acid. Estimated phase composition of films formed under laser treatment simulated in the program astics. The study to increase the corrosion resistance of steel and titanium, have shown that under the chosen methods of processing of materials degradation observed.

  20. Ultrafast state detection and 2D ion crystals in a Paul trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Michael; Ransford, Anthony; Campbell, Wesley

    2016-05-01

    Projective readout of quantum information stored in atomic qubits typically uses state-dependent CW laser-induced fluorescence. This method requires an often sophisticated imaging system to spatially filter out the background CW laser light. We present an alternative approach that instead uses simple pulse sequences from a mode-locked laser to affect the same state-dependent excitations in less than 1 ns. The resulting atomic fluorescence occurs in the dark, allowing the placement of non-imaging detectors right next to the atom to improve the qubit state detection efficiency and speed. We also study 2D Coulomb crystals of atomic ions in an oblate Paul trap. We find that crystals with hundreds of ions can be held in the trap, potentially offering an alternative to the use of Penning traps for the quantum simulation of 2D lattice spin models. We discuss the classical physics of these crystals and the metastable states that are supported in 2D. This work is supported by the US Army Research Office.

  1. Junction-less poly-Ge FinFET and charge-trap NVM fabricated by laser-enabled low thermal budget processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wen-Hsien; Shen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Hsing-Hsiang; Yang, Chih-Chao; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Hsieh, Jin-Long; Yeh, Wen-Kuan [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 26, Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Shieh, Jia-Min, E-mail: jmshieh@narlabs.org.tw, E-mail: jmshieh@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [National Nano Device Laboratories, No. 26, Prosperity Road 1, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Departments of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tzu-En [Departments of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2016-06-13

    A doping-free poly-Ge film as channel material was implemented by CVD-deposited nano-crystalline Ge and visible-light laser crystallization, which behaves as a p-type semiconductor, exhibiting holes concentration of 1.8 × 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3} and high crystallinity (Raman FWHM ∼ 4.54 cm{sup −1}). The fabricated junctionless 7 nm-poly-Ge FinFET performs at an I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio over 10{sup 5} and drain-induced barrier lowering of 168 mV/V. Moreover, the fast programming speed of 100 μs–1 ms and reliable retention can be obtained from the junctionless poly-Ge nonvolatile-memory. Such junctionless poly-Ge devices with low thermal budget are compatible with the conventional CMOS technology and are favorable for 3D sequential-layer integration and flexible electronics.

  2. Improvement of range precision in laser detection and ranging system by using two Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kong, Hong Jin; Jo, Sung Eun; Jeon, Byoung Goo; Oh, Min Seok; Heo, Ayoung; Park, Dong Jo

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the improvement of range precision in a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system by using two Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (GmAPDs) is described. The LADAR system is implemented by using two GmAPDs with a beam splitter and applying comparative process to their ends. Then, the timing circuit receives the electrical signals only if each GmAPDs generates electrical signals simultaneously. Though this system decreases the energy of a laser-return pulse scattered from the target, it is effective in reducing the range precision. The experimental results showed that the average value of standard deviation of time of flights was improved from 61 mm to 37 mm when the pulse energy is 0.6 μJ. When the time bin width is 0.5 ns, the single-shot precision error of the LADAR system was also improved from 280 mm to 67 mm.

  3. Improvement of range precision in laser detection and ranging system by using two Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Kong, Hong Jin; Jo, Sung Eun; Jeon, Byoung Goo; Oh, Min Seok; Heo, Ayoung; Park, Dong Jo

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, the improvement of range precision in a laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system by using two Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes (GmAPDs) is described. The LADAR system is implemented by using two GmAPDs with a beam splitter and applying comparative process to their ends. Then, the timing circuit receives the electrical signals only if each GmAPDs generates electrical signals simultaneously. Though this system decreases the energy of a laser-return pulse scattered from the target, it is effective in reducing the range precision. The experimental results showed that the average value of standard deviation of time of flights was improved from 61 mm to 37 mm when the pulse energy is 0.6 μJ. When the time bin width is 0.5 ns, the single-shot precision error of the LADAR system was also improved from 280 mm to 67 mm.

  4. The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Asma; Bashir, Shazia; Rafique, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz; Akram, Mahreen; Mahmood, Khaliq; Zaheer, Ali

    2017-08-01

    The role of spatial confinement for improvement of laser-induced Mg plasma parameters and growth of surface features is investigated by introducing a metallic blocker. Nd: YAG laser at various fluences ranging from 7 to 28 J cm-2 was employed as an irradiation source. All measurements were performed in the presence of Ar under different pressures. Confinement effects offered by metallic blocker are investigated by placing the blocker at different distances of 6, 8 and 10 mm from the target surface. It is revealed from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis that both plasma parameters, i.e., excitation temperature and electron number density initially increase with increasing laser fluence due to enhancement in energy deposition. With further increase in laser fluence, a decreasing trend followed by saturation is observed which is attributable to shielding effect and self-regulating regime. It is also observed that spatial confinement offered by metallic blocker is responsible for the significant enhancement of both electron temperature and electron number density of Mg plasma. This is true for all laser fluences and pressures of Ar. Maximum values of electron temperature and electron number density without blocker are 8335 K and 2.4 × 1016 cm-3, respectively, whereas these values are enhanced to 12,200 K and 4 × 1016 cm-3 in the presence of the blocker. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Mg plasma parameters are plasma compression, confinement and pronounced collisional excitations due to reflection of shock waves. Scanning electron microscope analysis was performed to explore the surface morphology of laser-ablated Mg. It reveals the formation of cones, cavities and ripples. These features become more distinct and well defined in the presence of the blocker due to plasma confinement. The optimum combination of blocker distance, fluence and Ar pressure can identify the suitable conditions for defining the role of plasma parameters

  5. Improved repetition rate mixed isotope CO{sub 2} TEA laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, D. B., E-mail: dbctechnology@earthlink.net [DBC Technology Corp., 4221 Mesa St, Torrance, California 90505 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    A compact CO{sub 2} TEA laser has been developed for remote chemical detection that operates at a repetition rate of 250 Hz. It emits 700 mJ/pulse at 10.6 μm in a multimode beam with the {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotope. With mixed {sup 12}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} plus {sup 13}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} isotopes it emits multiple lines in both isotope manifolds to improve detection of a broad range of chemicals. In particular, output pulse energies are 110 mJ/pulse at 9.77 μm, 250 mJ/pulse at 10 μm, and 550 mJ/pulse at 11.15 μm, useful for detection of the chemical agents Sarin, Tabun, and VX. Related work shows capability for long term sealed operation with a catalyst and an agile tuner at a wavelength shift rate of 200 Hz.

  6. Sub-Pixel Extraction of Laser Stripe Center Using an Improved Gray-Gravity Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuehua; Zhou, Jingbo; Huang, Fengshan; Liu, Lijian

    2017-04-10

    Laser stripe center extraction is a key step for the profile measurement of line structured light sensors (LSLS). To accurately obtain the center coordinates at sub-pixel level, an improved gray-gravity method (IGGM) was proposed. Firstly, the center points of the stripe were computed using the gray-gravity method (GGM) for all columns of the image. By fitting these points using the moving least squares algorithm, the tangential vector, the normal vector and the radius of curvature can be robustly obtained. One rectangular region could be defined around each of the center points. Its two sides that are parallel to the tangential vector could alter their lengths according to the radius of the curvature. After that, the coordinate for each center point was recalculated within the rectangular region and in the direction of the normal vector. The center uncertainty was also analyzed based on the Monte Carlo method. The obtained experimental results indicate that the IGGM is suitable for both the smooth stripes and the ones with sharp corners. The high accuracy center points can be obtained at a relatively low computation cost. The measured results of the stairs and the screw surface further demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  7. Depside salts from Salvia miltiorrhiza improve myocardial microperfusion in rats using laser Doppler flowmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fen LI; Yi-ping WANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of depside salts from Salvia miltiorrhiza on myo-cardial microperfusion and systemic hemodynamics in open-chest anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats.Methods: Myocardial micropeffusion was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry with a needle probe; cardiac output (CO) was determined using ultrasonic Doppler flowmetry. Other hemodynamic parameters, including femoral artery blood pressure, cardiac inotropy, and systemic vascular resistance (SVR) were simultaneously recorded by the PowerLab system.Results: Intrave-nous administration of S miltiorrhiza depside salts resulted in a significant imme-diate increase in CO and cardiac inotropy, but a fall in SVR. S miltiorrhiza depside salts (30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg) promoted cardiac index (CI) by 12.2%±6.3% (P<0.01vs baseline) and 20.1%±3.5% (P<0.01), respectively. Myocardial microperfusion maximally increased by 6.3%±2.9% (P<0.01) and 9.6%±4.0% (P<0.01) for 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg S miltiorrhiza depside salts, respectively.Conclusion: These results indicated that S miltiorrhiza depside salts improved myocardial micro-perfusion, as well as CO.

  8. Laser-induced forward transfer for improving fine-line metallization in photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Aniorte, M. I.; Mouhamadou, B.; Alloncle, A. P.; Sarnet, T.; Delaporte, P.

    2016-06-01

    Grand challenges to create new front metallization techniques in photovoltaic focus considerable attention on laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) approach. This alternative method aims to overcome the limitations of the well-established and mature screen-printing (SP) technique. Such limitations are for instance restrictions in the grid pattern design, high-temperature steps, and limited aspect ratio of the line contact (Poulain et al. in Appl Surf Sci 257:5241-5244, 2011). Although different new front contact metallization concepts have been studied, most of them require a second print step to increase the volume of the contact (Gao et al. in Proceedings of 25th EU PVSEC conference, 2010; Beaucarne and Schubert in Energy Proc 67:2-12, 2015; Lossen and Matusovsky in Energy Proc 67:156-162, 2015; Green in Phys E 14:65-70, 2002; Lennon et al. in Prog Photovolt Res Appl V21:1454-1468, 2012). As a result, it is desirable to find innovative metallization techniques to improve the cell efficiency without significantly increasing the cost. Although many challenges remain before to obtain high-quality, robust, and high-performance LIFT contact formation, it required a fully theoretical and experimental assessment. This paper presents the results of a study of the LIFT technique in picosecond regime and thick silver pastes to create high-quality conductive lines for photovoltaic applications.

  9. Trapping Plan Amendment: Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sherburne National Wildlife Refuge proposes to amend the present trapping plan in order to improve the quality of this program by providing more explicit direction...

  10. Laser surface alloying of aluminium with WC+Co+NiCr for improved wear resistance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nath, S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, laser surfac ealloying of aluminium with WC + Co + NiCr (in the ratio of 70:15:15) has been conducted using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser (at a beam diameter of 0.003 m), with the output power ranging from 3 to 3.5 k...

  11. Laser surface alloying of aluminium with WC+Co+NiCr for improved wear resistance

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nath, S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, laser surface alloying of aluminium with WC + Co + NiCr (in the ratio of 70:15:15) has been conducted using a 5 kW continuous wave (CW) Nd:YAG laser (at a beam diameter of 0.003 m), with the output power ranging from 3 to 3.5 k...

  12. Laser composite surfacing of A681 steel with WC + Cr + Co for improved wear resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Felipe Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface alloying (LSA is a surface treatment technique. It involves the near surface melting by a powerful laser beam with a pre-deposited or concomitantly added alloying element along with a part of the underlying substrate to form a surface alloyed zone. In this paper, it is reported the treatment by laser surface alloying of a cold work steel ASTM A681 substrate simultaneously fed with a powder mixture of 86 wt.% WC + 8 wt.% Cr + 6 wt.% Co. It was carried out using a continuous wave λ = 1064 nm fiber-coupled diode laser with five different laser intensities – resulting in five specimens – and then studied and analyzed their microstructure, phases, composition and microhardness. One of these configurations was applied to enhance a deep drawing tool for automotive steel sheet stamping. The process modified the specimens near surface layer, from a ferritic structure into an austenitic matrix with a refined dendritic microstructure, with an enhanced surface hardness from 250 HV to ∼560 HV. The treated deep drawing tool showed remarkable wear improvement compared to a non-treated one after one thousand stamps. This result allows the process for industrial applications.

  13. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper H.

    2016-04-01

    Repeatability and reproducibility of parts produced by selective laser melting is a standing issue, and coupled with a lack of standardized quality control presents a major hindrance towards maturing of selective laser melting as an industrial scale process. Consequently, numerical process modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures. In this paper, a systematic approach towards establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters, but at different locations in a powder bed and in different laser scanning directions. The difference in melt track widths and depths captures the effect of changes in incident beam power distribution due to location and processing direction. The experimental results are used in combination with numerical model, and subjected to uncertainty and reliability analysis. Cumulative probability distribution functions obtained for melt track widths and depths are found to be coherent with observed experimental values. The technique is subsequently extended for reliability characterization of single layers produced on a thick powder bed without support structures, by determining cumulative probability distribution functions for average layer thickness, sample density and thermal homogeneity.

  14. Improved optical limiting performance of laser-ablation-generated metal nanoparticles due to silica-microsphere-induced local field enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zheren; Chen, Lianwei; Kao, Tsung-Sheng; Wu, Mengxue; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    For practical application, optical limiting materials must exhibit a fast response and a low threshold in order to be used for the protection of the human eye and electro-optical sensors against intense light. Many nanomaterials have been found to exhibit optical limiting properties. Laser ablation offers the possibility of fabricating nanoparticles from a wide range of target materials. For practical use of these materials, their optical limiting performance, including optical limiting threshold and the ability to efficiently attenuate high intensity light, needs to be improved. In this paper, we fabricate nanoparticles of different metals by laser ablation in liquid. We study the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion. Silica microspheres are used to enhance the optical limiting performance of the nanoparticle dispersion. The change in the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion caused by silica microspheres is studied. It is found that the incident laser beam is locally focused by the microspheres, leading to an increased optical nonlinearity of the nanoparticle dispersion.

  15. Improved optical limiting performance of laser-ablation-generated metal nanoparticles due to silica-microsphere-induced local field enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheren Du

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For practical application, optical limiting materials must exhibit a fast response and a low threshold in order to be used for the protection of the human eye and electro-optical sensors against intense light. Many nanomaterials have been found to exhibit optical limiting properties. Laser ablation offers the possibility of fabricating nanoparticles from a wide range of target materials. For practical use of these materials, their optical limiting performance, including optical limiting threshold and the ability to efficiently attenuate high intensity light, needs to be improved. In this paper, we fabricate nanoparticles of different metals by laser ablation in liquid. We study the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion. Silica microspheres are used to enhance the optical limiting performance of the nanoparticle dispersion. The change in the optical nonlinear properties of the laser-generated nanoparticle dispersion caused by silica microspheres is studied. It is found that the incident laser beam is locally focused by the microspheres, leading to an increased optical nonlinearity of the nanoparticle dispersion.

  16. Improved efficiency of hybrid organic photovoltaics by pulsed laser sintering of silver nanowire network transparent electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Joshua A; Nagamatsu, Ken A; Sturm, James C; Arnold, Craig B

    2015-05-20

    In this Research Article, we demonstrate pulsed laser processing of a silver nanowire network transparent conductor on top of an otherwise complete solar cell. The macroscopic pulsed laser irradiation serves to sinter nanowire-nanowire junctions on the nanoscale, leading to a much more conductive electrode. We fabricate hybrid silicon/organic heterojunction photovoltaic devices, which have ITO-free, solution processed, and laser processed transparent electrodes. Furthermore, devices which have high resistive losses show up to a 35% increase in power conversion efficiency after laser processing. We perform this study over a range of laser fluences, and a range of nanowire area coverage to investigate the sintering mechanism of nanowires inside of a device stack. The increase in device performance is modeled using a simple photovoltaic diode approach and compares favorably to the experimental data.

  17. AlGaAs/GaAs laser diode bars (λ = 808 nm) with improved thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmalyuk, A A; Ladugin, M A; Andreev, A Yu; Telegin, K Yu; Yarotskaya, I V; Meshkov, A S; Konyaev, V P; Sapozhnikov, S M; Lebedeva, E I; Simakov, V A [Open Joint-Stock Company M.F. Stel' makh Polyus Research Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-31

    Two series of AlGaAs/GaAs laser heterostructures have been grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy, and 808-nm laser diode bars fabricated from the heterostructures have been investigated. The heterostructures differed in waveguide thickness and quantum well depth. It is shown that increasing the barrier height for charge carriers in the active region has an advantageous effect on the output parameters of the laser sources in the case of the heterostructures with a narrow symmetric waveguide: the slope of their power – current characteristics increased from 0.9 to 1.05 W A{sup -1}. Thus, the configuration with a narrow waveguide and deep quantum well is better suited for high-power laser diode bars under hindered heat removal conditions. (lasers)

  18. Advanced Mitigation Process (AMP) for Improving Laser Damage Threshold of Fused Silica Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Huang, Jin; Liu, Hongjie; Geng, Feng; Sun, Laixi; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Weidong; Qiao, Liang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, Wanguo

    2016-08-01

    The laser damage precursors in subsurface of fused silica (e.g. photosensitive impurities, scratches and redeposited silica compounds) were mitigated by mineral acid leaching and HF etching with multi-frequency ultrasonic agitation, respectively. The comparison of scratches morphology after static etching and high-frequency ultrasonic agitation etching was devoted in our case. And comparison of laser induce damage resistance of scratched and non-scratched fused silica surfaces after HF etching with high-frequency ultrasonic agitation were also investigated in this study. The global laser induce damage resistance was increased significantly after the laser damage precursors were mitigated in this case. The redeposition of reaction produce was avoided by involving multi-frequency ultrasonic and chemical leaching process. These methods made the increase of laser damage threshold more stable. In addition, there is no scratch related damage initiations found on the samples which were treated by Advanced Mitigation Process.

  19. Ruby laser-assisted depilation: The mode of action and potential ways of improved outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Adam Partington

    Aim - To improve efficacy and lessen side effects resulting from normal mode ruby laser (NMRL)-assisted depilation via a greater understanding of its mode of action and the development of novel methods of reducing associated epidermal damage. Employing a thermal imaging camera and ex vivo hair-bearing skin, the targets for the NMRL (pulse duration 900 musec and spot size 7 mm) were defined, the temperatures reached and the heat dissipation rates determined. Production of heat was confined to the hair follicles, with the peak temperatures reached varying considerably between hairs within the same treatment area and also between individuals. Histological assessment for a known indicator of cellular damage (p53 expression) identified the sites and extent of damage, which correlated with the peak temperatures measured. An energy meter was used to detect the penetration of NMRL light through ex vivo skin, which was found to be deeper than previously theorised. The black-haired mouse (C57B1/10) was assessed both macroscopically and histologically and found to be an acceptable animal model of NMRL depilation and associated epidermal damage. Attempts to reduce the epidermal damage by simply stopping the light reaching the epidermis using a chromophore block were assessed. Chromophore did indeed reduce the amount of epidermal damage detected in laser-irradiated ex vivo human skin, whereas in contrast it increased the wounding seen in the much thinner skin of the mouse. Nevertheless the mouse model showed that this technique did not affect the depilation efficacy. An alternative method of reducing epidermal damage using induction of the cells' intrinsic protective mechanisms (heat shock proteins, HSP) was assessed using cultured keratinocytes and the mouse model. Primarily, the sub-lethal temperature optimum for HSP expression in human keratinocytes was determined, then an in vitro model of NMRL-associated epidermal damage was established and the heat pre-treatment assessed

  20. Improvement of bonding properties of laser transmission welded, dissimilar thermoplastics by plasma surface treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.; Sooriyapiragasam, S.; Behm, H.; Dahlmann, R. [Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), RWTH Aachen University, Pontstrasse 49, 52062 Aachen (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Compared to different welding methods such as ultrasonic welding, laser transmission welding is a relatively new technology to join thermoplastic parts. The most significant advantages over other methods are the contactless energy input which can be controlled very precisely and the low mechanical loads on the welded parts. Therefore, laser transmission welding is used in various areas of application, for example in medical technology or for assembling headlights in the automotive sector. However, there are several challenges in welding dissimilar thermoplastics. This may be due to different melting points on the one hand and different polarities on the other hand. So far these problems are faced with the intermediate layer technique. In this process a layer bonding together the two components is placed between the components. This means that an additional step in the production is needed to apply the extra layer. To avoid this additional step, different ways of joining dissimilar thermoplastics are investigated. In this regard, the improvement in the weldability of the dissimilar thermoplastics polyamide 6 (PA 6) and polypropylene (PP) by means of plasma surface modification and contour welding is examined. To evaluate the influence of the plasma surface modification process on the subsequent welding process of the two dissimilar materials, the treatment time as well as the storage time between treatment and welding are varied. The treatment time in pulsed micro wave excited oxygen plasmas with an electron density of about 1x10{sup 17} m{sup −3} is varied from 0.5 s to 120 s and the time between treatment and welding is varied from a few minutes up to a week. As reference, parts being made of the same polymer (PP and PA 6) are welded and tested. For the evaluation of the results of the welding experiments, short-time tensile tests are used to determine the bond strength. Without plasma treatment the described combination of PA 6/PP cannot be welded with